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Sample records for improved drilling fluid

  1. Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judzis, Arnis [Salt Lake City, UT; Black, Alan D [Coral Springs, FL; Green, Sidney J [Salt Lake City, UT; Robertson, Homer A [West Jordan, UT; Bland, Ronald G [Houston, TX; Curry, David Alexander [The Woodlands, TX; Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W.

    2011-04-19

    To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

  2. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A reduced abrasion drilling fluid system and method of drilling a borehole by circulating the reduced abrasion drilling fluid through the borehole is disclosed. The reduced abrasion drilling fluid comprises a drilling fluid, a first additive and a weighting agent, wherein the weighting agent has a

  3. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A reduced abrasion drilling fluid system and method of drilling a borehole by circulating the reduced abrasion drilling fluid through the borehole is disclosed. The reduced abrasion drilling fluid comprises a drilling fluid, a first additive and a weighting agent, wherein the weighting agent has a

  4. Towards the design of new and improved drilling fluid additives using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Richard L.; Greenwel, H. Christopher; Suter, James L.; Coveney, Peter V.; Jarvis, Rebecca M.

    2010-01-01

    During exploration for oil and gas, a technical drilling fluid is used to lubricate the drill bit, maintain hydrostatic pressure, transmit sensor readings, remove rock cuttings and inhibit swelling of unstable clay based reactive shale formations. Increasing environmental awareness and resulting legislation has led to the search for new, improved biodegradable drilling fluid components. In the case of additives for clay swelling inhibition, an understanding of how existing effective additives interact with clays must be gained to allow the design of improved molecules. Owing to the disordered nature and nano scope dimension of the interlayer pores of clay minerals, computer simulations have become an increasingly useful tool for studying clay-swelling inhibitor interactions. In this work we briefly review the history of the development of technical drilling fluids, the environmental impact of drilling fluids and the use of computer simulations to study the interactions between clay minerals and swelling inhibitors. We report on results from some recent large-scale molecular dynamics simulation studies on low molecular weight water-soluble macromolecular inhibitor molecules. The structure and interactions of poly(propylene oxide)-diamine, poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(ethylene oxide)-diacrylate inhibitor molecules with montmorillonite clay are studied. (author)

  5. Evaluation on the Presence of Nano Silver Particle in Improving a Conventional Water-based Drilling Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husin, H.; Ahmad, N.; Jamil, N.; Chyuan, O. H.; Roslan, A.

    2018-05-01

    Worldwide demand in oil and gas energy consumption has been driving many of oil and gas companies to explore new oil and gas resource field in an ultra-deep water environment. As deeper well is drilled, more problems and challenges are expected. The successful of drilling operation is highly dependent on properties of drilling fluids. As a way to operate drilling in challenging and extreme surroundings, nanotechnology with their unique properties is employed. Due to unique physicochemical, electrical, thermal, hydrodynamic properties and exceptional interaction potential of nanomaterials, nanoparticles are considered to be the most promising material of choice for smart fluid design for oil and gas field application. Throughout this paper, the effect of nano silver particle in improving a conventional water based drilling fluid was evaluated. Results showed that nano silver gave a significant improvement to the conventional water based drilling fluid in terms of its rheological properties and filtration test performance.

  6. Towards the design of new and improved drilling fluid additives using molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Anderson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During exploration for oil and gas, a technical drilling fluid is used to lubricate the drill bit, maintain hydrostatic pressure, transmit sensor readings, remove rock cuttings and inhibit swelling of unstable clay based reactive shale formations. Increasing environmental awareness and resulting legislation has led to the search for new, improved biodegradable drilling fluid components. In the case of additives for clay swelling inhibition, an understanding of how existing effective additives interact with clays must be gained to allow the design of improved molecules. Owing to the disordered nature and nanoscopic dimension of the interlayer pores of clay minerals, computer simulations have become an increasingly useful tool for studying clay-swelling inhibitor interactions. In this work we briefly review the history of the development of technical drilling fluids, the environmental impact of drilling fluids and the use of computer simulations to study the interactions between clay minerals and swelling inhibitors. We report on results from some recent large-scale molecular dynamics simulation studies on low molecular weight water-soluble macromolecular inhibitor molecules. The structure and interactions of poly(propylene oxide-diamine, poly(ethylene glycol and poly(ethylene oxide-diacrylate inhibitor molecules with montmorillonite clay are studied.Durante a exploração de óleo e gás um fluido de perfuração é usado para lubrificar 'bit' da perfuradora, manter a pressão hidrostática, transmitir sensores de leitura, remover resíduos da rocha e inibir o inchamento da argila instável baseada nas formações dos folhelhos. O aumento das preocupações ambientais bem como a legislação resultante levou à procura de novos fluidos de perfuração com componentes biodegradáveis. No caso dos aditivos para inibir o inchamento das argilas o entendimento das interações entre os aditivos e as argilas tem que ser adquirido para permitir o

  7. Drilling Fluids Using Multiwall Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sedaghatzadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Designing drilling fluids for drilling in deep gas reservoirs and geothermal wells is a major challenge. Cooling drilling fluids and preparing stable mud with high thermal conductivity are of great concern. Drilling nanofluids, i.e. a low fraction of carbon nanotube (CNT well dispersed in mud, may enhance the mixture thermal conductivity compared to the base fluids. Thus, they are potentially useful for advanced designing high temperature and high pressure (HTHP drilling fluids. In the present study, the impacts of CNT volume fraction, ball milling time, functionalization, temperature, and dispersion quality (by means of scanning electron microscopy, SEM on the thermal and rheological properties of water-based mud are experimentally investigated. The thermal conductivities of the nano-based drilling fluid are measured with a transient hot wire method. The experimental results show that the thermal conductivity of the water-based drilling fluid is enhanced by 23.2% in the presence of 1 vol% functionalized CNT at room temperature; it increases by 31.8% by raising the mud temperature to 50 °C. Furthermore, significant improvements are seen in the rheological properties—such as yield point, filtration properties, and annular viscosity—of the CNTmodified drilling fluid compared to the base mud, which pushes forward their future development.

  8. Inverted emulsion drilling fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ana, I; Astanei, E; Mireanu, G; Orosz, M; Popescu, F; Vasile, I

    1979-07-28

    The subject of the invention is the method of obtaining inverted drilling fluid which is required during stripping of a productive bed and ending of a well where difficulties develop during drilling of the argillaceous rock. Example: in a reservoir with capacity 30 m/sup 3/, 10 m/sup 3/ of diesel fuel are added. A total of 1000 kg of emulsifier are added to the diesel fuel consisting of: 85 mass% of a mixture of sodium and potassium salts of fatty acids, residues of fatty acids or naphthene acids with high molecular weight taken in proportion of 10:90; 5 mass% of a mixture of polymers with hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties obtained by mixing 75 mass% of polyethylene oxide with molecular weight 10,000 and 25 mass% of propylene oxide with molecular weight 15,000, and 10 mass% of salt on alkaline earth metal (preferably calcium chloride). The mixture is mixed into complete dissolving. Then 1200 kg of filtering accelerator are added obtained from concentrated sulfuric acid serving for sulfur oxidation, asphalt substance with softening temperature 85-104/sup 0/C and fatty acids C/sub 10/-C/sub 20/ taken in a proportion of 23.70 and 7 mass% The mixture obtained in this manner is neutralized by adding calcium hydroxide and equal quantities of alumina and activated bentonite clay in a concentration of 1-10 mass%, more preferably 5 mass% in relation to the initial mixture. The obtained mass is mixed until complete dispersion, after which 200 kg of organophilic clay are added obtained from bentonite of the type montmorillonite of sodium by processing with derivate obtained from amine of the type of the quaternary base of ammonium salt, and agent of hydrophobization of the type of fatty alcohols, fatty acids, nonion surfactants of the block-polymer type. After complete dispersion of the organophilic clay, 100 kg of stabilizer of emulsion of the surfactant type was added with molecular weight of 250010,000, more preferably 5000, in concentration of 0.1-5.0 mass%, more

  9. Experimental study of improved rheology and lubricity of drilling fluids enhanced with nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bég, O. Anwar; Espinoza, D. E. Sanchez; Kadir, Ali; Shamshuddin, MD.; Sohail, Ayesha

    2018-04-01

    An experimental study of the rheology and lubricity properties of a drilling fluid is reported, motivated by applications in highly deviated and extended reach wells. Recent developments in nanofluids have identified that the judicious injection of nano-particles into working drilling fluids may resolve a number of issues including borehole instability, lost circulation, torque and drag, pipe sticking problems, bit balling and reduction in drilling speed. The aim of this article is, therefore, to evaluate the rheological characteristics and lubricity of different nano-particles in water-based mud, with the potential to reduce costs via a decrease in drag and torque during the construction of highly deviated and ERD wells. Extensive results are presented for percentage in torque variation and coefficient of friction before and after aging. Rheology is evaluated via apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity and gel strength variation before and after aging for water-based muds (WBM). Results are included for silica and titanium nano-particles at different concentrations. These properties were measured before and after aging the mud samples at 80 °C during 16 h at static conditions. The best performance was shown with titanium nano-particles at a concentration of 0.60% (w/w) before aging.

  10. Effects of drilling fluids on marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, P.R.; Duke, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on drilling fluids, also called drilling muds, which are essential to drilling processes in the exploration and production of oil and gas from the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). These fluids are usually discharged from drilling platforms into surrounding waters of the OCS and are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a program carried out by the EPA Environmental research Laboratory at Gulf Breeze, Florida, diverse marine species as well as microbiotic and macrobiotic communities were studied. Drilling fluids were toxic to marine organisms in certain concentrations and exposure regimes. Furthermore, the fluids adversely affected the benthos physically by burying them or by altering the substrates. Toxicity of the drilling-fluid components, used drilling fluids from active Gulf of Mexico sites, and laboratory-prepared drilling fluids varied considerably. for example 96-h LC 50 s were from 25 μ liter -1 to > 1500 μl liter -1 for clams, larval lobsters, mysids, and grass shrimp. In most instances, mortality was significantly (α = 0.05) correlated with the diesel-oil content of the fluids collected from the Gulf of Mexico. Data and model simulations suggest a rapid dilution of drilling fluids released into OCS waters, resulting in concentrations below the acute-effect concentration for the water column organisms tested

  11. HORIZONTAL WELL DRILL-IN FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Main objective of horizontal driling is to place a drain-hole for a long distance within the pay zone to enhance productivity or injectivity. In drilling horizontal wells, more serious problems appear than in drilling vertical wells. These problems are: poor hole cleaning, excessive torque and drag, hole filling, pipe stucking, wellbore instability, loss of circulation, formation damage, poor cement job, and difficulties at logging jobs. From that reason, successful drilling and production of horizontal well depends largely on the fluid used during drilling and completion phases. Several new fluids, that fulfill some or all of required properties (hole cleaning, cutting suspension, good lubrication, and relative low formation damage, are presented in this paper.

  12. Improvement in the Performance of Potato Starch Used in the Water-Based Drilling Fluid via Its Chemical Modification by Grafting Copolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdollahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the thermal stability and resistance to bacterial attack (bioresistance of the potato starch used in the water-based drilling fluid is the aim of this work. Four types of potato starch grafted with acrylamide and a mixture of each one with acrylic acid, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulfuric acid and itaconic acid were synthesized by manganese (IV-induced redox system at the suitable concentrations of initiator and monomer(s. FTIR spectroscopy was used to verify the grafting of monomers onto the starch. The effect of grafted starches on the rheological and fluid loss properties before and after aging of the water-based drilling fluid prepared with fresh water, 4% saline and the South applied method were investigated. The results showed that temperature and aging of fluid enhance the rheological and fluid loss control properties of water-based drilling fluids prepared in the presence of grafted starches. In other words, grafted starches are stable against thermal degradation and can be used in the formulation of water-based drilling fluids for drilling of deep wells.

  13. Numerical modelling of cuttings transport in horizontal wells using conventional drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Bjorndalen, E.; Kuru, E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Some of the problems associated with poor wellbore cleaning include high drag or torque, slower rate of penetration, formation fractures and difficulty in wellbore steering. Some of the factors that affect cuttings transport include drilling fluid velocity, inclination angle, drilling fluid viscosity and drilling rate. The general practice is to stop drilling when necessary to clean boreholes with viscous pills, pipe rotation or drilling fluid circulation. It is important to predict when drilling should be stopped for remedial wellbore cleaning. This can be accomplished with a transient cuttings transport model which can improve drilling hydraulics, particularly in long horizontal well sections and extended reach (ERD) wells. This paper presents a newly developed 1-dimensional transient mechanistic model of cuttings transport with conventional (incompressible) drilling fluids in horizontal wells. The numerically solved model predicts the height of cutting beds as a function of different drilling operational parameters such as fluid flow rate and rheological characteristics, drilling rates, wellbore geometry and drillpipe eccentricity. Sensitivity analysis has demonstrated the effects of these parameters on the efficiency of solids transport. The proposed model can be used in the creation of computer programs designed to optimize drilling fluid rheology and flow rates for horizontal well drilling. 29 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs.

  14. Polymer Drilling Fluid with Micron-Grade Cenosphere for Deep Coal Seam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional shallow coal seam uses clean water, solid-free system, and foam system as drilling fluid, while they are not suitable for deep coal seam drilling due to mismatching density, insufficient bearing capacity, and poor reservoir protection effect. According to the existing problems of drilling fluid, micron-grade cenosphere with high bearing capacity and ultralow true density is selected as density regulator; it, together with polymer “XC + CMC” and some other auxiliary agents, is jointly used to build micron-grade polymer drilling fluid with cenosphere which is suitable for deep coal seam. Basic performance test shows that the drilling fluid has good rheological property, low filtration loss, good density adjustability, shear thinning, and thixotropy; besides, drilling fluid flow is in line with the power law rheological model. Compared with traditional drilling fluid, dispersion stability basically does not change within 26 h; settlement stability evaluated with two methods only shows a small amount of change; permeability recovery rate evaluated with Qinshui Basin deep coal seam core exceeds 80%. Polymer drilling fluid with cenosphere provides a new thought to solve the problem of drilling fluid density and pressure for deep coal seam drilling and also effectively improves the performance of reservoir protection ability.

  15. Tragacanth gum: an effective oil well drilling fluid additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahto, V.; Sharma, V. [Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India). Department of Petroleum Engineering

    2005-02-15

    The low penetration rate, excessive torque and drag, poor hole cleaning and formation damage are major impediments in drilling oil and gas well. These have a major impact on drilling efficiency and well economics. Keeping these in mind, an attempt was made to design a water based drilling fluid system using Indian bentonite clays and tragacanth gum. The effect of tragacanth gum on rheological behavior of three different Indian bentonite water suspensions was studied and a drilling fluid system was developed. The filtrates of these drilling fluids were subjected to formation damage study on the field core using Ruska Liquid Permeameter. The laboratory investigation furnishes that tragacanth gum acts as a good viscosifier and fluid loss control agent. The drilling fluid filtrate also has less effect on formation damage. (author)

  16. The impact of environmental regulations on drilling fluid technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    A multitude of new drilling fluid products, systems, and treatment processes have been developed in recent years in response to increasingly stringent environmental regulations. Many fluid additives and systems that once played a major role in the drilling industry are little used today or are no longer available. New water-base mud systems are approaching the performance levels typical of conventional oil-base muds, levels largely achieved by the new synthetic-base fluids. However, these new drilling fluids do not have the adverse environmental impact associated with oil-base systems when waste fluids and cuttings are discarded. 65 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Optimum fluid design for drilling and cementing a well drilled with coil tubing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swendsen, O.; Saasen, A.; Vassoy, B. [Statoil (Norway); Skogen, E.; Mackin, F.; Normann, S. H.

    1998-12-31

    The strategy, design and drilling fluid and cementing operations in the first two wells drilled with coil tubing technology in the Gullfaks field in the Tampen Spur Area of the Norwegian sector of the North Sea are discussed. The drilling fluid use was a solids-free potassium formate/polymer brine-based fluid with a density of 1,50-1.56 g/cc, with flow properties characterized by very low fluid loss due to high extensional viscosity, a low viscosity at all shear rates, and a low degree of shear-thinning. The low viscous drilling fluid is considered to have been the major contributing factor in achieving excellent hole cleaning, no differential sticking, successful setting of cement kick-off plugs, problem-free running of the liner, and excellent zonal isolation when cementing the liner. These experiences led the authors to conclude that it is possible to formulate a brine-based solids-free drilling fluid with low viscosity and fluid loss properties for most formation pressure regimes, and that such a drilling fluid is well suited to drilling highly deviated slim hole wells where hole cleaning and differential sticking present special challenges. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  18. Performance of Partially-Hydrolyzed Polyacrylamide in Water Based Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Nasiri*

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluid properties with constant improvement in efficiency have been noticeable as important criteria in drilling operation. The main drilling fluid properties highly depend on utilization of new polymers with high efficiency in drilling fluid composition. In this paper, the performance of a new polymer, called partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer (PHPA, is studied which has recently entered the drilling fluids industry in Iran. Hence viscosity property, fluid loss control and shale inhibition of this polymer have been evaluated based on an international standard method of API-13-I by considering the drilling and operational priorities of thecountry. Then the thermal effect, salt contaminants such as sodium chloride, calcium chloride, magnesium chloride and pH tolerance effect as major pollution indicators are also investigated in relation to polymeric fluid properties. The results obtained by the tests show that furthermore polymer PHPA increases rheological properties (apparent viscosity, plastic fluidity and yield point and it plays important role in increases in fluid loss. This polymer has also demonstrated acceptable resistance toward sodium chloride contaminants, but its efficiency decreases toward calcium and magnesium ion contaminants. The thermal tests show that polymer PHPA has high thermal stability up to 150°C. This polymer improves shale inhibition property and by encapsulation mechanism prevents dispersion of shale cuttings into the drilling fluid system as it stops any changes in fluid properties which will finally results inwellbore stability.

  19. 30 CFR 250.458 - What quantities of drilling fluids are required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations... the daily inventories of drilling fluid and drilling fluid materials, including weight materials and... drilling fluid material to maintain well control, you must suspend drilling operations. [68 FR 8423, Feb...

  20. Means and Method for Measurement of Drilling Fluid Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysyannikov, A.; Kondrashov, P.; Pavlova, P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper addresses the problem on creation of a new design of the device for determining rheological parameters of drilling fluids and the basic requirements which it must meet. The key quantitative parameters that define the developed device are provided. The algorithm of determining the coefficient of the yield point from the rheological Shvedov- Bingam model at a relative speed of rotation of glasses from the investigated drilling fluid of 300 and 600 rpm is presented.

  1. New generation of membrane efficient water-based drilling fluids: pragmatic and cost-effective solutions to borehole stability problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tare, U.A. [Haliburton, Calgary, AB (Canada); Mody, F.K. [Shell International E and P Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Tan, C.P. [CSIRO Petroleum, Kensington, WA (Australia)

    2002-06-01

    Drilling and completion operations in shales often suffer as a result of wellbore instability. Mechanical failure of the rock around a wellbore is the primary cause of shale instability. This process can be exacerbated by physico-chemical interactions between drilling fluids and shales. Water-based drilling fluids are used more and more due to environmental awareness that becomes more prevalent. Wellbore instability problems can however result from an improper application of water-based drilling fluids in those cases where drilling occurs in sensitive clay-rich formations. To meet the requirements of the petroleum industry, considerable collaborative efforts were expanded in the development of innovative environmentally acceptable water-based drilling fluids. In this paper, the authors describe the process that leads to the development of these drilling fluids. It is possible to achieve shale stability through an osmotic outflow of pore fluid and prevention/minimization of mud pressure penetration, as laboratory experiments on shale samples under realistic downhole conditions exposed to these drilling fluids prove. High membrane efficiencies, in excess of 80 per cent, were generated by this new generation of membrane efficient water-based drilling fluids. Drilling objectives resulting from an improved application of water-based drilling fluids are made possible by a fundamental understanding of the main drilling fluid-shale interaction mechanisms for shale stability and the application of experimental data to field conditions. The authors indicate that the achievement of trouble-free drilling of shales and notable reductions in non-productive time is accomplished by following the practical guidelines included in this paper for maintaining shale stability with the new generation of water-based drilling fluids. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  2. Phospholipids Polysaccharide and Its Application as Inhibitive Drilling Fluid Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xue-Fan; Hu, Wei-Min; Zhang, Fan; Du, Wei-Chao; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yong-Ming; Chen, Gang

    2018-03-01

    For the improvement of solubility and the performance of the sample that derived plant polysaccharide(SJ) in drilling fluid based on water, which was improved by phosphoric esterification with phospholipids reagent. The conditions of the reaction were discussed by orthogonal ways in four factors and three levels, and the optimization of handling approaches were found out: With pH=12 at the temperature of 80°C, the mass ratio between phospholipids agent and SJ is 0.1g/1g. The viscosity about the system added by sulfonated SJ (SJP) was extremely increased and below 120°, rheological properties had a slight change. The inhibitive ability of SJP is assessed by the mud ball immersing tests and clay-swelling experiments, that is apparently better than SJ and even 4wt% KCl in free water.

  3. A field application of nanoparticle-based invert emulsion drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, Alexey S.; Husein, Maen, E-mail: mhusein@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering (Canada); Hareland, Geir [Oklahoma State University, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Application of nanotechnology in drilling fluids for the oil and gas industry has been a focus of several recent studies. A process for the in situ synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) into drilling fluids has been developed previously in our group and showed that calcium-based NPs (CNPs) and iron-based NPs (INPs), respectively, with concentrations of 0.5–2.0 wt% can dramatically improve filtration properties of commercial drilling fluids in a laboratory environment. In this work, a modified process for the emulsion-based synthesis of NPs on a 20 m{sup 3} volume and its subsequent full-scale field testing are presented. Comparison between NP carrier fluids prepared under controlled environment in the laboratory and those prepared on a large scale in a mixing facility revealed very little variation in the main characteristics of the drilling fluid; including the size of the solid constituents. Transmission electron microscopy photographs suggest an average CNP particle size in the carrier fluid of 51 ± 11 nm. Results from the full-scale field test showed that total mud losses while drilling with CNP-based invert emulsion were on average 27 % lower than in the case of conventional fluids. This loss prevention falls within the range observed in the laboratory.

  4. Rheological behavior of drilling fluids under low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomba, Rosana F.T.; Sa, Carlos H.M. de; Brandao, Edimir M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas]. E-mails: rlomba, chsa, edimir@cenpes.petrobras.com.br

    2000-07-01

    The so-called solid-free fluids represent a good alternative to drill through productive zones. These drill-in fluids are known to be non-damaging to the formation and their formulation comprise polymers, salts and acid soluble solids. Xanthan gum is widely used as viscosifier and modified starch as fluid loss control additive. The salts most commonly used are sodium chloride and potassium chloride, although the use of organic salt brines has been increasing lately. Sized calcium carbonate is used as bridging material, when the situation requires. The low temperatures encountered during deep water drilling demand the knowledge of fluid rheology at this temperature range. The rheological behavior of drill-in fluids at temperatures as low as 5 deg C was experimentally evaluated. Special attention was given to the low shear rate behavior of the fluids. A methodology was developed to come up with correlations to calculate shear stress variations with temperature. The developed correlations do not depend on a previous choice of a rheological model. The results will be incorporated in a numerical simulator to account for temperature effects on well bore cleaning later on. (author)

  5. Polyethylene glycol drilling fluid for drilling in marine gas hydrates-bearing sediments: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, G.; Liu, T.; Ning, F.; Tu, Y.; Zhang, L.; Yu, Y.; Kuang, L. [China University of Geosciences, Faculty of Engineering, Wuhan (China)

    2011-07-01

    Shale inhibition, low-temperature performance, the ability to prevent calcium and magnesium-ion pollution, and hydrate inhibition of polyethylene glycol drilling fluid were each tested with conventional drilling-fluid test equipment and an experimental gas-hydrate integrated simulation system developed by our laboratory. The results of these tests show that drilling fluid with a formulation of artificial seawater, 3% bentonite, 0.3% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, 10% polyethylene glycol, 20% NaCl, 4% SMP-2, 1% LV-PAC, 0.5% NaOH and 1% PVP K-90 performs well in shale swelling and gas hydrate inhibition. It also shows satisfactory rheological properties and lubrication at temperature ranges from -8 {sup o}C to 15 {sup o}C. The PVP K-90, a kinetic hydrate inhibitor, can effectively inhibit gas hydrate aggregations at a dose of 1 wt%. This finding demonstrates that a drilling fluid with a high addition of NaCl and a low addition of PVP K-90 is suitable for drilling in natural marine gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. (authors)

  6. Polyethylene Glycol Drilling Fluid for Drilling in Marine Gas Hydrates-Bearing Sediments: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Kuang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shale inhibition, low-temperature performance, the ability to prevent calcium and magnesium-ion pollution, and hydrate inhibition of polyethylene glycol drilling fluid were each tested with conventional drilling-fluid test equipment and an experimental gas-hydrate integrated simulation system developed by our laboratory. The results of these tests show that drilling fluid with a formulation of artificial seawater, 3% bentonite, 0.3% Na2CO3, 10% polyethylene glycol, 20% NaCl, 4% SMP-2, 1% LV-PAC, 0.5% NaOH and 1% PVP K-90 performs well in shale swelling and gas hydrate inhibition. It also shows satisfactory rheological properties and lubrication at temperature ranges from −8 °C to 15 °C. The PVP K-90, a kinetic hydrate inhibitor, can effectively inhibit gas hydrate aggregations at a dose of 1 wt%. This finding demonstrates that a drilling fluid with a high addition of NaCl and a low addition of PVP K-90 is suitable for drilling in natural marine gas-hydrate-bearing sediments.

  7. A wash fluid for drilling into a field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyakov, V M; Badzhurak, R F; Koptelova, Ye K; Rogovoy, V K; Sapozhnikov, N G

    1979-01-18

    A wash fluid is proposed, used in drilling wells in water and a content of 3-5% by weight starch products. To speed up destruction of the starch products, to the fluid are added amylolytic enzymes in the amount of 0.01-0.1 percent by weight of the starch products' weight. To lower the use of starch products, up to 3% clay can be added to the fluid. The wash fluid is prepared directly at the work site. Dry powder of modified starch is mixed with cold water until a colloidal solution is obtained. Such a wash fluid preserves the required structural-mechanical properties for 3-5 days, which ensures prompt drilling into the waterbearing layer and installation of the filter. Then, during the work process, 5-6 hours before the moment required for lowering the viscosity, to the wash fluid is added the amylolytic enzyme; under its influence, the starch molecules split up, and the viscosity drops sharply. Using this wash fluid enables a reduction in well construction times from the beginning of drilling to the end of development of the water-bearing layer, and a rise in outputs and well service lives by reducing sedimentation of the water-bearing formation and elimination of down times during work required while waiting for destruction of the starch wash fluid under natural conditions.

  8. Simulated behavior of drilling fluid discharges off Southern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandsma, M.G.; Kolpack, R.L.; Dickey, T.D.; Balcom, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on the computer-simulated short-term behavior of drilling-fluid solids from the time of release to initial deposition on the ocean bottom. The geographic areas of primary interest were the Santa Barbara Channel and Point Conception regions off southern California. Simulations (53) were conducted for water depths ranging from 30 to 750 m. Oceanographic parameters for several representative oceanic conditions were obtained from available field measurements in the area. Characteristics of representative drilling-fluid solids were formulated from information supplied by several offshore operators and by laboratory analyses of samples

  9. Clay-based geothermal drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guven, N.; Carney, L.L.; Lee, L.J.; Bernhard, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The rheological properties of fluids based on fibrous clays such as sepiolite and attapulgite have been systematically examined under conditions similar to those of geothermal wells, i.e. at elevated temperatures and pressures in environments with concentrated brines. Attapulgite- and sepiolite-based fluids have been autoclaved at temperatures in the range from 70 to 800/sup 0/F with the addition of chlorides and hydroxides of Na, K, Ca, and Mg. The rheological properties (apparent and plastic viscosity, fluid loss, gel strength, yield point, and cake thickness) of the autoclaved fluids have been studied and correlated with the chemical and physical changes that occur in the clay minerals during the autoclaving process.

  10. Framework for a comparative environmental assessment of drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.

    1998-11-01

    During the drilling of an oil or gas well, drilling fluid (or mud) is used to maintain well control and to remove drill cuttings from the hole. In response to effluent limitation guidelines promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for discharge of drilling wastes offshore, alternatives to water and oil-based muds have been developed. These synthetic-based muds (SBMs) are more efficient than water-based muds (WBMs) for drilling difficult and complex formation intervals and have lower toxicity and smaller environmental impacts than diesel or conventional mineral oil-based muds (OBMs). A third category of drilling fluids, derived from petroleum and called enhanced mineral oils (EMOs), also have these advantages over the traditionally used OBMs and WBMs. EPA recognizes that SBMs and EMOs are new classes of drilling fluids, but their regulatory status is unclear. To address this uncertainty, EPA is following an innovative presumptive rulemaking process that will develop final regulations for SBM discharges offshore in less than three years. This report develops a framework for a comparative risk assessment for the discharge of SBMs and EMOs, to help support a risk-based, integrated approach to regulatory decision making. The framework will help identify potential impacts and benefits associated with the use of SBMs, EMOs, WBMs, and OBMs; identify areas where additional data are needed; and support early decision-making in the absence of complete data. As additional data becomes available, the framework can support a full quantitative comparative assessment. Detailed data are provided to support a comparative assessment in the areas of occupational and public health impacts.

  11. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.

  12. Purification of drilling fluids by vibration-settling tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulatov, A.I.; Prokopov, L.I.; Proselkov, Yu.M.; Reznichenko, I.N.; Skvortsov, D.S.; Volkov, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of studies done by the authors of a prototype of a new tool for cleaning a drilling fluid, a vibration settling tank. It is indicated that the vibration settling tank has many advantages over the most advanced vibration screens VS-1. This makes it possible to recommend development and broad industrial testing of this apparatus.

  13. Drilling fluid base oil biodegradation potential of a soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus sp. isolated from oil-contaminated soil was grown in 1% drilling fluid base oil, HDF- 2000, as a sole source of carbon and energy. The organism has strong affinity for the substrate, growing at the rate of 0.16 h-1. It uses adherence and emulsification as mechanisms for oil uptake. In a nutrient-rich marine ...

  14. 30 CFR 250.457 - What equipment is required to monitor drilling fluids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monitor the drilling fluid returns. The indicator may be located in the drilling fluid-logging compartment... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What equipment is required to monitor drilling... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations...

  15. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CUTTING FLUID EFFECTS IN DRILLING. (R825370C057)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were designed and conducted on aluminum alloys and gray cast iron to determine the function of cutting fluid in drilling. The variables examined included speed, feed, hole depth, tool and workpiece material, cutting fluid condition, workpiece temperatures and drill...

  16. Control of chemical usage in drilling fluid formulations to minimize discharge to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geehan, T.; Forbes, D.M.; Moore, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A reduction in the environmental footprint from drilling operations can best be addressed by minimizing the sources of that footprint. One of the principal sources of possible environmental damage is drilling fluid and drill solid discharge. The toxicity as measured by acute and/or sub-chronic testing regimes depends on the composition of the drilling fluid/drill solids slurry. The trend within the drilling fluids industry has been to direct its attention to finding drilling fluid products which alone and in combination are considered to be non-toxic as determined by required testing procedures. This paper goes on to describe a parallel approach in which the total volume of chemicals discharged (whether considered toxic or benign) is reduced. Both approaches can be considered complimentary. The reduction in volume/mass of discharge is achieved by increased monitoring of both drilling fluid properties, composition and solids control operational efficiency. Additionally the increased monitoring allows less complicated formulations to be used to produce the desired drilling fluid properties; as specified by the mud programme. The need for more complete rigsite monitoring packages, will become more important as oilbased muds are replaced by waterbased mud for difficult drilling situations with stricter environmental regulations on discharge of drilling waste. The paper also outlines how the optimization of the drilling fluid operation was linked to a reduction in drilling fluid costs at the same time maintaining drilling efficiency

  17. Offshore disposal of oil-based drilling fluid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malachosky, E.; Shannon, B.E.; Jackson, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Offshore drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico may use oil-based drilling fluids to mitigate drilling problems. The result is the generation of a significant quantity of oily cuttings and mud. The transportation of this waste for onshore disposal is a concern from a standpoint of both personnel safety and potential environmental impact. A process for preparing a slurry of this waste and the subsequent disposal of the slurry through annular pumping has been put into use by ARCO Oil and Gas Company. The disposal technique has been approved by the Minerals Management Service (MMS). The slurried waste is displaced down a casing annulus into a permeable zone at a depth below the surface casing setting depth. The annular disposal includes all cuttings and waste oil mud generated during drilling with oil-based fluids. This disposal technique negates the need for cuttings storage on the platform, transportation to shore, and the environmental effects of onshore surface disposal. The paper describes the environmental and safety concerns with onshore disposal, the benefits of annular disposal, and the equipment and process used for the preparation and pumping of the slurry

  18. Well successfully drilled with high performance water-based fluid: Santos Basins, offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasier, Frank C.; Luzardo, Juan P. [Halliburton Company, Houston, TX (United States); Bishnoi, M.L. [Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltda. (ONGC), Dehradun (India)

    2012-07-01

    Santos Basin is a 352,260 square kilometers (136,010 sq mi) offshore pre-salt basin. It is located in the South Atlantic Ocean, some 300 kilometers (190 mi) South East of Sao Paulo, Brazil. One of the largest Brazilian sedimentary basins, it is the site of several recent significant oil fields, including Tupi and Jupiter. The criteria for drilling fluid selection is based upon the following factors: maximum cost efficiency, environmental friendliness, optimum borehole stability, and ease of use. The recommended drilling fluid formulation takes into consideration the experience gained during the drilling of wells in the Santos Basin area. The operator wanted to use a high-performance water-based fluid (HPWBF) that could provide shale inhibition, wellbore stability, lubricity and improved rate of penetration (ROP) as an alternative to synthetic-based drilling fluids to present value in terms of economics and environmental friendliness. The HPWBF consists of three synergistic products: a hydration suppressant, a dispersion suppressant, and an accretion suppressant. The system is formulated based on customized solutions for managing the clay reactivity. High logistics costs require drilling fluids that can be prepared with sea water and discharged to the sea without environmental impact. The HPWBF is a clay-free system designed for maximum shale inhibition in highly reactive formations. The system can provide wellbore stability, high rates of penetration, and acceptable rheological properties over a wide range of temperatures, with the added benefit of allowing cuttings discharge based upon water base environmental restrictions. Since no oil is used in the formulation, the HPWBF eliminates the need for cuttings processing and monitoring equipment, and exceeds the environmental requirements by achieving an LC50 value of 345,478.22 ppm in comparison with the minimum requirement (LC50 > 30,000 ppm in 96 hr), permitting use and discharge to the sea. The HPWBF selected

  19. New possibilities of developing formulas for flushing drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beregi, I; Dobozy, G; Szornyi, I

    1982-01-01

    The problem of preventing cave-in of the walls of boreholes can be effectively and economically solved only with a broad assortment of flushing fluids (FF) of the corresponding quality. In order to search for inexpensive and simple methods of preparing and formulas of FF which have good stabilizing properties, the authors conducted laboratory studies. It is indicated that this goal can be reached by three methods: 1) improvement in the properties by traditional (based on gypsum and lime) FF by additives (for example, chloride, acetate and potassium dihydrophosphate); 2) production of FF of the limestone type based on new theoretical concepts regarding the mechanism of their effect, and 3) by using as the FF ammonium-containing chemical compounds (for example, diammonium hydrophosphate). The studied FF were tested under field conditions and yielded positive results. It was established that different specific conditions of the wells make it necessary to systematically study clays and marls in the drilling zone in order to select the most effective and economical for the given conditions of FF. This will permit the maximum use of local raw material and selection of the simplest method of preparing FF.

  20. Synthesis of high-temperature viscosity stabilizer used in drilling fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanna; Luo, Huaidong; Shi, Libao; Huang, Hongjun

    2018-02-01

    Abstract For a well performance drilling fluid, when it operates in deep wells under high temperature, the most important property required is the thermal stability. The drilling fluid properties under high temperature can be controlled by proper selection of viscosity stabilizer, which can capture oxygen to protect polymer agent in the drilling fluid. In this paper a viscosity stabilizer PB-854 is described, which was synthesized by 4-phenoxybutyl bromide, paraformaldehyde, and phloroglucinol using etherification method and condensation reaction. We studied the effect of catalyst dosage, temperature, time, and stirring rate on the synthetic yield. Under this condition: molar ratio of 2-tert-Butylphenol, paraformaldehyde and phloroglucinol of 2:1:2.5, reacting temperature of 100 °C, stirring rate of 100 r min-1, and mass content of catalyst of 15 %, char yield of 5-bromine-3-tert-butyl salicylaldehyde reached 86 %. Under this condition: molar ratio of 5-bromine-3-tert-butyl salicylaldehyde and phloroglucinol of 4, reacting temperature of 60 °C, reacting time of 30 min, volume content of sulphuric acid of 80 %, char yield of the target product viscosity stabilizer PB-854 is 86%. Finally, in this paper, infrared spectroscopy is adopted to analyse the structure of the synthetic product PB-854.The improvement in the stability of drilling fluid was further shown after adding the viscosity stabilizer in the common polymer drilling fluid under high temperature conditions of 120 °C ˜ 180 °C. The results show significant change in terms of fluid stability in the presence of this new stabilizer as it provides better stability.

  1. High-tech hammer : BBJ Tools transforms the traditional fluid hammer into a revolutionary drilling tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byfield, M.

    2010-12-15

    This article described BBJ Tools' patent-pending fluid hammer that enhances drilling rate of penetration. The technology was awarded the 2010 winner for best drilling technology for a company with fewer than 100 employees. The fluid hammer features several improvements in terms of maintaining drill-bit integrity, steering ability, and operating flexibility. The hammer incorporates a positive displacement motor and adjustable housing that uniquely allow the driller to steer the drill bit. The fluid hammer works with both polycrystalline diamond compact bits and roller cones. The unique weight-to-bit-transfer design allows the operator to have diversified percussion control. More weight on the bit results in more force, and hammering stops when weight is taken off the bit. The major components of the mud motor are incorporated into the fluid hammer, allowing the tool to compete in every application in which a mud motor is used. The percussion mechanism transmits left-hand reactive torque to the housing. The rate of penetration is substantially better than other similar tools on the market. 2 figs.

  2. Agarwood Waste as A New Fluid Loss Control Agent in Water-based Drilling Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlinda Azizi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Agarwood has been used widely in various ways, including traditional medicine and art. The usage of agarwood has grown broader in modern times include in therapeutic medicines and perfumery. In this paper the agarwood waste has been explored to be used as a fluid loss control agent to control fluid loss without affecting the drilling fluid rheological properties which are density, pH, viscosity, yield point and gel strength. Agarwood waste was used as an additive in the drilling fluid system due to its unique characteristic. Rheological and filtration measurements were performed on the formulated water-based drilling fluid. Formulations of a base solution of fresh water, sodium hydroxide, bentonite, barite, and xanthan gum were presented. The performance of the agarwood waste as the fluid loss control agent was compared with based fluid formulation and water-based drilling fluid with treating with conventional fluid loss control agent (starch. The filtrate volume of drilling fluid with agarwood waste was about 13 ml while for drilling fluid with conventional fluid loss control agent, starch gave 12 ml of filtrate volume after undergoing filtration test by using LPLT filter press. The performance of drilling fluid with agarwood was efficient as drilling fluid with starch. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso

  3. Control and particles distribution in drilling fluids while drilling; Controle e distribuicao de particulas em fluidos de perfuracao enquanto perfurando

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Luiz Augusto dos [PETROBRAS, XX (Brazil). Dept. de Perfuracao. Div. de Fluidos de Perfuracao

    1988-12-31

    Factors contributing both directly and indirectly to formation damage are discussed, including plugging by solids disseminated in drilling fluids, filtrations, spurt loss, and cake deposition. (author) 6 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Water and clay based drilling fluids for oil wells; Fluidos hidroargilosos para perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.C.A. de; Amorim, L.V.; Santana, L.N. de L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)], e-mail: nalealves@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In the onshore drilling of wells are commonly used aqueous fluids containing bentonite clays. However, to perform their functions generally there is the necessity of additives to drilling fluids, like viscositying, filtered reducer and lubricant. Thus, this work aims to develop water and clay base drilling fluids with low solid text, and with polymeric and lubricants additives. Were studied a sample of industrialized sodium bentonite clays, three polymeric compounds in the ternary form and a sample of lubricant, in different concentrations. Were determined the flow curves, the apparent and plastic viscosities, the yield limit and gel force in Fann 35A viscometer, the filtered volume in API filter-press and the lubricity coefficient in Ofite lubricimeter. The results showed that the fluid had pseudoplastic behavior, the polymeric additives adjusts their rheological properties and filtration and the addition of 1% of lubricant is sufficient to improve the lubricity of fluids. (author)

  5. Graphene nanoplatelets as high-performance filtration control material in water-based drilling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridha, Syahrir; Ibrahim, Arif; Shahari, Radzi; Fonna, Syarizal

    2018-05-01

    The main objective of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) as filtration control materials in water based drilling fluids. Three (3) general samples of water based drilling fluids were prepared including basic potassium chloride (KCl) drilling fluids, nanosilica (NS) drilling fluids and GNP drilling fluids. Several concentrations of NS and GNP were dispersed in controlled formulations of water based drilling fluids. Standard API filtration tests were carried out for comparison purposes as well as High Temperature High Pressure (HTHP) filtration tests at 150 °F (∼66 °C), 250 °F (∼121 °C) and 350 °F (∼177 °C) at a fixed 500 (∼3.45MPa) psi to study the filtration trend as a function of temperature. Mud cake samples from several tests were selectively chosen and analyzed under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) for its morphology. Results from this work show that nanoparticle concentrations play a factor in filtration ability of colloid materials in water based drilling fluids when studied at elevated temperature. Low temperature filtration, however, shows only small differences in volume in all the drilling fluid samples. 0.1 ppb concentrations of GNP reduced the fluid loss of 350 °F by 4.6 mL as compared to the similar concentration of NS drilling fluids.

  6. Method and apparatus for determining fluid circulation conditions in well drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrig, G.F.; Speers, J.M.

    1986-09-09

    A system is described for monitoring the delta flow-rate of drilling fluid in the course of circulating drilling fluid through a well from a drilling rig, comprising: an inflow flowmeter adapted for establishing a first signal representing the rate at which drilling fluid is injected into the well from the drilling rig; an outflow flowmeter adapted for establishing a second signal representing the rate at which drilling fluid is returned to the drilling rig from the well; and a signal processing system adapted for receiving the first and second signals and calculating a third signal representing the filtered difference between the first and second signals, the signal processing system being adapted to repeatedly update the degree of filtering applied in calculating the third signal in accordance with a relation serving to increase the degree of filtering in response to an increase in the magnitude of the cyclical variations in the rate at which drilling fluid is returned to the drilling rig and to decrease the degree of filtering in response to a decrease in the magnitude of the cyclical variations in the rate at which drilling fluid is returned to the drilling rig.

  7. Rheological and filtration characteristics of drilling fluids enhanced by nanoparticles with selected additives: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Mohamadian

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The suspension properties of drilling fluids containing pure and polymer-treated (partially-hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHPA or Xanthan gum clay nanoparticles are compared withthose of a conventional water-and-bentonite-based drilling fluid, used as the referencesample. Additionally, the mud weight, plastic viscosity, apparent viscosity, yield point, primary and secondary gelatinization properties, pH, and filtration properties of the various drilling fluids studied are also measured and compared. The performance of each drilling fluid type is evaluated with respect in terms of its ability to reduce mud cake thickness and fluid loss thereby inhibiting differential-pipe-sticking. For that scenario, the mud-cake thickness is varied, and the filtration properties of the drilling fluids are measured as an indicator of potential well-diameter reduction, caused by mud cake, adjacent to permeable formations. The novel results show that nanoparticles do significantly enhance the rheological and filtration characteristics of drilling fluids. A pure-clay-nanoparticle suspension, without any additives, reduced fluid loss to about 42% and reduced mud cake thickness to 30% compared to the reference sample. The xanthan-gum-treated-clay-nanoparticle drilling fluid showed good fluid loss control and reduced fluid loss by 61% compared to the reference sample. The presence of nanofluids also leads to reduced mud-cake thicknesses, directly mitigating the risks of differential pipe sticking.

  8. Effect of drilling fluids on permeability of uranium sandstone. Report of Investigations/1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlness, J.K.; Johnson, D.I.; Tweeton, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines conducted laboratory and field experiments to determine the amount of permeability reduction in uranium sandstone after its exposure to different drilling fluids. Seven polymer and two bentonite fluids were laboratory-tested in their clean condition, and six polymer fluids were tested with simulated drill cuttings added. Sandstone cores cut from samples collected at an open pit uranium mine were the test medium. The clean fluid that resulted in the least permeability reduction was an hydroxyethyl cellulose polymer fluid. The greatest permeability reduction of the clean polymers came from a shale-inhibiting synthetic polymer. Six polymer fluids were tested with simulated drill cuttings added to represent field use. The least permeability reduction was obtained from a multi-polymer blend fluid. A field experiment was performed to compare how two polymer fluids affect formation permeability when used for drilling in situ uranium leaching wells

  9. Selective-placement burial of drilling fluids: 2. Effects on buffalograss and fourwing saltbrush

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, M.L.; Hartmann, S.; Ueckert, D.N.; Hons, F.M.

    1992-01-01

    Surface disposal of spent drilling fluids used in petroleum and natural gas exploration causes surface soil contamination that severely inhibits secondary plant succession and artificial revegetation efforts. Selective-placement burial was evaluated at two locations in western Texas for on-site disposal of drilling fluids in arid and semiarid regions. Establishment, yield, and chemical composition of fourwing saltbrush [Atriplex canescens (Pursh Nutt.)] and buffalograss [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] transplants on undisturbed soils and on plots with spent drilling fluids and cuttings buried 30, 90 (with and without a 30-cm coarse limestone capillary barrier) and 150 cm were compared. Survival of both species was 97 to 100% 17 months after planting on plots with buried drilling wastes. Canopy cover and aboveground biomass of fourwing saltbrush were greater over buried drilling wastes than on untreated plots, whereas canopy cover and aboveground biomass of buffalograss were not affected by the treatments. Significant increases in Na, M, and Mg concentrations in buffalograss after 17 months on plots with drilling fluids buried 30 cm deep at one location indicated plant uptake of some drilling fluid constituents. Elevated Zn concentrations in fourwing saltbush indicated that a portion of the Zn in the drilling fluids was available for plant uptake, while no evidence of plant accumulation of Ba, Cr, Cu, or Ni from drilling fluids was detected

  10. EFFECTS OF PROPERTIES POLYMERIC ADDITIVES IN RHEOLOGIC AND DRILLING FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielly Vieira de Lucena

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of carboxymethylcellulose, CMC (filtrate reducer and xanthan gum (viscosifier in plastic and apparent viscosity at yield strength and the volume of filtrate in the composition of drilling fluids based on water was investigated based on statistical design. Five formulations consist of a range of concentrations used commercially were utilized in the design of the experiment. The formulations were prepared in accordance with company standards Petrobras. Regression models were calculated and correlated with the properties of the compositions. The relevance and validation of the models were confirmed by statistical analysis. The design can be applied to statistically optimize the mud properties considering the addition of CMC and xanthan gum, and to provide a better understanding of the influence of additives on the properties of polymer-based fluid system water. From the study it was observed that the values of the rheological properties vary with the concentration of additives, increasing with increasing concentration of the same, and that the concentration of the additives caused a decline of parameter values filtration.

  11. THE APPLICATION OF LASERS IN MEASUREMENT OF FLUID FLOW THROUGH DRILLING BIT NOZZLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenko Drakulić

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Two optical methods based on laser and video technology and digital signal and image processing techniques - Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV and Particle image velocimetry (PIV were applied in highly accurate fluid flow measurement. Their application in jet velocity measurement of flows through drilling bit nozzles is presented. The role of nozzles in drilling technology together with procedures and tests performed on their optimization are reviewed. In addition, some experimental results for circular nozzle obtained both with LDV and PIV are elaborated. The experimental set-up and the testing procedure arc briefly discussed, as well as potential improvements in the design. Possible other applications of LDV and PIV in the domain of petroleum engineering are suggested (the paper is published in Croatian.

  12. Anti-collapse mechanism of CBM fuzzy-ball drilling fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although fuzzy-ball drilling fluid has been successfully applied in CBM well drilling, it is necessary to study its anti-collapse mechanism so that adjustable coalbed sealing effects, controllable sealing strength, rational sealing cost and controllable reservoir damage degree can be realized. In this paper, laboratory measurement was performed on the uniaxial compressive strength of the plungers of No. 3 coalbed in the Qinshui Basin and the inlet pressure of Ø38 mm coal plunger displacement. The strengths of coal plungers were tested and compared after 2% potassium chloride solution, low-solids polymer drilling fluid and fuzzy-ball drilling fluid were injected into the coal plungers respectively. It is shown that coal strength rises by 38.46% after the fuzzy-ball drilling fluid is injected (in three groups; and that no fuzzy-ball drilling fluid is lost at the displacement pressures of 20.73 and 21.46 MPa, nor 2% potassium chloride solution is leaked at such pressures of 24.79 and 25.64 MPa after the plunger was sealed by the fuzzy-ball drilling fluid. This indicates that the fuzzy-ball drilling fluid can increase the formation resistance to fluid. Indoor microscopic observation was conducted on the sealing process of the fuzzy-ball drilling fluid in sand packs with coal cuttings of three grain sizes (60–80, 80–100 and 100–120 mesh. It is shown that the leakage pathways of different sizes are sealed by the vesicles in the form of accumulation, stretch and blockage. And there are vesicles at the inlet ends of the flowing pathways in the shape of beaded blanket. The impact force of drilling tools on the sidewalls is absorbed by the vesicles due to their elasticity and tenacity, so the sidewall instability caused by drilling tools is relieved. It is concluded that the main anti-collapse mechanisms of the CBM fuzzy-ball drilling fluid are to raise the coal strength, increase the formation resistance to fluid, and buffer the impact of

  13. Damage evaluation on oil-based drill-in fluids for ultra-deep fractured tight sandstone gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the damage mechanisms and improve the method to evaluate and optimize the performance of formation damage control of oil-based drill-in fluids, this paper took an ultra-deep fractured tight gas reservoir in piedmont configuration, located in the Cretaceous Bashijiqike Fm of the Tarim Basin, as an example. First, evaluation experiments were conducted on the filtrate invasion, the dynamic damage of oil-based drill-in fluids and the loading capacity of filter cakes. Meanwhile, the evaluating methods were optimized for the formation damage control effect of oil-based drill-in fluids in laboratory: pre-processing drill-in fluids before grading analysis; using the dynamic damage method to simulate the damage process for evaluating the percentage of regained permeability; and evaluating the loading capacity of filter cakes. The experimental results show that (1 oil phase trapping damage and solid phase invasion are the main formation damage types; (2 the damage degree of filtrate is the strongest on the matrix; and (3 the dynamic damage degree of oil-based drill-in fluids reaches medium strong to strong on fractures and filter cakes show a good sealing capacity for the fractures less than 100 μm. In conclusion, the filter cakes' loading capacity should be first guaranteed, and both percentage of regained permeability and liquid trapping damage degree should be both considered in the oil-based drill-in fluids prepared for those ultra-deep fractured tight sandstone gas reservoirs.

  14. Drilling fluid technologies : what goes in must come out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polczer, S.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of drilling wastes contaminated with invert drilling muds was discussed. The tight emulsion properties which make invert drilling muds useful are the same properties that make their disposal so difficult. Potential long-term liability associated with inverts is another reason for reluctance to use these products. Inverts are toxic and highly mobile in the environment, and must therefore be handled with care. Often the costs associated with their disposal are greater than their potential benefits. Petro-Canada Lubricants has formulated a new, non-diesel based product called Drill Mud Oil HT40N which completely eliminates toxic aromatic molecules. It is composed of 98 per cent plus of cyclic and branched isoparaffins with an average carbon number of C16. The level of polynuclear aromatics is reduced to parts per billion levels. Drill Mud Oil HT40N was being used at Hibernia until an even newer product, IPAR3 synthetic drill mud oil, was developed exclusively for offshore use. Drill Mud Oil HT40N is less prone to flash fires, is odourless and is more likely to be used in places such as the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. Drill Mud Oil HT40N works almost exactly the same as a diesel-based drill mud oil but has many advantages in terms of safety and ease of disposal, particularly in landfarming operations. Drill Mud Oil HT40N does not irritate the skin or release toxic fumes. The cost of Drill Mud Oil HT40N is higher than conventional diesel-based drilling muds. 2 figs

  15. The effect of gas and fluid flows on nonlinear lateral vibrations of rotating drill strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajiyeva, Lelya; Kudaibergenov, Askar; Kudaibergenov, Askat

    2018-06-01

    In this work we develop nonlinear mathematical models describing coupled lateral vibrations of a rotating drill string under the effect of external supersonic gas and internal fluid flows. An axial compressive load and a torque also affect the drill string. The mathematical models are derived by the use of Novozhilov's nonlinear theory of elasticity with implementation of Hamilton's variation principle. Expressions for the gas flow pressure are determined according to the piston theory. The fluid flow is considered as added mass inside the curved tube of the drill string. Using an algorithm developed in the Mathematica computation program on the basis of the Galerkin approach and the stiffness switching method the numerical solution of the obtained approximate differential equations is found. Influences of the external loads, drill string angular speed of rotation, parameters of the gas and fluid flows on the drill string vibrations are shown.

  16. Improving Coolant Effectiveness through Drill Design Optimization in Gundrilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, K. S.; Tnay, G. L.; Rahman, M.

    2018-05-01

    Effective coolant application is essential to prevent thermo-mechanical failures of gun drills. This paper presents a novel study that enhances coolant effectiveness in evacuating chips from the cutting zone using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. Drag coefficients and transport behaviour over a wide range of Reynold numbers were first established through a series of vertical drop tests. With these, a CFD model was then developed and calibrated with a set of horizontal drilling tests. Using this CFD model, critical drill geometries that lead to poor chip evacuation including the nose grind contour, coolant hole configuration and shoulder dub-off angle in commercial gun drills are identified. From this study, a new design that consists a 20° inner edge, 15° outer edge, 0° shoulder dub-off and kidney-shaped coolant channel is proposed and experimentally proven to be more superior than all other commercial designs.

  17. An Improved Triangular Element With Drilling Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars; Grønne, Mikael

    2002-01-01

    by rotations in the corner nodes. Compared to Allman's plane element which was the first succesfull implementation of drilling rotations the proposed element has extra displacements in the mid-side nodes parallel to the element sides. The performance should therefore be better and closer to the LST...

  18. Performance of the mineral blended ester oil-based drilling fluid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, A.R.; Kamis, A.; Foo, K.S. [University Teknologi (Malaysia)

    2001-06-01

    A study was conducted in which the properties of ester oil-based drilling fluid systems were examined using a blended mixture of ester and synthetic mineral oil. Biodegradable invert emulsion ester-based fluids are preferred over mineral oil-based drilling fluids for environmental reasons, but they tend to cause alkaline hydrolysis resulting in solidification of the drilling fluid systems. The drilling fluid examined here consisted of Malaysian palm oil ester derivatives (methyl laureate ester or isopropyl laureate ester) blended with commercially available synthetic mineral oil. This mineral oil was added to reduce the problem of alkaline hydrolysis. This mixture, however, was found to be unstable and could not solve the problem at high temperature. The isopropyl laureate and mineral oil blended system was more stable towards the hydrolysis process up to 250 degrees F. In order to enhance the performance of an invert emulsion drilling fluid system, it was recommended that brine water content of the fluid system be lowered. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  19. The application of SEM in analyzing the damage to the petroleum reservoirs caused by drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Razak Ismail

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to analyze the damage to the potential oil and gas reservoirs due to the invasion of drilling fluid during drilling operation. Two types of rock samples representing low and high permeability were used to stimulate the petroleum reservoirs. Sea water based drilling fluids were used in this study. Detail observations to the rock samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of both permeability restoration and SEM observation showed that severe permeability impairments were obtained for high permeability rock. These results indicate that the relative size of the barite particles and the pore size distribution and characteristics of the formation play an important role in determining the damage caused by the drilling fluids

  20. Waste drilling-fluid-utilising microorganisms in a tropical mangrove swamp oilfield location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benka-Coker, M.O.; Olumagin, A.

    1995-01-01

    Waste drilling-fluid-utilising microorganisms were isolated from drilling-mud cuttings, soil and creek water from a mangrove swamp oilfield location in the Delta area of Nigeria using waste drilling-fluid as the substrate. Eighteen bacterial isolates obtained were identified as species of Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Serratia, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Nocardia, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus and Pseudomonas, while the genera of fungi isolated were Penicillium, Cladosporium and Fusarium. Even though drilling-fluid-utilising genera were in higher numbers in the soil than in the two other sources examined, the percentages of the total heterotrophic bacteria that utilised waste drilling-fluid were 6.02 in the drilling-mud cuttings, 0.83 in creek water and 0.42 in soil. The screen tests for biodegradation potential of the bacterial isolates showed that, even though all the isolates were able to degrade and utilise the waste fluid for growth, species of Alcaligenes and Micrococcus were more active degraders of the waste. The significance of the results in environmental management in oil-producing areas of Nigeria is discussed. (Author)

  1. Waste drilling-fluid-utilising microorganisms in a tropical mangrove swamp oilfield location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benka-Coker, M.O.; Olumagin, A. [Benin Univ. (Nigeria). Dept. of Microbiology

    1995-12-31

    Waste drilling-fluid-utilising microorganisms were isolated from drilling-mud cuttings, soil and creek water from a mangrove swamp oilfield location in the Delta area of Nigeria using waste drilling-fluid as the substrate. Eighteen bacterial isolates obtained were identified as species of Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Serratia, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Nocardia, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus and Pseudomonas, while the genera of fungi isolated were Penicillium, Cladosporium and Fusarium. Even though drilling-fluid-utilising genera were in higher numbers in the soil than in the two other sources examined, the percentages of the total heterotrophic bacteria that utilised waste drilling-fluid were 6.02 in the drilling-mud cuttings, 0.83 in creek water and 0.42 in soil. The screen tests for biodegradation potential of the bacterial isolates showed that, even though all the isolates were able to degrade and utilise the waste fluid for growth, species of Alcaligenes and Micrococcus were more active degraders of the waste. The significance of the results in environmental management in oil-producing areas of Nigeria is discussed. (Author)

  2. Development of drilling fluids based on polysaccharides and natural minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanar Nurakhmetova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The technology of oil well drilling in complex geological conditions by applying the drilling muds based on the polysaccharides – gellan, xanthan and their mixture which potentially possess a good flocculation properties and the ability to reversible sol-gel transition in dependence of temperature and concentration of low molecular weight cations in water has been justified in this work. For the preparation of drilling muds, gellan and xanthan were used, these polymers were obtained from biomass by an aerobic fermentation using microorganisms Sphingomonas elodea and Xanthomonas campestris. Bentonite was used as a natural mineral. Physical and chemical characteristics of aqueous and aqueous-salt solutions of natural polysaccharide gellan including: density, intrinsic and effective viscosity, static shear stress, dynamic shear stress, sedimentation stability and other parameters were determined while varying polymer compositions and concentrations, ionic strength of the solution, nature of low molecular weight salts, concentration of dispersion phase, pH of the medium and temperature.

  3. Synthetic-based fluid replacement: excellent drilling efficiency and imaging evaluation achieved with inhibitive water-based fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Ricardo; Fernandez, Jovan Andrade [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Anderson, Tom; Loureiro, Mario; Pereira, Alex; Shah, Fayyaz [Halliburton Baroid, Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The highly reactive Calumbi shale is encountered in wells drilled by PETROBRAS in the Sergipe area. Normally an invert emulsion fluid would be used. However, the ability to run high resolution imaging logs was crucial to determining the potential of the offshore Sergipe fields, and these tools work best in water-based fluids. PETROBRAS selected a new high performance water-based fluid (WBF) to drill the Poco 3-GA-73-SES well. The fluid selection was based on the results of X-ray diffraction, dispersion/erosion and linear swell meter testing of Calumbi formation samples. The new WBF incorporates a unique polymer chemistry that can provide shale inhibition very similar to that achieved with an invert emulsion fluid, without sacrificing drilling performance. The polymeric additives can effectively flocculate and encapsulate colloidal drill solids so that they can be easily removed mechanically. The polymers also help prevent hole erosion and bit balling. After the high-performance WBF was used, the following results were obtained on the Poco 3- GA-73-SES well: 805 m drilled in 65 hr (12.65 m/hr) in a single bit run; trips completed with minimal use of the pumps or back reaming, considered exceptional for a WBF while drilling the Calumbi shale; imaging logs run successfully with no delays or obstructions while tripping or logging; the average hole diameter was 8.63-in. per the caliper log for the 8 1/2-in. section; no accretion on the bit or drill string observed; no flow line plugging or shaker screen blinding. (author)

  4. A New Calculation Method of Dynamic Kill Fluid Density Variation during Deep Water Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghai Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are plenty of uncertainties and enormous challenges in deep water drilling due to complicated shallow flow and deep strata of high temperature and pressure. This paper investigates density of dynamic kill fluid and optimum density during the kill operation process in which dynamic kill process can be divided into two stages, that is, dynamic stable stage and static stable stage. The dynamic kill fluid consists of a single liquid phase and different solid phases. In addition, liquid phase is a mixture of water and oil. Therefore, a new method in calculating the temperature and pressure field of deep water wellbore is proposed. The paper calculates the changing trend of kill fluid density under different temperature and pressure by means of superposition method, nonlinear regression, and segment processing technique. By employing the improved model of kill fluid density, deep water kill operation in a well is investigated. By comparison, the calculated density results are in line with the field data. The model proposed in this paper proves to be satisfactory in optimizing dynamic kill operations to ensure the safety in deep water.

  5. Combined Effect of Pressure and Temperature on the Viscous Behaviour of All-Oil Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermoso J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this research was to study the combined influence of pressure and temperature on the complex viscous behaviour of two oil-based drilling fluids. The oil-based fluids were formulated by dispersing selected organobentonites in mineral oil, using a high-shear mixer, at room temperature. Drilling fluid viscous flow characterization was performed with a controlled-stress rheometer, using both conventional coaxial cylinder and non-conventional geometries for High Pressure/High Temperature (HPHT measurements. The rheological data obtained confirm that a helical ribbon geometry is a very useful tool to characterise the complex viscous flow behaviour of these fluids under extreme conditions. The different viscous flow behaviours encountered for both all-oil drilling fluids, as a function of temperature, are related to changes in polymer-oil pair solvency and oil viscosity. Hence, the resulting structures have been principally attributed to changes in the effective volume fraction of disperse phase due to thermally induced processes. Bingham’s and Herschel-Bulkley’s models describe the rheological properties of these drilling fluids, at different pressures and temperatures, fairly well. It was found that Herschel-Bulkley’s model fits much better B34-based oil drilling fluid viscous flow behaviour under HPHT conditions. Yield stress values increase linearly with pressure in the range of temperature studied. The pressure influence on yielding behaviour has been associated with the compression effect of different resulting organoclay microstructures. A factorial WLF-Barus model fitted the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the plastic viscosity of both drilling fluids fairly well, being this effect mainly influenced by the piezo-viscous properties of the continuous phase.

  6. Development and evaluation of a meter for measuring return line fluid flow rates during drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeppke, G.E.; Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wright, E.K. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-06-01

    The most costly problem routinely encountered in geothermal drilling is lost circulation, which occurs when drilling fluid is lost to the formation rather than circulating back to the surface. The successful and economical treatment of lost circulation requires the accurate measurement of drilling fluid flow rate both into and out of the well. This report documents the development of a meter for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates in the return line of a drilling rig. The meter employs a rolling counterbalanced float that rides on the surface of the fluid in the return line. The angle of the float pivot arm is sensed with a pendulum potentiometer, and the height of the float is calculated from this measurement. The float height is closely related to the fluid height and, therefore, the flow rate in the line. The prototype rolling float meter was extensively tested under laboratory conditions in the Wellbore Hydraulics Flow Facility; results from these tests were used in the design of the field prototype rolling float meter. The field prototype meter was tested under actual drilling conditions in August and September 1991 at the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, Ca. In addition, the performance of several other commercially available inflow and outflow meters was evaluated in the field. The tested inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flowmeters, and an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. On the return flow line, a standard paddlemeter, an acoustic level meter, and the prototype rolling float meter were evaluated for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates.

  7. A Comprehensive Prediction Model of Hydraulic Extended-Reach Limit Considering the Allowable Range of Drilling Fluid Flow Rate in Horizontal Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Gao, Deli; Chen, Xuyue

    2017-06-08

    Hydraulic extended-reach limit (HERL) model of horizontal extended-reach well (ERW) can predict the maximum measured depth (MMD) of the horizontal ERW. The HERL refers to the well's MMD when drilling fluid cannot be normally circulated by drilling pump. Previous model analyzed the following two constraint conditions, drilling pump rated pressure and rated power. However, effects of the allowable range of drilling fluid flow rate (Q min  ≤ Q ≤ Q max ) were not considered. In this study, three cases of HERL model are proposed according to the relationship between allowable range of drilling fluid flow rate and rated flow rate of drilling pump (Q r ). A horizontal ERW is analyzed to predict its HERL, especially its horizontal-section limit (L h ). Results show that when Q min  ≤ Q r  ≤ Q max (Case I), L h depends both on horizontal-section limit based on rated pump pressure (L h1 ) and horizontal-section limit based on rated pump power (L h2 ); when Q min  drilling fluid flow rate, while L h2 keeps decreasing as the drilling fluid flow rate increases. The comprehensive model provides a more accurate prediction on HERL.

  8. Parameter definition using vibration prediction software leads to significant drilling performance improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Dalmo; Hanley, Chris Hanley; Fonseca, Isaac; Santos, Juliana [National Oilwell Varco, Houston TX (United States); Leite, Daltro J.; Borella, Augusto; Gozzi, Danilo [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The understanding and mitigation of downhole vibration has been a heavily researched subject in the oil industry as it results in more expensive drilling operations, as vibrations significantly diminish the amount of effective drilling energy available to the bit and generate forces that can push the bit or the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) off its concentric axis of rotation, producing high magnitude impacts with the borehole wall. In order to drill ahead, a sufficient amount of energy must be supplied by the rig to overcome the resistance of the drilling system, including the reactive torque of the system, drag forces, fluid pressure losses and energy dissipated by downhole vibrations, then providing the bit with the energy required to fail the rock. If the drill string enters resonant modes of vibration, not only does it decreases the amount of available energy to drill, but increases the potential for catastrophic downhole equipment and drilling bit failures. In this sense, the mitigation of downhole vibrations will result in faster, smoother, and cheaper drilling operations. A software tool using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been developed to provide better understanding of downhole vibration phenomena in drilling environments. The software tool calculates the response of the drilling system at various input conditions, based on the design of the wellbore along with the geometry of the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) and the drill string. It identifies where undesired levels of resonant vibration will be driven by certain combinations of specific drilling parameters, and also which combinations of drilling parameters will result in lower levels of vibration, so the least shocks, the highest penetration rate and the lowest cost per foot can be achieved. With the growing performance of personal computers, complex software systems modeling the drilling vibrations using FEA has been accessible to a wider audience of field users, further complimenting with real time

  9. Hydrodynamics of the Fluid Filtrate on Drilling-In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasov, É. M.; Agaeva, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    The volume of the liquid penetrating into the formation after drilling-in has been determined on the basis of theoretical investigations. The dynamics of change in the bottom-hole pressure has been determined in this process. It has been shown that because of the water hammer, the bottom-hole pressure can be doubled in the presence of large fractures and pores closer to the well-bottom zone.

  10. Experimental and modeling hydraulic studies of foam drilling fluid flowing through vertical smooth pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Saxena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foam has emerged as an efficient drilling fluid for the drilling of low pressure, fractured and matured reservoirs because of its the ability to reduce formation damage, fluid loss, differential sticking etc. However the compressible nature along with its complicated rheology has made its implementation a multifaceted task. Knowledge of the hydrodynamic behavior of drilling fluid within the borehole is the key behind successful implementation of drilling job. However, little effort has been made to develop the hydrodynamic models for the foam flowing with cuttings through pipes of variable diameter. In the present study, hydrodynamics of the foam fluid was investigated through the vertical smooth pipes of different pipe diameters, with variable foam properties in a flow loop system. Effect of cutting loading on pressure drop was also studied. Thus, the present investigation estimates the differential pressure loss across the pipe. The flow loop permits foam flow through 25.4 mm, 38.1 mm and 50.8 mm diameter pipes. The smaller diameter pipes are used to replicate the annular spaces between the drill string and wellbore. The developed model determines the pressure loss along the pipe and the results are compared with a number of existing models. The developed model is able to predict the experimental results more accurately.

  11. Field test to assess the effects of drilling fluids on groundwater chemistry collected from Columbia River basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, D.L.; Bryce, R.W.; Halko, D.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project has used water-based drilling fluids in borehole construction. Fluids begin as a mixture of Columbia River water and bentonite. Other compounds such as organic polymers, soda ash, and chromium lignosulfonate are added to attain desired fluid characteristics. A field test was conducted to assess the effects of these fluids on basaltic groundwater chemistry. A one-month hydrochemistry baseline was established for a single interlow zone in borehole DC-14. Following baseline data collection, approximately 40,000 liters of drilling fluid were injected into the interflow. Samples were collected and analyzed for anions, cations, stable and radioactive isotopes, dissolved gases, and three specific drilling fluid tracers (i.e., tritium, fluorescein, and total organic carbon), for a period of one year following injection. Nearly 8.0 million liters of fluid were removed since initiation of the test. Test results demonstrated that drilling fluid tracers are useful indicators of how well drilling fluids have been removed from a borehole. Constituents such as Na + , SO 4 -2 , and all carbon species showed increases in concentration, whereas species such as Cl - , F - , and Si demonstrated a substantial decrease in concentration as a consequence of drilling fluid injection. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen were insensitive to relatively small amounts ( 14 C was significantly affected by the introduction of ''live'' carbon as a result of drilling fluid injection. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Risk to water wells of pathogens in drilling fluids[Section 7 : reviewed literature added November 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abiola, A.T. [Olds College, Olds, AB (Canada); Ryan, C. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    Public concern regarding the presence of pathogens in surface waters used in drilling fluids and their potential impact on groundwater and water wells has increased in recent years. This report addressed those concerns. The most common sources of water for drilling fluids include dugouts, sloughs, small creeks and beaver dams. The Energy Resources Conservation Board commissioned a study to examine the abundance of pathogens in surface waters and to evaluate whether pathogens in surface waters that are used in drilling fluids have the ability to survive in or be transported through groundwater. The report was written for the general public and represents a professional opinion based on an extensive review of literature and professional experience. It described the risk to well water of pathogens in drilling fluids; pathogens in well water; and fate of pathogens in drilling fluids. The key findings of the report were that the subsurface of the earth presents a hostile environment to surface water pathogens. In addition to pathogen introduction from drilling fluid, pathogens can be introduced through animal waste, sewage and industrial or agricultural waste. Typically, the types of pathogens found in Alberta surface waters are not likely to survive the salt levels found in nontoxic drilling fluids. Pathogen transport into the subsurface is unlikely, even over shorter distances, because of the low infiltration distance of drilling fluids from the wellbore. 142 refs.

  13. 30 CFR 250.459 - What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... addition: (1) If natural means provide adequate ventilation, then a mechanical ventilation system is not... areas where adequate ventilation is provided by natural means. You must test and recalibrate gas... install and maintain a ventilation system and gas monitors. Drilling fluid-handling areas must have the...

  14. A novel enzyme-based acidizing system: Matrix acidizing and drilling fluid damage removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.E.; McKay, D.M. [Cleansorb Limited, Surrey (United Kingdom); Moses, V. [King`s College, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    A novel acidizing process is used to increase the permeability of carbonate rock cores in the laboratory and to remove drilling fluid damage from cores and wafers. Field results show the benefits of the technology as applied both to injector and producer wells.

  15. Economic Viability of the Use of Local Pseudo-Oils for Drilling Fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... Applications” Journal of Petroleum and Gas. Engineering, Vol. 6(4) ... productive, onshore horizontal wells in India. (Sawyer et al. ... fewer effects on benthic communities than the early generation oil ... Home-Cooking Oil (XB1000). Drilling fluids ..... mining and microbial mineral recovery and environmental.

  16. Selective-placement burial of drilling fluids: 1. Effects on soil chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, M.L.; Hartmann, S.; Ueckert, D.N.; Hons, F.M.

    1992-01-01

    Burial of spent drilling fluids used in petroleum and natural gas exploration was evaluated for reducing soil contamination caused by conventional, surface disposal of these wastes on arid and semiarid rangelands. Simulated reserve pits at two locations provided burial depths of 30, 90 (with and without a 30-cm capillary barrier of coarse limestone), and 150 cm below the surface, with sequential replacement of stockpiled subsoil and topsoil. The drilling fluids contained extremely high concentrations of soluble salts, with Na and Cl being the dominant soluble ions. Upward migration of contaminants was evaluated over a 20-month period. Soluble salts migrated upward 15 to 30 cm into the overlying soil, and salt movement appeared to be governed to a greater extent by diffusive rather than convective flow mechanisms. Capillary barriers of coarse limestone effectively reduced salt movement at one of the two sites. Sodium, Ca, and Cl were the dominant mobile ions. Exchangeable Na percentages did not increase in soil increments > 15 cm above buried drilling wastes. Barium, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn in drilling fluids did not migrate into overlying soil. Movement of contaminants was similar where fourwing saltbush [Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt.], a deep-rooted shrub, and buffalograss [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm], a shallow-rooted grass, were used for revegetation

  17. Drilling fluids and lost circulation in hot-dry-rock geothermal wells at Fenton Hill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G.; Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico encountered problems of catastrophic lost circulation in cavernous areas of limestones in the Sandia Formation, severe corrosion due to temperatures of up to 320/sup 0/C, and torque problems caused by 35/sup 0/ hole angle and the abrasiveness of Precambrian crystalline rock. The use of polymeric flocculated bentonite fluid, clear water, fibrous material, dry drilling, oxygen scavengers, a biodegradable lubricant mixture of modified triglicerides and alcohol, and maintenance of a high pH, were some of the approaches taken toward solving these problems.

  18. Soil and plant response to used potassium silicate drilling fluid application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Linjun; Anne Naeth, M

    2015-10-01

    Use of drilling waste generated from the oil and gas industry for land reclamation has potential to be a practical and economical means to improve soil fertility and to decrease landfills. A four month greenhouse experiment with common barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) on three different textured soils was conducted to determine soil and plant response to incorporated or sprayed potassium silicate drilling fluid (PSDF). Two PSDF types (used once, used twice) were applied at six rates (10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 120m(3)ha(-1)) as twelve PSDF amendments plus a control (non PSDF). Effects of PSDF amendment on plant properties were significant, and varied through physiological growth stages. Barley emergence and below ground biomass were greater with used once than used twice PSDF at the same application rate in clay loam soil. Used twice PSDF at highest rates significantly increased barley above ground biomass relative to the control in loam and sand soil. All PSDF treatments significantly increased available potassium relative to the control in all three soils. Soil electrical conductivity and sodium adsorption ratio increased with PSDF addition, but not to levels detrimental to barley. Soil quality rated fair to poor with PSDF amendments in clay loam, and reduced plant performance at the highest rate, suggesting a threshold beyond which conditions are compromised with PSDF utilization. PSDF application method did not significantly affect plant and soil responses. This initial greenhouse research demonstrates that PSDF has potential as a soil amendment for reclamation, with consideration of soil properties and plant species tolerances to determine PSDF types and rates to be used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. How we improved operations in drilling pre-salt wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hougaz, Augusto Borella [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Martins, Luiz Felipe; Bittencourt, Jessica Lima; Braz, Luciano Machado [Genesis do Brasil, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Damski, Carlos [Genesis Petroleum Technology Pty Ltd. (GPT), Bentley, WA (Australia)

    2012-07-01

    The development of pre-salt wells offshore Brazil has been one of the most challenging projects in history of E and P. Facing water depths of 2000+ meters, a salt layer 2000 meters thick to reach reservoirs at 7000 meters below sea level, has to use technological and procedural techniques never used before. In those 2 years of exploration of those fields many technologies were tested and improved. This paper describes the systematic approach was taken to analyze, plan and follow-up the development of drilling operations campaign in those fields, and the case study of overall process improvement. The assumption was to apply a risk analysis tool which uses previous data to analyze the performance and plan future time. The goals of this process are continuous improvement of execution and process control for each operation. Looking into previous performance, new interventions were planned more accurately and further improvements were studied. The frequent follow up of the drilling intervention was done using the statistical base to compare the most recent results. At operational level it was possible to see if the last operation was done in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th quartile of its related statistical distribution, as well as to verify the difference within P10 and P90, which indicates the control of each operation execution process. The same process was done for some rig related operations and for the whole intervention at end of it. Close contact with the intervention progress was kept and actions taken in any major deviation from the plan. This paper describes the case study where the process control and optimization of the total time for drilling 10 wells with similar design was measured between March 2009 and May 2011. It resulted in significant improvement in the drilling process. (author)

  20. DALI - drilling advisor with logic interpretations: methodological issues for designing underbalanced drilling operations. Improving efficiency using case-based reasonic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Gustavo A.; Velazquez C, David [Mexican Oil Institute, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A system that applies a method of knowledge-intensive case-based reasoning, for repair and prevention of unwanted events in the domain of offshore oil well drilling, has been developed in cooperation with an oil company. From several reoccurring problems during oil well drilling the problem of 'lost circulation', i.e. loss of circulating drilling fluid into the geological formation, was picked out as a pilot problem. An extensive general knowledge model was developed for the domain of oil well drilling. Different cases were created on the basis of information from one Mexican Gulf operator. When the completed CBR-system was tested against a new case, cases with descending similarity were selected by the tool. In an informal evaluation, the two best fitting cases proved to give the operator valuable advise on how to go about solving the new case (author)

  1. Performance evaluation of NEEM oil and HONGE Oil as cutting fluid in drilling operation of mild steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothi, P. N.; Susmitha, M.; Sharan, P.

    2017-04-01

    Cutting fluids are used in machining industries for improving tool life, reducing work piece and thermal deformation, improving surface finish and flushing away chips from the cutting zone. Although the application of cutting fluids increases the tool life and Machining efficiency, but it has many major problems related to environmental impacts and health hazards along with recycling & disposal. These problems gave provision for the introduction of mineral, vegetable and animal oils. These oils play an important role in improving various machining properties, including corrosion protection, lubricity, antibacterial protection, even emulsibility and chemical stability. Compared to mineral oils, vegetable oils in general possess high viscosity index, high flash point, high lubricity and low evaporative losses. Vegetable oils can be edible or non-edible oils and Various researchers have proved that edible vegetable oils viz., palm oil, coconut oil, canola oil, soya bean oil can be effectively used as eco-friendly cutting fluid in machining operations. But in present situations harnessing edible oils for lubricants formation restricts the use due to increased demands of growing population worldwide and availability. In the present work, Non-edible vegetable oil like Neem and Honge are been used as cutting fluid for drilling of Mild steel and its effect on cutting temperature, hardness and surface roughness are been investigated. Results obtained are compared with SAE 20W40 (petroleum based cutting fluid)and dry cutting condition.

  2. The fluid–solid coupling analysis of screw conveyor in drilling fluid centrifuge based on ANSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the centrifugal separations of drilling fluid, screw conveyor is a critical component to push and separate the sediment. The work performance and structural parameters of conveyor are immediately related to the production capability, the working life and the separating effect of the centrifuge. The existing researches always use the theoretical calculation of the approximate loads to analyze the strength of conveyor, and it cannot reflect the stress situations accurately. In order to ensure the precise mastery of the working performance, this article obtained pressure distribution under working conditions from CFX evaluation and gained equivalent stress and deformation under several load conditions by using the ANSYS Workbench platform to check the strength of conveyor. The results showed that the influence of centrifugal hydraulic pressure was less than that of centrifugal force on the strength and deformation of conveyor. Besides, the maximum equivalent stress occurred at the inside of the feed opening, while the maximum deformation occurred at the conveyor blade edge of taper extremity. Furthermore, whether considered the feed opening or not, the computing model had a great influence on the analysis results, and the simplified loads had a great influence on the deformation analysis results. The methods and results from this article can provide reference for the design and the improvement of screw conveyor.

  3. Evaluation of saponite and saponite/sepiolite fluids for geothermal drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guven, N.; Panfil, D.J.; Carney, L.L. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1991-02-01

    The rheology and other properties of drilling fluids containing saponite and a saponite-sepiolite mixture as the main vicosifier have been systematically evaluated in the temperature range of 300-600{degree}F under appropriate confining pressures up to 16,000 psi. Saponite represents the magnesium analog of the clay mineral montmorillonite, which is the main constituent in conventional bentonite-based fluids. The fluid with 6% saponite exhibits a prominent viscosity enhancement at temperatures above 250{degree}F. This viscosity enhancement is easily controlled by salts and hydroxides of Na and K. The addition of Na-polyacrylates (low- and high-molecular weight polymers) eliminates the viscosity anomaly of pure saponite fluids. These polymers also increase the filtration control of saponite. The anomalous viscosity enhancement of saponite is significantly reduced by the addition of sepiolite (a clay mineral with a fibrous morphology). 12 refs., 31 figs., 26 tabs.

  4. Method and apparatus for monitoring fluid flow between a borehole and the surrounding formations in the course of drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J. L.; Gehrig, G. F.; Speers, J. M.

    1985-11-19

    A method and apparatus for establishing the rate at which fluid is transferred between a borehole and the surrounding formations in the course of moving drill string upward or downward in the borehole. A bell nipple is situated at the upper portion of the borehole. While tripping, drilling fluid is circulated into the borehole and exits through an outflow port in the bell nipple. The level of drilling fluid is maintained constant at the outflow port. Meters are provided to measure inflow and outflow rates. Circuitry is provided to establish the volume rate at which the amount of drill string within the borehole changes. The outputs of the meters and rate establishing means are summed to establish the compensated rate at which fluid is transferred between the formations and the borehole. This compensated rate is compared to an alarm limit. An alarm is activated if the compensated rate exceeds the alarm limit.

  5. Computerized tomography with X-rays: an instrument in the analysis physico-chemical between formations and drilling fluids interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Marcus Vinicius Cavalcante

    1998-01-01

    In this study it is demonstrated the applicability of the Computerized Tomography technique with x-rays to evaluate the reactivity degree between various drilling fluids and argillaceous sediments (Shales and Sandstones). The research has been conducted in the Rock-Fluid Interaction Pressure Simulator (RFIPS), where the possible physico-chemical alterations can be observed through successive tomography images, which are obtained during the flow of the fluid through the samples. In addition, it was noticed the formation of mud cake in Berea Sandstones samples in the RFIPS, though the Computerized Tomography with X-rays, when utilizing drilling fluids weighted with the baryte. (author)

  6. Advanced Drilling through Diagnostics-White-Drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FINGER, JOHN T.; GLOWKA, DAVID ANTHONY; LIVESAY, BILLY JOE; MANSURE, ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.

    1999-01-01

    A high-speed data link that would provide dramatically faster communication from downhole instruments to the surface and back again has the potential to revolutionize deep drilling for geothermal resources through Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD). Many aspects of the drilling process would significantly improve if downhole and surface data were acquired and processed in real-time at the surface, and used to guide the drilling operation. Such a closed-loop, driller-in-the-loop DWD system, would complete the loop between information and control, and greatly improve the performance of drilling systems. The main focus of this program is to demonstrate the value of real-time data for improving drilling. While high-rate transfer of down-hole data to the surface has been accomplished before, insufficient emphasis has been placed on utilization of the data to tune the drilling process to demonstrate the true merit of the concept. Consequently, there has been a lack of incentive on the part of industry to develop a simple, low-cost, effective high-speed data link. Demonstration of the benefits of DWD based on a high-speed data link will convince the drilling industry and stimulate the flow of private resources into the development of an economical high-speed data link for geothermal drilling applications. Such a downhole communication system would then make possible the development of surface data acquisition and expert systems that would greatly enhance drilling operations. Further, it would foster the development of downhole equipment that could be controlled from the surface to improve hole trajectory and drilling performance. Real-time data that would benefit drilling performance include: bit accelerations for use in controlling bit bounce and improving rock penetration rates and bit life; downhole fluid pressures for use in the management of drilling hydraulics and improved diagnosis of lost circulation and gas kicks; hole trajectory for use in reducing directional

  7. Adsorption of dispersing polyelectrolytes: stabilization of drilling fluids; Adsorption de polyelectrolytes dispersants: stabilisation des fluides de forage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balastre, M.

    1999-11-10

    Instabilities of concentrated colloidal suspensions are a source of many industrial problems, as in drilling fluid formulations where aggregation and severe settling phenomena can occur. Low molecular weight polyelectrolyte dispersants are used to solve these problems, but their optimal use requires a better understanding of the phenomena that are involved. After materials characterization, adsorption mechanisms of two anionic polyelectrolytes (PANa, PSSNa) on a soluble substrate model, barium sulfate powder are studied. Barium sulfate is the principal additive used to adapt the density of drilling fluids. A simple model allows us to propose a distribution of the microscopic species at the interface. Presence of divalent ions induces the formation of a strong complex with the polyelectrolyte. Adsorption and electro-kinetic data are presented and exchange equilibrium are examined in relation with the surface uptake. The binding mechanism and the surface speciation of the polymer groups are deduced from the ion exchange analysis. The macroscopic behavior of suspensions on different conditions (volume fraction, ionic strength, dispersant concentration) is studied by settling and rheological measurements. The macroscopic properties are connected to structural aspects, and we show that dispersing effects are mostly related to electro-steric repulsion. The dispersion state depends on two principal factors adsorbed amounts and adsorbed layer properties, especially the excess charge, and the molecules conformation. (author)

  8. Development and application of ZM-2 drilling fluid density adjustment mixing device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongming Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure shallow (gas/water flow is often hidden in the deepwater seabed, so penetrating shallow flow in drilling without BOP will be highly risky. In this case, the conventional well killing method to balance the formation pressure with back pressure generated by well head equipment is no longer suitable. Based on the analysis of structural characteristics of domestic and foreign multi-phase mixing systems, a ZM-2 drilling fluid density adjustment mixing device with independent intellectual property right was developed according to the principles of dynamic well killing. The device is mainly composed of a throttle valve, a high-precision electromagnetic flowmeter, a mixer, dumbbell-shaped nozzles, connecting pipes and other components. Fixed on the mixer are three inlets to fill heavy mud, seawater and additives. Opposed jetting is adopted to realize rapid and uniform mixing of fluids with different densities. A laboratory test was conducted to work out the relationship between throttle opening and injection flow rate and establish a linear relationship between killing fluid density and heavy mud flow. The results of field test conducted in the Nanhai No.8 drill ship showed that the mixing device was stable in operation and excellent in mixing performance. The density difference of ingredient mixture could be controlled within 0.05 g/cm3 after the mixture flowed out of the mixing chamber of the mixer of about 0.3 m long, so such high precision can meet the requirement of dynamic well killing.

  9. Evaluation des fluides de forage HP/HT pour forages profonds Evaluation of Hp/Ht Drilling Fluid Formulations for Deep Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argillier J. F.

    2006-11-01

    nombre de boues à base d'eau. Les résultats font apparaître que la nature des composants de la formulation exerce une forte influence sur le comportement de la boue dans des conditions difficiles. Le choix approprié d'additifs, tels que viscosifiants et réducteurs de filtrat, peut limiter les risques inhérents aux conditions de forage difficiles. Deep well drilling require the development of drilling fluid formulations adapted to high formation temperatures : a major cause of problems is the thermal degradation of chemical additives used in water based formulations that often occurs while drilling high temperature wells. Such a degradation can lead to strong variations in rheological and filtration characteristics and loss of properties. Moreover, even if no degradation of components occurs, the viscosity of hydrosoluble polymer solutions commonly used in fluid formulations strongly decreases as temperature increases above 60°C (150°F. Another cause of problems that arise at high temperature when using water based muds is the gelation of clays used in the formulation. This induces a deep increase in formulation viscosity and pressure drop, in particular when setting back in operation. Different methodologies have been developed for studying the behaviour of water based muds under high pressure/high temperature conditions. They include:(1 laboratory scale experiments such as anaerobic stability of polymer solutions, rheological behaviour of clay suspensions under high pressure/high temperature conditions thus simulating gelification properties of clays at high temperature;studying drilling fluids under realistic bottom hole conditions that are temperatures up to 180°C (380°F, pressures up to 500 bar and shear rates up to 10,000 s to the power of (-1. Using this methodology different water based muds have been tested. The results show that the nature of the constituents used in the water based formulation strongly influences the mud behaviour under harsh

  10. Temperature and Pressure Effects on Drilling Fluid Rheology and ECD in Very Deep Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rommetveit, R.; Bjoerkvoll, K.S.

    1997-12-31

    The rheological properties of drilling fluids are usually approximated to be independent of pressure and temperature. In many cases this is a good approximation. However, for wells with small margins between pore and fracture pressure, careful evaluations and analysis of the effects of temperature and pressure on well bore hydraulics and kick probability are needed. In this publication the effects of pressure and temperature are discussed and described for typical HPHT (High Pressure High Temperature) wells. Laboratory measurements show that rheology is very pressure and temperature dependent. The practical implications of these observations are illustrated through a series of calculations with an advanced pressure and temperature simulator. 10 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Use of hypane to treat drilling fluids at fields of the Tyumen Oblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radyuk, M I; Gur' yevskikh, T S; Kozubovskiy, A I

    1980-01-01

    It is recommended that hypane be used during drilling as the conductor (in concentration 0.10-0.25%) to increase viscosity of the argillaceous suspensions and reduce the consumption of clay powder, and also to obtain liquids and reduce density of fluids (in a quantity of 0.5-1.0%) in combination with purification and dilution. Hypane is used starting with depths where intensive enrichment of the circulating liquid with the argillaceous phase stops and the section is more stable (1800-2000 m for the central Ob region).

  12. Two-riser system improves drilling at Auger prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Marsh, G.L.; Ritter, P.B.; Mendel, P.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a two-rise system (TRS) for drilling deepwater development wells which eliminates some of the limitations of conventional subsea technology and allows flexibility in well programs. Shell Offshore Inc.'s deep exploratory wells in Garden Banks 426 and 471 have encountered drilling problems that were attributed to limitations in casing sizes imposed by conventional subsea drilling systems. These problems are not uncommon in exploratory deepwater, deep well drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. Reservoir depths of up to 19,500 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 7-in. production casing requirements led to potentially troublesome and expensive well plans. Because of the constraints placed on the development drilling program by completion requirements and directional drilling, a two-riser system was designed and fabricated. Solving such significant drilling problems has reduced overall development costs

  13. Aerated drilling cutting transport analysis in geothermal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhyudin, Aris; Setiawan, Deni; Dwi Marjuan, Oscar

    2017-12-01

    Aeratad drilling widely used for geothermal drilling especially when drilled into predicted production zone. Aerated drilling give better performance on preventing lost circulation problem, improving rate of penetration, and avoiding drilling fluid invasion to productive zone. While well is drilled, cutting is produced and should be carried to surface by drilling fluid. Hole problem, especially pipe sticking will occur while the cutting is not lifted properly to surface. The problem will effect on drilling schedule; non-productive time finally result more cost to be spent. Geothermal formation has different characteristic comparing oil and gas formation. Geothermal mainly has igneous rock while oil and gas mostly sedimentary rock. In same depth, formation pressure in geothermal well commonly lower than oil and gas well while formation temperature geothermal well is higher. While aerated drilling is applied in geothermal well, Igneous rock density has higher density than sedimentary rock and aerated drilling fluid is lighter than water based mud hence minimum velocity requirement to transport cutting is larger than in oil/gas well drilling. Temperature and pressure also has impact on drilling fluid (aerated) density. High temperature in geothermal well decrease drilling fluid density hence the effect of pressure and temperature also considered. In this paper, Aerated drilling cutting transport performance on geothermal well will be analysed due to different rock and drilling fluid density. Additionally, temperature and pressure effect on drilling fluid density also presented to merge.

  14. Improved Fluid Perturbation Theory: Equation of state for Fluid Xenon

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qiong; Liu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Gong-Mu; Zhao, Yan-Hong; Tian, Ming-Feng; Song, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The traditional fluid perturbation theory is improved by taking electronic excitations and ionizations into account, in the framework of average ion spheres. It is applied to calculate the equation of state for fluid Xenon, which turns out in good agreement with the available shock data.

  15. Improved dental implant drill durability and performance using heat and wear resistant protective coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Nilay; Alkan, Alper; İlday, Serim; Bengu, Erman

    2018-03-02

    Dental implant drilling procedure is an essential step for implant surgery and frictional heat appeared in bone during drilling is a key factor affecting the success of an implant. The aim of this study is to increase the dental implant drill lifetime and performance using heat- and wear-resistant protective coatings hence to decrease the alveolar bone temperature caused by the dental implant drilling procedure. Commercially obtained stainless steel drills were coated with titanium aluminum nitride, diamond-like carbon, titanium boron nitride, and boron nitride coatings via magnetron-sputter deposition. Drilling procedure was performed on a bovine femoral cortical bone under the conditions mimicking clinical practice, where the tests were performed both under water-assisted cooling and under the conditions without any cooling was applied. Coated drill performances and durabilities were compared to that of three commonly used commercial drills which surfaces are made from namely; zirconia, black diamond and stainless steel. Protective coatings with boron nitride, titanium boron nitride and diamond-like carbon have significantly improved drill performance and durability. Especially boron nitride-coated drills have performed within safe bone temperature limits for 50 drillings even without any cooling is applied. Titanium aluminium nitride coated drills did not show any improvement over commercially obtained stainless steel drills. Surface modification using heat and wear resistant coatings is an easy and highly effective way to improve implant drill performance and durability, which can reflect positively on surgical procedure and healing period afterwards. The noteworthy success of different types of coatings is novel and likely to be applicable to various other medical systems.

  16. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

  17. Environmental implications of release of oil-based drilling fluids and oily cuttings into waters of the Canadian northwest Atlantic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barchard, W.W.; Doe, K.G.; Mahon, S.D.; Moores, R.B.; Osborne, J.M.; Parker, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    In 1982, the Environmental Protection Service became aware that companies conducting petroleum exploration in the waters of eastern Canada would request permission to use and discharge oil-based drilling fluids and/or drill cuttings contaminated with oil-based drilling fluids. It was determined from an evaluation of North Sea data that aspects of the toxicity of oil-based drilling fluids should be evaluated using techniques applicable to Canadian marine conditions. Although it is unlikely that permission will be granted to dispose of whole oil-based muds into the ocean, whole mud formulations were tested as a close approximation to the mixture which would adhere to discharged drilling cuttings. Test organisms were exposed to whole muds as an approximation of the worst possible exposure regime. Static bioassays (96-hour) were conducted using threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). In general, high pH and the inclusion of certain emulsifiers seemed to contribute greatly to the lethality of the whole muds. Diesel oil-based muds were more acutely toxic than those formulated with alternate base oils which were virtually non-acutely toxic. Acute, sublethal and long-term studies were also conducted only on drill cuttings contaminated with alternate base oil muds. These more closely reflect proposed discharge strategies. Although 96-hour exposures resulted in no mortality, longer-term exposures (four to thirty-two days) resulted in significant behavioural changes and/or mortality to Macoma balthica, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, larval Homarus americanus and Nephthys caeca. The results suggest that use of alternate oil-based drilling fluids will have an effect on the marine environment intermediate between water-based muds and diesel oil-based muds. 73 refs., 6 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. Drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanchik, N P; Demin, A V; Khrustalev, N N; Linnik, G N; Lovchev, S V; Rozin, M M; Sidorov, R V; Sokolov, S I; Tsaregradskiy, Yu P

    1981-01-01

    A drilling unit is proposed which includes a hydraulic lifter, hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump with valve distribution and sectional drilling pump with separators of the working and flushing fluid. In order to reduce metal consumption and the overall dimensions of the drilling unit, the working cavity of each cylinder of the hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump is equipped with suction and injection valves and is hydraulically connected to the working cavity by one of the sections of the drilling pump.

  19. A Transient Analytical Model for Predicting Wellbore/Reservoir Temperature and Stresses during Drilling with Fluid Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisheng Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of heat transfer in a wellbore during drilling, which includes fluid circulation, is important for wellbore stability analysis. In this work, a pseudo-3D model is developed to simultaneously calculate the heat exchange between the flowing fluid and the surrounding media (drill pipe and rock formation and the in-plane thermoelastic stresses. The cold drilling fluid descends through the drill pipe at constant injection rates and returns to the ground surface via the annulus. The fluid circulation will decrease the wellbore bottom temperature and reduce the near-wellbore high compressive stress, potentially leading to tensile fracturing of the well. The governing equations for the coupled heat transfer stress problem are formulated to ensure that the most important parameters are taken into account. The wellbore is subject to a non-hydrostatic in situ far-field stress field. In modeling heat exchange between fluid and surrounding media, the heat transfer coefficients are dependent on fluid properties and flow behavior. Analytical solutions in the Laplace space are obtained for the temperatures of the fluid in both the drill pipe and annulus and for the temperature and stress changes in the formation. The numerical results in the time domain are obtained by using an efficient inversion approach. In particular, the near-well stresses are compared for the cases with fixed and time-dependent cooling wellbore conditions. This comparison indicates that the using a fixed temperature wellbore conditions may over-estimate or under-estimate the bottom-hole stress change, potentially leading to wellbore stability problems.

  20. Casing drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heenan, D. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviewed the experience that Tesco has gained by drilling several wells using only casings as the drill stem. Tesco has manufactured a mobile and compact hydraulic drilling rig called the Casing Drilling {sup TM} system. The system could be very effective and efficient for exploration and development of coalbed methane (CBM) reserves which typically require extensive coring. Continuous coring while drilling ahead, along wire line retrieval, can offer time savings and quick core recovery of large diameter core which is typically required for exploration core desorption tests. The proposed system may also have the potential to core or drill typically tight gas sands or underbalanced wells with air or foam. This would reduce drilling fluid damage while simultaneously finding gas. Compared to conventional drill pipes, Casing Drilling {sup TM} could also be effective with water production from shallow sands because of the smaller annual clearance which requires less air volumes to lift any produced water. 9 figs.

  1. Optimization of surfactant application for synthetic drilling fluid; Otimizacao da aplicacao de emulsificante em fluidos de perfuracao sinteticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Jefferson Teixeira [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Santos, Telma Pitanga; Medeiros, Ana Catarina da Rocha; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Pesquisa em Petroleo

    2008-07-01

    The most common synthetic drilling fluids are made of polymerized olefins, paraffin and esters, which have absence of aromatics hydrocarbons and biodegradability as advantages. These fluids have good performance during the drilling operations (high thermal stability) and have low toxicity. Nevertheless, their big disadvantage is the high cost, which limits their use. One of the biggest challenges in working with synthetic fluids is the control of water/oil emulsion stability, being the surfactant the main agent responsible for keeping this stability between both phases of the fluid. The water/oil and oil/water emulsion is defined by the chemical nature of the surfactant. The emulsions can be changed from oil/water to water/oil and vice versa by many mechanisms, such as temperature variation, addition of another surfactant and alteration of the disperse phase volumetric percentage. The aim of this work was the optimization of synthetic drilling fluids formulations by using commercial surfactants. The optimized formulations showed similar rheological properties. After aging at high temperature (300 deg F), some tendency to migration of oil phase in both fluids was observed. This result was associated to the fluid's viscosity. However, the formulations showed high electrical stability, indicating formation of stable emulsions. The HTHP filtration volumes were small. (author)

  2. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 92-0361-2343, M-I Drilling Fluids, Greybull, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gilder, T.J.; Robinson, L.

    1993-08-01

    In response to a request from the state epidemiologist in Wyoming, an investigation was begun of two cases of acute, febrile hepatitis in employees of M-I Drilling Fluids (SIC-1459), Greybull, Wyoming. The two cases of hepatitis were caused by Coxiella-burnetii, the rickettsia which causes Q-fever. A survey of 39 workers using a self-administered questionnaire and a blood test revealed seven workers with serologic evidence of infection. Three showed evidence of recent infection and four showed evidence of past infection. The major risk factor identified through the questionnaire data was sheep ownership. Risk factors suggestive of either recent or past infection included working outdoors, operating heavy equipment, and hunting.

  3. Effect of Nitric Acid on the Low Fluorescing Performance of Drilling Fluid Lubricant Based Animal and Vegetable Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-shan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After synthesis of mixed fatty acid triethanolamine ester surfactant based on animal and vegetable mixed oils, the reaction solution was added into 4% (wt/wt liquid nitric acid or 9% (wt/wt solid nitric acid as eliminating fluorescent agent continuing to react from 1 to 2 hours. The low fluorescence lubricant named E167 for drilling fluid was prepared, in which maximum fluorescence intensity (Fmax was less than 10 in three-dimensional fluorescence spectra of excitation wavelength range. When the E167 was added into fresh water based drilling fluid at the dosage of 0.5% (wt/wt, the sticking coefficient reduced rate (ΔKf is 78% and the extreme pressure (E-P friction coefficient reduced rate (Δf is 79%. In the case of 4% brine mud with 0.5% (wt/wt E167 in it, the ΔKf and Δf are 75% and 62%, respectively. After the hot rolling ageing test 180°C × 16 h with the E167 was added into fresh water based drilling fluid at the dosage of 1% (wt/wt, the ΔKf and Δf are greater than 70%, which shows a much better lubrication properties of strong resistance to high temperature. The fresh water based drilling fluid which contains 1% (wt/wt E167 is almost nonfoaming even after hot rolling ageing 120°C × 16 h.

  4. Development of new additive for drilling fluid from the partial hydrophobization N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, Thacyla C. do; Lopes, Grazielle; Silva, Joaquim F.M. da; Nascimento, Regina S.V.

    2009-01-01

    N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) hydrophobically modified can act as an excellent additive for drilling fluids water based, working as inhibitor of reactive shales and rheological modifiers. The cationic chitosan was obtained by reaction of chitosan with CH 3 I in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone to obtain the TMC and chitosan was also hydrophobically modified with palmitoil chloride to get Quit P. Through another route, Quit P was modified to obtain the cationic TMCP. The derivatives were characterized by FT-IR and 1 HNMR spectrophotometry allowing the calculation of the degree of quaternization of the TMC. The rheology tests showed that the system with TMCP presented pseudo plastic behavior, while the system with TMC behaved as a Newtonian fluid. The results indicated that TMCP can act as rheology modifier for water-based drilling fluids. (author)

  5. Drilling trends in the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    At a conference on various aspects of well drilling in the 1990s, papers were presented on drilling waste management, well completion and workovers, drilling fluids, drilling rig equipment and design, drilling mechanics, drill stem testing and materials, cementing, business management, health and safety, environmental issues, and directional drilling technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 46 papers from this conference

  6. Water drilling fluids: evaluation of lubricity and clay swelling control; Fluidos de perfuracao a base de agua: avaliacao de lubricidade e controle de inchamento de argilas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Thiago de Freitas; Arruda, Jefferson Teixeira; Medeiros, Ana Catarina; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    During the oil well drilling, drilling fluids are used in order to transport the cuttings until the surface. This fluid is also responsible for the mechanical sustentation of the well walls, the control of undesirable production of fluids in the formation, the lubricity and the cooling of the bit. The drilling fluids based on water are extensively applied due to their lower cost, thermal stability, biodegradability, easiness of pumping and treatment, resulting in smaller environmental impacts. However, some situations, such as hydrophilic shale drilling, request the use of additives to avoid the hydration of them and, consequently, the tool imprisonment or migration (filtration) of the drilling fluids into the rock. The goal of this work was to develop and test formulations of water-base drilling fluids with high capacity of inhibition of clay swelling and lubricity, obtaining drillings with larger penetration rate and calipers without enlargements. The results showed that the appropriate combination of commonly used commercial products can promote the obtaining of fluids with equal or better performance than those used by world companies. (author)

  7. Effects of waste drilling fluid on bacterial isolates from a mangrove swamp oilfield location in the Niger delta of Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benka-Coker, M.O.; Olumagin, A.

    1996-01-01

    Four bacteria strains isolated from a mangrove swamp oilfield location in the Niger Delta of Nigeria were cultured aerobically in the presence of 1.0% waste drilling fluid, to determine the effect of the waste on their growth. A 2-h lag phase of growth was produced by the waste in cultures of Micrococcus and Pseudomonas species, while the waste increased the lag phases of Alcaligenes and Staphylococcus species to 4 h. The exponential phase of growth of Pseudomonas sp. was depressed by the waste drilling fluid but fluid stimulated the exponential phases of Micrococcus and Alcaligenes spp. There was enhancement of the growth rate of Alcaligenes and Micrococcus spp. while those of Staphylococcus and Pseudonomas spp. were decreased. The depressed growth rates of Staphylococcus and Pseudonomas spp. in the presence of the waste drilling fluid might lead to a decrease in their contribution to the removal of the waste from the environment during spillage or disposal and, therefore, may result in an accumulation of the waste in the environment. (author)

  8. Effects of waste drilling fluid on bacterial isolates from a mangrove swamp oilfield location in the Niger delta of Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benka-Coker, M.O.; Olumagin, A. [Benin Univ. (Nigeria). Dept. of Microbiology

    1996-03-01

    Four bacteria strains isolated from a mangrove swamp oilfield location in the Niger Delta of Nigeria were cultured aerobically in the presence of 1.0% waste drilling fluid, to determine the effect of the waste on their growth. A 2-h lag phase of growth was produced by the waste in cultures of Micrococcus and Pseudomonas species, while the waste increased the lag phases of Alcaligenes and Staphylococcus species to 4 h. The exponential phase of growth of Pseudomonas sp. was depressed by the waste drilling fluid but fluid stimulated the exponential phases of Micrococcus and Alcaligenes spp. There was enhancement of the growth rate of Alcaligenes and Micrococcus spp. while those of Staphylococcus and Pseudonomas spp. were decreased. The depressed growth rates of Staphylococcus and Pseudonomas spp. in the presence of the waste drilling fluid might lead to a decrease in their contribution to the removal of the waste from the environment during spillage or disposal and, therefore, may result in an accumulation of the waste in the environment. (author)

  9. Small subchondral drill holes improve marrow stimulation of articular cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldracher, Mona; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali; Pape, Dietrich; Madry, Henning

    2014-11-01

    Subchondral drilling is an established marrow stimulation technique. Osteochondral repair is improved when the subchondral bone is perforated with small drill holes, reflecting the physiological subchondral trabecular distance. Controlled laboratory study. A rectangular full-thickness chondral defect was created in the trochlea of adult sheep (n = 13) and treated with 6 subchondral drillings of either 1.0 mm (reflective of the trabecular distance) or 1.8 mm in diameter. Osteochondral repair was assessed after 6 months in vivo by macroscopic, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses and by micro-computed tomography. The application of 1.0-mm subchondral drill holes led to significantly improved histological matrix staining, cellular morphological characteristics, subchondral bone reconstitution, and average total histological score as well as significantly higher immunoreactivity to type II collagen and reduced immunoreactivity to type I collagen in the repair tissue compared with 1.8-mm drill holes. Analysis of osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defects revealed no significant differences between treatment groups. Restoration of the microstructure of the subchondral bone plate below the chondral defects was significantly improved after 1.0-mm compared to 1.8-mm drilling, as shown by higher bone volume and reduced thickening of the subchondral bone plate. Likewise, the microarchitecture of the drilled subarticular spongiosa was better restored after 1.0-mm drilling, indicated by significantly higher bone volume and more and thinner trabeculae. Moreover, the bone mineral density of the subchondral bone in 1.0-mm drill holes was similar to the adjacent subchondral bone, whereas it was significantly reduced in 1.8-mm drill holes. No significant correlations existed between cartilage and subchondral bone repair. Small subchondral drill holes that reflect the physiological trabecular distance improve osteochondral repair in a translational

  10. Improving recovery efficiency of water-drive channel sandstone reservoir by drilling wells laterally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiguo, F.; Quinglong, D.; Pingshi, Z.; Bingyu, J.; Weigang, L. [Research Institute of Exploration and Development, Daqing (China)

    1998-12-31

    Example of drilling a horizontal well in reservoir rock of only four meter thick by using existing casing pipe of low efficiency vertical wells to induce production in the top remaining reservoir is described. The experience shows that drilling horizontal wells laterally in thin bodies of sandstone reservoirs and improve their productivity is a feasible proposition. Productivity will still be low, but it can be improved by well stimulation. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  11. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF CALCIUM CARBONATE PARTICLE SIZE SELECTION FOR DRILL-IN FLUIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2002-01-01

    The technological development in horizontal, re-entry and multilateral wells require drilling and completion the reservoir sections of a well including as little damage as possible. The trends towards open hole completion places additional emphasis on formation damage avoidance. One of critical factors in avoiding formation damage during drilling is obtaining surface bridging on the formation face with minimum indepth solids penetration. In case of overbalanced drilling, this can be donme by ...

  12. Purification of bentonitics of the city Cubati-PB to obtaining organoclays for use in oil-based drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.M.R.; Vitorino, I.J.F.; Silva, I.A.; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    In Boa Vista, PB, are located deposits of bentonite clays commonly used in the preparation of drilling fluids. The disorderly exploitation of the deposits of Boa Vista is causing the depletion of these clays, which will cause a very serious problem for the national oil industry. This work aims to characterize new deposits of bentonite clays Cubati, PB, for the development of organoclay from its refining using a hydrocyclone for use in oil based drilling fluids. The characterization of samples of the clays was performed through the techniques: AG, XRD, EDX, TGA and DTA. The characterization is typical of bentonite for the purification process was determined the best configuration of the hydrocyclone, and the environment organic diesel fuel, the best affinity was obtained with clays organophilizated with surfactant Praepagen WB. (author)

  13. Study of smectite clays of the city Pedra Lavrada - PB for use in water-based drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, I.A. da; Costa, J.M.R.; Cardoso, M.A.F.; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Paraiba has large reserves of bentonite clays, with the largest deposits in Boa Vista, PB. Recently new deposits were discovered in the cities of Cubati and Pedra Lavrada-PB, creating great expectations for further expansion of reserves for industrial production. The aim of this work is the study of smectite clays from the city of Pedra Lavrada, PB for use in drilling fluids water based. The characterization was made by the diffraction of laser (AG), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), chemical composition by X-ray fluorescence (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), exchange capacity of cations (ECC) and surface area (SA). The results obtained so far showed that the samples presented at its mineral composition smectite, kaolinite and quartz. In relation to rheological properties showed that the bentonite clay sample Dark presents promising features for use in water based drilling fluids. (author)

  14. Organophilization of bentonite clays with non-ionic surfactants aiming their use in drilling fluids base oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, I.A.; Costa, J.M.R.; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C.; Ferreira, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    The use of nonionic surfactants has been replacing the traditional ionic surfactants among others by its high potential for resistance to thermal degradation. This work aims at the development of organoclay by the addition of nonionic surfactants for use in drilling fluids for oil wells based oil. The bentonite clay was organophilized and then characterized by X-ray diffraction and swelling Foster, seeking the most appropriate choice of surfactant to liquid organic dispersing media: ester, diesel and paraffin. With the obtained dispersions were measured apparent viscosities and plastic. The results showed that incorporation of surfactants used in the clay interlayer spacing increased significantly and that the dispersions showed rheological properties within the specifications of PETROBRAS, for the use of organophilic clays in drilling fluids in a non-aqueous base. (author)

  15. Laboratory exposures of invertebrate and vertebrate species to concentrations of IA-35 (Petro-Canada) drill mud fluid, production water, and Hibernia mud cuttings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, J.; Fancey, L.; Andrews, C.; Meade, J.; Power, F.; Veinot, G. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, St. John' s, NF (Canada). Science Branch; Lee, K. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Mont-Joli, PQ (Canada). Maurice Lamontagne Inst.; Cook, A. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada). Environmental Quality Laboratory

    2001-04-01

    The authors studied the short term effects on brine shrimp nauplii (Artemia franciscana), capelin larvae (Mallotus villosus), marine copepods (Calanus finmarchicus), juvenile yellowtail flounder (Limanda ferruginea) and ctenophores (Pleurobrachius pileus) of synthetic drill mud fluid, produced water and drill mud cuttings. In this report, they presented the data collected, including data on the water solubility of Petro-Canada drill mud fluid IA-35 and metal analysis of production water from the Sable Island Offshore Exploration Project. Low acute toxicity potential for drill mud fluid, production water and Hibernia drill cuttings for the species and life stages tested were revealed. The hypothesis to the effect that wastes pose very little or no risk of an acute toxic nature to the marine environment were reinforced by the results from this study. 5 refs., 25 tabs.

  16. Improved fluid-structure coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, W.H.; Gong, E.Y.; Landram, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    In the computer code PELE-IC, an incompressible Eulerian hydrodynamic algorithm was coupled to a Lagrangian finite element shell algorithm for the analysis of pressure suppression in boiling water reactors. This effort also required the development of a free surface algorithm capable of handling expanding gas bubbles. These algorithms have been improved to strengthen the coupling and to add the capability for following the more complex free surfaces resulting from steam condensation. These improvements have also permitted more economical 2D calculations and have made it feasible to develop a 3D version. A compressible option using the acoustic approximation has also been added, furthering the usefulness of the code. The coupling improvements were made in three areas which are identified as (1) preferential coupling, (2) merged cell coupling, and (3) free surface-structure coupling, and are described. These algorithms have been additionally implemented in a three dimensional version of the code called PELE3D. This version has a free surface capability to follow expanding and contracting bubbles and is coupled to a curved rigid surface

  17. The multiphase flow system used in exploiting depleted reservoirs: water-based Micro-bubble drilling fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Lihui; He Xiaoqing; Wang Xiangchun; Fu Lixia

    2009-01-01

    Water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid, which is used to exploit depleted reservoirs, is a complicated multiphase flow system that is composed of gas, water, oil, polymer, surfactants and solids. The gas phase is separate from bulk water by two layers and three membranes. They are 'surface tension reducing membrane', 'high viscosity layer', 'high viscosity fixing membrane', 'compatibility enhancing membrane' and 'concentration transition layer of liner high polymer (LHP) and surfactants' from every gas phase centre to the bulk water. 'Surface tension reducing membrane', 'high viscosity layer' and 'high viscosity fixing membrane' bond closely to pack air forming 'air-bag', 'compatibility enhancing membrane' and 'concentration transition layer of LHP and surfactants' absorb outside 'air-bag' to form 'incompact zone'. From another point of view, 'air-bag' and 'incompact zone' compose micro-bubble. Dynamic changes of 'incompact zone' enable micro-bubble to exist lonely or aggregate together, and lead the whole fluid, which can wet both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface, to possess very high viscosity at an extremely low shear rate but to possess good fluidity at a higher shear rate. When the water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid encounters leakage zones, it will automatically regulate the sizes and shapes of the bubbles according to the slot width of fracture, the height of cavern as well as the aperture of openings, or seal them by making use of high viscosity of the system at a very low shear rate. Measurements of the rheological parameters indicate that water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid has very high plastic viscosity, yield point, initial gel, final gel and high ratio of yield point and plastic viscosity. All of these properties make the multiphase flow system meet the requirements of petroleum drilling industry. Research on interface between gas and bulk water of this multiphase flow system can provide us with information of synthesizing effective

  18. New high-performance, water-based fluid benefits Santos basin operations with excellent inhibition and drilling efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Tom; West, Gary [Halliburton Baroid, Santos, SP (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    For decades drilling fluids companies have been striving to create a water-based fluid (WBF) that yields performance similar to that of an invert emulsion in the areas of hole stability, rate of penetration (ROP) and lubricity. The HYDRO-GUARD system is a new highly inhibitive WBF that can yield drilling performance approaching that of an invert emulsion system. The new system uses a new combination of polymeric additives designed to inhibit reactive clays, minimize colloidal solids buildup, and produce a lubricious, gauge wellbore. This paper compares the field performance of the HYDRO-GUARD system on two recent Santos Basin wells drilled to over 5,000 m with the performance of synthetic-based fluids (SBF) used historically in the same area. Bottom hole temperatures (BHT) on these wells exceeded 315 deg F (157 deg C). Performance measures such as hole cleaning, penetration rates, hole stability, and torque and drag will be reviewed as well as general system benefits. (author)

  19. Preparation of fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion as anti-collapse agent for drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqiang Xiong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion (FCCSE was prepared by using interfacial complexes generation method that was simple and versatile. The critical factors influencing the sample preparation process were optimized, for instance, the optimum value of the mixed hydrophile-lipophile balance of compound emulsifier was 11.36, the content of compound emulsifier was 4 wt%, the emulsification temperature was 75 °C, the agitation speed was 200 rpm, and the emulsification time was 30–45 min. The performance as a drilling fluid additive was also investigated with respect to rheological properties, filtration loss and inhibition of FCCSE. Experimental results showed that FCCSE was favorable to inhibiting clay expansion and dispersion and reducing fluid loss. Furthermore, it had good compatibility with other additives and did not affect the rheological properties of drilling fluids. FCCSE exhibited better performance than the available emulsified asphalt. It has a promising application as anti-collapse agent in petroleum and natural gas drilling.

  20. Deep drilling KLX 02. Drilling and documentation of a 1700 m deep borehole at Laxemar, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, O [VBB VIAK AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1994-08-01

    In this report the preparation and execution of the deep core drilling KLX 02 is described. The hole was drilled with the wireline methods, NQ dimension (diameter 76 mm), to a final depth of 1700.5 m. Prior to core drilling a diameter 215 mm pilot hole was pre drilled to 200 m with controlled hammer drilling (DTH). In this hole casing and air-lift equipment was installed with the aim to support the circulation of drilling fluid. During core drilling there was a measurement of major drilling parameters and drilling fluid in and out of hole. As a fluid tracer uranine was used. Each 300 m of core drilling air-lift pump tests were performed. After completion a flow-meter log was run to finalize the project phase. It can be concluded that both the pre drilling and core drilling methods used proved to be successful. No severe technical problem occurred. However, potential risks have been pointed at in the report. The air-lift system functioned only partly and has to be modified for further use. Also the technique for monitoring of drilling parameters needs improvement as does the method for air-lift pump tests with packer. The organisation model for planning and realization functioned satisfactory and can be recommended for similar future projects. 9 refs, numerous tabs and figs.

  1. Deep drilling KLX 02. Drilling and documentation of a 1700 m deep borehole at Laxemar, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, O.

    1994-08-01

    In this report the preparation and execution of the deep core drilling KLX 02 is described. The hole was drilled with the wireline methods, NQ dimension (diameter 76 mm), to a final depth of 1700.5 m. Prior to core drilling a diameter 215 mm pilot hole was pre drilled to 200 m with controlled hammer drilling (DTH). In this hole casing and air-lift equipment was installed with the aim to support the circulation of drilling fluid. During core drilling there was a measurement of major drilling parameters and drilling fluid in and out of hole. As a fluid tracer uranine was used. Each 300 m of core drilling air-lift pump tests were performed. After completion a flow-meter log was run to finalize the project phase. It can be concluded that both the pre drilling and core drilling methods used proved to be successful. No severe technical problem occurred. However, potential risks have been pointed at in the report. The air-lift system functioned only partly and has to be modified for further use. Also the technique for monitoring of drilling parameters needs improvement as does the method for air-lift pump tests with packer. The organisation model for planning and realization functioned satisfactory and can be recommended for similar future projects. 9 refs, numerous tabs and figs

  2. Evaluation of low toxicity mineral oil base drilling fluids; Avaliacao de fluidos de perfuracao a base de oleo mineral de baixa toxidez

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponte, Ielton Frederico da [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Div. de Explotacao

    1989-12-31

    In order to introduce low toxicity mineral oil base drilling fluids in Brazil, we carried out a series with a low aromatic content basic oil for lubricants, produced by PETROBRAS: the Lubrax Industrial OB-9 (Lubind OB-9). This oil, as well as its mixture with aviation kerosene to reduce viscosity, was found adequate for use in drilling fluids together with other national products developed by companies that supply additives for drilling fluids in Brazil. We present the results of laboratory tests with systems of four different manufacturers, one of which was chosen for initial field tests. These tests, which were carried out at the Miranga and Bu River Fields, in the Drilling District of Bahia, produced satisfactory results. We anticipate the use of these fluids in other areas where the company operates. (author) 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of low toxicity mineral oil base drilling fluids; Avaliacao de fluidos de perfuracao a base de oleo mineral de baixa toxidez

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponte, Ielton Frederico da [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Div. de Explotacao

    1990-12-31

    In order to introduce low toxicity mineral oil base drilling fluids in Brazil, we carried out a series with a low aromatic content basic oil for lubricants, produced by PETROBRAS: the Lubrax Industrial OB-9 (Lubind OB-9). This oil, as well as its mixture with aviation kerosene to reduce viscosity, was found adequate for use in drilling fluids together with other national products developed by companies that supply additives for drilling fluids in Brazil. We present the results of laboratory tests with systems of four different manufacturers, one of which was chosen for initial field tests. These tests, which were carried out at the Miranga and Bu River Fields, in the Drilling District of Bahia, produced satisfactory results. We anticipate the use of these fluids in other areas where the company operates. (author) 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Validation and comparison of two sampling methods to assess dermal exposure to drilling fluids and crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Karen S; McGonagle, Carolyn; Sleeuwenhoek, Anne; Todd, David; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez

    2014-06-01

    Dermal exposure to drilling fluids and crude oil is an exposure route of concern. However, there have been no published studies describing sampling methods or reporting dermal exposure measurements. We describe a study that aimed to evaluate a wipe sampling method to assess dermal exposure to an oil-based drilling fluid and crude oil, as well as to investigate the feasibility of using an interception cotton glove sampler for exposure on the hands/wrists. A direct comparison of the wipe and interception methods was also completed using pigs' trotters as a surrogate for human skin and a direct surface contact exposure scenario. Overall, acceptable recovery and sampling efficiencies were reported for both methods, and both methods had satisfactory storage stability at 1 and 7 days, although there appeared to be some loss over 14 days. The methods' comparison study revealed significantly higher removal of both fluids from the metal surface with the glove samples compared with the wipe samples (on average 2.5 times higher). Both evaluated sampling methods were found to be suitable for assessing dermal exposure to oil-based drilling fluids and crude oil; however, the comparison study clearly illustrates that glove samplers may overestimate the amount of fluid transferred to the skin. Further comparison of the two dermal sampling methods using additional exposure situations such as immersion or deposition, as well as a field evaluation, is warranted to confirm their appropriateness and suitability in the working environment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  5. Evaluation of differential risk of arrest of drilling and polymeric fluids; Avaliacao do risco de prisao diferencial de fluidos de perfuracao hidroargilosos e polimericos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, L.R.B.; Lira, D.S.; Nascimento, R.C.A.M.; Amorim, L.V. [Universidadde Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)], Email: ligia_rafa@hotmail.com

    2010-07-01

    This work evaluates the risk of differential sticking (DS) of clay and water based drilling fluids, before and after adding polymer and lubricant additives, and polymeric fluids. From the results, it was concluded that the addition of lubricant to the clay and water based fluids reduces the torque necessary to free the pipes that are stuck by differential pressure, as for the polymeric fluids presented the lowest filtration losses, cake thickness, differential sticking coefficient and DS risk. (author)

  6. Water base drilling fluids for high-angle wells; Fluidos a base de agua para perfuracao de pocos com elevada inclinacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarelli, Rui [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Perfuracao. Div. de Fluidos de Perfuracao; Lomba, Rosana Fatima T [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Div. de Explotacao

    1990-12-31

    Horizontal drilling has experimented a large increase in last years. In Brazil, two horizontal wells were drilled in Fazenda Belem and Carmopolis Fields. The first one reached a final measured depth of 1128 m and the horizontal length was 533 m. The drilling fluid program was elaborated after a large number of laboratory tests, in order to get a composition that best fitted the drilling requirements, mainly the desirable lubricity. The idea of using a water-base fluid instead of an oil-based, known as more suitable in this case, arose because the Company is interested in drilling this kind of well offshore, in deep water, where the use of oil-base muds is forbidden. Different compositions of water base muds were developed and tested in laboratory and the results led to low-solids salt fluids having a lubricant in its composition. The lubricity coefficients of these fluids are similar to those obtained with oil-base muds. 9-FZB-446D-CE well was drilled with the chosen fluid and high values of torque and drag were not registered, being the operation a total success. (author) 10 tabs.

  7. Water base drilling fluids for high-angle wells; Fluidos a base de agua para perfuracao de pocos com elevada inclinacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarelli, Rui [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Perfuracao. Div. de Fluidos de Perfuracao; Lomba, Rosana Fatima T. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Div. de Explotacao

    1989-12-31

    Horizontal drilling has experimented a large increase in last years. In Brazil, two horizontal wells were drilled in Fazenda Belem and Carmopolis Fields. The first one reached a final measured depth of 1128 m and the horizontal length was 533 m. The drilling fluid program was elaborated after a large number of laboratory tests, in order to get a composition that best fitted the drilling requirements, mainly the desirable lubricity. The idea of using a water-base fluid instead of an oil-based, known as more suitable in this case, arose because the Company is interested in drilling this kind of well offshore, in deep water, where the use of oil-base muds is forbidden. Different compositions of water base muds were developed and tested in laboratory and the results led to low-solids salt fluids having a lubricant in its composition. The lubricity coefficients of these fluids are similar to those obtained with oil-base muds. 9-FZB-446D-CE well was drilled with the chosen fluid and high values of torque and drag were not registered, being the operation a total success. (author) 10 tabs.

  8. Experimental results on improved JARE deep ice core drill-Experiments in Rikubetsu, Hokkaido in 2002 -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Kameda

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Deep ice coring to bedrock (3028m in depth at Dome Fuji Station is planned during three successive summer seasons starting from 2003/2004. An improved JARE deep ice core drill (12.2m in length and 3.8m in maximum core length was developed in December 2001 for the ice coring at Dome Fuji. In January/February of 2002,we performed experiments on drill performance using artificial ice blocks in Rikubetsu, Hokkaido. In this paper, we outline the experiment and report the results. It was found through the experiment that an ice core of 3.8m length was smoothly obtained by the improved drill with three screws in the chip chamber and cutting pitch of 5mm/cycle. About 45000 small holes 1.2mm in diameter were made on the surface of the chip chamber. These small holes enabled liquid to circulate between cutters and outside of the drill through the chip chamber in the drill. The dry density of the chips was 440 to 500kg/m^3 and the chip recovery rate during ice coring was 65 to 91%. A check valve installed at the bottom of the chip chamber to prevent outflow of chips from the drill was not tested enough, but more durability is needed for the valve. The newly developed motor system and core catchers of the drill worked perfectly. The average coring speed was 24.5cm/min with cutting pitch of 5mm/cycle. The average power consumption during ice coring was 171W.

  9. Effect of a synthetic drilling fluid (IPAR) on antioxidant enzymes and peroxisome proliferation in the American lobster, Homarsus americanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamoutene, D.; Payne, J.F.; Andrews, C.; Wells, J.; Guiney, J.

    2004-07-01

    The acute, sublethal toxicity of a synthetic paraffinic drilling fluid (IPAR) was examined in this study which exposed 2 sets of 14 lobsters to the substance. Synthetic-based muds (SBMs) make up the fluid component of drilling muds along with water-based muds (WBMs) and oil-based muds (OBMs). Although SBMs are proposed to replace OBMs, little is known about their environmental impact. IPAR, an ultra-pure isoalkane with no aromatics or sulphur compounds, is currently used in the Newfoundland offshore. This study examined the effect of IPAR on benthic crustacean because most of the wastes discharged from drilling platforms sediment quickly and the impact is greatest on benthic animals. The lobsters were injected with 1 mL of IPAR every 3 days, to a maximum of 5 mL. They were also exposed to very high levels of the fluid, which would not be expected under field conditions. Different aspects of lipid and protein metabolism were monitored along with the effect of IPAR on peroxisome proliferations and various serum and organ enzymes. The study showed that even at the high dose administered to the lobsters, the isoalkane mixture had no influence on peroxisome proliferation. Increased amounts of protein was found in claw muscles, but no increase was observed in gills, hepatopancreas or heart, suggesting no adverse impact of IPAR. A slight increase was also noted in serum aminotransferases. The study results are in agreement with the hypothesis that IPAR has little or no ecotoxicological potential. 32 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  10. Effect of a synthetic drilling fluid (IPAR) on antioxidant enzymes and peroxisome proliferation in the American lobster, Homarsus americanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamoutene, D.; Payne, J.F.; Andrews, C.; Wells, J.; Guiney, J.

    2004-01-01

    The acute, sublethal toxicity of a synthetic paraffinic drilling fluid (IPAR) was examined in this study which exposed 2 sets of 14 lobsters to the substance. Synthetic-based muds (SBMs) make up the fluid component of drilling muds along with water-based muds (WBMs) and oil-based muds (OBMs). Although SBMs are proposed to replace OBMs, little is known about their environmental impact. IPAR, an ultra-pure isoalkane with no aromatics or sulphur compounds, is currently used in the Newfoundland offshore. This study examined the effect of IPAR on benthic crustacean because most of the wastes discharged from drilling platforms sediment quickly and the impact is greatest on benthic animals. The lobsters were injected with 1 mL of IPAR every 3 days, to a maximum of 5 mL. They were also exposed to very high levels of the fluid, which would not be expected under field conditions. Different aspects of lipid and protein metabolism were monitored along with the effect of IPAR on peroxisome proliferations and various serum and organ enzymes. The study showed that even at the high dose administered to the lobsters, the isoalkane mixture had no influence on peroxisome proliferation. Increased amounts of protein was found in claw muscles, but no increase was observed in gills, hepatopancreas or heart, suggesting no adverse impact of IPAR. A slight increase was also noted in serum aminotransferases. The study results are in agreement with the hypothesis that IPAR has little or no ecotoxicological potential. 32 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  11. High performance nature of biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites for oil-well drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Madkour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT and graphene nanoplatelet reinforced thermoplastic poly(lactic acid (PLA biodegradable nanocomposites were designed and prepared using solution casting techniques. The prepared biodegradable polymers are expected to provide an environmentally friendly alternative to petroleum-based polymers. Both nanocomposite systems exhibited better thermal stability and improved mechanical performance over the unreinforced polymer exhibiting excellent strength and degradability. The addition of graphene nanofiller in varied amounts was aimed to enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites even further and incorporate the outstanding characteristics of graphene nanoplatelets into the nanocomposites. The polymeric nanocomposites showed also superior advantages for oil drilling relevances, automotive lubricating purposes, membrane technology and food packaging. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated a homogeneous dispersion of the nanofiller within the polymeric matrix at low filler loadings and a cluster formation at higher loadings that could be responsible for the polymeric matrix movement restrictions. The enthalpy of mixing (the polymer and the nanofiller measured could explain the cause of the repulsive interactions between the nanoparticles and the polymeric chains, which created an additional excluded volume that the polymeric segments were restricted to occupy, thus forcing the conformational characteristics of the polymeric chains to deviate away from those of the bulk chains. The prepared polymeric nano composites (poly lactic acid carbon nano tube and poly lactic acid graphene nanoplatelets were utilized in the formulation of oil-base mud as a viscosifier. The rheological, filtration properties and electrical stability of the oil based mud formulation with the new polymeric nanocomposite were studied and the result compared to the oil-based mud formulation with commercial viscosifier.

  12. Disposal of drilling fluids and solids generated from water-based systems in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parenteau, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    The different disposal options for drilling wastes as outlined in Guide 50 of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) are discussed. Guide 50 provides for the cost effective and environmentally sound disposal of drilling waste generated in Alberta. Each disposal option of the guide is reviewed and common methods of operation are outlined. Relative costs, environmental suitability and liability issues associated with each option are described. Issues regarding overall disposal considerations, on-site and off-site disposal options, hydrocarbon contamination, salt contaminated waste, toxic waste, and documentation of waste disposal outlined. Some recent programs which have been in the trial phase for a few years are also addressed

  13. Influence of non-edible vegetable based oil as cutting fluid on chip, surface roughness and cutting force during drilling operation of Mild Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susmitha, M.; Sharan, P.; Jyothi, P. N.

    2016-09-01

    Friction between work piece-cutting tool-chip generates heat in the machining zone. The heat generated reduces the tool life, increases surface roughness and decreases the dimensional sensitiveness of work material. This can be overcome by using cutting fluids during machining. They are used to provide lubrication and cooling effects between cutting tool and work piece and cutting tool and chip during machining operation. As a result, important benefits would be achieved such longer tool life, easy chip flow and higher machining quality in the machining processes. Non-edible vegetable oils have received considerable research attention in the last decades owing to their remarkable improved tribological characteristics and due to increasing attention to environmental issues, have driven the lubricant industry toward eco friendly products from renewable sources. In the present work, different non-edible vegetable oils are used as cutting fluid during drilling of Mild steel work piece. Non-edible vegetable oils, used are Karanja oil (Honge), Neem oil and blend of these two oils. The effect of these cutting fluids on chip formation, surface roughness and cutting force are investigated and the results obtained are compared with results obtained with petroleum based cutting fluids and dry conditions.

  14. Helium measurements of pore fluids obtained from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD, USA) drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2011-02-01

    4He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk 4He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 ± 1.3 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 at 21°C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 × 10-18 cm2 s-1 (21°C) to 3.0 × 10-15 cm2 s-1 (150°C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of 4Hewater for matrix porosity (˜3%) and tortuosity (˜6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 (21°C) and 1 × 10-7 (120°C), effectively isolating pore fluid 4He from the 4He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 ± 0.4% (SD, n = 4) and mudstones 3.1 ± 0.8% (SD, n = 4).

  15. USE OF DRILLING FLUIDS IN MONITORING WELL NETWORK INSTALLATION: LANL AND OPEN DISCUSSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personnel at the EPA Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) were requested by EPA Region 6 to provide a technical analysis of the impacts of well drilling practices implemented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of the development of their grou...

  16. Effects of vegetable-based cutting fluids on the wear in drilling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... In this study, performances of three VBCFs developed from crude sunflower oil, refined sunflower oil, refined canola oil and commercial semi-synthetic cutting fluid are compared in terms of tool wear, thrust force and surface roughness during drilling of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel with HSSE tool.

  17. Restart of circulation of gelled drilling fluids; Estudo do inicio da recirculacao de fluidos de perfuracao gelificados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Gabriel M. de [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Rocha, Leandro L.V. da; Franco, Admilson T.; Negrao, Cezar O.R. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais; Martins, Andre L. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model that simulates the start-up flow of gelled drilling fluids in annular spaces with the purpose to predict pressure peaks at the beginning of the flow. The model comprises the one-dimensional conservation equations of mass and momentum, which are discretized by Finite Volume Method. Fully implicit and up-wind discretization schemes are used and the resultant algebraic equations are solved iteratively by developing a FORTRAN algorithm. The model has the potentiality to be easily adapted to a flow inside a tube. Cases studies are conducted to evaluate the temporal variation of velocity and pressure fields inside both the annular space and a tube. One observed that increasing fluid compressibility or viscosity leads to a reduction of the pressure peaks. (author)

  18. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

    2004-05-01

    We report on progress in three areas. In part one, the wetting effects of synthetic base oils are reported. Part two reports progress in understanding the effects of surfactants of known chemical structures, and part three integrates the results from surface and core tests that show the wetting effects of commercial surfactant products used in synthetic and traditional oil-based drilling fluids. An important difference between synthetic and traditional oil-based muds (SBM and OBM, respectively) is the elimination of aromatics from the base oil to meet environmental regulations. The base oils used include dearomatized mineral oils, linear alpha-olefins, internal olefins, and esters. We show in part one that all of these materials except the esters can, at sufficiently high concentrations, destabilize asphaltenes. The effects of asphaltenes on wetting are in part related to their stability. Although asphaltenes have some tendency to adsorb on solid surfaces from a good solvent, that tendency can be much increased near the onset of asphaltene instability. Tests in Berea sandstone cores demonstrate wetting alteration toward less water-wet conditions that occurs when a crude oil is displaced by paraffinic and olefinic SBM base oils, whereas exposure to the ester products has little effect on wetting properties of the cores. Microscopic observations with atomic forces microscopy (AFM) and macroscopic contact angle measurements have been used in part 2 to explore the effects on wetting of mica surfaces using oil-soluble polyethoxylated amine surfactants with varying hydrocarbon chain lengths and extent of ethoxylation. In the absence of water, only weak adsorption occurs. Much stronger, pH-dependent adsorption was observed when water was present. Varying hydrocarbon chain length had little or no effect on adsorption, whereas varying extent of ethoxylation had a much more significant impact, reducing contact angles at nearly all conditions tested. Preequilibration of

  19. Drilling fluids formulation with cationic hydro-soluble polymers as inhibitors reactive shales; Formulacao de fluidos de perfuracao contendo polimeros cationicos hidrossoluveis como inibidores de formacoes reativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Carlos Eduardo C. de; Nascimento, Regina Sandra V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Sa, Carlos Henrique [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), having different molecular weight, and a copolymer with acrylamide were evaluated as shale inhibitor additive for water based drilling fluid, as well as the compatibility of these polycations with others additives present in the drilling fluid and the testing results for these fluids were compared with those for formulations with commercial cationic polymers from drilling fluids additives suppliers. The ability of the polymers and KCl systems in inhibiting the clay's dispersion were evaluated with hot rolling tests. The others additives, like viscosifier and fluid loss control agent, had their added amount systematically optimized by rheological and filtration tests. All cationic polymers and the electrolyte were able to inhibit the swelling and dispersion of clay and the results showed a synergistic increase in clay inhibition for the combination of polymer and KCl over either additive alone. The results suggested that greater polymer adsorption, implies in lower content of water in clays and better inhibition of swelling and dispersion of the clay. The polycations were compatible with the other additives in drilling fluids and the fluids formulated with these polymers were able to inhibit efficiently the dispersion and disintegration of clay and to keep the cuttings and barite in suspension. (author)

  20. The Preparation and Performances of Self-Dispersed Nanomicron Emulsified Wax Solid Lubricant Ewax for Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-shan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An oil-in-water nanomicron wax emulsion with oil phase content 45 wt% was prepared by using the emulsifying method of surfactant-in-oil. The optimum prepared condition is 85°C, 20 min, and 5 wt% complex emulsifiers. Then the abovementioned nanomicron emulsifying wax was immersed into a special water-soluble polymer in a certain percentage by the semidry technology. At last, a solidified self-dispersed nanomicron emulsified wax named as Ewax, a kind of solid lubricant for water based drilling fluid, was obtained after dried in the special soluble polymer containing emulsifying wax in low temperature. It is shown that the adhesion coefficient reduced rate (ΔKf is 73.5% and the extreme pressure (E-P friction coefficient reduced rate (Δf is 77.6% when the produced Ewax sample was added to fresh water based drilling fluid at dosage 1.0 wt%. In comparison with other normal similar liquid products, Ewax not only has better performances of lubrication, filtration loss control property, heat resistance, and tolerance to salt and is environmentally friendly, but also can solve the problems of freezing in the winter and poor storage stability of liquid wax emulsion in oilfield applications.

  1. ORAL DRILLS AND WRITING IMPROVEMENT IN THE FOURTH GRADE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILLER, BARBARA D.; NEY, JAMES W.

    BELIEVING FORMAL WRITTEN ENGLISH TO BE A "FOREIGN LANGUAGE" TO MOST AMERICAN PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS, RESEARCHERS USED THE AUDIO-LINGUAL METHOD OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION TO PROMOTE WRITING IMPROVEMENT IN FOURTH-GRADERS. TWO RANDOMLY-SELECTED CLASSES OF STUDENTS OF AVERAGE ABILITY COMPOSED THE STUDY POPULATION--ONE CLASS FOR THE EXPERIMENT,…

  2. Fifth DOE symposium on enhanced oil and gas recovery and improved drilling technology. Volume 3. Gas and drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linville, B. [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Volume 3 contains papers from the sessions on natural gas supporting research, western gas sands project, drilling technology, and environmental effects. Individuals were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  3. Water and clay based drilling fluids: rheologic, filtration and lubricity behavior; Fluidos hidroargilosos: comportamento reologico, de filtracao e lubricidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Luciana V.; Pereira, Melquesedek S.; Ferreira, Heber C. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work is to provide continuity for UFCG studies presenting results of rheological, filtration and the lubricity behaviors obtained with fluids prepared with bentonite clays from Paraiba, in binary compositions, after treatment with lubricants agents. It was selected two samples of bentonite clays and four lubricants (Lub 1, Lub 2, Lub 3 and Lub 4). The results showed that: depending on the composition, the drilling fluids presented bingham and pseudo plastic rheological behaviors, and with the additives bingham behavior; among the rheological and filtration properties evaluated, the apparent viscosity, yield limiting and the water loss are the have changes with the addition of lubricants; the values of the lubricity coefficient (LC) of fluids without additives were next of 0.50, independent of the composition of the bentonite clay mixture; after addition of the lubricants, the LC of fluids reduced for values next to 0,11, independent of its concentration and lubricants the best-performing are the Lub 2 and Lub 4. (author)

  4. Implementation of improved underbalanced drilling in AbuDhabi onshore field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhammadi, Adel Mohammed

    Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operations (ADCO) is considering Underbalanced Drilling (UBD) as a means to develop lower permeability units in its fields. In addition to productivity and recovery gains, ADCO also expects reservoir characterization benefits from UBD. Reservoir screening studies were carried out on all of ADCO's reservoirs to determine their applicability for UBD. The primary business benefits of UBD were determined to be reservoir characterization, damage Mitigation, and rate of Penetration "ROP" Improvement. Apart from the primary benefits, some of the secondary benefits of UBD that were identified beforehand included rig performance. Since it's a trial wells, the challenge was to drill these wells safely, efficiently and of course meeting well objectives. Many operators worldwide drill these well in underbalanced mode but complete it overbalanced. In our case the plan was to drill and complete these wells in underbalanced condition. But we had to challenge most operators and come up with special and unique casing hanger design to ensure well control barriers exists while fishing the control line of the Downhole Deployment Valve "DDV". After intensive studies and planning, the hanger was designed as per our recommendations and found to be effective equipment that optimized the operational time and the cost as well. This report will provide better understanding of UBD technique in general and shade on the special designed casing hanger compared to conventional or what's most used worldwide. Even thought there were some issues while running the casing hanger prior drilling but managed to capture the learning's from each well and re-modified the hanger and come up with better deign for the future wells. Finally, the new design perform a good performance of saving the operation time and assisting the project to be done in a safe and an easy way without a major impact on the well cost. This design helped to drill and complete these wells safely with

  5. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF STATE DATA RELATED TO ABANDONED CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Seay Nance

    2003-03-01

    This 2003 Spring Semi-Annual Report contains a summary of the Final Technical Report being prepared for the Soil Remediation Requirements at Commercial and Centralized Drilling-Fluid Disposal (CCDD) Sites project funded by the United States Department of Energy under DOE Award No. DE-AC26-99BC15225. The summary describes (1) the objectives of the investigation, (2) a rationale and methodology of the investigation, (3) sources of data, assessment of data quality, and data availability, (4) examples of well documented centralized and commercial drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites and other sites where drilling fluid was disposed of, and (5) examples of abandoned sites and measures undertaken for their assessment and remediation. The report also includes most of the figures, tables, and appendices that will be included in the final report.

  6. Development of the Breitbrunn/Eggstaett natural gas deposit: Drilling of the 8 1/2 inch horizontal boreholes with drill-in fluid; Ausbau des Erdgasspeichers Breitbrunn/Eggstaett, hier: Bohren der 8 1/2{sup ''}-Horizontalstrecken mit Drill-in-Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, A.; Jakschies, R. [RWE-DEA Aktiengesellschaft fuer Mineraloel und Chemie, Hamburg (Germany); Gankin, V. [Baroid Drilling Fluids GmbH, Celle (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    During the second stage of development of the project, six horizontal boreholes of 584-960 m were drilled at a depth of about 2000 m using the drill-in fluid technique. Details are presented. It was found that extremely high differential pressures will pose no problem provided that the drilling technology and flushing system are well matched. [German] Waehrend der 2. Baustufe des Projektes Erdgasspeicher Breitbrunn/Eggstaett sind in Teufe von ca. 2000 m sechs Bohrungen mit Horizontalstrecken von 584-960 m in den bis ca. 3 MPa (30 bar) druckabgesenkten Speichergesteinen C und D abgeteuft worden. Die Gesamtabweichung vom Ansatzpunkt auf der Sammellokation betraegt bis zu 2 518 m. Die Horizontalstrecken sind mit Hilfe eines auf die Formation abgestimmten fluessigen Spuelungssystems, dem sogenannten Drill-in-Fluid, gebohrt. Hauptaugenmerk galt bei dieser Spuelung dem Aufbau eines extrem duennen, impermeablem Filterkuchens mit niedrigem Reibungsfaktor. Die im Bereich der 9 5/8{sup ''}-Rohrtour in den Bohrstrang integrierten Torque-Reducer und dem Spuelungssystem zugefuehrtes Schmlermittel trugen zu einer erheblichen Reduzierung der Reibkraefte bei. Durch Einbau von Non-Hanging Anti-Sticking-Stabilisatoren in den Bohrstrang ist die Gefahr des Festwerdens zusaetzlich minimiert. Der Einsatz von LWD Geosteering Equipment und begleitende mikropalaeontologische Untersuchungen ermoeglichten eine optimale Orientierung der abzuteufenden Strecken. Die Erfahrungen von insgesamt 6 Breitbrunn-Bohrungen belegen, dass extrem hohe Differenzdruecke kein Problem fuer das erfolgreiche Abteufen einer Bohrung sein muessen, wenn Bohrtechnik und Spuelungssystem sorgfaeltig aufeinander abgestimmt werden. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of drilling fluids flow regime in annular sections; Avaliacao do regime de escoamento de fluidos de perfuracao em secoes anulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Maria das Gracas Pena [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Setor de Tecnologia de Perfuracao

    1990-12-31

    The determination of the transition zone between the laminar and turbulent flow regimes of particular importance in optimizing the hydraulics of drilling operations. The principal advantage which laminar flow in the annular space has in drilling operations in the avoidance of wall enlargement (wash-outs), maintaining formation integrity as much as possible. On the other hand, a lower-energy regime such as laminar flow does not provide the same cuttings-carrying capacity as that obtained when the drilling fluid is in turbulent flow. However, to be able to optimize the hydraulics it is necessary to have determined, among other parameters, the transition zone, in order to maximize the drilling rate while obtaining the hole clear of cuttings and maintaining the hole diameter constant over the whole of the section drilled. This paper presents, based on experimental results obtained on the SHS physical simulator, the transition zone expressed through the critical Reynolds numbers and those for low stable turbulence of various drilling fluids tested over the temperature range of 25-80 deg C. (author) 20 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Improvement of Drill Performance in Metal Cutting Using MoST Solid Lubricant Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.R. Thomas; D.G. Teer; S. Yang; S. Hickman

    2004-01-01

    Coated tools are widely used in today's metal cutting industries and have significantly improved machining productivity through reducing operation costs and time. This paper presents the results of a systematic study of the performance of HSS drills coated with CrTiAlN and drills with a top solid lubricant coating of MoSTTM. The tests were performed on a Haas vertical machining centre under wet and dry cutting conditions to machine through holes in medium carbon steel workpieces. The feed force and torque were recorded throughout some of the tests using a force dynamometer,while the tool wear was monitored and measured. It was found that MoSTTM coatings even under accelerated conditions improve the tool life significantly based on their unique properties and very low friction.

  9. Evaluation of the aging of polymeric drilling fluids to oil wells; Avaliacao do envelhecimento de fluidos de perfuracao polimericos para pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, K.V.; Amorim, L.V. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Mecanica, UAEM/CCT - UFCG], e-mail: kassie@dem.ufcg.edu.br; Leite, R.S. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Graduacao Engenharia de Materiais; Lira, H.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais, UAEMa/ CCT - UFCG

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the aging of polymeric drilling fluids to oil wells, from the rheological, filtration and lubricity properties in the temperatures 100 degree F ({approx} 38 degree C) and 150 degree F ({approx} 66 degree C). The results had been compared with a standard fluid used for the oil industry and had evidenced that the polymeric fluids had presented good thermal stability, presenting a small reduction in the rheological properties and better values of lubricity coefficient that a reference fluid. (author)

  10. Improvement of aluminum drilling efficiency and precision by shaped femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Ying; Qi, Hongxia; Chen, Anmin; Hu, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The ablation accuracy can be improved by the shaped femtosecond laser pulse. • The ablation rate can be improved by the shaped femtosecond laser pulse with higher laser fluence. • The results can be used to optimize femtosecond micromachining metal. - Abstract: Shaped femtosecond laser pulses with the plain phase (transform-limited pulse) and sine phase (A = 1.2566, T = 30, T = 10, and T = 5) were used to drill Al sheet in vacuum. Using different phase, the number of pulses required to drill through the sheet was different. With lower laser pulse energy, the ablation rate was the highest when plain phase (corresponding to transform limited pulse) was used. With higher laser energy, the optimized ablation rate can be achieved by increasing the time separation between the subpulses of pulse train produced from the sine phase function. And, with the shaped femtosecond laser, the diameter of ablation holes produced was smaller, the ablation precision was also improved. The results showed that shaped femtosecond laser pulse has great advantages in the context of femtosecond laser drilling

  11. Effects of non-aqueous fluids-associated drill cuttings discharge on shelf break macrobenthic communities in the Campos Basin, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Fernanda L; Silva, Janete; Fachel, Jandyra M G; Pulgati, Fernando H

    2010-08-01

    This paper assesses the effects of non-aqueous fluids (NAF)-associated drill cuttings discharge on shelf break macrobenthic communities in the Campos Basin, off the southeast Brazilian coast, Rio de Janeiro State. Samples were taken with a 0.25-m2 box corer from surrounding two oil and gas wells on three monitoring cruises: before drilling, three months after drilling, and 22 months after drilling. Statistical methodologies used Bayesian geostatistical and analysis of variance models to evaluate the effects of the NAF-associated drill cuttings discharge and to define the impact area. The results indicated that marked variations were not observed in the number of families between cruises, though there were changes in the fauna composition. The changes seen in biological descriptors in both control and background situation areas were not considered significant, showing a temporal homogeneity in means. The impact area presented changes in biological descriptors of communities and trophic structure during the three cruises and such changes were correlated to chemical and physical variables related to the drilling activities, as a result of the mix of drill cuttings and sediment and the anoxic conditions established in the substrate. In that area, three months after drilling, a decrease in diversity and an increase in density, motile deposit-feeders and Pol/Crp ratio, and dominance of opportunistic organisms, such as the capitellid Capitella sp., were observed and, 22 months after drilling, an increase of diversity, reduction of dominance of capitellid polychaete, changes in the fauna composition, and a dominance of opportunistic burrowing and tube-building organisms were observed, indicating an ecological succession process.

  12. Drilling technologies in hydrogeological survey

    OpenAIRE

    Vorlíček, Petr

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the drilling technologies used in hydrogeology. The main aim of the work is to explore types of drilling technologies used at hydrogeological drilling wells and modern technologies that could potentially be used in the future. The work also summarizes a historical development of drilling techniques, a drilling process procedure, information obtained from boreholes and the most common types of drilling fluids.

  13. Study of methane solubility in oil base used in oil base drilling fluid; Estudo da solubilidade de metano em base oleo utilizada em fluido de perfuracao base oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carolina Teixeira da; Mariolani, Jose Ricardo Lenzi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ribeiro, Paulo Roberto; Lomba, Rosana Fatima Teixeira; Bonet, Euclides Jose

    2004-07-01

    During drilling a well, it is necessary to prevent and control high pressurized zones because while drilling on those zones, could occur a kick if the formation pressure were higher then downhole pressure, allowing the entering of undesirables fluids from the formation to the wellbore. If the well is not controlled this kick could became a blowout, generating damages to the environment, to the equipment and the human life. When drilling using oil-based mud, the concern related to the well control would be higher due the gas solubility in the mud, which could make it hard to detect the kick, especially in deep and ultra deep waters. In this work we have studied the interaction between methane and organic liquids used in drilling fluids, and the measurement and analysis of the thermodynamic properties of those gas liquid mixtures. There have been measured parameters like the oil formation volume factor (FVF{sub o}), bubble pressure, solubility (Rs) and the density of the saturated liquid in function of methane mole fraction and temperature. The results have shown that the gas solubility, at downhole conditions and during kick circulation, is a factor very important to the safety during well drilling in deep and ultra deep waters. (author)

  14. Optimization of organo clay production for applications in based oil drilling fluid; Otimizacao do processo de organofilizacao para aplicacoes em fluidos de perfuracao base oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Heber S; Martins, Alice B; Costa, Danubia L. da; Ferreira, Heber C; Neves, Gelmires de A; Melo, Tomas J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Teixeira Neto, Erico [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The organophilic clays are widely used as an agent dispersed in the composition of oil based drilling fluids. The organophilic clays are gotten from bentonite clays treated, in watery way, with ionic surfactants, that are adsorbed in the surface of interlayer of the clays, re-covered them with a organic layer. A fundamental stage of production of the organophilic clays is the dispersion of bentonite clays, in way that variables like: speed of agitation, temperature and time of cure, influences directly in plastic and apparent viscosities of these dispersions, together with other variables of organophilization process, like, temperature and time of cure of organophilization, has direct influence in efficiency of the organophilization process. This work considers a study of these variable, using bentonite clays: Brasgel PA{sup R} and Cloisite Na{sup +R}, treated with the ionic surfactant Praepagem WB{sup R}. The organophilic clays gotten had been characterized by rays X diffraction, Foster's swelling, and the results were compared with the commercial organophilic clay VG-69{sup R}, industrially treated with ionic surfactant. Viscosities plastic and apparent of the dispersions had been measured in the midst of organic dispersant diesel oil used to obtain the oil based drilling fluids. Preliminary results of Foster's swelling and preparation of fluids show that the clays have affinity with the means liquid organic dispersants, and the fluids meet specifications of PETROBRAS (N-22581-1997 and N-2259 to 1997) for use in the of diesel oil based drilling fluids. (author)

  15. Multilateral wells drilling technology implementation in the Castilla Field - Colombia, to improve Guadalupe reservoirs drainage: Castilla 32, 33, and 34 ML wells cases study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florez, Alberto; Mercado, Orlando; Rodriguez, Sandra; Rojas, Ricardo; Naranjo, Carlos A. [ECOPETROL, Bogota (Colombia); Velez, Jorge [Halliburton Latin-America, Santa Fe de Bogota (Colombia)

    2008-07-01

    National Colombian Petroleum Company - ECOPETROL, is in the process of evaluating different technologies to increase production and improve recovery factors in their mature oil and gas fields. As part of that process, a multidisciplinary team evaluated the feasibility of multilateral well technology implementation in some of their mature fields that are currently in the late-development phase. Castilla field, located in the eastern planes of Colombia, was selected as the first option for multilateral technology implementation based in reservoir features, type of oil, and field antecedents. This paper presents the process used to conceptualize the optimum multilateral well design for Castilla field, integrating all of the geological and engineering disciplines. Geology: geological model visualization, target zones definition, pay zones lateral continuity, petrophysical properties, and fluids distribution were evaluated to select the areas to drill with advanced architecture well design. Reservoir: basic reservoir performance simulation was performed to evaluate productivity with horizontal and multilateral wells, and the difference in final reserves recovery compared with current conventional directional wells. Water production and coning problems were identified as key factors to define the multilateral well implementation in this field. Drilling: trajectory design, multilateral junction depth definition and TAML level selection, casing point's definition, drilling time and AFE estimation were the technical aspects evaluated during the planning phase to determine if the technology would be feasible. A comparison with conventional pad design was conducted to validate economic value. Multilateral TAML level 4 system selection flow process is presented applying oil industry best practices. Completion: The optimum lateral completion and production assembly design were main concerns during the planning process. Slotted liners, screens, and open-hole completion

  16. Emulsifiers performance on the stability of the drilling fluid base biodiesel; Desempenho de emulsificantes sobre a estabilidade de fluido de perfuracao a base de biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Giselle P.; Costa, Marta [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work was prepared six (6) formulations of biodiesel based drilling fluids. Three formulations in the proportion oil-water 70/30 and other three in 60/40, just varying the employed surfactants: new product derived the citric acid (developed at our laboratory) and two other commercial surfactants. After production the fluids, It was analyzed them performance of the products through rheological properties to 135 deg F , filtrate volume in HPHT to 500 psi and to 200 deg F, electric stability to 135 deg F and phase separation during seven days of rest. The rheological analyses allowed to determine the behavior every fluids, though flow curves. Those fluids presented same behavior of the fluids used in oil field (Binghamianos). The laboratory tests demonstrated that new surfactant reduced the filtrated volume and provided mechanics and thermic stability. (author)

  17. Comparison of the effects of drilling fluid on macrobenthic invertebrates associated with the seagrass, Thalassia testudinum, in the laboratory and field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, D.E.; Flemer, D.A.; Bundick, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of a macrobenthic invertebrate community associated with the seagrass, Thalassia testudinum, was evaluated under laboratory and field conditions. The research focused on: (1) the effects of pollution stress from a representative drilling fluid used in offshore oil and gas operations, and (2) a comparison of responses of the seagrass-invertebrate community in the laboratory and field. The numbers of macrobenthic invertebrates were suppressed by drilling fluid at both exposure periods in the laboratory, but inhibitory effects were absent in the field. Invertebrate densities in the field were similar among control and treated plots, and were much lower than densities occurring in the laboratory control. In most instances, species richness values were similar in the field and laboratory at the end of each 6 and 12 week period

  18. Recovery Act. Sub-Soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling, Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank, Brian D. [Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-27

    Nevada Geothermal Power Company (NGP) was awarded DOE Award DE-EE0002834 in January 2010 to conduct sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion studies and slim well drilling at its Black Warrior Project (now known as North Valley) in Washoe and Churchill Counties, Nevada. The project was designed to apply highly detailed, precise, low-cost subsoil and down-hole gas geochemistry methods from the oil and gas industry to identify upflow zone drilling targets in an undeveloped geothermal prospect. NGP ran into multiple institutional barriers with the Black Warrior project relating to property access and extensive cultural survey requirement. NGP requested that the award be transferred to NGP’s Pumpernickel Valley project, due to the timing delay in obtaining permits, along with additional over-budget costs required. Project planning and permit applications were developed for both the original Black Warrior location and at Pumpernickel. This included obtaining proposals from contractors able to conduct required environmental and cultural surveying, designing the two-meter probe survey methodology and locations, and submitting Notices of Intent and liaising with the Bureau of Land Management to have the two-meter probe work approved. The award had an expiry date of April 30, 2013; however, due to the initial project delays at Black Warrior, and the move of the project from Black Warrior to Pumpernickel, NGP requested that the award deadline be extended. DOE was amenable to this, and worked with NGP to extend the deadline. However, following the loss of the Blue Mountain geothermal power plant in Nevada, NGP’s board of directors changed the company’s mandate to one of cash preservation. NGP was unable to move forward with field work on the Pumpernickel property, or any of its other properties, until additional funding was secured. NGP worked to bring in a project partner to form a joint venture on the property, or to buy the property. This was unsuccessful, and NGP notified

  19. Methodology to predict friction pressure drop in drilling fluid flows; Metodologia para previsao de perdas de carga em escoamentos de fluidos de perfuracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheid, Claudia Miriam; Calcada, Luis Americo [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica (Brazil)], e-mails: scheid@ufrrj.br, calcada@ufrrj.br; Rocha, Daniele Cristine [Centro de Pesquisas da Petrobras (CENPES). Engenharia Basica de Abastecimento - Gas e Energia (Brazil)], e-mail: drocha@petrobras.com.br; Aranha, Pedro Esteves [Centro de Pesquisas da Petrobras (CENPES). Gerencia de Perfuracao e Completacao de Pocos (Brazil)], e-mail: pearanha@petrobras.com.br; Aragao, Atila Fernando Lima [E and P Construcao de Pocos Maritimos. Gerencia de Tecnologia de Fluidos (Brazil)], e-mail: atila_aragao@petrobras.com.br

    2009-12-15

    An extensive experimental study is detailed to evaluate the friction pressure drop resulting from the flow through pipe and annular sections, accessories such as tool joints, bit jets and stabilizers of four different drilling fluids used in deep water operations. After a data analysis process, it was possible to compile a set of equations to predict relevant hydraulic friction pressure loss calculations, such as: hydraulic diameter for annular flows, friction factors for pipe and annular turbulent flows and discharge coefficients for accessories. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the rheological behavior of drilling fluids in annular flow conditions; Avaliacao do comportamento reologico de fluidos de perfuracao no escoamento anular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Maria das Gracas Pena; Martins, Andre Leibsohn; Oliveira, Antonio Augusto Junqueira de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Div. de Explotacao

    1988-12-31

    The rheological behavior of drilling fluids during annular flow in a physical simulator well (Surface Hydraulic System - SHS)was investigated. Measurement of volumetric flow and pressure drop the 10-meter simulator well was used to assess applicability of the Bingham, power Law, Casson, and Herschell-Bulkley models to the annular flow of water and oil-based fluids under different temperatures. Additionally, under different pre-set deformation ranges, SHS-observed behavior was compared with behavior observed using the traditional Fann VG 35 A viscometer. (author) 8 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Geometric improvement of electrochemical discharge micro-drilling using an ultrasonic-vibrated electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Min-Seop; Min, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Sang Jo

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemical discharge machining (ECDM) is a spark-based micromachining method especially suitable for the fabrication of various microstructures on nonconductive materials, such as glass and some engineering ceramics. However, since the spark discharge frequency is drastically reduced as the machining depth increases ECDM microhole drilling has confronted difficulty in achieving uniform geometry for machined holes. One of the primary reasons for this is the difficulty of sustaining an adequate electrolyte flow in the narrow gap between the tool and the workpiece, which results in a widened taper at the hole entrance, as well as a significant reduction of the machining depth. In this paper, ultrasonic electrolyte vibration was used to enhance the machining depth of the ECDM drilling process by assuring an adequate electrolyte flow, thus helping to maintain consistent spark generation. Moreover, the stability of the gas film formation, as well as the surface quality of the hole entrance, was improved with the aid of a side-insulated electrode and a pulse-power generator. The side-insulated electrode prevented stray electrolysis and concentrated the spark discharge at the tool tip, while the pulse voltage reduced thermal damage to the workpiece surface by introducing a periodic pulse-off time. Microholes were fabricated in order to investigate the effects of ultrasonic assistance on the overcut and machining depth of the holes. The experimental results demonstrated that the possibility of consistent spark generation and the machinability of microholes were simultaneously enhanced

  2. Economic effectiveness of using a dispersing agent in preparing drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubaydullayev, S R

    1978-01-01

    A technique is suggested for preparing argillaceous solutions with the help of a dispersing agent for laboratory studies and a set of formulas for evaluating the economic effectiveness of the obtained solution. Initially an original argillaceous solution from clay powder with viscosity of 25 s is prepared. Then the solution is treated in a laboratory ultrasonic dispersing device until the condition ''does not flow.'' After this, by adding water, viscosity of the solution is brought to 25 s, and density to 1.2 g/cm/sup 3/. In this case the output of solution after treatment by the dispersing agent is improved by 35.2%. As a result annual saving of clay of about 365 T for the Pamukskiy clay plant or R 4745 in a monetary expression is reached.

  3. A Universal Rig for Supporting Large Hammer Drills: Reduced Injury Risk and Improved Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, David; Barr, Alan

    2015-10-01

    Drilling holes into concrete with heavy hammer and rock drills is one of the most physically demanding tasks performed in commercial construction and poses risks for musculoskeletal disorders, noise induced hearing loss, hand arm vibration syndrome and silicosis. The aim of this study was to (1) use a participatory process to develop a rig to support pneumatic rock drills or large electric hammer drills in order to reduce the health risks and (2) evaluate the usability of the rig. Seven prototype rigs for supporting large hammer drills were developed and modified with feedback from commercial contractors and construction workers. The final design was evaluated by laborers and electricians (N=29) who performed their usual concrete drilling with the usual method and the new rig. Subjective regional fatigue was significantly less in the neck, shoulders, hands and arms, and lower back) when using the universal rig compared to the usual manual method. Usability ratings for the rig were significantly better than the usual method on stability, control, drilling, accuracy, and vibration. Drilling time was reduced by approximately 50% with the rig. Commercial construction contractors, laborers and electricians who use large hammer drills for drilling many holes should consider using such a rig to prevent musculoskeletal disorders, fatigue, and silicosis.

  4. Study of formation and stability conditions of gas hydrates in drilling fluids; Etude des conditions de formation et de stabilite des hydrates de gaz dans les fluides de forage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharrat, M.

    2004-10-15

    Drilling fluids are complex media, in which solid particles are in suspension in a water-in-oil emulsion. The formation of gas hydrates in these fluids during off shore drilling operations has been suspected to be the cause of serious accidents. The purpose of this thesis is the study of the formation conditions as well as the stability of gas hydrates in complex fluids containing water-in-oil emulsions. The technique of high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry was used to characterise the conditions of hydrates formation and dissociation. Special attention has first been given to the validation of thermodynamic measurements in homogeneous solutions, in the pressure range 4 to 12 Mpa; the results were found to be in good agreement with literature data, as well as with modelling results. The method was then applied to water-in-oil emulsion, used as a model for real drilling fluids. It was proven that thermodynamics of hydrate stability are not significantly influenced by the state of dispersion of the water phase. On the other hand, the kinetics of formation and the amount of hydrates formed are highly increased by the dispersion. Applying the technique to real drilling fluids confirmed the results obtained in emulsions. Results interpretation allowed giving a representation of the process of hydrate formation in emulsion. Empirical modelling was developed to compute the stability limits of methane hydrate in the presence of various inhibitors, at pressures ranging from ambient to 70 MPa. Isobaric phase diagrams were constructed, that allow predicting the inhibiting efficiency of sodium chloride and calcium chloride at constant pressure, from 0,25 to 70 MPa. (author)

  5. Optimization of organo clay production for applications in based oil drilling fluid; Otimizacao do processo de organofilizacao para aplicacoes em fluidos de perfuracao base oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Heber S.; Martins, Alice B.; Costa, Danubia L. da; Ferreira, Heber C.; Neves, Gelmires de A.; Melo, Tomas J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Teixeira Neto, Erico [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The organophilic clays are widely used as an agent dispersed in the composition of oil based drilling fluids. The organophilic clays are gotten from bentonite clays treated, in watery way, with ionic surfactants, that are adsorbed in the surface of interlayer of the clays, re-covered them with a organic layer. A fundamental stage of production of the organophilic clays is the dispersion of bentonite clays, in way that variables like: speed of agitation, temperature and time of cure, influences directly in plastic and apparent viscosities of these dispersions, together with other variables of organophilization process, like, temperature and time of cure of organophilization, has direct influence in efficiency of the organophilization process. This work considers a study of these variable, using bentonite clays: Brasgel PA{sup R} and Cloisite Na{sup +R}, treated with the ionic surfactant Praepagem WB{sup R}. The organophilic clays gotten had been characterized by rays X diffraction, Foster's swelling, and the results were compared with the commercial organophilic clay VG-69{sup R}, industrially treated with ionic surfactant. Viscosities plastic and apparent of the dispersions had been measured in the midst of organic dispersant diesel oil used to obtain the oil based drilling fluids. Preliminary results of Foster's swelling and preparation of fluids show that the clays have affinity with the means liquid organic dispersants, and the fluids meet specifications of PETROBRAS (N-22581-1997 and N-2259 to 1997) for use in the of diesel oil based drilling fluids. (author)

  6. Horizontal drilling under Lake Erie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, R.

    2001-07-01

    Drilling oil wells under Lake Erie calls for horizontal drilling wells to be drilled from shore out into the pay-zone under the lake. The nature and characteristics of horizontal wells as compared to vertical wells are explored. Considerations that have to be taken into account in drilling horizontal wells are explained (the degree of curvature, drilling fluid quality, geosteering in the pay-zone, steering instrumentation, measurements while drilling (MWD), logging while drilling (LWD)). The concept and reasons for extended reach wells are outlined, along with characteristic features of multilateral wells.

  7. Modeling pellet impact drilling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, S. Ya; Isaev, Ye D.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rocks. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The experiments conducted has allowed modeling the process of pellet impact drilling, which creates the scientific and methodological basis for engineering design of drilling operations under different geo-technical conditions.

  8. Water-based inhibitive drilling fluids for oil wells: preliminary study; Fluidos aquosos inibidos para perfuracao de pocos de petroleo: estudo preliminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Kassie V.; Amorim, Luciana V.; Silva, Aline R.V.; Ferreira, Heber C. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work is to do formulations of water-based inhibitive drilling fluids and to evaluate their rheologic, filtration and lubrication properties and the degree of swell of clays. It was studied eight formulations containing the following additives: viscosity, filtered reducer, controlling of pH, hydratable clays inhibitors, anti-foamy, bactericide, lubricant and sealant. The fluids were prepared according to the field practice that consists of adding to water the additives under constant agitation. After 24 h resting, it was carried out a study of the rheologic behavior, in a Fann 35 A viscosimeter, and of the filtration properties in a Fann press-filter and of lubricity in a Ofite Lubricity tester through the determination of the flow curves, apparent and plastic viscosities, yield limit, gel force, filtered volume, filter-cake thickness and lubricity coefficient. It was also been essays to evaluate the capacity of inhibition of clay with the chemical inhibitors isolated and in set. The results had proven that the presence of inhibitor of clay in drilling fluids has great importance and promotes the inhibition of the swell of clay in all concentrations studied and amongst the formulations developed, six had presented performance next to the fluid Standard. (author)

  9. Drilling mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusayev, A A; Bibikov, K V; Simonenkov, I D; Surkova, K I

    1982-01-01

    Drilling mud is proposed which contains clay, water, water output reducer, pH regulator, viscosity reducer and hydrogen sulfide absorber. In order to improve the absorbing capacity of the drilling mud with pH 8-11 and simultaneously preservation of the technological properties of the mud, it contains as the absorber of hydrogen sulfide pyrite cinders with the following ratio of components, % by mass: clay 5.0-35.0; water output reducer 0.2-2.0; pH regulator 0.05-0.25; viscosity reducer 0.1-1.0; pyrite cinders 0.5-4.0; water--the rest.

  10. Accuracy improvements of gyro-based measurement-while-drilling surveying instruments by a laser testing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Zhao, Jianhui; Li, Fan

    2009-07-01

    Gyroscope used as surveying sensor in the oil industry has been proposed as a good technique for measurement-whiledrilling (MWD) to provide real-time monitoring of the position and the orientation of the bottom hole assembly (BHA).However, drifts in the measurements provided by gyroscope might be prohibitive for the long-term utilization of the sensor. Some usual methods such as zero velocity update procedure (ZUPT) introduced to limit these drifts seem to be time-consuming and with limited effect. This study explored an in-drilling dynamic -alignment (IDA) method for MWD which utilizes gyroscope. During a directional drilling process, there are some minutes in the rotary drilling mode when the drill bit combined with drill pipe are rotated about the spin axis in a certain speed. This speed can be measured and used to determine and limit some drifts of the gyroscope which pay great effort to the deterioration in the long-term performance. A novel laser assembly is designed on the wellhead to count the rotating cycles of the drill pipe. With this provided angular velocity of the drill pipe, drifts of gyroscope measurements are translated into another form that can be easy tested and compensated. That allows better and faster alignment and limited drifts during the navigation process both of which can reduce long-term navigation errors, thus improving the overall accuracy in INS-based MWD system. This article concretely explores the novel device on the wellhead designed to test the rotation of the drill pipe. It is based on laser testing which is simple and not expensive by adding a laser emitter to the existing drilling equipment. Theoretical simulations and analytical approximations exploring the IDA idea have shown improvement in the accuracy of overall navigation and reduction in the time required to achieve convergence. Gyroscope accuracy along the axis is mainly improved. It is suggested to use the IDA idea in the rotary mode for alignment. Several other

  11. Hydrate formation in drilling fluids: prevention and countering; Formacao de hidratos em fluidos de perfuracao: prevencao e controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villas Boas, Mario Barbosa [PETROBRAS, Macae, RJ (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao do Sudeste. Setor de Fluidos de Perfuracao

    1988-12-31

    The possibility of hydrates forming during deep water well drilling is analyzed under conditions typical of the state of Rio de Janeiro`s coastal ocean bed. Relying on an extensive review of technical literature, an effort has been made to ascertain the conditions which favor the occurrence of such hydrates in gas-contaminated water-based drilling muds. Based on this study, methods are proposed for preventing and countering this problem. (author) 58 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Evaluation of glycerol derivative as emulsifier for oil based drilling fluids; Avaliacao de derivados de glicerina como emulsificante para fluidos de perfuracao de base oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Susan A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Cavalcanti, Milena Y.; Rodrigues Junior, Jorge; Lachter, Elizabeth R.; Nascimento, Regina Sandra V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    In view of the growing search for new applications for the surplus glycerine of biodiesel production, the use of a glycerine derivative as emulsifier in oil based muds is proposed in this work. Glycerine monooleate was synthesized through esterification reaction, and characterized by NMR{sup 13}C. Its applicability as emulsifier was verified through electric stability tests performed on inverted phase drilling fluids. The obtained results were compared with two formulations containing different emulsifiers (sorbitol monooleate and trimethylolpropane monooleate). It was also evaluated the rheological properties of the formulated fluids through standard tests. It was verified that the fluid that contained the glycerine derivative showed considerably better electric stability results than the other systems. It also presented rheological properties similar to the ones shown by the system that contained the commercial emulsifier (sorbitol monooleate). Thus, it was found that glycerine monooleate is a potential substitute to the currently emulsifiers (author)

  13. An assessment of surface mud system design options for minimizing the health, safety, and environmental impact concerns associated with drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minton, R.C.; Bailey, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a drilling fluid surface system design concept is proposed that resolves the Environmental, occupational hygiene and safety issues associated with conventional designs. Automation of the chemical handling and dosing system is the central element of the concept which, when fully integrated into the system, permits a significant reduction in the surface volume requirements. This, in turn, results in weight and capital cost savings, offsetting the cost of the processing and treatment plant, and a smaller overall footprint for the system. Adoption of the design philosophy results in a safe, healthy working environment in which all of the waste streams are managed so as to minimize the overall environmental impact of the drilling process

  14. South African drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    According to the president of the South African Drilling Association, the drilling industry is meeting head-on the challenges created by the worldwide recession. The paper is a synopsis of several of the papers presented at the SADA symposium and a look at several mining-related drilling projects in South Africa. These papers include grouting techniques, the use of impregnated bits in hard rock drilling, tunnel boring for mines, surveying improvement methods and the use of explosives to increase groundwater yield

  15. FORMATE-BASED FLUIDS: FORMULATION AND APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Formate-based fluids has been successfully used in over hunders HPHT well operations since they introduced in field practice. They have many advantages when compared with conventional HPHT drilling and completion fluids such as: minimal formation damage, maintenance of additve properties at high temperatures, reduced hydraulic flow resistance, low potential for differential sticking, naturally lubricating, very low corrosion rates, biodegradable and pose little risk to the environment etc. Formate-based fluids can be applied during deep slim hole drilling, shale drilling, reservoir drilling, salt and gas hydrate formations drilling. The laboratory research was carried out to evaluate the rheological behavior of formate-based fluids as a function of temperature. Formate-based fluids were formulated using potassium formate brine, xanthan polymer, PAC, starch and calcium carbonate. Experimental results show that potassium formate improves the thermal stability of polymers.

  16. Fluid inclusion from drill hole DW-5, Hohi geothermal area, Japan: Evidence of boiling and procedure for estimating CO2 content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasada, M.; Roedder, E.; Belkin, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid inclusion studies have been used to derive a model for fluid evolution in the Hohi geothermal area, Japan. Six types of fluid inclusions are found in quartz obtained from the drill core of DW-5 hole. They are: (I) primary liquid-rich with evidence of boiling; (II) primary liquid-rich without evidence of boiling; (III) primary vapor-rich (assumed to have been formed by boiling); (IV) secondary liquid-rich with evidence of boiling; (V) secondary liquid-rich without evidence of boiling; (VI) secondary vapor-rich (assumed to have been formed by boiling). Homogenization temperatures (Th) range between 196 and 347??C and the final melting point of ice (Tm) between -0.2 and -4.3??C. The CO2 content was estimated semiquantitatively to be between 0 and 0.39 wt. % based on the bubble behavior on crushing. NaCl equivalent solid solute salinity of fluid inclusions was determined as being between 0 and 6.8 wt. % after minor correction for CO2 content. Fluid inclusions in quartz provide a record of geothermal activity of early boiling and later cooling. The CO2 contents and homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions with evidence of boiling generally increase with depth; these changes, and NaCl equivalent solid solute salinity of the fluid can be explained by an adiabatic boiling model for a CO2-bearing low-salinity fluid. Some high-salinity inclusions without CO2 are presumed to have formed by a local boiling process due to a temperature increase or a pressure decrease. The liquid-rich primary and secondary inclusions without evidence of boiling formed during the cooling process. The salinity and CO2 content of these inclusions are lower than those in the boiling fluid at the early stage, probably as a result of admixture with groundwater. ?? 1986.

  17. The Hans Tausen drill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Sigfus Johann; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, excellent results from the GRIP and GISP2 deep drilling projects in Greenland opened up funding for continued ice-coring efforts in Antarctica (EPICA) and Greenland (NorthGRIP). The Glaciology Group of the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, was assigned the task...... of providing drilling capability for these projects, as it had done for the GRIP project. The group decided to further simplify existing deep drill designs for better reliability and ease of handling. The drill design decided upon was successfully tested on Hans Tausen Ice Cap, Peary Land, Greenland, in 1995....... The 5.0 m long Hans Tausen (HT) drill was a prototype for the ~11 m long EPICA and NorthGRIP versions of the drill which were mechanically identical to the HT drill except for a much longer core barrel and chips chamber. These drills could deliver up to 4 m long ice cores after some design improvements...

  18. Theoretical analysis and design of hydro-hammer with a jet actuator: An engineering application to improve the penetration rate of directional well drilling in hard rock formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiang-Fu; Liang, Yun-Pei; Li, Li-Jia; Luo, Yong-Jiang

    2018-01-01

    Rapid horizontal directional well drilling in hard or fractured formations requires efficient drilling technology. The penetration rate of conventional hard rock drilling technology in horizontal directional well excavations is relatively low, resulting in multiple overgrinding of drill cuttings in bottom boreholes. Conventional drilling techniques with reamer or diamond drill bit face difficulties due to the long construction periods, low penetration rates, and high engineering costs in the directional well drilling of hard rock. To improve the impact energy and penetration rate of directional well drilling in hard formations, a new drilling system with a percussive and rotary drilling technology has been proposed, and a hydro-hammer with a jet actuator has also been theoretically designed on the basis of the impulse hydro-turbine pressure model. In addition, the performance parameters of the hydro-hammer with a jet actuator have been numerically and experimentally analyzed, and the influence of impact stroke and pumped flow rate on the motion velocity and impact energy of the hydro-hammer has been obtained. Moreover, the designed hydro-hammer with a jet actuator has been applied to hard rock drilling in a trenchless drilling program. The motion velocity of the hydro-hammer ranges from 1.2 m/s to 3.19 m/s with diverse flow rates and impact strokes, and the motion frequency ranges from 10 Hz to 22 Hz. Moreover, the maximum impact energy of the hydro-hammer is 407 J, and the pumped flow rate is 2.3 m3/min. Thus, the average penetration rate of the optimized hydro-hammer improves by over 30% compared to conventional directional drilling in hard rock formations.

  19. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, A.H.; Zheng, R.R.; Tang, H.Q.; Qi, X.Y.; Ye, B.

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  20. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, A. H.; Zheng, R. R.; Tang, H. Q.; Qi, X. Y.; Ye, B.

    2014-06-01

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  1. Experimental determination of wellbore diameter and shape (4D imaging of wellbore) by using ultrasonic caliper within different fluids for real-time drilling application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elahifar, Behzad; Esmaeili, Abdolali; Thonhauser, Gerhard [Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Fruhwirth, Rudolf K. [TDE Thonhauser Data Engineering GmbH, Leoben (Austria)

    2013-03-15

    Drilling programs continue to push into new and more complicated environments. As a result, accurate measurement, interpretation and analysis of drilling data in real time are becoming more critical. One of the key measurement devices for drilling, cementing and formation evaluation is the borehole caliper. An ultrasonic sensor caliper tool is thereby a key measurement device for determining the borehole diameter in MWD or LWD tools. Another use of ultrasonic caliper tools is to offer a method for calculating borehole volumes. Real-time application of ultrasonic caliper tools can also support the early detection of borehole instability. This paper describes the experiments related to the accuracy of the ultrasonic sensor for measuring wellbore diameter by performing the tests in different fluids, comparing the results and determining the weak points of the sensor for detecting echoes. In addition the wellbore profiles were simulated and the simulated results were compared with the recorded data. Different tests related to the position of the caliper tool inside the wellbore were performed as well as the evaluation of the accuracy of the ultrasonic sensor by simulating dog-legs and latches. (orig.)

  2. Encapsulated Nanoparticle Synthesis and Characterization for Improved Storage Fluids: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, G. C.; Pradhan, S.; Kang, J.; Curtis, C.; Blake, D.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are typically composed of 50--500 atoms and exhibit properties that are significantly different from the properties of larger, macroscale particles that have the same composition. The addition of these particles to traditional fluids may improve the fluids' thermophysical properties. As an example, the addition of a nanoparticle or set of nanoparticles to a storage fluid may double its heat capacity. This increase in heat capacity would allow a sensible thermal energy storage system to store the same amount of thermal energy in half the amount of storage fluid. The benefit is lower costs for the storage fluid and the storage tanks, resulting in lower-cost electricity. The goal of this long-term research is to create a new class of fluids that enable concentrating solar power plants to operate with greater efficiency and lower electricity costs. Initial research on this topic developed molecular dynamic models that predicted the energy states and transition temperatures for these particles. Recent research has extended the modeling work, along with initiating the synthesis and characterization of bare metal nanoparticles and metal nanoparticles that are encapsulated with inert silica coatings. These particles possess properties that make them excellent candidates for enhancing the heat capacity of storage fluids.

  3. Improving Site Characterization for Rock Dredging using a Drilling Parameter Recorder and the Point Load Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    materials. Also, available data from drilling rates in the mining and tunneling industries (Howarth and Rowlands 1987, Somerton 1959) indicate a...selected uniform natural rock materials and several man -made rock simulants were used to obtain drilling parameter records for materials of known...Dredging Seminar, Atlantic City, NJ, May 1993. Western Dredging Association (WEDA) and Texas A&M University. Somerton , W. H. (1959). "A laboratory study of

  4. Application of Composite Indices for Improving Joint Detection Capabilities of Instrumented Roof Bolt Drills in Underground Mining and Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenpeng; Rostami, Jamal; Elsworth, Derek; Ray, Asok

    2018-03-01

    Roof bolts are the dominant method of ground support in mining and tunneling applications, and the concept of using drilling parameters from the bolter for ground characterization has been studied for a few decades. This refers to the use of drilling data to identify geological features in the ground including joints and voids, as well as rock classification. Rock mass properties, including distribution of joints/voids and strengths of rock layers, are critical factors for proper design of ground support to avoid instability. The goal of this research was to improve the capability and sensitivity of joint detection programs based on the updated pattern recognition algorithms in sensing joints with smaller than 3.175 mm (0.125 in.) aperture while reducing the number of false alarms, and discriminating rock layers with different strengths. A set of concrete blocks with different strengths were used to simulate various rock layers, where the gap between the blocks would represent the joints in laboratory tests. Data obtained from drilling through these blocks were analyzed to improve the reliability and precision of joint detection systems. While drilling parameters can be used to detect the gaps, due to low accuracy of the results, new composite indices have been introduced and used in the analysis to improve the detection rates. This paper briefly discusses ongoing research on joint detection by using drilling parameters collected from a roof bolter in a controlled environment. The performances of the new algorithms for joint detection are also examined by comparing their ability to identify existing joints and reducing false alarms.

  5. Improved design features of KSNP+ BOP Fluid System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heung Gyu; Yoon, Kyung Sup

    2002-01-01

    KOPEC (Korea Power Engineering Co.) in conjunction with the client KHNP (Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.) has been developing the KSNP + (Improved Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants) design concept since 1998. The main objective of the KSNP + is to enhance safety and economy of KSNP. The design concepts of the KSNP + will be implemented in Shin-Kori Units 1 and 2 Shin-Wolsung Units 1 and 2. This paper provides on an introduction to the improved design features of the KSNP + BOP fluid system consisting of 45 design improvement items. The design improvement concepts of the BOP fluid system have been developed as follows: optimization of system configuration and capacity, simplification of system, and adoption of advanced design features. Improved design features of the BOP fluid system allow additional benefits due to making a contribution to the optimization of plant arrangement and the reduction of operating costs during the plant life time. In conclusion, design improvement to the BOP fluid system have contributed to the KSNP + design concept being more reliable, safe and economically competitive

  6. Making Safe Surgery Affordable: Design of a Surgical Drill Cover System for Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Lawrence L; Black, Marianne S; Cancilla, Michael A; Huisman, Elise S; Kooyman, Jeremy J R; Nelson, Scott C; OʼHara, Nathan N; OʼBrien, Peter J; Blachut, Piotr A

    2015-10-01

    Many surgeons in low-resource settings do not have access to safe, affordable, or reliable surgical drilling tools. Surgeons often resort to nonsterile hardware drills because they are affordable, robust, and efficient, but they are impossible to sterilize using steam. A promising alternative is to use a Drill Cover system (a sterilizable fabric bag plus surgical chuck adapter) so that a nonsterile hardware drill can be used safely for surgical bone drilling. Our objective was to design a safe, effective, affordable Drill Cover system for scale in low-resource settings. We designed our device based on feedback from users at Mulago Hospital (Kampala, Uganda) and focused on 3 main aspects. First, the design included a sealed barrier between the surgical field and hardware drill that withstands pressurized fluid. Second, the selected hardware drill had a maximum speed of 1050 rpm to match common surgical drills and reduce risk of necrosis. Third, the fabric cover was optimized for ease of assembly while maintaining a sterile technique. Furthermore, with the Drill Cover approach, multiple Drill Covers can be provided with a single battery-powered drill in a "kit," so that the drill can be used in back-to-back surgeries without requiring immediate sterilization. The Drill Cover design presented here provides a proof-of-concept for a product that can be commercialized, produced at scale, and used in low-resource settings globally to improve access to safe surgery.

  7. Development of high performance drilling fluids from national products: part I; Desenvolvimento de fluidos de perfuracao de alto desempenho a partir de produtos nacionais: parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Kassie V.; Amorim, Luciana V. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Agencia Nacional do Petroleo (ANP), Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Programa de Recursos Humanos; Lira, Helio L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2008-07-01

    This work has a main objective to develop formulations of high performance water-based drilling fluids composed of national additives and evaluate their rheologic, filtration and lubrication behavior. It was developed ten formulations containing the following additives: viscosity, filtered reducer, controlling of pH, hydra table clays inhibitors, anti foamy, bactericide, lubricant and sealant. The fluids were prepared according to the field practice that consists of adding to water the additives under constant agitation. After 24 h resting, it was carried out a study of the rheologic behavior, in a Fann 35 A viscosimeter, and of the filtration properties in a Fann press-filter and of lubricity in a Ofite lubricimeter through the determination of the flow curves, apparent and plastic viscosities, yield limit, gel force, filtered volume, filter-cake thickness and lubricity coefficient. The results obtained were very promising, with properties close to the standard. (author)

  8. Drilling mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babets, M A; Nechayev, N D; Vinogradova, G P

    1982-01-01

    A drilling mud is proposed which contains clay, alkali, water and stabilizer reagent. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the viscosity and static shear stress, the stabilizer reagent contained is composted solid general wastes with the following ratio of components (% by weight): clay 10-15, alkali 0.1-0.2; composted solid general wastes 2-5; water--the rest.

  9. Model Comparison Exercise Circuit Training Game and Circuit Ladder Drills to Improve Agility and Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilaturochman Hendrawan Koestanto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare: (1 the effect of circuit training game and circuit ladder drill for the agility; (2 the effect of circuit training game and circuit ladder drill on speed; (3 the difference effect of circuit training game and circuit ladder drill for the speed (4 the difference effect of circuit training game and circuit ladder drill on agility. The type of this research was quantitative with quasi-experimental methods. The design of this research was Factorial Design, with analysing data using ANOVA. The process of data collection was done by using 30 meters sprint speed test and shuttle run test during the pretest and posttest. Furthermore, the data was analyzed by using SPSS 22.0 series. Result: The circuit training game exercise program and circuit ladder drill were significant to increase agility and speed (sig 0.000 < α = 0.005 Group I, II, III had significant differences (sig 0.000 < α = 0.005. The mean of increase in speed of group I = 0.20 seconds, group II = 0.31 seconds, and group III = 0.11 seconds. The average increase agility to group I = 0.34 seconds group II = 0.60 seconds, group III = 0.13 seconds. Based on the analysis above, it could be concluded that there was an increase in the speed and agility of each group after being given a training.

  10. Drilling mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorescu, V; Ditulescu, E

    1979-01-30

    A method is proposed for producing stable drilling mortar from drilled rock which makes it possible to stabilize the walls of the borehole and to maintain producing horizons of oil and gas wells in an undisturbed state. The proposed drilling mortar includes 5-12 wt.-% dry modified calcium lignosulfonate in the form of a solution containing about 30% dry matter with the addition of 0.1 wt.-% anti-foaming agent consisting of C/sub 19/-C/sub 20/ alcohol dissolved in a light petroleum product; cream of milk with about 10 wt.-% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ in a quantity sufficient for reducing the pH value of the ions down to 10.5; sodium chloride in amounts from 5 mg to 100 ml (aqueous phase); ordinarily used agents for ensuring the necessary density, viscosity, and filterability. For example, the preparation of the drilling fluid begins with the processing under laboratory conditions of lignosulfonic pulp obtained in the production of yeast fodder with the following characteristics: specific density, 1.15 kgf/dm/sup 3/; water content, 67% (according to the Dean and Stark method); pH 4.0. In the vessel is placed 1000 cm/sup 3/ lignosulfonic pulp containing 33% dry matter, and the pulp is heated to 90-95/sup 0/C by means of a water bath. To the heated pulp 33 cm/sup 3/ formic acid at a 40-% concentration is added by mixing. The specific temperature of the pulp is maintained in the constant mixing process for two hours. Then the cream of milk containing 10 wt.-% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ is added to raise the pH to 10.5. The cooled product is calcium lignosulfonate. To produce a stable form of the drilling mortar, 750 g clay and 10 g trass gel are added to a vessel containing 1500 cm/sup 3/ fresh water by means of mixing. The resulting dispersed mass remains at rest for 12 hours for purposes of hydration. Then 2 g of an anti-foaming agent dissolved in 6 cm/sup 3/ benzene is introduced to 1000 cm/sup 3/ modified calcium lignosulfonate produced by the above method.

  11. Best of the lot : engineered measurement-while-drilling tool improves efficiency of operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, J.

    2010-10-15

    NuEra Oilfield Services Inc. combines various technologies, including advanced bearing assemblies and compact wireless decoders that interface with downhole directional tools, to engineer unique, purpose-built measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool string packages. The 9-metre-long MWD tool string is lowered into the drill pipe from the surface. The directional module monitors the position of the drill bit, which the driller can monitor using an electronic drilling recorder at the surface. The directional drillstring uses a mud motor with adjustable bent housing to correct the direction of the well, as the system cannot steer while drilling. At bottomhole, mud circulation continues after the rotation of the drillstring has been stopped, driving the mud motor, which in turn drives the drill bit, permitting a new direction to be taken even though the drillstring is not turning. The operator points the bent housing in a new direction and slides the bit along before restarting the rotation of the drillstring. The NuEra drillstring uses a new bearing pack that makes the mud motor more robust and longer-lived, preventing costly down time for operators. The bearing pack is designed to distribute the load geometrically so that only one-third of the weight-on-bit is on the bearings at any point in time, which extends bearing life and reduces repair costs. The custom selection and mating of superior components made by different tool manufacturers has resulted in the MWD tool string that is reliable and able to pump more and carry more weight. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  12. CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

    2003-06-01

    Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned

  13. Bucket drill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezverkhiy, V.M.; Nabokov, I.M.; Podoksik, D.Z.; Sadovskiy, S.S.; Shanyukevich, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The bucket drill including a cylindrical housing with bottom, ground intake windows and cutting knives is hinged to the housing, the mechanism of rotation of the cutting knives including rods connected by the cutter knives, and drive shaft is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the effectiveness of drilling by automatic change in the angle of cutting depending on the strength of the drillable rock, the drill is equipped with elastic elements and cap with annular slits in which there are elastic elements. The mechanism of rotation of the cutting knives is equipped with levers hinged to the housing, pins with shaft and rocker arm. The rods are made with a slit and from one end are rigidly connected to the cutting knives, and from the other end to the levers by means of pins which are arranged in slits of the rod with the possibility of movement. The upper ends of the levers are installed with the possibility of movement in the pins whose shafts are arranged with the possibility of rotation in the rocker arm rigidly connected to the drive shaft. The drive shaft is equipped with cantilevers installed in the cap with the possibility of rotation and interaction with the elastic elements.

  14. Base fluid in improving heat transfer for EV car battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin-Abdun, Nazih A.; Razlan, Zuradzman M.; Shahriman, A. B.; Wan, Khairunizam; Hazry, D.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Adnan, Nazrul H.; Heng, R.; Kamarudin, H.; Zunaidi, I.

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the effects of base fluid (as coolants) channeling inside the heat exchanger in the process of the increase in thermal conductivity between EV car battery and the heat exchanger. The analysis showed that secondary cooling system by means of water has advantages in improving the heat transfer process and reducing the electric power loss on the form of thermal energy from batteries. This leads to the increase in the efficiency of the EV car battery, hence also positively reflecting the performance of the EV car. The present work, analysis is performed to assess the design and use of heat exchanger in increasing the performance efficiency of the EV car battery. This provides a preface to the use this design for nano-fluids which increase and improve from heat transfer.

  15. Improving fluid intelligence with training on working memory

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeggi, Susanne M.; Buschkuehl, Martin; Jonides, John; Perrig, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    Fluid intelligence (Gf) refers to the ability to reason and to solve new problems independently of previously acquired knowledge. Gf is critical for a wide variety of cognitive tasks, and it is considered one of the most important factors in learning. Moreover, Gf is closely related to professional and educational success, especially in complex and demanding environments. Although performance on tests of Gf can be improved through direct practice on the tests themselves, there is no evidence ...

  16. Prediction Model of Mechanical Extending Limits in Horizontal Drilling and Design Methods of Tubular Strings to Improve Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical extending limit in horizontal drilling means the maximum horizontal extending length of a horizontal well under certain ground and down-hole mechanical constraint conditions. Around this concept, the constrained optimization model of mechanical extending limits is built and simplified analytical results for pick-up and slack-off operations are deduced. The horizontal extending limits for kinds of tubular strings under different drilling parameters are calculated and drawn. To improve extending limits, an optimal design model of drill strings is built and applied to a case study. The results indicate that horizontal extending limits are underestimated a lot when the effects of friction force on critical helical buckling loads are neglected. Horizontal extending limits firstly increase and tend to stable values with vertical depths. Horizontal extending limits increase faster but finally become smaller with the increase of horizontal pushing forces for tubular strings of smaller modulus-weight ratio. Sliding slack-off is the main limit operation and high axial friction is the main constraint factor constraining horizontal extending limits. A sophisticated installation of multiple tubular strings can greatly inhibit helical buckling and increase horizontal extending limits. The optimal design model is called only once to obtain design results, which greatly increases the calculation efficiency.

  17. The influence of drilling process automation on improvement of blasting works quality in open pit mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodlak, Maciej; Dmytryk, Dominik; Mertuszka, Piotr; Szumny, Marcin; Tomkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    The article describes the monitoring system of blasthole drilling process called HNS (Hole Navigation System), which was used in blasting works performed by Maxam Poland Ltd. Developed by Atlas Copco's, the HNS system - using satellite data - allows for a very accurate mapping of the designed grid of blastholes. The article presents the results of several conducted measurements of ground vibrations triggered by blasting, designed and performed using traditional technology and using the HNS system and shows first observations in this matter.

  18. Ultrasonically assisted drilling of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, N. V.; Onawumi, P. Y.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2018-05-01

    Conventional drilling of rocks can generate significant damage in the drilled material; a material layer is often split off a back surface of a sample during drilling, negatively affecting its strength. To improve finish quality, ultrasonically assisted drilling (UAD) was employed in two rocks - sandstone and marble. Damage areas in both materials were reduced in UAD when compared to conventional drilling. Reductions in a thrust force and a torque reduction were observed only for UAD in marble; ultrasonic assistance in sandstone drilling did not result in improvements in this regard.

  19. Evaluation of an air drilling cuttings containment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westmoreland, J.

    1994-04-01

    Drilling at hazardous waste sites for environmental remediation or monitoring requires containment of all drilling fluids and cuttings to protect personnel and the environment. At many sites, air drilling techniques have advantages over other drilling methods, requiring effective filtering and containment of the return air/cuttings stream. A study of. current containment methods indicated improvements could be made in the filtering of radionuclides and volatile organic compounds, and in equipment like alarms, instrumentation or pressure safety features. Sandia National Laboratories, Dept. 61 11 Environmental Drilling Projects Group, initiated this work to address these concerns. A look at the industry showed that asbestos abatement equipment could be adapted for containment and filtration of air drilling returns. An industry manufacturer was selected to build a prototype machine. The machine was leased and put through a six-month testing and evaluation period at Sandia National Laboratories. Various materials were vacuumed and filtered with the machine during this time. In addition, it was used in an actual air drive drilling operation. Results of these tests indicate that the vacuum/filter unit will meet or exceed our drilling requirements. This vacuum/filter unit could be employed at a hazardous waste site or any site where drilling operations require cuttings and air containment.

  20. Well drilling by rotary percussive drill above ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatier, G.

    1987-01-01

    Originally, the Well Drilling Section of Cogema used only the diamond core drilling technique. The appearance of independent rotation for compressed air rock drills has led to the use and to the development of this drilling system, as a drill core is not indispensable, when the material of the search is radioactive. During the last few years, hydraulic drills have replaced the compressed air drills and have resulted in a very marked improvement: - of the penetration rates; - of the depth achieved. The Well Drilling Section of Cogema has to drill about 400 km per year with rock drills above ground and holds also the record for depth achieved with this technique, i.e. 400 m in granite. In France, the costs of these types of drilling are for the same depth of the order of one-quarter of the core drilling and half of the drilling with a down-the-hole drill. Cogema has greatly developed the types of well logging which now permits the extension of this type of drilling to the search for other materials than uranium [fr

  1. A Promising Material by Using Residue Waste from Bisphenol A Manufacturing to Prepare Fluid-Loss-Control Additive in Oil Well Drilling Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Lei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The residues mixture from Bisphenol A manufacturing process was analyzed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR were used to characterize the residues. The results indicated that the residues were complex mixture of several molecules. 3-(2-Hydroxyphenyl-1,1,3-trimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-5-ol and phenol were the main components of the residues. The technical feasibility of using it as phenol replacement in fluid-loss-control additive production was also investigated. The fluid-loss-control capacity of the novel additive was systematically investigated. It was discovered that the well fluid-loss performance of the prepared additive can be achieved, especially at high temperature.

  2. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  3. The influence of drilling process automation on improvement of blasting works quality in open pit mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodlak Maciej

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the monitoring system of blasthole drilling process called HNS (Hole Navigation System, which was used in blasting works performed by Maxam Poland Ltd. Developed by Atlas Copco's, the HNS system – using satellite data – allows for a very accurate mapping of the designed grid of blastholes. The article presents the results of several conducted measurements of ground vibrations triggered by blasting, designed and performed using traditional technology and using the HNS system and shows first observations in this matter.

  4. An Improved Approach for Forecasting Ecological Impacts from Future Drilling in Unconventional Shale Oil and Gas Plays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolaver, Brad D; Pierre, Jon Paul; Ikonnikova, Svetlana A; Andrews, John R; McDaid, Guinevere; Ryberg, Wade A; Hibbitts, Toby J; Duran, Charles M; Labay, Benjamin J; LaDuc, Travis J

    2018-04-13

    Directional well drilling and hydraulic fracturing has enabled energy production from previously inaccessible resources, but caused vegetation conversion and landscape fragmentation, often in relatively undisturbed habitats. We improve forecasts of future ecological impacts from unconventional oil and gas play developments using a new, more spatially-explicit approach. We applied an energy production outlook model, which used geologic and economic data from thousands of wells and three oil price scenarios, to map future drilling patterns and evaluate the spatial distribution of vegetation conversion and habitat impacts. We forecast where future well pad construction may be most intense, illustrating with an example from the Eagle Ford Shale Play of Texas. We also illustrate the ecological utility of this approach using the Spot-tailed Earless Lizard (Holbrookia lacerata) as the focal species, which historically occupied much of the Eagle Ford and awaits a federal decision for possible Endangered Species Act protection. We found that ~17,000-45,500 wells would be drilled 2017‒2045 resulting in vegetation conversion of ~26,485-70,623 ha (0.73-1.96% of pre-development vegetation), depending on price scenario ($40-$80/barrel). Grasslands and row crop habitats were most affected (2.30 and 2.82% areal vegetation reduction). Our approach improves forecasts of where and to what extent future energy development in unconventional plays may change land-use and ecosystem services, enabling natural resource managers to anticipate and direct on-the-ground conservation actions to places where they will most effectively mitigate ecological impacts of well pads and associated infrastructure.

  5. Trends in hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010: data analysis and comparison to the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is presently the primary stimulation technique for oil and gas production in low-permeability, unconventional reservoirs. Comprehensive, published, and publicly available information regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States is scarce. This national spatial and temporal analysis of data on nearly 1 million hydraulically fractured wells and 1.8 million fracturing treatment records from 1947 through 2010 (aggregated in Data Series 868) is used to identify hydraulic fracturing trends in drilling methods and use of proppants, treatment fluids, additives, and water in the United States. These trends are compared to the literature in an effort to establish a common understanding of the differences in drilling methods, treatment fluids, and chemical additives and of how the newer technology has affected the water use volumes and areal distribution of hydraulic fracturing. Historically, Texas has had the highest number of records of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells in the United States documented in the datasets described herein. Water-intensive horizontal/directional drilling has also increased from 6 percent of new hydraulically fractured wells drilled in the United States in 2000 to 42 percent of new wells drilled in 2010. Increases in horizontal drilling also coincided with the emergence of water-based “slick water” fracturing fluids. As such, the most current hydraulic fracturing materials and methods are notably different from those used in previous decades and have contributed to the development of previously inaccessible unconventional oil and gas production target areas, namely in shale and tight-sand reservoirs. Publicly available derivative datasets and locations developed from these analyses are described.

  6. Development of new additive for drilling fluid from the partial hydrophobization N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC); Desenvolvimento de novos aditivos para fluidos de perfuracao a partir da hidrofobizacao parcial da N,N,N trimetilquitosana (TMQ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Thacyla C. do; Lopes, Grazielle; Silva, Joaquim F.M. da; Nascimento, Regina S.V., E-mail: cycyla@hotmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Polo de Xistoquimica

    2009-07-01

    N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) hydrophobically modified can act as an excellent additive for drilling fluids water based, working as inhibitor of reactive shales and rheological modifiers. The cationic chitosan was obtained by reaction of chitosan with CH{sub 3}I in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone to obtain the TMC and chitosan was also hydrophobically modified with palmitoil chloride to get Quit P. Through another route, Quit P was modified to obtain the cationic TMCP. The derivatives were characterized by FT-IR and {sup 1}HNMR spectrophotometry allowing the calculation of the degree of quaternization of the TMC. The rheology tests showed that the system with TMCP presented pseudo plastic behavior, while the system with TMC behaved as a Newtonian fluid. The results indicated that TMCP can act as rheology modifier for water-based drilling fluids. (author)

  7. Evaluation of some natural water-insoluble cellulosic material as lost circulation control additives in water-based drilling fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed Alsabagh

    2015-12-01

    In this work, three natural water-insoluble cellulosic materials; peanut hulls, bagasse and sawdust were investigated as lost circulation control materials. One hundred and eight different LCM samples made of various materials were tested with mud. The experiments were conducted in a permeability plugging apparatus (PPA at a differential pressure of 100 psi and 300 psi, using 10, 60 and 90 ceramic discs. The performance of each LCM sample was determined based on the amount of spurt loss and total fluid loss of the mud according to the American Petroleum Institute (API standard. The obtained results showed that, the amount of the fluid loss depends on the LCM material, concentration and size distribution, testing results show that, the peanut gives the best results among the bagasse and sawdust, especially fine size which exhibited better results in the filtration characteristics due to the better filling properties of this size. Peanut hulls, bagasse and sawdust show a slight effect on the rheological properties of the mud. The results were discussed on light of particle size distribution.

  8. Buffer fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadzhanzade, A Kh; Dedusanko, G Ya; Dinaburg, L S; Markov, Yu M; Rasizade, Ya N; Rozov, V N; Sherstnev, N M

    1979-08-30

    A drilling fluid is suggested for separating the drilling and plugging fluids which contains as the base increased solution of polyacrylamide and additive. In order to increase the viscoelastic properties of the liquid with simultaneous decrease in the periods of its fabrication, the solution contains as an additive dry bentonite clay. In cases of the use of a buffer fluid under conditions of negative temperatures, it is necessary to add to it table salt or ethylene glycol.

  9. Improving coal flotation recovery using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Koh [CSIRO Minerals (Australia)

    2009-06-15

    This work involves using the latest advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to increase understanding of the hydrodynamics in coal flotation and to identify any opportunities to improve design and operation of both the Microcel column and Jameson cell. The CSIRO CFD model incorporates micro-processes from cell hydrodynamics that affect particle-bubble attachments and detachments. CFD simulation results include the liquid velocities, turbulent dissipation rates, gas hold-up, particle-bubble attachment rates and detachment rates. This work has demonstrated that CFD modelling is a cost effective means of developing an understanding of particle-bubble attachments and detachments, and can be used to identify and test potential cell or process modifications.

  10. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  11. Improving fluid intelligence with training on working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, Susanne M; Buschkuehl, Martin; Jonides, John; Perrig, Walter J

    2008-05-13

    Fluid intelligence (Gf) refers to the ability to reason and to solve new problems independently of previously acquired knowledge. Gf is critical for a wide variety of cognitive tasks, and it is considered one of the most important factors in learning. Moreover, Gf is closely related to professional and educational success, especially in complex and demanding environments. Although performance on tests of Gf can be improved through direct practice on the tests themselves, there is no evidence that training on any other regimen yields increased Gf in adults. Furthermore, there is a long history of research into cognitive training showing that, although performance on trained tasks can increase dramatically, transfer of this learning to other tasks remains poor. Here, we present evidence for transfer from training on a demanding working memory task to measures of Gf. This transfer results even though the trained task is entirely different from the intelligence test itself. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the extent of gain in intelligence critically depends on the amount of training: the more training, the more improvement in Gf. That is, the training effect is dosage-dependent. Thus, in contrast to many previous studies, we conclude that it is possible to improve Gf without practicing the testing tasks themselves, opening a wide range of applications.

  12. Aquifer restoration system improvement using an acid fluid purge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodder, E.A.; Peck, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of a water pump acid purge procedure at a free-phase liquid hydrocarbon recovery site has increased water pump operational run times and improved the effectiveness of the aquifer restoration effort. Before introduction of this technique, pumps at some locations would fail within 14 days of operation due to CaSO 4 .2H 2 O (calcium sulfate) precipitate fouling. After acid purge implementation at these locations, pump operational life improved to an average of over 110 days. Other locations, where pump failures would occur within one month, were improved to approximately six months of operation. The increase in water pump run time has also improved the liquid hydrocarbon recovery rate by 2,000 gallons per day; representing a 20% increase for the aquifer restoration system. Other concepts tested in attempts to prolong pump life included: specially designed electric submersible pumps, submersible pump shrouds intended to reduce the fluid pressure shear that enhances CaSO 4 .2H 2 O precipitation, and high volume pneumatic gas lift pumps. Due to marginal pump life improvement or other undesirable operational features, these concepts were primarily ineffective. The purge apparatus utilizes an acid pump, hose, and discharge piping to deliver the solution directly into the inlet of an operating water pump. The water pumps used for this activity require stainless steel construction with Teflon or other acid resistant bearings and seals. Purges are typically conducted before sudden discharge pressure drops (greater than 15 psig) occur for the operating water pump. Depending on volume of precipitate accumulation and pump type, discharge pressure is restored after introduction of 10 to 40 gallons of hydrochloric acid solution. The acid purge procedure outlined herein eliminates operational downtime and does not require well head pump removal and the associated costs of industry cleaning procedures

  13. Bayesian spatial modeling applied to environmental monitoring due to the use of different drilling fluids in the maritime exploration activity; Modelagem espacial Bayesiana aplicada ao monitoramento ambiental decorrente do uso de diferentes fluidos de perfuracao na atividade exploratoria maritima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulgati, Fernando H. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Modelagem de Bacias (LAB2M); Zouain, Ricardo N.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Centro de Estudos de Geologia Costeira e Oceanica; Fachel, Jandyra M.G. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Matematica; Landau, Luiz [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Metodos Computacionais em Engenharia (LAMCE)

    2004-07-01

    Controlling and monitoring environmental researches have accompanied the development of offshore exploration drill activities aimed at finding oil and gas reserves, as there has been an increase in the environmental demands and restrictions. Three stages of the drilling process were isolated and the effects of different fluids were measured using Bayesian spatial models. The probable impact of the use of non-aqueous fluid (NAF) was measured through changes observed in sea sediments in three different occasions: previous to the activity, one (1) month after the end of the activity, and one (1) year after the end of the activity. BACI (Before-After Control Impact) design, which allows the control of temporal and spatial variation components, was chosen. (author)

  14. PDVSA INTEVEP Technologies in oil well drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, C.; Rafael, A.; Davila, Manuel A.

    1998-01-01

    The orimulsion, the generation of catalytic technologies and the development of HDH (process which transform heavy crudes in light crudes), are examples of some of the well known technologies developed by PDVSA INTEVEP. But the drilling oil wells technologies developed by the same entreprise, even though are very important, are less known all around the world. This document describes some products developed through those technologies: THIXOGAS T M which is an antimigratory aditive; INTEFLOW T M which is a fluid for drilling, complementation and rehabilitation of oil drills; INTERCAB T M which is an aditive for fluids in drilling; orimatita which is a denser for drilling fluids; CARBOLIG T M which is an aditive for drilling fluids; and many other products and technologies in development, impacted considerably the venezuelan economy by preserving the environment and saving quite an important amount of money in 1997 (Bs. 3.000 M M)

  15. The development of Canadian leadership in horizontal drilling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, J R

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal wells are of increasing interest in the oil and gas industry, as is evident from the increase in the numbers of such wells being drilled. Horizontal well technology is used to improve production rates, notably in low permeability formations; to capture reserves if a reservoir is not economic using non-horizontal wells; to manage breakthrough of sweep fluids and increase sweep efficiency; and to extend the areal reach from a single surface location, especially in offshore production. The types of horizontal wells, differentiated on the basis of how quickly the well becomes horizontal, are briefly outlined and a short history of horizontal wells is presented. Canadian accomplishments in this field are then described, including steerable drilling systems, measurement-while-drilling systems, management of hole drag and torque, and well completion techniques. About 25 horizontal wells are forecast to be drilled in Canada in 1989, indicating the favorable future of this technology. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Drilling and well technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milheim, K. [Mining University Leoben Institute for Drilling Technology, (Austria)

    1996-12-31

    Over a billion dollars a year is lost by exploration and production companies drilling wells because of the lack of learn curve management (LMC) practices. This paper presents the importance of the LMC concept, what it is, why LMC has not yet been recognized as a major initiative for improving drilling cost performance. The paper discusses the different types of planning, problems with implementation of plans, the use and misuse of drilling results and data bases, and the lack of post analysis practices. The major point of the paper is to show the massive savings that can be achieved by valuing LMC, learning LMC and successfully implementing LMC. . 2 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Drilling reorganizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    As the first in a proposed series of steps that would move scientific ocean drilling from its own niche within the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Astronomical, Atmospheric, Earth, and Ocean Sciences (AAEO) into the agency's Division of Ocean Sciences, Grant Gross, division director, has been appointed acting director of the Office of Scientific Ocean Drilling (OSOD). Gross will retain the directorship of the division, which also is part of AAEO. Allen M. Shinn, Jr., OSOD director for nearly 2 years, has been reassigned effective July 10 to a position in NSF's Office of Planning and Resource Management.The move aims to tie drilling operations more closely to the science with which it is associated, Gross said. This first step is an organizational response to the current leaning toward using a commercial drilling vessel as the drilling platform, he said. Before the market for such commercial drill ships opened (Eos, February 22, 1983, p . 73), other ship options for scientific ocean drilling included refurbishing the aging Glomar Challenger or renovating, at great expense, the Glomar Explorer. A possible next step in the reorganization is to make OSOD the third section within the Ocean Sciences Division. Currently, the division is divided into the Oceanographic Facilities and Support Section and the Ocean Sciences Research Section.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Foam Drilling Hydraulics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Baris

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of foam as a drilling fluid was developed to meet a special set of conditions under which other common drilling fluids had failed. Foam drilling is defined as the process of making boreholes by utilizing foam as the circulating fluid. When compared with conventional drilling, underbalanced or foam drilling has several advantages. These advantages include: avoidance of lost circulation problems, minimizing damage to pay zones, higher penetration rates and bit life. Foams are usually characterized by the quality, the ratio of the volume of gas, and the total foam volume. Obtaining dependable pressure profiles for aerated (gasified fluids and foam is more difficult than for single phase fluids, since in the former ones the drilling mud contains a gas phase that is entrained within the fluid system. The primary goal of this study is to expand the knowledge-base of the hydrodynamic phenomena that occur in a foam drilling operation. In order to gain a better understanding of foam drilling operations, a hydrodynamic model is developed and run at different operating conditions. For this purpose, the flow of foam through the drilling system is modeled by invoking the basic principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics. The model was designed to allow gas and liquid flow at desired volumetric flow rates through the drillstring and annulus. Parametric studies are conducted in order to identify the most influential variables in the hydrodynamic modeling of foam flow.

  19. Fluid Analysis and Improved Structure of an ATEG Heat Exchanger Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z. B.; Deng, Y. D.; Su, C. Q.; Yuan, X. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a numerical model has been employed to analyze the internal flow field distribution in a heat exchanger applied for an automotive thermoelectric generator based on computational fluid dynamics. The model simulates the influence of factors relevant to the heat exchanger, including the automotive waste heat mass flow velocity, temperature, internal fins, and back pressure. The result is in good agreement with experimental test data. Sensitivity analysis of the inlet parameters shows that increase of the exhaust velocity, compared with the inlet temperature, makes little contribution (0.1 versus 0.19) to the heat transfer but results in a detrimental back pressure increase (0.69 versus 0.21). A configuration equipped with internal fins is proved to offer better thermal performance compared with that without fins. Finally, based on an attempt to improve the internal flow field, a more rational structure is obtained, offering a more homogeneous temperature distribution, higher average heat transfer coefficient, and lower back pressure.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide removal in water-based drilling fluid by metal oxide nanoparticle and ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi Morgani, M.; Saboori, R.; Sabbaghi, S.

    2017-07-01

    Advanced approaches to the application of nanomaterials for environmental studies, such as waste-water treatment and pollution removal/adsorption, have been considered in recent decades. In this research, hydrogen sulfide removal from water-based drilling fluid by ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles and a ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite was studied experimentally. The ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by sedimentation and the sol-gel method. A sol-chemical was employed to synthesize the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the produced ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles, and the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite. The results showed that the concentration of hydrogen sulfide decreased from 800 ppm to about 250 ppm (about 70% removal) and less than 150 ppm (more than 80% removal) using the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles with a 0.67 wt% concentration, respectively. Hydrogen sulfide removal using the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite with a 0.67 wt% showed the highest value of removal in comparison with the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles. The hydrogen sulfide level was lowered from 800 ppm to less than 5 ppm (99% removal) by the nanocomposite.

  1. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid = Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Se propoersiona un fluido de perforación de abarsividad reducida y un método de perforación de un hoyo en formaciones subterráneas haciendo circular un fluido de perforación de abrasividad reducida a través de este. El fluido de abarsividad reducida comprende un fluido de perforación, un primer

  2. Hard rock drilling: from conventional technologies to the potential use of laser; Perfuracao em rochas duras: das tecnologias convencionais ate o potencial uso do laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, Renato; Lomba, Rosana Fatima Teixieira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Perez, Maria Angelica Acosta; Valente, Luiz Carlos Guedes; Braga, Arthur Martins Barbosa [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the drilling of the carbonate rocks of the Pre-salt is to overcome the low penetration rates that have been obtained in the drilling of the reservoir rock in the vertical and directional wells. To overcome this challenge, a great effort is being developed in several lines of research, both in developing new concepts in drill bits and in the selection of a drilling system that together with appropriate type of bit provide an expected improvement in performance. To achieve these results, procedures are being prioritized and drilling systems with lower vibration levels are being used, since this phenomenon of vibration reduces the performance of penetration rate also affecting the lifetime of the equipment and consequently causes a reduction in reliability of all system and raises the cost per meter of drilling. Thus, new drill bit technology and new drilling systems are under development and, among these technologies we can distinguish those that promote improvements in conventional technologies and innovative technologies frankly which uses new mechanisms to cut or weaken the rock. This paper presents an overview of the conventional technology of drilling systems and drill bits, and provides information about the researches that have been developed with the use of innovative technologies which is presented as highly promising, among these innovative technologies, laser drilling and the drilling itself assisted by laser. In this process the laser beam has the main function to weaken the rock improving the rate of penetration. This paper presents a summary of studies and analyzes which are underway to investigate the potential of laser technology, also presents some results of laboratory tests already carried out. The drilling fluid in which the laser will have to pass through in the future applications is analyzed on the approach of their physicochemical properties. Thus, a better understanding of the interaction with the drilling

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

    2001-07-01

    Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed

  4. Slant rigs offer big payoffs in shallow drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.; Edwards, B.

    1992-01-01

    Slant hole drilling technology can result in considerable savings over conventionally drilled deviated holes because mud motors and deviation control with measurement while drilling tools are usually unnecessary. The benefits of using slant hole rigs for development drilling improve after the bit walk tendencies and the correct bottom hole assemblies have been determined for a particular area. This article discusses three recent drilling operations that successfully used slant drilling technology on land-based projects: drilling for heavy oil in Alberta, drilling for gas in Alberta, and drilling a river crossing for a gas pipeline in British Columbia. These examples demonstrate the flexibility of slant drilling technology

  5. Computerized tomography with X-rays: an instrument in the analysis physico-chemical between formations and drilling fluids interactions; Tomografia computadorizada com raios-X: uma ferramenta na analise das interacoes fisico-quimicas entre as formacoes rochosas e fluidos de perfuracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Marcus Vinicius Cavalcante

    1998-12-31

    In this study it is demonstrated the applicability of the Computerized Tomography technique with x-rays to evaluate the reactivity degree between various drilling fluids and argillaceous sediments (Shales and Sandstones). The research has been conducted in the Rock-Fluid Interaction Pressure Simulator (RFIPS), where the possible physico-chemical alterations can be observed through successive tomography images, which are obtained during the flow of the fluid through the samples. In addition, it was noticed the formation of mud cake in Berea Sandstones samples in the RFIPS, though the Computerized Tomography with X-rays, when utilizing drilling fluids weighted with the baryte. (author) 35 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Computerized tomography with X-rays: an instrument in the analysis physico-chemical between formations and drilling fluids interactions; Tomografia computadorizada com raios-X: uma ferramenta na analise das interacoes fisico-quimicas entre as formacoes rochosas e fluidos de perfuracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Marcus Vinicius Cavalcante

    1999-12-31

    In this study it is demonstrated the applicability of the Computerized Tomography technique with x-rays to evaluate the reactivity degree between various drilling fluids and argillaceous sediments (Shales and Sandstones). The research has been conducted in the Rock-Fluid Interaction Pressure Simulator (RFIPS), where the possible physico-chemical alterations can be observed through successive tomography images, which are obtained during the flow of the fluid through the samples. In addition, it was noticed the formation of mud cake in Berea Sandstones samples in the RFIPS, though the Computerized Tomography with X-rays, when utilizing drilling fluids weighted with the baryte. (author) 35 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. The Marskhod Egyptian Drill Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M. A. M.

    We describe a possible participation of Egypt in a future Mars rover Mission. It was suggested that Egypt participate through involvement in the design, building and testing of a drill to obtain sub-surface samples. The Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IKI), formally invited the Egyptian Ministry of Scientific Research to study the concept for potential use on the Russian Mars 2001 Mission. As one of the objectives of the Marskhod mission was the analysis of sub-surface samples, a drilling mechanism in the payload would be essential. The Egyptian expertise in drill development is associated with the archaeological exploration of the Pyramids. A sophisticated drilling system perforated limestone to a depth of 2 m without the use of lubricants or cooling fluids that might have contaminated the Pit's environment. This experience could have been applied to a drill development Mars 2001 mission, which was unfortunately canceled due to economic problems.

  8. Desenvolvimento de fluidos aquosos com bentonita para perfuração de poços de petróleo onshore Development of aqueous fluids with bentonite clay for drilling of onshore oil wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. A. M Nascimento

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Devido aos grandes desafios encontrados na perfuração de poços, há a necessidade de se desenvolver fluidos com propriedades adequadas e capazes de atender todas as exigências da perfuração, como elevada capacidade de carreamento de sólidos e alta lubricidade, como também fluidos ambientalmente corretos. O grau de impacto dos fluidos de perfuração no meio ambiente depende especialmente do tipo de fluido utilizado, se de base aquosa, oleosa, sintética ou mesmo de base ar. Portanto, é de fundamental importância o desenvolvimento de fluidos com características específicas em cada etapa da perfuração. Sendo assim, este trabalho objetivou o desenvolvimento de fluidos aquosos, com baixo teor de sólidos e propriedades reológicas, de filtração e lubricidade adequadas à perfuração de poços de petróleo onshore. Os fluidos foram formulados utilizando em sua composição bentonita sódica industrializada, aditivos poliméricos e lubrificantes, em diferentes concentrações. O estudo reológico, de filtração e lubricidade mostrou que os fluidos apresentam comportamento pseudoplástico e que os aditivos selecionados desempenham com êxito suas funções de modificadores reológicos, redutores de filtrado e agente lubrificante. Além disto, ficou evidenciada a necessidade de aditivos lubrificantes em fluidos aquosos contendo argila bentonítica e polímeros. A adição de 1% de lubrificante no fluido é suficiente para adequar a capacidade lubrificante dos fluidos.Due to challenges encountered in drilling wells, there is a need to develop fluids that have properties suitable and able to meet all the requirements of drilling, such as, high capacity for carrying of solid and high lubricity. Besides that, they need to be environmentally friend. The degree of impact of drilling fluids in the environment depends on the type of fluid used, if water or oil or synthetic or air based. It is therefore of fundamental importance to develop

  9. Methods to ensure optimal off-bottom and drill bit distance under pellet impact drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Isaev, Ye D.; Vagapov, A. R.; Urnish, V. V.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rock for various purposes. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The paper presents the survey of methods ensuring an optimal off-bottom and a drill bit distance. The analysis of methods shows that the issue is topical and requires further research.

  10. Evaluation of polymers of different degrees viscosities as additives for drilling fluids for oil well; Avaliacao de polimeros de diferentes graus de viscosidades como aditivos para fluidos de perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, K.V.; Amorim, L.V.; Silva, A.V. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (DEMa/UFCG), PB (Brazil); Lira, H.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais], e-mail: kassiefarias@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this work is to study the polymers influence of different degrees of viscosity, used as viscositying and filtered reducer additives, in the rheological, filtration and lubricity properties of drilling fluids for oil wells. Were determined the rheological behavior, the apparent and plastic viscosities, the yield limit and gel force, the filtered volume and the lubricity coefficient in accordance with API standard. The fluids showed pseudoplastic behavior with properties close to the standard fluid; the increase of viscositying and filtered reducer concentrations lead to the increase of rheological properties and the filtered reducer values, from the concentration of 3,5g/350mL of water it acted as viscositying, increasing the values of apparent and plastic viscosities, yield limit and gel force, being 3,0g/350mL of water the adequate concentration of this additive, promoting better results of rheological and filtration properties. (author)

  11. Caractérisation rhéologique et modélisation structurelle des systèmes argile-polymère. Application aux fluides de forage Rheometry and Structural Modelling of Clay-Polymer Systems. Application to Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartalos U.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Le comportement rhéologique des systèmes argile-polymère couramment utilisés dans les formulations des fluides de forage est examiné dans cet article. Un protocole d'essai adapté à leur nature thixotrope qui permet d'effectuer des mesures reproductibles est mis au point. Les propriétés intrinsèques du matériau sont ainsi déterminées sur toute la gamme de sollicitations : du comportement solide aux faibles déformations au comportement fluide aux taux de déformations intenses. Il est montré que ces systèmes sont caractérisés par des temps de restructuration longs, par des rhéogrammes en régime permanent présentant un minimum de contrainte et par des dépassements importants de la contrainte lors des essais transitoires. Ces effets peuvent être complètement masqués par des procédures d'essai préconisés par les normes en vigueur dans le forage. Une loi de comportement structurelle récente qui relie les propriétés thixotropes et viscoélastiques du matériau aux mécanismes de création et de rupture des flocs peut reproduire l'ensemble des phénomènes observés. Sa capacité de décrire le changement de structure au sein du fluide sous écoulement ou au repos et les variations associées de la contrainte permet d'envisager une meilleure modélisation de l'hydraulique du forage. The rheological behaviour of clay-polymer systems that are currently used in the formulation of drilling fluids was studied. A specific experimental procedure was used to account for thixotropic effects and obtain, thus, reproducible results. In this way it was possible to determine intrinsic properties in the whole range, from solid behaviour below the yield stress to liquid behaviour at very high shear. These systems are shown to be characterised by very long time scales of structure recovery, by the existence of a minimum shear stress in the steady state flow curve and by important stress overshoots in transient flows. These effects can be

  12. System and method for improving performance of a fluid sensor for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubinski, David [Canton, MI; Zawacki, Garry [Livonia, MI

    2009-03-03

    A system and method for improving sensor performance of an on-board vehicle sensor, such as an exhaust gas sensor, while sensing a predetermined substance in a fluid flowing through a pipe include a structure for extending into the pipe and having at least one inlet for receiving fluid flowing through the pipe and at least one outlet generally opposite the at least one inlet, wherein the structure redirects substantially all fluid flowing from the at least one inlet to the sensor to provide a representative sample of the fluid to the sensor before returning the fluid through the at least one outlet.

  13. An experimental system for coiled tubing partial underbalanced drilling (CT-PUBD) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H. Z.; Ji, Z. S.; Zhao, H. Q.; Chen, Z. L.; Zhang, H. Z.

    2018-05-01

    To improve the rate of penetration (ROP) in hard formations, a new high-speed drilling technique called Coiled Tubing Partial Underbalanced Drilling (CT-PUBD) is proposed. This method uses a rotary packer to realize an underbalanced condition near the bit by creating a micro-annulus and an overbalanced condition at the main part of the annulus. A new full-scale laboratory experimental system is designed and set up to study the hydraulic characteristics and drilling performance of this method. The system is composed of a drilling system, circulation system, and monitor system, including three key devices, namely, cuttings discharge device, rotary packer, and backflow device. The experimental results showed that the pressure loss increased linearly with the flow rate of the drilling fluid. The high drilling speed of CT-PUBD proved it a better drilling method than the conventional drilling. The experimental system may provide a fundamental basis for the research of CT-PUBD, and the results proved that this new method is feasible in enhancing ROP and guaranteeing the drilling safety.

  14. Study on the effect of innovative leaching solvent on the oil removal for oily drilling cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ma, Cha; Hao, Weiwei; Li, Mu; Huang, Zhao; Liu, Yushuang

    2018-02-01

    A new type of leaching solvent for oily drilling cuttings was developed, and the effect of leaching solvent on the oil removal for oily cuttings was investigated. The results indicated that the leaching solvent had good capacity of oil removal for oily cuttings, and the oil content of treated cuttings is less than 0.6%. The leaching solvent could be separated from the oil phase through distillation, and the recyclable solvent could be reused to treat other cuttings. Moreover, oil resources adsorbed on the oily cuttings could be recycled and reused to prepare new drilling fluids, so the drilling cost could be reduced greatly. As a result, the leaching solvent could treat the oily cuttings effectively, and recycle and reuse oil resources, and thus produce great economic benefits. It can play an essential role in safe drilling jobs and improvement of drilling efficiency in the future.

  15. Influence of plasma shock wave on the morphology of laser drilling in different environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhaoyang; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Kedian; Yang, Huizhu

    2017-05-01

    Nanosecond pulse laser was used to study nickel-based alloy drilling and compare processing results of microholes in air environment and water environment. Through analysis and comparison, it's found that environmental medium had obvious influence on morphology of laser drilling. High-speed camera was used to shoot plasma morphology during laser drilling process, theoretical formula was used to calculate boundary dimension of plasma and shock wave velocity, and finally parameters were substituted into computational fluid dynamics simulation software to obtain solutions. Obtained analysis results could intuitively explain different morphological features and forming reasons between laser drilling in air environment and water environment in the experiment from angle of plasma shock waves. By comparing simulation results and experimental results, it could help to get an understanding of formation mechanism of microhole morphology, thus providing basis for further improving process optimization of laser drilling quality.

  16. Relation between structure and properties of modified starches. Application to the formulation of non-polluting drilling fluids; Relation structure/proprietes d'amidons modifies. Application a la formulation de fluides de forage non polluants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, I.

    1999-12-06

    Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate derivative with anhydro-glucose units and is extracted from the tissues of certain plants. In its native form, starch granule is non soluble in cold water and therefore most applications need a cooking period in the presence of an excess of water. The cooking treatment is therefore associated with large changes in viscosity. Overall, starch suspensions properties are strongly influenced by starch botanical origins, shearing and heating conditions under which they are prepared. Their properties can be modulated though chemical modifications depending on their uses in the petroleum industry. This study focuses on the relations between structure and physico-chemical, rheological and filtration properties of modified starches. These starches are originated from native potato, i. e. hydroxy-propyl and/or crosslinked starches above or below the gelatinization temperature. The samples were characterised in terms of swelling capacity, average granule size distribution and molecular weight. Microscopic methods were used to investigate starch structure. Relations were established between the rheological properties and the physico-chemical parameters. These properties are governed by the deformability and rigidity parameters as a function of the concentration. The best samples were then chosen and were submitted to the high temperature (140 deg. C - 160 deg. C), high shearing (16000 tr/ mn) and salinity (CaCl{sub 2}, 1M). The physico-chemical and rheological studies showed that the starch system which is crosslinked below the gelatinization temperature is more resistant that the samples crosslinked above the gelatinization temperature. Then, a drilling fluid formulation was investigated. The filtration results evidenced an increase of the cake permeability in the presence of starch particles but the good stability of these samples permits their uses for high temperature. Thus, non crosslinked / crosslinked starch mixtures were investigated

  17. Relation between structure and properties of modified starches. Application to the formulation of non-polluting drilling fluids; Relation structure/proprietes d'amidons modifies. Application a la formulation de fluides de forage non polluants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, I

    1999-12-06

    Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate derivative with anhydro-glucose units and is extracted from the tissues of certain plants. In its native form, starch granule is non soluble in cold water and therefore most applications need a cooking period in the presence of an excess of water. The cooking treatment is therefore associated with large changes in viscosity. Overall, starch suspensions properties are strongly influenced by starch botanical origins, shearing and heating conditions under which they are prepared. Their properties can be modulated though chemical modifications depending on their uses in the petroleum industry. This study focuses on the relations between structure and physico-chemical, rheological and filtration properties of modified starches. These starches are originated from native potato, i. e. hydroxy-propyl and/or crosslinked starches above or below the gelatinization temperature. The samples were characterised in terms of swelling capacity, average granule size distribution and molecular weight. Microscopic methods were used to investigate starch structure. Relations were established between the rheological properties and the physico-chemical parameters. These properties are governed by the deformability and rigidity parameters as a function of the concentration. The best samples were then chosen and were submitted to the high temperature (140 deg. C - 160 deg. C), high shearing (16000 tr/ mn) and salinity (CaCl{sub 2}, 1M). The physico-chemical and rheological studies showed that the starch system which is crosslinked below the gelatinization temperature is more resistant that the samples crosslinked above the gelatinization temperature. Then, a drilling fluid formulation was investigated. The filtration results evidenced an increase of the cake permeability in the presence of starch particles but the good stability of these samples permits their uses for high temperature. Thus, non crosslinked / crosslinked starch mixtures were investigated

  18. Semi-industrial production of organo clays to use in base oil drilling fluid; Producao em escala piloto de argilas organofilicas visando uso em fluidos de perfuracao base oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Heber S.; Martins, Alice B.; Costa, Danubia L. da; Ferreira, Heber C.; Neves, Gelmires de A.; Melo, Tomas J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Teixeira Neto, Erico [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The drilling fluids are essential to the operations of exploration of oil. The organoclays are widely used in the composition of the oil based drilling fluids and raw materials are of high value added. These clays can be obtained, traditionally, from bentonitic clay treated, in water, with ionic surfactants, however, non-ionic surfactants can be adsorbed on the surface of interlamelar bentonitic clay, naturally hydrophilic, making them organophilic. A pilot plant for production of organoclays was mounted in the Recycling Laboratory / UFCG. The bentonitic clay imported Cloisite Na{sup +R} was treated with a non-ionic surfactant in levels of 40, 50 and 60% in scale and bench-scale pilot. The commercial organoclay VG-69{sup R} was used as a standard for comparison of results. The clay obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and Foster's swelling. The oil based fluids were prepared in accordance with the standards of PETROBRAS (N-22581 1997 and N-2259, 1997). Tests show that the characterization of organoclays have obtained intercalation of non-ionic surfactant with great expansion of layers of clay, with interlayer distances more significant than the clay trade, both on clay obtained in the laboratory scale as in clays obtained by pilot scale, with results very similar for both methods. It appears that it is possible the pilot-scale production of organoclays with equivalent quality produced in the laboratory scale and quality compatible with the clay used commercially. (author)

  19. Drilling rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galiopa, A A; Yegorov, E K

    1981-01-04

    A drilling rig is proposed which contains a tower, lifter in the form of n infinite chain, and mobile rotator with holding device connected to the chain, and pipe holder. In order to accelerate the auxiliary operations to move the drilling string and unloaded rotator, the rotator is equipped with a clamp with means for transverse connection of it to both branches of the chain, while the pipe holders equipped with a clamp with means of connecting it to one of the branches of the chain.

  20. An improved apparatus for pressure-injecting fluid into trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garold F. Gregory; Thomas W. Jones

    1975-01-01

    Our original tree-injection apparatus was modified to be more convenient and efficient. The fluid reservoir consists of high-pressure plastic plumbing components. Quick couplers are used for all hose connections. Most important, the injector heads were modified for a faster and more convenient and secure attachment with double-headed nails.

  1. You say you want a revolution: casing drilling targets 30 per cent well-cost saving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polczer, S.; Marsters, S.

    1999-10-01

    Casing drilling is a new method of drilling that eliminates drill strings by using standard casing to simultaneously drill and case wells. Tesco Corporation of Calgary acquired patent rights to casing drilling technology in 1995. The company now offers a conversion kit for existing drill rigs as well a new compact casing drilling rig for shallow markets. The single derrick will be rated at 1,500 meters, but initially it will be used to drill 700-800 meter gas wells in southeast Alberta. Some cost savings will be realized at these shallow depths, but the real cost saving advantages will be realized on deep holes. In the meantime, improvements are planned to the cutting structures of the under-rimming bit to increase safety and withstand higher torque loads. It will be also necessary to adapt techniques such as directional drilling and logging to the casing drilling conveyance mechanism which has been only partially successful thus far, especially in the retrieving mode. Another challenge already met, involved ensuring that casing could be run in high-compression loads without damage to connections. Despite these problems, the system attracted considerable attention with several international companies placing orders for immediate delivery. Another system, this one developed by Sperry-Sun Drilling Services and known as a 'casing while drilling' (CWD) system, is strictly a downhole assembly and is targeted for offshore use and deeper vertical holes. This system is currently being tested in two commercial operations in offshore Indonesia for Unocal Corporation. Despite numerous problems to fill casing with fluid during connections, penetration rates of 300-400 feet per hour were achieved.

  2. New drilling optimization technologies make drilling more efficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.C.-K. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada). Sperry Division

    2004-07-01

    Several new technologies have been adopted by the upstream petroleum industry in the past two decades in order to optimize drilling operations and improve drilling efficiency. Since financial returns from an oil and gas investment strongly depend on drilling costs, it is important to reduce non-productive time due to stuck pipes, lost circulation, hole cleaning and well bore stability problems. The most notable new technologies are the use of computer-based instrumentation and data acquisition systems, integrated rig site systems and networks, and Measurement-While-Drilling and Logging-While-Drilling (MWD/LWD) systems. Drilling optimization should include solutions for drillstring integrity, hydraulics management and wellbore integrity. New drilling optimization methods emphasize information management and real-time decision making. A recent study for drilling in shallow water in the Gulf of Mexico demonstrates that trouble time accounts for 25 per cent of rig time. This translates to about $1.5 MM U.S. per well. A reduction in trouble time could result in significant cost savings for the industry. This paper presents a case study on vibration prevention to demonstrate how the drilling industry has benefited from new technologies. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Optimization of Mud Hammer Drilling Performance--A Program to Benchmark the Viability of Advanced Mud Hammer Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnis Judzis

    2006-03-01

    Operators continue to look for ways to improve hard rock drilling performance through emerging technologies. A consortium of Department of Energy, operator and industry participants put together an effort to test and optimize mud driven fluid hammers as one emerging technology that has shown promise to increase penetration rates in hard rock. The thrust of this program has been to test and record the performance of fluid hammers in full scale test conditions including, hard formations at simulated depth, high density/high solids drilling muds, and realistic fluid power levels. This paper details the testing and results of testing two 7 3/4 inch diameter mud hammers with 8 1/2 inch hammer bits. A Novatek MHN5 and an SDS Digger FH185 mud hammer were tested with several bit types, with performance being compared to a conventional (IADC Code 537) tricone bit. These tools functionally operated in all of the simulated downhole environments. The performance was in the range of the baseline ticone or better at lower borehole pressures, but at higher borehole pressures the performance was in the lower range or below that of the baseline tricone bit. A new drilling mode was observed, while operating the MHN5 mud hammer. This mode was noticed as the weight on bit (WOB) was in transition from low to high applied load. During this new ''transition drilling mode'', performance was substantially improved and in some cases outperformed the tricone bit. Improvements were noted for the SDS tool while drilling with a more aggressive bit design. Future work includes the optimization of these or the next generation tools for operating in higher density and higher borehole pressure conditions and improving bit design and technology based on the knowledge gained from this test program.

  4. Evacuation drill at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont-Sagorin and Christoph Schaefer

    2012-01-01

    Training personnel, including evacuation guides and shifters, checking procedures, improving collaboration with the CERN Fire Brigade: the first real-life evacuation drill at CMS took place on Friday 3 February from 12p.m. to 3p.m. in the two caverns located at Point 5 of the LHC.   CERN personnel during the evacuation drill at CMS. Evacuation drills are required by law and have to be organized periodically in all areas of CERN, both above and below ground. The last drill at CMS, which took place in June 2007, revealed some desiderata, most notably the need for a public address system. With this equipment in place, it is now possible to broadcast audio messages from the CMS control room to the underground areas.   The CMS Technical Coordination Team and the GLIMOS have focused particularly on preparing collaborators for emergency situations by providing training and organizing regular safety drills with the HSE Unit and the CERN Fire Brigade. This Friday, the practical traini...

  5. Modern Shale Gas Horizontal Drilling: Review of Best Practices for Exploration Phase Planning and Execution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nathaniel Harding; Stephen Smith; John Shelton; Mike D. Bumaman

    2009-01-01

    The challenging characteristics of shale formations often require horizontal drilling to economically develop their potential. While every shale gas play is unique, there are several best practices for the proper planning and execution of a horizontal well. In planning a horizontal well, the optimal method and technology for building inclination and extending the lateral section must be determined. Properly specified logging-while-drilling tools are essential to keep the wellbore within the target formation. Planning must also focus on casing design. Doing so will help ensure stability and enable reliable and productive completions. Shales pose a challenge for these elements of well planning due to their thin strata and potentially low mechanical competence when foreign fluids are introduced. Once a plan is developed, executing it is even more important to prove a viable exploration program. Fast, efficient drilling with wellbore control and minimal torque and drag should be the priority. This may be achieved by focusing on fluid hydraulics and rheology and bottom hole assembly. Managed pressure drilling (MPD) will help fast drilling, well control and stability. If MPD can be combined with new generation rotary steerable systems that allow the drill string to maintain rotation, impressive efficiencies are possible. Modern drilling parameter analysis represents the newest opportunity for executing shale gas horizontal wells. A method for ROP analysis to improve operational parameters and equipment selection is also proposed.

  6. Progress in reducing the environmental impacts of offshore drilling wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flemming, D; Candler, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Full text:Over the past several years, great progress has been made in understanding and reducing the environmental impacts of offshore drilling wastes. Our understanding of sea floor impacts has been helped along by new environmental assessment tools such us computer modeling of sea floor deposition of drilling discharges, sediment profile imaging, and in situ sediment toxicity bioassays. To further reduce environmental impacts, new pollution prevention technologies have been developed that can shrink the environmental footprint of offshore drilling. These technologies reduce the total amount of drilling wastes discharged and include cuttings dryers and centrifuges that can reduce the drilling fluid content of drill cuttings to below 10 percent. In conclusion, the oil and gas industry is adopting more environmentally compatible drilling fluids, new environmental assessment tools and pollution prevention technologies that dramatically reduce the amount of drilling wastes discharged. Together, all of these elements have the potential to reduce environmental impacts of offshore drilling

  7. Review of casing while drilling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavković Bojan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional drilling methods have been plagued with huge operational and financial challenges, such as cost of purchasing, inspecting, handling, transporting the drill equipment and most importantly, tripping in-and-out of the drill string whenever the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA needs a replacement, needs of wiper trip or when total depth is reached. The tripping in-and-out of the drill string not only contributes to Non Productive Time (NPT but also leads to well control difficulties including wellbore instability and lost circulation. All this has led Oil and Gas industry, as well as any other engineering industry, to seek for new ways and methods in order to reduce these problems. Thanks to the advances in technical solutions and constant improvements of conventional drilling methods, a new drilling method - casing while drilling has been developed. Casing Drilling encompasses the process of simultaneously drilling and casing a well, using the active casing and thus optimizes the production. This paper presents a review of casing while drilling method (CwD and its practical usage in drilling wells. The comparison of conventional drilling method and casing while drilling is also presented. The CwD method achieves significantly better results than conventional drilling method.

  8. Technologies in deep and ultra-deep well drilling: Present status, challenges and future trend in the 13th Five-Year Plan period (2016–2020

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haige Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During the 12th Five-Year Plan period (2011–2015, CNPC independently developed a series of new drilling equipment, tools and chemical materials for deep and ultra-deep wells, including six packages of key drilling equipment: rigs for wells up to 8000 m deep, quadruple-joint-stand rigs, automatic pipe handling devices for rigs for wells being 5000/7000 m deep, managed pressure drilling systems & equipment, gas/fuel alternative combustion engine units, and air/gas/underbalanced drilling systems; seven sets of key drilling tools: automatic vertical well drilling tools, downhole turbine tools, high-performance PDC bits, hybrid bits, bit jet pulsation devices, no-drilling-surprise monitoring system, & casing running devices for top drive; and five kinds of drilling fluids and cementing slurries: high temperature and high density water-based drilling fluids, oil-based drilling fluids, high temperature and large temperature difference cementing slurry, and ductile cement slurry system. These new development technologies have played an important role in supporting China's oil and gas exploration and development business. During the following 13th Five-Year Plan period (2016–2020, there are still many challenges to the drilling of deep and ultra-deep wells, such as high temperatures, high pressures, narrow pressure window, wellbore integrity and so on, as well as the enormous pressure on cost reduction and efficiency improvement. Therefore, the future development trend will be focused on the development of efficient and mobile rigs, high-performance drill bits and auxiliary tools, techniques for wellbore integrity and downhole broadband telemetry, etc. In conclusion, this study will help improve the ability and level of drilling ultra-deep wells and provide support for oil and gas exploration and development services in China. Keywords: Deep well, Ultra-deep well, Drilling techniques, Progress, Challenge, Strategy, CNPC

  9. High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Kamalesh [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States); Aaron, Dick [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States); Macpherson, John [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Many countries around the world, including the USA, have untapped geothermal energy potential. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology is needed to economically utilize this resource. Temperatures in some EGS reservoirs can exceed 300°C. To effectively utilize EGS resources, an array of injector and production wells must be accurately placed in the formation fracture network. This requires a high temperature directional drilling system. Most commercial services for directional drilling systems are rated for 175°C while geothermal wells require operation at much higher temperatures. Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) projects have been initiated to develop a 300°C capable directional drilling system, the first developing a drill bit, directional motor, and drilling fluid, and the second adding navigation and telemetry systems. This report is for the first project, “High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System, including drill bit, directional motor and drilling fluid, for enhanced geothermal systems,” award number DE-EE0002782. The drilling system consists of a drill bit, a directional motor, and drilling fluid. The DOE deliverables are three prototype drilling systems. We have developed three drilling motors; we have developed four roller-cone and five Kymera® bits; and finally, we have developed a 300°C stable drilling fluid, along with a lubricant additive for the metal-to-metal motor. Metal-to-metal directional motors require coatings to the rotor and stator for wear and corrosion resistance, and this coating research has been a significant part of the project. The drill bits performed well in the drill bit simulator test, and the complete drilling system has been tested drilling granite at Baker Hughes’ Experimental Test Facility in Oklahoma. The metal-to-metal motor was additionally subjected to a flow loop test in Baker Hughes’ Celle Technology Center in Germany, where it ran for more than 100

  10. A new drilling method-Earthworm-like vibration drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Ni, Hongjian; Wang, Ruihe

    2018-01-01

    The load transfer difficulty caused by borehole wall friction severely limits the penetration rate and extended-reach limit of complex structural wells. A new friction reduction technology termed "earthworm-like drilling" is proposed in this paper to improve the load transfer of complex structural wells. A mathematical model based on a "soft-string" model is developed and solved. The results show that earthworm-like drilling is more effective than single-point vibration drilling. The amplitude and frequency of the pulse pressure and the installation position of the shakers have a substantial impact on friction reduction and load transfer. An optimization model based on the projection gradient method is developed and used to optimize the position of three shakers in a horizontal well. The results verify the feasibility and advantages of earthworm-like drilling, and establish a solid theoretical foundation for its application in oil field drilling.

  11. Case drilling - an innovative approach to reducing drilling costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madell, G.; Tessari, R. M. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Warren, T. [Tesco Drilling Technology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    Casing drilling is introduced as a new drilling technique that uses standard oil field casing to simultaneously drill and case the well. The technology includes both rig and downhole equipment, customized to function effectively as an integrated drilling system. This paper describes the testing program designed to identify and overcome technical challenges. Although not fully optimized, it appears that the system is functional. Test results indicate the need for improvements in the pump down cement float equipment and the tools and procedures for drilling up the cement plugs. The pump down latch and retrieval system also needs to be further developed and tested for high angle directional applications. Cost savings in the range of 10 to 15 per cent are expected for trouble-free wells. By eliminating the cost of unscheduled events encountered in troublesome wells, cost savings may reach as high as 30 per cent. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  13. Synthesis of polyisoprene and its evaluation as reducer of flow loss temperature of paraffinic drilling fluid; Sintese de poliisopreno e sua avaliacao como redutor da temperatura de perda de fluidez de fluido de perfuracao parafinico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palermo, Luiz Carlos; Pires, Renata V.; Sant' Anna, Monica; Cardoso, Jaciene J.F.; Lucas, Elizabete F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/ Instituto de Macromoleculas/ Laboratorio de Macromoleculas e Coloides na Industria de Petroleo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: luizpalermo@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-07-01

    N-paraffin fluids are widely used in drilling oil wells. However, under low temperature, such as those found in deep water, they lose their ability to flow due to solidification of paraffins. In order to keep the fluid flowing, isoparaffins are added to fluids. Nevertheless, the safety of the process is affected, due to its low flash point, especially during the storage in platforms offshore. This paper aims to obtain polymeric additives that can reduce the flow loss temperature of the n-paraffin fluid, replacing the isoparaffin, without affecting its rheological properties. So, oligomers/polymers based on isoprene were synthesized and the rheological behavior of the products and their mixtures with n-paraffin, as a function of decreasing temperature, was evaluated. Products from chemical degradation of natural rubber (NR) were also evaluated. The results showed that samples presenting relatively low molar mass, about 5,000 g/mol, exhibited good performance. When obtaining product by polymerization, a chain transfer agent must be used. (author)

  14. Improving students’ conceptions on fluid dynamics through peer teaching model with PDEODE (PTM-PDEODE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudin, A.; Fratiwi, N.; Amin, N.; Wiendartun; Supriyatman; Wibowo, F.; Faizin, M.; Costu, B.

    2018-05-01

    This study based on an importance of improving students’ conceptions and reduces students’ misconceptions on fluid dynamics concepts. Consequently, should be done the study through combining Peer Teaching Model (PTM) and PDEODE (Prediction, Discuss, Explain, Observe, Discuss and Explain) learning strategy (PTM-PDEODE). For the research methods, we used the 4D model (Defining, Designing, Developing, and Disseminating). The samples are 38 students (their ages were an average of 17 years-old) at one of the senior high schools in Bandung. The improvement of students’ conceptions was diagnosed through a four-tier test of fluid dynamics. At the disseminating phase, students’ conceptions of fluid dynamics concepts are increase after the use of PTM-PDEODE. In conclusion, the development of PTM-PDEODE is respectable enough to improve students’ conceptions on dinamics fluid.

  15. Study of the stability of sugar Ester and its application potential with additives in the drilling fluids; Estudo da estabilidade do ester de acucar e sua potencial aplicacao como aditivo em fluido de perfuracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Suzan I.G.; Costa, Marta; Macedo, Sinara P.N. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work describe the enzymatic synthesis of the glucose ester starting from fatty acid, using protease Bacillus subtilis as biologic catalyst. The efficiency of ester has determined through the surface tension analyses in different pH (2-12), temperature (25-100 deg C) and salinity (50-115 g/L of NaCl). For a better understanding as for the applicability of the ester of sugar in drilling fluids, it was done necessary to know the values of interfacial tension of the oil/water; in that analysis, the mineral oil was investigated as oily phase and, as aqueous phase, biosurfactant solution. The results of interfacial tension of the water/oil and biosurfactant /oil they allowed to quantify us the influence of the benefactor's front to an organic phase, because the same made a significant reduction the interfacial tension of 26,0725 mN/m (water/oil) or 1,7527 mN/m (biosurfactant aqueous solution/oil). D-glucose ester was shown stable in different concentrations of NaCl, pH and temperature, and efficient in the reduction of the superficial tension of the water (of 72 mN/m for 28 mN/m). Preliminary test reveal that the ricinoleoil of D-glucose presents functionality as lubricant for drilling fluids to the base water. In the studied formulations, the obtained composition reduces the coefficient of lubricity of 0,20 for 0,04 and it stabilizes the fluid, reducing the volume of the filtrate of 5,0 mL for 3,4 mL. (author)

  16. ResonantSonic drilling. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The technology of ResonantSonic drilling is described. This technique has been demonstrated and deployed as an innovative tool to access the subsurface for installation of monitoring and/or remediation wells and for collection of subsurface materials for environmental restoration applications. The technology uses no drilling fluids, is safe and can be used to drill slant holes

  17. Drilling mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranovskiy, V D; Brintsev, A I; Gusev, V G; Katenev, Ye P; Pokhorenko, I V

    1979-10-25

    A drilling mud is proposed, which contains a dispersion medium, a dispersion phase, for instance, clay, a stabilizer reagent, for instance, carboxymethylcellulose and a weighter. In order to reduce the viscosity and to increase the stability of the mud it contains as the dispersion medium a 75% aqueous solution of the L-7 reagent. To increase the salt resistance of the mud, it additionally contains sodium chloride in a volume of 4.04.5 percent by weight, and to regulate the alkalinity, it additionally contains sodium hydroxide in a volume of 1.1 to 1.3 percent by weight.

  18. Radioimmunoassay of the myelin basic protein in biological fluids, conditions improving sensitivity and specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delassalle, A.; Jacque, C.; Raoul, M.; Legrand, J.C.; Cesselin, F.; Drouet, J.

    1980-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay (RIA) for myelin basic protein (MBP) in biological fluids was reassessed in order to improve its sensitivity and eliminate some interferences. By using the pre-incubation technique and the charcoal-dextram-horse serum mixture for the separation step, the detection limit could be lowered to 200 pg/ml for cerebrospinal fluids (CSF), amniotic fluids (AF) and nervous tissue extracts and 600 pg/ml for sera. The RIA could be used directly on CSF, AF and nervous tissue extracts. Sera, however, had to be heated in citrate buffer at 100 0 C in order to discard interfering material. The present method is 10 to 20 times more sensitive than others previously published. Moreover, it can be applied to amniotic fluid. The biological fluids had to be promptly frozen to avoid degradation of MBP

  19. Drilling of bone: A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rupesh Kumar; Panda, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone fracture treatment usually involves restoring of the fractured parts to their initial position and immobilizing them until the healing takes place. Drilling of bone is common to produce hole for screw insertion to fix the fractured parts for immobilization. Orthopaedic drilling during surgical process causes increase in the bone temperature and forces which can cause osteonecrosis reducing the stability and strength of the fixation. Methods A comprehensive review of all the relevant investigations carried on bone drilling is conducted. The experimental method used, results obtained and the conclusions made by the various researchers are described and compared. Result Review suggests that the further improvement in the area of bone drilling is possible. The systematic review identified several consequential factors (drilling parameters and drill specifications) affecting bone drilling on which there no general agreement among investigators or are not adequately evaluated. These factors are highlighted and use of more advanced methods of drilling is accentuated. The use of more precise experimental set up which resembles the actual situation and the development of automated bone drilling system to minimize human error is addressed. Conclusion In this review, an attempt has been made to systematically organize the research investigations conducted on bone drilling. Methods of treatment of bone fracture, studies on the determination of the threshold for thermal osteonecrosis, studies on the parameters influencing bone drilling and methods of the temperature measurement used are reviewed and the future work for the further improvement of bone drilling process is highlighted. PMID:26403771

  20. Application of MRIL-WD (Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging While Drilling) for irreducible water saturation, total reservoir, free-fluid, bound-fluid porosity measurements and its value for the petrophysical analysis of RT/RM data from the Shah Deniz well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    Sperry-Sun (Sperry Drilling Services) is the leader in MWD/LWD reliability, has developed the industry's first LWD NMR/MRIL-WD (nuclear magnetic resonance) tool. The MRIL-WD (magnetic resonance imaging logging-while-drilling) service directly measures the T1 component of hydrogen in subsurface rock units while drilling to obtain total reservoir porosity and to dissect the observed total porosity into its respective components of free fluid and bound fluid porosity. These T1 data are used to secure accurate total, free-fluid, capillary-bound water, and clay-bound water porosity of the reservoir sections which can be drilled in the several Runs. Over the last decade, results from Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs (NMR) have added significant value to petrophysical analysis and understanding by providing total, free-fluid and bound-fluid porosities, combined with fluid typing capabilities. With MRIL-WD very valuable Real-Time or Recorded Memory data/information is now available during or shortly after the drilling operation (formation properties measurement can be taken right after a drill bit penetration), while trip in and trip out as well. A key point in utilizing MRIL in an LWD environment is motion-tolerant measurements. Recent MRIL-WD logging runs from the Shah Deniz wells located in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic helped to delineate and assess hydrocarbon bearing zones. Acquired results demonstrate how MRIL data can be acquired while-drilling and provide reliable/high quality measurements. Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs at some developments wells have become a cornerstone in formation evaluation and petrophysical understanding. By providing total, free-fluid, and bound-fluid porosities together with fluid typing, MRIL results have significantly added to the assessment of reservoirs. In order to reduce NPT (Non-Productive Time) and save the rig operations time, there is always the desire to obtain logging results as soon as possible

  1. Drilling Performance of Rock Drill by High-Pressure Water Jet under Different Configuration Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the rock drilling progress, the resistant force results in tools failure and the low drilling efficiency; thus, it is necessary to reduce the tools failure and enhance the drilling efficiency. In this paper, different configuration modes of drilling performance assisted with water jet are explored based on the mechanism and experiment analysis of rock drilling assisted with water jet. Moreover, the rotary sealing device with high pressure is designed to achieve the axial and rotation movement simultaneously as well as good sealing effect under high-pressure water jet. The results indicate that the NDB and NFB have better effects on drilling performance compared with that of NSB. Moreover, the high-pressure water jet is helpful not only to reduce the drill rod deflection, but also to reduce the probability of drill rod bending and improve the drill rod service life.

  2. A potential spatial working memory training task to improve both episodic memory and fluid intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Rudebeck

    Full Text Available One current challenge in cognitive training is to create a training regime that benefits multiple cognitive domains, including episodic memory, without relying on a large battery of tasks, which can be time-consuming and difficult to learn. By giving careful consideration to the neural correlates underlying episodic and working memory, we devised a computerized working memory training task in which neurologically healthy participants were required to monitor and detect repetitions in two streams of spatial information (spatial location and scene identity presented simultaneously (i.e. a dual n-back paradigm. Participants' episodic memory abilities were assessed before and after training using two object and scene recognition memory tasks incorporating memory confidence judgments. Furthermore, to determine the generalizability of the effects of training, we also assessed fluid intelligence using a matrix reasoning task. By examining the difference between pre- and post-training performance (i.e. gain scores, we found that the trainers, compared to non-trainers, exhibited a significant improvement in fluid intelligence after 20 days. Interestingly, pre-training fluid intelligence performance, but not training task improvement, was a significant predictor of post-training fluid intelligence improvement, with lower pre-training fluid intelligence associated with greater post-training gain. Crucially, trainers who improved the most on the training task also showed an improvement in recognition memory as captured by d-prime scores and estimates of recollection and familiarity memory. Training task improvement was a significant predictor of gains in recognition and familiarity memory performance, with greater training improvement leading to more marked gains. In contrast, lower pre-training recollection memory scores, and not training task improvement, led to greater recollection memory performance after training. Our findings demonstrate that practice

  3. Cleaning fluid emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikryl, J; Kotyza, R; Krulikovsky, J; Mjartan, V; Valisova, I

    1981-09-15

    Composition of cleaning fluid emulsion are presented for drilling small diameter wells in clay soils, at high drill bit rotation velocity. The emulsions have lubricating properties and the abilty to improve stability of the drilled soil. The given fluids have a high fatty acid content with 12-24 carbon atoms in a single molecule, with a predominance of resinous acids 1-5% in mass, and having been emulsified in water or clay suspension without additives, or in a clay suspension with high-molecular polymer additives (glycobate cellulose compounds and/or polysaccharides, and/or their derivatives) in an amount of 0.1-3% per mass; thinning agents - huminite or lignite compounds in the amount of 0.01 to 0.5% in mass; weighting material - barite or lime 0.01 to 50% per mass; medium stabilizers - organic poly-electrolyte with polyacrylate in the amount of 0.05 to 2% in mass, or alkaline chloride/alkaline-ground metals 1-10% per mass. A cleaning emulsion fluid was prepared in the laboratory according to the given method. Add 3 kg tall oil to a solution of 1 kg K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ per 100 l of water. Dynamic viscosity was equal to 1.4 x 10-/sup 3/ Pa/s. When drilling in compacted clay soils, when the emulsions require improved stability, it is necessary to add the maximum amount of tall oil whose molecules are absorbed by the clay soil and increase its durability.

  4. Improving total-building seismic performance using linear fluid viscous dampers

    OpenAIRE

    Del Gobbo, GM; Blakeborough, A; Williams, MS

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that Eurocode-compliant structures can experience structural and nonstructural damage during earthquakes. Retrofitting buildings with fluid viscous dampers (FVDs) can improve interstorey drifts and floor accelerations, two structural parameters that characterize seismic demand. Previous research focusing on FVD applications for improving seismic performance has focused on structural performance. Structural parameters such as interstorey drifts and floor accelera...

  5. A comparison of nano bentonite and some nano chemical additives to improve drilling fluid using local clay and commercial bentonites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada S. Al-Zubaidi

    2017-09-01

    In the second part, a commercial bentonite was used and mixed with nano commercial bentonite and nano chemical materials (MgO, TiO2, and graphene at 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 wt% concentrations. The results showed that nano commercial bentonite gives the same filtration behavior of graphene, whereas, the plastic viscosity, yield point and apparent viscosity were the same when using nano commercial bentonite, TiO2 and graphene. The best results were obtained with MgO addition, whereby the filter loss decreased to 35% with a higher value of yield point.

  6. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia M.

    2010-12-28

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  7. Use of organoclays obtained with nonionic surfactants for drilling fluids base organic; O uso de argilas organofilicas obtidas com tensoativo nao-ionico para fluidos de perfuracao base organica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, F.K.A. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UATEC/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Tecnologia do Desenvolvimento], e-mail: kegealves@ufcg.edu.br; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C.; Silva, A.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG/UAEMa), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Campos, L.F.A. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, DEMat/CCT/UFPB, PB (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This paper aims to use the compositions of organo clays obtained with nonionic surfactant for drilling fluids organic base containing additives, emulsifiers, brine, activator, reducer filtered, adensante and evaluate their rheological, filtration and electrical stability. Were studied through the mixture delineament, ten compositions of organo clays, and its performance is evaluated by means of the rheological behavior (flow curves, GI, GF, VA, VP and LE) and the tests recommended by API (PE, EE and VF). The results were compared with the standard PETROBRAS and showed that among the developed compositions, two compositions showed promising that met most of the properties and use the clay of inferior quality (Bofe and Verde-lodo) in greater quantity and minimum clay Chocolate UBM, considered the best clay in the region mines Boa Vista, PB. (author)

  8. Drilling miniature holes, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-07-01

    Miniature components for precision electromechanical mechanisms such as switches, timers, and actuators typically require a number of small holes. Because of the precision required, the workpiece materials, and the geometry of the parts, most of these holes must be produced by conventional drilling techniques. The use of such techniques is tedious and often requires considerable trial and error to prevent drill breakage, minimize hole mislocation and variations in hole diameter. This study of eight commercial drill designs revealed that printed circuit board drills produced better locational and size repeatability than did other drills when centerdrilling was not used. Boring holes 1 mm in dia, or less, as a general rule did not improve hole location in brass or stainless steel. Hole locations of patterns of 0.66-mm holes can be maintained within 25.4-..mu..m diametral positional tolerance if setup misalignments can be eliminated. Size tolerances of +- 3.8 ..mu..m can be maintained under some conditions when drilling flat plates. While these levels of precision are possible with existing off-the-shelf drills, they may not be practical in many cases.

  9. Dewatering cuts drilling mud and disposal costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.; Pharis, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on rig site dewatering of drilling fluids with recycling of processed water that can help an operator to comply with environmental rules by reducing volumes of waste and reducing long term liabilities. It can also reduce disposal costs and provide a cleaner drill site overall. Rig site dewatering is the process of injecting coagulants or flocculating chemicals into the mud entering a large clarifying centrifuge. This coagulates the fine, drilled particles allowing them to be separated from the fluid which can then be handled separately. Most of the environmental concerns during the 1980s involved hazardous materials and toxic wastes. Drilling fluids, many of which are chemically benign, have escaped many of the difficult-to-comply-with rules and regulations. During the 1990s, however, operators may be required to submit a written plan for liquid waste reduction for even nonhazardous materials. Many states and local agencies may institute total bans on oil field wastes. Drilling rigs typically produce about 1 bbl of liquid waste for every 1 ft of hole drilled. Thus, a typical drilling operation can produce a large quantity of waste

  10. Environmental Measurement While Drilling System for Real-Time Field Screening of Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Williams, C.V.

    1999-01-01

    Sampling during environmental drilling is essential to fully characterize the spatial distribution and migration of subsurface contaminants. However, analysis of the samples is expensive and time-consuming: off-site laboratory analysis can take weeks or months. Real-time information on environmental conditions, drill bit location and temperature during drilling is valuable in many environmental restoration operations. This type of information can be used to provide field screening data and improved efficiency of site characterization activities. The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) System represents an innovative blending of new and existing technology in order to obtain real-time data during drilling. The system consists of two subsystems. The down-hole subsystem (at the drill bit) consists of sensors, a power supply, a signal conditioning and transmitter board, and a radio-frequency (RF) coaxial cable. The up-hole subsystem consists of a battery pack/coil, pickup coil, receiver, and personal computer. The system is compatible with fluid miser drill pipe, a directional drilling technique that uses minimal drilling fluids and generates little to no secondary waste. In EMWD, downhole sensors are located behind the drill bit and linked by a high-speed data transmission system to a computer at the surface. Sandia-developed Windowstrademark-based software is used for data display and storage. As drilling is conducted, data is collected on the nature and extent of contamination, enabling on-the-spot decisions regarding drilling and sampling strategies. Initially, the downhole sensor consisted of a simple gamma radiation detector, a Geiger-Mueller tube (GMT). The design includes data assurance techniques to increase safety by reducing the probability of giving a safe indication when an unsafe condition exists. The EMWD system has been improved by the integration of a Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) in place of the GMT. The GRS consists of a sodium iodide

  11. A new drilling method—Earthworm-like vibration drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Ruihe

    2018-01-01

    The load transfer difficulty caused by borehole wall friction severely limits the penetration rate and extended-reach limit of complex structural wells. A new friction reduction technology termed “earthworm-like drilling” is proposed in this paper to improve the load transfer of complex structural wells. A mathematical model based on a “soft-string” model is developed and solved. The results show that earthworm-like drilling is more effective than single-point vibration drilling. The amplitude and frequency of the pulse pressure and the installation position of the shakers have a substantial impact on friction reduction and load transfer. An optimization model based on the projection gradient method is developed and used to optimize the position of three shakers in a horizontal well. The results verify the feasibility and advantages of earthworm-like drilling, and establish a solid theoretical foundation for its application in oil field drilling. PMID:29641615

  12. An evaluation of calculation procedures affecting the constituent factors of equivalent circulating density for drilling hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, William J

    1997-12-31

    This Dr. ing. thesis covers a study of drilling hydraulics offshore. The purpose of drilling hydraulics is to provide information about downhole pressure, suitable surface pump rates, the quality of hole cleaning and optimum tripping speeds during drilling operations. Main fields covered are drilling hydraulics, fluid characterisation, pressure losses, and equivalent circulating density. 197 refs., 23 figs., 22 tabs.

  13. 30 CFR 250.414 - What must my drilling prognosis include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Projected plans for logging; (c) Planned safe drilling margin between proposed drilling fluid weights and... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must my drilling prognosis include? 250... OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations...

  14. An evaluation of calculation procedures affecting the constituent factors of equivalent circulating density for drilling hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, William J.

    1996-12-31

    This Dr. ing. thesis covers a study of drilling hydraulics offshore. The purpose of drilling hydraulics is to provide information about downhole pressure, suitable surface pump rates, the quality of hole cleaning and optimum tripping speeds during drilling operations. Main fields covered are drilling hydraulics, fluid characterisation, pressure losses, and equivalent circulating density. 197 refs., 23 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. Hydraulics calculation in drilling simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyugin, Aleksey A.; Kazunin, Dmitry V.

    2018-05-01

    The modeling of drilling hydraulics in the simulator system is discussed. This model is based on the previously developed quasi-steady model of an incompressible fluid flow. The model simulates the operation of all parts of the hydraulic drilling system. Based on the principles of creating a common hydraulic model, a set of new elements for well hydraulics was developed. It includes elements that correspond to the in-drillstring and annular space. There are elements controlling the inflow from the reservoir into the well and simulating the lift of gas along the annulus. New elements of the hydrosystem take into account the changing geometry of the well, loss in the bit, characteristics of the fluids including viscoplasticity. There is an opportunity specify the complications, the main one of which is gas, oil and water inflow. Correct work of models in cases of complications makes it possible to work out various methods for their elimination. The coefficients of the model are adjusted on the basis of incomplete experimental data provided by operators of drilling platforms. At the end of the article the results of modeling the elimination of gas inflow by a continuous method are presented. The values displayed in the simulator (drill pipe pressure, annulus pressure, input and output flow rates) are in good agreement with the experimental data. This exercise took one hour, which is less than the time on a real rig with the same configuration of equipment and well.

  16. Oil drilling rig diesel power-plant fuel efficiency improvement potentials through rule-based generator scheduling and utilization of battery energy storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavković, Danijel; Sedić, Almir; Guzović, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Isolated oil drilling rig microgrid power flows are analyzed over 30 days. • Rule-based diesel generator scheduling is proposed to reduce fuel consumption. • A battery energy storage is parameterized and used for peak load leveling. • The effectiveness of proposed hybrid microgrid is verified by simulations. • Return-of-investment might be expected within 20% of battery system lifetime. - Abstract: This paper presents the development of a rule-based energy management control strategy suitable for isolated diesel power-plants equipped with a battery energy storage system for peak load shaving. The proposed control strategy includes the generator scheduling strategy and peak load leveling scheme based on current microgrid active and reactive power requirements. In order to investigate the potentials for fuel expenditure reduction, 30 days-worth of microgrid power flow data has been collected on an isolated land-based oil drilling rig powered by a diesel generator power-plant, characterized by highly-variable active and reactive load profiles due to intermittent engagements and disengagements of high-power electric machinery such as top-drive, draw-works and mud-pump motors. The analysis has indicated that by avoiding the low-power operation of individual generators and by providing the peak power requirements (peak shaving) from a dedicated energy storage system, the power-plant fuel efficiency may be notably improved. An averaged power flow simulation model has been built, comprising the proposed rule-based power flow control strategy and the averaged model of a suitably sized battery energy storage system equipped with grid-tied power converter and state-of-charge control system. The effectiveness of the proposed rule-based strategy has been evaluated by means of computer simulation analysis based on drilling rig microgrid active and reactive power data recorded during the 30 day period. The analysis has indicated that fuel consumption of

  17. New optimized drill pipe size for deep-water, extended reach and ultra-deep drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellison, Michael J.; Delgado, Ivanni [Grant Prideco, Inc., Hoston, TX (United States); Falcao, Jose Luiz; Sato, Ademar Takashi [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Moura, Carlos Amsler [Comercial Perfuradora Delba Baiana Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    A new drill pipe size, 5-7/8 in. OD, represents enabling technology for Extended Reach Drilling (ERD), deep water and other deep well applications. Most world-class ERD and deep water wells have traditionally been drilled with 5-1/2 in. drill pipe or a combination of 6-5/8 in. and 5-1/2 in. drill pipe. The hydraulic performance of 5-1/2 in. drill pipe can be a major limitation in substantial ERD and deep water wells resulting in poor cuttings removal, slower penetration rates, diminished control over well trajectory and more tendency for drill pipe sticking. The 5-7/8 in. drill pipe provides a significant improvement in hydraulic efficiency compared to 5-1/2 in. drill pipe and does not suffer from the disadvantages associated with use of 6-5/8 in. drill pipe. It represents a drill pipe assembly that is optimized dimensionally and on a performance basis for casing and bit programs that are commonly used for ERD, deep water and ultra-deep wells. The paper discusses the engineering philosophy behind 5-7/8 in. drill pipe, the design challenges associated with development of the product and reviews the features and capabilities of the second-generation double-shoulder connection. The paper provides drilling case history information on significant projects where the pipe has been used and details results achieved with the pipe. (author)

  18. Newberry exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1997-11-01

    During July--November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5,360 feet exploratory slimhole (3.895 inch diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: over 4,000 feet of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  19. Molecular dynamics studies of fluid/oil interfaces for improved oil recovery processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lara, Lucas S; Michelon, Mateus F; Miranda, Caetano R

    2012-12-20

    In our paper, we study the interface wettability, diffusivity, and molecular orientation between crude oil and different fluids for applications in improved oil recovery (IOR) processes through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD). The salt concentration, temperature, and pressure effects on the physical chemistry properties of different interfaces between IOR agents [brine (H(2)O + % NaCl), CO(2), N(2), and CH(4)] and crude oil have been determined. From the interfacial density profiles, an accumulation of aromatic molecules near the interface has been observed. In the case of brine interfaced with crude oil, our calculations indicate an increase in the interfacial tension with increasing pressure and salt concentration, which favors oil displacement. On the other hand, with the other fluids studied (CO(2), N(2), and CH(4)), the interfacial tension decreases with increasing pressure and temperature. With interfacial tension reduction, an increase in fluid diffusivity in the oil phase is observed. We also studied the molecular orientation properties of the hydrocarbon and fluids molecules in the interface region. We perceived that the molecular orientation could be affected by changes in the interfacial tension and diffusivity of the molecules in the interface region with the increased pressure and temperature: pressure (increasing) → interfacial tension (decreasing) → diffusion (increasing) → molecular ordering. From a molecular point of view, the combination of low interfacial tension and high diffusion of molecules in the oil phase gives the CO(2) molecules unique properties as an IOR fluid compared with other fluids studied here.

  20. Geothermal drilling in Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A., Bernardo

    1982-08-10

    The number of characteristics of the different wells that have been drilled in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field to date enable one to summarize the basic factors in the applied technology, draw some conclusions, improve systems and procedures, and define some problems that have not yet been satisfactorily solved, although the existing solution is the best now available. For all practical purposes, the 100 wells drilled in the three areas or blocks into which the Cerro Prieto field has been divided have been completed. Both exploratory and production wells have been drilled; problems of partial or total lack of control have made it necessary to abandon some of these wells, since they were unsafe to keep in production or even to be used for observation and/or study. The wells and their type, the type of constructed wells and the accumulative meters that have been drilled for such wells are summarized.

  1. Study of rock-drilling fluid interactions that contribute for the borehole instability; Estudo das interacoes rocha-fluido de perfuracao que contribuem para a instabilidade dos pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Cleysson C.; Nascimento, Regina S.V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Sa, Carlos H. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    In this work it was developed a new three points flexural mechanical test submersed for the simultaneous evaluation of the mechanical and chemical nature processes involved in the rock/drilling fluid interactions, which contribute for the borehole instability. The utilized fluids were air, mineral oil, distilled water and water solutions of non hydrolized polyacrylamide, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) with different molecular weights, and the copolymer with acrylamide. Cuttings rolling tests were utilized to help in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the shale's inhibition process. The results suggest that shale/polymer interactions are responsible for the shale's mechanical resistance, since the quantity of water and total carbon content of the shales were the same, after the test, independently of the inhibitor used. The results also suggest that the shale instability depends on the amount of adsorbed water, since independently of the inhibitor utilized, the quantity of adsorbed water was the same as that obtained with the shale/water system. (author)

  2. Enhanced oil recovery using improved aqueous fluid-injection methods: an annotated bibliography. [328 citations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, M.J.; Kettenbrink, G.K.; Collins, A.G.

    1976-10-01

    This annotated bibliography contains abstracts, prepared by the authors, of articles published between 1968 and early 1976 on tests of improved aqueous fluid injection methods (i.e., polymer and surfactant floods). The abstracts have been written and organized to facilitate studies of the oil recovery potential of polymer and surfactant floods under known reservoir conditions. 328 citations.

  3. Improving food and fluid intake for older adults living in long-term care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Heather; Beck, Anne Marie; Namasivayam, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    intake for persons living in LTC. Top determinants to address with intervention research included social interactions of residents at mealtime; self-feeding ability; the dining environment; the attitudes, knowledge, and skills of staff; adequate time to eat/availability of staff to provide assistance...... for the development and testing of interventions to improve food and fluid intake of older adults living in LTC....

  4. Avoiding pollution in scientific ocean drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, T.J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific ocean drilling has been carried out in the world's oceans since the nineteen sixties. From 1968-83 the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), managed by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in California under a contract with the US National Science Foundation, employed the drilling vessel Glomar Challenger for this purpose. In January 1985 the Ocean Drilling Program (GDP), operated by Texas A and M University, began operations with the drillship JOIDES Resolution which continue to this day. The principal funding agency remains the US National Science Foundation, but since its inception GDP has been an international program and currently receives financial support from 21 countries. The ODP operates globally and, as with DSDP before it, drills without a riser or blowout preventer in a wide range of geological environments. Water depths at GDP drill sites have ranged from 38 m to 5969 m, but are typically within the range 1000-5000 m. Depths of penetration at GDP drill sites, while generally less than 1000 m, have ranged up to 2111 m below the sea floor. The drilling fluid is seawater, although occasional slugs of mud are circulated to clean or condition the hole. Thus drilling is carried out without well control, i.e. without the ability to control pressures within the well. Because of the absence of well control, it is vital to ensure that the drillship does not drill into an accumulation of oil or gas. Drilling into a charged reservoir and causing oil or gas to escape into the marine environment is recognised as the main pollution hazard in scientific ocean drilling

  5. CASING DRILLING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Casing drilling is an alternative option to conventional drilling and uses standard oilfield casing instead of drillstring. This technology is one of the greatest developments in drilling operations. Casing drilling involves drilling and casing a well simultaneously. In casing driling process, downhole tools can be retrieved, through the casing on wire-line, meaning tool recovery or replacement of tools can take minutes versus hours under conventional methods. This process employs wireline-retrievable tools and a drill-lock assembly, permitting bit and BHA changes, coring, electrical logging and even directional or horizontal drilling. Once the casing point is reached, the casing is cemented in place without tripping pipe.

  6. Cutting and drill fluids destruction by electro-coagulation: a new technological option. Eliminacion de fluidos de corte y taladrinas por electrocoagulacion: una nueva alternativa tecnologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alava, J.I.; Ipinaza, E.; Ortiz de Urbina, G.; Mugica, J.C.; Yurramendi, L.; Labarta, C.; Solazabal, R. (Centro Tecnologico de Materiales, San Sebastian (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    With the aim of comparison between incoming technologies, that use electro coagulation as a method for cutting fluids elimination, some restricted conditions have been selected that, equalized the feature of different electro technologies. It has been also specifically selected, those treatments, that are starting-up in the industrial environment. The comparison shows the efficiency of the destruction of organic compounds (until 98%) and equalized his environmental advantages and disadvantages. (Author) 10 refs. (Author)

  7. Disk brake design for cooling improvement using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munisamy, Kannan M; Shafik, Ramel

    2013-01-01

    The car disk brake design is improved with two different blade designs compared to the baseline blade design. The two designs were simulated in Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain heat transfer properties such as Nusselt number and Heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer property is compared against the baseline design. The improved shape has the highest heat transfer performance. The curved design is inferior to baseline design in heat transfer performance.

  8. Disk brake design for cooling improvement using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munisamy, Kannan M.; Shafik, Ramel

    2013-06-01

    The car disk brake design is improved with two different blade designs compared to the baseline blade design. The two designs were simulated in Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain heat transfer properties such as Nusselt number and Heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer property is compared against the baseline design. The improved shape has the highest heat transfer performance. The curved design is inferior to baseline design in heat transfer performance.

  9. Microbial community stratification controlled by the subseafloor fluid flow and geothermal gradient at the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 331).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Breuker, Anja; Schippers, Axel; Nishizawa, Manabu; Ijiri, Akira; Hirai, Miho; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Sunamura, Michinari; Urabe, Tetsuro; Nunoura, Takuro; Takai, Ken

    2014-10-01

    The impacts of lithologic structure and geothermal gradient on subseafloor microbial communities were investigated at a marginal site of the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough. Subsurface marine sediments composed of hemipelagic muds and volcaniclastic deposits were recovered through a depth of 151 m below the seafloor at site C0017 during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 331. Microbial communities inferred from 16S rRNA gene clone sequencing in low-temperature hemipelagic sediments were mainly composed of members of the Chloroflexi and deep-sea archaeal group. In contrast, 16S rRNA gene sequences of marine group I Thaumarchaeota dominated the microbial phylotype communities in the coarse-grained pumiceous gravels interbedded between the hemipelagic sediments. Based on the physical properties of sediments such as temperature and permeability, the porewater chemistry, and the microbial phylotype compositions, the shift in the physical properties of the sediments is suggested to induce a potential subseafloor recharging flow of oxygenated seawater in the permeable zone, leading to the generation of variable chemical environments and microbial communities in the subseafloor habitats. In addition, the deepest section of sediments under high-temperature conditions (∼90°C) harbored the sequences of an uncultivated archaeal lineage of hot water crenarchaeotic group IV that may be associated with the high-temperature hydrothermal fluid flow. These results indicate that the subseafloor microbial community compositions and functions at the marginal site of the hydrothermal field are highly affected by the complex fluid flow structure, such as recharging seawater and underlying hydrothermal fluids, coupled with the lithologic transition of sediments. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. An Improved Method for Collection of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Anesthetized Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Nastasia K-H; Moestrup, Visse Theresia Skov; Zhang, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    a technique that improves on current methods of collection to minimize contamination from blood and allow for the abundant collection of CSF (on average 10-15 µL can be collected). This technique can be used with other dissection methods for tissue collection from mice, as it does not impact any tissues......The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a valuable body fluid for analysis in neuroscience research. It is one of the fluids in closest contact with the central nervous system and thus, can be used to analyze the diseased state of the brain or spinal cord without directly accessing these tissues. However......, in mice it is difficult to obtain from the cisterna magna due to its closeness to blood vessels, which often contaminate samples. The area for CSF collection in mice is also difficult to dissect to and often only small samples are obtained (maximum of 5-7 µL or less). This protocol describes in detail...

  11. Using quality improvement methods to reduce clear fluid fasting times in children on a preoperative ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard J G; Stuart, Grant M; Willdridge, Daniel J; Thomas, Mark

    2017-08-01

    We applied quality improvement (QI) methodology to identify the different aspects of why children fasted for prolonged periods in our institution. Our aim was for 75% of all children to be fasted for clear fluid for less than 4 hours. Prolonged fasting in children can increase thirst and irritability and have adverse effects on haemodynamic stability on induction. By reducing this, children may be less irritable, more comfortable and more physiologically stable, improving the preoperative experience for both children and carers. We conducted a QI project from January 2014 until August 2016 at a large tertiary pediatric teaching hospital. Baseline data and the magnitude of the problem were obtained from pilot studies. This allowed us to build a key driver diagram, a process map and conduct a failure mode and effects analysis. Using a framework of Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles our key interventions primarily focused on reducing confusion over procedure start times, giving parents accurate information, empowering staff and reducing variation by allowing children to drink on arrival (up to one hour) before surgery. Prior to this project, using the 6,4,2 fasting rule for solids, breast milk, and clear fluids, respectively, 19% of children were fasted for fluid for less than 4 hours, mean fluid fasting time was 6.3 hours (SD 4.48). At the conclusion 72% of patients received a drink within 4 hours, mean fluid fasting reduced to 3.1 hours (SD 2.33). The secondary measures of aspiration (4.14:10 000) and cancellations have not increased since starting this project. By using established QI methodology we reduced the mean fluid fasting time for day admissions at our hospital to 3.1 hours and increased the proportion of children fasting for less than 4 hours from 19% to 72%. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Radioactive tracer system to indicate drill bit wear or failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, B.A.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive tracer system for indicating drill bit wear or failure utilizing radioactive krypton 85 in clathrate form, in the form of water-soluble kryptonates, or dissolved grease, is described. Preferably the radioactive krypton is placed so that when drill bit wear or failure occurs, the radioactive krypton 85 is relased and effectively becomes diffused in the circulating drilling fluid. At the surface, the radioactive krypton 85 gas is separated from the circulating drilling fluid by gas-mud separating means and is transported as a gas to a counting chamber where an accurate radioactivity count of beta rays released from the krypton is obtained. (Patent Office Record)

  13. Safety Requirement for Nuclear Logging in Logging While Drilling as an Application of Nuclear Energy in Industrial Facilities; an Overview for the Improvement of Nuclear Energy Regulating Process in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2012-01-01

    Data transmission processes in LWD are basically performed in two ways: data transmission within the downhole assembly and data transmission to surface. Tools readings can either be stored in downhole memory or transmitted to surface using mud pulse telemetry. Whenever required the two methods can be combined by storing some data in memory and transmitting some in real time. Yet in the case of data supply exceeding data transmission capacity, only key data is transmitted uphole whilst the rest of some sensors output shall be stored downhole. Another way of transmitting data for real time reading is by taking a limited data sample, for example one in every four readings to be sent uphole. The remaining of data readings will be stored to be downloaded to computer once the memory-pack within the tool is brought to surface. In general, analog data from LWD are converted to binary form downhole. Data are transmitted by using a flow-restricting mechanism in the drilling-fluid flow stream and produce positive or negative pressure pulses which are then transmitted through the mud column inside the drill pipe, read at the surface by pressure sensors and later on recorded and processed. Data transmission can also be performed by using rotary valve pressure-pulse generators, which alternately restrict and and open the drilling-fluid flow, causing varying pressure waves generated in the drilling-fluid at carrier frequency which is proportional to the rate of interruption. Downhole sensor-response data are transmitted to the surface by modulating this acoustic carrier frequency

  14. Safety Requirement for Nuclear Logging in Logging While Drilling as an Application of Nuclear Energy in Industrial Facilities; an Overview for the Improvement of Nuclear Energy Regulating Process in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwang Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Data transmission processes in LWD are basically performed in two ways: data transmission within the downhole assembly and data transmission to surface. Tools readings can either be stored in downhole memory or transmitted to surface using mud pulse telemetry. Whenever required the two methods can be combined by storing some data in memory and transmitting some in real time. Yet in the case of data supply exceeding data transmission capacity, only key data is transmitted uphole whilst the rest of some sensors output shall be stored downhole. Another way of transmitting data for real time reading is by taking a limited data sample, for example one in every four readings to be sent uphole. The remaining of data readings will be stored to be downloaded to computer once the memory-pack within the tool is brought to surface. In general, analog data from LWD are converted to binary form downhole. Data are transmitted by using a flow-restricting mechanism in the drilling-fluid flow stream and produce positive or negative pressure pulses which are then transmitted through the mud column inside the drill pipe, read at the surface by pressure sensors and later on recorded and processed. Data transmission can also be performed by using rotary valve pressure-pulse generators, which alternately restrict and and open the drilling-fluid flow, causing varying pressure waves generated in the drilling-fluid at carrier frequency which is proportional to the rate of interruption. Downhole sensor-response data are transmitted to the surface by modulating this acoustic carrier frequency

  15. Drilling to investigate processes in active tectonics and magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, J.; Evans, J.; Toy, V.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Clarke, A.; Eichelberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coordinated drilling efforts are an important method to investigate active tectonics and magmatic processes related to faults and volcanoes. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) recently sponsored a series of workshops to define the nature of future continental drilling efforts. As part of this series, we convened a workshop to explore how continental scientific drilling can be used to better understand active tectonic and magmatic processes. The workshop, held in Park City, Utah, in May 2013, was attended by 41 investigators from seven countries. Participants were asked to define compelling scientific justifications for examining problems that can be addressed by coordinated programs of continental scientific drilling and related site investigations. They were also asked to evaluate a wide range of proposed drilling projects, based on white papers submitted prior to the workshop. Participants working on faults and fault zone processes highlighted two overarching topics with exciting potential for future scientific drilling research: (1) the seismic cycle and (2) the mechanics and architecture of fault zones. Recommended projects target fundamental mechanical processes and controls on faulting, and range from induced earthquakes and earthquake initiation to investigations of detachment fault mechanics and fluid flow in fault zones. Participants working on active volcanism identified five themes: the volcano eruption cycle; eruption sustainability, near-field stresses, and system recovery; eruption hazards; verification of geophysical models; and interactions with other Earth systems. Recommended projects address problems that are transferrable to other volcanic systems, such as improved methods for identifying eruption history and constraining the rheological structure of shallow caldera regions. Participants working on chemical geodynamics identified four major themes: large igneous provinces (LIPs), ocean islands, continental hotspot tracks and rifts, and

  16. Percolation experiments to determine fluid-matrix interaction (with particular regard to pretreatment of the drill core); Kerndurchstroemungsversuche zur Ermittlung von Fluid-Matrix-Wechselwirkungen (unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung der Kernvorbehandlung)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M; Seibt, A [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bohrtechnik und Fluidbergbau; Hoth, P [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The injection of fluids into sandstone reservoirs leads to interactions between these waters, the reservoir rocks, and the formation fluids. Estimations about possible permeability reducing processes caused by these interactions are therefore of great importance for the exploitation of sandstone aquifers as geothermal reservoirs. Percolation experiments under in situ conditions with core samples from North German geothermal boreholes were done in order to investigate these fluid-rock interactions. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Die Injektion von Fluiden in Aquiferspeicher fuehrt zu Wechselwirkungen zwischen dem Speichergestein, den Formationsfluiden und den injizierten Loesungen. Fuer die Bewirtschaftung der Speicher sind insbesondere Kenntnisse ueber moegliche Permeabilitaetsreduzierungen durch diese Wechselwirkungen von Bedeutung. Mit Hilfe von Kern-Durchstroemungsexperimenten, durchgefuehrt unter lagerstaettenaehnlichen Bedingungen mit Original- bzw. modifizierten Fluiden, wurde daher das Durchstroemungsverhalten von unterschiedlich ausgebildeten Reservoirsandsteinen aus norddeutschen Geothermiebohrungen untersucht. (orig./AKF)

  17. Superhot Drilling in Iceland, the Experience of the Iceland Deep Drilling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Friðleifsson, G. Ó.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Fowler, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project aims to improve geothermal economics by producing supercritical fluids (www.iddp.is). Supercritical wells could yield an order of magnitude more usable energy than that from conventional geothermal wells because of higher enthalpy and enhanced flow properties. In 2009, the IDDP-1 well failed to reach supercritical conditions in the Krafla caldera in NE Iceland, after encountering rhyolite magma at only 2.1 km depth. The completed geothermal well became the world's hottest and produced superheated steam with a wellhead temperature of 452°C and flow sufficient to generate 35 MWe. The IDDP next moved SW to the Reykjanes Peninsula, the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where it is possible to study an analog of the roots of a black smoker. Reykjanes is unique among Icelandic geothermal systems in being recharged by seawater, which has a critical point of 406°C at 298 bars. Drilling began by deepening an existing 2.5 km deep production well to 3 km depth, and then angling it towards the main upflow zone of the system, for a total slant depth of 4,659 m. Total circulation losses were encountered below 3 km that could not be cured by lost circulation materials or by multiple cement jobs. Accordingly, drilling continued to total depth without return of drill cuttings. We attempted 13 core runs below 3 km depth, only half of which recovered core. The cores are basalts and dolerites with alteration ranging from lower greenschist facies to lower amphibolite facies, suggesting formation temperatures >450°C. After the end of drilling in January 2017, following only six days of heating, supercritical conditions (426°C at 340 bars) were measured in the well at a depth of 4.5 km. The well has not yet been allowed to equilibrate to full in situ temperature. A perforated liner was inserted to 4,570 m, depth to facilitate temperature cycling to enhance permeability at depth through thermal cracking. In 2018 this will be followed by a

  18. Theoretical analysis of multiphase flow during oil-well drilling by a conservative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Lopez, Ruben

    2005-11-01

    In order to decrease cost and improve drilling operations is necessary a better understood of the flow mechanisms. Therefore, it was carried out a multiphase conservative model that includes three mass equations and a momentum equation. Also, the measured geothermal gradient is utilized by state equations for estimating physical properties of the phases flowing. The mathematical model is solved by numerical conservative schemes. It is used to analyze the interaction among solid-liquid-gas phases. The circulating system consists as follow, the circulating fluid is pumped downward into the drilling pipe until the bottom of the open hole then it flows through the drill bit, and at this point formation cuttings are incorporated to the circulating fluid and carried upward to the surface. The mixture returns up to the surface by an annular flow area. The real operational conditions are fed to conservative model and the results are matched up to field measurements in several oil wells. Mainly, flow rates, drilling rate, well and tool geometries are data to estimate the profiles of pressure, mixture density, equivalent circulating density, gas fraction and solid carrying capacity. Even though the problem is very complex, the model describes, properly, the hydrodynamics of drilling techniques applied at oil fields. *Authors want to thank to Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo and Petroleos Mexicanos for supporting this research.

  19. Robotic Planetary Drill Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian J.; Thompson, S.; Paulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several proposed or planned planetary science missions to Mars and other Solar System bodies over the next decade require subsurface access by drilling. This paper discusses the problems of remote robotic drilling, an automation and control architecture based loosely on observed human behaviors in drilling on Earth, and an overview of robotic drilling field test results using this architecture since 2005. Both rotary-drag and rotary-percussive drills are targeted. A hybrid diagnostic approach incorporates heuristics, model-based reasoning and vibration monitoring with neural nets. Ongoing work leads to flight-ready drilling software.

  20. Drilling a better pair : new technologies in SAGD directional drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, C.; Richter, D. [Statoil Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Person, J.; Tilley, J.; Bittar, M. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The Leismer Demonstration Project (LDP) is the first of 8 proposed major steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) projects for Statoil's Kai Kos Dehseh (KKD) asset in the Athabasca oil sands deposit. The bitumen resources are expected to produce approximately 2.2 billion barrels of oil over approximately 35 years with a peak production of 220,000 bbl/day. To date, 23 well pairs have been drilled on 4 drilling pads. The precise placement of well pairs is among the most important factors in a successful SAGD drilling program. The producer well must be placed in relation to the reservoir boundaries. It must also be accurately twinned with the injector well. A strong focus on technological innovation is needed in order to deliver on these high expectations in unconsolidated formations, such as the McMurray oil sands. Lateral SAGD pairs are often drilled with conventional steerable mud motors and logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity measurements, but this combination imposes certain limitations in terms of wellbore quality and placement. Several industry firsts were successfully implemented at the Statoil LDP, including a combination of the newest and most cutting-edge directional, measurement, and LWD technology. The keystone of these industry firsts was the use of a soft formation modified, point-the-bit rotary steerable system (RSS), used on 20 horizontal wells. The RRS was combined with an ultra deep azimuthal resistivity sensor to provide precise geosteering along the bottom bed boundary in the producer wells, resulting in improved reservoir capture and reservoir characterization. This paper described the new drilling system and its impact on the progressive future of directional drilling in SAGD. 8 refs., 1 tab., 22 figs.

  1. Simulation of erosion in drilling tools for oil and gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arefi, B.; Settari, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Angman, P. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Erosion in oil well drilling tools is a form of wear which occurs when fluid containing solid particles impacts a solid surface. The intensity of erosion is generally measured as the rate of material removal from the surface, and is expressed as E{sub r}, the weight of material removed by unit weight of impacting particles. Erosion can also be reduced by tool improvement and modification, thereby extending the life of drilling tools. To date, no attempt has been made to model the erosion phenomenon in drilling tools. This paper presents a newly developed erosion simulator which is the first design tool for the drilling industry. This work demonstrates that erosion can be simulated. A model was developed to calibrate the erosion coefficients for drilling tool conditions. The mechanism of erosion can be controlled by the impact velocity and angle. Algorithms were developed for transient simulation of the erosion of any surface in 2-dimensional geometry. The Erosion Simulator has been validated and calibrated against data provided by TESCO Corporation's casing drilling tools. The model has been shown to successfully predict and minimize erosion by modifying the tool geometry and metallurgy. 21 refs., 1 tab., 15 figs.

  2. Study for increasing micro-drill reliability by vibrating drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhaojun; Li Wei; Chen Yanhong; Wang Lijiang

    1998-01-01

    A study for increasing micro-drill reliability by vibrating drilling is described. Under the experimental conditions of this study it is observed, from reliability testing and the fitting of a life-distribution function, that the lives of micro-drills under ordinary drilling follow the log-normal distribution and the lives of micro-drills under vibrating drilling follow the Weibull distribution. Calculations for reliability analysis show that vibrating drilling can increase the lives of micro-drills and correspondingly reduce the scatter of drill lives. Therefore, vibrating drilling increases the reliability of micro-drills

  3. An improved lattice Boltzmann scheme for multiphase fluid with multi-range interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maquignon, Nicolas; Duchateau, Julien; Roussel, Gilles; Rousselle, François; Renaud, Christophe [Laboratoire Informatique Signal et Image de la Côte d' Opale, 50 rue Ferdinand Buisson, 62100 Calais (France); Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 1 place de l' Yser, 59140, Dunkerque (France); Association INNOCOLD, MREI 1, 145 (France)

    2014-10-06

    Modeling of fluids with liquid to gas phase transition has become important for understanding many environmental or industrial processes. Such simulations need new techniques, because traditional solvers are often limited. The Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM) allows simulate complex fluids, because its mesoscopic nature gives possibility to incorporate additional physics in comparison to usual methods. In this work, an improved lattice Boltzmann model for phase transition flow will be introduced. First, the state of art for Shan and Chen (SC) type of LBM will be reminded. Then, link to real thermodynamics will be established with Maxwell equal areas construction. Convergence to isothermal liquid vapor equilibrium will be shown and discussed. Inclusion of an equation of state for real fluid and better incorporation of force term is presented. Multi-range interactions have been used for SC model, but it hasn't been yet applied to real fluid with non-ideal equation of state. In this work, we evaluate this model when it is applied to real liquid-vapor equilibrium. We show that important differences are found for evaluation of gas density. In order to recover thermodynamic consistency, we use a new scheme for calculation of force term, which is a combination of multi range model and numerical weighting used by Gong and Cheng. We show the superiority of our new model by studying convergence to equilibrium values over a large temperature range. We prove that spurious velocities remaining at equilibrium are decreased.

  4. Accounting for the temperature conditions during deep prospecting hole drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherban, A N; Cheniak, V P; Zolotarenko, U P

    1977-01-01

    A methodology is described for calculating and controlling the temperature in inclined holes in order to establish a non-steady-state heat exchange between the medium circulating in the hole, and the construction components and rock. In order to verify the proposed methodology, the temperature of the drilling fluid is measured directly during the drilling process using a specially-designed automatic device which is lowered into the hole with the drilling string and turned on automatically at a given depth. This device makes it possible to record the drilling fluid temperature on magnetic tape, and convert the sensor signals arriving from the drilling string and the annular space. A comparison of calculation and experimental data confirmed the sufficiently high accuracy of the methods for predicting the thermal conditions in drilling deep prospecting holes.

  5. Mud pressure simulation on large horizontal directional drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placido, Rafael R.; Avesani Neto, Jose O.; Martins, Pedro R.R.; Rocha, Ronaldo [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas do Estado de Sao Paulo (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) is being extensively used in Brazil for installation of oil and gas pipelines. This trenchless technology is currently used in crossings of water bodies, environmental sensitive areas, densely populated areas, areas prone to mass movement and anywhere the traditional technology is not suitable because of the risks. One of the unwanted effects of HDD is collapsing of the soil surrounding the bore-hole, leading to loss of fluid. This can result in problems such as reducing the drilling efficiency, ground heave, structures damage, fluid infiltration and other environmental problems. This paper presents four simulations of down-hole fluid pressures which represents two different geometrical characteristics of the drilling and two different soils. The results showed that greater depths are needed in longer drillings to avoid ground rupture. Thus the end section of the drilling often represents the critical stage. (author)

  6. Additive to clay drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voytenko, V.S.; Nekrasova, V.B.; Nikitinskiy, E.L.; Ponomarev, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to improve the lubricating and strengthening properties of clay drilling muds. This goal is achieved because the lubricating and strengthening additive used is waste from the pulp and paper industry at the stage of reprocessing crude sulfate soap into phytosterol.

  7. Numerical analysis of wellbore instability in gas hydrate formation during deep-water drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiwen; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Qingchao; Yan, Chuanliang; Han, Xiuting

    2018-02-01

    Gas hydrate formation may be encountered during deep-water drilling because of the large amount and wide distribution of gas hydrates under the shallow seabed of the South China Sea. Hydrates are extremely sensitive to temperature and pressure changes, and drilling through gas hydrate formation may cause dissociation of hydrates, accompanied by changes in wellbore temperatures, pore pressures, and stress states, thereby leading to wellbore plastic yield and wellbore instability. Considering the coupling effect of seepage of drilling fluid into gas hydrate formation, heat conduction between drilling fluid and formation, hydrate dissociation, and transformation of the formation framework, this study established a multi-field coupling mathematical model of the wellbore in the hydrate formation. Furthermore, the influences of drilling fluid temperatures, densities, and soaking time on the instability of hydrate formation were calculated and analyzed. Results show that the greater the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and hydrate formation is, the faster the hydrate dissociates, the wider the plastic dissociation range is, and the greater the failure width becomes. When the temperature difference is greater than 7°C, the maximum rate of plastic deformation around the wellbore is more than 10%, which is along the direction of the minimum horizontal in-situ stress and associated with instability and damage on the surrounding rock. The hydrate dissociation is insensitive to the variation of drilling fluid density, thereby implying that the change of the density of drilling fluids has a minimal effect on the hydrate dissociation. Drilling fluids that are absorbed into the hydrate formation result in fast dissociation at the initial stage. As time elapses, the hydrate dissociation slows down, but the risk of wellbore instability is aggravated due to the prolonged submersion in drilling fluids. For the sake of the stability of the wellbore in deep

  8. Method and apparatus for jet-assisted drilling or cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, David Archibold; Woelk, Klaus Hubert; Oglesby, Kenneth Doyle; Galecki, Grzegorz

    2012-09-04

    An abrasive cutting or drilling system, apparatus and method, which includes an upstream supercritical fluid and/or liquid carrier fluid, abrasive particles, a nozzle and a gaseous or low-density supercritical fluid exhaust abrasive stream. The nozzle includes a throat section and, optionally, a converging inlet section, a divergent discharge section, and a feed section.

  9. Revised Starling equation and the glycocalyx model of transvascular fluid exchange: an improved paradigm for prescribing intravenous fluid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, T E; Woodcock, T M

    2012-03-01

    I.V. fluid therapy does not result in the extracellular volume distribution expected from Starling's original model of semi-permeable capillaries subject to hydrostatic and oncotic pressure gradients within the extracellular fluid. Fluid therapy to support the circulation relies on applying a physiological paradigm that better explains clinical and research observations. The revised Starling equation based on recent research considers the contributions of the endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL), the endothelial basement membrane, and the extracellular matrix. The characteristics of capillaries in various tissues are reviewed and some clinical corollaries considered. The oncotic pressure difference across the EGL opposes, but does not reverse, the filtration rate (the 'no absorption' rule) and is an important feature of the revised paradigm and highlights the limitations of attempting to prevent or treat oedema by transfusing colloids. Filtered fluid returns to the circulation as lymph. The EGL excludes larger molecules and occupies a substantial volume of the intravascular space and therefore requires a new interpretation of dilution studies of blood volume and the speculation that protection or restoration of the EGL might be an important therapeutic goal. An explanation for the phenomenon of context sensitivity of fluid volume kinetics is offered, and the proposal that crystalloid resuscitation from low capillary pressures is rational. Any potential advantage of plasma or plasma substitutes over crystalloids for volume expansion only manifests itself at higher capillary pressures.

  10. Investigating Created Properties of Nanoparticles Based Drilling Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Nahid; Mirzaee, Mojtaba; Aghayari, Reza; Maddah, Heydar

    2018-05-01

    The success of drilling operations is heavily dependent on the drilling fluid. Drilling fluids cool down and lubricate the drill bit, remove cuttings, prevent formation damage, suspend cuttings and also cake off the permeable formation, thus retarding the passage of fluid into the formation. Typical micro or macro sized loss circulation materials (LCM) show limited success, especially in formations dominated by micropores, due to their relatively large sizes. Due to unique characteristics of nanoparticles such as their size and high surface area to volume ratio, they play an effective role in solving problems associated with the drilling fluid. In this study, we investigate the effect of adding Al2O3 and TiO2 nanoparticles into the drilling mud. Al2O3 and TiO2 nanoparticles were used in 20 and 60 nm of size and 0.05 wt% in concentration. Investigating the effects of temperature and pressure has shown that an increase in temperature can reduce the drilling mud rheological properties such as plastic viscosity, while an increase in pressure can enhance these properties. Also, the effects of pressure in high temperatures were less than those in low temperatures. Studying the effects of adding nanoparticles has shown that they can reduce the drilling mud rheological properties. Moreover, they can increase gel strength, reduce capillary suction time and decrease formation damage.

  11. Drilling contracts and incentives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmundsen, Petter; Sorenes, Terje; Toft, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Shortages of rigs and personnel have encouraged discussion of designing incentive contracts in the drilling sector. However, for the drilling contracts, there are not a large variety of contract types in use. This article describes and analyses incentives for drilling contractors. These are directly represented by the compensation formats utilised in the present and in the consecutive drilling contracts. Indirectly, incentives are also provided by the evaluation criteria that oil companies use for awarding drilling assignments. Changes in contract format pose a number of relevant questions relating to resource management, and the article takes an in-depth look at some of these. Do evaluation criteria for awarding drilling assignments encourage the development of new technology and solutions? How will a stronger focus on drilling efficiency influence reservoir utilisation?

  12. Improving fluid registration through white matter segmentation in a twin study design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Yu; Lepore, Natasha; Brun, Caroline; Barysheva, Marina; McMahon, Katie; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Wright, Margaret J.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-03-01

    Robust and automatic non-rigid registration depends on many parameters that have not yet been systematically explored. Here we determined how tissue classification influences non-linear fluid registration of brain MRI. Twin data is ideal for studying this question, as volumetric correlations between corresponding brain regions that are under genetic control should be higher in monozygotic twins (MZ) who share 100% of their genes when compared to dizygotic twins (DZ) who share half their genes on average. When these substructure volumes are quantified using tensor-based morphometry, improved registration can be defined based on which method gives higher MZ twin correlations when compared to DZs, as registration errors tend to deplete these correlations. In a study of 92 subjects, higher effect sizes were found in cumulative distribution functions derived from statistical maps when performing tissue classification before fluid registration, versus fluidly registering the raw images. This gives empirical evidence in favor of pre-segmenting images for tensor-based morphometry.

  13. Can a Drill Guide Improve the Coracoid Graft Placement During the Latarjet Procedure? A Prospective Comparative Study With the Freehand Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Neyton, Lionel; Lafosse, Laurent; Walch, Gilles

    2017-10-01

    One of the factors that can affect the success of the Latarjet procedure is accurate coracoid graft (CG) placement. The use of a guide can improve placement of the CG and screw positioning in the sagittal and axial planes as compared with the classic open ("freehand") technique. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 49 patients who underwent a Latarjet procedure for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability were prospectively included; the procedure was performed with the freehand technique in 22 patients (group 1) and with use of a parallel drill guide during screw placement in 27 patients (group 2). All patients underwent a postoperative computed tomography scan with the same established protocol. The scans were used to evaluate and compare the position of the CG in the sagittal and axial planes, the direction of the screws (α angle), and overall contact of the graft with the anterior surface of the glenoid after the 2 surgical techniques. The CG was placed >60% below the native glenoid equator in 23 patients (85.2%) in group 2, compared with 14 patients (63.6%) in group 1 ( P = .004). In the axial plane, the position of the CG in group 2 patients was more accurate (85.2% and 88.9% flush) at the inferior and middle quartiles of the glenoid surface ( P = .012 and .009), respectively. Moreover, with the freehand technique (group 1), the graft was in a more lateral position in the inferior and middle quartiles ( P = .012 and .009, respectively). No differences were found between groups 1 and 2 regarding the mean α angle of the superior (9° ± 4.14° vs 11° ± 6.3°, P = .232) and inferior (9.5° ± 6° vs 10° ± 7.5°, P = .629) screws. However, the mean contact angle (angle between the posterior coracoid and the anterior glenoid surface) with the freehand technique (3.8° ± 6.8°) was better than that of the guide (8.55° ± 8°) ( P = .05). Compared with the classic freehand operative technique, the parallel drill guide can ensure

  14. Drilling for improvement : Statoil and Halliburton report significant cost savings and more accurate well placement at the Leismer demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, D.

    2010-07-15

    This article discussed new improvements in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) made by Statoil and Halliburton at the Leismer demonstration project. The Leismer project is Statoil's inaugural project in oil sands development, and will have a capacity to produce 10,000 barrels per day through 4 separate well pads with 23 well pairs. Challenges to the project included the long lateral sections required for the well pairs to remain parallel to each other while remaining within the target formation. An azimuthal deep resistivity (ADR) tool was used to detect the proximity of the wellbore to shale and water zones. Use of the tool allowed operators to modify the planned well trajectory in order to optimize placements within the reservoir. A rotary steerable system (RSS) was used increase injection times. The project was completed 6 to 8 weeks ahead of schedule. Applications have now been filed for a further 10 phases that will produce 240,000 barrels per day. 1 fig.

  15. Westinghouse GOCO conduct of casualty drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, C.P.

    1996-02-01

    Purpose of this document is to provide Westinghouse Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) Facilities with information that can be used to implement or improve drill programs. Elements of this guide are highly recommended for use when implementing a new drill program or when assessing an existing program. Casualty drills focus on response to abnormal conditions presenting a hazard to personnel, environment, or equipment; they are distinct from Emergency Response Exercises in which the training emphasis is on site, field office, and emergency management team interaction. The DOE documents which require team training and conducting drills in nuclear facilities and should be used as guidance in non-nuclear facilities are: DOE 5480.19 (Chapter 1 of Attachment I) and DOE 5480.20 (Chapter 1, paragraphs 7 a. and d. of continuing training). Casualty drills should be an integral part of the qualification and training program at every DOE facility

  16. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E; Perry, Carl Allison

    2014-03-04

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  17. Key technologies for well drilling and completion in ultra-deep sour gas reservoirs, Yuanba Gasfield, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxiang Xia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Yuanba Gasfield is a large gas field discovered by Sinopec in the Sichuan Basin in recent years, and another main exploration area for natural gas reserves and production increase after the Puguang Gasfield. The ultra-deep sour gas reservoir in the Yuanba Gasfield is characterized by complicated geologic structure, deep reservoirs and complex drilled formation, especially in the continental deep strata which are highly abrasive with low ROP (rate of penetration and long drilling period. After many years of drilling practice and technical research, the following six key drilling and completion technologies for this type reservoir are established by introducing new tools and technologies, developing specialized drill bits and optimizing drilling design. They are: casing program optimization technology for ROP increasing and safe well completion; gas drilling technology for shallow continental strata and high-efficiency drilling technology for deep high-abrasion continental strata; drilling fluid support technologies of gas–liquid conversion, ultra-deep highly-deviated wells and horizontal-well lubrication and drag reduction, hole stability control and sour gas contamination prevention; well cementing technologies for gas medium, deep-well long cementing intervals and ultra-high pressure small space; horizontal-well trajectory control technologies for measuring instrument, downhole motor optimization and bottom hole assembly design; and liner completion modes and completion string optimization technologies suitable for this gas reservoir. Field application shows that these key technologies are contributive to ROP increase and efficiency improvement of 7000 m deep horizontal wells and to significant operational cycle shortening.

  18. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  19. Quality in drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, E; Gervais, I [Sedco Forex Jacintoport Facility, Channelview, TX (United States); Le Moign, Y; Pangarkar, S; Stibbs, B [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); McMorran, P [Sedco Forex, Pau (France); Nordquist, E [Dubai Petroleum Company, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Pittman, T [Sedco Forex, Perth (Australia); Schindler, H [Sedco Forex, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Scott, P [Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty. Ltd., Perth (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Driven by cost and profitability pressures, quality has taken on new meaning and importance in the oil field during the past decade. In drilling operations, new initiatives have led to cooperative team efforts between operators and drilling contractors to enhance quality. In this article examples are given of how one drilling contractor, by adopting a quality culture, is reaping major benefits for its clients as well as its employees. 22 figs., 19 refs.

  20. Quality in drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, E.; Gervais, I. [Sedco Forex Jacintoport Facility, Channelview, TX (United States); Le Moign, Y.; Pangarkar, S.; Stibbs, B. [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); McMorran, P. [Sedco Forex, Pau (France); Nordquist, E. [Dubai Petroleum Company, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Pittman, T. [Sedco Forex, Perth (Australia); Schindler, H. [Sedco Forex, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Scott, P. [Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty. Ltd., Perth (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Driven by cost and profitability pressures, quality has taken on new meaning and importance in the oil field during the past decade. In drilling operations, new initiatives have led to cooperative team efforts between operators and drilling contractors to enhance quality. In this article examples are given of how one drilling contractor, by adopting a quality culture, is reaping major benefits for its clients as well as its employees. 22 figs., 19 refs.

  1. Optimization of bridging agents size distribution for drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, Alex; Andrade, Alex Rodrigues de; Pires Junior, Idvard Jose; Martins, Andre Leibsohn [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: awaldmann@petrobras.com.br; andradear.gorceix@petrobras.com.br; idvard.gorceix@petrobras.com.br; aleibsohn@petrobras.com.br

    2008-07-01

    The conventional drilling technique is based on positive hydrostatic pressure against well walls to prevent inflows of native fluids into the well. Such inflows can cause security problems for the team well and to probe. As the differential pressure of the well to reservoir is always positive, the filtrate of the fluid tends to invade the reservoir rock. Minimize the invasion of drilling fluid is a relevant theme in the oil wells drilling operations. In the design of drilling fluid, a common practice in the industry is the addition of bridging agents in the composition of the fluid to form a cake of low permeability at well walls and hence restrict the invasive process. The choice of drilling fluid requires the optimization of the concentration, shape and size distribution of particles. The ability of the fluid to prevent the invasion is usually evaluated in laboratory tests through filtration in porous media consolidated. This paper presents a description of the methods available in the literature for optimization of the formulation of bridging agents to drill-in fluids, predicting the pore throat from data psychotherapy, and a sensitivity analysis of the main operational parameters. The analysis is based on experimental results of the impact of the size distribution and concentration of bridging agents in the filtration process of drill-in fluids through porous media submitted to various different differential of pressure. The final objective is to develop a software for use of PETROBRAS, which may relate different types and concentrations of bridging agents with the properties of the reservoir to minimize the invasion. (author)

  2. New findings for the use of NMR- and computer tomography for gauging the potential of drilling fluids to cause damage to rocks; Neue Erkenntnisse bei der Anwendung von NMR- und Computertomografie-Methoden im Rahmen der Bewertung des Traegerschaedigungspotentiales von Bohrfluessigkeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwaag, C. van der [Reservoir Labs. AS, Trondheim (Norway); Stallmach, F. [Univ. Leipzig (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik und Geowissenschaften; Hanssen, J.E. [MI/Anchor Drilling Fluids AS, Stavanger (Norway); Soergaard, E. [Norsk Hydro AS, Bergen (Norway); Toennesen, R. [Saga Petroleum ASA, Stavanger (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    Polyanionic cellulose, xanthane and ppolyglycole are standard additives for water-based drilling fluids. These are added to drilling liquids to control water loss, provide viscosity and inhibit slating. Filtration losses, which are unavoidable when drilling, cause scavenging polymers to penetrate the area around the drilled hole. This causes a number of different reactions with the surrounding rocks and may ultimately have a permanent influence on the flow conditions of hydrocarbons. The study mentioned above aimed at determining the damage potential of these additives. [Deutsch] Polyanionische Cellulose, Xanthan und Polyglykol sind uebliche Zusatzstoffe von wasserbasischen Bohrspuelungen. Diese werden Bohrfluessigkeiten zur Wasserverlustkontrolle, zur Viskositaetsbildung und zur Schieferinhibierung zugesetzt. Die beim Bohrprozess unvermeidlichen Filtrationsverluste fuehren dazu, dass Spuelungspolymere beim Bohren in den Bohrlochnahbereich eindringen. Die Beschaffenheit dieser Stoffe fuehrt nach dem Eindringen zu unterschiedlichen Reaktionen mit dem Traegergestein. Diese koennen letzten Endes einen dauerhaften Einfluss auf die Zuflussbedingungen von Kohlenwasserstoffen haben. Das Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war es, das Traegerschaedigungspotential der obengenannten Spuelungszusaetze zu charakterisieren. (orig.)

  3. Maximizing productivity of horizontal drilling and completion techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schein, G. [BJ Services Company, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    There are currently 160 active drilling rigs in the Barnett shale play, and small early developments have now become large-scale operations. This presentation outlined methods currently used to improve the productivity of directional drilling and completion techniques in gas shale plays. Horizontal completions are used to control height growth and increase contact areas. A typical horizontal well casing program was described along with details of cement liner treatment programs. Charts of optimum and non-optimum azimuth wells were included. Increased reservoir contact has been achieved by using limited-entry designs and acid stages with ball-sealers and abrasive jet-cutters. Pump rates have been increased during various stages, and larger fluid and sand volumes were used. A mineralogy comparison was provided, as well as details of the general design criteria for vertical wells in the region. It was concluded that drilling in the Barnett shale play has been successful as a result of using 3-dimensional seismic mapping as well as by initiating multiple, simultaneous fracs. The presentation also included charts of the Arkoma-Woodford play, the Arkoma-Fayetteville play, and the Delaware Basin. tabs., figs.

  4. Downhole Temperature Modeling for Non-Newtonian Fluids in ERD Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Sui

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Having precise information of fluids' temperatures is a critical process during planning of drilling operations, especially for extended reach drilling (ERD. The objective of this paper is to develop an accurate temperature model that can precisely calculate wellbore temperature distributions. An established semi-transient temperature model for vertical wellbores is extended and improved to include deviated wellbores and more realistic scenarios using non-Newtonian fluids. The temperature model is derived based on an energy balance between the formation and the wellbore. Heat transfer is considered steady-state in the wellbore and transient in the formation through the utilization of a formation cooling effect. In this paper, the energy balance is enhanced by implementing heat generation from the drill bit friction and contact friction force caused by drillpipe rotation. A non-linear geothermal gradient as a function of wellbore inclination, is also introduced to extend the model to deviated wellbores. Additionally, the model is improved by considering temperature dependent drilling fluid transport and thermal properties. Transport properties such as viscosity and density are obtained by lab measurements, which allows for investigation of the effect of non-Newtonian fluid behavior on the heat transfer. Furthermore, applying a non-Newtonian pressure loss model enables an opportunity to evaluate the impact of viscous forces on fluid properties and thus the overall heat transfer. Results from sensitivity analysis of both drilling fluid properties and other relevant parameters will be presented. The main application area of this model is related to optimization of drilling fluid, hydraulics, and wellbore design parameters, ultimately leading to safe and cost efficient operations.

  5. Improving the trajectory of transpedicular transdiscal lumbar screw fixation with a computer-assisted 3D-printed custom drill guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Xuan Shao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transpedicular transdiscal screw fixation is an alternative technique used in lumbar spine fixation; however, it requires an accurate screw trajectory. The aim of this study is to design a novel 3D-printed custom drill guide and investigate its accuracy to guide the trajectory of transpedicular transdiscal (TPTD lumbar screw fixation. Dicom images of thirty lumbar functional segment units (FSU, two segments of L1–L4 were acquired from the PACS system in our hospital (patients who underwent a CT scan for other abdomen diseases and had normal spine anatomy and imported into reverse design software for three-dimensional reconstructions. Images were used to print the 3D lumbar models and were imported into CAD software to design an optimal TPTD screw trajectory and a matched custom drill guide. After both the 3D printed FSU models and 3D-printed custom drill guide were prepared, the TPTD screws will be guided with a 3D-printed custom drill guide and introduced into the 3D printed FSU models. No significant statistical difference in screw trajectory angles was observed between the digital model and the 3D-printed model (P > 0.05. Our present study found that, with the help of CAD software, it is feasible to design a TPTD screw custom drill guide that could guide the accurate TPTD screw trajectory on 3D-printed lumbar models.

  6. Improving the performance of industrial clarifiers using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankhadeep Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation is one of the most popular wastewater treatment processes, and is used to separate solid particles from carrier fluid in settling tanks known as clarifiers. The clarifier, as the last major facility in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, can limit or define the performance of the overall WWTP. This paper presents a novel three-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD model to improve the efficiency of an industrial clarifier that had been experiencing underperformance and reduction in wastewater handling capacity. We propose a numerical technique to address the transient process of removing sludge from the floor of clarifiers by using rotating rakes. The CFD model was first applied to analyzing the ramifications of the current clarifier geometry on performance. The results show that the root causes for underperformance are related to the unconventional top side feed design of the clarifier, which leads to significant asymmetry in the flow distribution. The CFD model was next used to investigate various design modifications with the goal of improving the clarifier performance. A few geometry modification ideas such as an inward baffle, dissipating inlets, and a submerged skirt were found to create a more uniform flow distribution in the clarifier, significantly reducing the backflow into the feedwell and the velocity of the flow exiting the feedwell, which helps the solid particles to settle in the clarifier. These three designs were found to reduce the effluent total suspended solids (TSS by more than 80% and thus significantly improve clarifier performance. It is believed that the CFD model developed in this study can become a computationally efficient tool for investigating the performance of industrial clarifiers with complex geometries and rotating rakes.

  7. Drilling bits for deep drilling and process for their manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhode, H.; Juergens, R.; Feenstra, R.; Busking, B.E.

    1978-11-30

    The invention concerns a drilling head or a drilling bit for use in deep drilling in underground formations and particularly concerns a drilling bit with a drilling bit body, which has a shank and a hollow space, which is connected with a duct extending through the shank. The drilling bit body has several separate cutting elements for removing material from the floor of a borehole and hydraulic devices for cooling and/or cleaning the cutting elements are provided.

  8. A self propelled drilling system for hard-rock, horizontal and coiled tube drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biglin, D.; Wassell, M.

    1997-12-31

    Several advancements are needed to improve the efficiency and reliability of both hard rock drilling and extended reach drilling. This paper will present a Self Propelled Drilling System (SPDS) which can grip the borehole wall in order to provide a stable platform for the application of weight on bit (WOB) and resisting the reactive torque created by the downhole drilling motor, bit and formation interaction. The system will also dampen the damaging effects of drill string vibration. This tool employs two hydraulically activated anchors (front and rear) to grip the borehole wall, and a two-way thrust mandrel to apply both the drilling force to the bit, and a retraction force to pull the drill string into the hole. Forward drilling motion will commence by sequencing the anchor pistons and thrust mandrel to allow the tool to walk in a stepping motion. The SPDS has a microprocessor to control valve timing, sensing and communication functions. An optional Measurement While Drilling (MWD) interface can provide two-way communication of critical operating parameters such as hydraulic pressure and piston location. This information can then be telemetered to the surface, or used downhole to autonomously control system parameters such as anchor and thrust force or damping characteristics.

  9. Casing drilling TM : a viable technology for coal bed methane?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madell, G.; Muqeem, M. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper highlighted the experience that Tesco has gained by drilling more than 30 wells using only casings as the drill stem, suggesting that such technology could be advantageous for Coal Bed Methane (CBM) exploration and development. Tesco has manufactured a mobile and compact hydraulic drilling rig that is ideal to meet the great demand for CBM development in Canada. The Casing Drilling TM system, when used in conjunction with the drilling rig, could be very effective and efficient for exploration and development of CBM reserves which typically require extensive coring. Continuous coring while drilling ahead and wire line retrieval can offer time savings and quick core recovery of large diameter core required for exploration core desorption tests. The proposed system may also have the potential to core or drill typically tight gas sands or coal beds under balanced with air or foam. This would reduce drilling fluid damage while finding gas at the same time. Compared to conventional drill pipes, Casing Drilling TM could also be effective with water production from shallow sands because of the smaller annual clearance which requires less air volumes to lift any produced water. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  10. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-04-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  11. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  12. Hydraulic lifter of a drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikovskiy, L S; Demin, A V; Shadchinov, L M

    1979-01-08

    The invention refers to drilling equipment, in particular, devices for lowering and lifting operations during drilling. A hydraulic lifter of the drilling unit is suggested which contains a hydraulic cylinder, pressure line and hollow plunger whose cavities are hydraulically connected. In order to improve the reliability of the hydraulic lifter by balancing the forces of compression in the plunger of the hydraulic cylinder, a closed vessel is installed inside the plunger and rigidly connected to its ends. Its cavity is hydraulically connected to the pressure line.

  13. Drilling contract issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, G.B.; Worden, D.R.; Borbridge, G.K.D.

    1997-01-01

    Some selected issues which are facing both operators and contractors in drilling for oil and gas, such as the allocation of risk by contract and by statute and the implementation of new technologies, were discussed. There are three varieties of written drilling contracts used in Canada: (1) day work and meterage contracts, (2) master drilling agreements, and (3) contracts that are used in construction projects that do not specifically relate to drilling. Issues relevant to the contractual allocation of risk, to implementing new drilling technologies, to reconciling contract and statute liability, and the formation of strategic alliances for mutual benefit, and the factors contributing to the success of such alliances were explored. 12 refs

  14. Potential performance improvement using a reacting gas (nitrogin tetroxide) as the working fluid in a closed Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochl, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an analysis to estimate the performance that could be obtained by using a chemically reacting gas (nitrogen tetroxide) as the working fluid in a closed Brayton cycle are presented. Compared with data for helium as the working fluid, these results indicate efficiency improvements from 4 to 90 percent, depending on turbine inlet temperature, pressures, and gas residence time in heat transfer equipment.

  15. Membranes having aligned 1-D nanoparticles in a matrix layer for improved fluid separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revanur, Ravindra; Lulevich, Valentin; Roh, Il Juhn; Klare, Jennifer E.; Kim, Sangil; Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica

    2015-12-22

    Membranes for fluid separation are disclosed. These membranes have a matrix layer sandwiched between an active layer and a porous support layer. The matrix layer includes 1-D nanoparticles that are vertically aligned in a porous polymer matrix, and which substantially extend through the matrix layer. The active layer provides species-specific transport, while the support layer provides mechanical support. A matrix layer of this type has favorable surface morphology for forming the active layer. Furthermore, the pores that form in the matrix layer tend to be smaller and more evenly distributed as a result of the presence of aligned 1-D nanoparticles. Improved performance of separation membranes of this type is attributed to these effects.

  16. Orbitally shaken shallow fluid layers. II. An improved wall shear stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpresa, Paola; Sherwin, Spencer; Weinberg, Peter; van Reeuwijk, Maarten

    2018-03-01

    A new model for the analytical prediction of wall shear stress distributions at the base of orbitally shaken shallow fluid layers is developed. This model is a generalisation of the classical extended Stokes solution and will be referred to as the potential theory-Stokes model. The model is validated using a large set of numerical simulations covering a wide range of flow regimes representative of those used in laboratory experiments. It is demonstrated that the model is in much better agreement with the simulation data than the classical Stokes solution, improving the prediction in 63% of the studied cases. The central assumption of the model—which is to link the wall shear stress with the surface velocity—is shown to hold remarkably well over all regimes covered.

  17. Improved penetration capacity of cement fluids during repair-insulation operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruglitskiy, M M; Gorbachev, V M; Khaber, N V

    1979-01-01

    In order to conduct repair-installation work as an additive to the plugging solution made of highly dispersed oxides, a hydrpohilic organic aerosol is suggested, diethylene glycol aerosol (DEGA). It is an amorphous silica with specific surface of the globules 300 m/sup 3//g (100 times greater than cement). When particles of DEGA are added, there is a significant change in the process of structural-formation of the suspension. Strength during bending of two-day stones hardened at temperatures 75/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure increases by 20-30%. The maximum deformation of the aerosol-containing composition increases by 8-16%, and the compression strength by 21-23% in different periods of hardening under normal conditions. These data show that in addition to increasing the fracture stablity of the cement stone, the DEGA additive promotes an improvement in its homogeneity and decrease in porosity. When DEGA is added to cement solutions, their sedimentation stability drastically improves. This is especially important in conducting insulation operations in inclined wells, since in this case the probability of formation of near-wall channels in the inclined parts of the shaft diminishes. Experiments have shown that when DEGA additive is introduced, the permeability of the plugging fluids increases 1.5-2.5-fold. The best results were obtained when DEGA is added to the plugging fluid stabilized by polymer. In this case such a shortcoming of aerosol-containing composition is removed such as aggression of the actual particles of aerosol in the hardening water as a consequence of which their dispersion is not completely manifest.

  18. Enhancing down-the-hole air hammer capacity in directional drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klishin, V. I.; Timonin, V. V.; Kokoulin, D. I.; Alekseev, S. E.; Kubanychbek, B.

    2017-09-01

    The authors discuss the issue connected with drilling trajectory deviation and present the technique of rotary-percussion drilling with a down-the-hole air hammer. The article describes pilot testing of the air hammer drill PNB76 in Berezovskaya Mine. The ways of improving the air hammer drill are identified, and the basic diagram and R&D test data are given.

  19. A dimorphic magnetorheological fluid with improved oxidation and chemical stability under oscillatory shear

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlačík, M.; Pavlínek, V.; Vyroubal, R.; Peer, Petra; Filip, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2013) ISSN 0964-1726 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : goethites * magnetorheological fluids * MR fluids * tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.449, year: 2013

  20. Applying fluid dynamics simulations to improve processing and remediation of nuclear waste - 59172

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Kelly J.; Peltier, Joel; Berkoe, Jon; Rosendall, Brigette; Kennedy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Transport and processing of nuclear waste for treatment and storage can involve unique and complex thermal and fluid dynamic conditions that pose potential for safety risk and/or design uncertainty and also are likely to be subjected to more precise performance requirements than in other industries. From an engineering analysis perspective, certainty of outcome is essential. Advanced robust methods for engineering analysis and simulation of critical processes can help reduce risk of design uncertainty and help mitigate or reduce the amount of expensive full-scale demonstration testing. This paper will discuss experience gained in applying computational fluid dynamics models to key processes for mixing, transporting, and thermal treatment of nuclear waste as part of designing a massive vitrification process plant that will convert high and low level nuclear waste into glass for permanent storage. Examples from industrial scale simulations will be presented. The computational models have shown promise in replicating several complex physical processes such as solid-liquid flows in suspension, blending of slurries, and cooling of materials at extremely high temperature. Knowledge gained from applying simulation has provided detailed insight into determining the most critical aspects of these complex processes that can ultimately be used to help guide the optimum design of waste handling equipment based on credible calculations while ensuring risk of design uncertainty is minimized. The WTP Project is faced with complex technical challenges that must have solutions that enable the successful operation of the plant for its 30+ year operating life. The Project chose to reduce those risks by employing an experienced team that applied CFD in a disciplined manner and adhered to an established guideline with the following benefits: - Gained an improvement in accuracy of predictions for complex physical situations; - Gained an improvement of the quality of experimental

  1. Fluid sampling tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  2. Fluid sampling tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  3. Specific features of well logging of boreholes drilled on electrical nonconducting solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchkin, A.F.; Fomenko, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    Methods for identification of permeable strata and determination of their porosity and oil-gas saturation using standard combination of geophysical investigations in the boreholes drilled with nonaqueous and inert drilling fluids are considered. Geophysical combination consists of the methods indications of which are independent on electrical conductivity of drilling fluids. They are all modifications of radioactivity logging (gamma logging, neutron logging, neutron-gamma logging, gamma-gamma logging, pulsed neutron logging, nuclear-magnetic logging), acoustic logging and thermal logging

  4. A reagent for processing drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, G.A.; Khon-Pak, A.T.; Khon, A.V.; Normatov, L.N.; Telegin, B.V.

    1983-01-01

    A reagent is proposed for processing drilling muds. It contains an acrylic polymer and potassium permanganate. The reagent is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the quality of the drilling muds by increasing their salt resistance, the reagent contains hydrolized nitron fiber as the acrylic polymer with the following component relationship (in percent by weight): potassium permanganate, 0.015 to 0.065 and hydrolyzed nitron fiber, the remainder.

  5. SALTON SEA SCIENTIFIC DRILLING PROJECT: SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J.H.; Elders, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, was spudded on 24 October 1985, and reached a total depth of 10,564 ft. (3. 2 km) on 17 March 1986. There followed a period of logging, a flow test, and downhole scientific measurements. The scientific goals were integrated smoothly with the engineering and economic objectives of the program and the ideal of 'science driving the drill' in continental scientific drilling projects was achieved in large measure. The principal scientific goals of the project were to study the physical and chemical processes involved in an active, magmatically driven hydrothermal system. To facilitate these studies, high priority was attached to four areas of sample and data collection, namely: (1) core and cuttings, (2) formation fluids, (3) geophysical logging, and (4) downhole physical measurements, particularly temperatures and pressures.

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF MUD HAMMER DRILLING PERFORMANCE - A PROGRAM TO BENCHMARK THE VIABILITY OF ADVANCED MUD HAMMER DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnis Judzis

    2003-01-01

    This document details the progress to date on the ''OPTIMIZATION OF MUD HAMMER DRILLING PERFORMANCE -- A PROGRAM TO BENCHMARK THE VIABILITY OF ADVANCED MUD HAMMER DRILLING'' contract for the quarter starting October 2002 through December 2002. Even though we are awaiting the optimization portion of the testing program, accomplishments included the following: (1) Smith International participated in the DOE Mud Hammer program through full scale benchmarking testing during the week of 4 November 2003. (2) TerraTek acknowledges Smith International, BP America, PDVSA, and ConocoPhillips for cost-sharing the Smith benchmarking tests allowing extension of the contract to add to the benchmarking testing program. (3) Following the benchmark testing of the Smith International hammer, representatives from DOE/NETL, TerraTek, Smith International and PDVSA met at TerraTek in Salt Lake City to review observations, performance and views on the optimization step for 2003. (4) The December 2002 issue of Journal of Petroleum Technology (Society of Petroleum Engineers) highlighted the DOE fluid hammer testing program and reviewed last years paper on the benchmark performance of the SDS Digger and Novatek hammers. (5) TerraTek's Sid Green presented a technical review for DOE/NETL personnel in Morgantown on ''Impact Rock Breakage'' and its importance on improving fluid hammer performance. Much discussion has taken place on the issues surrounding mud hammer performance at depth conditions.

  7. Rock melting technology and geothermal drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    National awareness of the potential future shortages in energy resources has heightened interest in exploration and utilization of a variety of geothermal energy (GTE) reservoirs. The status of conventional drilling of GTE wells is reviewed briefly and problem areas which lead to higher drilling costs are identified and R and D directions toward solution are suggested. In the immediate future, an expanded program of drilling in GTE formations can benefit from improvements in drilling equipment and technology normally associated with oil or gas wells. Over a longer time period, the new rock-melting drill bits being developed as a part of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Subterrene Program offer new solutions to a number of problems which frequently hamper GTE drilling, including the most basic problem - high temperature. Two of the most favorable characteristics of rock-melting penetrators are their ability to operate effectively in hot rock and produce glass linings around the hole as an integral part of the drilling process. The technical advantages to be gained by use of rock-melting penetrators are discussed in relation to the basic needs for GTE wells.

  8. Taking aim : particle impact drilling targets ROP gains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J.

    2005-11-01

    Details of a new drilling technique developed by Particle Drilling Technologies Inc. were presented. Particle impact drilling uses buckshot-like steel particles entrained with ordinary drilling mud that are accelerated through a specially-designed drill bit to bombard hard-rock formations at rapid-fire velocities of up to 4 million times a minute. Conventional drill bits rely on mechanical energy from some 50,000 pounds of weight on bit and torque to break or fracture the formation, whereas particle impact drilling relies on hydraulic energy to blast the steel particles from the bit's jetting nozzles in order to repeatedly fracture the formation. It was suggested that the new technology will accelerate the drilling process. Tests have shown that the new device out-performs conventional bits in hard formations by utilizing the hydraulics of the rig to drill with particles. In field tests, drilling was 4 times faster than conventional methods. It was anticipated that the bit will be up to 150 per cent faster in softer rock formations. In order to avoid clogging, the system uses a shot trap to remove the steel balls, which are roughly one-tenth of an inch in diameter, from the drilling fluid before it enters the shale shaker. The shot is recycled after each well. During drilling, mud circulation must be continuous for the system to work. If the system can't circulate cleanly out of a hole, there is a disruption in the process and drilling fluid may move up the annulus at 350 feet per minute when it leaves bottomhole. It was suggested that circulation issues can be resolved by increasing mud viscosity. A less than optimal performance during a recent test at Catoosa was attributed to a lack of control over drilling fluid parameters and to the use of an overly-large well casing. It was concluded that the new system will likely greatly reduce the number of days it takes to drill a well. 2 figs.

  9. A vision for drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millheim, K. [Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria)

    1995-12-31

    The future of drilling lies in its relationship with the oil and gas industry. This paper examines how the future of drilling is seen from the view point of the exploration manager, the drilling contractor, the drilling engineer and the company president or managing director. The various pressures on the oil and gas industry are examined, such as environmental issues, alternative energy sources, and the price of oil which determines how companies are run. Exploration activity is driven by the price of oil and gas. The development of wells with multiple horizontal wells or multiple horizontal wells with tributaries will reduce the cost of exploration. Companies will rely less and less on reservoir simulation and more on cheap well-bores, multi-lateral well-bores and will exploit oil that could not be exploited before. The cost of exploratory drilling will need to be kept down so that in the future the industry will get better at economically finding fields at the 10 million to 20 million barrel range that would not have been possible before. The future is expected to see drilling contractors tunnelling, making sewerage lines and drilling 10,000 foot wells with purpose built rigs. Franchising will become a feature of the industry as will the use of databases to answer key technical questions. Offshore platforms will be built to be moveable and disposable. The industry is capable of solving problems, meeting challenges and making ideas work, providing much hope for the future. 10 figs., 1 photo.

  10. Drilling cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Drilling assumes greater importance in present day uranium exploration which emphasizes to explore more areas on the basis of conceptual model than merely on surface anomalies. But drilling is as costly as it is important and consumes a major share (50% to 60%) of the exploration budget. As such the cost of drilling has great bearing on the exploration strategy as well as on the overall cost of the project. Therefore, understanding the cost analysis is very much important when planning or intensifying an exploration programme. This not only helps in controlling the current operations but also in planning the budgetary provisions for future operations. Also, if the work is entrusted to a private party, knowledge of in-house cost analysis helps in fixing the rates of drilling in different formations and areas to be drilled. Under this topic, various factors that contribute to the cost of drilling per meter as well as ways to minimize the drilling cost for better economic evaluation of mineral deposits are discussed. (author)

  11. Drilling for scientific purpose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shoichi

    1987-09-01

    Drilling for scientific purpose is a process of conducting geophysical exploration at deep underground and drilling for collecting crust samples directly. This is because earth science has advanced to get a good understanding about the top of the crust and has shifted its main interest to the lower layer of the crust in land regions. The on-land drilling plan in Japan has just started, and the planned drilling spots are areas around the Minami River, Hidaka Mts., kinds of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic granite in outside zone, the extension of Japan Sea, Ogasawara Is., Minami-Tori Is., and active volcanos. The paper also outlines the present situation of on-land drilling in the world, focusing on the SG-3rd super-deep well SG-3 on the Kola Peninsula, USSR, Satori SG-1st well SG-1 in Azerbaidzhan S.S.R, V.S.S.R, Sweden's wells, Cyprus' wells, Bayearn well Plan in West Germany, and Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program in the U.S. At its end, the paper explains the present situation and the future theme of the Japanese drilling technique and points out the necessity of developing equipment, and techniques. (14 figs, 5 tabs, 26 refs)

  12. Improved techniques for fluid diversion in oil recovery. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seright, R.S.

    1993-12-01

    This three-year project has two general objectives. The first objective is to compare the effectiveness of gels in fluid diversion with those of other types of processes. Several different types of fluid-diversion processes are being compared, including those using gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates. The ultimate goals of these comparisons are to (1) establish which of these processes are most effective in a given application, and (2) determine whether aspects of one process can be combined with those of other processes to improve performance. Analyses and experiments are being performed to verify which materials are the most effective in entering and blocking high-permeability zones. Another objective of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which materials (particularly gels) selectively reduce permeability to water more than to oil. This report describes work performed during the first year of the project. Following the introduction, Chapters 2 through 5 present several surveys concerning field applications of gel treatments. Based on the results of the surveys, guidelines are proposed in Chapter 5 for the selection of candidates for gel treatments (both injection wells and production wells). Chapters 6, 7, 8, and 11 discuss theoretical work that was performed during the project. Chapter 6 examines whether Hall plots indicated selectivity during gelant placement. Chapter 7 discusses several important theoretical aspects of gel treatments in production wells with water-coning problems. Chapter 8 considers exploitation of density differences during gelant placement. Chapter 11 presents a preliminary consideration of the use of precipitates as blocking agents. Chapters 9 and 10 detail the experimental work for the project. Chapter 9 describes an experimental investigation of gelant placement in fractured systems. Chapter 10 describes experiments that probe the mechanisms for disproportionate permeability reduction by gels.

  13. Improved seismic response of rc frame structures by using fluid viscous dampers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Q.S.; Qazi, A.U.; Ilyas, M.

    2013-01-01

    In modern era passive control devices are used to improve the seismic response of structures during large magnitude earthquakes. In this research an analytical study is carried out on commercial FEM program SAP 2000 by modeling five, seven and nine storey RC frame structures. Response to four earthquake ground motions on modeled frame structures is studied and is effectively controlled by varying the characteristic properties of Fluid viscous dampers (FVD). Response in terms of frequency, displacement, velocity, acceleration, storey drift, base shear and energy dissipation is studied. Quantitatively in the modeled frames damage in terms of percentage change in global stiffness and natural frequency is determined. Qualitatively damage in terms of performance levels as per ATC-40 and FEMA-440 is considered. With an increase in Additional Stiffness Ratio of FVD corresponding increase in natural frequency and reduction in dynamic response is observed. FVDs significantly improve structural performance level of frames from Completely Damage to Immediate Occupancy/Operational Level during large magnitude earthquakes. (author)

  14. GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

    2012-01-19

    Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

  15. Evaluate the action of polymeric additives in protect and recover water and bentonite clay based drilling fluids contaminated by degradation agents; Analise da acao de aditivos polimericos na protecao e recuperacao de fluidos de perfuracao base agua e bentonita contaminados por sais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, L.F.A.; Ferreira, H.S.; Amorim, L.V.; Franca, K.B.; Ferreira, H.C. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this paper is study influences of electrolytes and cellulose polymers on rheological and water loss properties of dispersions of bentonite compositions. Evaluate the action of degradation additives CaSO{sub 4}, MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} and polymeric additives to protect and recover water and clay based. The results show a negative effect of degradation additives the rheological and water loss properties of drilling fluids. The cellulose polymers can be successfully applied to protect and recover of the rheological properties and water loss of the dispersions contaminated. (author)

  16. A new converter for improving efficiency of multi-actuators fluid power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Yong; Shang, JianZhong; Yang, JunHong; Wang Zhuo [National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China)

    2016-05-15

    This paper is concerned with the application of energy efficient fluid power in mobile robots system and proposes a new fluid power converter system which is analogous to a boost converter in power electronics. The fluid power converter system is based on the principle of pulse-width modulation. The fluid power converter has an effect akin to an electrical switched inductance transformer, wherein the output pressure or flow rate can be stepped up or down. Using an inductive reactance device (an inertia mass-block), the output flow and pressure can be varied to meet the load by a means that does not rely on dissipation of power (the resistance control). The simulation model based on the mathematics models of the components is built to analyse the performance of the fluid power converter. It is clearly shown that the fluid power converter has higher energy efficiency than conventional resistance control manners.

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment to Improve Adherence to Hemodialysis Fluid Restrictions: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Anson, Heather M.; Byrd, Michelle R.; Koch, Ellen I.

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes outpatient psychological treatment targeting adherence to fluid restrictions in a hemodialysis patient. The consequences of nonadherence to fluid restrictions in hemodialysis patients range from minor discomfort to increased hospitalizations and mortality rates. In addition, when patients chronically fail to adhere, they may no longer be candidates for kidney transplant. The interventions focused on polydipsia, characterized by excessive fluid intake. The methods in...

  18. Humvee Armor Plate Drilling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    When drilling holes in hard steel plate used in up-armor kits for Humvee light trucks, the Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama, requested the assistance of the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM...

  19. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denninger, Kate; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Bell, Sean; Jacobs, Amelia; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Tilley, Mitch; Quick, Ralph

    2015-09-02

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling. This study of drilling operations seeks opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies. The scope of this study included analyzing 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'Perfect Well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.) and poor data collection practices An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate figures for analysis. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/ equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averaged 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million was spent on non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells, compared with only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry using Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time services, and official glossary terms to describe rig operations, and advanced drilling rigs/technology.

  20. An improved specimens handling procedure for pathogen detection of the cerebrospinal fluid by microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Hua-cheng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The diagnosis of encephalitis depends on the finding of pathogens in the brain parenchyma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. But the success rates of finding pathogens by microscope are low by the traditional specimens handling procedure in which pathogens are detected by direct centrifugation of CSF getting from lumbar puncture. The process of pathogen collection from the CSF such as centrifugation and washing would cause the destruction and loss of pathogens, resulting in a lower rate of pathogen discovery. Therefore, in order to increase the detection rate of pathogenic microorganisms in CSF, these traditional steps need to be improved. Methods CSF samples of 23 patients with suspected viral encephalitis and 10 control patients with fracture were prepared by two methods: traditional specimens handling procedure (TSHP and improved specimens handling procedure (ISHP. In the ISHP, a final concentration of 2.5% glutaraldehyde was added to CSF in a glass tube, mixed and kept not moving in 4 ℃ for 2 to 4 h or in 37 ℃for 1 h. Then a smear was made from the sediment formed in the tube to check pathogens by microscope. As for the TSHP, pathogens were collected by direct centrifugation of CSF which had not been treated after lumbar puncture, and checked through Gimenze staining. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the two dealing procedures in the control group ( P = 1.000. As for the case group, there were 10 cases showing positive in Pandy test after TSHP, and visible sediments were seen in all the 23 cases after ISHP. There was statistically significant difference between two kinds of CSF treatment for the finding of pathogens (P = 0.000. Seven cases presented pathogen growth in CSF and were diagosed as rickettsial infections by Gimenze staining, immunofluorescence assay (IFA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Conclusion Improved specimens handling procedures of CSF contribute to the seperation of cells

  1. Drilling rig mast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgakov, E.S.; Barashkov, V.A.; Lebedev, A.I.; Panin, N.M.; Sirotkin, N.V.

    1981-01-07

    A drilling rig mast is proposed that contains a portal with a carrier shaft hinged to it and struts with stays. In order to decrease the time expended in the assembly and dessembly of the drilling rig, the portal is constructed from mobile and immobile parts that are connected together by a ball pivot; the immobile section of the portal has a T-shaped recess for directing the mobile section.

  2. Percussive drilling application of translational motion permanent magnet machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shujun

    2012-07-01

    It is clear that percussive drills are very promising since they can increase the rate of penetration in hard rock formations. Any small improvements on the percussive drills can make a big contribution to lowering the drilling costs since drilling a well for the oil and gas industry is very costly. This thesis presents a percussive drilling system mainly driven by a tubular reciprocating translational motion permanent magnet synchronous motor (RTPMSM), which efficiently converts electric energy to kinetic energy for crushing the hard rock since there is no mechanical media. The thesis starts from state-of-the-art of percussive drilling techniques, reciprocating translational motion motors, and self-sensing control of electric motors and its implementation issues. The following chapters present modeling the hard rock, modeling the drill, the design issues of the drill, the RTPMSM and its control. A single-phase RTPMSM prototype is tested for the hard rock drilling. The presented variable voltage variable frequency control is also validated on it. The space vector control and self-sensing control are also explored on a three-phase RTPMSM prototype. The results show that the percussive drill can be implemented to the hard rock drilling applications. A detailed summarisation of contributions and future work is presented at the end of the thesis.(Author)

  3. Characterization of drilling waste from shale gas exploration in Central and Eastern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikos-Szymańska, Marzena; Rusek, Piotr; Borowik, Krzysztof; Rolewicz, Maciej; Bogusz, Paulina; Gluzińska, Joanna

    2018-05-28

    The purpose of this research was to determine and evaluate the chemical properties of drilling waste from five well sites in Central and Eastern Poland. It was found that spent drilling fluids can contain high values of nickel and mercury (270 and 8.77 mg kg -1 , respectively) and can exceed the maximum permissible limits recommended by the EC regulations for safety of soils (75 mg kg -1 for nickel and 1.5 mg kg -1 for mercury). The heavy metal concentrations in the studied drill cuttings did not exceed the maximum permissible limits recommended by the EC regulation. Drilling wastes contain macroelements (e.g., calcium, magnesium, and potassium) as well as trace elements (e.g., copper, iron, zinc, and manganese) that are essential for the plant growth. It was stated that water extracts of drilling fluids and drill cuttings, according to anions presence, had not any specific constituents of concern based on FAO irrigation guidelines, the USEPA WQC, and toxicity values. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to understand the structure and texture of waste drilling fluid solids and drill cuttings. Analysis of the mineralogical character of drilling fluid solids revealed that they contained calcite, quartz, muscovite, sylvite, barite, dolomite, and orthoclase. Drill cuttings contained calcite quartz, muscovite, barite, dolomite, and barium chloride.

  4. A Fast Inspection of Tool Electrode and Drilling Depth in EDM Drilling by Detection Line Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Yi

    2008-08-21

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel measurement method using a machine vision system. Besides using image processing techniques, the proposed system employs a detection line algorithm that detects the tool electrode length and drilling depth of a workpiece accurately and effectively. Different boundaries of areas on the tool electrode are defined: a baseline between base and normal areas, a ND-line between normal and drilling areas (accumulating carbon area), and a DD-line between drilling area and dielectric fluid droplet on the electrode tip. Accordingly, image processing techniques are employed to extract a tool electrode image, and the centroid, eigenvector, and principle axis of the tool electrode are determined. The developed detection line algorithm (DLA) is then used to detect the baseline, ND-line, and DD-line along the direction of the principle axis. Finally, the tool electrode length and drilling depth of the workpiece are estimated via detected baseline, ND-line, and DD-line. Experimental results show good accuracy and efficiency in estimation of the tool electrode length and drilling depth under different conditions. Hence, this research may provide a reference for industrial application in EDM drilling measurement.

  5. Slim hole drilling and testing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Garg, Sabodh K.; Goranson, Colin

    2017-12-01

    The financial and geologic advantages of drilling slim holes instead of large production wells in the early stages of geothermal reservoir assessment has been understood for many years. However, the practice has not been fully embraced by geothermal developers. We believe that the reason for this is that there is a poor understanding of testing and reservoir analysis that can be conducted in slim holes. In addition to reservoir engineering information, coring through the cap rock and into the reservoir provides important data for designing subsequent production well drilling and completion. Core drilling requires significantly less mud volume than conventional rotary drilling, and it is typically not necessary to cure lost circulation zones (LCZ). LCZs should be tested by either production or injection methods as they are encountered. The testing methodologies are similar to those conducted on large-diameter wells; although produced and/or injected fluid volumes are much less. Pressure, temperature and spinner (PTS) surveys in slim holes under static conditions can used to characterize temperature and pressure distribution in the geothermal reservoir. In many cases it is possible to discharge slim holes and obtain fluid samples to delineate the geochemical properties of the reservoir fluid. Also in the latter case, drawdown and buildup data obtained using a downhole pressure tool can be employed to determine formation transmissivity and well properties. Even if it proves difficult to discharge a slim hole, an injection test can be performed to obtain formation transmissivity. Given the discharge (or injection) data from a slimhole, discharge properties of a large-diameter well can be inferred using wellbore modeling. Finally, slim hole data (pressure, temperature, transmissivity, fluid properties) together with reservoir simulation can help predict the ability of the geothermal reservoir to sustain power production.

  6. Potential environmental benefits from regulatory consideration of synthetic drilling muds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, C.J.; Veil, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    When drilling exploration and production wells for oil and gas, drillers use specialized drilling fluids, referred to as muds, to help maintain well control and to remove drill cuttings from the hole. Historically, either water-based muds (WBMs) or oil-based muds (OBMs) have been used for offshore wells. Recently, in response to US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations and drilling-waste discharge requirements imposed by North Sea nations, the drilling industry has developed several types of synthetic-based muds (SBMs) that combine the desirable operating qualities of OBMs with the lower toxicity and environmental impact qualities of WBMs. This report describes the operational, environmental, and economic features of all three types of muds and discusses potential EPA regulatory barriers to wider use of SBMs

  7. Drilling and testing hot, high-pressure wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacAndrew, R. (Ranger Oil Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Parry, N. (Phillips Petroleum Company United Kingdom Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Prieur, J.M. (Conoco UK Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Wiggelman, J. (Shell UK Exploration and Production, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Diggins, E. (Brunei Shell Petroleum (Brunei Darussalam)); Guicheney, P. (Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)); Cameron, D.; Stewart, A. (Dowell Schlumberger, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    Meticulous planning and careful control of operations are needed to safely drill and test high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Techniques, employed in the Central Graben in the UK sector of the North Sea, where about 50 HTHP wells have been drilled, are examined. Three main areas of activity are covered in this comprehensive review: drilling safety, casing and cementation, and testing. The three issues at the heart of HTHP drilling safety are kick prevention, kick detection and well control. Kicks are influxes of reservoir fluid into the well. Test equipment and operations are divided into three sections: downhole, subsea and surface. Also details are given of how this North Sea experience has been used to help plan a jackup rig modification for hot, high-pressure drilling off Brunei. 16 figs., 32 refs.

  8. Amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing interleukin-1 receptor antagonist improve fulminant hepatic failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Bao Zheng

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled hepatic immunoactivation is regarded as the primary pathological mechanism of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF. The major acute-phase mediators associated with FHF, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, impair the regeneration of liver cells and stem cell grafts. Amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs have the capacity, under specific conditions, to differentiate into hepatocytes. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra plays an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic role in acute and chronic inflammation, and has been used in many experimental and clinical applications. In the present study, we implanted IL-1Ra-expressing AF-MSCs into injured liver via the portal vein, using D-galactosamine-induced FHF in a rat model. IL-1Ra expression, hepatic injury, liver regeneration, cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and animal survival were assessed after cell transplantation. Our results showed that AF-MSCs over-expressing IL-1Ra prevented liver failure and reduced mortality in rats with FHF. These animals also exhibited improved liver function and increased survival rates after injection with these cells. Using green fluorescent protein as a marker, we demonstrated that the engrafted cells and their progeny were incorporated into injured livers and produced albumin. This study suggests that AF-MSCs genetically modified to over-express IL-1Ra can be implanted into the injured liver to provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of FHF.

  9. Solving the Fluid Pressure Poisson Equation Using Multigrid-Evaluation and Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Christian; Rogowsky, Marcus; Westermann, Rudiger

    2016-11-01

    In many numerical simulations of fluids governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the pressure Poisson equation needs to be solved to enforce mass conservation. Multigrid solvers show excellent convergence in simple scenarios, yet they can converge slowly in domains where physically separated regions are combined at coarser scales. Moreover, existing multigrid solvers are tailored to specific discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation, and they cannot easily be adapted to other discretizations. In this paper we analyze the convergence properties of existing multigrid solvers for the pressure Poisson equation in different simulation domains, and we show how to further improve the multigrid convergence rate by using a graph-based extension to determine the coarse grid hierarchy. The proposed multigrid solver is generic in that it can be applied to different kinds of discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation, by using solely the specification of the simulation domain and pre-assembled computational stencils. We analyze the proposed solver in combination with finite difference and finite volume discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation. Our evaluations show that, despite the common assumption, multigrid schemes can exploit their potential even in the most complicated simulation scenarios, yet this behavior is obtained at the price of higher memory consumption.

  10. Construction of Fluid - solid Coupling Model with Improved Richards - BP & Its Engineering Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chengyu; Jia, Nan; Shi, Dongping; Lu, Hao

    2017-10-01

    In order to study the slurry diffusion law during grouting, Richards unsaturated-saturated model was introduced, the definition of the grouting model is clear, the Richards model control equation was established, And the BP neural network was introduced, the improved fluid-solid coupling model was constructed, Through the use of saturated - unsaturated seepage flow model, As well as the overflow boundary iterative solution of the mixed boundary conditions, the free surface is calculated. Engineering practice for an example, with the aid of multi - field coupling analysis software, the diffusion law of slurry was simulated numerically. The results show that the slurry diffusion rule is affected by grouting material, initial pressure and other factors. When the slurry starts, it flows in the cracks along the upper side of the grouting hole, when the pressure gradient is reduced to the critical pressure, that is, to the lower side of the flow, when the slurry diffusion stability, and ultimately its shape like an 8. The slurry is spread evenly from the overall point of view, from the grouting mouth toward the surrounding evenly spread, it gradually reaches saturation by non-saturation, and it is not a purely saturated flow, when the slurry spread and reach a saturated state, the diffusion time is the engineering grouting time.

  11. The UKNEQAS scheme for cerebrospinal fluid haem pigments: a paradigm for service improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetham, Robert; Egner, William; Patel, Dina

    2011-11-01

    We describe the programme of an established External Quality Assurance (EQA) provider and a Specialist Advisory Group (SAG) to develop a successful EQA scheme for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) haem pigments as an example of a professionally led, unfunded initiative with the real potential to benefit patients. Within three years, we had assured sample stability, stoichiometry, and published best practice guidelines, enabling both analytical results and interpretation to be assessed and reported with an educative summary of the desired responses. Misclassification scoring of analysis and interpretation was introduced. Following audit, guidelines were modified and republished. The outcomes were as follows: Participant numbers increased from 63 at inception to 150 10 years later; The percentage of participants using visual inspection, a poor practice indicator, decreased from 27% to less than 1%; In all, 94-100% of participants consistently detected minor increases in bilirubin over the last four years of the scheme; More than 93% of participants were able to interpret analytical results linked to straightforward clinical scenarios; Misclassification scoring demonstrated that more complex scenarios repeatedly posed problems and is the next challenge to address. Scheme success is attributed to the experience of the operator and the formation of a voluntary expert advisory group, with both concerned to advance science and patient safety and thus contribute unpaid time and effort in order to succeed. In times of fiscal constraint, such resource may not be so readily available, yet is a vital part of continuous quality improvement for the benefit of patients.

  12. Automated Kick Control Procedure for an Influx in Managed Pressure Drilling Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within drilling of oil and gas wells, the Managed Pressure Drilling (MPD method with active control of wellbore pressure during drilling has partly evolved from conventional well control procedures. However, for MPD operations the instrumentation is typically more extensive compared to conventional drilling. Despite this, any influx of formation fluids (commonly known as a kick during MPD operations is typically handled by conventional well control methods, at least if the kick is estimated to be larger than a threshold value. Conventional well control procedures rely on manual control of the blow out preventer, pumps, and choke valves and do not capitalize on the benefits from the instrumentation level associated with MPD. This paper investigates two alternative well control procedures specially adapted to backpressure MPD: the dynamic shut-in (DSI procedure and the automatic kick control (AKC procedure. Both methods capitalize on improvements in Pressure While Drilling (PWD technology. A commercially available PWD tool buffers high-resolution pressure measurements, which can be used in an automated well control procedure. By using backpressure MPD, the choke valve opening is tuned automatically using a feedback-feedforward control method. The two procedures are evaluated using a high fidelity well flow model and cases from a North Sea drilling operation are simulated. The results show that using AKC procedure reduces the time needed to establish control of the well compared to DSI procedure. It also indicates that the AKC procedure reduces the total kick size compared to the DSI procedure, and thereby reduces the risk of lost circulation.

  13. Extended Reach Drilling on the example of Reelwell Drilling Method: Influence examination of different drill pipes on drilling performance on Idun field on the Norwegian Continental Shelf by PGNiG Norway AS.

    OpenAIRE

    Krol, Dariusz Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering Horizontal or extended reach drilling is incredibly fast growing technology. Although in some areas of the world ERD is still novelty, most of oil companies have been using the technology reliably and successfully for dozens of years. And those companies want to improve well-worn solutions to obtain better performance, thereby reducing costs. One of the main aspects that affects drilling performance and efficiency is adequate choice of drill pipe...

  14. Improvement of MRR and surface roughness during electrical discharge machining (EDM) using aluminum oxide powder mixed dielectric fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. A.; Mohiuddin, A. K. M.; Latif, M. A. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of aluminium oxide (Al203) addition to dielectric fluid during electrical discharge machining (EDM). Aluminium oxide was added to the dielectric used in the EDM process to improve its performance when machining the stainless steel AISI 304, while copper was used as the electrode. Effect of the concentration of Al203 (0.3 mg/L) in dielectric fluid was compared with EDM without any addition of Al203. Surface quality of stainless steel and the material removal rate were investigated. Design of the experiment (DOE) was used for the experimental plan. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA and then appropriate model was designated. The experimental results show that with dispersing of aluminium oxide in dielectric fluid surface roughness was improved while the material removal rate (MRR) was increased to some extent. These indicate the improvement of EDM performance using aluminium oxide in dielectric fluid. It was also found that with increase in pulse on time both MRR and surface roughness increase sharply.

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment to Improve Adherence to Hemodialysis Fluid Restrictions: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Anson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes outpatient psychological treatment targeting adherence to fluid restrictions in a hemodialysis patient. The consequences of nonadherence to fluid restrictions in hemodialysis patients range from minor discomfort to increased hospitalizations and mortality rates. In addition, when patients chronically fail to adhere, they may no longer be candidates for kidney transplant. The interventions focused on polydipsia, characterized by excessive fluid intake. The methods involved 11-sessions of individual psychotherapy incorporating strategies including increasing awareness, decreasing motivation, increasing effort, engaging in competing events, conducting thought stopping, breaking repetitive routines, eliciting social support, and receiving reinforcement. Results demonstrated that the patient successfully restricted his fluid intake at or below recommended levels 83% of days after fading of treatment began. This case report demonstrates the success of cognitive behavioral treatment strategies with a nonpsychiatric hemodialysis patient.

  16. Undergraduate medical textbooks do not provide adequate information on intravenous fluid therapy: a systematic survey and suggestions for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Arfon G M T; Paterson-Brown, Simon; Drummond, Gordon B

    2014-02-20

    Inappropriate prescribing of intravenous (IV) fluid, particularly 0.9% sodium chloride, causes post-operative complications. Fluid prescription is often left to junior medical staff and is frequently poorly managed. One reason for poor intravenous fluid prescribing practices could be inadequate coverage of this topic in the textbooks that are used. We formulated a comprehensive set of topics, related to important common clinical situations involving IV fluid therapy, (routine fluid replacement, fluid loss, fluids overload) to assess the adequacy of textbooks in common use. We assessed 29 medical textbooks widely available to students in the UK, scoring the presence of information provided by each book on each of the topics. The scores indicated how fully the topics were considered: not at all, partly, and adequately. No attempt was made to judge the quality of the information, because there is no consensus on these topics. The maximum score that a book could achieve was 52. Three of the topics we chose were not considered by any of the books. Discounting these topics as "too esoteric", the maximum possible score became 46. One textbook gained a score of 45, but the general score was poor (median 11, quartiles 4, 21). In particular, coverage of routine postoperative management was inadequate. Textbooks for undergraduates cover the topic of intravenous therapy badly, which may partly explain the poor knowledge and performance of junior doctors in this important field. Systematic revision of current textbooks might improve knowledge and practice by junior doctors. Careful definition of the remit and content of textbooks should be applied more widely to ensure quality and "fitness for purpose", and avoid omission of vital knowledge.

  17. Development of new heat transfer media for improving efficiency in energy systems : conventional fluids and nanofluids

    OpenAIRE

    Cabaleiro Alvarez, David

    2016-01-01

    This PhD Thesis aims to characterize different conventional thermal fluids and propose new nanofluids based on their thermophysical, rheological, (solid-liquid) phase equilibria and their capability to heat transfer or heat storage. The selected conventional fluids are commonly used in the majority of heat transfer systems such as ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), a (ethylene glycol + water) mixture at 50 vol.% (EG+W), or the (diphenyl ether + biphenyl) mixtures. The nanofluids wer...

  18. Performance of palm oil as a biobased machining lubricant when drilling inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Rahim Erween

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metalworking fluid acts as cooling and lubrication agent at the cutting zone in the machining process. However, conventional Metalworking fluid such mineral oil gives negative impact on the human and environment. Therefore, the manufacture tends to substitute the mineral oil to bio-based oil such as vegetables and synthetic oil. In this paper, the drilling experiment was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of palm oil and compare it with minimal quantity lubrication technique using synthetic ester, flood coolant and air blow with respect to cutting temperature, cutting force, torque and tool life. The experimental results showed that the application of palm oil under minimal quantity lubrication condition as the cutting fluid was more efficient process as it improves the machining performances.

  19. Improving the economy-of-scale of small organic rankine cycle systems through appropriate working fluid selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Martin; Sayma, Abdulnaser I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel system model coupling turbine and ORC system performance. • Contour plots to characterise working fluid and turbine performance. • Changing working fluid can expand pump and turbine operating envelope. • Possible to improve the economy-of-scale through optimal working fluid selection. - Abstract: Organic Rankine cycles (ORC) are becoming a major research area within the field of sustainable energy systems. However, a major challenge facing the widespread implementation of small and mini-scale ORC systems is the economy-of-scale. To overcome this challenge requires single components that can be manufactured in large volumes and then implemented into a wide variety of different applications where the heat source conditions may vary. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether working fluid selection can improve the current economy-of-scale by enabling the same system components to be used in multiple ORC systems. This is done through coupling analysis and optimisation of the energy process, with a performance map for a small-scale ORC radial turbine. The performance map, obtained using CFD, is adapted to account for additional loss mechanisms not accounted for in the original CFD simulation before being non-dimensionalised using a modified similitude theory developed for subsonic ORC turbines. The updated performance map is then implemented into a thermodynamic model, enabling the construction of a single performance contour that displays the range of heat source conditions that can be accommodated by the existing turbine whilst using a particular working fluid. Constructing this performance map for a range of working fluids, this paper demonstrates that through selecting a suitable working fluid, the same turbine can efficiently utilise heat sources between 360 and 400 K, with mass flow rates ranging between 0.5 and 2.75 kg/s respectively. This corresponds to using the same turbine in ORC applications where the heat available ranges

  20. Composição de argilas organofílicas obtida com tensoativo não-iônico para fluidos de perfuração base orgânica Compositions of organoclays obtained with nonionic surfactant for organic base drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. K. A. Sousa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem como objetivo o estudo do efeito da composição de misturas de argilas bentoníticas organofílicas na reologia de fluidos de perfuração base orgânica. As composições foram estudadas por meio de delineamento de misturas, viscosidade aparente, plástica e limite de escoamento e dos testes recomendados pelo Instituto Americano de Petróleo, API (peso específico, estabilidade elétrica e volume de filtrado. Os resultados foram comparados aos obtidos com fluido padrão utilizado pela Petrobrás. Dentre as composições desenvolvidas, duas apresentaram potencial de utilização em fluidos de perfuração base orgânica, atendendo a maioria das propriedades. Foram desenvolvidas composições contendo as argilas de qualidade "inferior" (Bofe e verde-lodo em maior quantidade e o mínimo da argila Chocolate UBM, considerada como a melhor argila da região das minas de Boa Vista, PB, para uso em fluidos de perfuração.This paper aims to study the effect of compositions of bentonite organoclays for drilling fluids containing organic base. The compositions were studied using the mixture design of experiment methodology and their performance evaluated by rheological behavior (flow curves, the initial gel, final gel apparent viscosity, plastic, and flow limit and the tests recommended by API (specific gravity, electrical stability and filtrate volume. Results were compared to those obtained with standard fluid used by Petrobrás. The results showed that among the developed compositions, two compositions showed promising potential for use in organic drilling fluids, achieving most of the limits of the normalization. Compositions containing high amount of low quality clays (Bofe and verde-lodo and a minimum of high quality clay (Chocolate of the mines of Boa Vista PB were developed for using in drilling fluids operation.

  1. Mars Drilling Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Humboldt, C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the current status of work to explore Mars beneath the surface of planet. One of the objective of this work is to enable further exploration of Mars by humans. One of the requirements for this is to find water on Mars. The presences of water is critical for Human Exploration and a permanent presence on Mars. If water is present beneath the surface it is the best chance of finding life on Mars. The presentation includes a timeline showing the robotic missions, those that have already been on Mars, and planned missions, an explanation of why do we want to drill on Mars, and some of the challenges, Also include are reviews of a missions that would drill 200 and 4,000 to 6,000 meters into the Martian bedrock, and a overview description of the drill. There is a view of some places where we have hopes of finding water.

  2. Preliminary Research on Possibilities of Drilling Process Robotization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawel, Stefaniak; Jacek, Wodecki; Jakubiak, Janusz; Zimroz, Radoslaw

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, drilling & blasting is crucial technique for deposit excavation using in hard rock mining. Unfortunately, such approach requires qualified staff to perform, and consequently there is a serious risk related to rock mechanics when using explosives. Negative influence of explosives usage on safety issues of underground mine is a main cause of mining demands related to elimination of people from production area. Other aspects worth taking into consideration are drilling precision according to drilling pattern, blasting effectiveness, improvement of drilling tool reliability etc. In the literature different drilling support solutions are well-known in terms of positioning support systems, anti-jamming systems or cavity detection systems. For many years, teleoperation of drilling process is also developed. Unfortunately, available technologies have so far not fully met the industries expectation in hard rock. Mine of the future is expected to incorporate robotic system instead of current approaches. In this paper we present preliminary research related to robotization of drilling process and possibilities of its application in underground mine condition. A test rig has been proposed. To simulate drilling process several key assumptions have been accepted. As a result, algorithms for automation of drilling process have been proposed and tested on the test rig. Experiences gathered so far underline that there is a need for further developing robotic system for drilling process.

  3. An improved mass spectrometry-based measurement of NO metabolites in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingbin; Bondonno, Catherine P; Indrawan, Adeline; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Croft, Kevin D

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of NO metabolism in vivo relies on the accurate measurement of its metabolites nitrite (NO(2)(-)), nitrate (NO(3)(-)), and nitrosothiols (RSNOs) in biological fluids. We report a sensitive method to simultaneously determine NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) in biological matrixes. Tetraoctylammonium was used to catalyze the complete conversion of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) to stable pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) derivatives directly from aqueous acetone medium before gas chromatography and negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC/NICI/MS). This catalyst dramatically improved the yield of PFB derivatives for NO(2)(-) (4.5 times) and NO(3)(-) (55 times) compared to noncatalyzed derivatization methods. Analysis was performed using (15)N-labeled internal standards by selected-ion monitoring at m/z 46 for fragment NO(2)(-) and m/z 47 for its isotope analogue, (15)NO(2)(-), and m/z 62 for NO(3)(-) and m/z 63 for (15)NO(3)(-). This method allowed specific detection of both PFB derivatives over a wide dynamic range with a limit of detection below 4.5 pg for NO(2)(-) and 2.5 pg for NO(3)(-). After the specific conversion of RSNOs by HgCl(2) to NO(2)(-), this GC/NICI/MS analysis was used to measure RSNOs in plasma. A further comparison with the widely used tri-iodide chemiluminescence (I(3)(-)-CL) assay indicated that the GC/MS assay validated the lower physiological RSNO and nitrite levels reported using I(3)(-)-CL detection compared with values obtained using UV-photolysis methods. Plasma levels of RSNOs determined by GC/MS and I(3)(-)-CL were well correlated (r = 0.8). The improved GC/MS method was successfully used to determine the changes in plasma, urinary, and salivary NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) as well as plasma RSNOs in humans after either a low-NO(3)(-) or a high-NO(3)(-) meal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rotary core drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-11-30

    The design of a rotary core drill is described. Primary consideration is given to the following component parts of the drill: the inner and outer tube, the core bit, an adapter, and the core lifter. The adapter has the form of a downward-converging sleeve and is mounted to the lower end of the inner tube. The lifter, extending from the adapter, is split along each side so that it can be held open to permit movement of a core. It is possible to grip a core by allowing the lifter to assume a closed position.

  5. Drilling comparison in "warm ice" and drill design comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustin, L.; Motoyama, H.; Wilhelms, F.

    2007-01-01

    For the deep ice-core drilling community, the 2005/06 Antarctic season was an exciting and fruitful one. In three different Antarctic locations, Dome Fuji, EPICA DML and Vostok, deep drillings approached bedrock (the ice-water interface in the case of Vostok), emulating what had previously been...... achieved at NorthGRIP, Greenland, (summer 2003 and 2004) and at EPICA Dome C2, Antarctica (season 2004/05). For the first time in ice-core drilling history, three different types of drill (KEMS, JARE and EPICA) simultaneously reached the depth of 'warm ice' under high pressure. After excellent progress...... at each site, the drilling rate dropped and the drilling teams had to deal with refrozen ice on cutters and drill heads. Drills have different limits and perform differently. In this comparative study, we examine depth, pressure, temperature, pump flow and cutting speed. Finally, we compare a few...

  6. [Improving myocardial mechanics parameters of severe burn rabbits with oral fluid resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jing; Zhang, Bing-qian; Wang, Guang; Luo, Zhong-hua; Zheng, Qing-yi; Zheng, Jian-sheng; Huang, Yue-sheng; Xiao, Rong

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the protective effect of oral fluid resuscitation on cardiac function in severe burn rabbits. One hundred and fifty rabbits were randomly divided into normal control group (NC group, n = 6, without treatment), burn group (B group, n = 42, without fluid therapy), immediate oral fluid resuscitation group (C group, n = 42), delayed oral fluid resuscitation group (D group, n = 30) and delayed and rapid oral fluid resuscitation group (E group, n = 30). The rabbits in B, C, D, E groups were subjected to 40% TBSA full-thickness burn, then were treated with fluid therapy immediately after burn (C group), at 6 hour after burn (D, E groups). The myocardial mechanics parameters including mean arterial pressure (MAP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP), LV +/- dp/dt max were observed at 2, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 post burn hour (PBH). Urine output was also examined. The level of LVSP, LV +/- dp/dt max in B roup were significantly lower than those in NC group. The level of LVSP, LV +/- dp/dt max in the C and E group were singnificantly increased during 24 hour after burn. The level of LV + dp/dt max and LV-dp/dt max in C group peaked at 8 PBH (892 +/- 116 kPa/s) and at 6PBH (724 +/- 149 kPa/s) respectively. The levels of LV +/- dp/dt max, LVSP in D group at each time point were similar to B group (P > 0.05). Both the levels of LV +/- dp/dt max in E group peaked at 8 PBH. The level of LVEDP was no obvious difference between B and other groups at each time point (P > 0.05). The changes of MAP and urine output on 24 PBH in each group were similar to above indices. Effective oral fluid therapy in severe burn rabbits during 24 hours after burn can ameliorate myocardial mechanics parameters. The amount of fluid resuscitation can be estimated according to relevant formula for delayed fluid resuscitation in burn rabbits.

  7. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII

  8. Drill Sergeant Candidate Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    leadership styles of NCOs entering Drill Sergeant School (DSS). ARI also developed and administered a prototype DS Assessment Battery to assess...preferred leadership styles . DSS training increases both the degree to which the DSC feels obligated to and identifies with the Army. DSS training...4 TABLE 3. PREFERRED LEADERSHIP STYLES DEFINITIONS .............................................6 TABLE 4. DSC CHANGE IN

  9. Measurement Space Drill Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-30

    II) H-47 Block II (I) *H-47 Block II (II) AVN FVL Att (I) * AVN FVL Att (II) TRAC- MTRY F2025B Logistic Flow MS Drill Support FY15 Research...does not have to use other AVN /ground assets to cover the area, freeing these assets to perform other missions and potentially enhancing the

  10. WHATS-3: An improved flow-through multi-bottle fluid sampler for deep-sea geofluid research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Junichi; Makabe, Akiko; Matsui, Yohei; Ebina, Naoya; Tsutsumi, Saki; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Chen, Chong; Kaneko, Sho; Takai, Ken; Kawagucci, Shinsuke

    2017-06-01

    Deep-sea geofluid systems, such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, are key to understanding subseafloor environments of Earth. Fluid chemistry, especially, provides crucial information towards elucidating the physical, chemical and biological processes that occur in these ecosystems. To accurately assess fluid and gas properties of deep-sea geofluids, well-designed pressure-tight fluid samplers are indispensable and as such they are important assets of deep-sea geofluid research. Here, the development of a new flow-through, pressure-tight fluid sampler capable of four independent sampling events (two subsamples for liquid and gas analyses from each) is reported. This new sampler, named WHATS-3, is a new addition to the WHATS-series samplers and a major upgrade from the previous WHATS-2 sampler with improvements in sample number, valve operational time, physical robustness, and ease of maintenance. Routine laboratory-based pressure tests proved that it is suitable for operation up to 35 MPa pressure. Successful field tests of the new sampler were also carried out in five hydrothermal fields, two in Indian Ocean and three in Okinawa Trough (max. depth 3,300 m). Relations of Mg and major ion species demonstrated bimodal mixing trends between a hydrothermal fluid and seawater, confirming the high-quality of fluids sampled. The newly developed WHATS-3 sampler is well-balanced in sampling capability, field usability, and maintenance feasibility, and can serve as one of the best geofluid samplers available at present to conduct efficient research of deep-sea geofluid systems.

  11. WHATS-3: An Improved Flow-Through Multi-bottle Fluid Sampler for Deep-Sea Geofluid Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Miyazaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea geofluid systems, such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, are key to understanding subseafloor environments of Earth. Fluid chemistry, especially, provides crucial information toward elucidating the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in these ecosystems. To accurately assess fluid and gas properties of deep-sea geofluids, well-designed pressure-tight fluid samplers are indispensable and as such they are important assets of deep-sea geofluid research. Here, the development of a new flow-through, pressure-tight fluid sampler capable of four independent sampling events (two subsamples for liquid and gas analyses from each is reported. This new sampler, named WHATS-3, is a new addition to the WHATS-series samplers and a major upgrade from the previous WHATS-2 sampler with improvements in sample number, valve operational time, physical robustness, and ease of maintenance. Routine laboratory-based pressure tests proved that it is suitable for operation up to 35 MPa pressure. Successful field tests of the new sampler were also carried out in five hydrothermal fields, two in Indian Ocean, and three in Okinawa Trough (max. depth 3,300 m. Relations of Mg and major ion species demonstrated bimodal mixing trends between a hydrothermal fluid and seawater, confirming the high quality of fluids sampled. The newly developed WHATS-3 sampler is well-balanced in sampling capability, field usability, and maintenance feasibility, and can serve as one of the best geofluid samplers available at present to conduct efficient research of deep-sea geofluid systems.

  12. Liberal versus restrictive fluid administration to improve recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a randomized, double-blind study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Klarskov, Birthe; Christensen, Dorte Stig

    2004-01-01

    ). All other aspects of perioperative management as well as preoperative fluid status were standardized. Primary outcome parameters were assessed repeatedly for the first 24 postoperative hours and included pulmonary function (spirometry), exercise capacity (submaximal treadmill test), cardiovascular...... hormonal responses, balance function, pain, nausea and vomiting, recovery, and hospital stay. RESULTS: Intraoperative administration of 40 mL/kg compared with 15 mL/kg LR led to significant improvements in postoperative pulmonary function and exercise capacity and a reduced stress response (aldosterone......, antidiuretic hormone, and angiotensin II). Nausea, general well-being, thirst, dizziness, drowsiness, fatigue, and balance function were also significantly improved, as well as significantly more patients fulfilled discharge criteria and were discharged on the day of surgery with the high-volume fluid...

  13. Development of a Mine Rescue Drilling System (MRDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaither, Katherine N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Polsky, Yarom [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knudsen, Steven D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Broome, Scott Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Su, Jiann-Cherng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blankenship, Douglas A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Costin, Laurence S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has a long history in developing compact, mobile, very high-speed drilling systems and this technology could be applied to increasing the rate at which boreholes are drilled during a mine accident response. The present study reviews current technical approaches, primarily based on technology developed under other programs, analyzes mine rescue specific requirements to develop a conceptual mine rescue drilling approach, and finally, proposes development of a phased mine rescue drilling system (MRDS) that accomplishes (1) development of rapid drilling MRDS equipment; (2) structuring improved web communication through the Mine Safety & Health Administration (MSHA) web site; (3) development of an improved protocol for employment of existing drilling technology in emergencies; (4) deployment of advanced technologies to complement mine rescue drilling operations during emergency events; and (5) preliminary discussion of potential future technology development of specialized MRDS equipment. This phased approach allows for rapid fielding of a basic system for improved rescue drilling, with the ability to improve the system over time at a reasonable cost.

  14. Drill-string design for directional wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, R; Corbett, K T [Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (USA)

    1983-01-01

    This paper is concerned with predicting the tension and torsion loads on drill strings in directional wells and with adjusting the string design or well plan to provide adequate strength. Drill-string drag is the incremental force that is required to move the pipe up or down in the hole; torque is the moment required to rotate the pipe. Drag forces are usually given relative to the string weight measured with the string roating but not reciprocating. Measured from the roating string weight, the pick-up drag is usually slightly greater than the slack-off drag. The magnitudes of torque and drag are related in any particular well; high drag forced and exessive torque loads normally occur together. There are a number of phenomena wich contribute to torque and drag. Included are tight hole conditions, sloughing hole, keyseats, differential sticking, cuttings build up due to poor hole cleaning and sliding wellbore friction. With the exception of sliding friction, these causes are associated with problem conditions in the wellbore. Conversely, in wells with good hole conditions, the primary source of torque and drag is sliding friction. This paper is only concerned with the torque and drag caused by sliding friction. The cabability to predict frictional loads on drill pipe has two main benefits. First, more complete knowledge of drill-string loading allows use of improved drill-string design techniques. Drill-string components can be chosen using a systematic approach considering the force involved. Second, deep, highly-deviated wells can be planned to minimize torque and drag. Use of torque and drag as a criteria to select the most appropriate well path will help ensure successful drilling operations to total depth. 1 fig., 2 tabs. (Author).

  15. Sandia's Geothermal Advanced Drill Rig Instrumentation Assists Critical Oil and Gas Drilling Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staller, George E.; Whitlow, Gary

    1999-01-01

    about 30 days. Several other Sandia instruments being developed for geothermal drilling are also being evaluated during this operation, Successful performance of these instruments on this important drilling job will reinforce our efforts to commercialize this technology for the geothermal and oil and gas drilling industries. Sandia's Rolling Float Meter was developed through the Lost Circulation Technology Program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. It monitors drilling fluid returns to rapidly detect loss of circulation during geothermal drilling. Lost circulation is particularly prevalent in geothermal wells, and can add as much as 10% to the total cost of drilling the well. Consequently, rapid detection and treatment of lost circulation is necessary for cost- effective geothermal drilling. Sandia has been evaluating and demonstrating the capabilities of the RFM to the geothermal industry for several years. In addition to lost circulation, the RFM is also useful for accurately detecting well kicks. Contacts have been made with mud logging companies that are involved with both geothermal and oil and gas drilling operations

  16. An Innovative Improvement of Engineering Learning System Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, T. C.; Wang, S. K.; Tai, S. W.; Hung, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    An innovative concept of an electronic learning system has been established in an attempt to achieve a technology that provides engineering students with an instructive and affordable framework for learning engineering-related courses. This system utilizes an existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package, Active Server Pages programming,…

  17. Improvements in or relating to fluid operated devices for moving articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogerson, Victor.

    1986-01-01

    The patent relates to fluid operated devices for moving articles. The machine may be used in filling a nuclear fuel canister with fuel pellets where there is a tendency for out of squareness of pellets to produce a jam condition readily cleared by a modest force. (U.K.)

  18. Salmeterol improves fluid clearance from alveolar-capillary membrane in COPD patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Fabiano; Guazzi, Marco; Sferrazza Papa, Giuseppe Francesco; Vicenzi, Marco; Santus, Pierachille; Busatto, Paolo; Piffer, Federico; Blasi, Francesco; Centanni, Stefano

    2012-02-01

    The cardiovascular component associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) plays a major role in disease prognosis, accounting for 25% of the deaths. Experimental and initial clinical data suggest that beta-adrenergic agonists accelerate fluid clearance from the alveolar airspace, with potentially positive effects on cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary oedema. This pilot study investigated the acute effects of the long-acting beta-2 agonist, salmeterol, on alveolar fluid clearance after rapid saline intravenous infusion by evaluating diffusive and mechanical lung properties. Ten COPD and 10 healthy subjects were treated with salmeterol or placebo 4 h before the patient's mechanical and diffusive lung properties were measured during four non consecutive days, just before and after a rapid saline infusion, or during a similar period without an infusion. In both COPD and healthy subjects, rapid saline infusion with placebo or salmeterol premedication lead to a significant decrease in diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). Nonetheless, salmeterol pretreatment lead to a significantly reduced gas exchange impairment caused by saline infusion (-64% of DLCO reduction compared with placebo), whereas it did not affect changes in FEV1. In the control setting with no infusion, we found no significant change in either DLCO or mechanical properties of the lung. Salmeterol appears to provide a protective effect, not related to bronchodilation, against an acute alveolar fluid clearance challenge secondary to lung fluid overload in COPD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental analysis to improving thermosyphon (TPCT) thermal efficiency using nanoparticles/based fluids (water)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseinzadeh, S.; Sahebi, S. A. R.; Ghasemiasl, R.; Majidian, A. R.

    2017-05-01

    In the present study an experimental set-up is used to investigate the effect of a nanofluid as a working fluid to increase thermosyphon efficiency. Nanofluids are a new form of heat transfer media prepared by suspending metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles in a base fluid. The nanoparticles added to the fluid enhance the thermal characteristics of the base fluid. The nanofluid used in this experiment was a mixture of water and nanoparticles prepared with 0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, or 2% (v) concentration of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles and 1%, 2% and 3% (v) concentration of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) in an ultrasonic homogenizer. The results indicate that the SiC/water and Al2O3/water nanofluids increase the thermosyphon performance. The efficiency of the thermosyphon using the 2% (v) (SiC) nanoparticles nanofluid was 1.11 times that of pure water and the highest efficiency occurs for the 3% (Al2O3) nanoparticle concentration with input power of 300 W. The decrease in the temperature difference between the condenser and evaporator confirms these enhancements.

  20. Chronic resuscitation after trauma-hemorrhage and acute fluid replacement improves hepatocellular function and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, D E; Wang, P; Cioffi, W G; Bland, K I; Chaudry, I H

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether prolonged (chronic) resuscitation has any beneficial effects on cardiac output and hepatocellular function after trauma-hemorrhage and acute fluid replacement. Acute fluid resuscitation after trauma-hemorrhage restores but does not maintain the depressed hepatocellular function and cardiac output. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a 5-cm laparotomy (i.e., trauma was induced) and were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until 40% of maximal bleed-out volume was returned in the form of Ringer's lactate (RL). The animals were acutely resuscitated with RL using 4 times the volume of maximum bleed-out over 60 minutes, followed by chronic resuscitation of 0, 5, or 10 mL/kg/hr RL for 20 hours. Hepatocellular function was determined by an in vivo indocyanine green clearance technique. Hepatic microvascular blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined by bioassay. Chronic resuscitation with 5 mL/kg/hr RL, but not with 0 or 10 mL/kg/hr RL, restored cardiac output, hepatocellular function, and hepatic microvascular blood flow at 20 hours after hemorrhage. The regimen above also reduced plasma IL-6 levels. Because chronic resuscitation with 5 mL/kg/hr RL after trauma-hemorrhage and acute fluid replacement restored hepatocellular function and hepatic microvascular blood flow and decreased plasma levels of IL-6, we propose that chronic fluid resuscitation in addition to acute fluid replacement should be routinely used in experimental studies of trauma-hemorrhage.

  1. Drilling mud and cement slurry rheology manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    This book is not primarily concerned with theory. Its basic approach is practical. It has attempted to present a logical treatment which will be easy to apply in practice. As a result, certain computing methods were omitted, and precision sometimes has to be sacrificed to simplicity. However, no apology is made for the use of such approximations; in fact, any attempt at rigor would be doomed to failure, in view of the many inherent factors which do not lend themselves to quantitative treatment. Chapter 1: deals with fundamental concepts. Chapter 2: refers to the general principles involved in determining rheological parameters of drilling fluids and cement slurries. Chapter 3: relates to practical methods for using the results obtained in the first two Chapters, in units employed on the worksite. It is primarily intended for technicians called upon to make ''hydraulic'' computations during drilling. Chapter 4: contains several examples.

  2. Real Time Seismic Prediction while Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, F. R.; Bohlen, T.; Edelmann, T.; Kassel, A.; Heim, A.; Gehring, M.; Lüth, S.; Giese, R.; Jaksch, K.; Rechlin, A.; Kopf, M.; Stahlmann, J.; Gattermann, J.; Bruns, B.

    2009-12-01

    Efficient and safe drilling is a prerequisite to enhance the mobility of people and goods, to improve the traffic as well as utility infrastructure of growing megacities, and to ensure the growing energy demand while building geothermal and in hydroelectric power plants. Construction within the underground is often building within the unknown. An enhanced risk potential for people and the underground building may arise if drilling enters fracture zones, karsts, brittle rocks, mixed solid and soft rocks, caves, or anthropogenic obstacles. Knowing about the material behavior ahead of the drilling allows reducing the risk during drilling and construction operation. In drilling operations direct observations from boreholes can be complemented with geophysical investigations. In this presentation we focus on “real time” seismic prediction while drilling which is seen as a prerequisite while using geophysical methods in modern drilling operations. In solid rocks P- and S-wave velocity, refraction and reflection as well as seismic wave attenuation can be used for the interpretation of structures ahead of the drilling. An Integrated Seismic Imaging System (ISIS) for exploration ahead of a construction is used, where a pneumatic hammer or a magnetostrictive vibration source generate repetitive signals behind the tunneling machine. Tube waves are generated which travel along the tunnel to the working face. There the tube waves are converted to mainly S- but also P-Waves which interact with the formation ahead of the heading face. The reflected or refracted waves travel back to the working front are converted back to tube waves and recorded using three-component geophones which are fit into the tips of anchor rods. In near real time, the ISIS software allows for an integrated 3D imaging and interpretation of the observed data, geological and geotechnical parameters. Fracture zones, heterogeneities, and variations in the rock properties can be revealed during the drilling

  3. Air distribution system with the discharge action in the working cavity of downhole air hammer drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonin, VV; Alekseev, SE; Kokoulin, DI; Kubanychbek, B.

    2018-03-01

    It is proposed to carry out pre-mine methane drainage using underground degassing holes made by downhole air hammer drills. The features of downhole air drills are described. The downhole air drill layout with the simple-shape striking part is presented with its pluses and minuses. The researchers point at available options to eliminate the shortcomings. The improved layout of the downhole air hammer drill is suggested. The paper ends with the test data on the prototype air hammer drill, its characteristics and trial drilling results.

  4. Changing the fundamentals[Drill technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatern, R. von

    2003-02-01

    Evolution of the science of drilling oil and gas wells has evolved in fits and starts. From drilling with cables to rotary tables to top drives, from straight holes to horizontal, it has been a process interrupted occasionally by flashes of revolutionary brilliance. In this article the author looks at the state of just a few of the technologies that define or threaten to change how drillers go about their business. In the early days of deepwater exploration drillers responded more to technical challenges than financial ones, primarily with immense semisubmersibles and drillships, together with all he necessary ancillary items. The goal of getting deeper faster is not a new one, better performance bits, muds, LWD and MWD, together with numerous other developments all emerged as a result of the desire to shorten the time between spud and TD. But whereas saving a day or two drilling onshore or nearshore is desirable, it has never before been possible to realize the kind of substantial financial benefits from relatively small time savings. Research and development into these type of savings with the design and improvement of different types drill bits and casing drilling is described.

  5. Drilling subsurface wellbores with cutting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansure, Arthur James; Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona

    2010-11-30

    A system for forming a wellbore includes a drill tubular. A drill bit is coupled to the drill tubular. One or more cutting structures are coupled to the drill tubular above the drill bit. The cutting structures remove at least a portion of formation that extends into the wellbore formed by the drill bit.

  6. Fluids engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  7. Lifting device for drilling rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzivilovich, L L; Laptev, A G; Lipkovich, V A

    1982-01-01

    A lifter is proposed for drilling rods including a spacer stand with rotating bracket, boom with by-pass rollers, spacing and lifting hydrocylinders with rods and flexible tie mechanism. In order to improve labor productivity by improving maneuverability and to increase the maintenance zone, the lifter is equipped with a hydrocylinder of advance and a cross piece which is installed with the possibility of forward and rotational movement on the stand, and in which by means of the hydrocylinder of advance a boom is attached. Within the indicated boom there is a branch of the flexible tie mechanism with end attached with the possibility of regulation over the length on a rotating bracket, while the rod of the lifting hydrocylinder is connected to the cross piece.

  8. Growth hormone treatment improves body fluid distribution in patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J; Jensen, M B; Frandsen, E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible beneficial effects of growth hormone (GH) in catabolic patients we examined the impact of GH on body fluid distribution in patients with ulcerative colitis undergoing elective abdominal surgery. DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: Twenty-four patients (14 female, 10 male...... at day -2 and at day 7, and body composition was estimated by dual X-ray absorptiometry and bioimpedance. Changes in body weight and fluid balance were recorded and hence intracellular volume was assessed. RESULTS: During placebo treatment body weight decreased 4.3 +/- 0.6 kg; during GH treatment body.......05). Plasma renin and aldosterone remained unchanged in both study groups. CONCLUSION: Body weight, plasma volume and intracellular volume is preserved during GH treatment in catabolic patients and ECV is increased. From a therapeutic point of view these effects may be desirable under conditions of surgical...

  9. Deep-Time drilling in the Australian Archean: the Agouron Institute geobiological drilling project. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buick, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Agouron Institute has sponsored deep-time drilling across the South African Archean-Proterozoic boundary, investigating the rise of oxygen over an onshore-offshore environmental transect. It is now supporting a drilling program in the Australian Archean of the Pilbara Craton, addressing a similar theme but with the added goal of resolving controversy over the age and origin of hydrocarbon biomarker molecules in ancient kerogenous shales. As these have been claimed to provide evidence for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis long before the rise of atmospheric oxygen to persistently high levels during the ~2.3 Ga “Great Oxidation Event”, their syngenesis with their host shales is thus of critical importance for the interpretation of Earth’s early oxygenation history. During the first drilling season, 3 holes were drilled using techniques and equipment to minimize organic geochemical contamination (new drill-string components cleaned before drilling potentially biomarker-bearing rocks, pre-contamination of drilling fluid with a synthetic organic compound of similar geochemical characteristics to biomarkers, sterile cutting and storage of samples immediately upon retrieval from the core-barrel). The initial hole was a blank control for organic geochemistry, drilled into rocks too metamorphosed to retain biomarker molecules. These rocks, cherts, carbonates and pelites of the 3.52 Ga Coucal Formation, Coonterunah Group, have been metamorphosed to upper greenschist facies at temperatures near 500°C and so should have had any ancient soluble hydrocarbons destroyed. However, because they contain both carbonate and organic carbon, these rocks can instead provide isotopic information about the earliest evolution of biological metabolism as they possess residues of both the reactant and product sides of the carbon-fixation reaction. The second hole sampled an on-shore section of carbonates and kerogenous shales in the ~2.65 Ga Carawine Dolomite and Lewin Shale

  10. Pre-drilling prediction techniques on the high-temperature high-pressure hydrocarbon reservoirs offshore Hainan Island, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyu; Liu, Huaishan; Wu, Shiguo; Sun, Jin; Yang, Chaoqun; Xie, Yangbing; Chen, Chuanxu; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Jiliang

    2018-02-01

    Decreasing the risks and geohazards associated with drilling engineering in high-temperature high-pressure (HTHP) geologic settings begins with the implementation of pre-drilling prediction techniques (PPTs). To improve the accuracy of geopressure prediction in HTHP hydrocarbon reservoirs offshore Hainan Island, we made a comprehensive summary of current PPTs to identify existing problems and challenges by analyzing the global distribution of HTHP hydrocarbon reservoirs, the research status of PPTs, and the geologic setting and its HTHP formation mechanism. Our research results indicate that the HTHP formation mechanism in the study area is caused by multiple factors, including rapid loading, diapir intrusions, hydrocarbon generation, and the thermal expansion of pore fluids. Due to this multi-factor interaction, a cloud of HTHP hydrocarbon reservoirs has developed in the Ying-Qiong Basin, but only traditional PPTs have been implemented, based on the assumption of conditions that do not conform to the actual geologic environment, e.g., Bellotti's law and Eaton's law. In this paper, we focus on these issues, identify some challenges and solutions, and call for further PPT research to address the drawbacks of previous works and meet the challenges associated with the deepwater technology gap. In this way, we hope to contribute to the improved accuracy of geopressure prediction prior to drilling and provide support for future HTHP drilling offshore Hainan Island.

  11. Fluid resuscitation does not improve renal oxygenation during hemorrhagic shock in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Legrand, Matthieu; Mik, Egbert; Balestra, Gianmarco; Lutter, Rene; Pirracchio, Romain; Payen, Didier; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The resuscitation strategy for hemorrhagic shock remains controversial, with the kidney being especially prone to hypoxia. Methods: The authors used a three-phase hemorrhagic shock model to investigate the effects of fluid resuscitation on renal oxygenation. After a 1-h shock phase, rats were randomized into four groups to receive either normal saline or hypertonic saline targeting a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of either 40 or 80 mmHg. After such resuscitation, rats w...

  12. Bifurcation and stability of an improved time-delayed fluid flow model in internet congestion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Liang, Liu; Jie, Zhu; Xiao-Shu, Luo

    2009-01-01

    Based on the fluid flow time-delayed model proposed by Misra et al in internet congestion control, one modified time-delayed model is presented, where the influence of the communication delay on the router queue length is investigated in detail. The main advantage of the new model is that its stability domain is larger even without an extra controller. By linear stability analysis and numerical simulation, the effectiveness and feasibility of the novel model in internet congestion control are verified

  13. Bifurcation and stability of an improved time-delayed fluid flow model in internet congestion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Jie; Luo, Xiao-Shu

    2009-09-01

    Based on the fluid flow time-delayed model proposed by Misra et al in internet congestion control, one modified time-delayed model is presented, where the influence of the communication delay on the router queue length is investigated in detail. The main advantage of the new model is that its stability domain is larger even without an extra controller. By linear stability analysis and numerical simulation, the effectiveness and feasibility of the novel model in internet congestion control are verified.

  14. Transfer effects after working memory training lead to improved fluid intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Onken, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Fluid intelligence describes the ability to think abstract, to adapt to new situations and to solve unknown problems. It is important for learning as well as for academic and professional success. Working memory is characterized as a cognitive system, that saves information over a short period of time in spite of possible distractions. More- over, working memory is able to assess the relevance of information while requirements change. Effective implicit training is able to increase the workin...

  15. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  16. Offset drilling obligations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, K.D.; Kalmakoff, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the 'offset well' clause found in freehold and Crown natural gas and petroleum leases was presented. The objective was to provide lessors and lessees with a clear understanding of the rights and obligations associated with offset wells. It was noted that offset well obligations vary according to the form of lease used, the type of offsetting well, the regulatory regime and the geophysical characteristics of the producing formation. Some suggestions were made as to how current versions of the offset well clause can be amended to overcome some of the problems encountered in applying the clause to an offset horizontal well that has been drilled on adjoining lands. Failure to resolve the new issues presented by horizontal drilling technology in terms of documentation, which records respective rights and obligations on the basis of generally accepted principles, will result in large numbers of conflicts and unnecessary litigation. 144 refs., 1 fig

  17. Ecotoxicological testing of performance fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallqvist, T.

    1990-05-01

    The report deals with a project comprising the testing of drilling fluids concerning ecotoxicology, biological degradation, and toxicity. Two types of drilling fluids were tested for toxic effects on marine algae and biological degradability. A fluid based on mineral oil was readily degradable (98% DOC removal in 28 days) while an ether based oil degraded more slowly (56% DOC removal in 28 days). The toxicity of both fluids was tested after emulsification of the oils in water and separating the oil and water phase after equilibration. The EC 50 values obtained with this approach were 8.15 g/l for the oil based fluid and 116 g/l for the ether fluid. 9 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Usefulness of temporal bone prototype for drilling training: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussedat, C; Venail, F; Nguyen, Y; Lescanne, E; Marx, M; Bakhos, D

    2017-12-01

    Dissection of cadaveric temporal bones (TBs) is considered the gold standard for surgical training in otology. For many reasons, access to the anatomical laboratory and cadaveric TBs is difficult for some facilities. The aim of this prospective and comparative study was to evaluate the usefulness of a physical TB prototype for drilling training in residency. Prospective study. Tertiary referral centre. Thirty-four residents were included. Seventeen residents (mean age 26.7±1.6) drilled on only cadaveric TBs ("traditional" group), in the traditional training method, while seventeen residents (mean age 26.5±1.7) drilled first on a prototype and then on a cadaveric TB ("prototype" group). Drilling performance was assessed using a validated scale. Residents completed a mastoid image before and after each drilling to enable evaluation of mental representations of the mastoidectomy. No differences were observed between the groups with respect to age, drilling experience and level of residency. Regarding drilling performance, we found a significant difference across the groups, with a better score in the prototype group (P=.0007). For mental representation, the score was statistically improved (P=.0003) after drilling in both groups, suggesting that TB drilling improves the mental representation of the mastoidectomy whether prototype or cadaveric TB is used. The TB prototype improves the drilling performance and mental representation of the mastoidectomy in the young resident population. A drilling simulation with virtual or physical systems seems to be a beneficial tool to improve TB drilling. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Diamond bits for directional drilling of wells and technology of using them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, V P; Steblev, B Ye; Sumaneyev, N N

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics are presented for a diamond bit for directional drilling ADN-08. Technology of using it is described, as well as cutter bits for directional drilling. Based on specially developed technique, the economic effect of using the diamond bits is calculated. This indicates that the use of the diamond bits in rocks of the VIII category significantly improves the quality of directional drilling.

  20. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilley, Mitch; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Quick, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling; however, there are opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies used. The scope of this drilling operational study included 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'perfect well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.), poor data collection, and difficult to ascertain handwriting. An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate analysis figures. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averages 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million would be lost due to non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells and only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry. It is the use of Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. However, a work-flow must also be established in order for there to be an efficient drilling program. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real

  1. Investigation on the Effect of a Pre-Center Drill Hole and Tool Material on Thrust Force, Surface Roughness, and Cylindricity in the Drilling of Al7075

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Ghasemi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drilling is one of the most useful metal cutting processes and is used in various applications, such as aerospace, electronics, and automotive. In traditional drilling methods, the thrust force, torque, tolerance, and tribology (surface roughness are related to the cutting condition and tool geometry. In this paper, the effects of a pre-center drill hole, tool material, and drilling strategy (including continuous and non-continuous feed on thrust force, surface roughness, and dimensional accuracy (cylindricity have been investigated. The results show that using pre-center drill holes leads to a reduction of the engagement force and an improvement in the surface quality and cylindricity. Non-continuous drilling reduces the average thrust force and cylindricity value, and High Speed Steels HSS-Mo (high steel speed + 5–8% Mo reduces the maximum quantity of cutting forces. Moreover, cylindricity is directly related to cutting temperature and is improved by using a non-continuous drilling strategy.

  2. Investigation on the Effect of a Pre-Center Drill Hole and Tool Material on Thrust Force, Surface Roughness, and Cylindricity in the Drilling of Al7075.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Amir Hossein; Khorasani, Amir Mahyar; Gibson, Ian

    2018-01-16

    Drilling is one of the most useful metal cutting processes and is used in various applications, such as aerospace, electronics, and automotive. In traditional drilling methods, the thrust force, torque, tolerance, and tribology (surface roughness) are related to the cutting condition and tool geometry. In this paper, the effects of a pre-center drill hole, tool material, and drilling strategy (including continuous and non-continuous feed) on thrust force, surface roughness, and dimensional accuracy (cylindricity) have been investigated. The results show that using pre-center drill holes leads to a reduction of the engagement force and an improvement in the surface quality and cylindricity. Non-continuous drilling reduces the average thrust force and cylindricity value, and High Speed Steels HSS-Mo (high steel speed + 5-8% Mo) reduces the maximum quantity of cutting forces. Moreover, cylindricity is directly related to cutting temperature and is improved by using a non-continuous drilling strategy.

  3. Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

  4. Exploring thermal anisotropy of cortical bone using temperature measurements in drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khurshid

    2016-05-12

    Bone drilling is widely used in orthopaedics for fracture treatment, reconstructive surgery and bone biopsy. Heat generation in bone drilling can cause rise in bone temperature resulting in prolonged healing time or loosening of fixation. The purpose of this study was to investigate thermal anisotropy of bone by measuring the level of temperature in bone drilling with and without cooling conditions in two anatomical directions. Drilling tests were performed on bovine cortical bone. A total of fifteen specimens were used to obtain data for statistical analysis. Temperature near the cutting zone was measured in two anatomical directions. i.e. along the longitudinal and circumferential direction. Temperature distribution was also found in the two prescribed directions. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify significant drilling parameter affecting bone temperature. Drilling speed, feed rate and drill size were found influential parameters affecting bone temperature. Higher drilling speed, feed rate, and large drill size were found to cause elevated temperature in bone. Much lower temperature was measured in bone when cooling fluid was supplied to the drilling region. Experimental results revealed lower temperatures in the circumferential direction compared to the longitudinal direction. Thermal anisotropy for heat transport was found in the bone. This study recommends lower drilling speed and feed rate and cooling for controlling rise in bone temperature.

  5. Importance of drill string assembly swivel in horizontal drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund Tasak

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A part of the drill string – the swivel (rotational connector – accomplishes an important task in the horizontal drilling. Its malfunctioning makes it impossible to draw in ( install large diameter and length pipelines. The causes of the connector break-down during the horizontal drilling are investigated in the paper. The drilling has been made for twenty inches gas pipeline installation during reaming operations. A trouble was encountered making good work conditions of a system consisting of the drilling machine drill string reamer swivel tube shield of Cardan joint and the gas pipeline 500 m long. In this case, the swivel brokes down and the planned operation was not finished. The assessment of improper drilling conditions, selection of operation system components, and drilling parameters and the insufficient technological supervising have created an excessive risk of failure. A proper application of technical analysis would considerably decrease the hazard of failure which cause large costs, delays and decrease of confidence to the drilling contractor and pipeline installation.

  6. New roles of LWD and wireline logging in scientific ocean drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanada, Y.; Kido, Y. N.; Moe, K.; Aoike, K.

    2014-12-01

    D/V Chikyu implemented by CDEX/JAMSTEC joined IODP from 2007. Various LWD (Logging While Drilling) and wireline logging have been carried out in many expeditions and for various purposes. Significant features of logging in Chikyu expeditions are many use of LWD than wireline logging, and riser dirlling. riser selected specific tools for each scientific target, and 3) carried out various borehole experiments. LWD has been more popular than wireline logging in Chikyu expeditions, because its advantages match theirs science targets. The advantages are followings. 1) LWD has more opportunities for measurement in unstable borehole, such as in the series of Nankai trough drilling expeditions. 2) LWD realtime data allows us to make realtime interpretation and operational decision. Realtime interpretation was required to set obsevartory at the properposition. 3) LWD before coring allows us to make a strategy of spot coring.We can design coring intervals for our interest and core length to improve core recovery.Riser drilling brings us merits for logging. One is hole stability (good hole condition) and the other is the use of large diameter tools. Controled drilling mud in riser drilling system prevent mud invasion to formation and mitigates collapse of borehole wall. They reduce the risk of tool stack and improve data quality. Large diameter of riser pipe enhances variation of tool seizes. A couple of new tools were used for new measurement and improvement of the data quality. For example, SonicScanner (trademark of Schulumberger) successfully measured compressional and share velocity in very low velocities at the soft sediment, where it has been difficult to measure them with conventional DSI tool (Exp319). The stress and pore pressure in the borehole were measured with the wireline logging tool, (Schlumberger MDT). The single probe tool enable to measure temporal formation fluid pressure. The double packer tool enable to fracture test by sealing and pumping in the

  7. An evaluation of flowmeters for the detection of kicks and lost circulation during drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wright, K.E. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01

    An independent evaluation of current industry standard and state-of-the-art drilling fluid inflow and outflow meters was conducted during the drilling of a geothermal exploratory well. Four different types of fluid inflow meters and three different types of fluid outflow meters were tested and evaluated during actual drilling operations. The tested drilling fluid inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flow meters, and a Doppler ultrasonic flow meter. On the return flow line, a standard paddle meter, an acoustic level meter, and a prototype rolling float meter were evaluated to measure drilling fluid outflow rates. The prototype outflow meter utilizes a rolling float which rides on the surface of the flow thereby measuring the fluid height in the pipe. Both the prototype meter and the conventional paddle meter were also extensively tested under a variety of drilling conditions in a full-scale laboratory test facility. The meters were evaluated and compared on the basis of reliability and accuracy, and the results are presented in the paper.

  8. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  9. Drill string gas data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, E.R.

    1998-05-12

    Data and supporting documentation were compiled and analyzed for 26 cases of gas grab samples taken during waste-tank core sampling activities between September 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997. These cases were tested against specific criteria to reduce uncertainties associated with in-tank sampling location and conditions. Of the 26 possible cases, 16 qualified as drill-string grab samples most likely to represent recently released waste gases. The data from these 16 ``confirmed`` cases were adjusted to remove non-waste gas contributions from core-sampling activities (argon or nitrogen purge), the atmospheric background, and laboratory sampler preparation (helium). The procedure for subtracting atmospheric, laboratory, and argon purge gases was unambiguous. No reliable method for determining the exact amount of nitrogen purge gas was established. Thus, the final set of ``Adjusted`` drill string gas data for the 6 nitrogen-purged cases had a greater degree of uncertainty than the final results for the 10 argon-purged cases. Including the appropriate amounts of uncertainty, this final set of data was added to the set of high-quality results from the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), and good agreement was found for the N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mole fractions sampled from common tanks. These results indicate that under favorable sampling conditions, Drill-String (DS) grab samples can provide reasonably accurate information about the dominant species of released gas. One conclusion from this set of total gas data is that the distribution of the H{sub 2} mole fractions is bimodal in shape, with an upper bound of 78%.

  10. Drilling string lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakhobalov, A B; Galiopa, A A; Ponomarev, G V; Ushakov, A M

    1981-04-28

    A drilling string lifter is suggested which includes a rotating tower installed on a fixed base, hydraulic cylinder and pipe-clamping assembly connected through a chain gear to the drive motor. In order to simplify the design of the hydraulic lifter, the drive motor is installed on a fixed base so that the axis of the outlet shaft of the drive motor coincides with the axis of rotation of the tower. In addition, the axis of rotation of the tower is made in the form of a tubular element, and the outlet shaft of the drive motor is ranged between the tubular element.

  11. U.S. drilling contractors could face stiff challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Although the outlook for most segments of the contract drilling business is now more optimistic than in the past decade, the increased activity has brought several problems: the availability of fully trained crews, the need for new capital, and the limited number of quality drillstrings. These problems will grow in importance if natural gas deliverability begins to decline visibly and once the scramble to correct this decline begins. As the drilling recovery unfolds, the most important lesson to remember, based on worldwide activity in the past year, is how rapidly conditions can change and how quickly excess capacity can turn into chronic shortages. The various segments of the world wide contract drilling industry's prospects have changed dramatically during the past 12 months, and oddly, some market sectors have improved while others have become worse. These quick changes highlight the unpredictable and volatile nature of the markets for contract drilling and other services needed to drill and complete oil and gas wells. The paper describes the business of well drilling onshore and offshore in the US, drilling activities in Canada, international markets, capacity, the supplies of natural gas, Gulf of Mexico activities, drill pipe shortages, manpower shortages, and challenges offshore

  12. Quality, health and environment system integrated application in the processes of drilling, completion and work over fluids and waste management in the exploration and production activities; Aplicacao do sistema de gestao integrada de qualidade, saude, meio ambiente e seguranca nos processos de fluidos de perfuracao, completacao, workover e gerenciamento de residuos nas atividades de E e P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca Filho, Jose; Chio, Alessandra F.; Sa, Carlos M. de [M-I Swaco do Brasil - Comercio, Servicos e Mineracao Ltda., Mossoro, RN (Brazil). Quality, Health, Safety and Environmental

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the strategy developed by M-I SWACO Brasil for identification of the need for implementation and management of a system that in an integrated way attended to the requirements of Quality, Health, Environment and Safety in the processes of drilling, completion and work over fluids and waste management in the E and P activities involving all steps, from planning to execution of the projects. The Integrated Management System was based on requirements of the international standards ISO 9001:2000, ISO 14001:1996 and OHSAS 18001:1999 and on internal corporate requirements as the HSE Management System. The conception of IMS is associated to a preventive posture, with the identification, evaluation and control of environmental and occupational risks, as well as the compliance to the products quality requirements and services related to the processes of fluids and waste management, with a systemic vision in that all those segments were managed in a integrated way. The system propitiated a better management of the processes and of the aspects of Quality, Health, Environment and Safety, increasing the awareness and the proactive attitude with the commitment of all levels of the company, adding value in the services and products, being a differentiation factor for customers, suppliers and community. (author)

  13. Coated carbide drill performance under soluble coconut oil lubricant and nanoparticle enhanced MQL in drilling AISI P20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, N. A. M.; Azmi, A. I.; Fairuz, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This research experimentally investigates the performance of a TiAlN coated carbide drill bit in drilling AISI P20 through two different kinds of lubricants, namely; soluble coconut oil (SCO) and nanoparticle-enhanced coconut oil (NECO) under minimum quantity lubrication system. The tool life and tool wear mechanism were studied using various cutting speeds of 50, 100 and 150 m/min with a constant feed of 0.01 mm/rev. Since the flank wear land was not regular along the cutting edge, the average flank wear (VB) was measured at several points using image analysis software. The drills were inspected using a scanning electron microscope to further elucidate the wear mechanism. The result indicates that drilling with the nanoparticle- enhanced lubricant was better in resisting the wear and improving the drill life to some extent

  14. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  15. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-08-21

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  16. Étude des interactions mécaniques et physico-chimiques entre les argiles et les fluides de forage. Application à l'argile de Boom (Belgique A Study O the Mechanical and Physicochemical Interactions Between the Clay Materials and the Drilling Fluids. Application to the Boom Clay (Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshibangu J. P.

    2006-11-01

    pour sa disponibilité et, d'autre part, pour la grande quantité d'informations disponibles sur ce matériau. General ConsiderationsThis work deals with problems encountered regarding the stability of wells drilled in the clay material formations with water based muds. In fact, clays or shales have a property of taking water, thus causing the instability of wells either because of the swelling of some mineral species, or because the supporting pressure is suppressed by modification of the pore pressure. The aim here is to experimentally emphasize the principal mechanisms driving the phenomenon of instability, and to try to quantify the importance of these mechanisms in order to include them in calculation models. The behaviour of a shale put in contact of a water based fluid depends on its initial water activity and on the composition of the fluid. According to the situation, the shale will take or expel water, with a consequence of swelling or shrinkage. Three factors play an important role in the water activity of shales :- The electrostatic interaction which is related to the cation exchange. This mechanism consists in a cation passing from the solution to the surface of a layer and an interlayer cation of the clay doing the opposite path. Clay materials are characterized by the Cation Exchange Capacity or CEC;- The salt concentration which is related to the osmotic phenomenon. If a shale, and especially a montmorillonite, is put in contact with a pure solvent, in addition of the ion hydration, the solvent will be taken by the shale in order to dilute the high ionic concentration of that shale. This last mechanism is macroscopically expressed by a difference of osmotic pressure between the external solvent and the pore fluid of the shale. If we consider the case in which the solvent is pure water the osmotic pressure is expressed by equation (2 in which awi is the water activity of the shale and vw the partial molar volume of water (we suppose here that this vw has

  17. 30 CFR 57.7052 - Drilling positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drilling positions. 57.7052 Section 57.7052... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7052 Drilling positions. Persons shall not drill...

  18. 30 CFR 56.7052 - Drilling positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drilling positions. 56.7052 Section 56.7052... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7052 Drilling positions. Persons shall not drill from— (a) Positions which hinder...

  19. Control procedure for well drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdon, J C

    1988-09-09

    A control procedure of rotary drilling operations is proposed. It uses the Drill off test. The drill-off test permits to determine the rock drill speed variation as a function of the wright applied on the top of the pipe. We can deduce from that a rock drill wear parameter. The method permits to prevent a rupture and its grave economic consequences.

  20. 30 CFR 33.34 - Drilling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drilling test. 33.34 Section 33.34 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test Requirements § 33.34 Drilling test. (a) A drilling test shall consist of drilling a set of 10 test holes, without...

  1. Individual Drilling Bit Design and Optimization in Mahu Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wenbo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are three sets of gravels in Mahu region. The gravels formation is characterized by high heterogeneity, high abrasiveness and poor drillability. It is so difficult to optimize bit that restrict seriously the overall exploration and development process. The compressive strength, internal friction angle, and drillability of the formation are tested to check the rock mechanical characteristic profile established by logging data. The individual bit design is carried out by the 3D simulation technology. A new PDC bit type is designed to form the drill bit series for Mahu area. Single PDC bit increases 90% of the drilling footage. The trip average footage is improved 3.45 times, the horizontal section average penetration increased 34.8%. The technical achievements have greatly improved economic development benefits of Mahu region by improving drilling speed and saving drilling costs.

  2. Activity plan: Directional drilling and environmental measurements while drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    This activity plan describes the testing of directional drilling combined with environmental measurements while drilling at two Hanford Site locations. A cold test is to be conducted at the 105A Mock Tank Leak Facility in the 200 East Area. A hot test is proposed to be run at the 216-B-8 tile field north of the 241-B Tank Farm in 200 East Area. Criteria to judge the success, partial success or failure of various aspects of the test are included. The TWRS program is assessing the potential for use of directional drilling because of an identified need to interrogate the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tanks. Because every precaution must be taken to assure that investigation activities do not violate the integrity of the tanks, control of the drill bit and ability to follow a predetermined drill path are of utmost importance and are being tested

  3. Design and Exploitation Problems of Drill String in Directional Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarz Stanislaw

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Drill string design for directional drilling requires accounting for a number of factors. First, types and expected values of loads should be determined. Then, elements of the drill string should be so selected as to enable realization of the plan at specified loads. Some of additional factors, e. g. purchase, exploitation cost, geological conditions in the bore-hole, washing of the bore-hole, stability, trajectory, rig parameters, accuracy of gauges, pumps parameters remain in conflict. Drill pipes are made of rolled pipes, upset and welded with tool joints to 9,5 m long; the shorter ones can be made of hot forged rods. Exploitation requirements, being a result of practical experience supported by theoretical and laboratory analyses should be a part of syllabuses of technical staff educational programs. Apart from designing the string, it is also vital to lower the risk of a drilling failure. The significance of these aspects seems to be unquestionable.

  4. Activity plan: Directional drilling and environmental measurements while drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.A.

    1998-07-16

    This activity plan describes the testing of directional drilling combined with environmental measurements while drilling at two Hanford Site locations. A cold test is to be conducted at the 105A Mock Tank Leak Facility in the 200 East Area. A hot test is proposed to be run at the 216-B-8 tile field north of the 241-B Tank Farm in 200 East Area. Criteria to judge the success, partial success or failure of various aspects of the test are included. The TWRS program is assessing the potential for use of directional drilling because of an identified need to interrogate the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tanks. Because every precaution must be taken to assure that investigation activities do not violate the integrity of the tanks, control of the drill bit and ability to follow a predetermined drill path are of utmost importance and are being tested.

  5. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2007-02-28

    side tracking applications. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report has been prepared in two parts and each part may be treated as a stand-alone document. Part 1 (High Energy Laser Drilling) includes the general description of the concept and focuses on results from experiments under the ambient lab conditions. Part 2 (High Energy Laser Perforation and Completion Techniques) discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling to Improve Natural Flow Rate and Sweet Pepper Productivity in Greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    W. Limtrakarn; P. Boonmongkol; A. Chompupoung; K. Rungprateepthaworn; J. Kruenate; P. Dechaumphai

    2012-01-01

    Natural flow rate and sweet peppers productivity in tropical greenhouse are improved by CFD simulation is the main objective of this research work. Most of the greenhouse types today are in the arch shape. To develop an improved greenhouse structure for the region, the arch type was built and used as the control model. Mae Sar Mai agriculture research station under the royal project foundation was selected as the field test site. Temperature sensors with data logger were installed to monitor ...

  7. Improved solid-phase extraction method for systematic toxicological analysis in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, T; Jurado, C; Menéndez, M; Repetto, M

    2001-03-01

    A method for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative determination of drugs of abuse (opiates, cocaine, or amphetamines) and prescribed drugs (tricyclic antidepressants, phenotiazines, benzodiazepines, etc.) in biological fluids--blood, urine, bile, and gastric contents--was developed. This procedure involves solid-phase extraction with Bond-Elut Certify columns followed by analysis by gas chromatography-nitrogen-phosphorus detection (GC-NPD) and confirmation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), after derivatization, when necessary. Pretreatment was performed on all samples: sonication for 15 min plus enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase in urine. With respect to the internal standards, nalorphine and trihexylamine were used for basic substances, allobarbital for acidic drugs, and prazepam for benzodiazepines. Acidic and basic compounds were extracted from different aliquots of samples at different pH levels: 6-6.5 for the acidic and neutral and 8-8.5 for the basic and the benzodiazepines. Several areas of experimental design were considered in the process of method optimization. These included internal standards, pH, sonication, flow rate and washing solvents. It was found that systematic analysis could be reliably performed using optimized extraction conditions. The recovery rates for the compounds tested were always higher than 61.02%.

  8. Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Oglesby

    2008-12-01

    An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

  9. Registration and processing of acoustic signal in rock drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futó Jozef

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available For the determination of an effective rock disintegration for a given tool and rock type it is needed to define an optimal disintegration regime. Optimisation of the disintegration process by drilling denotes the finding out an appropriate couple of input parameters of disintegration, i.e. the thrust and revolutions for a quasi-equal rock environment. The disintegration process can be optimised to reach the maximum immediate drilling rate, to reach the minimum specific disintegration energy or to reach the maximum ratio of immediate drilling rate and specific disintegration energy. For the determination of the optimal thrust and revolutions it is needed to monitor the disintegration process. Monitoring of the disintegration process in real conditions is complicated by unfavourable factors, such as the presence of water, dust, vibrations etc. Following our present experience in the monitoring of drilling or full-profile driving, we try to replace the monitoring of input values by monitoring of the scanned acoustic signal. This method of monitoring can extend the optimisation of disintegration process in the technical practice. Its advantage consists in the registration of one acoustic signal by an appropriate microphone. Monitoring of acoustic signal is used also in monitoring of metal machining by milling and turning jobs. The research results of scanning of the acoustic signal in machining of metals are encouraging. Acoustic signal can be processed by different statistical parameters. The paper decribes some results of monitoring of the acoustic signal in rock disintegration on the drilling stand of the Institute of Geotechnics SAS in Košice. The acoustic signal has been registered and processed in no-load run of electric motor, in no-load run of electric motor with a drilling fluid, and in the Ruskov andesite drilling. Registration and processing of the acoustic signal is solved as a part of the research grant task within the basic research

  10. Control procedure for fluid kicks in hydrocarbons wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavignet, A

    1989-02-10

    This invention is a control procedure of the fluids inflows coming from an underground formation during a drill. These inflows happen when a drill reaches a permeable area containing a high pressure fluid. The latter will engulf into the well which may cause a catastrophic eruption, if nothing is done. Therefore is it necessary to know as soon as possible the physical nature of the fluids inflows. The proposed method consists in calculating the fluids characteristic through the measure of the pressures and debits of injection and return of the drilling mud.

  11. Delta flow: An accurate, reliable system for detecting kicks and loss of circulation during drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speers, J.M.; Gehrig, G.F.

    1987-12-01

    A system to monitor drilling-fluid flow rate has been developed that detects kicks and lost returns in floating, fixed-platform, and land-base drilling operations. The system uses flowmeters that monitor the flow rates of drilling fluids entering the borehole through the standpipe and leaving the well through the return flowline. These readings are processed in a computer-based, data-acquisition system to form a filtered delta-flow signal that identified the occurrence of downhole fluid gains or losses. The system is designed to trip an alarm when a gain or loss exceeds 25 gal/min (1.6 dm/sup 3//s), even in a floating drilling environment. This sensitivity will generally keep gains or losses to less than 5 bbl (0.8 m/sup 3/).

  12. Influence of Clays on Borehole Stability : a Literature Survey Part One: Occurence of Drilling Problems. Physico-Chemical Description of Clays and of Their Interaction with Fluids Influence des argiles sur la stabilité des parois de puits : revue bibliographique. Première partie : les problèmes rencontrés lors du forage dans les argiles. Description physico-chimique des argiles et de leur interaction avec les fluides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsans T.

    2006-11-01

    , generally performed in the presence of a gas phase, cannot be readily compared to the in situ behaviour of the shales, but give insights on the possible artefacts of laboratory experiments. Caution is thus necessary before any application of literature results to real samples, all preliminary conditioning (initial state and composition of the clay and the water, way of hydration/dehydration, or compaction being able to modify the behaviour of the clay-water system. The third section sets the problem of describing the mechanical behaviour of the rock formation on drilling. This behaviour depends on initial in situ stresses, pore pressure and temperature, and on the constitutive law of the rock, i. e. the relation between stress and strain. As an example, the Cam Clay elasto-plastic law is developed. Then the laboratory experimental sets used to identify mechanical properties are described : triaxial tests, drained or undrained, oedometric tests, and hollow cylinder tests, the first ones being used to calibrate borehole stability, while the latter simulate drilled boreholes. Specific aspects of shales are then recalled : dependence of mechanical properties on the water content, anisotropy and influence of time. Coupling between physico-chemistry and mechanics arises from the lack of chemical equilibrium between the solid and the liquid. This desequilibrium induces a transfer of water and chemical species in solution, modifying the pore pressure, thus the stress on the rock, and leading to chemical reactions, which have been described in section III. Follows a description of stability models, which should be able to predict mud characteristics for the drilling as well as evolution of the borehole with time. Stability models intend to calculate the maximum/minimum mud weight, from a relevant instability criterion, drawn from well data, mechanical data and fluid properties. The choice of the constitutive law is thus important, and elasto-plastic ones seem the more relevant

  13. Certain problems in the economics of deep drilling operations conducted in the Chechen-Ingush Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanskiy, L.M.; Repina, I.S.

    1981-01-01

    The authors provide analysis and evaluation of technical-economic indicators for borehole drilling conducted at great depths in the Chechen-Ingush Autonomous Republic. Suggestions are made for improving such drilling operations in this area.

  14. Reinforcement and Drill by Microcomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    1984-01-01

    Points out why drill work has a role in the language arts classroom, explores the possibilities of using a microcomputer to give children drill work, and discusses the characteristics of a good software program, along with faults found in many software programs. (FL)

  15. High cost for drilling ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooghiemstra, J.

    2007-01-01

    Prices for the rent of a drilling ship are very high. Per day the rent is 1% of the price for building such a ship, and those prices have risen as well. Still, it is attractive for oil companies to rent a drilling ship [nl

  16. Drill pipe bridge plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winslow, D.W.; Brisco, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method of stopping flow of fluid up through a pipe bore of a pipe string in a well. It comprises: lowering a bridge plug apparatus on a work string into the pipe string to a position where the pipe bore is to be closed; communicating the pipe bore below a packer of the bridge plug apparatus through the bridge plug apparatus with a low pressure zone above the packer to permit the fluid to flow up through the bridge plug apparatus; engaging the bridge plug apparatus with an internal upset of the pipe string; while the fluid is flowing up through the bridge plug apparatus, pulling upward on the work string and the bridge plug apparatus and thereby sealing the packer against the pipe bore; isolating the pipe bore below the packer from the low pressure zone above the packer and thereby stopping flow of the fluid up through the pipe bore; disconnecting the work string from the bridge plug apparatus; and maintaining the bridge plug apparatus in engagement with the internal upset and sealed against the pipe bore due to an upward pressure differential applied to the bridge plug apparatus by the fluid contained therebelow

  17. Simulated rat intestinal fluid improves oral exposure prediction for poorly soluble compounds over a wide dose range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Berghausen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solubility can be the absorption limiting factor for drug candidates and is therefore a very important input parameter for oral exposure prediction of compounds with limited solubility. Biorelevant media of the fasted and fed state have been published for humans, as well as for dogs in the fasted state. In a drug discovery environment, rodents are the most common animal model to assess the oral exposure of drug candidates. In this study a rat simulated intestinal fluid (rSIF is proposed as a more physiologically relevant media to describe drug solubility in rats. Equilibrium solubility in this medium was tested as input parameter for physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK simulations of oral pharmacokinetics in the rat. Simulations were compared to those obtained using other solubility values as input parameters, like buffer at pH 6.8, human simulated intestinal fluid and a comprehensive dissolution assay based on rSIF. Our study on nine different compounds demonstrates that the incorporation of rSIF equilibrium solubility values into PBPK models of oral drug exposure can significantly improve the reliability of simulations in rats for doses up to 300 mg/kg compared to other media. The comprehensive dissolution assay may help to improve further simulation outcome, but the greater experimental effort as compared to equilibrium solubility may limit its use in a drug discovery environment. Overall, PBPK simulations based on solubility in the proposed rSIF medium can improve prioritizing compounds in drug discovery as well as planning dose escalation studies, e.g. during toxicological investigations.

  18. Ultrasonic rotary-hammer drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Kassab, Steve (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism for drilling or coring by a combination of sonic hammering and rotation. The drill includes a hammering section with a set of preload weights mounted atop a hammering actuator and an axial passage through the hammering section. In addition, a rotary section includes a motor coupled to a drive shaft that traverses the axial passage through the hammering section. A drill bit is coupled to the drive shaft for drilling by a combination of sonic hammering and rotation. The drill bit includes a fluted shaft leading to a distal crown cutter with teeth. The bit penetrates sampled media by repeated hammering action. In addition, the bit is rotated. As it rotates the fluted bit carries powdered cuttings helically upward along the side of the bit to the surface.

  19. Drilling waste makes concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosfjord, A.

    1993-01-01

    The article deals with a method of drilling waste reclamation by utilizing the converted oil-containing cuttings from the North Sea in the concrete production in Norway. The oil content is to be removed in an incineration process by heating the cuttings to about 800 o C. The output capacity from the exhaust gas water cooling system is 7500 kW/hour, and is to be used in different industrial heating processes. The remaining content of pollutants in the cleaned exhaust gas outlet corresponds to the required limits with the exception of SO 2 and HCl. In addition, an exhaust gas washing plant is to be installed in the near future designed for the further reduction of pollutants by 90%. The converted raw materials are used as a supplement for lessening the demand of sand and cement in the production of concrete-made pipes. 1 fig

  20. Hospital preparation and drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.C.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss how effective management of radiation accidents requires a large amount of preparation and thought. In addition, training of the staff is absolutely essential. This is best accomplished through annual drills, but also may be accomplished through the use of videotapes. The critical points to be remembered in the handling of such accidents and in writing the procedures is that treatment of non-radiation-related injuries and medical stabilization are paramount. The second point is that it is important to be able to distinguish between a patient who has been irradiated from an external radiation source and one who is contaminated with radioactive materials. The handling of these two types of accidents is entirely different and this distinction needs to be made early. All of the items outlined in this chapter concern the care of the severely injured and radioactively contaminated

  1. Drillings at Veitsivaara in Hyrynsalmi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkkanen, H.; Oehberg, A.

    1990-04-01

    According to Governmen's decision in principle Teollisuuden Voima Oy is obliged to make bedrock investigations for the final disposal of the spent fuel produced by its power plant in Olkiluoto. Areas in Kuhmo, Hyrynsalmi, Sievi, Konginkangas and Olkiluoto were selected for the preliminary site investigations to be carried out during years 1987-1992. In Veitsivaara, Hyrynsalmi the investigation program was started in April 1987. During years 1987-1988 a deep borehole (1002 m) and 4 and 500 m deep additional boreholes were core drilled in the area. Various parameters were measured from the flushing water during the drilling. Corelogging included collecting detailed data of fractures and determining the weathering degree and petrographical properties. Rock mechanical properties, uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus and Poisso's ratio were measured from core samples. The flushing water needed in the drillings was pumped from 100 m deep borehole wells drilled with down-the-hole method in the vicinity of the borehole. The water was labeled with 2 tracers before use. About 75 m deep hole was percussion drilled near the borehole KR1. The spreading of the flushing water in the upper part of bedrock and the quality off the ground of the groundwater were studied by taking watersamples from the hole. 30 vertical holes were core drilled down to the depth of 10 m in bedrock with a light drilling unit. Drilling was carried out in order to determine the thickness of the overburden, to investigate the geophysical anomaly sources and to support geological mapping in areas covered with overburden. Groundwater hydraulics is one of the main subjects during the preliminary site investigation phase. For that reason 7 multilevel piezometers were installed on the site to monitore hydraulic head in 3 levels in the uppermost part of bedrock. The work consisted of borehole drillings to the depth of 100 m, geophysical borehole loggings and installation of piezometers. In addition

  2. [Role of mesenteric lymph drainage improving the metabolism of red blood cell in hemorrhagic shock rats following fluid resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui; Du, Hui-bo; Lu, Bei; Si, Yong-hua; Zhang, Li-min; Zhang, Yu-pin; Zhao, Zi-gang; Niu, Chun-yu

    2012-08-01

    To observe the effects of mesenteric lymph drainage on the metabolism of red blood cell (RBC) in hemorrhagic shock (HS) rats following fluid resuscitation. Eighteen male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham group (n=6), HS group (n=6), HS + drainage group (n=6). After 1.5 hours of HS model prepared, the animals were given fluid resuscitation by lost blood plus equal volume of Ringer solution within 30 minutes in HS and HS + drainage groups, and mesenteric lymph drainage was performed after 1 hour of hypotension in HS + drainage group. At 3 hours after resuscitation or corresponding time, blood samples were obtained from abdominal aorta. Membrane suspensions of RBC prepared from part of whole blood samples were used to measure the activities of adenosine triphosphate ase (ATPase) and contents of ATP and lactic acid (LA), the intracellular fluid of RBC prepared from part of whole blood samples was used to determine the concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid (2,3-DPG), Na(+) and K(+), plasma samples isolated from blood by centrifugation were used to determine the concentration of Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) and total Ca. Compared with sham group, the content of ATP (μmol/g), activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (μmol×mg(-1)×h(-1)) and Ca(2+)-ATPase (μmol×mg(-1)×h(-1)) in RBC membrane and total Ca (mmol/L) in plasma were decreased markedly (ATP: 6.698±0.938 vs. 10.670±1.466, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase: 0.042±0.010 vs. 0.066±0.019, Ca(2+)-ATPase: 0.054±0.015 vs. 0.081±0.017, total Ca: 2.27±0.18 vs. 2.66±0.21, P0.05). Compared with HS group, the contents of 2,3-DPG (4.459±0.900) and ATP (8.859±1.189), the activities of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (0.089±0.022), Ca(2+)-ATPase (0.082±0.020) of RBC were increased in HS + drainage group, and the level of LA (2.060±0.810) was decreased observably (Pdrainage plays an important role in improving the metabolism of RBC in HS rats following fluid resuscitation, subsequently, may preserve the structure and function of RBC.

  3. DYNAMIC MODELLING OF VIBRATIONS ASSISTED DRILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu LADONNE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The number of multi-materials staking configurations for aeronautical structures is increasing, with the evolution of composite and metallic materials. For drilling the fastening holes, the processes of Vibration Assisted Drilling (VAD expand rapidly, as it permits to improve reliability of drilling operations on multilayer structures. Among these processes of VAD, the solution with forced vibrations added to conventional feed to create a discontinuous cutting is the more developed in industry. The back and forth movement allows to improve the evacuation of chips by breaking it. This technology introduces two new operating parameters, the frequency and the amplitude of the oscillation. To optimize the process, the choice of those parameters requires first to model precisely the operation cutting and dynamics. In this paper, a kinematic modelling of the process is firstly proposed. The limits of the model are analysed through comparison between simulations and measurements. The proposed model is used to develop a cutting force model that allows foreseeing the operating conditions which ensure good chips breaking and tool life improvement.

  4. Organofilização de argilas bentoníticas com tensoativos não- iônicos visando seu uso em fluidos de perfuração base óleo Nonionic surfactants organophilization bentonite clays aiming their use in oil base drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O uso de tensoativos não iônicos vem substituindo os tradicionais tensoativos iônicos dentre outros motivos pelo seu elevado potencial de resistência a degradação térmica. Assim, este trabalho tem por objetivo o desenvolvimento de argilas organofílicas através da incorporação de tensoativos não iônicos visando seu uso em fluidos de perfuração de poços de petróleo base óleo. Argilas bentoníticas natural, industrializadas e organofilizadas foram caracterizadas por análise química, difração de raios X e análises térmicas. Após a organofilização foi realizado o inchamento de Foster, visando a escolha dos tensoativos mais adequados aos meios líquidos orgânicos dispersantes: éster, diesel e parafina. Com as dispersões obtidas foram determinadas as propriedades reológicas através de viscosidades aparente e plástica. Os resultados evidenciaram que as argilas organofilicas apresentaram um aumento do espaçamento interlamelar e que as dispersões apresentaram propriedades reológicas dentro das especificações da Petrobrás, para uso como argilas organofílicas em fluidos de perfuração em base óleo.The nonionic surfactants use is replacing the traditional ionic surfactants among other reasons because of its high resistance to thermal degradation potential. This work aims the organoclays development through the nonionic surfactants incorporation in order to oil base drilling fluids use. The natural bentonite clay, and industrialized organophilizated were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. After, the clay organophilization was performed by Foster swelling, seeking the most appropriate choice of surfactants to the liquid media organic dispersants, ester, paraffin and diesel. With the obtained dispersions were determined by plastic and apparent viscosities the rheological properties. The results showed that organoclays increase in the interlayer spacing and that the dispersions

  5. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  6. DEVELOPMENT SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY BASED TEACHING MATERIALS ON DYNAMIC FLUIDS TO IMPROVE STUDENTS ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeliana Veronika Sirait

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to investigate whether the developed scientific inquiry-based teaching materials can improve the students’ response, the students’ activity and the students’ achievement. This study is development which based on Borg & Gall product development. Samples were selected randomly by raffling 4 classes into one class, applied teaching materials based scientific inquiry. The instruments which are used in this study consisted of three namely quetionnaires used for validation of teaching material by the expert of the material and the expert of design, the evaluation of physics teacher and students’ response toward teaching materials and observation sheet of students’ activity used in learning process and also test for students’ achievement in the form of multiple choice consisted of 10 quetions provided for end of the learning. The results of this study showed that the developed scientific inquiry-based teaching materials can improve the students’ response, the students’ activity and the students’ achievement in every session.

  7. Application of Formation Testing While Drilling (GeoTap) for acquiring formation pressure data from the Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    time. The GeoTap tester obtains direct pore-pressure measurements as the well is being drilled, with accuracy and precision comparable to that of wireline testers. The GeoTap service can eliminate the time, risk, and cost associated with running pipe-conveyed wireline test tools. It also measures annular and bore pressure while drilling, providing accurate, continuous, real-time hydrostatic pressure, and equivalent circulating density (ECD) information. This aids in determining and maintaining optimal mud weight, reduces formation damage, increases the rate of penetration, and increases operational safety. GeoTap benefits can be improvement of formation evaluation, real-time fluid gradients and fluid mobility (permeability/viscosity indicator), identification of fluid contact points, determination of reservoir connectivity/compartmentalization and depletion, increase safety of operation, determination of optimal mud weight and manage of ECD. We can also continuously monitor wellbore stability for assessments in order to reduce formation damage which in turns will help to increase drilling effectiveness (determine precise overbalance for maximizing ROP and continuously monitor hole-cleaning effectiveness with pressure-while-drilling, while reducing formation damage due to swab/surge). Save time and money by reducing rig down time associated with wireline testing. GeoTap Tool capable of performing more than 150 pressure tests per run and optional orientation of pressure measurement is available (top, right, bottom or left). GeoTap testing has been completed with encouraging results in many wells up to circa 3000m deep. Data has been acquired successfully both in a "Drill-Test-Drill' mode and a "Post-Drill-Test" mode. GeoTap tests have spanned wide ranges of borehole temperature, pressure, mobility as well as formation permeability and overbalance conditions. GeoTap tests in Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan

  8. Trace elements in a North Sea drill core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Gwozdz, R.; Svendsen, N.

    1986-01-01

    , V, Sr, Dy, Mg, Ti, Ba and Eu. The major elements Ca and Al could be related to petrophysical parameters, particularly Al which shows a correlation with the silicification/argillaceous content. Na (and Cl) has a low content in the hydrocarbon-bearing section of the drill core suggesting that the pore......Chalk samples, systematically taken along a drill core from one of the hydrocarbon producing fields of the North Sea (Tyra field), were analysed by a neutron activation technique involving measurement of radioisotopes with relatively short half-lives. Elements determined include Na, Al, Cl, Ca, Mn...... space is filled mainly by hydrocarbons. A significant decrease of Mn with depth probably suggests diagenesis of chalk prior to, or with, hydrocarbon emplacement. Investigations of drilling fluids and cuttings reveal a strong contamination of the latter, mainly by Ba. Chalk data from comparable onshore...

  9. Environmental control technology in petroleum drilling and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtanowicz, A.K.

    1997-01-01

    Environmental control technology (ECT) is process integrated and relates mainly to pollution prevention and risk assessment. Mechanisms of environmental impact in petroleum drilling, well completion and production, include the generation of waste, induction of toxicity or the creation of pathways for pollutant migration. The identification and evaluation of these mechanisms constitute two parts of the scope of ECT. A third part is the development of new techniques to comply with environmental requirements without prejudicing productivity. The basic concepts of the ECT approach are presented in this chapter. The approach is then used to analyse oilfield drilling and production processes. Environmental control components developed in these technologies are described. These include: the control of the volume and toxicity of drilling fluids; source separation technology in produced water cleaning; subsurface injection of oilfield waste slurries; containment technology in the integrity of petroleum wells; subsurface reduction of produced water; oilfield pit closure technology. (37 figures; 26 tables; 227 references) (UK)

  10. Dynamic Analysis procedure for fluid kicks in hydrocarbon wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavignet, A

    1989-02-10

    A method for analyzing fluid kicks in wells during drilling, in order to assess the risk of a blowout, is presented. An automatic data acquisition and processing system is used to analyze pressure data from transient flow regimes of the drill slurries to determine the nature of the fluid in the borehole (gas, liquid, mixture). The method can be used even if the fluid flowing into the borehole is in an horizontal section of the well.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling to Improve Natural Flow Rate and Sweet Pepper Productivity in Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Limtrakarn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural flow rate and sweet peppers productivity in tropical greenhouse are improved by CFD simulation is the main objective of this research work. Most of the greenhouse types today are in the arch shape. To develop an improved greenhouse structure for the region, the arch type was built and used as the control model. Mae Sar Mai agriculture research station under the royal project foundation was selected as the field test site. Temperature sensors with data logger were installed to monitor variation of temperature inside the greenhouse. The measured temperature data were used as the boundary conditions for the CFD analysis. A new greenhouse model with two-step roof shape was designed and the air flow behavior was simulated by using CFD. Regarding CFD results the air flow rate of the new model is about 39% higher than that of old model. The maximum temperature of the new model is lower than that of the old one. The sweet paper growths in both greenhouse models were measured and compared. Results show that the new model obtains 4°C lower maximum temperature in day time, 97% in number and 90% in weight higher the first grade pepper productivity than the old one.

  12. A Novel CO2-Responsive Viscoelastic Amphiphilic Surfactant Fluid for Fracking in Enhanced Oil/Gas Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L.; Wu, X.; Dai, C.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past decade, the rapid rise of unconventional shale gas and tight sandstone oil development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has expanded the extraction of hydrocarbon resources. Hydraulic fracturing fluids play very important roles in enhanced oil/gas recovery. However, damage to the reservoir rock and environmental contamination caused by hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids has raised serious concerns. The development of reservoir rock friendly and environmental benign fracturing fluids is in immediate demand. Studies to improve properties of hydraulic fracturing fluids have found that viscoelastic surfactant (VES) fracturing fluid can increase the productivity of gas/oil and be efficiently extracted after fracturing. Compared to conventional polymer fracturing fluid, VES fracturing fluid has many advantages, such as few components, easy preparation, good proppant transport capacity, low damage to cracks and formations, and environment friendly. In this work, we are developing a novel CO2-responsive VES fracking fluid that can readily be reused. This fluid has a gelling-breaking process that can be easily controlled by the presence of CO2 and its pressure. We synthesized erucamidopropyl dimethylamine (EA) as a thickening agent for hydraulic fracturing fluid. The influence of temperature, presence of CO2 and pressure on the viscoelastic behavior of this fluid was then investigated through rheological measurements. The fracturing fluid performance and recycle property were lastly studied using core flooding tests. We expect this fluid finds applications not only in enhanced oil/gas recovery, but also in areas such as controlling groundwater pollution and microfluidics.

  13. Drillings at Kivetty in Konginkangas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkkanen, H.; Oehberg, A.

    1990-05-01

    According to Government's decision in principle Teollisuuden Voima Oy is obliged to make bedrock investigations for the final disposal of the spent fuel produced by its power plant in Olkiluoto. Areas in Kuhmo, Hyrynsalmi, Sievi, Konginkangas and Olkiluoto were selected for the preliminary site investigations to be carried out during years 1987-1992. In Kivetty, Konginkangas the investigation program was started in spring 1988. During years 1988-1989 a deep borehole (1019 m) and 4 about 500 m deep additional boreholes were core drilled in the area. The structure of the holes makes it possible to carry out many investigations in the holes. Various parameters were measured from the flushing water during the drilling. Corelogging included collecting detailed data of fractures and determining the weathering degree and petrographical properties. Rock mechanical properties, uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured from core samples. The flushing water needed in the drillings was pumped from 100 m deep borehole wells drilled with down-the-hole method in the vicinity of the borehole. The water was labeled with 2 tracers before use. 30 vertical holes were core drilled down to the depth of 10 m in bedrock with a light drilling unit. Drilling was carried out in order to determine the thickness of the overburden to investigate the geophysical anomaly sources and to support geological mapping in areas covered with overburden. Groundwater hydraulics is one of the main subjects during the preliminary site investigation phase. For that reason 7 multilevel piezometers were installed on the site to monitore hydraulic head in 3 levels in the uppermost part of bedrock. The work consisted of borehole drillings to the depth of 100 m, geophysical borehole loggings and installation of piezometers. In addition about 65 shotholes were drilled for VSP-, tubewave and seismic measurements

  14. Drillings at Syyry in Sievi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkkanen, H.; Oehberg, A.

    1990-10-01

    According to Government's decision in principle Teollisuuden Voima Oy is obliged to make bedrock investigations for the final disposal of the spent fuel produced by its power plant in Olkiluoto. Areas in Kuhmo, Hyrynsalmi, Sievi, Konginkangas and Olkiluoto were selected for the preliminary site investigations to be carried out during years 1987-1992. In Syyry, Sievi the investigation program was started in spring 1988. During years 1988-1989 a deep borehole (1022 m) and 4 about 500-700 m deep additional boreholes were core drilled in the area. The structure of the holes makes it possible to carry out many investigations in the holes. Various parameters were measured from the flushing water during the drilling. Corelogging included collecting detailed data of fractures and determining the weathering degree and petrographical properties. Rock mechanical properties, uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured from core samples. The flushing water needed in the drillings was pumped from 100 m deep borehole wells drilled with down-the-hole method in the vicinity of the borehole. The water was labeled with 2 tracers before use. 35 vertical holes were core drilled down to the depth of 10-20 m in bedrock with a light drilling unit. Drilling was carried out in order to determine the thickness of the overburden, to investigate the geophysical anomaly sources and to support geological mapping in areas covered with overburden. Groundwater hydraulics is one of the main subjects during the preliminary site investigation phase. For that reason 7 multilevel piezometers were installed on the site to monitore hydraulic head in 3 levels in the uppermost part of bedrock. The work consisted of borehole drillings to the depth of 100 m, geophysical borehole loggings and installation of piezometers. In addition about 85 shotholes were drilled for VSP-, tubewave and seismic measurements

  15. DOE HIGH-POWER SLIM-HOLE DRILLING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. William C. Maurer; John H. Cohen; J. Chris Hetmaniak; Curtis Leitko

    1999-09-01

    This project used a systems approach to improve slim-hole drilling performance. A high power mud motor, having a double-length power section, and hybrid PDC/TSP drill bit were developed to deliver maximum horsepower to the rock while providing a long life down hole. This high-power slim-hole drilling system drills much faster than conventional slim-hole motor and bit combinations and holds significant potential to reduce slim-hole drilling costs. The oil and gas industries have been faced with downward price pressures since the 1980s. These pressures are not expected to be relieved in the near future. To maintain profitability, companies have had to find ways to reduce the costs of producing oil and gas. Drilling is one of the more costly operations in the production process. One method to reduce costs of drilling is to use smaller more mobile equipment. Slim holes have been drilled in the past using this principle. These wells can save money not only from the use of smaller drilling equipment, but also from reduced tubular costs. Stepping down even one casing size results in significant savings. However, slim holes have not found wide spread use for three reasons. First, until recently, the price of oil has been high so there were no forces to move the industry in this direction. Second, small roller bits and motors were not very reliable and they drilled slowly, removing much of the economic benefit. The third and final reason was the misconception that large holes were needed everywhere to deliver the desired production. Several factors have changed that will encourage the use of slim holes. The industry now favors any method of reducing the costs of producing oil and gas. In addition, the industry now understands that large holes are not always needed. Gas, in particular, can have high production rates in smaller holes. New materials now make it possible to manufacture improved bits and motors that drill for long periods at high rates. All that remains is to

  16. Oman Drilling Project Phase I Borehole Geophysical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, J. M.; Pezard, P. A.; Henry, G.; Brun, L.; Célérier, B.; Lods, G.; Robert, P.; Benchikh, A. M.; Al Shukaili, M.; Al Qassabi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Oman Drilling Project (OmanDP) drilled six holes at six sites in the Samail ophiolite in the southern Samail and Tayin massifs. 1500-m of igneous and metamorphic rocks were recovered at four sites (GT1, GT2, GT3 and BT1) using wireline diamond core drilling and drill cuttings at two sites (BA1, BA2) using air rotary drilling, respectively. OmanDP is an international collaboration supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, the Deep Carbon Observatory, NSF, NASA, IODP, JAMSTEC, and the European, Japanese, German and Swiss Science Foundations, and with in-kind support in Oman from Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, Public Authority of Mining, Sultan Qaboos University and the German University of Technology. A comprehensive borehole geophysical survey was conducted in all the OmanDP Phase I boreholes shortly after drilling in April 2017. Following geophysical wireline logs, using slim-hole borehole logging equipment provided and run by the Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Université de Montpellier/ Géosciences Montpellier, and logging trucks from the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, were collected in most of the holes: electrical resistivity (dual laterolog resistivity, LLd and LLs), spectral gamma ray (K, U, and Th contents), magnetic susceptibility, total natural gamma ray, full waveform sonic (Vp and Vs), acoustic borehole wall imaging, optical borehole wall imaging, borehole fluid parameters (pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, redox potential, non-polarized spontaneous electrical potential), and caliper (borehole diameter). In addition, spinner flowmeter (downhole fluid flow rate along borehole axis) and heatpulse flow meter logs (dowhole fluid flow rate along borehole axis) were collected in BA1 to characterize downhole fluid flow rates along borehole axis. Unfortuantely, only incomplete wireline logs are available for

  17. Psychosocial intervention improves depression, quality of life, and fluid adherence in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; Ver Halen, Nisha; Asher, Deborah Rosenthal; Coplan, Jeremy D; Weedon, Jeremy; Wyka, Katarzyna E; Saggi, Subodh J; Kimmel, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Patients with ESRD have high rates of depression, which is associated with diminished quality of life and survival. We determined whether individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) reduces depression in hemodialysis patients with elevated depressive affect in a randomized crossover trial. Of 65 participants enrolled from two dialysis centers in New York, 59 completed the study and were assigned to the treatment-first group (n=33) or the wait-list control group (n=26). In the intervention phase, CBT was administered chairside during dialysis treatments for 3 months; participants were assessed 3 and 6 months after randomization. Compared with the wait-list group, the treatment-first group achieved significantly larger reductions in Beck Depression Inventory II (self-reported, P=0.03) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (clinician-reported, P<0.001) scores after intervention. Mean scores for the treatment-first group did not change significantly at the 3-month follow-up. Among participants with depression diagnosed at baseline, 89% in the treatment-first group were not depressed at the end of treatment compared with 38% in the wait-list group (Fisher's exact test, P=0.01). Furthermore, the treatment-first group experienced greater improvements in quality of life, assessed with the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form (P=0.04), and interdialytic weight gain (P=0.002) than the wait-list group, although no effect on compliance was evident at follow-up. In summary, CBT led to significant improvements in depression, quality of life, and prescription compliance in this trial, and studies should be undertaken to assess the long-term effects of CBT on morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD.

  18. Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 4 - System Description. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E.E.; Maurer, W.C.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

    1990-06-01

    The first section of this Volume will discuss the ''Conventional Drilling System''. Today's complex arrangement of numerous interacting systems has slowly evolved from the very simple cable tool rigs used in the late 1800s. Improvements to the conventional drilling rig have varied in size and impact over the years, but the majority of them have been evolutionary modifications. Each individual change or improvement of this type does not have significant impact on drilling efficiency and economics. However, the change is almost certain to succeed, and over time--as the number of evolutionary changes to the system begin to add up--improvements in efficiency and economics can be seen. Some modifications, defined and described in this Volume as Advanced Modifications, have more than just an evolutionary effect on the conventional drilling system. Although the distinction is subtle, there are several examples of incorporated advancements that have had significantly more impact on drilling procedures than would a truly evolutionary improvement. An example of an advanced modification occurred in the late 1970s with the introduction of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) drill bits. PDC bits resulted in a fundamental advancement in drilling procedures that could not have been accomplished by an evolutionary improvement in materials metallurgy, for example. The last drilling techniques discussed in this Volume are the ''Novel Drilling Systems''. The extent to which some of these systems have been developed varies from actually being tested in the field, to being no more than a theoretical concept. However, they all have one thing in common--their methods of rock destruction are fundamentally different from conventional drilling techniques. When a novel drilling system is introduced, it is a revolutionary modification of accepted drilling procedures and will completely replace current techniques. The most prominent example of a

  19. GEO-ECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF DRILLING WASTE DISPOSAL IN THE YAMAL PENINSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreshkin Dmitrij Vladimirovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil and gas fields are located in remote areas known for their severe geological and climatic conditions that are aggravated by the presence of the paleocrystic frozen rock. Borehole drilling causes generation of the substantial amount of drilling waste. The sludge weighs millions of tons. Any rock is to remain frozen at any drilling site in the Yamal peninsula. Semifluid drilling waste occupies extensive areas around drilling sites; they prevent development of the surface infrastructure, they interfere with the work of drilling technicians and contribute to hazardous working conditions, they are a challenge to the local ecology. The above factors produce a negative impact on the environment and prevent sustainable development of the region. For example, disposal of drilling waste at condensed gas fields operated in the Yamal peninsula represents a substantial problem. Drilling waste contains drilling fluid used in the process of borehole drilling. It was discovered in the course of the preliminary research that drilling fluids were composite suspensions that contained bentonite, heavy spar, caustic soda, dilutants, and polymers. It was found out that the sludge was composed of silica, calcite, dolomite, aragonite, magnesite, some feldspars, heavy spar, gypsum and anhydrite, micas, hydromicas, clay minerals. Projections provided in the paper say that pre-neutralized sludge may be used in the manufacturing of building materials, such as bricks, claydite, small-size building units, etc. The authors argue that further research of the sludge elements and microstructure, as well as its chemical, mineral, granulometric and X-ray phase analyses need to be performed.

  20. The rates measurement of methane hydrate formation and dissociation using micro-drilling system application for gas hydrate exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin Dou [Engineering Faculty, China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China)]|[Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Technology Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Reinicke, K.M. [Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Technology Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Guosheng Jiang; Xiang Wu; Fulong Ning [Engineering Faculty, China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China)

    2006-07-01

    When drilling through gas hydrate bearing formations, the energy supplied by virtue of the drilling process may lead to a destabilization of the hydrates surrounding the wellbore. Therefore, as the number of oil and gas fields being development in deepwater and onshore arctic environments increases, greater emphasis should be placed on quantifying the risks, gas hydrates pose to drilling operations. The qualification of these risks requires a comprehensive understanding of gas hydrate-formation and dissociation as a result of drilling induced processes. To develop the required understanding of gas hydrat formation and dissociation, the authors conducted laboratory experiments by using a micro-drilling system, to study the dissociation rates of methane hydrates contained in a tank reactor. The test facility used is a development of China University of Geosciences. The rates of methane hydrate formation and dissociation in the tank reactor were measured at steady-state conditions at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 25 MPa and temperatures ranging from -5 to 20 C. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by the fluid system used to form the hydrates, pressure and temperature, with the influence of the temperature on methane hydrate dissociation being stronger than that of the pressure. Drilling speed, drilling fluids and hydrate dissociation inhibitors were also shown to influence hydrate dissociation rate. The derived results have been used to predict hydrate drilling stability for several drilling fluid systems.

  1. Obtenção de argilas organofílicas purificadas através de tensoativos iônicos e não iônicos visando uso em fluidos de perfuração base óleo Getting purified organoclays by ionic and non-ionic surfactant aiming use in oil based drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. R. Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Em perfurações de petróleo sensíveis ao contato com água, torna-se necessária a utilização de fluidos de perfuração base óleo. Nestes casos, utilizam-se argilas organofílicas, que são obtidas a partir de argilas bentoníticas purificadas e tratadas com a adição de tensoativos. A utilização do hidrociclone pode representar uma ferramenta eficiente e de custo acessível para purificar argilas naturais em escala industrial. Este trabalho tem por objetivo estudar a purificação de argilas bentoníticas utilizando-se um hidrociclone, visando o desenvolvimento de argilas organofílicas para uso em fluidos de perfuração base óleo. As caracterizações das amostras das argilas estudadas - Brasgel PA e Chocolate - foram efetuadas por meio das técnicas: análise granulométrica por difração de laser, difração de raios X (DRX e análise química por fluorescência de raios X. A caracterização das argilas organofílicas obtidas foi efetuada por meio dos seguintes métodos: DRX e por uma modificação do inchamento de Foster. Os resultados mostram que o processo de purificação foi eficiente na redução de impurezas presentes na bentonita e que a argila organofílica purificada tratada com Praepagen WB e Imidazolina Oléica Vegetal apresenta valores de inchamento de Foster em éster, óleo diesel e parafina superiores aos obtidos com argilas organofílicas sem purificação (natural, e evidenciando maior afinidade com o tensoativo Praepagen WB.Oil drilling in sensitive contact with water, becomes required the use of oil base drilling fluids. In these cases, organoclays are used, which are made from clay bentonite purified and treated with surfactants addition. The use of the hydrocyclone can be a effective tool and affordable for purifying clays in industrial scale. This work aims to study the purification of clays bentonite using a hydrocyclone, aiming to develop organoclays for use in oil base drilling fluids. The

  2. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Yamada

    Full Text Available The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: "metallic and unpleasant" and "powerful". LAeq had a strong relationship with "powerful impression", calculated sharpness was positively related to "metallic impression", and "unpleasant impression" was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating a

  3. Case study : environmental considerations of horizontal directional drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    A pipeline construction project by Enbridge Pipelines (Toledo) Inc. which relied on horizontal directional drilling (HDD) techniques to install the pipe was analyzed with particular focus on the environmental benefits and risks of using directional drills compared to open cut installation. The construction of the 35-mile, 16-inch crude petroleum pipeline from Stockbridge to Freedom Junction in Michigan involved the use of 11 separate directional drills to cross through wetlands, streams and state recreational areas. The role that HDD played in route selection and environmental permit considerations was discussed along with some of the problems encountered with directional drilling. A successful HDD program must have adequate geotechnical information to properly design and plan the crossings. It was recommended that geotechnical borings should be conducted every 300 to 500 feet across the HDD alignment. It was also recommended that a frac-out contingency plan should be developed and to be prepared for the temporary shut down of the HDD rig if a frac-out occurs. Frac-outs must be investigated, contained and any released fluid should be removed. Some recommendations from past experiences were also presented as a guide for future planning of pipeline projects that include HDD techniques, particularly in wetland areas. Appendix A to this presentation included a contingency plan for illustrative purposes only. The plan was de