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Sample records for improve radiotherapy results

  1. Results of the national audit in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, Jose Luis; Dominguez, Lourdes; Alert Silva, Jose; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo; Larrinaga Cortina, Eduardo; Garcia Yip, Fernando; Rodriguez Machado, Jorge; Morales Lopez, Jorge Luis; Silvestre Patallo, Ileana

    2009-01-01

    The National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy in Cuba working for 8 years regularly visiting each country's radiotherapy service at least once every two years, during the visit involving two medical physicists and radiation oncologist. This paper presents the main features of the program and its main results. Early detection deficiencies in the work of the Radiation Therapy Services that may cause radiological risk situations for both patients and workers and the general public. Help with their comments to the continuous improvement of quality of care. During audit visits is reviewed the whole process of radiotherapy, since the patient comes to the monitoring service. This is done by dividing the audits into three groups or aspects: Clinical Aspects, Aspects of Safety and Quality Control Aspects of the equipment. Methodological guidelines have been established for conducting audits and they serve as standards of quality in radiation therapy, these guidelines also allow the quantification of results. It has identified the main gaps in services that affect the quality of care. After each visit, leave recommendations may be directed to the service itself, to the direction of the provincial hospital or health. Conclusions. We believe that the National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy is an effective tool in controlling the quality of the treatments offered and at the same time with its recommendations helps services to continually improve quality. (Author)

  2. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederman, M V; Silveira Filho, L; Martorelli Filho, B [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement.

  3. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, M.V.; Silveira Filho, L.; Martorelli Filho, B.

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement [pt

  4. The result of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Yang, K. M.; Suh, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors for disease-free survival and long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The study involved a retrospective review of outcome in a series of 27 patients with pituitary adenoma, between 1984 and 1995 at Paik hospital. The study included 20 patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and 7 with radiotherapy alone. The patients were followed for 12-146 months (median: 97 months). Seventeen were men and 10 were women. The numbers of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenoma were 22 and 5 respectively and those of microadenoma and macroadenoma were 4 and 23 respectively. The radiation doses of 5040-5580cGy(median: 5040cGy) were delivered over 5-7 weeks, using 4MV LINAC. The prognostic factors were analyzed by log-rank test. For radiation therapy alone, the 5 YSR was 100% and progression free survival rate was 85.8%. The tumor was controlled in 6/7 (85.8%). For surgery and postoperative radiotherapy , the 5YSR, progression free survival rate and local control rate were 95%, 84.8%, and 89.5% respectively. The parameters of tumor size, hormone secretion, radiation dose, radiotherapy field size were evaluated in a uni- and multivariate analysis and all the factors were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Eleven of 12 (92%) with visual field defect experienced normalization or improvement, and 5 for 7 evaluable patients with hyperprolactinoma achieved normalization in 4 and decrement in 5 patients. Only 2 patients developed mild degree of panhypopituitarism. The radiotherapy appears to be effective in controlling clinical symptoms and signs resulting from pituitary adenoma. Local control rate with radiotherapy alone or with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was comparable. There was a trend toward high recurrence rate in patients with nonfunctioning or prolactin secreting tumor and larger radiation field sizes. (author)

  5. The result of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. J.; Yang, K. M.; Suh, S. H. [Inje Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Cho, H. L.; Shon, S. C. [Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors for disease-free survival and long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The study involved a retrospective review of outcome in a series of 27 patients with pituitary adenoma, between 1984 and 1995 at Paik hospital. The study included 20 patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and 7 with radiotherapy alone. The patients were followed for 12-146 months (median: 97 months). Seventeen were men and 10 were women. The numbers of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenoma were 22 and 5 respectively and those of microadenoma and macroadenoma were 4 and 23 respectively. The radiation doses of 5040-5580cGy(median: 5040cGy) were delivered over 5-7 weeks, using 4MV LINAC. The prognostic factors were analyzed by log-rank test. For radiation therapy alone, the 5 YSR was 100% and progression free survival rate was 85.8%. The tumor was controlled in 6/7 (85.8%). For surgery and postoperative radiotherapy , the 5YSR, progression free survival rate and local control rate were 95%, 84.8%, and 89.5% respectively. The parameters of tumor size, hormone secretion, radiation dose, radiotherapy field size were evaluated in a uni- and multivariate analysis and all the factors were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Eleven of 12 (92%) with visual field defect experienced normalization or improvement, and 5 for 7 evaluable patients with hyperprolactinoma achieved normalization in 4 and decrement in 5 patients. Only 2 patients developed mild degree of panhypopituitarism. The radiotherapy appears to be effective in controlling clinical symptoms and signs resulting from pituitary adenoma. Local control rate with radiotherapy alone or with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was comparable. There was a trend toward high recurrence rate in patients with nonfunctioning or prolactin secreting tumor and larger radiation field sizes. (author).

  6. The study on improvement of radiotherapy for intractable cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This study group was organized to improve the results of radiotherapy in national hospitals. The period of the study is three years from 1986 to 1989. Many national hospitals are the centers of local medical facilities, therefore, it is expected that they should play their role to offer the high technical care, inspite of the great unbalanced finance. This study had been conducted to improve the results of radiotherapy. The fundamental studies including the dose distribution, time dose factor and proper arrangement of radiotherapeutic equipments, and the clinical studies including applied hyperthermia, sensitizer and chemotherapy were performed respectively. Preliminary results were satisfactory. (author)

  7. Results of concomitant cisplatin and radiotherapy in non-operable non small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, E.; Mazeron, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Radiotherapy and Lung Cancer Cooperative Groups of the EORTC performed a randomized study in patients with non-metastatic inoperable non small-cell lung cancer to compare the results of radiotherapy alone (radiation was administered for two wk at a dose of 3 Gy given 10 times followed by a three-wk rest period and then radiotherapy for two more wk at a dose of 2.5 Gy given 10 times) with radiotherapy on the same schedule combined with cisplatin given either on the first day of each treatment week at a dose of 30 mg/m 2 , or daily before radiotherapy at a dose of 6 mg/m 2 . Preliminary results showed a significantly improved three-yr survival rate in the radiotherapy-daily cisplatin group as compared with the radiotherapy group (16% versus 2%; P = 0.009) and without major increase in toxicity. This survival benefit was due to improved control of local disease; survival without local recurrence was 31% at two yr in the radiotherapy-daily cisplatin group as compared with 19% in the radiotherapy (P = 0.003)

  8. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  9. Results of radiotherapy and vitamin E in the treatment of peyronie's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Cristine I.; Njo, K. Hian; Karim, Abdul B. M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis of 38 patients with Peyronie's disease treated with primary radiotherapy in the period of 1975-1993. Methods and Materials: Important complaints were curvature of the penis during erection for 92% of the patients, painful erection for 68%, and problems with sexual intercourse for 37.5%. Average size of all indurated plaques was 2.5 cm. The average pretreatment duration of symptoms was 9.5 months. All 38 patients were irradiated with orthovoltage radiotherapy (200 and 250 kV photons) with a total dose of 9 Gy in 5 alternating days (regimen A). Because of minimal response, 16 patients were irradiated again with another 9 Gy in 5 days and finally received 18 Gy (regimen B). Results: With regimen A, a satisfying improvement was achieved for the majority of the patients: 65% experienced less penile pain during erection, 40% reported less curvature of the penis, and 47% experienced an improvement of their sex life. With the higher dose of regimen B there was an additional improvement for a minority of the patients: 25% reported less pain during erection, 21% had less curvature, and 29% experienced an improved sex life. With regimen A, pain improvement was statistically significantly superior when compared to regimen B. For all other improvements (curvature, sexual intercourse, and induration) no dose-response relation could be demonstrated between regimen A and the higher dose regimen B. No patient experienced any radiation-induced morbidity. After evaluating regimen A and regimen B, the overall result was that 76% experienced less pain, 60% reported an improved sex life, and 48% had a diminished curvature during erection. Conclusion: From this analysis it can be concluded that the distressing symptoms of Peyronie's disease can be treated successfully with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy proves to be a safe, noninvasive treatment method without causing morbidity. Low-dose radiotherapy with only a few fractions is recommended for an effective

  10. Radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy superior to radiotherapy alone in the treatment of locally advanced anal cancer: results of a phase III randomized trial of the EORTC radiotherapy and gastrointestinal tract cooperative groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelink, H.; Roelofsen, F.; Bosset, J.F.; Eschwege, F.; Rougier, Ph.; Peiffert, D.; Glabbeke, M. van; Pierart, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential gain of the concomitant use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in improving local control and reducing the need for colostomy, a randomized phase-III trial was performed in patients with locally advanced anal cancer. Material and methods: In the period 1987-1994 110 patients were randomized between radiotherapy alone and a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The patients had tumors larger than 4 cm, or T 3-4 N 0-3 , or T 1-2 N 1-3 anal cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy given in 5 weeks, with a daily dose of 1.8 Gy. After a rest period of 6 weeks a boost of 15 Gy or 20 Gy was given in case of partial or complete response respectively. Chemotherapy was given during radiotherapy, 750 mg/m2 daily as continuous infusion on day 1-5 and 29-33, a single dose of Mitomycin C 15 mg/m 2 was administered on day 1. Results: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy has resulted in an increase in the complete remission rate from 54% to 80%, and from 83% to 94% if results are considered after surgical resections. This has led to a significant improvement in loco-regional control and colostomy free survival (P=0.04, P=0.003 resp.) both in favor of the combined modality treatment. No significant difference was found when severe side effects were considered. The survival rate remained similar in both treatment arms. Skin ulceration, nodal involvement and sex were the most important prognostic factors for both local control and survival. These remained significant after multivariate analysis. The improvement seen in local control by adding chemotherapy to radiotherapy remained also significant after adjusting for prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The concomitant use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy resulted in an improved local control rate and a reduction in the need for colostomy in patients with locally advanced anal cancer

  11. Radiotherapy professionals faced with the obligation of treatments safety improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of a major accident in Epinal (2006), followed by one in Toulouse (2007), led the Ministry of Health to mobilize the whole actors in radiotherapy in order to define national measures intended to improve health care security. Compiled in the so-called 'road map', these measures were presented in November 2007, and implemented in the 2009-2013 cancer programme. The French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) undertook a study aiming at assessing the effects of the above-mentioned measures on organization and safety management of radiotherapy facilities, but also on treatment achievement procedures and health professionals. More specifically, IRSN sought to examine the ability of health professionals to take into account new safety demands and to adapt their practices accordingly. With these purposes objectives, a qualitative study using the methods of ergonomics and sociology of organizations was completed in 2009-2010. The results of the study presented in this report show an effective improvement of health care safety along with a variable integration of safety measures depending on radiotherapy facilities and units. In particular, integration depends on 1) the governance mode of the health care facility, more or less conducive to promoting safety, 2) the pre-existence of a safety culture and safety organization, and 3) the facility commitment to health care safety improvement actions. The study also reveals that the implementation of new safety demands and the changes they involve create new constraints, which put pressure on health professionals and may threaten the durability of the improvements made. In order to facilitate the appropriation and implementation by radiotherapy units of the measures meant to improve health care safety, IRSN identifies 6 lines of thought: - strengthen coordination between institutional actors in order to ensure the consistency of the requests addressed to the facilities and limit their

  12. Radiotherapy in poor risk patients with stage I cancer of the endometrium: results of not giving external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCruze, B; Guthrie, D

    1999-01-01

    Poor prognosis (poorly differentiated and/or deep myometrial invasion) Stage I endometrial cancer can have a relapse rate as high as 50%. Traditionally, most clinical oncologists treat these patients with external beam radiotherapy after surgery but there is no evidence to show that this improves survival. The retrospective study looks at the results of not giving external beam radiotherapy in 25 consecutive patients and compares the results with a group of 13 consecutive patients who did have such treatment. The two groups were comparable with regard to age, degree of differentiation and degree of invasion. Survival was comparable in the two groups. There is no evidence of any obvious decrease in survival from withholding external beam radiotherapy, but this was not a prospective randomized controlled trial. This study illustrates that it is essential that the Medical Research Council ASTEC trial should be supported because this will determine the true place of external beam radiotherapy in such patients.

  13. Long-term results of radiotherapy for 104 patients with Graves' orbitopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Baolin; Yang Dong; Feng Linchun; Luo Zhiyuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the long-term outcome and the sequelae of Graves' orbitopathy treated with radiotherapy, and to specify the prognostic factors. Methods: From 1979 to 1999, 104 patients with progressive Graves' orbitopathy were treated with conventional orbital radiotherapy. Post globe and pituitary irradiation of 25-35 Gy was given to 56 patients, which was followed by a boost of 15-20 Gy to the pituitary. Follow-up time was 7.5 - 25.0 years. The result of radiotherapy was analyzed. Results: Overall response rate was 71.1%. The response rate of patients with soft-tissue infiltration, corneal involvement, proptosis, sight loss and extraocular muscle dysfunction was 88.4%, 75.1%, 55.6%, 68.8% and 64.4%, respectively. Twelve patients (11.5%) developed cataracts 2.5-18.3 years (median 11.2 years) after irradiation. One patient developed left-eye retinopathy 3.2 years after irradiation. No patient developed secondary tumor within the irradiation field. Conclusions: Orbital radiotherapy for progressive Graves' orbitopathy, being effective and safe, can control the disease progression and improve the symptoms. The side effect of radiotherapy is fewer than other treatment modalities. (authors)

  14. Children Undergoing Radiotherapy: Swedish Parents’ Experiences and Suggestions for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 300 children, from 0 to 18 years old, are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year. Of these children, 80–90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment for their cancer. Although radiotherapy is an encounter with advanced technology, few studies have investigated the child’s and the parent’s view of the procedure. As part of an ongoing multicenter study aimed to improve patient preparation and the care environment in pediatric radiotherapy, this article reports the findings from interviews with parents at baseline. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe parents’ experience when their child undergoes radiotherapy treatment, and to report parents’ suggestions for improvements during radiotherapy for their children. Sixteen mothers and sixteen fathers of children between 2–16 years old with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings showed that cancer and treatment turns people’s lives upside down, affecting the entire family. Further, the parents experience the child’s suffering and must cope with intense feelings. Radiotherapy treatment includes preparation by skilled and empathetic staff. The parents gradually find that they can deal with the process; and lastly, parents have suggestions for improvements during the radiotherapy treatment. An overarching theme emerged: that despair gradually turns to a sense of security, with a sustained focus on and close interaction with the child. In conclusion, an extreme burden was experienced around the start of radiotherapy, though parents gradually coped with the process. PMID:26509449

  15. Improving TL dosimetry for external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos, S.R.; Velez, G.; Rubio, M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In vivo thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has always been one of the most accurate dosimetry method for external radiotherapy control, but the delay in the response is a well know drawback when it is applied. In this work we show some improvements and demonstrate that keeping the precision and accuracy of this technique, it is possible to obtain a response in few hours. Harshaw 4000 TL reader and LiF TLD-100 dosimeters, chips (3,1 x 3,1 x 0,9 mm 3 ) and rods (1 x 1 x 6 mm 3 ) have been used. The thermal treatment necessary to reuse the TLD is only 1h at 400 degree C, by using a glow curve analyser developed at the Ciemat (Spain), that allows a complete, prompt and precise identification of the individuals peaks. The dosimeters are periodically and individually calibrated. We also have study the factors contributing to the relation TL-dose like linearity, energy correction, directional response and fading. All those results are included into an Excel worksheet which automatically give us the dose resulting from the TL reading (peaks areas 4 and 5). The obtained uncertainty is better than 5%. The TLD already irradiated in radiotherapy institutions distant 30-40 Km from our centre can be read and analysed in about 3-4 hours. These facts render our methods rapid and allow a better control of radiotherapy treatment even if it is bi-fractionated. (author) [es

  16. Long-term results of radiotherapy for periarthritis of the shoulder: a retrospective evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Naumann, Susanne; Ruebe, Christian

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the results of radiotherapy for periarthritis of the shoulder In 1983–2004, 141 patients were treated, all had attended at least one follow-up examination. 19% had had pain for several weeks, 66% for months and 14% for years. Shoulder motility was impaired in 137/140 patients. Nearly all patients had taken oral analgesics, 81% had undergone physiotherapy, five patients had been operated on, and six had been irradiated. Radiotherapy was applied using regular anterior-posterior opposing portals and Co-60 gamma rays or 4 MV photons. 89% of the patients received a total dose of 6 Gy (dose/fraction of 1 Gy twice weekly, the others had total doses ranging from 4 to 8 Gy. The patients and the referring doctors were given written questionnaires in order to obtain long-term results. The mean duration of follow-up was 6.9 years [0–20 years]. During the first follow-up examination at the end of radiotherapy 56% of the patients reported pain relief and improvement of motility. After in median 4.5 months the values were 69 and 89%, after 3.9 years 73% and 73%, respectively. There were virtually no side effects. In the questionnaires, 69% of the patients reported pain relief directly after radiotherapy, 31% up to 12 weeks after radiotherapy. 56% of the patients stated that pain relief had lasted for 'years', in further 12% at least for 'months'. Low-dose radiotherapy for periarthropathy of the shoulder was highly effective and yielded long-lasting improvement of pain and motility without side effects

  17. Results of the national audits radiotherapy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, Jose Luis; Alert Silva, Jose; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    The National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy in Cuba works regularly 8 years visiting each country's radiotherapy service at least once every two years, during the visit involving two physicists and an oncologist radiation therapist. This paper presents the main features of the program and its main . Early detection deficiencies in the work of the Radiation Therapy Services to may cause radiological risk situations for both patients and workers and the general public. Help with their comments to the continuous improvement of quality treatments. During audit visits is reviewed throughout the process of radiation from that the patient comes to the monitoring service. This is done by dividing the audits into three groups or aspects Clinical Aspects, Aspects of Safety and Quality Control Aspects of the equipment. Methodological guidelines have been established for conducting audits and they serve as standards of quality in radiation therapy, these guidelines also allow quantification of the . It has identified the main gaps in services that affect quality treatments. After each visit, leave recommendations may be directed to service itself, to the direction of the provincial hospital or health. We believe that the National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy is a efficient tool in controlling the quality of treatments given and at the same time with its recommendations to help improve services of continuous quality. (author)

  18. Long-term results of synchronized radiotherapy in squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esser, E.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two clinical pilot investigations concerning the so-called synchronised radiotherapy of inoperable oral cavity-oropharynx carcinomas are compared. There are no considerable therapeutical differences. Synchronisation-caused partial effects cannot be manifested clinically. Generally, chemoradiotherapy seems to bring an improvement of the short-term results, with an increased rate of side effects. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  19. Therapeutic Results of Radiotherapy in Rectal Carcinoma -Comparison of Sandwich Technique Radiotherapy with Postoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Gil Cha; Suh, Hyun Suk; Lee, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Re Hwe; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Hong Yong; Kim, Sung Rok

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the potential advantage for 'sandwich' technique radiotherapy compared to postoperative radiotherapy in respectable rectal cancer. Between January 1989 and May 1994, 60 patients with respectable rectal cancer were treated at Inje University Seoul and Sanggye Paik Hospital.Fifty one patients were available for analysis : 20 patients were treated with sandwich technique radiotherapy and 31 patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. In sandwich technique radiotherapy(RT), patients were treated with preoperative RT 1500 cGy/5fx followed by immediate curative resection. Patients staged as Astler-Coller B2, C were considered for postoperative RT with 2500-4500 cGy. In postoperative RT, total radiation dose of 4500-6120 cGy, 180 cGy daily at 4-6 weeks was delivered. Patients were followed for median period of 25 months. Results : The overall 5-year survival rates for sandwich technique RT group and postoperative RT group were 60% and 71%, respectively(p>0.05). The 5-year disease free survival rates for each group were 63%. There was no difference in local failure rate between two groups(11% versus 7%). Incidence of distant metastasis was 11%(2/20) in the sandwich technique RT group and 20%(6/31) in the postoperative RT group(p>0.05). The frequencies of acute and chronic complications were comparable in both groups. Conclusion : The sandwich technique radiotherapy group shows local recurrence and survival similar to those of postoperative RT alone group but reduced distant metastasis compared to postoperative RT group. But long term follow-up and large number of patients is needed to make an any firm conclusion regarding the value of this sandwich technique RT

  20. Survey of potential improvements during the course of the radiotherapy treatment. A patient questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momm, Felix; Jooss, David; Adebahr, Sonja; Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Heinemann, Felix; Kirste, Simon; Messmer, Marc-Benjamin; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Xander, Carola J.; Becker, Gerhild

    2011-01-01

    In the context of quality assurance, increasing demands are placed on the whole radiotherapy treatment process. The patients directly concerned generally do not realize most aspects of the quality assurance program (e.g., additional safety checks) during their daily therapy. It was the aim of this study to systematically ask patients about potential improvements during the course of radiotherapy treatment from their own perspective. In the defined time span (1 month), 624 radiotherapy patients (600 questionnaires were returned, 96.2%) were interviewed using a questionnaire newly developed to inquire about several aspects of their treatment. Furthermore, they were asked for their specific needs and suggestions for improvements that could be made during the course of radiotherapy treatment. Overall, the patients were satisfied with the course of their radiotherapy treatment and with patient care. As an example, about 90% agreed with the statement: ''My first contact with the radiation oncology unit proceeded with kindness and competence so that I was given the impression that I will be well cared for in this clinic.'' Considering the organization of the course of radiotherapy, a large majority of patients attached great value to set appointments for the therapy fractions. A main point of criticism was waiting times or delays caused by servicing or machine failures. Small, low cost improvements as music in the therapy room were considered as important as expensive measures (e.g., daylight in the therapy room). The patients emphasized the importance of staff friendliness. The situation of radiotherapy patients was, in general, satisfactory. Future improvements can be mainly expected from smooth organisation of both planning and treatment which can be achieved by electronic scheduling systems. Many results of the survey could be easily implemented in daily practice. In matters of organization radiation oncology with its complex procedures can be used as a model for

  1. Radiotherapy Results of Early Uterine Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : This study was done to analyze survivals, patterns of failure, and complications of early uterine cervix cancer after curative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials : Eighty patients with uterine cervix cancer FIGO Stage IB (48 cases) and Stage IIA (32 cases) treated with radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were treated from November 1985 to May 1993, and minimum follow up period was 24 months. and 6 cases were lost to follow up. All of them were treated with external radiotherapy and different fractions of high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy. Survival rates, failure patterns, complication rates and degrees of severity were analyzed according to several factors. Results : Overall 5 year survival rate and relapse free survival rate were 72.3%, and 72.8% respectively. Prognostic factors were stage, size, pathology, RT response and there was no significant survival difference among the reasons of radiotherapy choice. There were 19 cases of treatment failure, another 3 cases were not tumor related death, and most of treatment related failure occurred within 24 months. Late complication rate of bladder and rectum were 8.8%, 15% respectively, frequency and severity of complication were correlated with ICR fractionation dose and total dose. Conclusion : These results showed that survival rates of early stage radiation treated cervix cancer patients were comparable to surgical series, but more aggressive treatment methods needed for stage IIA poor prognostic patients, To decrease late complication, choice of proper ICR dose and meticulous vaginal packing is needed

  2. Results of different modes conformal radiotherapy in treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovs'ka, L.M.; Yivankova, V.S.; Khrulenko, T.V.; Skomorokhova, T.V.; Gorelyina, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Development of techniques for cytotoxic treatment applying different modes of conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy and high-energy (high dose rate - HDR) is one of the promising areas of optimization and efficiency of conservative treatment of patients with regional forms of cervical cancer. At Radiation Oncology Department, National Cancer Institute, 89 patients with stage 2b-3b cervical cancer, aged 29 to 70, underwent examination and combined radiotherapy course. The patients were divided into 2 main groups (56 patients) depending on the mode of developed conformal radiation therapy, and a control group made up by 33 patients (classic, default conformal radiotherapy). Results. Along with external beam radiotherapy, the patients of Group 2 were provided with conformal radiotherapy carried out by means of the linear accelerator of electrons in the mode of enhanced multi fractionation of irradiation dose applied to the small pelvis area (tumor and lymph efflux channels) with the single tumor dose 1.3 Gy twice per day once 4-6 hours up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy applied to the small pelvis lymph nodes. The patients of Group 1 and the ones of the control group underwent conformal radiotherapy in the mode of standard fractionation applied to the small pelvis area with the single tumor dose of 1.8 Gy up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy. Conformal radiotherapy was carried out for the patients of Group 1 associated with chemoradiomodifiers (tegafur, cisplatin). At the stage 2 of combined radiotherapy course, all patients underwent HDR brachytherapy via Co60 source in the mode of the single tumor dose of 5 Gy at point A up to the total radiation dose of 35-40 Gy. Therefore, employing accelerated mode of multifractiation in conformal radiotherapy of patients with regional cervical cancer makes it possible to enhance canrcinocidal irradiation doses applied to a tumor, and an interval between radiotherapy fractions provides conditions for initiation of

  3. Radiotherapy in early-stage Dupuytren's contracture. Long-term results after 13 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, Nicolas; Ott, Oliver J.; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer; Adamietz, Boris; Keilholz, Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose: In early-stage Dupuytren's contracture, radiotherapy is applied to prevent disease progression. Long-term outcome and late toxicity of the treatment were evaluated in a retrospective analysis. Patients and Methods: Between 12/1982 and 02/2006, 135 patients (208 hands) were irradiated with orthovoltage (120 kV; 20 mA; 4-mm Al filter), in two courses with five daily fractions of 3.0 Gy to a total dose of 30 Gy; separated by a 6- to 8-week interval. The extent of disease was described according to a modified classification of Tubiana et al. Long-term outcome was analyzed at last follow-up between 02/2008 and 05/2008 with a median follow-up of 13 years (range, 2-25 years). Late treatment toxicity and objective reduction of symptoms as change in stage and numbers of nodules and cords were evaluated and used as evidence to assess treatment response. Results: According to the individual stages, 123 cases (59%) remained stable, 20 (10%) improved, and 65 (31%) progressed. In stage N 87% and in stage N/I 70% remained stable or even regressed. In more advanced stages, the rate of disease progression increased to 62% (stage I) or 86% (stage II). 66% of the patients showed a long-term relief of symptoms (i.e., burning sensations, itching and scratching, pressure and tension). Radiotherapy did not increase the complication rate after surgery in case of disease progression and only minor late toxicity (skin atrophy, dry desquamation) could be observed in 32% of the patients. There was no evidence for a second malignancy induced by radiotherapy. Conclusion: After a mean follow-up of 13 years radiotherapy is effective in prevention of disease progression and improves patients' symptoms in early-stage Dupuytren's contracture (stage N, N/I). In case of disease progression after radiotherapy, a ''salvage'' operation is still feasible. (orig.)

  4. Long-term results of radiotherapy for subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (ARMD)

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    Kim, Bo Kyong; Kim, Il Han [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    We performed this prospective randomized study to evaluate the efficacy and the complications of radiotherapy for Subfoveal CNV in ARMD and to compare the treatment results at two dosages (14.4 Gy and 19.8 Gy). 60 eyes of 55 patients were enrolled, and randomized into 14.4 Gy (31 eyes) or 19.8 Gy (29 eyes) groups. CT was used to plan the radiotherapy. All patients received radiotherapy with a 1.8 Gy daily dose using 4 MV photon. We categorized treatment results as improved, stable, or deteriorated based on visual acuity changes of more than 2 lines on the ETDRS chart. Median follow-up period was 33.5 months. At 12 months, visual acuity improved in 9 (16.7%), stable in 41 (75.9%), and aggravated in 4 (7.4%) of 54 evaluated eyes. At 24 months, 49 eyes (81.7%) were evaluated. Visual acuity improved in 6 (12.2%), was stable in 33 (67.4%), and deteriorated in 10 (20.4%). At 36 months, 37 eyes were evaluated. Six (16.2%) eyes were improved, 21 (56.8%) stable, and 10 (27.0%) deteriorated. No significant difference in response was observed between the 14.4 Gy and 19.8 Gy groups (Mantel-Haenszel {chi} {sup 2} = 0.4756). The proportion of eyes with a vision of 20/100 {<=} increased from 28.3% initially to 32.7% after 24 months of radiotherapy. There were no severe acute or chronic complications. External beam radiotherapy with doses of 14.4 or 19.8 Gy may be an effective treatment for subfoveal CNV in ARMD. No dose-response relationships with respect to treatment response or toxicity were observed between the 14.4 Gy and 19.8 Gy groups.

  5. Results of radiotherapy for brain metastases in old-aged patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, C.; Niewald, M.; Schnabel, K.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate which patients older tahn 70 years will benefit by radiotherapy for their brain metastases the data of 35 patients in this age-group who were treated between 1983 and 1994 were retrospectivley analyzed. All patients were previously untreated and received a whole-brain irradiation and concomitantly corticosteroids. The median total dose was 30 Gy (fractionation: 10 times 3 Gy in 2 weeks). Six patients each received lower or higher total doses with 50.4 Gy at maximum. Six patients failed to complete their prescribed treatment (17%). The median survival of all patients who completed their radiotherapy course was 67 days only. Patients with extracerebral metastases had a median survival of 31 days. Survival was not dependent on total dose of radiotherapy. In 56% of all cases the general condition of the patients improved or remained stable at a high level. Karnofsky-performance status was the most important prognostic factor. Advanced age is an unfavourable prognostic factor. Only patients in good general condition without extracerebral metastases had survival times which justify radiotherapy for their brain metastases. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas. Evaluation of tumor control and hypopituitarism after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Emiko; Sakai, Kunio; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sugita, Tadashi; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the results of conventional radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas assessed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Endpoints include tumor control, normalization of hormone levels in functioning adenomas, and hypopituitarism after radiotherapy as an adverse effect. Forty-two patients were treated with radiotherapy from 1982 to 1995 at Niigata University Hospital. Forty patients were irradiated after surgery because of residual adenomas in 33 patients and tumor regrowth in 7 patients. One patient was treated with radiotherapy alone, and the remaining 1 patient was treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Tumor size and extension were evaluated using CT or MRI, and all tumors were macroadenomas. They consisted of 18 non-functioning and 24 functioning adenomas (growth hormone (GH)-secreting: 11, prolactinomas: 7, concomitant GH and prolactin (PRL)-secreting: 5, gonadotropin-secreting: 1). Treatment was given in 200 cGy daily fraction size and a total dose of 50 Gy was given to most patients. Sixteen patients with GH- and/or PRL-secreting adenomas received bromocriptine. Tumor progression was determined by increase in tumor size as shown by CT or MRI. Hypopituitarism after radiotherapy was evaluated using the functions of corticotropin (ACTH), thyrotropin (TSH), and gonadotropin. Median follow-up time from the end of radiotherapy was 103 months. Tumor progression occurred in 2 out of 42 patients and 10-year progression-free rate for all patients was 93.7%. Normalization of GH levels was obtained in 12 of 16 GH-secreting adenomas with a mean time of 27 months after radiotherapy, and 9 of 12 PRL-secreting adenomas achieved normalization of PRL levels with a mean time of 34 months. One gonadotropin-secreting adenoma achieved normalization of gonadotropin level at 21 months after radiotherapy. The incidence of hypopituitarism after radiotherapy increased with time, and cumulative risk of deficiencies of ACTH, TSH, and gonadotropin at 10

  7. Approaches for improving cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, Vijay K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation and cancer are intricately related. Radiotherapy, either alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy, is used for treatment of 60% of cancers. It will continue to be the mainstay for multi-modality treatment protocols unit new molecular therapies can be developed and brought to the stage of clinical trials. It will continue to be relevant thereafter, to compare the efficacy and cost effectiveness of the novel drugs under development. And it could also be useful as an adjuvant therapy, to augment the effects of novel drugs, at optimum dose levels. However, radiation is a well documented carcinogenic agent. Several studies have shown a statistically significant, though small enhancement in the risk of second malignancies, particularly in long-term survivors. The above discussions suggest that it is imperative to carry out preclinical radiobiological research for increasing tumor cell damage, while reducing the effective radiation doses. Development of radiobiological research programs in our institutions of higher learning such as post graduate medical institutions, cancer centers and universities could lead to the generation of a wealth of radiobiological data with potential clinical applications. Radiobiologists could utilize the infra-structure such as expensive radiotherapy equipment as well as clinical materials. For example, tumour biopsies readily available in the medical and cancer centers. However, if these studies have clinically meaningful implications it will be important to facilitate very close interactions between the basic scientists and clinicians. Some of the approaches for improving radiotherapy of cancer will be very briefly reviewed. Our current work about the effects of radiation-drug and drug-drug interactions for increasing cellular damage and death in brain tumor cells will also be presented. (author)

  8. Dementia post-radiotherapy: improvement with acetylcholinesterase inhibitor A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Eduardo Damin

    Full Text Available Abstract Cognitive decline associated with radiotherapy is a progressive complication that affects many patients submitted to this form of treatment. The lack of an effective treatment drives research for new treatment options to improve the quality of life of patients with this disorder. We report the case of a 64 year-old man who developed a severe dementia of the frontal subcortical type, which was associated with subcortical frontal lesions and appeared as a late complication of radiotherapy used to treat a pituitary tumor. After many pharmacological attempts to improve his cognitive and behavioral problems, the patient showed a significant improvement in the cognitive, functional and behavioral impairments after treatment with an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. This report discusses hypotheses for the positive effect of this treatment.

  9. Review of potential improvements using MRI in the radiotherapy workflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torresin, Alberto; Brambilla, Maria Grazia; Monti, Angelo F.; Moscato, Alessio; Brockmann, Marc A.; University Medical Center Mannheim; Schad, Lothar; Attenberger, Ulrike I.; Lohr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The goal of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a lethal amount of dose to tissue volumes that contain a significant amount of tumour cells while sparing surrounding unaffected or healthy tissue. Online image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound, fiducial-based planar X-ray imaging or helical/conebeam CT has dramatically improved the precision of radiotherapy, with moving targets still posing some methodical problems regarding positioning. Therefore, requirements for precise target delineation and identification of functional body structures to be spared by high doses become more evident. The identification of areas of relatively radioresistant cells or areas of high tumor cell density is currently under development. This review outlines the state of the art of MRI integration into treatment planning and its importance in follow up and the quantification of biological effects. Finally the current state of the art of online imaging for patient positioning will be outlined and indications will be given what the potential of integrated radiotherapy/online MRI systems is.

  10. Methods and results of radiotherapy in case of medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberg, M.; Sauerwein, W.; Scherer, E.

    1982-01-01

    The prognosis of the medulloblastoma with its marked tendency towards early formation of metastases by way of liquor circulation can be decisively improved by post-surgical homogenous irradiation. A successful radiotherapy is only possible by means of new irradiation methods which have been developed for high-voltage units during recent years and which require great experience and skill on the part of the radiotherapeutist. At the Radiological Centre of Essen, 26 patients with medulloblastoma have been submitted to such a specially developed post-surgical radiotherapy since 1974. After a follow-up period of at most seven years, 16 patients have survived (two of them with recurrences) and 10 patients died because of a local recurrence. In dependence on the patient's state of health after surgery and before irradiation, the neurologic state and physical condition of these patients seem favorable after unique post-operative radiotherapy. New therapeutic possibilities are provided by radiosensitizing substances. The actually most effective radiosensitizer Misonidazol, however, could not respond hitherto to clinical expectances. (orig.) [de

  11. To improve the safety of treatments in radiotherapy by developing a safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Following the radiotherapy accidents between 2004 and 2006, the I.R.S.N. deemed necessary to lead a study on the safety of treatments in radiotherapy and on the use and the adaptation to the medical domain of safety analysis approach developed for the nuclear installations. Of this study, six mains lines of investigation appear: Endow the radiotherapy services with real referential of safety, reinforce the robustness of the organization of radiotherapy services, improve the safety of the equipment and software at the design and operating stages, improve the management of the expertise and reinforce the operating feed back on incidents and accidents. The main learning from this study is the benefit that could be gained by fitting the safety analysis concepts and methods to the specificities of radiotherapy considering the organization of it collective work, the cooperation between actors stemming from different jobs as well as the interactions between actors and technical systems in the process of the treatments, when they are put into service and during their periodic checks. (author)

  12. Radiotherapy professionals faced with the obligation of treatments safety improvement; Les professionnels de la radiotherapie face a l'obligation d'ameliorer la securite des traitements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The occurrence of a major accident in Epinal (2006), followed by one in Toulouse (2007), led the Ministry of Health to mobilize the whole actors in radiotherapy in order to define national measures intended to improve health care security. Compiled in the so-called 'road map', these measures were presented in November 2007, and implemented in the 2009-2013 cancer programme. The French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) undertook a study aiming at assessing the effects of the above-mentioned measures on organization and safety management of radiotherapy facilities, but also on treatment achievement procedures and health professionals. More specifically, IRSN sought to examine the ability of health professionals to take into account new safety demands and to adapt their practices accordingly. With these purposes objectives, a qualitative study using the methods of ergonomics and sociology of organizations was completed in 2009-2010. The results of the study presented in this report show an effective improvement of health care safety along with a variable integration of safety measures depending on radiotherapy facilities and units. In particular, integration depends on 1) the governance mode of the health care facility, more or less conducive to promoting safety, 2) the pre-existence of a safety culture and safety organization, and 3) the facility commitment to health care safety improvement actions. The study also reveals that the implementation of new safety demands and the changes they involve create new constraints, which put pressure on health professionals and may threaten the durability of the improvements made. In order to facilitate the appropriation and implementation by radiotherapy units of the measures meant to improve health care safety, IRSN identifies 6 lines of thought: - strengthen coordination between institutional actors in order to ensure the consistency of the requests addressed to the facilities and limit

  13. Improved tolerance of abdominal large-volume radiotherapy due to ornithine aspartate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuttig, H.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of ornithine aspartate on supporting the hepatic function was investigated in a group of 47 patients with tumour dissemination in the pelvic and abdominal region, randomised on the basis of the progress of the serum enzymes GOT, GPT, LAD, LDH, LAP and the alkaline phosphatase during and following completion of a course of large-volume radiotherapy. The adjuvant therapy with ornithine aspartate resulted in reduced enzyme movement with an earlier tendency to normalisation. The results, which are borne out by statistics, clearly show an improvement in the hepatic function on detoxication of toxic degradation products of radiotherapy with reduced impairment of the body's own defence mechanisms. Subjectively too, the course of treatment with ornithine aspartate showed a reduced ratio of side effects as regards lassitude and impairment of the patient's general well-being as compared with the group of patients to whom ornithine aspartate was not simultaneously administered. (orig.) [de

  14. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  15. Temozolomide during radiotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Daily administration improves survival

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    Nachbichler, Silke Birgit; Schupp, Gabi; Ballhausen, Hendrik; Niyazi, Maximilian; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Temozolomide-(TMZ)-based chemoradiotherapy defines the current gold standard for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Data regarding the influence of TMZ dose density during chemoradiotherapy are currently not available. We retrospectively compared outcomes in patients receiving no TMZ, TMZ during radiotherapy on radiotherapy days only, and TMZ constantly 7 days a week. From 2002-2012, a total of 432 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma received radiotherapy in our department: 118 patients had radiotherapy alone, 210 had chemoradiotherapy with TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}) daily (7/7), and 104 with TMZ only on radiotherapy days (5/7). Radiotherapy was applied to a total dose of 60 Gy. Median survival after radiotherapy alone was 9.1 months, compared to 12.6 months with 5/7-TMZ and to 15.7 months with 7/7-TMZ. The 1-year survival rates were 33, 52, and 64%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant improvement of TMZ-7/7 vs. 5/7 (p = 0.01 by the log-rank test), while 5/7-TMZ was still superior to no TMZ at all (p = 0.02). Multivariate Cox regression showed a significant influence of TMZ regimen (p = 0.009) on hazard rate (+58% between groups) even in the presence of confounding factors age, sex, resection status, and radiotherapy dose concept. Our results confirm the findings of the EORTC/NCIC trial. It seems that also a reduced TMZ scheme can at first prolong the survival of glioblastoma patients, but not as much as the daily administration. (orig.) [German] Eine Temozolomid-(TMZ-)basierte Radiochemotherapie ist der gegenwaertige Goldstandard in der Behandlung von neu diagnostizierten Glioblastomen. Daten bezueglich des Einflusses der TMZ-Dosisdichte waehrend der Radiochemotherapie sind derzeit nicht vorhanden. Wir haben retrospektiv die Ergebnisse von Patienten verglichen, die entweder kein TMZ, TMZ zur Strahlentherapie nur an Bestrahlungstagen oder TMZ konstant 7 Tage/Woche erhalten hatten. Von 2002-2012 bekamen insgesamt 432 Patienten mit

  16. Improved management of radiotherapy departments through accurate cost data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesteloot, K.; Lievens, Y.; Schueren, E. van der

    2000-01-01

    Escalating health care expenses urge Governments towards cost containment. More accurate data on the precise costs of health care interventions are needed. We performed an aggregate cost calculation of radiation therapy departments and treatments and discussed the different cost components. The costs of a radiotherapy department were estimated, based on accreditation norms for radiotherapy departments set forth in the Belgian legislation. The major cost components of radiotherapy are the cost of buildings and facilities, equipment, medical and non-medical staff, materials and overhead. They respectively represent around 3, 30, 50, 4 and 13% of the total costs, irrespective of the department size. The average cost per patient lowers with increasing department size and optimal utilization of resources. Radiotherapy treatment costs vary in a stepwise fashion: minor variations of patient load do not affect the cost picture significantly due to a small impact of variable costs. With larger increases in patient load however, additional equipment and/or staff will become necessary, resulting in additional semi-fixed costs and an important increase in costs. A sensitivity analysis of these two major cost inputs shows that a decrease in total costs of 12-13% can be obtained by assuming a 20% less than full time availability of personnel; that due to evolving seniority levels, the annual increase in wage costs is estimated to be more than 1%; that by changing the clinical life-time of buildings and equipment with unchanged interest rate, a 5% reduction of total costs and cost per patient can be calculated. More sophisticated equipment will not have a very large impact on the cost (±4000 BEF/patient), provided that the additional equipment is adapted to the size of the department. That the recommendations we used, based on the Belgian legislation, are not outrageous is shown by replacing them by the USA Blue book recommendations. Depending on the department size, costs in

  17. Stage I/II endometrial carcinomas: preoperative radiotherapy: results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Belichard, C.; Horiot, J.C.; Barillot, I.; Fraisse, J.; Collin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The AIM of this retrospective study is to analyse the indications and the results of treatment of endometrial carcinomas by preoperative radiotherapy. MATERIAL: From 1976 to 1995, 183 patients FIGO stage I or II were treated by preoperative radiotherapy consisting in 95 cases of external radiotherapy (XRT) and brachytherapy (BT) followed by surgery (S) and, in 88 cases of BT alone before surgery, XRT was indicated in cases of grade 2 or 3 and/or cervical involvement. METHODS: XRT was delivered with a 4-fields technique to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with a medial shielding at 30 Gy. BT was done with low dose rate Cs137 and Fletcher-Suit-Delclos applicators with two intra-uterine tubes and vaginal ovoieds. Complications were scored using the French-Italian syllabus. RESULTS: Five-year actuarial survival rates per stage are: Ia=91%, Ib=83%, II=71%, and per grade: G1=80%, G2=79%, G3=90%. Failures were pelvic in 5/183 (2.7%), vaginal in 4 cases (2%) and nodal in 2 cases (1%). Twelve patients developed metastases (6.5%). Complications were analysed during the radiotherapy, after the surgery and with unlimited follow-up. After BT/S, 12 grade 1, 1 grade 2 and 1 grade 3 complications were observed. In the group of patients treated by RT/BT/S, 22 grade 1, 11 grade 2, 4 grade 3 occurred. There is no statistical correlation between complications and parameters of treatment (XRT, hwt, HWT, reference dose to the bladder and rectum, dose rate of brachytherapy). SUMMARY: Preoperative irradiation is an effective and safe treatment of high risk stage I/II endometrial carcinomas. Results seem independent of the pathology grade

  18. Radiotherapy Results of Carcinoma of Cervix with positive Resection Margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Won Dong; Wu, Hong Gyun; Ha, Sung Whan; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : Patients with cervical cancer who have positive resection margins after radical hysterectomy are at increased risk for local recurrence. The results of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for cervix cancer with positive resection margins were analyzed to evaluated the role of radiotherapy. Materials and Methods : Between 1979 and 1992, 60 patients of cervix carcinoma were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after radical hysterectomy because of positive vaginal(48 patients) or parametrial resection margins(12 patients). Patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy(EBRT) alone (12 patients) or EBRT plus vaginal ovoid irradiation (VOI) (48 patients). The median follow-up period was 5 months. Results : The 5-year actuarial disease free and overall survival rates for all patients were 75.2%, 84.1%, respectively. The overall recurrence rate was 23%(14/60). In 48 patients with positive vaginal resection margins, the pelvic recurrence was 8%(4/48). Distant metastasis was 15%(7/48). Of the 43 patients with positive vaginal resection margins treated with EBRT and VOI, recurrence rate was 21%(9/43), while recurrence rate was 40%(2/5) in the EBRT only treated group. In 12 patients with positive parametrial margins, three patients (25%) had distant metastases. The most significant prognostic factor was lymph node metastasis. Complications resulting from radiotherapy occurred at a rate of 32%(19/60) and grade III complications occurred in three patients (5%). Conclusion : Postoperative radiotherapy can produce excellent pelvic control rates in patients with positive resection margins. In patients with positive vaginal margins, whole pelvic EBRT and BOI is recommended

  19. Single-Fraction Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Early Cosmetic Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Borgen, Patrick; Fey, Jane; Goldberg, Jessica; Sacchini, Virgilio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic outcome of patients treated with wide local excision and intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 women were treated on a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy at wide local excision. The eligibility criteria included age >60, tumor size ≤2.0 cm, clinically negative lymph nodes, and biopsy-established diagnosis. After wide local excision, a custom breast applicator was placed in the excision cavity, and a dose of 20 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 1 cm. After 18 patients were treated, the dose was constrained laterally to 18 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by photographs at baseline and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Four examiners graded the photographs for symmetry, edema, discoloration, contour, and scarring. The grades were evaluated in relationship to the volume of irradiated tissue, tumor location, and dose at the lateral aspects of the cavity. Results: The median volume of tissue receiving 100% of the prescription dose was 47 cm 3 (range, 20-97 cm 3 ). Patients with ≤47 cm 3 of treated tissue had better cosmetic outcomes than did the women who had >47 cm 3 of treated tissue. Women who had received 18 Gy at the lateral aspects of their cavities had better cosmetic outcomes than did women who had received 20 Gy at the lateral aspects. When comparing the 6- and 12-month results, the scores remained stable for 63%, improved for 17%, and worsened for 20%. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy appears feasible for selected patients. A favorable cosmetic outcome appears to be related to a smaller treatment volume. The cosmetic outcome is acceptable, although additional follow-up is necessary

  20. Long term results of radiotherapy of degenerative joint diseases

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    Lindner, H; Freislederer, R

    1982-04-01

    At the Radiologic Department of the Staedt. Krankenhaus Passau, 473 patients with degenerative diseases in the big joints and the spine were irradiated with the caesium unit between 1971 and 1979. Among these patients, 249 could be followed up during a prolonged period (1/2 to 9 years, i.e. 4.2 years on an average). According to the categories of v. Pannewitz, 11% were pain-free at this moment, 21% showed an essential improvement, 29% showed an improvement, and 39% were not influenced by the treatment. 13.5% showed recurrent pains; these were mentioned as 'not influenced' in the statistical analysis. It is proved that the relief of pain does not depend on the age of the patients, but on the anamnesis period, the results of the X-ray examiantion, and the degree of the restriction of mobility. Due to the delay of irradiation, a preliminary treatment mostly produces a less favorable radiotherapeutic result. Compared with other therapeutic methods, the long term results of radiotherapy of degenerative joint diseases are generally favorable. This conclusion is also confirmed by the results of patients checked up more than five years after the treatment.

  1. Urethral carcinoma in women: results of treatment with primary radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.F.; Wards, P.R.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; McLean, M.; Catton, P.A.; Catton, C.N.; Banerjee, D.

    2000-01-01

    Urethral carcinoma in women is uncommon. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of these tumors. The hospital records of 34 women with primary urethral carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. There were 15 squamous cell carcinomas, 13 transitional cell carcinomas, and six adenocarcinomas. The primary tumor was >4 cm in size in eight patients, involved the proximal urethra in 19 and extended to adjacent organs in 22. Inguinal or iliac lymphadenopathy was present in nine patients. There were eight TNM stage I/II tumors, 11 stage III tumors and 15 stage IV tumors. Radiotherapy was administered only to the primary tumor in 15 patients, and to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes in the remaining 19 patients. Brachytherapy with or without external radiation was used to treat the primary tumor in 20 patients. Tumor recurred in 21 patients. The 7-year actuarial overall and cause-specific survivals were 41 and 45%, respectively. Large primary tumor bulk and treatment with external beam radiation alone (no brachytherapy) were independent adverse prognostic factors for local tumor recurrence. Brachytherapy reduced the risk of local recurrence by a factor of 4.2. The beneficial effect of brachytherapy was most prominently seen in patients with bulky primary disease. Large tumor size was the only independent adverse predictor of overall disease recurrence and death from cancer. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for carcinoma of the female urethra and preserves normal anatomy and function. Brachytherapy improves local tumor control, possibly as a result of the higher radiation dose that can safely be delivered. (author)

  2. Improving patient safety in radiotherapy through error reporting and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, Ú.; Best, H.; Ottrey, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To improve patient safety in radiotherapy (RT) through the analysis and publication of radiotherapy errors and near misses (RTE). Materials and methods: RTE are submitted on a voluntary basis by NHS RT departments throughout the UK to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) or directly to Public Health England (PHE). RTE are analysed by PHE staff using frequency trend analysis based on the classification and pathway coding from Towards Safer Radiotherapy (TSRT). PHE in conjunction with the Patient Safety in Radiotherapy Steering Group publish learning from these events, on a triannual and summarised on a biennial basis, so their occurrence might be mitigated. Results: Since the introduction of this initiative in 2010, over 30,000 (RTE) reports have been submitted. The number of RTE reported in each biennial cycle has grown, ranging from 680 (2010) to 12,691 (2016) RTE. The vast majority of the RTE reported are lower level events, thus not affecting the outcome of patient care. Of the level 1 and 2 incidents reported, it is known the majority of them affected only one fraction of a course of treatment. This means that corrective action could be taken over the remaining treatment fractions so the incident did not have a significant impact on the patient or the outcome of their treatment. Analysis of the RTE reports demonstrates that generation of error is not confined to one professional group or to any particular point in the pathway. It also indicates that the pattern of errors is replicated across service providers in the UK. Conclusion: Use of the terminology, classification and coding of TSRT, together with implementation of the national voluntary reporting system described within this report, allows clinical departments to compare their local analysis to the national picture. Further opportunities to improve learning from this dataset must be exploited through development of the analysis and development of proactive risk management strategies

  3. Radiobiological research for improving tumor radiotherapy - an Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Viney

    1990-01-01

    Radiation-induced damage to normal tissues within the non-target volume is a major limitation of tumor radiotherapy. Physical methods to obtain superior spatial dose distributions use sophisticated technology and are expensive. Large scale applications of these technologies in a developing country like India, with a large number of cancer patients, poor instrumental facilities and inadequate infrastructure face several problems. Radiobiological research aiming at developing simple, inexpensive and effective methods to increase the differential response between tumor and normal tissues should be, therefore, strengthened. Biological end-points are determined not only by the molecular lesions produced due to the absorption of the radiation energy but also by the cellular repair processes, which become operative in response to lesions in the living system. Therefore, enhancement of repair processes in the normal tissues and inhibition of the same in tumors should considerably improve the therapeutic index of radiation treatment. A combination of agents which can suitably alter the spectrum of important molecular lesions with modifiers of cellular repair could be an effective strategy. Initial experiments using halopyrimidines to increase repairable DNA lesions produced by sparsely ionizing radiations in combination with 2-deoxy-D-glucose to modulate differentially the repair and fixation processes in the tumor and normal tissues have provided promising results. Further research work is warranted since this strategy appears to have great potential for improving tumor radiotherapy. (author). 46 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibroma: updating of radiotherapy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alert Silva, Jose; Caballero Aguirrechu, Iraida; Reno Cespedes, Jesus; Perez Penna, Lourdes

    2010-01-01

    The nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibroma is a uncommon benign tumor composed of fibrous connective tissue and many vascular spaces covered by endothelium. It is almost exclusive of male sex and of adolescents. Choice treatment is the exeresis without obviate other possibilities as the radiotherapy. The aim of present study was to show the results of this latter as therapeutical option

  5. Radiotherapy treatment results of bladder cancer: study of 458 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vara Santos, J.; Torre Tomas, A. de la; Romero Fernandez, J.; Regueiro Otero, C.; Clavo Varas, B.; Magallan Sebastian, R.; Valcarcel Sancho, F.; Polo Tolosana, E.; Aragon de la Cruz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1964 to 1990, 458 patients diagnosed of bladder cancer have been treated with radical radiotherapy in our department. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial survival rates were 37% and 27% respectively. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial local control rates, evaluated in 404 patients, were 41% and 38%. In regard to survival, T stage (p=0.013), advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p>0.0001), and squamous differentiation (p<0.0001), reached statistical significance as adverse prognostic factors. In 248 patients, with invasive transitional carcinoma, radical radiotherapy alone was used. In this group of patients, T stage (p=0.006) and advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p=0.0002) were adverse prognostic factors for survival. Our results suggest that radical radiotherapy must be considered and alternative to surgery in management of bladder cancer. On the basis of prognostic factors evidenced in this series a subgroup of patients with low probability of survival when treated with exclusive radiotherapy are defined. This patients must be included in clinical research protocols. (Author) 44 refs

  6. Survey of Equipment Quality Control in Radiotherapy Centers in Croatia: First Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, S.; Diklic, A.; Smilovic Radojcic, Dj.; Svabic, M.; Kasabasic, M.; Ivkovic, A.; Faj, D.

    2011-01-01

    parameters were resolution f 5 0, f 4 0, f 3 0, contrast to noise ratio (CNR), noise, field size and central axis deviation. Measured values were highly in tolerance. Measurements performed on simulators showed that all values were in tolerance except for the laser alignment which showed out-of-tolerance values in 8.3 % of cases. These results were expected since radiotherapy equipment for QC is still not recognized as an important issue from some hospitals management. Therefore, existence of equipment for QC is more exception than rule and written QC protocols do not exists in more than half Croatian radiotherapy departments. Quality assurance of radiotherapy machines is essential in reducing uncertainties and errors in whole radiotherapy procedure. Upgrading the QA/QC in radiotherapy departments in Croatia is an ongoing process. Large improvements can be seen especially now because lot of new, very sophisticated equipment has been acquired recently. We proposed a unique QA manual that can be used for this equipment in whole Croatia. (author)

  7. Patients and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eardley, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of interviews with thirty discharged patients who had undergone radical radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck are presented. Patients were asked whether their side-effects had got worse or had stayed the same, what effect their side effects had had on eating and drinking and whether they had felt depressed during this period. Measures which could be taken to improve patients' experiences of radiotherapy are discussed. (U.K.)

  8. Radiotherapy dosimetry audit: three decades of improving standards and accuracy in UK clinical practice and trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Catharine H; Aird, Edwin G A; Bolton, Steve; Miles, Elizabeth A; Nisbet, Andrew; Snaith, Julia A D; Thomas, Russell A S; Venables, Karen; Thwaites, David I

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetry audit plays an important role in the development and safety of radiotherapy. National and large scale audits are able to set, maintain and improve standards, as well as having the potential to identify issues which may cause harm to patients. They can support implementation of complex techniques and can facilitate awareness and understanding of any issues which may exist by benchmarking centres with similar equipment. This review examines the development of dosimetry audit in the UK over the past 30 years, including the involvement of the UK in international audits. A summary of audit results is given, with an overview of methodologies employed and lessons learnt. Recent and forthcoming more complex audits are considered, with a focus on future needs including the arrival of proton therapy in the UK and other advanced techniques such as four-dimensional radiotherapy delivery and verification, stereotactic radiotherapy and MR linear accelerators. The work of the main quality assurance and auditing bodies is discussed, including how they are working together to streamline audit and to ensure that all radiotherapy centres are involved. Undertaking regular external audit motivates centres to modernize and develop techniques and provides assurance, not only that radiotherapy is planned and delivered accurately but also that the patient dose delivered is as prescribed.

  9. Radiotherapy dosimetry audit: three decades of improving standards and accuracy in UK clinical practice and trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Edwin GA; Bolton, Steve; Miles, Elizabeth A; Nisbet, Andrew; Snaith, Julia AD; Thomas, Russell AS; Venables, Karen; Thwaites, David I

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetry audit plays an important role in the development and safety of radiotherapy. National and large scale audits are able to set, maintain and improve standards, as well as having the potential to identify issues which may cause harm to patients. They can support implementation of complex techniques and can facilitate awareness and understanding of any issues which may exist by benchmarking centres with similar equipment. This review examines the development of dosimetry audit in the UK over the past 30 years, including the involvement of the UK in international audits. A summary of audit results is given, with an overview of methodologies employed and lessons learnt. Recent and forthcoming more complex audits are considered, with a focus on future needs including the arrival of proton therapy in the UK and other advanced techniques such as four-dimensional radiotherapy delivery and verification, stereotactic radiotherapy and MR linear accelerators. The work of the main quality assurance and auditing bodies is discussed, including how they are working together to streamline audit and to ensure that all radiotherapy centres are involved. Undertaking regular external audit motivates centres to modernize and develop techniques and provides assurance, not only that radiotherapy is planned and delivered accurately but also that the patient dose delivered is as prescribed. PMID:26329469

  10. Testicular cancer: seminoma. Stage I. Adjuvant radiotherapy. Results at 3 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lione, M.; Ticera, N.; Mandachain, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To evaluate the results achieved with adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and methods: We analyzed 40 medical records of patients diagnosed with stage I of testicular cancer, all of them received adjuvant radiotherapy between April 1992 and May 2004. The histological type was classical seminoma (95%) and spermatocytes (5%). Diagnosis and staging were performed with testicular ultrasound, determination of tumor markers, computed tomography of abdomen - pelvis and chest radiographs. Radiotherapy: Patients were treated with 60 Co unit and a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Volumes: Group I: lumboaortic lymph node region and ipsilateral pelvis. Group II: lumboaortic only. Daily dose: 1.8 Gy, total dose: 30.6 Gy. Patient in supine position, 2 parallel fields and opposed, DFP: 80 cm, calculated from midplane. They were followed for 3 years with chest X-ray, CAT scan of abdomen and pelvis at 12 months and then a full clinical control 1 time per year. Results: We defined the rate of ipsilateral pelvic node recurrence (group I: 0% vs. Group II: 6.25%), progression at distance (group I: 8.3% vs. Group II: 0%) and global survival (GS) (group I: 100% vs. group II: 100%) at 3 years of follow up. Conclusions: Our result is similar to that published in the international literature. Given the small number of patients, no evidence of changes in GS with the addition of radiotherapy to ipsilateral pelvic node. Radiation therapy to lumboaortic lymph nodes is the usual treatment, being necessary to optimize the modality of radiotherapy (RC3D - IRMT) to reduce toxicity in a long term. (authors) [es

  11. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  12. Automatic block-matching registration to improve lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Scott Patrick

    To improve relatively poor outcomes for locally-advanced lung cancer patients, many current efforts are dedicated to minimizing uncertainties in radiotherapy. This enables the isotoxic delivery of escalated tumor doses, leading to better local tumor control. The current dissertation specifically addresses inter-fractional uncertainties resulting from patient setup variability. An automatic block-matching registration (BMR) algorithm is implemented and evaluated for the purpose of directly localizing advanced-stage lung tumors during image-guided radiation therapy. In this algorithm, small image sub-volumes, termed "blocks", are automatically identified on the tumor surface in an initial planning computed tomography (CT) image. Each block is independently and automatically registered to daily images acquired immediately prior to each treatment fraction. To improve the accuracy and robustness of BMR, this algorithm incorporates multi-resolution pyramid registration, regularization with a median filter, and a new multiple-candidate-registrations technique. The result of block-matching is a sparse displacement vector field that models local tissue deformations near the tumor surface. The distribution of displacement vectors is aggregated to obtain the final tumor registration, corresponding to the treatment couch shift for patient setup correction. Compared to existing rigid and deformable registration algorithms, the final BMR algorithm significantly improves the overlap between target volumes from the planning CT and registered daily images. Furthermore, BMR results in the smallest treatment margins for the given study population. However, despite these improvements, large residual target localization errors were noted, indicating that purely rigid couch shifts cannot correct for all sources of inter-fractional variability. Further reductions in treatment uncertainties may require the combination of high-quality target localization and adaptive radiotherapy.

  13. Treatment results of radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cheek mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Kazuko; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime; Fujita, Masahiro; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Inoue, Toshihiko.

    1992-01-01

    The results of radiotherapeutic treatment in 71 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cheek mucosa were reviewed. The actuarial 5-year local control rate was 100% for T1 (8 patients), 62% for T2 (43), 65% for T3 (17) and 0% for T4 (3). The patients were divided into four groups according to treatment modality; group 1 was treated by radiotherapy alone (R), group 2 by radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy of BLM or PEP (R + C), group 3 by external radiotherapy followed by surgery (R + S) and group 4 by a combination of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery (R + C + S). The 5-year local control rate was 44% for R (11 patients), 61% for R + C (39), 63% for R+ S (6) and 80% for R + C + S (15). Nine of 14 cases or 64% of the surgical specimens in the R + C + S group showed no tumor cells microscopically, a rate comparable with the 5-year local control rate of the R + C group. Including the results of secondary treatment by surgery for recurrent cases, the ultimate local control rate was 83% in both the R and R + C groups. The local control rate was 88% for carcinoma located in the anterior half of the cheek and 53% for that in the posterior cheek. The results suggested that tumors extending to the bucco-alveolar sulci would be more difficult to control by radiotherapy alone, with or without chemotherapy. (author)

  14. Quality Audits In Radiotherapy. Chapter 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely recognized that quality audits constitute a vital component of quality management in radiotherapy [20.1–20.3]. The main reason why quality audits are considered an important activity is that they help to review the quality of radiotherapy services and improve them. Quality audits check whether radiotherapy practices are adequate, i.e. that what should be done is being done; and in case it is not, audits provide recommendations to encourage improvements to be made. Without some form of auditing, it would be difficult to determine whether radiotherapy services are safe and effective for cancer treatment. In other words, a quality audit in radiotherapy is a method of reviewing whether the quality of activities in a radiotherapy department adheres to the standards of good practices to ensure that the treatment to the cancer patient is optimal. Overall, audits lead to improvements of professional practices and the general quality of services delivered. There are many recommendations regarding quality in radiotherapy practice, both national and international. Practices vary depending on the economic level of States, including specific procedures, equipment and facilities, as well as available resources. Good practices evolve with research developments, including new clinical trial results, progress in evidence based medicine and developments in radiotherapy technology. Quality audits involve the process of fact finding and comparing the findings against criteria for good practices in radiotherapy. Various issues and gaps may be identified by the auditors in the audit process, for example insufficiencies in structure, inadequacies in technology or deviations in procedures. This way the weak points or areas of concern are documented and recommendations for the audited centre are formulated that address these areas with the purpose of improving quality.

  15. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in radiotherapy: radiobiological mechanisms, preclinical and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a fastly developing field in preclinical and clinical cancer research. This review presents the current status of knowledge and discusses radiobiological mechanisms which may underly the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors combined with irradiation. Materials and methods: Preclinical and clinical results on combined targeting of the EGFR and irradiation from the literature and from this laboratory are reviewed. Focus is given to the radiobiological rationale of this approach and to endpoints of experimental radiotherapy. Results: Overexpression of the EGFR is associated with decreased local tumour control after radiotherapy, especially when the overall treatment time is long. Inhibition of the EGFR either alone or in combination with irradiation decreases the growth rate of tumours expressing this receptor. Preclinical data provide proof-of-principle that local tumour control may be improved by combining irradiation with C225 mAb. In a randomised phase III clinical trial, simultaneous irradiation and treatment with the EGFR antibody Cetuximab (Erbitux[reg]; C225) in head and neck cancer patients resulted in significantly improved locoregional tumour control and survival compared to curative irradiation alone. Acute skin reactions increased in the experimental arm. The underlying mechanisms of enhanced radiation effects of combined EGFR inhibition with irradiation and of the partly conflicting results in different studies are poorly understood. There is increasing evidence, that important intertumoral heterogeneity in the response to EGFR inhibition alone and combined with irradiation exists, which appears to be at least partly dependent on specific mutations of the receptor as well as of molecules that are involved in the intracellular signal transduction pathway. Conclusions and outlook: Further investigations at all levels of the translational research chain exploring the mechanisms of

  16. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  17. An improved fast and elitist multi-objective genetic algorithm-ANSGA-II for multi-objective optimization of inverse radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ruifen; Li Guoli; Song Gang; Zhao Pan; Lin Hui; Wu Aidong; Huang Chenyu; Wu Yican

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To provide a fast and effective multi-objective optimization algorithm for inverse radiotherapy treatment planning system. Methods: Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-NSGA-II is a representative of multi-objective evolutionary optimization algorithms and excels the others. The paper produces ANSGA-II that makes use of advantage of NSGA-II, and uses adaptive crossover and mutation to improve its flexibility; according the character of inverse radiotherapy treatment planning, the paper uses the pre-known knowledge to generate individuals of every generation in the course of optimization, which enhances the convergent speed and improves efficiency. Results: The example of optimizing average dose of a sheet of CT, including PTV, OAR, NT, proves the algorithm could find satisfied solutions in several minutes. Conclusions: The algorithm could provide clinic inverse radiotherapy treatment planning system with selection of optimization algorithms. (authors)

  18. Long-term results of ipsilateral radiotherapy for tonsil cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Ryoolk; Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept. of Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of ipsilateral radiotherapy for the patient with well lateralized tonsil cancer: not cross midline and <1 cm of tumor invasion into the soft palate or base of tongue. From 2003 to 2011, twenty patients with well lateralized tonsil cancer underwent ipsilateral radiotherapy. Nineteen patients had T1-T2 tumors, and one patient had T3 tumor; twelve patients had N0-N2a disease and eight patients had N2b disease. Primary surgery followed by radiotherapy was performed in fourteen patients: four of these patients received chemotherapy. Four patients underwent induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The remaining two patients received induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and definitive CCRT, respectively. No patient underwent radiotherapy alone. We analyzed the pattern of failure and complications. The median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 11 to 106 months) for surviving patients. One patient had local failure at tumor bed. There was no regional failure in contralateral neck, even in N2b disease. At five-year, local progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and progression-free survival rates were 95%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. One patient with treatment failure died, and the five-year overall survival rate was 95%. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia was found in one patient at least 6 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Ipsilateral radiotherapy is a reasonable treatment option for well lateralized tonsil cancer. Low rate of chronic xerostomia can be expected by sparing contralateral major salivary glands.

  19. Influence of the timing of surgery and postoperative radiotherapy on treatment results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The timing of surgery and postoperative radiotherapy - especially if combined with chemotherapy - has been a subject of interest over the past years. Methods: This analysis was based on a literature review of mostly retrospective publications. Data concerning the interval between surgery and radiotherapy were correlated with the locoregional control, incidence of distant metastases and prognosis of breast cancer, lung carcinoma, and head and neck carcinomas. Results and Conclusions: The reviewed data did not show a clear relationship of the time interval between surgery and start of radiotherapy and locoregional control. However, evaluation of the data was difficult, because in most publications, retrospective analyses were performed and other prognostically more relevant parameters may influence locoregional control stronger than the time interval. In patients with head and neck carcinomas, there is a negative effect of time interval between surgery and radiotherapy on local control if unfavorable factors exist, i.e., close surgical margins, unfavorable pathohistological parameters and low radiation dose. In patients with breast cancer who do not receive chemotherapy, there are inconsistent reports in the literature. If additional chemotherapy is necessary, the sequence surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy seems adequate. Although some data suggest that delaying the initiation of radiotherapy due to chemotherapy may increase the risk of local recurrences, there may, on the other hand, be an increased likelihood of systemic metastases, if radiotherapy is applied before chemotherapy. Concerning lung cancer, only one retrospective analysis exists suggesting a better survival of patients with an interval of more than 36 days between surgery and radiotherapy as compared to patients with a shorter interval. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiotherapy of degenerative joint disorders. Indication, technique and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keilholz, L.; Sauer, R.; Seegenschmiedt, M.H.; Alfred-Krupp-Krankenhaus, Essen

    1998-01-01

    From 1984 to 1994, 85 patients with painful osteoarthritis were treated. The mean follow-up was 4 (1 to 10) years. Seventy-three patients (103 joints) were available for long-term analysis: 17 patients (27 joints) with omarthrosis, 19 (20 joints) with rhizarthrosis, 31 (49 joints) with osteoarthritis of the knee and 6 patients (7 joints) with osteoarthritis of the hip. All patients were intensively pretreated over long time. Mean symptom duration prior to radiotherapy was 4 (1 to 10) years. Orthovoltage or linac photons were applied using some technical modifications depending upon the joint. Two radiotherapy series (6 x 1 Gy, total dose: 12 Gy, 3 weekly fractions) were prescribed. The interval between the 2 series was 6 weeks. The subjective pain profil was assessed prior to and 6 months after radiotherapy and at last follow-up. Forty-six (63%) patients (64 joints) achieved a reduction of pain symptoms; 16 of those had a 'major pain relief' and 14 'complete pain relief'. Large joints - knee and hip - responded better (64% each) than the rhizarthrosis (53%). All pain categories and grades and their combined pain score were significantly reduced. The pain reduction was mostly pronounced for the symptom 'pain at rest'. The orthopedic score correlated well with the subjective response of the patients. The thumb score improved in 11 (57%) joints, the shoulder score of Constant and Murley in 16 (59%), the Japonese knee score of Sasaki et al. in 33 (67%), the hip score of Harris in 5 (71%) joints. Only 9 of 19 patients which were treated to avoid surgery, had to be operated, and 3 of those received a total arthroplasty of the hip or knee. In multivariate analysis for the endpoint 'complete' or 'major pain relief' only the criterion 'symptom duration ≥2 years prior to radiotherapy' was an independent negative prognostic parameter. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  2. Early glottic carcinoma: results of treatment by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, R.; Williams, J.; Fisher, R.; Bridger, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to review the results of treating early stages glottic, squamous cell carcinoma by radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney. A retrospective review was carried out of all patients seen in the department from 1967 to 1994, inclusive. To be eligible, patients had to have newly diagnosed cancer and to have been treated with curative intent by radiotherapy alone. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients satisfied the eligibility requirements. The mean follow-up time was 12.2 years (maximum: 28 years). At 5 years the actuarial local control rate was 80% (84% for stage T 1 and 72% for T 2 ). The ultimate local control rate was 96%. The overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 73% and 52%, respectively. The risk of nodal recurrence was much higher after persisting disease or local recurrence. Our results confirm the high cure rates achieved with this modality of treatment and are comparable with those reported in the literature. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty. Ltd

  3. 3D in radiotherapy - pushing the dose envelope to improve cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibel, Steven A.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately one in four newly diagnosed cancer patients receive radiation in the initial attempt to cure the tumor. In terms of the 1996 cancer incidence data, this comprises more than 350,000 patients. Inasmuch as 25% of these patients initially relapse at primary tumor sites, the issue of improving local control remains a major challenge to the profession. Recent improvements in treatment planning and delivery have enhanced the precision of radiotherapy, but radiation resistance remains a critical issue that confounds the potential for cure in many tumors. Chemical and biological modifiers of the radiation response have provided an approach with clinical promise, but their therapeutic impact remains to be established. Hence, tumor dose escalation continues to represent the most viable approach to improve local control. Recent experience with new conformal radiotherapy techniques has demonstrated that significant tumor dose escalation is feasible with concomitant reduction in normal tissue toxicity. This experience provides the best hope for immediate improvement in the rates of local tumor control. It remains, nonetheless, unclear how far the dose envelope can be pushed and whether this would be sufficient to overcome the problem of local failure. It may turn out that biological modification of the radiation response may still be necessary to provide a maximal control in certain types of tumors

  4. Effects of low dose mitomycin C on experimental tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianzheng; Liang Shuo; Qu Yaqin; Pu Chunji; Zhang Haiying; Wu Zhenfeng; Wang Xianli

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possibility of low dose mitomycin C(MMC) as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. Methods: Change in tumor size tumor-bearing mice was measured. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine immune function of mice. Results: Low dose Mac's pretreatment reduced tumor size more markedly than did radiotherapy only. The immune function in mice given with low dose MMC 12h before radiotherapy was obviously higher than that in mice subjected to radiotherapy only (P<0.05), and was close to that in the tumor-bearing mice before radiotherapy. Conclusion: Low dose MMC could improve the radiotherapy effect. Pretreatment with low dose MMC could obviously improve the immune suppression state in mice caused by radiotherapy. The mechanism of its improvement of radiotherapeutic effect by low dose of MMC might be due to its enhancement of immune function and induction of adaptive response in tumor-bearing mice

  5. Results of radiotherapy with and without chemotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Yoshihiro

    1986-01-01

    From 1975 to 1983, a total of 51 cases of esophageal cancer with T2 ∼ T3 in TNM classification, were treated by radiotherapy alone or combined chemotherapy. All 51 patients received total dose of 60 ∼ 70 GY for 6 ∼ 8 weeks and 20 out of 51 were treated by radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (5FU or UFT and/or bleomycin or pepleomycin). The 2-year-survival rate was slightly better in patients treated by radiotherapy plus chemotherapy than in patients treated by radiotherapy alone, but this difference was not significant. (author)

  6. Therapeutic results in ovarian cancer after replacement of conventional radiotherapy by Co-60 irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, H.; Szalay, St.; Weghaupt, K.; Heckenthaler, W.; Vienna Univ.

    1981-01-01

    The use of Co-60 screen and pendular irradiation instead of conventional radiotherapy has brought about an improvement in the 5-year survival rate in patients with more advanced stages of ovarian cancer. Although the general side effects of Co-60 irradiation are considered to be more unpleasant than those of X-ray and radium therapy, severe, reversible or irreversible damage to the urogenital tract and intestinal organs was diminished by accurate planning of Co-60 therapy, so that these complications occurred less frequently than with conventional radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Results of radiotherapy for ureteric obstruction in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, M.; Miskowiak, J.; Rolff, H.

    1996-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of the records of 574 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer revealed 90 patients (16%) with ureteric obstruction; the obstruction was bilateral in 24%. The effect of radiotherapy was assessed in 55 patients with 68 obstructed kidneys. Six patients with eight obstructed kidneys required percutaneous nephrostomy or ureteric catheters in addition to radiotherapy. Drainage improved in only 20% of kidneys and the diverting catheter could be withdrawn permanently in only one (17%) of the diverted patients. The median survival was 11 months. Irradiation was followed by significant complications in 37 patients (67%). This raises doubts about the assumed beneficial effect of irradiation on ureteric obstruction due to muscle invasive bladder cancer. The short median survival of 11 months confirms that ureteric obstruction is a poor prognostic factor in muscle invasive bladder cancer. (au) 10 refs

  8. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  9. Experience of the Casablanca radiotherapy-oncology centre on radiotherapy in the treatment of the adult Hodgkin lymphoma; Experience du centre de radiotherapie-oncologie de Casablanca sur la radiotherapie dans le traitement du lymphome de Hodgkin de l'adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchbika, Z.; Benchakroun, N.; Sellai, N.; Jouhadi, H.; Tawfiq, N.; Sahraoui, S.; Benider, A. [Service radiotherapie-oncologie, CHU Ibn-Rochd, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of the local control, global survival and survival without recurrence, and also late complications, based on retrospective study over 8 years of 169 cases Hodgkin lymphoma in patients older than 18 (average age of 34) and who had been submitted to radiotherapy. Survival has been computed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. The authors notice that the recurrence rate is slightly higher than in the literature. During the considered period, radiotherapy was two-dimensional with higher doses than those corresponding to current standards. The improvement of radiotherapy techniques and the decrease of doses within the standards should improve the therapeutic results. Short communication

  10. Experiment on radiotherapy of postnatal mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhut'ko, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of radiotherapy of postnatal mastitis in 78 women are presented. It is shown that the radiotherapy is the method of choice. Application of radiotherapy at different stages of disease promotes either complete resolution of infiltration (1-2 irradiations) or stipulates the decrease in temperature, abatement of pains and improvement of general state (at the presence of purulent fusion of mammary tissue). X-ray therapy of postnatal mastitis has does not affect the lactational function of mammary gland

  11. Parotid gland-sparing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy results in less severe dry mouth in nasopharyngeal cancer patients: A dosimetric and clinical comparison with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, Y.-M.; Shih Rompin; Lin, Y.-S.; Su, W.-F.; Ku, C.-H.; Chang, C.-S.; Shueng, P.-W.; Hwang, J.-M.; Liu, D.-W.; Chao, H.-L.; Lin, H.-Y.; Chang, L.-P.; Shum, W.-Y.; Lin, C.-S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study examined the efficacy of parotid gland sparing of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) compared with conventional radiotherapy for NPC patients. Both the dose given to the parotids and clinical assessment of dry mouth were conducted. Materials and methods: Dry mouth was assessed for 108 patients treated with conventional technique and 72 treated with 3DCRT. Dose analysis was performed in 48 patients of the 3DCRT group. A dose of 70 Gy was given to the midplane in conventional radiotherapy and to 90% isodose volume in 3DCRT. Prognostic factors affecting the severity of dry mouth were analyzed using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE). Results: In the 3DCRT group about 50% of the patients' parotid glands received less than 25 Gy. Parallel analysis of dry mouth shows a significant decrease in the incidence of severe xerostomia after 3DCRT. The proportion of patients without dry mouth was also significantly higher in the 3DCRT group than the conventional group at 1-3 years after completion of radiotherapy. Although 3DCRT delivered a higher dose to the tumor, it spared the parotid gland significantly better than the conventional treatment. Late toxicities were mostly similar between the 2 groups while local control in T4 patients and survival were improved for 3DCRT. Conclusion: Dosimetrically and clinically 3DCRT is better than conventional technique regarding parotid gland protection

  12. External radiotherapy in macular degeneration: Our technique, dosimetric calculation, and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akmansu, M.; Dirican, Bahar; Oeztuerk, Berrin; Egehan, Ibrahim; Subasi, Mahmut; Or, Meral

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine the toxicity and efficacy of external-beam radiotherapy in patients with age-related subfoveal neovascularization. Methods and Materials: Between January 1996 and September 1996, 25 patients with a mean age of 70.5 (60-84) years were enrolled. All patients underwent fluorescein angiographic evaluation and documentation of their neovascular disease prior to irradiation. A total of 25 patients were treated with a total dose of 12 Gy in 6 fractions over 8 days. We used a lens-sparing technique and patients were treated with a single lateral 6-MV photon beam. To assess the risk of radiation carcinogenesis after treatment of age-related subfoveal neovascularization, we estimated the effective dose for a standard patient on the basis of tissue-weighting factors as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The calculations were made with TLD on a male randophantom. The lens dose was found to be 0.217 Gy per fraction. Results: No significant acute morbidity was noted. Visual acuity was maintained or improved in 76% and 80% of treated patients at their 1- and 3-month follow-up examinations, respectively. On angiographic imaging, there was stabilization of subfoveal neovascular membranes in 23 patients (92%) at 3 months after irradiation. Conclusion: Our observations on these 25 patients in this study indicate that many patients will have improved or stable vision after radiotherapy treatment with low-dose irradiation

  13. Survey of potential improvements during the course of the radiotherapy treatment. A patient questionnaire; Erfassung moeglicher Verbesserungen im Ablauf der Strahlentherapie. Eine Patientenbefragung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momm, Felix; Jooss, David; Adebahr, Sonja; Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Heinemann, Felix; Kirste, Simon; Messmer, Marc-Benjamin; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Xander, Carola J.; Becker, Gerhild [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Palliativeinheit

    2011-11-15

    In the context of quality assurance, increasing demands are placed on the whole radiotherapy treatment process. The patients directly concerned generally do not realize most aspects of the quality assurance program (e.g., additional safety checks) during their daily therapy. It was the aim of this study to systematically ask patients about potential improvements during the course of radiotherapy treatment from their own perspective. In the defined time span (1 month), 624 radiotherapy patients (600 questionnaires were returned, 96.2%) were interviewed using a questionnaire newly developed to inquire about several aspects of their treatment. Furthermore, they were asked for their specific needs and suggestions for improvements that could be made during the course of radiotherapy treatment. Overall, the patients were satisfied with the course of their radiotherapy treatment and with patient care. As an example, about 90% agreed with the statement: ''My first contact with the radiation oncology unit proceeded with kindness and competence so that I was given the impression that I will be well cared for in this clinic.'' Considering the organization of the course of radiotherapy, a large majority of patients attached great value to set appointments for the therapy fractions. A main point of criticism was waiting times or delays caused by servicing or machine failures. Small, low cost improvements as music in the therapy room were considered as important as expensive measures (e.g., daylight in the therapy room). The patients emphasized the importance of staff friendliness. The situation of radiotherapy patients was, in general, satisfactory. Future improvements can be mainly expected from smooth organisation of both planning and treatment which can be achieved by electronic scheduling systems. Many results of the survey could be easily implemented in daily practice. In matters of organization radiation oncology with its complex procedures can be used

  14. Carcinomas of the Paranasal Sinuses and Nasal Cavity Treated With Radiotherapy at a Single Institution Over Five Decades: Are We Making Improvement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Daly, Megan E.; Bucci, M. Kara; Xia Ping; Akazawa, Clayton C.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Weinberg, Vivian; Garcia, Joaquin; Lee, Nancy Y.; Kaplan, Michael J.; El-Sayed, Ivan; Eisele, David W.; Fu, Karen K.; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical outcomes of patients with carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity according to decade of radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2005, 127 patients with sinonasal carcinoma underwent radiotherapy with planning and delivery techniques available at the time of treatment. Fifty-nine patients were treated by conventional radiotherapy; 45 patients by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy; and 23 patients by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Eighty-two patients (65%) were treated with radiotherapy after gross total tumor resection. Nineteen patients (15%) received chemotherapy. The most common histology was squamous cell carcinoma (83 patients). Results: The 5-year estimates of overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival for the entire patient population were 52%, 62%, and 54%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to decade of treatment or radiotherapy technique (p > 0.05, for all). The 5-year overall survival rate for patients treated in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s was 46%, 56%, 51%, 53%, and 49%, respectively (p = 0.23). The observed incidence of severe (Grade 3 or 4) late toxicity was 53%, 45%, 39%, 28%, and 16% among patients treated in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, respectively (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Although we did not detect improvements in disease control or overall survival for patients treated over time, the incidence of complications has significantly declined, thereby resulting in an improved therapeutic ratio for patients with carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity

  15. Results of radiotherapy and a combined radio- and chemotherapy for hypopharyngeal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariya, Yasushi; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Takekawa, Shoichi; Yodono, Hiraku; Mori, Isao; Shinkawa, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Sadao; Miyano, Kazuo; Kattou, Keiichi.

    1992-01-01

    We analyzed the results of radiotherapy in 36 patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma. The overall 2-year and 5-year survival rates were 45.3% and 31.1%, respectively. For 23 patients given radical irradiation, the corresponding figures were 37.8% and 28.3%. However, in 16 patients receiving a combined therapy of radical irradiation and chemotherapy, mainly an intraarterial injection of cisplatin, the survivals were better; the 2-year survival rate was 50.0% and four patients have survived for more than three years without recurrence. In managing patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma, this combined therapy would improve therapeutic outcome and also assist in larynx preservation. (J.P.N.)

  16. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: preliminary results with the CyberKnife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier; Prevost, Bernard; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dubus, Francois; Sarrazin, Thierry

    2009-04-01

    In the field of radiation oncology, equipment for fractionated radiotherapy and single-dose radiosurgery has become increasingly accurate, together with the introduction of robotized treatments. A robot is a device that can be programmed to carry out accurate, repeated and adjusted tasks in a given environment. Treatment of extracranial lesions involves taking into account organ mobility (tumor and healthy tissue) whilst retaining the ability to stereotactically locate the target. New imaging techniques (single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET)) provide further relevant information to slice images (computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI) for target definition. Hypo-fractionated treatments can only be used for curative treatment if the target is accurately defined and tracked during treatment. The CyberKnife is a non-invasive system of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. For intracranial lesions treated by single-dose radiosurgery, it has been used to treat meningioma, acoustic neuromas, pituitary adenoma, metastases, arteriovenous malformations and refractory pain (trigeminal neuralgia). More than 10,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Currently, the most significant developments are in the field of extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (lung, liver, reirradiation, prostate, etc.). Clinical results obtained in the CyberKnife Nord-Ouest program after 1 year of experience are presented. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Improving external beam radiotherapy by combination with internal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, A; Koi, L; Zöphel, K; Sihver, W; Kotzerke, J; Baumann, M; Krause, M

    2015-07-01

    The efficacy of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is dose dependent, but the dose that can be applied to solid tumour lesions is limited by the sensitivity of the surrounding tissue. The combination of EBRT with systemically applied radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising approach to increase efficacy of radiotherapy. Toxicities of both treatment modalities of this combination of internal and external radiotherapy (CIERT) are not additive, as different organs at risk are in target. However, advantages of both single treatments are combined, for example, precise high dose delivery to the bulk tumour via standard EBRT, which can be increased by addition of RIT, and potential targeting of micrometastases by RIT. Eventually, theragnostic radionuclide pairs can be used to predict uptake of the radiotherapeutic drug prior to and during therapy and find individual patients who may benefit from this treatment. This review aims to highlight the outcome of pre-clinical studies on CIERT and resultant questions for translation into the clinic. Few clinical data are available until now and reasons as well as challenges for clinical implementation are discussed.

  18. Radiobiological research needed for the improvement of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of radiation in therapy of cancer and diagnosis of other diseases has been practised since the discovery of X-ray. Radiotherapy of cancer was founded on the simple observation that radiations can kill tumour cells. As the science of radiobiology developed, some of its concepts were slowly incorporated in the therapeutic use of radiations, and this led to improve patient treatment. However, although radiobiology continued to progress, a communication gap built up between practising clinicians and radiobiologists. The purpose of this symposium was to help bridge the gap and to encourage co-operation between radiotherapists and radiobiologists. Fractionated dose regimes for external cobalt or X-ray therapy were extensively discussed. Of particular concern was whether acute dose rates which could reduce treatment time per patient would be favourable from the point of view of side effects on normal tissues such as skin, spinal cord, lungs, kidneys and other organs. Also discussed was whether high doses followed by small dose fractionation would lead to a therapeutic gain. New information was presented that during the fractionation period, normal cells may have better recovery potential than the tumour cells, and in view of this new information, the present practice of radiotherapy using fractionated doses may be further improved. The failures of radiotherapy are mainly due to the radioresistant hypoxic cells which escape radiation damage. These could be destroyed with the use of high LET radiations, super fractionated dose schedules or radiosensitisers specifically active towards hypoxic cells. Chemical radiosensitisers have now become available and have proved as effective as neutrons in their therapeutic gains. Clinical trials are underway in the UK and Romania on these radiosensitisers. One that deserves special mention is a nitroimidazole derivative, RO-07-0582, which has had extensive in vitro and in vivo studies, and clinical trials with human patients

  19. Adaptive-Predictive Organ Localization Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Improved Accuracy in External Beam Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Methods and Materials: Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30 minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's 'library,' and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. Results: A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Conclusions: Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens.

  20. The Results of Combined External Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in the Management of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Suh, Hyun Suk; Kim, Jun Hee; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Sung Rok; Kim, Re Hwe

    1996-01-01

    therapy revealed more frequent leukopenia and nausea/vomiting than radiation alone group, but degree of side effects was only mild to moderate. Conclusion : The combined external radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer appears to improve the response rate, local control rate and survival rate, but the improvement was not statistically significant. The side effects of combined modalities were mild to moderate without significant morbidity. Therefore it may be worthwhile to continue the present combined external radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the management of advanced esophageal cancer to confirm our result

  1. Treatment Result of Postoperative Radiotherapy of Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Charn Il; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Lee, Hyo Pyo; Shin, Myon Woo; Kim, Jung Soo

    1985-01-01

    The early carcinoma of the uterine cervix may be treated by either radical surgery or radical radiotherapy according to the patient characteristics, and the survival is high with either treatment. But, because of the size of the lesion, metastasis to lymph nodes, and vascular space invasion by tumor have all been shown to influence recurrence and survival, postoperative radiotherapy may be considered as their histopathologic finding after radical surgery. However, there are still debates on the increasing survival rates with postoperative radiotherapy. Two hundreds and three patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy from February 1979 to September 1982 in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University were analyzed and following results were obtained. 3-year actuarial survival rate and 3-year disease free survival rate were 83.4% and 73.4% respectively and 3-year actuarial survival rates by stages were 90.7% for I B, 69.6% for II A, and 85.2% for II b. The overall acute complication rate was 57.6%; tolerable cases was 50.2% and severe cases was 7.4%, Late complication rate was 7.9% and the major late complication were intestinal obstruction, aggravated urinary symptom, radiation cystitis in ORDER of frequency

  2. Results of a prospective randomised trial comparing conventional radiotherapy to split course bifractionated radiation therapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, Jamel; Toumi, Nabil; Siala, Wissem; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Drira, Mohamed Mokthar; Frikha, Mounir

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is generally responsive to radiation therapy. However therapeutic results after conventional radiotherapy remain relatively poor especially for patients with locoregional advanced NPC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a split course bifractionated radiotherapy regimen in a phase III randomised trial. Patients and methods: From January 1997 to September 2003, 154 patients with M0 histologically proven NPC were treated in our institution. They were staged according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer - International Union Against Cancer (AJCC-UICC) 1986 TNM classification. Patients with locally advanced nodal disease (N2-N3) received induction chemotherapy. All patients were randomised to receive either conventional radiotherapy at 2 Gy/fraction/day, 5 days/week to 70 Gy/7 weeks or split course bifractionated radiotherapy at 1.6 Gy/fraction, twice daily, 5 days/week to 70.4 Gy/6 weeks. Response and toxicity were evaluated according to the WHO and RTOG criteria. Results: Patients were well balanced between the two arms. The complete remission rate was 91% in conventional radiotherapy arm and 93% in bifractionated radiotherapy arm (p = 0.3). There was more grade II-III skin fibrosis in experimental arm with a 5 year actuarial probability of 66% vs 52% (p = 0.04). Locoregional and distant relapses occurred in 34% of cases in conventional arm and 38% in experimental arm (p = 0.28). With a median follow-up of 56 months, the 5 year overall survival and the disease free survival rates were, respectively (71% and 61%), in conventional arm and (62% and 60%) in bifractionated arm, the difference being statistically non significant. Comments: The present trial comparing conventional radiotherapy to a split course bifractionated radiation therapy failed to demonstrate significant improvement in locoregional control and survival in experimental arm which was associated with more grade II-III skin

  3. Improving DNA double-strand repair inhibitor KU55933 therapeutic index in cancer radiotherapy using nanoparticle drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xi; Lara, Haydee; Wagner, Kyle T.; Saripalli, Srinivas; Hyder, Syed Nabeel; Foote, Michael; Sethi, Manish; Wang, Edina; Caster, Joseph M.; Zhang, Longzhen; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2015-11-01

    Radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment. Because of its importance, there has been high interest in developing agents and strategies to further improve the therapeutic index of radiotherapy. DNA double-strand repair inhibitors (DSBRIs) are among the most promising agents to improve radiotherapy. However, their clinical translation has been limited by their potential toxicity to normal tissue. Recent advances in nanomedicine offer an opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the proof of principle by developing and evaluating nanoparticle (NP) formulations of KU55933, a DSBRI. We engineered a NP formulation of KU55933 using nanoprecipitation method with different lipid polymer nanoparticle formulation. NP KU55933 using PLGA formulation has the best loading efficacy as well as prolonged drug release profile. We demonstrated that NP KU55933 is a potent radiosensitizer in vitro using clonogenic assay and is more effective as a radiosensitizer than free KU55933 in vivo using mouse xenograft models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Western blots and immunofluorescence showed NP KU55933 exhibited more prolonged inhibition of DNA repair pathway. In addition, NP KU55933 leads to lower skin toxicity than KU55933. Our study supports further investigations using NP to deliver DSBRIs to improve cancer radiotherapy treatment.

  4. A prospective and randomized study of radiotherapy, sequential chemotherapy radiotherapy and concomitant chemo therapy-radiotherapy in unresectable non small cell carcinoma of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta Anirban

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Treatment of advanced Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC often produces dismal results. Combination of available treatment modalities has reportedly improved the outcome. A prospectively randomized trial was conducted, comparing combined treatment modalities versus radiotherapy alone, in treatment of unresectable NSCLC. Materials and Methods: A total of 103 patients were randomized to three groups. In group ′A′, 32 patients received radiotherapy alone (6500 cGy/30 fraction. In group ′B′, 35 patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Cisplatin 80 mg/m2 on day 1 and Etoposide 100 mg/m day 1-3 intravenously q3 weeks for 3 cycles, followed by radiotherapy (6000 cGy/30 fractions and 3 more cycles of Chemotherapy, with the same regimen. In group ′C′, 36 patients received radiotherapy (5000 cGy/25 fractions with concurrent chemotherapy (ciplatin 20 mg/m2 + Etoposide 75 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1-5 and day 22-26, followed by 2 more cycles of chemotherapy,q3 weeks with the same regimen. Results: Initial treatment responses were significantly higher in group ′B′ ( P P Conclusion: Addition of chemotherapy with radiation in unresectable NSCLC improves response rates, time to tumour progression and disease free survival, though the same effect is not translated in overall survival.

  5. Influence of peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration on the result of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Beiwa; Zhang Guofen; Zhao Yutian; Wang Zhenwu; Xu Min; Hu Yulin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration on the radiotherapy result of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: From January 1989 to December 1998, 304 patients with pathologically confirmed NPC received radical radiation. There were 209 males and 95 females. The ages ranged from 16 to 77 years with a median of 42. All patients were irradiated by 60 Co or 6 MV external beam with a total dose of 64 - 76 Gy for the primary tumor and 46 - 77 Gy for the cervical lymph nodes. The peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration for all patients was measured before, during and after radiotherapy. These patients were divided into three groups according to the peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration before radiotherapy: anemia ( 160 g/L), and into two groups according to the change in the peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration during radiotherapy as increased and decreased groups. Results: All patients were followed with a follow-up rate of 90.5%. The peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration had a significant effect on the survival of NPC patients. Its decrease or increase during radiotherapy affected the survival and local control rates of NPC patients. Conclusions: The change of peripheral hemoglobin concentration affecting the oxygen content in the blood, can influence the local control and survival rates of NPC patients. Increase results in higher survival

  6. Modern indications for post-mastectomy radiotherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvanova, V.

    2002-01-01

    Before the effective adjuvant chemotherapy, post-mastectomy chemotherapy was usually used in breast cancer patients. The interest in this approach was revived after a number of studies were successful in identifying patient subgroups with 20 and 40 percent of locoregional relapses following mastectomy and chemotherapy. These subgroups including women presenting 4 and more positive lymph odes or an advanced primary tumor (measuring 5 cm or more, or a neoplasm invading skin or contiguous musculature) are taken to be the most likely to benefit from a course od post-mastectomy radiotherapy. Recent randomized trials demonstrate adequate tumor control and heightened overall survival rates when mastectomy is supplemented by radiotherapy. A currently performed meta-analysis of over 22000 women comparing groups with and without adjuvant radiotherapy point to an improvement in locoregional tumor control rates from 70 to 90 percent. The result of a 20-year follow-up study document a significant improvement of overall and disease-specific survivalship. These are findings lending support to the concept that improving locoregional tumor control rates in breast cancer may account for an increase of overall survivorship. Regardless of a rather short follow-up of women undergoing updated radiotherapy techniques, the preliminary results do not show increased incidence of vascular death, but pos-mastectomy radiotherapy continues to be associated with an elevated hand edema risk. For the time being, the role of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in women presenting 1 to 3 positive axillary lymph nodes remains not well enough clarified, and needs further evaluation in randomized clinical trials. (authors)

  7. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, Sylvain; Bouchard, Myriam; Germain, Isabelle; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Roy, Rene; Gingras, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements

  8. Does compliance to patient safety tasks improve and sustain when radiotherapy treatment processes are standardized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Pascale A M; Houben, Ruud; Benders, Jos; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Vandijck, Dominique; Marneffe, Wim; Backes, Huub; Groothuis, Siebren

    2014-10-01

    To realize safe radiotherapy treatment, processes must be stabilized. Standard operating procedures (SOP's) were expected to stabilize the treatment process and perceived task importance would increase sustainability in compliance. This paper presents the effects on compliance to safety related tasks of a process redesign based on lean principles. Compliance to patient safety tasks was measured by video recording of actual radiation treatment, before (T0), directly after (T1) and 1.5 years after (T2) a process redesign. Additionally, technologists were surveyed on perceived task importance and reported incidents were collected for three half-year periods between 2007 and 2009. Compliance to four out of eleven tasks increased at T1, of which improvements on three sustained (T2). Perceived importance of tasks strongly correlated (0.82) to compliance rates at T2. The two tasks, perceived as least important, presented low base-line compliance, improved (T1), but relapsed at T2. The reported near misses (patient-level not reached) on accelerators increased (P improvements sustained after 1.5 years, indicating increased stability. Perceived importance of tasks correlated positively to compliance and sustainability. Raising the perception of task importance is thus crucial to increase compliance. The redesign resulted in increased willingness to report incidents, creating opportunities for patient safety improvement in radiotherapy treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Results of a national quality audit programme for radiotherapy centers in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solimanian, A.; Ghafoori, M.

    1998-01-01

    The SSDL of Iran has established a quality audit programme for radiotherapy centers in the country. Most of the radiotherapy departments are now audited annually by the SSDL dosimetry team. During the site visits, beam characteristics of the teletherapy units are determined or tested. This report presents the results of the on-site output measurements conducted during the period 1985-1996 and demonstrates the role of traceability of absorbed dose to water determinations in hospitals to the SSDL standard. (author)

  10. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inuyama, Yukio; Fujii, Masato; Tanaka, Juichi; Takaoka, Tetsuro; Hosoda, Hyonosuke; Kawaura, Mitsuhiro; Toji, Masao

    1988-01-01

    There are 4 modalities of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy which include (1) concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, (2) sequential use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy (pre-radiation chemotherapy), (3) pre-radiation chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiation and chemotherapy, and (4) alternating use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy based upon Looney's hypothesis. We studied concurrent use of radiotherapy and UFT by means of animal experimentation and clinical trials. The results obtained revealed that UFT was a most suitable agent together with 5-fluorouracil for concurrent application of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy including pre-radiation chemotherapy was also studied in cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. From the results, it seemed desirable to use cisplatin and bleomycin analogs sequentially in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy should be studied successively to improve local tumor control rates and prevent distant metastases. For future perspectives, new trials of alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy based upon Looney's hypothesis seem necessary. (author)

  11. Treatment results of radical radiotherapy in uterine cervix cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Bo Kyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Shin, Seong Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kang, Min Kyu; Ahn, Yong Chan [Samsung Medical center, sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the treatment results, prognostic factors, and complication rates after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with uterine cervix cancer who were treated with curative aim. Of 269 cervix cancer patients treated at the department of radiation oncology, Samsung Medical Center from September 1994 to July 1998, the 106 who were treated with radical radiotherapy were analyzed. The median age was 61 years (range 22 to 89). All patients except 4 with carcinoma in situ (CIS) were given external beam radiotherapy (range 30.6 {approx} 50.4 Gy to whole pelvis) and HDR brachytherapy. The common regimens of HDR brachytherapy were a total dose of 24 {approx} 28 Gy with 6 {approx} 7 fractions to point A at two fractions per week. The median overall treatment time was 55 days (range 44 to 104) in patients given both external beam radiotherapy and HDR brachytherapy. Early response of radiotherapy were evaluated by gynecologic examination and follow-up MRI 1 month after radiotherapy. Treatment responses were complete remission in 72 patients, partial response in 33 and no response in 1. The overall survival (OS) rate of all patients was 82%, and 73%, and the disease free survival (DFS) rate was 72%, and 69%, at 3, and 5 years, respectively. The pelvic control rate (PCR) was 79% at both 3 and 5 years. According to the FIGO stage, 3 and 5 year OS were 100% and 50% in CIS/IA, 100% in 100% in IB, 83% and 69% in IIA, 87% and 80% in IIB, and 62% and 62% in III, respectively. The 3 year OS in 4 patients with stage IVA was 100%. Three-year DFS were 80% in CIS/IA, 88% in IB, 100% in IIA, 64% in IIB, 58% in III, and 75% in IVA. Three-year PCR were 100% in CIS/IA, 94% in IB, 100% in IIA, 84% in IIB, 69% in III, and 50% in IVA. By univariate analysis, FIGO stage and treatment response were significant factors for OS. The significant factors for DFS were age, FIGO stage, treatment response and overall treatment time (OTT). For pelvic control rate

  12. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage I/II seminoma: results for 212 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Glenn S.; Venkatesan, Varagur M.; Ago, C. Tetteh; Radwan, John S.; Dar, A. Rashid; Winquist, Eric W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review of patients with Stage I and II seminoma treated at a regional cancer center was performed to assess the long term efficacy and toxicity associated with post operative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1950 and 1995, 212 patients seen at the London Regional Cancer Centre received adjuvant radiotherapy following orchiectomy for Stage I (169) and II (43) seminoma. Median follow-up for the group was 7.5 years. Results: Progression free, cause specific, and overall survival were 95%, 98%, and 95% at 5 years, and 94%, 98%, and 94% at 10 years respectively. An increased risk of failure was noted among patients with bulky Stage II disease. No other prognostic factors for relapse were identified. Late toxicity was uncommon with only 12/212 (6%) developing any late GI toxicity potentially attributable to radiotherapy. The incidence of second malignancies (excluding second testicular tumors) was 6/212 (actuarial:1%, 1%, 6% at 5,10,15 years respectively). There was a trend toward increased acute complications for patients treated with larger volumes of radiation. No prognostic factors associated with increased risk of late toxicity or second malignancy were identified, likely a consequence of the small number of these events. Conclusion: Survival and toxicity were comparable to that reported in the literature. Post-operative radiotherapy remains a safe and efficacious adjuvant treatment for Stage I and early Stage II seminoma

  13. National arrangements for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    After a presentation of several letters exchanged between the French health ministry and public agencies in charge of public health or nuclear safety after a radiotherapy accident in Epinal, this report comments the evolution of needs in cancerology care and the place given to radiotherapy. It outlines the technological and organisational evolution of radiotherapy and presents the distribution of radiotherapy equipment, of radio-therapists and other radiotherapy professionals in France. Within the context of radiotherapy accidents which occurred in 2007, it presents the regulatory arrangements which aimed at improving the safety, short term and middle term arrangements which are needed to support and structure radiotherapy practice quality. It stresses the fact that the system will deeply evolve by implementing a radiotherapy vigilance arrangement and a permanent follow-on and adaptation plan based on surveys and the creation of a national committee

  14. The treatment Results of Radiotherapy for nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong Chul; Sohn, Seung Chang; Suh, Hyun Suk; Jaun, Woo Ki; Kim, Dong Soon; Sohn, Kwang Hyun

    1986-01-01

    From Nov. 1983 through Jan. 1986, 43 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated by radiation therapy at Inje Medical College Paik Hospital. 38 patients were available for the analysis of this study. 33 patients received definite irradiation with curative intent, while 5 patients received postoperative irradiation. Chemotherapy was added in 12 patients before, during and after radio-therapy. 28 patients were squamous cell carcinoma and 10 patients were adenocarcinoma. There were 29 men and 9 women (median age, 58 years; range 34 to 74 years). Stage I was 1 patient, Stage 11, 7 patient, and Stage 111, 30 patients. Among 33 patients who received radiotherapy with curative intent, follow up radiological study revealed complete response in 12 patients (36%), partial response, in 9 patients (27%), and minimal response, in 5 patients (15%), while 7 patients (21%) were nonresponders. Median survival for all patients was 6.9 months; squamous cell carcinoma, 7.3 months, adenocarcinoma, 5.9 months. Responders survived median 7 months, while nonresponders survived median 1.9 months. Improved complete response rate and survival were shown in high radiation dose group. As prognostic factors, age, initial performance status, sex, histology and tumor location were evaluated

  15. National arrangements for radiotherapy; Mesures nationales pour la radiotherapie. Travail collectif des missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    After a presentation of several letters exchanged between the French health ministry and public agencies in charge of public health or nuclear safety after a radiotherapy accident in Epinal, this report comments the evolution of needs in cancerology care and the place given to radiotherapy. It outlines the technological and organisational evolution of radiotherapy and presents the distribution of radiotherapy equipment, of radio-therapists and other radiotherapy professionals in France. Within the context of radiotherapy accidents which occurred in 2007, it presents the regulatory arrangements which aimed at improving the safety, short term and middle term arrangements which are needed to support and structure radiotherapy practice quality. It stresses the fact that the system will deeply evolve by implementing a radiotherapy vigilance arrangement and a permanent follow-on and adaptation plan based on surveys and the creation of a national committee.

  16. Results of radical radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the eyelid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Kuroda, Yuuki; Murakami, Naoya; Morota, Madoka; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sumi, Minako; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results of radical radiotherapy by electron beams for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the eyelid and to find the possible prognostic factors. Materials and Methods: Records of 38 patients with histologically confirmed SCC of the eyelid who underwent electron beam radiation therapy between 1964 and 2010 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. Median tumor size was 15 mm (range, 3–40 mm). T stage was T1 in three, T2a in six, T2b in 14, and T3a in 15 patients. Four patients had nodal metastasis. Of the 38 patients, 14 had relapsed disease after prior treatment. Median radiation dose was 60.0 Gy (range, 45.0–70.4 Gy). Median follow-up was 72.5 months (range, 2.0–369 months). Results: 5-year local relapse-free, nodal relapse-free, distant metastasis-free and relapse-free rates for all patients were 71.8%, 77.5%, 90.6% and 58.0%, respectively. In seven patients, lymph node metastases occurred in 11 faciocervical regions. The 5-year overall survival was 79.5%. T stage and radiation dose expressed in EQD 2 Gy tended to have impacts on local control. Relapsed patients showed unfavorable local relapse-free rate, however this was without statistical significance. Of the 14 patients who died, 12 succumbed to concurrent diseases. Grade 3 or greater severe late morbidities (CTCAE ver4.0) were observed in nine patients. Due to the morbidities, two patients lost their vision. Conclusion: Radical radiotherapy for SCC of the eyelid yielded good results and could be a treatment option. Whether radiation-dose escalation could improve local control in advanced T stages and relapsed patients needs further study

  17. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  18. Retrospective study of 48 cases of post-operative radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mnejja, W.; Yahiaoui, S.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J.; Ghorbel, A.; Frikha, M.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a study which aimed at assessing therapeutic results after post-operative radiotherapy of 48 patients suffering from head and neck cancers. The analysis is made in terms of cancer control, survival without recurrence and global survival. The post-operative radiotherapy improves the disease control rate. Ganglionary attack and capsular failure are survival prognosis factors. The concomitant association of chemo-therapy and radiotherapy should improve therapeutic results. Short communication

  19. Locally Advanced Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Impact of Pre-Radiotherapy Hemoglobin Level and Interruptions During Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Stoehr, Monika; Kazic, Nadja; Hakim, Samer G.; Walz, Annette; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Stage IV head and neck cancer patients carry a poor prognosis. Clear understanding of prognostic factors can help to optimize care for the individual patient. This study investigated 11 potential prognostic factors including pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level and interruptions during radiotherapy for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC) after radiochemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven factors were investigated in 153 patients receiving radiochemotherapy for Stage IV squamous cell head and neck cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor site, grading, T stage, N stage, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, surgery, chemotherapy type, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with KPS 90-100 (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.93; p = .012), hemoglobin ≥12 g/dL (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.53; p = .048), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.15-5.78; p = .021). Improved LC was significantly associated with lower T stage (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.16-4.63; p = .013), hemoglobin ≥12 g/dL (RR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.92-9.09; p 1 week. It appears important to avoid anemia and radiotherapy interruptions to achieve the best treatment results

  20. Adjuvant sequential chemo and radiotherapy improves the oncological outcome in high risk endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Mauro; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto; De Ponti, Elena; Grassi, Tommaso; Ponti, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the impact of sequential chemoradiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer (EC). Methods Two hundred fifty-four women with stage IB grade 3, II and III EC (2009 FIGO staging), were included in this retrospective study. Results Stage I, II, and III was 24%, 28.7%, and 47.3%, respectively. Grade 3 tumor was 53.2% and 71.3% had deep myometrial invasion. One hundred sixty-five women (65%) underwent pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy and 58 (22.8%) had nodal metastases. Ninety-eight women (38.6%) underwent radiotherapy, 59 (23.2%) chemotherapy, 42 (16.5%) sequential chemoradiotherapy, and 55 (21.7%) were only observed. After a median follow-up of 101 months, 78 women (30.7%) relapsed and 91 women (35.8%) died. Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved survival rates in women who did not undergo nodal evaluation (disease-free survival [DFS], p=0.040; overall survival [OS], p=0.024) or pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy (DFS, p=0.008; OS, p=0.021). Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved both DFS (p=0.015) and OS (p=0.014) in stage III, while only a trend was found for DFS (p=0.210) and OS (p=0.102) in stage I-II EC. In the multivariate analysis, only age (≤65 years) and sequential chemoradiotherapy were statistically related to the prognosis. Conclusion Sequential chemoradiotherapy improves survival rates in high risk EC compared with chemotherapy or radiotherapy alone, in particular in stage III. PMID:26197768

  1. Radiotherapy in the management of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Koh-ichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Morita, Kazuo; Osanai, Hajime; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Hinoda, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    To report the results of radiotherapy for patients with failure, adverse reactions or relative contraindications to the use of steroids or immunosuppressants, by using newly developed quantitative indexes. Fourteen female and six male patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with radiotherapy between 1989 and 1996. Prior to radiotherapy, eight patients received treatment with prednisone, four received immunosuppressants and four received a combination of both. Four patients with contraindications to steroids were initially managed with radiotherapy. Most of the patients received a dose of 24-28 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. We used the newly developed motility limitation index to assess extraocular motility. Treatment was well tolerated. There have been no late complications. All 12 patients with soft tissue signs such as edema, irritation, tearing and pain were improved. Proptosis did not improve or improved only slightly, 3 mm at best. However, proptosis in all but two has been stabilized and has not deteriorated in the follow-up period. Most of the patients have experienced an improvement of eye-muscle motility. Extraocular muscles that work for elevation were impaired more severely than the other muscles and this tended to remain. Of the 16 patients using steroids before or when radiotherapy was initiated, 15 were tapered off and only one patient required additional steroids, thus sparing the majority from steroid adverse reactions. Radiotherapy was effective in preventing exacerbations of active inflammatory ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves' disease with minimal morbidity and thus eliminated the adverse reactions associated with protracted corticosteroid use. The newly developed motility limitation index was useful in detecting delicate changes in motility of individual extraocular muscles. (author)

  2. Does chronomodulated radiotherapy improve pathological response in locally advanced rectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Tim; Buchanan, Grant; Rangiah, David; Davis, Ian; Yip, Desmond; Chua, Yu Jo; Rich, Tyvin; Elsaleh, Hany

    2017-01-01

    The predominant mode of radiation-induced cell death for solid tumours is mitotic catastrophe, which is in part dependent on sublethal damage repair being complete at around 6 h. Circadian variation appears to play a role in normal cellular division, and this could influence tumour response of radiation treatment depending on the time of treatment delivery. We tested the hypothesis that radiation treatment later in the day may improve tumour response and nodal downstaging in rectal cancer patients treated neoadjuvantly with radiation therapy. Recruitment was by retrospective review of 267 rectal cancer patients treated neoadjuvantly in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Canberra Hospital between January 2010 and November 2015. One hundred and fifty-five patients met the inclusion criteria for which demographic, pathological and imaging data were collected, as well as the time of day patients received treatment with each fraction of radiotherapy. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package R with nonparametric methods of significance for all tests set at p rectal cancer performed later in the day coupled with a longer time period to surgical resection may improve pathological tumour response rates and nodal downstaging. A prospective study in chronomodulated radiotherapy in this disease is warranted.

  3. Results of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens De Lichtenberg, Mette; Miskowiak, J; Rolff, H

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer.......To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer....

  4. Role of palliative radiotherapy in brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S Bilimagga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain metastases are a common manifestation of systemic cancer and exceed primary brain tumors in number and are a significant cause of neurologic problems. They affect 20-40% of all cancer patients. Aggressive management of brain metastases is effective in both symptom palliation and prolonging the life. Radiotherapy has a major role to play in the management of brain metastases. AIM: The aim of the study was to know the outcome of palliative radiotherapy in symptomatic brain metastases in terms of improvement in their performance status. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 63 patients diagnosed to have brain metastases and treated with palliative whole brain radiotherapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions over two weeks between June 1998 and June 2007. Diagnosis was done in most of the cases with computed tomography scan and in a few with magnetic resonance imaging. Improvement in presenting symptoms has been assessed in terms of improvement in their performance status by using the ECOG scale. Results: Fifty-four patients completed the planned treatment. Eight patients received concurrent Temozolamide; 88% of patients had symptom relief at one month follow-up; 39/54 patients had a follow-up of just one to three months. Hence survival could not be assessed in this study. Conclusion: External beam radiotherapy in the dose of 30 Gy over two weeks achieved good palliation in terms improvement in their performance status in 88% of patients. Addition of concurrent and adjuvant Timozolamide may improve the results.

  5. [Bladder-conserving treatment for bladder cancer: potential of and developments in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Pieters, Bradley R; Koning, Caro C E

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is surgical removal of the bladder and construction of a neobladder. Recently, important improvements have been made in the potential for bladder-conserving treatment using radiotherapy. External beam radiotherapy has undergone technological improvements, as a result of which it is possible to radiate the tumour more precisely while decreasing radiation to healthy tissue. Radiochemotherapy improves local recurrence-free and overall survival compared with radiotherapy alone. The results of this combined treatment are comparable with those of surgery. Additionally, Dutch radiotherapy departments have collected data in a national database of 1040 selected patients with confined bladder cancer. These patients were treated with external beam radiation, limited surgery and brachytherapy. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 75%. Bladder conserving treatment options for muscle-invasive bladder cancer should be discussed during the multidisciplinary meeting.

  6. Intraoperative and external beam radiotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma; Intraoperative und perkutane Radiotherapie des Pankreaskarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, M.J. [Abt. Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Maurer, U. [Klinikum der Stadt Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    1996-05-01

    Therapeutic strategies in the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma are based on the high number of non-resectable cancers, the high relative radioresistance and the high distant metastases rate. Even in curatively resected carcinomas, a locally effective treatment modality is needed because of the risk of microscopical residual disease in the peripancreatic tissue. The efficacy of radiotherapy is dose dependent. Based on an analysis of published data a dose of more than 50 Gy is recommended, resulting in a high morbidity rate with external beam radiotherapy alone. The use of intraoperative radiotherapy allows locally restricted dose escalation without increased perioperative morbidity. In adjuvant and in primary treatment, local tumor control was improved (70-90%). With palliative intent, pain relief was obtained rapidly in over 60% of patients and led to improved patient performance. As a result of the high distant metastases rate, even in curatively resected carcinomas, the overall prognosis could not be significantly improved. Further dose escalation is limited by the increasing incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (20-30%). (orig.) [Deutsch] Therapiestrategien beim Pankreaskarzinom werden bestimmt durch den hohen Anteil primaer nicht resektabler Karzinome, der hohen relativen Strahlenresistenz und der hohen Fernmetastasierungsrate. Selbst kurativ resezierte Karzinome erfordern durch ihre hohe lokale Tumorzellpersistenz eine lokal effektive adjuvante Behandlungsmassnahme. Die Effektivitaet einer Radiotherapie ist dosisabhaengig. Aus der Analyse publizierter Daten wird eine Dosis von >50 Gy, welche bei der alleinigen perkutanen Bestrahlung mit einer hohen Morbiditaet verbunden ist, empfohlen. Mit der intraoperativen Radiotherapie ist eine lokal begrenzte Dosiseskalation ohne erhoehte perioperative Morbiditaet moeglich. Sowohl in der adjuvanten als auch in der primaeren Behandlung kann die lokale Tumorkontrolle deutlich verbessert werden (70-90%). Unter

  7. Expression of Ku70 predicts results of radiotherapy in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Tomokazu; Someya, Masanori; Hori, Masakazu; Nakata, Kensei; Kitagawa, Mio; Tsuchiya, Takaaki; Sakata, Koh-ichi [Sapporo Medical University School of medicine, Department of Radiology, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Matsumoto, Yoshihisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Nojima, Masanori [The University of Tokyo, The Institute of Medical Science Hospital, Minatoku, Tokyo (Japan); Masumori, Naoya [Sapporo Medical University School of medicine, Department of Urology, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Hasegawa, Tadashi [Sapporo Medical University School of medicine, Department of Surgical Pathology, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    Therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer is decided according to T stage, Gleason score, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. These clinical factors are not accurate enough to predict individual risk of local failure of prostate cancer after radiotherapy. Parameters involved with radiosensitivity are required to improve the predictive capability for local relapse. We analyzed 58 patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate between August 2007 and October 2010 treated with 76 Gy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a discovery cohort and 42 patients between March 2001 and May 2007 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) as a validation cohort. Immunohistochemical examination for proteins involved in nonhomologous end-joining was performed using biopsy specimens. Ku70 expression was not correlated with various clinical parameters, such as the Gleason score and D'amico risk classification, indicating that Ku70 expression was an independent prognostic factor. The predictive value for PSA relapse was markedly improved after the combination of Gleason score and Ku70 expression, as compared with Gleason score alone. In patients treated with radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), no relapses were observed in patients with Gleason score ≤7 or low Ku70 expression. In contrast, patients with Gleason score ≥8 and high Ku70 expression had high PSA relapse rates. In the validation cohort, similar results were obtained. Treatment with 76 Gy and ADT can be effective for patients with Gleason score ≤7 or low Ku70 expression, but is not enough for patients with Gleason score ≥8 and high Ku70 expression and, thus, require other treatment approaches. (orig.) [German] Die Behandlung beim Prostatakarzinom ist abhaengig von T-Stadium, Gleason-Score und prostataspezifischem Antigen (PSA). Diese klinischen Faktoren sind jedoch zu ungenau, um das individuelle Lokalrezidivrisiko beim Prostatakarzinom nach

  8. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-07-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  9. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-01-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  10. Supervoltage orbital radiotherapy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy; Results of a twenty-year experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriss, J.P.; McDougall, I.R. (Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, California (USA)); Petersen, I.A.; Donaldson, S.S. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, California (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Since 1968 we have employed supervoltage orbital radiation as treatment for severe progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. A numerical ophthalmic index was used to asess pre- and post-treatment serverity. In the past 20 years we have treated 311 patients of whom 275 have been followed for {le} 1 year or until any eye surgery was performed. An orbital radiation dosage of 2000 rads in 2 weeks was used for the majority of patients (Series I and III). Series II patients received an orbital dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks. Demographic differences were observed between these series, thus mandating presentation of the results of each separately. Analyses excluded any result achieved by any post-radiation surgical procedure on the eyes. Post-theraphy worsening of ophtalmopathy occurred in only 29 of 1025 observations. Improvement or complete resolution was observed within each category of eye involvement, but lack of favorable response was also recorded in significant numbers. Improvement in proptosis occurred with the lowest frequency and magnitude. About 30% of the patients required eye muscle surgery to correct residual diplopia. Analysis of the data by step-wise linear regression analysis enabled us a. to derive formulae predicting the problable response to radiation therapy according to sign and severity, and b. identify parameters which diminished the likelihood or the extent of a favorable response. The latter included male sex, never thyrotoxic, age greater than 60 years, and requirement for concomitant treatment for hyperthyroidism. No long-term adverse reactions attributable to the radiotherapy have been observed. We conclude that supervoltage orbital radiotherapy, combined with later eye muscle surgery if necessary, is an effective treatment strategy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author).

  11. The Result of Radiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Charn Il; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chung, Woong Ki; Bang, Yung Jue; Kim, Noe Kyeong

    1988-01-01

    During the period between March 1979 and August 1986, 177 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with radiotherapy in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, SNUH. Among these, 25 patients who had incomplete treatment were excluded. So a retrospective analysis was undertaken of 152 patients who were treated by curative radiotherapy. More than 80% showed response: Complete remission (22%), partial remission (63%) and no response (15%). The overall two-year and five-year actuarial survival rate were 22.9% and 13.3% respectively. Prognostic factor was analyzed by it site, size, T stage, and tumor response. Patients with the best five-year survival rate were those who had the tumor no more than 5 cm in length (17%) or confined to the upper third of the esophagus (26.6%). Complete responders had 34.3% of 5-year actuarial survival, but no responders had 0% of survival

  12. Clinical results in heavy particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.; Quivey, J.M.; Saunders, W.M.; Woodruff, K.H.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.; Tobias, C.A.; Walton, R.E.; Peters, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    The chapter presents an overview of the use of heavy particles in human cancer radiotherapy. The biophysical characteristics and rationale for using heavy charged particle therapy are explored. The clinical experience with carbon, neon, argon and helium are summarized for various types of tumors including carcinomas of the uterine cervix and lung, skin melanomas and metastatic sarcomas. No obvious normal tissue complications have appeared

  13. Comparison of induction chemotherapy before radiotherapy with radiotherapy only in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, O.; Nou, E.; Mercke, C.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this randomised trial was to investigate the effect of induction chemotherapy before radiotherapy on survival in 302 patients with non-resectable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Radiotherapy, 56 Gy to the chest, was given to 154 patients and combined treatment, with chemotherapy preceding the radiotherapy, to 148 patients. Chemotherapy consisted of three courses of cisplatin (120 mg/m 2 ) and etoposide (100 mg/m 2 i.v. for 3 days) administered every fourth week. Median survival was 10.5 months in the radiotherapy arm and 11 months in the combined treatment arm. The 2-year survival rate was 17% in the radiotherapy arm and 21% in the combined treatment arm. Addition of chemotherapy seemed to significantly improve survival, according to the Cox multivariate analysis (P = 0.04), but as only a trend according to life-table analysis (P = 0.11). Chemotherapy also accomplished a trend towards improved local control (P 0.08) and towards decreased metastatic disease (P = 0.10). 2 patients in the combined treatment arm, but none in the radiotherapy ar, died from toxicity. The conclusion was that the value of the chemotherapy used in this study was very modest, but the results strongly support further research for more efficient drugs and combinations. (author)

  14. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Jayant S., E-mail: jayant.vaidya@ucl.ac.uk [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Baum, Michael [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Tobias, Jeffrey S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Wenz, Frederik [Radiation Oncology and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre of Mannheim (Germany); Massarut, Samuele [Surgery and Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano (Italy); Keshtgar, Mohammed [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hilaris, Basil [Radiation Oncology, Our Lady of Mercy, New York Medical College, New York (United States); Saunders, Christobel [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Corica, Tammy [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Roncadin, Mario [Surgery and Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano (Italy); Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc [Radiation Oncology and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre of Mannheim (Germany); Bulsara, Max [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David [Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  15. The IAEA quality audits in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Vatnitsky, S.T.; Salminen, E.

    2009-01-01

    The quality audits are considered as an essential component of management systems of quality in radiotherapy. this method consists in checking that the quality of activities of a radiotherapy center is consistent with the rules of correct practices. The principal objective of the quality audit is to contribute to an improvement of the quality. IAEA developed a method of complete audit in the framework of the quality assurance team in radio-oncology (Q.U.A.T.R.O.). The Q.U.A.T.R.O. missions consist in an evaluation of the radiotherapy infrastructure, including the aspects related to the patient and equipment and where appropriate, an assessment of the safety of using ionizing radiation and radiation protection of the patients. The assessment also covers the staffing and training programs for radiation oncologists and medical radiation physicists. These missions allow to identify the insufficiencies in term of infrastructures, material, human resources and procedures and to enlighten the points to improve. Their results proved useful to improve the dosimetry practices at the worldwide level. (N.C.)

  16. 3D Conformal radiotherapy for gastric cancer-results of a comparative planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Trevor; Willis, David; Joon, Daryl Lim; Condron, Sara; Hui, Andrew; Ngan, Samuel Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many radiation oncologists are reluctant to use anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) field arrangements when treating gastric cancer with adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy due to concerns about normal tissue toxicity, particularly in relation to the kidneys and spinal cord. In this report, we describe a multiple-field conformal radiotherapy technique, and compare this technique to the more commonly used AP-PA technique that was used in the recently reported Intergroup study (INT0116). Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiotherapy using a standardised 3D conformal radiotherapy technique that consisted of a 'split-field', mono-isocentric arrangement employing 6 radiation fields. For each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was generated utilising AP-PA fields. The two techniques were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: The conformal technique provides more adequate coverage of the target volume with 99% of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% of the prescribed dose, compared to 93% using AP-PA fields. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney and spinal cord demonstrate lower radiation doses using the conformal technique, and although the liver dose is higher, it is still well below liver tolerance. Conclusions: 3D conformal radiotherapy produces superior dose distributions and reduced radiation doses to the kidneys and spinal cord compared to AP-PA techniques, with the potential to reduce treatment toxicity

  17. [Current status and potential perspectives in classical radiotherapy technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabić-Stanković, Kata M; Stanković, Jovan B; Radosević-Jelić, Ljiljana M

    2004-01-01

    After purchase of radiotherapy equipment in 2003, classic radiation therapy in Serbia will reach the highest world level. In order to define the highest standards in radiation technology, we analyzed the current status and potential perspectives of radiation therapy. An analysis of present situation in the USA, assumed as the most developed in the world, was done. Available data, collected in the last 3 years (equipment assortment, therapy modalities, workload and manpower) for 284 radiotherapy centers, out of potential 2050, were analyzed. Results were presented as crude percentage and matched to point current status. The analysis showed that CLINAC accelerators are the most popular (82.7%), as well as, ADAC (43.7%) and Focus (CMS) (27.4%) systems for therapy planning. Movement towards virtual simulation is evident (59.3%), although classic "simulation" is not fully eliminated from the radiotherapy chain. The most popular brachytherapy afterloader is Microselectron HDR (71%). About 64.4% centers use IMPAC communication/verification/record system that seems more open than Varis. All centers practice modern radiotherapy modalities and techniques (CPRT, IMRT, SRS/SRT, TBI, IORT, IVBHRT, HDR BHRT, etc.). CT and MRI availability is out of question, but PET is available in 3% of centers, however this percentage is rapidly growing. Up to 350 new patients per year are treated by one accelerator (about 35 pts. a day). Centers are relatively small and utilize 2-3 accelerators on average. Average FTE staffing norm is 4 radiation oncologists, 2-3 medical radiotherapy physicists, about 3 certified medical dosimetrists and about 6 radiotherapy technologists. In the past 5 years relative stagnation in classic radiotherapy has been observed. In spite of substantial investments in technology and consequent improvements, as well as wide introduction of computers in radiotherapy, radiotherapy results have not changed significantly. Vendor developement strategies do not point that

  18. Improved genetic algorithm in optimization of beam orientation in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xinye; Yang Jianhua; Sun Suping; Yao Yi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: At present beam orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is mainly based on empiric knowledge. This study is to evaluate the feasibility of automated beam angle selection. Methods: Genetic algorithm technique which based on beam eye view dose measurement (BEVD-GA) was tested on two clinical cases, including a spine column cancer and a lung cancer. Three plans were obtained under the following different beam configurations: five equiangular-spaced beams, five beams with GA-selected, and five beams with BEVD-GA-selected beams. Then the dose distribution was compared among the three plans. Results: The method, restricting the range of genetic algorithm followed by carrying through genetic operations, not only shortened the optimization time, but also improved the optimization effect. For spine column cancer and lung cancer, the best IMRT plans were obtained with BEVD-GA-selected beams, which used automated beam orientation selection. Conclusions: Comparing with the conventional manual beam orientation selection, beam orientation optimization which is feasible in IMRT planning may significantly improve the efficiency and result. (authors)

  19. Effect of megestrol acetate and prepulsid on nutritional improvement in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hui-Chun; Leung, Stephen Wan; Wang, Chong-Jong; Sun, Li-Min; Fang, Fu-Min; Hsu, Jia-Hwa

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Anorexia is a common problem in cancer patients who receive radiotherapy. In this current study, we attempt to determine the effect of megestrol acetate and prepulsid on appetite and nutritional improvement in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty-nine consecutive patients with head and neck cancers treated between July 1993 and June 1994 were prospectively randomized to receive either megestrol acetate, 40 mg qid (megace group), prepulsid, 5 mg tid (cisapride group), or a placebo treatment (control group) during radiotherapy. Before radiotherapy, body weight (kg), appetite score, performance status, biochemical parameters and hematological parameters were evaluated, and the above-noted clinical and biochemical parameters were assessed and recorded every other week. All patients received 6- 10 MV X-rays or Co-60 γ-ray to head and neck region for a full course of radiotherapy, 61.2-75.6 Gy/7-9 weeks. Results: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the megace group, 41 patients in the cisapride group, and 40 patients in the control group. At the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th week, as the radiation dose escalated, the megace group had significantly less body weight loss than did the cisapride and control groups (P = 0.045, 0.024, 0.006, 0.003, respectively). The appetite scores of the megace group were significantly higher than those of the cisapride and control groups (P 0.0001). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the change of albumin level among these three groups at the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th week (P > 0.05, respectively). Conclusions: Megestrol acetate can significantly decrease the degree of body weight loss, and can prevent the deterioration of appetite in patients with head and neck cancers receiving radiotherapy. However, prepulsid lacks the above-mentioned clinical benefits

  20. The role of radiotherapy in hospice care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Akira; Shimizu, Teppei; Ichinohe, Kenji; Teshima, Takeshi; Kaneko, Masao; Hara, Yoshio; Chihara, Satoshi.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of palliative radiotherapy for the terminally ill is to improve the quality of the remaining span of life. From November 1982 to September 1987, 69 patients in the Seirei Hospice have been treated with such radiotherapy, and symptomatic relief was obtained in 64% of these patients. Radiotherapy also proved useful in achieving an improvement in their performance status. While the aim of hospice care is not directed towards treatment of the underlying disease, the use of radiotherapy is considered to have an important role in hospice care. (author)

  1. The evaluation of results and complications of radiotherapy in children treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronska-Gardas, A.; Pedziwiatr, K.; Chojnacka, M.

    2002-01-01

    To analyse treatment results and late complications of radiotherapy in children treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma. Between the years 1980 and 2000 34 children (median age 7 yrs. range: 1-15) with orbital RMS, were treated in the 1st Department of the MCCMCC in Warsaw. All but two of the patients received induction chemotherapy; 3 children were treated after ablative surgery (exenteration); 6 children were irradiated due to recurrence after chemotherapy. All the children were treated with megavoltage radiotherapy from a Co-60 unit or linear accelerator. We applied individual lens and lacrimal apparatus shielding in 16 patients. Five children, treated between 1996-2000, received conformal radiotherapy, with CT and 3-D treatment planning system.To obtain information about late side effects, we developed a questionnaire, including questions about the status of the affected eye, appearance of the orbit and facial structures.Thirty one patients (91%) are still living (between 24 and 264 months - median 138 mos) after completion of radiotherapy and 28 (82%) with no recurrence. In six patients treated due to recurrent tumour OS and DFS was 80% and 60%, respectively. Late complications were evaluated in 24 patients. We observed lacrimal duct stenosis in 33%, cataract in 29%, enophtalmos in 20% of patients. Retinopathy developed in 2 children, glaucoma in 2 pts, and facial asymmetry in 3 pts. In one case enucleation of blind eye was performed. Thirteen children have preserved adequate vision in the treated eye. In children treated with conformal radiotherapy we did not observe any late complications. Radiotherapy in orbital RMS allows to obtain good local control and excellent survival rate. Late complications could be limited with the application of individual treatment planning and conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Chemotherapy disruption of efficient radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nervi, C.; Friedman, M.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the use of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: indications for the use of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy; improvement of the therapeutic ratio following the use of methotrexate; advantages of preirradiation and postirradiation chemotherapy; side effects following simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy; and effects of chemotherapy on cure rate of radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. (U.S.)

  3. Cosmetic results following lumpectomy axillary dissection and radiotherapy for smaal breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, J.A.; Benhamou, S.; Benhamou, E.; Arriagada, R.; Petit, J.Y.; Fontaine, F.; Sarrazin, D.

    1988-01-01

    Between 1970 and April 1982, 592 women, with T/sub 1/, small T/sub 2/, N/sub 0/, N/sub 1/, M/sub 0/ breast cancer were managed by lumpectomy, axillary dissection and radiotherapy at the Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR). The overall cosmetic result and the degree of assymetry, fibrosis and telangiectasia of the treated breast were assessed by the radiation oncologist at each follow-up visit. The changes in these cosmetic parameters with time are shown. At 5 years the overall cosmetic result was excellent in 58%, good in 38% and fair or poor in 8%. A multivariate analysis was performed of the factors associated with a cosmetic defect. The most significant factors were tumour size, the presence of defect after surgery and the daily applied dose per fraction to the breast. Surgical and radiotherapy technique (especially alternate day fractionation) can significantly affect the cosmetic result obtained

  4. Radiotherapy plus concomitant adjuvant temozolomide for glioblastoma: Japanese mono-institutional results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Oike

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the feasibility and survival benefits of combined treatment with radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ, which has been covered by the national health insurance in Japanese patients with glioblastoma since September 2006. Between September 2006 and December 2011, 47 patients with newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed glioblastoma received radiotherapy for 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Among them, 45 patients (TMZ group received concomitant TMZ (75 mg/m(2/day, every day and adjuvant TMZ (200 mg/m(2/day, 5 days during each 28-days. All 36 of the glioblastoma patients receiving radiotherapy between January 1988 and August 2006 were analyzed as historical controls (control group. All patients were followed for at least 1 year or until they died. The median survival was 15.8 months in the TMZ group and 12.0 months in the control group after a median follow-up of 14.0 months. The hazard ratio for death in the TMZ group relative to the control group was 0.52 (P<0.01; the 2-year survival rate was 27.7% in the TMZ group and 14.6% in the control group. Hematologic toxicity of grade 3 and higher was observed in 20.4% in the TMZ group. Multivariate analysis showed that extent of surgery had the strongest impact on survival (P<0.01, while the use of TMZ had the second largest impact on survival (P = 0.035. The results indicate that combined treatment with radiotherapy and TMZ has a significant survival benefit for Japanese patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma with slightly higher toxicities than previously reported.

  5. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    The principal objective of combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy (XRT) for the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer is to improve the therapeutic ratio through the enhancement of local control and reduction of distant metastases without excessively enhancing normal tissue effects. Improved tumour control can result from sole additivity of either therapy or direct interactions between drug and radiation leading to increased tumour cell kill. Chemotherapy may sensitize the cells to radiation, interfere with repair of sublethal or potentially lethal radiation damage, induce cell synchrony, and reduce tumour mass leading to reoxygenation and decreased fraction of resistant hypoxic cells. Radiation may improve drug accessibility to tumour cells and reduce tumour volume leading to increased cell proliferation and chemosensitivity. If the enhanced effects of combined therapy are purely additive, then the two modalities can be administered either sequentially or concurrently with the same results. However, if the enhanced effects result from the direct interaction between drug and radiation, it is necessary that the two modalities be administered concurrently and in close temporal proximity. This review summarizes the results of clinical studies in which chemotherapy was administered concurrently during the course of radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated advanced squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck

  6. Second step report of the National Committee for the follow-up of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraninchi, D.; Houssin, D.; Podeur, A.; Lacoste, A.C.; Marimbert, J.; Degos, L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Sarrazin, T.; Saout, C.; Renody, N.; Depenweiller, C.; Goinere, R.

    2010-01-01

    In a first part, this report presents the outcome of the ministerial road-map for the national improvement of radiotherapy activities. Then, a second part presents the actions undertaken in 2009 to support the evolution of radiotherapy professions and care organization (accompanying the evolution of radiotherapy activities, increasing manpower, improving the vigilance system, accompanying care organization up to the implementation of approvals criteria, considering the possible R and D pathways in radiotherapy) The third part addresses some actions of the 2009-2013 Cancer Plan (support for practice quality and safety in authorized radiotherapy centres, strengthening of human means in these centres, updating good practice recommendations). The last part is a list of the publications resulting from the works of the national committee for the follow up of the national measures for radiotherapy

  7. Treatment results of preoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Naoto; Oguchi, Masahiko; Kurita, Hiroshi; Katsuno, Satoshi

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and nine patients with advanced head and neck cancers (oral cavity: 50, oropharynx: 11, hypopharynx: 18, larynx: 30) received preoperative radiotherapy from 1987 through 1997 in our institute. The median age was 66 years (20-83). Almost all patients had advanced disease (stage II: 17, III: 34, IV: 58). The median dose of preoperative radiotherapy was 40 Gy (20-50). Seventy patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of all patients were 66% and 56%, respectively. The 5-year locoregional and distant failure rates were 36% and 10%, respectively. The locoregional failure rate of oral cavity cancer (54%) was worse than those of other sites (13-28%) (p=0.0015). The locoregional failure rates of oral cavity cancers according to clinical stage were 59% (II), 57% (III) and 48% (IV), respectively. Incidentally those of other sites were 0% (II), 16% (III) and 30% (IV), respectively. Thirty-eight patients had major complication after surgery. The locoregional failure rates of preoperative radiotherapy following surgery for oral cavity cancers of all stages and other sites of stage IV were high. Preoperative radiotherapy should be stopped and postoperative radiotherapy for these patients should be considered. (author)

  8. Effect of radiotherapy on immunity function of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinli; Zhu Shentao; Xu Jiuhong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In order to observe the effect of radiotherapy on immunity function of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Methods: Cellular immunity is determined by APAAP; Humoral immunity is determined by transmission method. Results: The items of cellular immunity is lower than the control after radiotherapy. These items decrease continually. The difference between before and after radiotherapy has statistic significance. Of all Humoral immunity items, IgA, IgM decreased after radiotherapy and the difference has statistic significance. Conclusions: Radiotherapy can damage patients' immunity function

  9. Radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Iizumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shosei; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Tomokazu; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper explained the current state of radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer, and discussed the role of radiotherapy in curative treatment and the future development. In the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer, it is important to judge the existence of pathological muscular layer invasion based on transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT). In surgical results in Japan, the U.S., and Switzerland, 5-year survival rate is about 60 to 70%. Standard treatment for bladder cancer with muscle layer invasion had been surgery, and radiotherapy had been applied to the cases without resistance to surgery. Three combined therapy with TUR-BT and simultaneous chemoradiotherapy is the current standard bladder conserving therapy. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 60%, which is superior to the treatment with irradiation alone. Radiotherapy for kidney cancer is most often used as perioperative treatment for locally advanced cancer or as symptomatic treatment for metastatic lesions. However, due to recent improvement in radiotherapy technology, correspondence to respiratory movement and high dose administration associated with improvement in dose concentration have been realized, and stereotactic irradiation using a high single dose for inoperable disease cases or surgery refusal disease cases has come to be clinically applied. (A.O.)

  10. Chemo-radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    Malignant gliomas: Randomized clinical trials conducted in the USA showed that radiotherapy plus chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered a long-term survival advantage to patients younger than 60 years old with malignant gliomas. Combination chemotherapy, such as procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine (PCV) must be tested further, and intra-arterial chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered no survival advantage. Combination chemotherapy with PCV showed efficacy for patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Medulloblastoma: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy improved the survival of patients with poor risk medulloblastoma, and may reduce the required craniospinal radiation dose in patients with good risk medulloblastoma. Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL): Combination of chemotherapy with high-dose MTX and radiotherapy improved survival of patients with PCNSL; however, the neurotoxicity produced by this treatment modality is a serious problem in older patients. Intracranial germ cell tumors: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy may produce long term survival with good quality of life in patients with germinoma. Neoadjuvant therapy consisting of chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by complete surgical excision improved survival of patients with intracranial nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. (author)

  11. Chemo-radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka

    2002-01-01

    Malignant gliomas: Randomized clinical trials conducted in the USA showed that radiotherapy plus chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered a long-term survival advantage to patients younger than 60 years old with malignant gliomas. Combination chemotherapy, such as procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine (PCV) must be tested further, and intra-arterial chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered no survival advantage. Combination chemotherapy with PCV showed efficacy for patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Medulloblastoma: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy improved the survival of patients with poor risk medulloblastoma, and may reduce the required craniospinal radiation dose in patients with good risk medulloblastoma. Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL): Combination of chemotherapy with high-dose MTX and radiotherapy improved survival of patients with PCNSL; however, the neurotoxicity produced by this treatment modality is a serious problem in older patients. Intracranial germ cell tumors: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy may produce long term survival with good quality of life in patients with germinoma. Neoadjuvant therapy consisting of chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by complete surgical excision improved survival of patients with intracranial nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. (author)

  12. Improved normal tissue sparing in head and neck radiotherapy using biological cost function based-IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N; Lawford, C; Khoo, V; Rolfo, M; Joon, D L; Wada, M

    2011-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has reduced the impact of acute and late toxicities associated with head and neck radiotherapy. Treatment planning system (TPS) advances in biological cost function based optimization (BBO) and improved segmentation techniques have increased organ at risk (OAR) sparing compared to conventional dose-based optimization (DBO). A planning study was undertaken to compare OAR avoidance in DBO and BBO treatment planning. Simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were produced for 10 head and neck patients using both planning systems. Plans were compared for tar get coverage and OAR avoidance. Comparisons were made using the BBO TPS Monte Carlo dose engine to eliminate differences due to inherent algorithms. Target coverage (V95%) was maintained for both solutions. BBO produced lower OAR doses, with statistically significant improvement to left (12.3%, p = 0.005) and right parotid mean dose (16.9%, p = 0.004), larynx V50_Gy (71.0%, p = 0.005), spinal cord (21.9%, p < 0.001) and brain stem dose maximums (31.5%, p = 0.002). This study observed improved OAR avoidance with BBO planning. Further investigations will be undertaken to review any clinical benefit of this improved planned dosimetry.

  13. Results of radiotherapy in craniopharyngiomas analysed by the linear quadratic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerkaynak, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Oezyar, E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Zorlu, F. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Akyol, F.H. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Lale Atahan, I. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    1994-12-31

    In 23 craniopharyngioma patients treated by limited surgery and external radiotherapy, the results concerning local control were analysed by linear quadratic formula. A biologically effective dose (BED) of 55 Gy, calculated with time factor and an {alpha}/{beta} value of 10 Gy, seemed to be adequate for local control. (orig.).

  14. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano, E-mail: rezende.med@terra.com.br [Radioterapia do Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  15. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  16. Radiotherapy Alone is Associated with Improved Outcomes Over Surgery in the Management of Solitary Plasmacytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Wen; Niu, Shao-Qing; Wang, Han-Yu; Wen, Ge; Li, Yi-Yang; Xia, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Jing

    2015-01-01

    A moderate dose of radiation is the recommended treatment for solitary plasmacytoma (SP), but there is controversy over the role of surgery. Our study aimed at comparing different treatment modalities in the management of SP. Data from 38 consecutive patients with solitary plasmacytoma, including 16 with bone plasmacytoma and 22 with extramedullary plasmacytoma, were retrospectively reviewed. 15 patients received radiotherapy alone; 11 received surgery alone, and 12 received both. The median radiation dose was 50Gy. All operations were performed as radical resections. Local progression-free survival (LPFS), multiple myeloma-free survival (MMFS), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated and outcomes of different therapies were compared. The median follow-up time was 55 months. 5-year LPFS, MMFS, PFS and OS were 87.0%, 80.9%, 69.8% and 87.4%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed, compared with surgery alone, radiotherapy alone was associated with significantly higher 5-year LPFS (100% vs 69.3%, p=0.016), MMFS (100% vs 51.4%, p=0.006), PFS (100% vs 33.7%, p=0.0004) and OS (100% vs 70%, p=0.041). Radiotherapy alone can be considered as a more effective treatment for SP over surgery. Whether a combination of radiotherapy and surgery improves outcomes requires further study.

  17. Contribution of radiotherapy to the treatment of malignant tumors, 3. Combined drugs and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niibe, Hideo; Takahashi, Iku; Tamaki, Yoshio (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-09-01

    Effects of cytotoxic agent, hormone, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protector combined with radiation therapy in cancer management were analysed. The results were as follows: 1) An increase in response was seen in 25% or more of tumor nodules given radiotherapy combined with misonidazole, anoxic cell sensitizer, compared with radiotherpy alone. But the drug was also found to be neurotoxic and peripheral neuropathy. 2) Evidence has been given that Amifostine may protect the mucosal damage from radiation when Amifostine prior to irradiation was administrated to patients with tumor in the head and neck or in the pelvis. 3) There were no difference between five year survival of radiotherapy alone and with chemotherapy for patients with stage I Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Chemotherapy following radiotherapy for patients with stage II was more effective treatment method than radiotherapy alone. 4) Radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer was performed to control only primary site. The success rates of local control were over 80%. The near future holds extensive promise for a combination of radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormone therapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protectors. All of these when used in the appropriate circumstances may yield significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio and in the long-tern control of tumors.

  18. Tolerance and early outcome results of postprostatectomy three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Aschkenasy, Eric; Kelsen, Suzanne; Leibel, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) has been associated with a reduction in acute and late toxicity among patients treated for localized prostatic cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the acute and late toxicity of 3D-CRT delivered to patients in the postprostatectomy setting and to analyze which factors predict for durable biochemical control in this group of patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1994, 42 patients were treated after prostatectomy with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The median time from prostatectomy to radiotherapy was 11 months. Indications for treatment included a rising serum PSA level in 28 patients (65%) and positive surgical margins without a rising PSA level in 14 (35%). Twenty-five patients (60%) had pathologic stage T3 disease, and 32 (74%) had tumor at or close to the surgical margins. The median dose was 64.8 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2 years. Results: 3D-CRT in the postprostatectomy setting was well tolerated. Three patients (7%) experienced Grade II acute genitourinary toxicity and nine patients (21%) experienced Grade II acute gastrointestinal toxicity during treatment. No patient experienced Grade III or higher acute morbidity. The 2-year actuarial risk for Grade II late genitourinary and gastrointestinal late complications were 5 and 9%, respectively. In patients with existing incontinence, the incidence of worsening stress incontinence 6 months after treatment was 17%, which resolved within 12 months to its preradiotherapy level in four of six cases (66%). The overall 2-year postirradiation PSA relapse-free survival rate was 53%. The 2-year PSA relapse-free survival was 66% for patients with undetectable PSA levels in the immediate postoperative period compared to 26% for those with detectable levels of PSA after surgery (p 1.0 ng/ml (p 1 ng/ml (p < 0.002) was the most important covariate predicting for a rising PSA after radiotherapy. Conclusions: After

  19. Postoperative radiotherapy of uterine sarcoma: A multicentric retrospective study; Radiotherapie postoperatoire dans les sarcomes uterins: etude retrospective multicentrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champetier, C.; Cowen, D. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital de la Timone, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 05 (France); Hannoun-Levi, J.M. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue Valombrose, 06100 Nice (France); Resbeut, M. [Centre de radiotherapie Saint-Louis, rue Andre-Blondel, 83100 Toulon (France); Azria, D. [Centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Salem, N. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, 232, boulevard Sainte-Marguerite, 13009 Marseille (France); Tessier, E. [Centre azureen de radiotherapie, 1, place du Docteur-Jean-Luc-Broquerie, 06250 Mougins (France); Ellis, S. [Centre catalan de radiotherapie, 80, rue Pascal-Marie-Agasse, 66000 Perpignan (France)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose. - Surgery is the treatment of choice for localized uterine sarcomas. We conducted a retrospective study to define prognostic factors. Patients and methods. - We studied 111 cases of patients treated by adjuvant radiotherapy for uterine sarcoma in seven French centers. The median decline was 31 months. We conducted a univariate analysis to identify factors correlated with local recurrence. The statistically significant factors were studied in multivariate analysis by Cox model. Results. - The median dose of external beam radiotherapy was 45 Gy. Forty-three percent of patients had vaginal vault brachytherapy and 21 % chemotherapy. Only 6.3 % of patients had complications of acute grade III and 8.1 % of long-term sequelae of radiotherapy. The survival rate at 5 years was 74.6 %. They noted 12.6 % of isolated locoregional recurrences, against 29.7 % for distant recurrences, 80 % were pulmonary. Factors correlated with the risk of locoregional relapse were menopausal status (P = 0.045) and surgical margins suspicious or not healthy (P = 0.0095). The chemotherapy did not improve overall survival or disease free survival but the numbers were low. Conclusion. - The postoperative radiotherapy provides good local control in this disease. Brachytherapy is sometimes done, but it does not improve local control. Chemotherapy is not a standard localized stage but the rate of metastatic recurrence calls for the development of strategies involving systemic treatment with radiotherapy. (authors)

  20. Family physicians' perspectives regarding palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess family physicians' views on common indications for palliative radiotherapy and to determine whether this influences patient referral. Methods and materials: A 30-item questionnaire evaluating radiotherapy knowledge and training developed at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre (ORCC) was mailed to a random sample of 400 family physicians in eastern Ontario, Canada. The completed surveys were collected and analyzed, and form the basis of this study. Results: A total of 172 completed surveys were received for a net response rate of 50% among practicing family physicians. Almost all of the physicians (97%) had recently seen cancer patients in their offices, with 85% regularly caring for patient with advanced cancer. Fifty-four percent had referred patients in the past for radiotherapy and 53% had contacted a radiation oncologist for advice. Physicians who were more knowledgeable about the common indications for palliative radiotherapy were significantly more likely to refer patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Inability to contact a radiation oncologist was correlated with not having referred patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Only 10% of the physicians had received radiotherapy education during their formal medical training. Conclusions: Many of the family physicians surveyed were unaware of the effectiveness of radiotherapy in a variety of common palliative situations, and radiotherapy referral was correlated with knowledge about the indications for palliative radiotherapy. This was not surprising given the limited education they received in this area and the limited contact they have had with radiation oncologists. Strategies need to be developed to improve continuing medical education opportunities for family physicians and to facilitate more interaction between these physicians and radiation oncologists

  1. A comparison of the results of radiotherapy and surgical treatment of tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuki, Hirokazu; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hiromu; Takegawa, Yoshihiro; Kashihara, Kenichi

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the results of tongue cancer treatments retrospectively in order to compare the outcomes of radiotherapy and surgery among patients presenting with early-stage tongue cancer. One-hundred and forty-three patients who underwent radical treatment of tongue cancer between 1976 and 1996 were classified into six treatment groups in order to compare the 5-year survival rate, 5-year local control and lymph node metastasis between the groups. Furthermore, prognostic factors were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. The 5-year survival rate for the entire subject population was 71%, and that for patients diagnosed as having stage I, II, III and IV tumors was 85%, 80%, 76% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year survival rate of patients who underwent surgical treatment alone for early-stage tongue cancer was higher than that of patients who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone (100% and 70%, respectively). The 5-year local control rate did not differ significantly between patients who underwent surgical treatment alone for early-stage cancer and those who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone (87% and 86%, respectively). Furthermore, the survival rate did not differ significantly between patients presenting with cervical lymph node metastasis upon initial examination and those who developed cervical lymph node metastasis later (62% and 69%, respectively). The results of a univariate analysis showed that prognosis was significantly better for women and N0 patients, and the results of a multivariate analysis confirmed that prognosis was significantly better for patients under 60 years of age, women, and N0 patients. The survival rate of patients treated for early-stage tongue cancer was slightly higher for those who underwent surgical treatment alone compared with those who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone. However, local control was comparable between these two groups of patients. (author)

  2. Radiotherapy in supratentorial gliomas. A study of 821 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesters, M.; Molenaar, W.; Go, G.K.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the results of radiotherapy in a large group of cerebral gliomas with identification of prognostic factors and the outcome with respect to different decades of treatment. Patients and Methods: Two decades (1979-1999) of radiotherapy in supratentorial astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors (n = 821) at the University Hospital Groningen were retrospectively evaluated. Prognostic factors for survival were analyzed. Two decades of radiotherapy treatment were compared with respect to radiotherapy dose and treatment-field design. Results: Glioblastoma multiforme, including gliosarcoma, was the most frequent supratentorial glioma (n = 442) with a poor survival, i.e., median survival time (MST) 7 months, especially in patients > 50 years of age and with poor performance. Patients with good performance were selected for radiotherapy with an optimum dose of 60 Gy local-field irradiation. However, in patients with poor prognosis, no radiotherapy was applied or a shorter treatment scheme was given. Anaplastic astrocytomas (n = 131) were treated in the same way as glioblastoma multiforme. Over time, a decrease in radiation dose (from 60 to 45 Gy) and from whole brain irradiation to local-field treatment was observed, following the literature. In low-grade gliomas, prognostic factors for survival were age, performance, and extent of resection. Gemistocytic astrocytoma (n = 15) had an inferior survival compared to astrocytoma (MST 46 vs. 54 months), but a superior survival compared to anaplastic astrocytoma (MST 10 months). The presence of an oligodendroglial component in a glioma implied a superior survival compared to the astrocytic gliomas. The inherent biology of the glioma is reflected by the study of recurrent tumors with progression to higher grades of malignancy in 32-40% and by the histology of recurrent oligodendroglial tumors. In comparing two decades of radiotherapy in gliomas, no differences in survival were observed despite the technological

  3. Radiotherapy in supratentorial gliomas. A study of 821 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heesters, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Molenaar, W. [Dept. of Pathology, Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Go, G.K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands)

    2003-09-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the results of radiotherapy in a large group of cerebral gliomas with identification of prognostic factors and the outcome with respect to different decades of treatment. Patients and Methods: Two decades (1979-1999) of radiotherapy in supratentorial astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors (n = 821) at the University Hospital Groningen were retrospectively evaluated. Prognostic factors for survival were analyzed. Two decades of radiotherapy treatment were compared with respect to radiotherapy dose and treatment-field design. Results: Glioblastoma multiforme, including gliosarcoma, was the most frequent supratentorial glioma (n = 442) with a poor survival, i.e., median survival time (MST) 7 months, especially in patients > 50 years of age and with poor performance. Patients with good performance were selected for radiotherapy with an optimum dose of 60 Gy local-field irradiation. However, in patients with poor prognosis, no radiotherapy was applied or a shorter treatment scheme was given. Anaplastic astrocytomas (n = 131) were treated in the same way as glioblastoma multiforme. Over time, a decrease in radiation dose (from 60 to 45 Gy) and from whole brain irradiation to local-field treatment was observed, following the literature. In low-grade gliomas, prognostic factors for survival were age, performance, and extent of resection. Gemistocytic astrocytoma (n = 15) had an inferior survival compared to astrocytoma (MST 46 vs. 54 months), but a superior survival compared to anaplastic astrocytoma (MST 10 months). The presence of an oligodendroglial component in a glioma implied a superior survival compared to the astrocytic gliomas. The inherent biology of the glioma is reflected by the study of recurrent tumors with progression to higher grades of malignancy in 32-40% and by the histology of recurrent oligodendroglial tumors. In comparing two decades of radiotherapy in gliomas, no differences in survival were observed despite the technological

  4. Comprehensive audits of radiotherapy practices: A tool for quality improvement: Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-10-01

    As part of a comprehensive approach to quality assurance (QA) in the treatment of cancer by radiation, an independent external audit (peer review) is important to ensure adequate quality of practice and delivery of treatment. Quality audits can be of various types and at various levels, either reviewing critical parts of the radiotherapy process (partial audits) or assessing the whole process (comprehensive audits). The IAEA has a long history of providing assistance for dosimetry (partial) audits in radiotherapy to its Member States. Together with the World Health Organization (WHO), it has operated postal audit programmes using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams since 1969. Furthermore, it has developed a set of procedures for experts undertaking missions to radiotherapy hospitals in Member States for on-site review of dosimetry equipment, data and techniques, measurements and training of local staff. This methodology involves dosimetry and medical radiation physics aspects of the radiotherapy process without entering into clinical areas. The IAEA, through its technical cooperation programme, has received numerous requests from developing countries to perform comprehensive audits of radiotherapy programmes to assess the whole process. including aspects such as organization, infrastructure, and clinical and medical physics components. The objective of a comprehensive clinical audit is to review and evaluate thc quality of all of the components of the practice of radiotherapy at an institution, including its professional competence, with a view to quality improvement. A multidisciplinary team, comprising a radiation oncologist, a medical physicist and a radiotherapy technologist, carries out the audit. The present publication has been field tested by IAEA teams performing audits in radiotherapy programmes in hospitals in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. Their comments, corrections and feedback have been taken

  5. Comprehensive audits of radiotherapy practices: A tool for quality improvement: Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    As part of a comprehensive approach to quality assurance (QA) in the treatment of cancer by radiation, an independent external audit (peer review) is important to ensure adequate quality of practice and delivery of treatment. Quality audits can be of various types and at various levels, either reviewing critical parts of the radiotherapy process (partial audits) or assessing the whole process (comprehensive audits). The IAEA has a long history of providing assistance for dosimetry (partial) audits in radiotherapy to its Member States. Together with the World Health Organization (WHO), it has operated postal audit programmes using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams since 1969. Furthermore, it has developed a set of procedures for experts undertaking missions to radiotherapy hospitals in Member States for on-site review of dosimetry equipment, data and techniques, measurements and training of local staff. This methodology involves dosimetry and medical radiation physics aspects of the radiotherapy process without entering into clinical areas. The IAEA, through its technical cooperation programme, has received numerous requests from developing countries to perform comprehensive audits of radiotherapy programmes to assess the whole process. including aspects such as organization, infrastructure, and clinical and medical physics components. The objective of a comprehensive clinical audit is to review and evaluate thc quality of all of the components of the practice of radiotherapy at an institution, including its professional competence, with a view to quality improvement. A multidisciplinary team, comprising a radiation oncologist, a medical physicist and a radiotherapy technologist, carries out the audit. The present publication has been field tested by IAEA teams performing audits in radiotherapy programmes in hospitals in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. Their comments, corrections and feedback have been taken

  6. Assessment of improved organ at risk sparing for advanced cervix carcinoma utilizing precision radiotherapy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, D.; Georg, P.; Hillbrand, M.; Poetter, R.; Mock, U. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Medical Univ. AKH, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the potential benefit of proton therapy and photon based intensity-modulated radiotherapy in comparison to 3-D conformal photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced cervix cancer. Patients and methods: in five patients with advanced cervix cancer 3D-CRT (four-field box) was compared with intensity modulated photon (IMXT) and proton therapy (IMPT) as well as proton beam therapy (PT) based on passive scattering. Planning target volumes (PTVs) included primary tumor and pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for the PTV and various organs at risk (OARs) (rectal wall, bladder, small bowel, colon, femoral heads, and kidneys). In addition dose conformity, dose inhomogeneity and overall volumes of 50% isodoses were assessed. Results: all plans were comparable concerning PTV parameters. Large differences between photon and proton techniques were seen in volumes of the 50% isodoses and conformity indices. DVH for colon and small bowel were significantly improved with PT and IMPT compared to IMXT, with D{sub mean} reductions of 50-80%. Doses to kidneys and femoral heads could also be substantially reduced with PT and IMPT. Sparing of rectum and bladder was superior with protons as well but less pronounced. Conclusion: proton beam RT has significant potential to improve treatment related side effects in the bowel compared to photon beam RT in patients with advanced cervix carcinoma. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of improved organ at risk sparing for advanced cervix carcinoma utilizing precision radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, D.; Georg, P.; Hillbrand, M.; Poetter, R.; Mock, U.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the potential benefit of proton therapy and photon based intensity-modulated radiotherapy in comparison to 3-D conformal photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced cervix cancer. Patients and methods: in five patients with advanced cervix cancer 3D-CRT (four-field box) was compared with intensity modulated photon (IMXT) and proton therapy (IMPT) as well as proton beam therapy (PT) based on passive scattering. Planning target volumes (PTVs) included primary tumor and pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for the PTV and various organs at risk (OARs) (rectal wall, bladder, small bowel, colon, femoral heads, and kidneys). In addition dose conformity, dose inhomogeneity and overall volumes of 50% isodoses were assessed. Results: all plans were comparable concerning PTV parameters. Large differences between photon and proton techniques were seen in volumes of the 50% isodoses and conformity indices. DVH for colon and small bowel were significantly improved with PT and IMPT compared to IMXT, with D mean reductions of 50-80%. Doses to kidneys and femoral heads could also be substantially reduced with PT and IMPT. Sparing of rectum and bladder was superior with protons as well but less pronounced. Conclusion: proton beam RT has significant potential to improve treatment related side effects in the bowel compared to photon beam RT in patients with advanced cervix carcinoma. (orig.)

  8. The contribution of ergonomic analysis to the improvement of working conditions, patient reception, and quality in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estryn-Behar, M.; Bougniot, C.; Colleu, C.; Launec, V.; Lepinay, S.; Pihery, M.; Bauden, F.; Stambouli, A.; Maylin, C.

    2000-01-01

    The authors report an ergonomic analysis of the activity in a radiotherapy department of a hospital. This study aimed at understanding physiological fatigue and pathologies among technical personnel, at analyzing factors which impact reception quality, but also the professional satisfaction associated with this profession. The authors have developed a guide for a radiotherapy technician workstation study. They report and comment the activity analysis (time organisation, working time in different positions, movements and handling, handled weights), also outline the anxiety associated with the risk of mistake. They identify various improvement possibilities

  9. Twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Midori [Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital of Fuchu (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To improve the local control rate in radiotherapy for hand and neck cancer, several prospected twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDRF) were conducted in Tokyo Women`s Medical College. T2 glottic cancer was irradiated with 1.5 Gy/fraction, 2 fraction/day to a total dose of 72 Gy. Five cumulative local control rate was 88.2%. Locally advanced head and neck cancer was treated with TDFR and systemic chemotherapy. Response rate was 100%. Palliative radiotherapy with TDFR was done to relive from the pain and other symptoms for advanced and recurrent cases. Nine cases of 11 were relieved from the symptoms. These results was suggested the TDFR was useful to improve the local control rate. (author)

  10. Twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Midori

    1996-01-01

    To improve the local control rate in radiotherapy for hand and neck cancer, several prospected twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDRF) were conducted in Tokyo Women's Medical College. T2 glottic cancer was irradiated with 1.5 Gy/fraction, 2 fraction/day to a total dose of 72 Gy. Five cumulative local control rate was 88.2%. Locally advanced head and neck cancer was treated with TDFR and systemic chemotherapy. Response rate was 100%. Palliative radiotherapy with TDFR was done to relive from the pain and other symptoms for advanced and recurrent cases. Nine cases of 11 were relieved from the symptoms. These results was suggested the TDFR was useful to improve the local control rate. (author)

  11. Role of radiotherapy for the esophageal cancer with distant organ metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, Tamio; Hoshi, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Koh; Yamamoto, Rika; Otawa, Koichi; Asakawa, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    Eighty-nine patients with esophageal cancer that had metastases of distant organs were categorized into three groups on the basis of prognosis. Median survival time of the poor-prognosis group (performance status ≥2 and metastases not confined to the thoracic cavity) was 2 months. Because the median time to treatment effect by radiotherapy in this group was 4 weeks, the selection of a modality that can achieve more rapid improvement is recommended. Median survival time of the good-prognosis group (performance status =0-1 and metastases confined to the thoracic cavity) was 7.5 months. Because the contribution of local control to survival was greatest in this group, combined-modality treatment with radiotherapy is recommended. Among patients who could not eat solid food, swallowing function was improved temporarily by radiotherapy in more than 60%. However, this improvement did not result in long-term normal or near-normal swallowing function. In patients who could eat solid food, radiotherapy was effective for maintaining normal swallowing function. (author)

  12. Results of the application of the Risk Evaluation System in Radiotherapy (RESRA) in radiotherapy facilities in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz G, A.; Godinez S, V.

    2013-10-01

    The present work describes the main results of the risk evaluation for some radiotherapy treatments with lineal accelerators, cobalt 60, brachytherapy of high dose rate and brachytherapy of low dose rate that are realize in Mexico. These evaluations were carried out applying the risk matrices method with the tool computer risk evaluation system in radiotherapy, accessible for the national users through internet, and developed by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias in Mexico, in cooperation with the Forum of Ibero-American regulators. The used methodology is based on the risk matrices method that is a mathematical tool for the risk evaluation, and it was centered in the evaluation from the risk to which are exposed the patients, the occupational exposed personnel and people in general, by the mechanical faults of the treatment equipment s, bad calibrations, human errors, or any other event initiator of accidents. The events initiators of accidents are defined as those undesirable events that can produce and administration of an excessive dose or a sub-dose of the prescribed dose by the doctor, to the planned objective volume, or undesirable dose to the patient's regions or dose to occupational exposed personnel or people in general. The barriers are the actions and systems as mechanical switches, interlocks or alarms, dedicated to avoid that these accidents take place. The evaluation analysis of the risk developed by the members of the Forum for radiotherapy facilities together with the software RESRA has demonstrated to be useful in the prevention of many possible accidents that have happened in the past in other facilities and can avoid many others in the future. (Author)

  13. Respiratory gated radiotherapy: current techniques and potential benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Campana, F.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Reboul, F.; Garcia, R.; Clippe, S.; Carrie, C.; Dubray, B.

    2003-01-01

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart...) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily breath-hold. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. These techniques presently investigated in several medical centers worldwide. Although promising, the first results obtained in lung and liver cancer patients require confirmation. Physical, technical and physiological questions still remain to be answered. This paper describes the most frequently used gated techniques and the main published clinical reports on the use of respiration-gated radiotherapy in order to evaluate the impact of these techniques. (author)

  14. Preliminary results of the study about predictors of rectal side effects in radical radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, L; Barrios, E; Kasdorf, P; Valdagni, R; Paolini, G

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze quantitatively and qualitatively the rectal side effect of radical radiotherapy applied to prostate cancer in patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (INCA) with three-dimensional external radiotherapy which the purposes is to determine predictions of this. Materials and Methods: From July 2008 to July 2010 98 patients were recruited, 63 of whom were followed up for 6 months. The gastrointestinal secondary effects occurred in different times of monitoring patients with RTOG / EORTC classifications (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) and SOMA / LENT, is also used a questionnaire specifically constructed and validated by the cooperative Italian group . The results were correlated with clinical parameters (PSA, Gleason score, clinical T, risk class, hypertension and diabetes) and dosimetry (treatment volume, rectal volume, Total Dose, Dose Maximum rectum, mean dose to the rectum) to assess the correlation between them and the appearance of gastrointestinal secondary effects. Results: 27% and 28% patients experienced grade 1 and 2 RTOG rectal secondary effect at 1 and 3 months and 6 months the SOMA / LENT classification determined by 25%. Qualitatively altered intestinal transit is the most affected in these patients, it is having also found some relationship between the probability of occurrence of abnormal intestinal transit, and the tracking time passed. Conclusions: The rectal secondary effects is one of the major side effects both acute an chronic of the prostate radiotherapy, identify the determinants effects of the INCA patient population implies a substantial improvement in the quality of prostate cancer patients. Patients treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer often have long survivals and consequently may suffer chronic effects of radiation therapy. We have verified the existence of secondary effects in the intestine but the results are very preliminary

  15. Improvement of swallowing function in patients with esophageal cancer treated by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Nakajima, Kotaro; Nozawa, Kumiko [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi General Hospital; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Tanaka, Naomi; Fukao, Katashi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-12-01

    This study investigated the impact of radiotherapy on swallowing function in 152 patients with esophageal cancer. Swallowing function was retrospectively assessed in these patients using a swallowing-function scoring system. Total tumor dose ranged from 22.5 Gy in 14 fractions to 104.4 Gy in 50 fractions. Improvement in dysphagia was noted in 62.3% of these patients, with a median time to improvement of 6 weeks. Improvement rate of patients irradiated with 20.0 to 34.9 Gy, 35.0 to 59.9 Gy and 60.0 Gy or more was 23.1%, 58.3% and 71.6%, respectively. Patients with T1-3 showed, a greater improvement rate than patients with T4 cancer (72.2% versus 54.1%). On multivariate analysis, the initial score, total dose and T factor correlated with improvements in swallowing function. Our results suggest that 35.0 Gy or more is necessary to improve swallowing function. The median duration in which patients could swallow soft or solid foods, was 8 months in patients receiving 60.0 Gy or more and 2 months in patients receiving 50.0 to 59.9 Gy, respectively. There was a significant difference between these periods (p<0.01). Regarding duration of palliation, median duration for patients receiving 60.0 Gy or more was 30 weeks, while it was 22 weeks for patients treated with lesser doses (p=0.053). We recommend 60.0 Gy or more as the optimal dosage for improving dysphagia. (author)

  16. Preliminary Results of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy After Cyst Drainage for Craniopharyngioma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesaka, Naoto; Mikami, Ryuji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Nogi, Sachika; Tajima, Yu; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Wada, Jun; Miki, Tamotsu; Haraoka, Jou; Okubo, Mitsuru; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for craniopharyngioma. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2005, 16 patients with craniopharyngioma were referred to Tokyo Medical University Hospital. They received FSRT alone after histologic confirmation by needle biopsy and underwent cyst drainage via endoscopy. The median prescription dose fraction was 30 Gy in six fractions. All patients except 1 were followed up until December 2009 or death. Results: The median follow-up period was 52 months (range, 4–117 months). Of the 17 patients, 3 experienced recurrence 4 to 71 months after FSRT. The 3-year local control rate was 82.4%. One patient died of thyroid cancer, and the 3-year survival rate was 94.1%. Eight patients had improved visual fields at a median of 2.5 months after FSRT, but hormonal functions did not improve in any patient. Conclusions: FSRT after cyst drainage seems to be safe and effective for patients with craniopharyngiomas, and it may be a safe alternative to surgery.

  17. Preliminary Results of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy After Cyst Drainage for Craniopharyngioma in Adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanesaka, Naoto, E-mail: kaneka@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Mikami, Ryuji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Nogi, Sachika; Tajima, Yu [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Wada, Jun; Miki, Tamotsu; Haraoka, Jou [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Okubo, Mitsuru [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical University Ibaraki Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for craniopharyngioma. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2005, 16 patients with craniopharyngioma were referred to Tokyo Medical University Hospital. They received FSRT alone after histologic confirmation by needle biopsy and underwent cyst drainage via endoscopy. The median prescription dose fraction was 30 Gy in six fractions. All patients except 1 were followed up until December 2009 or death. Results: The median follow-up period was 52 months (range, 4-117 months). Of the 17 patients, 3 experienced recurrence 4 to 71 months after FSRT. The 3-year local control rate was 82.4%. One patient died of thyroid cancer, and the 3-year survival rate was 94.1%. Eight patients had improved visual fields at a median of 2.5 months after FSRT, but hormonal functions did not improve in any patient. Conclusions: FSRT after cyst drainage seems to be safe and effective for patients with craniopharyngiomas, and it may be a safe alternative to surgery.

  18. Postoperative radiotherapy improves local control and survival in patients with uterine leiomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Philip; Han, Kathy; Sykes, Jenna; Catton, Charles; Laframboise, Stephane; Fyles, Anthony; Manchul, Lee; Levin, Wilfred; Milosevic, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To examine the role of radiotherapy (RT) in uterine leiomyosarcomas (LMS) and to determine the patient population who may benefit from RT. From 1998–2008, 69 patients with primary uterine LMS underwent hysterectomy with or without pelvic radiotherapy to a median dose of 45 Gy. Univariate analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and cumulative-incidence function, and multivariate analyses using Fine and Gray or Cox proportional hazard models. Following surgery, 32 out of 69 patients received RT. There was no evidence of any correlation between patient, disease and treatment characteristics and the use of RT. Median follow-up was 57 months. RT was associated with reduced local recurrence (3y LR 19% vs. 39%; Gray’s p = 0.019) and improved overall survival (3y OS 69% vs. 35%; log-rank p = 0.025) on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that RT reduced LR (HR: 0.28, CI: 0.11-0.69, p = 0.006) and increased OS (HR: 0.44, CI: 0.23-0.85, p = 0.014) independent of other clinical and pathologic factors. Positive surgical margins increased the odds of LR (HR: 5.6, CI: 2.3-13.4, p = 0.00012). Large tumor size and advanced stage (II-IV) were associated with the development of distant metastases and inferior OS. Postoperative pelvic RT reduces LR and improves OS of patients with uterine LMS

  19. The early toxicity of escalated versus standard dose conformal radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression for patients with localised prostate cancer: Results from the MRC RT01 trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, David P.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Langley, Ruth E.; Graham, John D.; Huddart, Robert A.; Syndikus, Isabel; Matthews, John H.L.; Scrase, Christopher D.; Jose, Chakiath C.; Logue, John; Stephens, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Five-year disease-free survival rates for localised prostate cancer following standard doses of conventional radical external beam radiotherapy are around 80%. Conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) raises the possibility that radiotherapy doses can be increased and long-term efficacy outcomes improved, with safety an important consideration. Methods: MRC RT01 is a randomised controlled trial of 862 men with localised prostate cancer comparing Standard CFRT (64 Gy/32 f) versus Escalated CFRT (74 Gy/37 f), both administered with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression. Early toxicity was measured using physician-reported instruments (RTOG, LENT/SOM, Royal Marsden Scales) and patient-reported questionnaires (MOS SF-36, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index, FACT-P). Results: Overall early radiotherapy toxicity was similar, apart from increased bladder, bowel and sexual toxicity, in the Escalated Group during a short immediate post-radiotherapy period. Toxicity in both groups had abated by week 12. Using RTOG Acute Toxicity scores, cumulative Grade ≥2 bladder and bowel toxicity was 38% and 30% for Standard Group and 39% and 33% in Escalated Group, respectively. Urinary frequency (Royal Marsden Scale) improved in both groups from pre-androgen suppression to 6 months post-radiotherapy (p < 0.001), but bowel and sexual functioning deteriorated. This pattern was supported by patient-completed assessments. Six months after starting radiotherapy the incidence of RTOG Grade ≥2 side-effects was low (<1%); but there were six reports of rectal ulceration (6 Escalated Group), six haematuria (5 Escalated Group) and eight urethral stricture (6 Escalated Group). Conclusions: The two CFRT schedules with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression have broadly similar early toxicity profiles except for the immediate post-RT period. At 6 months and compared to before hormone therapy, bladder symptoms improved, whereas bowel and sexual symptoms worsened. These assessments of early treatment safety will be

  20. Quality indicators in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cionini, Luca; Gardani, Gianstefano; Gabriele, Pietro; Magri, Secondo; Morosini, Pier Luigi; Rosi, Antonella; Viti, Vincenza

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is a widespread and increasing tendency to develop hospital performance indicators in the field of accreditation/certification systems and quality benchmarking. A study has been undertaken to develop a set of performance indicators for a typical radiotherapy Centre and to evaluate their ability to provide a continuous quality improvement. Materials and methods: A working group consisting of radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation technologists under the coordination of experts in health technology assessment has elaborated a set of general indicators able to monitor performances and the quality level of a typical radiotherapy Centre. The work has been carried out through four steps: a preliminary set of indicators was selected; data on these indicators were collected in a number of Italian radiotherapy Centres and medical physics Services; problems in collection and analysis of data were discussed; a final set of indicators was developed. Results: A final set of 13 indicators is here presented. They concern general structural and/or operational features, health physics activities and accuracy and technical complexity of the treatment. Conclusions: The indicators tested in a few Italian Centres of radiotherapy and medical physics Services are now ready to be utilized by a larger community

  1. Results of postoperative radiotherapy for resectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerhards, Michael F.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; González González, Dioniso; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Gouma, Dirk J.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of radiotherapy, and especially intraluminal brachytherapy, after resection of hilar cholangio-carcinoma by analyzing long-term complications and survival. Between 1983 and 1998, 112 patients underwent resection of a hilar cholangio-carcinoma. Of the 91

  2. Development of radiation oncology learning system combined with multi-institutional radiotherapy database (ROGAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemura, Akihiro; Iinuma, Masahiro; Kou, Hiroko; Harauchi, Hajime; Inamura, Kiyonari

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed and are operating a multi-institutional radiotherapy database ROGAD (Radiation Oncology Greater Area Database) since 1992. One of it's purpose is 'to optimize individual radiotherapy plans'. We developed Radiation oncology learning system combined with ROGAD' which conforms to that purpose. Several medical doctors evaluated our system. According to those evaluations, we are now confident that our system is able to contribute to improvement of radiotherapy results. Our final target is to generate a good cyclic relationship among three components: radiotherapy results according to ''Radiation oncology learning system combined with ROGAD.'; The growth of ROGAD; and radiation oncology learning system. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  4. Evaluation of quality of life and psychological response in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Hondo, Mikito; Nishimura, Keiichiro; Kitani, Akira; Yamano, Takafumi; Yanagita, Hisami; Osada, Hisato; Shinbo, Munefumi; Honda, Norinari

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the quality of life (QOL) and mental condition of patients being treated for cancer is now recognized. In this study, we evaluated QOL and mental condition in patients with cancer before and after radiotherapy. The subjects were 170 patients who had undergone radiotherapy. The examination of QOL was performed using the quality of life questionnaire for cancer patients treated with anticancer drugs (QOL-ACD), and mental condition (anxiety and depression) was examined using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). These examinations were performed at the start of radiotherapy and immediately after radiotherapy. The QOL score was slightly higher in all patients after the completion of radiotherapy than before the start of radiotherapy. In the palliative radiotherapy group, QOL score was significantly improved by treatment. Anxiety and depression were improved after radiotherapy. There was a correlation between the degrees of improvement of the HADS and QOL score. We could treat cancer patients by radiotherapy without reducing their QOL, and improvement in QOL was significant in the palliative radiotherapy group. Mental condition was also improved after radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  6. Dosimetric inter-institutional comparison in European radiotherapy centres: Results of IAEA supported treatment planning system audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla; Petrovic, Borislava; Grezdo, Joseph; Chelminski, Krzysztof; do Carmo Lopes, Maria; Izewska, Joanna; Van Dyk, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    One of the newer audit modalities operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) involves audits of treatment planning systems (TPS) in radiotherapy. The main focus of the audit is the dosimetry verification of the delivery of a radiation treatment plan for three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy using high energy photon beams. The audit has been carried out in eight European countries - Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Serbia, Slovakia, Poland and Portugal. The corresponding results are presented. The TPS audit reviews the dosimetry, treatment planning and radiotherapy delivery processes using the 'end-to-end' approach, i.e. following the pathway similar to that of the patient, through imaging, treatment planning and dose delivery. The audit is implemented at the national level with IAEA assistance. The national counterparts conduct the TPS audit at local radiotherapy centres through on-site visits. TPS calculated doses are compared with ion chamber measurements performed in an anthropomorphic phantom for eight test cases per algorithm/beam. A set of pre-defined agreement criteria is used to analyse the performance of TPSs. TPS audit was carried out in 60 radiotherapy centres. In total, 190 data sets (combination of algorithm and beam quality) have been collected and reviewed. Dosimetry problems requiring interventions were discovered in about 10% of datasets. In addition, suboptimal beam modelling in TPSs was discovered in a number of cases. The TPS audit project using the IAEA methodology has verified the treatment planning system calculations for 3D conformal radiotherapy in a group of radiotherapy centres in Europe. It contributed to achieving better understanding of the performance of TPSs and helped to resolve issues related to imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning.

  7. Arterial occlusive disease after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Mazeron, J.J.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Becquemin, J.P.; Blanc, I.; Lange, F.; Melliere, D.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen cases of arterial occlusion or severe narrowing following radiotherapy are studied in order to assess the possible etiological role of such therapy in arterial lesion. Surgical results are also discussed in terms of long-term efficacy. The average time of occurrence after radiotherapy was 8 years post-radiotherapy. This series includes 7 supra-aortic trunk stenoses and 7 abdominal aorta trunk stenoses. The doses received in the volumes iradiated ranged from 47 to 70 Gy with standard fractionation. Association of atherosclerotic risk factors was present in 12 patients, but stenoses were usually confined to irradiated areas, and at imes occurred in uncommon sites. Surgical management included 11 by-passes, 2 endarterectomies and one percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. All patients experienced immediate and satisfactory functional improvements. Three patients were re-operated on because of the re-occlusion of the by-pass and graft infection. On the whole, stenoses in previously irradiated areas showed no particular difficulties for surgical treatment. It was concluded that radiotherapy seems to be a definite risk factor for arterial occlusion or narrowing, especially in association in association with atherosclerotic risk factors. (author). 45 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  8. Results of radiotherapy of Duplay's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreisfeldt, E.

    1979-01-01

    The observed patient group comprised 185 persons who underwent treatment during 1970 and 1976. The sexual distribution within this group is normal. The age peak ranges between 50 and 60 years. In a late inquiry 31.9% of the patients can indicate the freedom from pain. 29.2% tell about a good, 18.4% about moderate success. In about one half of the treated persons roentgenologically visible calcareous deposits were detected. In both groups their treatment led to an equally good result. However, an accumulation of diseases with calcifications is found in patients who were younger than 50 years. In acute cases without previous treatment the achieved result was better than in those who had been treated already elsewhere. Acute cases respond considerably better to the treatment than the chronicaal ones. For the acute cases also a notably inferior recidivity rate was found. In 38% of all cases recidivation was observed. For the acute cases this rate is only 16%. Although investigations exist which do not hint at an autonomous course of this disease, a therapeutic treatment is not considered as superfluous. Considering the known risks due to ionizing irradiation, radiotherapy of periarticular fibrositis is recommended particularly for patients older than 40 years. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Yeung, Latifa; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Barbera, Lisa; Spayne, Jacqueline; Danjoux, Cyril; Dahele, Max; Ung, Yee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of a single-institution series of accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery. Methods and Materials: Peripherally located T1 to T3 N0 M0 tumors were treated with 48 to 60 Gy in 12 to 15 fractions between 1996 and 2007. No elective nodal irradiation was delivered. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was abstracted from the medical records. Results: A total of 124 tumors were treated in 118 patients (56 male and 62 female). Median age at diagnosis was 76.3 years (range, 49-90 years). In all, 113 patients (95.8%) were not surgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.0% and 23.3%, respectively, and the 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 67.6% and 59.8%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 76.2% and 70.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size less than 3cm compared with greater than 3 cm resulted in significantly improved OS (40.0% vs. 5.0% at 5 years; p = 0.0002), CSS (69.7% vs. 45.1% at 5 years; p = 0.0461), and a trend toward better LC (82.5% vs. 66.9% at 2 years, 76.6% vs. 60.8% at 5 years; p = 0.0685). Treatment was well tolerated and there were no treatment delays because of acute toxicity. Conclusions: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with 48 to 60 Gy using fractions of 4 Gy per day provides very good results for small tumors in medically inoperable patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  10. Results of the radiotheraphy of the supraglottic larynx carcinomas observed at the Radiotherapy Department of the District Hospital of Varese (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosentino, D.; Scandolaro, L.; Cazzaniga, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors review the supraglottic laryngeal carcinomas examined in the Radiotherapy Department of the Ospedale Regionale of Varese, Italy, from 1979 to 1984. 255 patients have been monitored: 80 considered for radiotherapy alone and 77 for postoperatory radiotherapy treatment. The cumulative actuarial survival (pcs) after 60 months, for patients treated only with radiotherapy, is 0.66 +- e.s. 0.07; for patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy the cumulative actuarial survival (pcs) after 60 months is 0.49 +- e.s. 0.11. The irradiation techniques are described and the results achived fully discussed

  11. Radiotherapy for Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Review of the Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.; Barnes, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare form of non-melanoma skin cancer of neuroendocrine origin. Optimal management of patients is controversial and the role of radiotherapy is unclear. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to review the efficacy of RT in the treatment of both local and distant metastatic disease from MCC. Methods. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE (1946-January Week 1 2012) and Embase (1980-2012 Week 2). Articles of interest analyze the efficacy of radiotherapy for treatment of metastatic MCC and did not exclude case reports. Results. All articles except one focusing on the role of radiotherapy were of retrospective origin or case series. Significant limitations applied in all studies due to limited sample sizes and the retrospective nature of these studies. Radiotherapy improves locoregional control in the adjuvant setting, and many series suggest an improvement in overall survival. In cases where surgery is not possible, definitive radiotherapy may be an as-efficacious alternative. The radiosensitive nature of MCC coupled with existing reports suggests that treatment via current protocols for other primary tumors is adequate. Conclusion. Further studies should be conducted prospectively to clarify the true role of radiotherapy in metastatic MCC.

  12. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  13. Role of bio-effect models in improving radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S.

    2013-01-01

    Application of linear quadratic model of cell survival in radiotherapy has enabled to successfully predict the response of both the normal tissues and tumours. Even the simplest form of BED (biological effective dose) equation for fractionated radiotherapy could precisely predict the late normal tissue complications resulting from large dose per fraction. These observations have led to the development MFD (multiple fractions daily) protocol, with the specific objective of reducing late normal tissue morbidity. Protraction of treatment and consequent loss of BED and tumour control; multiple fractions delivered without adequate intervals resulting in incomplete repair of sub-lethal damage and consequent normal tissue complications, have been explained successfully by the LQ model. In the recent past LDR (low dose rate) brachytherapy is mostly replaced by HDR (high dose rate) technique. A series of calculations based on tumour bio-kinetics parameters, as well as the geometric sparing provides a sound rationale for replacing LDR technique by HDR technique. Some of the calculations relevant to this will be presented during this talk. Bio-effect models can also provide insight in to the rationale of RIT (radio-immunotherapy). With an adequate knowledge of biological half-life of antibodies in the tumour/critical organs, and biological uptake half-time in the tumour, it is possible to evaluate the efficacy of a number of radio-nuclides in RIT. Calculations based on LQ models suggest that longer lived isotopes such as 32 P, 86 Rb, 144m In may have an advantage over the shorter lived radio-nuclides. A clear knowledge of the various parameters like/values, potentially doubling time of tumour and other bio-kinetic parameters may hold the key for successful application of bio-effect models in predicting the response to radiotherapy. Feedback from the clinics will further help in refining and validating the existing models. (author)

  14. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  15. Results of intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Shinozaki, Jun; Noda, Masanobu

    1991-01-01

    Reported are the results and observations of the authors who, from July 1986 through December 1989, have used electron beam intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on 20 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancers, said number including 3 patients given a resection. In 14 of the 17 unresected patients, a chief symptom was pain, and 8 patients were given a celiac plexus block at the same time. The results and observations are given below. Life-threatening complications occurred in two patients, i.e., an insufficient pancreatojejunostomy, and a perforative peritonitis. In 12 of 13 evaluable patients, pain control was achieved for a mean period of 5 months, indicating that an IORT with celiac plexus block may be useful for palliation. In the resected patients, the mean survival time was 6 months, whereas in the unresected patients, the mean survival time was 7 months. The common cause of death in the unresected patients was a metastatic dissemination. Finally, in 3 of the 5 unresected patients, marked effects such as massive fibrosis were seen in the pancreatic tumor on autopsy. (author)

  16. Historical review of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy have been improved by development of particle accelerators, radionuclides and computers. This paper presents a historical review of the physical and technical aspects of radiotherapy in Japan. Changes in the kinds of radiation, such as X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and protons used for external radiotherapy, and the equipment involved are described chronologically, and historical changes in the quality of radiotherapy apparatus are outlined. Patient data acquisition equipment, such as X-ray simulator and X-ray CT, beam modifying devices, patient setup devices, and devices to verify treatment fields and patient doses are reviewed historically. Radiation sources for brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy, and remotely controlled afterloading systems are reviewed chronologically. Historical changes in methods to evaluate absorbed doses, dose monitor systems and beam data acquisition systems are outlined. Changes in methods of calculating dose distributions for external X-ray and electron therapy, brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy by unsealded radionuclides are described and calculation techniques for treatment planning system are reviewed. Annual figures in the numbers of radiotherapy equipment, such as telecobalt and telecesium units, linear accelerators, betatrons, microtrons, stereotactic gamma units, conformation radiotherapy units, remotely controlled afterloading systems, and associated equipment such as X-ray simulators and treatment planning systems are provided, as are changes in the number of accelerators by maximum X-ray energy and maximum electron energy, and in the number of licensed hospitals and clinics using small sealed sources. Changes in techniques of external radiotherapy and brachytherapy are described briefly from the point of view of dose distributions. (author)

  17. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Results of the conservative treatment associating radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy in the bladder filtering cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Karsenty, G.; Tallet, A.; Lopez, L.; Alzieu, C.; Serment, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: purpose: to describe outcome of patients with muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma treated with multimodality therapy in our institution from 1993 to 2002. Patients and methods: the charts of sixty patients with T2-4, N0-1, M0 treated with TURBT followed by a chemo-radiotherapy combination were retrospectively reviewed: 22 received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (CMV/MVAC) followed by concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (weakly cisplatin/carbo-platin or a cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil association) and the other 38 concomitant chemo-radiotherapy alone. Radiotherapy delivered a median dose of 45 Gy to the pelvis and 65 Gy to the bladder in a mono-fractionated or twice a day fractionation scheme. Follow-up evaluations included cystoscopy with biopsies at regular intervals. Salvage cystectomy was recommended in case of local persistent tumor or bladder relapse. Results: median follow-up was 48.5 months (10-126 months). 82% (18/22) of the patients receiving neo-adjuvant chemotherapy had 2 or more cycles and 85% (51/60) got the concomitant chemotherapy as planned. Radiotherapy was completed in 56 patients. Twenty-eight patients relapsed either locally (14 did not achieve local complete response after chemo-radiation and 6 had true local relapse during follow-up) or at distant sites. Actuarial 5-year disease-specific survival and freedom from local and distant relapse rate are respectively 54% and 42%. Actuarial local control rate with intact bladder was 56% at 5-year. When separated according to stage and grade, patients with T2/3 grade 2 tumors had significantly better chance of remaining relapse-free than the others (p = 0.045). Salvage cystectomy (n = 11) for isolated local failure in this population achieved limited results. Conclusion: our experience shows that a significant number of patients will achieve long survival with their bladder intact after multimodality therapy. (authors)

  19. Quality control guarantees the safety of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1994-01-01

    While radiotherapy equipment has seen some decisive improvements in the last few decades, the technology has also become more complicated. The advanced equipment produces increasingly good treatment results, but the condition of the equipment must be controlled efficiently so as to eliminate any defects that might jeopardise patient safety. The quality assurance measures that are taken to show that certain equipment functions as required are known as quality control. The advanced equipment and stricter requirements set for the precision of radiotherapy have meant that more attention must be paid to quality control. The present radiation legislation stipulates that radiotherapy equipment must undergo regular quality control. The implementation of the quality control is supervised by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Hospitals carry out quality control in accordance with a programme approved by STUK, and STUK inspectors periodically visit hospitals to check the results of quality control. (orig.)

  20. Unintended exposure in radiotherapy: Identification of prominent causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boadu, Mary; Rehani, Madan Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Unintended exposures in radiotherapy are likely to occur when certain conditions that favour such exposures exist. Based on the frequency of occurrence of various causes of 100 events of unintended exposures in radiotherapy as derived from the analysis of published reports, a checklist for assessing the vulnerability of radiotherapy facilities for potential accidents has been prepared. The list presents items to be considered for safety critical assessments of a radiotherapy department for the improvement of patient safety and the entire radiotherapy processes. Materials and methods: The resources used for this paper consist of 100 unintended radiotherapy exposures and were derived from existing published reports. The analysis was performed by forming two templates: one consisting of 10 initiating events and another of 35 contributing factors. Results: Four most prominent initiating events were identified and together accounted for about 70% of all the unintended exposure events. Ten most prominent contributing factors were also identified and together accounted for about 70% of all the radiotherapy unintended exposure events covered under this study. Conclusion: With this knowledge of high frequency of occurrences, the identified four prominent initiating events and the 10 most prominent contributing factors must be checked and dealt with as a matter of priority when assessing the safety of a radiotherapy facility. A simple checklist for checking the quality assurance programmes of a radiotherapy department for every aspect of the design and delivery of radiation have been provided.

  1. Development of radiation oncology learning system combined with multi-institutional radiotherapy database (ROGAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Akihiro; Iinuma, Masahiro; Kou, Hiroko [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Harauchi, Hajime; Inamura, Kiyonari

    1999-09-01

    We have constructed and are operating a multi-institutional radiotherapy database ROGAD (Radiation Oncology Greater Area Database) since 1992. One of it's purpose is 'to optimize individual radiotherapy plans'. We developed Radiation oncology learning system combined with ROGAD' which conforms to that purpose. Several medical doctors evaluated our system. According to those evaluations, we are now confident that our system is able to contribute to improvement of radiotherapy results. Our final target is to generate a good cyclic relationship among three components: radiotherapy results according to ''Radiation oncology learning system combined with ROGAD.'; The growth of ROGAD; and radiation oncology learning system. (author)

  2. Development of a model for recording and evaluating incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, A.L.C.; Paiva, E. de; Teixeira, F.C.S.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy has been constantly improving to become increasingly effective, thus contributing to increase the chances of healing patients. In this sense, incident learning gained prominence during successive approaches to patient safety. The objective is to develop a tool for recording and analyzing incidents in radiotherapy and applying it to clinics in Rio de Janeiro in order to implement the policy of quality management and safety culture. Steps were taken that involved the analysis of the process maps for the enrichment of the system (called the Standardized System of Incidents in Radiotherapy - SPIRad) that already has a version in physical form. The proposal is the conversion of this form to a digital tool to be used through the intranet. The next step is to apply it to radiotherapy clinics in Rio de Janeiro and evaluate the results obtained with the objective of possible improvements through feedback from users

  3. Therapeutic results and safety of postoperative radiotherapy for keloid after repeated Cesarean section in immediate postpartum period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Ju Ree; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of keloid scars administered immediately after Cesarean section. A total of 26 postpartum patients with confirmed keloids resulting from previous Cesarean sections received either 12 or 15 Gy radiotherapy. The radiotherapy was divided into three 6 MeV electron beam fractions administered during the postpartum period immediately following the fi nal Cesarean section. To evaluate ovarian safety, designated doses of radiation were estimated at the calculated depth of the ovaries using a solid plate phantom and an ionization chamber with the same lead cutout as was used for the treatment of Cesarean section operative scars and a tissue equivalent bolus. In total, the control rate was 77% (20 patients), while six (23%) developed focally elevated keloids (ranging from 0.5 to 2 cm in length) in the middle of the primary abdominal scar. Five patients experienced mild hyperpigmentation. Nonetheless, most patients (96%) were satisfied with the treatment results. The estimated percentage of the applied radiation doses that reached the calculated depth of the ovaries ranged from 0.0033% to 0.0062%. When administered during the immediate postpartum period, postoperative electron beam radiotherapy for repeated Cesarean section scars is generally safe and produces good cosmetic results with minimal toxicity.

  4. Therapeutic results and safety of postoperative radiotherapy for keloid after repeated Cesarean section in immediate postpartum period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Ju Ree; Lee, Sang Hoon [Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of keloid scars administered immediately after Cesarean section. A total of 26 postpartum patients with confirmed keloids resulting from previous Cesarean sections received either 12 or 15 Gy radiotherapy. The radiotherapy was divided into three 6 MeV electron beam fractions administered during the postpartum period immediately following the fi nal Cesarean section. To evaluate ovarian safety, designated doses of radiation were estimated at the calculated depth of the ovaries using a solid plate phantom and an ionization chamber with the same lead cutout as was used for the treatment of Cesarean section operative scars and a tissue equivalent bolus. In total, the control rate was 77% (20 patients), while six (23%) developed focally elevated keloids (ranging from 0.5 to 2 cm in length) in the middle of the primary abdominal scar. Five patients experienced mild hyperpigmentation. Nonetheless, most patients (96%) were satisfied with the treatment results. The estimated percentage of the applied radiation doses that reached the calculated depth of the ovaries ranged from 0.0033% to 0.0062%. When administered during the immediate postpartum period, postoperative electron beam radiotherapy for repeated Cesarean section scars is generally safe and produces good cosmetic results with minimal toxicity.

  5. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma: long-term outcome and sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, Mark W.; Buatti, John M.; Fennell, Eileen M.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.; Rhoton, Albert L.; Grant, Maria B.; Friedman, William A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To review outcome and treatment sequelae in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-one patients with pituitary adenomas received radiotherapy at the University of Florida and had 2-year minimum potential follow-up. One hundred twenty-one had newly diagnosed adenomas, and 20 had recurrent tumors. Newly diagnosed tumors were treated with surgery and radiotherapy (n = 98) or radiotherapy alone (n = 23). Patients with recurrent tumors received salvage treatment with surgery and radiotherapy (n = 10) or radiotherapy alone (n = 10). The impact of age, sex, presenting symptoms, tumor extent, surgery type, degree of resection, hormonal activity, primary or salvage therapy, and radiotherapy dose on tumor control was analyzed. Tumor control is defined by the absence of radiographic progression and stable or decreased hormone level (in hormonally active tumors) after treatment. Effect of therapy on vision, hormonal function, neurocognitive function, life satisfaction, and affective symptoms were examined. A Likert categorical scale survey was used for assessment of neurocognitive, life satisfaction, and affective symptom status. Survey results from the radiotherapy patients were compared with a control group treated with transsphenoidal surgery alone. Multivariate analysis used the forward step-wise sequence of chi squares for the log rank test. Results: At 10 years, tumor control for the surgery and radiotherapy group (S + RT) was 95% and not statistically different (p = 0.58) than for patients treated with radiotherapy alone (RT) (90%). Patients with prolactin- and ACTH-secreting tumors had significantly worse tumor control, as did patients treated for recurrent tumors. Multivariate analysis for tumor control revealed that only young age was predictive of worse outcome (p = 0.0354). Visual function was either unaffected or improved in most patients, although four patients developed visual

  6. Early and delayed results of radiotherapy and multimodality therapy of spinal hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.I.; Neretin, V.Ya.; Korshunov, A.I.; Nikolaeva, S.N.; Balkanov, A.S.; Marchenko, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors described the results of therapy of 74 spinal hemangioma patients. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 - radiotherapy only; 2 - radiotherapy following surgical intervention for enhanced symptoms of spinal compression. γ-beam therapy was given 5 times a week at a single dose of 0.8-1.2 Gy. An integral dose delivered to the cervical spine was 26-32 Gy, to the thoracic spine 28-30 Gy, to the lumber spine - 30-34 Gy. Field sizes varied from 3x4 to 3x12 cm depending on lesion spreading. Therapy also included traction on a special platform bed. An analysis of delayed therapeutic results (from 3 to 13 yrs.) has shown that clinical convalescence with regained working capacity in the 1st group (40 patients) was observed in 21 patients, in the 2nd group (34 patients) - in 5 patients only. Partial functional restoration was observed in both groups (19 patients in each group). The therapy applied was ineffective in 10 patients of the 2nd group

  7. Quality assurance in radiotherapy - a clinical point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, K.; Lessel, A.; Huettner, J.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the advanced treatment methods now available, the total result in 5-year survival is 40-50% of all patients with malignancies and 20% of these patients will have the chance of a 10-year survival. In the course of their disease a radiotherapy is indicated in about 2/3 of all patients. Thus, radiotherapy makes quite a considerable contribution to the qualitative improvement of the treatment of patients with malignancies. Eradication of the tumor and protection of normal tissue can only be a compromise between tumor control and the production of complications. For the risk assessment of radiotherapy, the steepness of dose-response curves is of paramount importance. That means, small errors in defining and delivering dose can have catastrophic results in terms of failure to control the patient's disease and, on the other side, in terms of complications, that means in quality of life. Although the costs of therapy, in absolute values, vary from one country to the other, it can be stated in rough approximation that a failed radiotherapy will make rise the costs by a factor of 3. According to the fact that in 30-40% of patients, who received radiotherapy, the initial treatment failed to control the primary disease, the enormous additional costs involved become obvious, not to speak of the main argument - the regrowth of the patients's tumor. For the improvement of this situation quality assurance (QA) is an essential prerequisite, which should be guaranteed in all successive steps of radiotherapy. In the paper an analysis is given for all individual steps in the chain of radiotherapeutic measures. (author)

  8. Organizational, technical, physical and clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Kaźmierczak, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background Indisputably, radiotherapy has become an entirely interdisciplinary specialty. This situation requires efficient planning, verification, monitoring, quality control and constant improvement of all aspects of service delivery, referring both to patients’ (including diagnosis, prescription and method of treatment, its justification, realization and follow up) and organizational, technical and physics matters. Aim The aim of this work was to develop technical, physics and clinical quality standards for radiotherapy. This paper presents chosen standards for each of the aforementioned category. Materials and methods For the development of quality standards the comparison analysis of EU and Polish acts of law passed between 1980 and 2010 was conducted, the universal industrial ISO norm 9001:2008 referring to quality management system was reviewed. Recommendations of this norm were completed with detailed quality standards based on the author's 11 year work experience and the review of articles on quality assurance and quality control standards for radiotherapy published between 1984 and 2009 and the review of current recommendations and guidelines of American, International, European and National bodies (associations, societies, agencies such as AAPM, ESTRO, IAEA, and OECI) for quality assurance and quality management in radiotherapy. Results As a result 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: (1) organizational standards, (2) physics and technical standards and (3) clinical standards. Conclusions Proposed quality standards for radiotherapy, can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical procedures. Nevertheless standards are only of value if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:24377023

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy in pediatric indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier-Chastagner, V.; Supiot, S.; Carrie, C.; Helfre, S.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a very high precision procedure, which has been limited to radiosurgery for a long time. Technological improvements allowed the development of radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions, leading to a lot of innovations. Previously indicated for cerebral pathologies, this procedure is now developed for extra-cerebral locations. In paediatrics, stereotactic radiotherapy is still limited, delivered precociously, due to the possibility of long-term late effects that needs to be addressed. This review reports the different useful conditions, technical evolutions, and the current validated paediatric indications, with differences from adults, and future directions. (authors)

  10. Isocentric integration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy with electron fields improves field junction dose uniformity in postmastectomy radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Pauliina; Suilamo, Sami; Lindholm, Paula; Kulmala, Jarmo

    2014-08-01

    In postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), the dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) with additional margins, including the chest wall, supraclavicular, interpectoral, internal mammary and axillar level I-III lymph nodes, is often compromised. Electron fields may improve the medial dose coverage while maintaining organ at risk (OAR) doses at an acceptable level, but at the cost of hot and cold spots at the electron and photon field junction. To improve PMRT dose coverage and uniformity, an isocentric technique combining tangential intensity-modulated (IM)RT fields with one medial electron field was implemented. For 10 postmastectomy patients isocentric IMRT with electron plans were created and compared with a standard electron/photon mix and a standard tangent technique. PTV dose uniformity was evaluated based on the tolerance range (TR), i.e. the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean dose, a dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the 90% isodose coverage and the hot spot volumes. OAR and contralateral breast doses were also recorded. IMRT with electrons significantly improved the PTV dose homogeneity and conformity based on the TR and DSC values when compared with the standard electron/photon and tangent technique (p < 0.02). The 90% isodose coverage improved to 86% compared with 82% and 80% for the standard techniques (p < 0.02). Compared with the standard electron/photon mix, IMRT smoothed the dose gradient in the electron and photon field junction and the volumes receiving a dose of 110% or more were reduced by a third. For all three strategies, the OAR and contralateral breast doses were within clinically tolerable limits. Based on these results two-field IMRT combined with an electron field is a suitable strategy for PMRT.

  11. Randomized clinical trial of post-operative radiotherapy versus concomitant carboplatin and radiotherapy for head and neck cancers with lymph node involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racadot, Severine; Mercier, Mariette; Dussart, Sophie; Dessard-Diana, Bernadette; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Martin, Michel; Malaurie, Emmanuelle; Favrel, Veronique; Housset, Martin; Durdux, Catherine; Journel, Catherine; Calais, Gilles; Huet, Jocelyne; Pillet, Gerard; Hennequin, Christophe; Haddad, Elias; Diana, Christian; Blaska-Jaulerry, Brigitte; Henry-Amar, Michel; Gehanno, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Post-operative radiotherapy is indicated for the treatment of head and neck cancers. In vitro, chemotherapy potentiates the cytotoxic effects of radiation. We report the results of a randomized trial testing post-operative radiotherapy alone versus concomitant carboplatin and radiotherapy for head and neck cancers with lymph node involvement. Materials and methods: The study involved patients undergoing curative-intent surgery for head and neck cancers with histological evidence of lymph node involvement. Patients were randomly assigned to receive radiotherapy alone (54-72 Gy, 30-40 fractions, 6-8 weeks) or identical treatment plus concomitant Carboplatin (50 mg/m 2 administered by IV infusion twice weekly). Results: Between February 1994 and June 2002, 144 patients were included. With a median follow-up of 106 months (95% confidence interval (CI) [92-119]), the 2-year rate of loco-regional control was 73% (95% CI: 0.61-0.84) in the combined treatment group and 68% (95% CI: 0.57-0.80) in the radiotherapy group (p = 0.26). Overall survival did not differ significantly between groups (hazard ratio for death, 1.05; 95% CI: 0.69-1.60; p = 0.81). Conclusions: Twice-weekly administration of carboplatin concomitant to post-operative radiotherapy did not improve local control or overall survival rates in this population of patients with node-positive head and neck cancers

  12. Radiotherapy of macular lesions in age-related macular degeneration (A.M.D.): preliminary results of a clinical study conducted in Lyon, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Mauget, M.; Gerard, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate irradiation effects on functional signs and choroidal neo-vascular lesions in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) that does not respond to laser therapy. Since 1994, 250 consecutive AMD patients were treated by two radiotherapy teams for sub-foveal neo-vascular lesions. At the end of september 1996, 52 patients were evaluable with a 1-year follow-up. Group 1 (Department de Radiotherapie Oncologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Lyon Sud) included 26 patients who were treated with a lateral beam of 6 MV photons. The irradiation dose were 20 Gy in five fractions for small lesions and 28.8 Gy in eight fractions for larger lesions. Group 2 (Centre Oncologie Radiotherapie Saint-Jean) was composed of 26 patients treated with a mini-beam of 25 MV photons via lateral arc-therapy. Beam diameters (14 and 18 mm) were adapted to the lesion size. The total dose was 16 Gy in four fractions or 20 Gy in five fractions. Functional and anatomical results were assessed at 3, 6, 9 months and 1 year after radiation therapy. Stable visual acuity was observed in 44 % (23/52) of the patients and visual acuity was improved in 35 % (18/52) of the patients at 6 months. Good functional results reached 79 % (41/52) at 6 months and 74 % (17/23) at 12 months. There was no statistical difference between the two groups and dose levels. All severe complications (1 cataract, 3 dilated choroidal vessels, and 2 papillitis) occurred in group 1. Though it is too early to conclude on the best dose level, radiotherapy of sub-foveal neo-vascular lesions of AMD that cannot be treated via laser therapy provides encouraging results. The technique used must be very precise to adequately irradiate the fovea and spare surrounding sensitive areas. Further studies and trials involving patients' randomization are necessary to confirm these preliminary results. (author)

  13. Different styles of image-guided radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herk, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    To account for geometric uncertainties during radiotherapy, safety margins are applied. In many cases, these margins overlap organs at risk, thereby limiting dose escalation. The aim of image-guided radiotherapy is to improve the accuracy by imaging tumors and critical structures on the machine just

  14. Radiotherapy for calcaneodynia. Results of a single center prospective randomized dose optimization trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Jeremias, C.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work was to compare the efficacy of two different dose fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of patients with calcaneodynia. Between February 2006 and April 2010, 457 consecutive evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective randomized trial. All patients received radiotherapy using the orthovoltage technique. One radiotherapy series consisted of 6 single fractions/3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks a second radiation series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. Endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after radiotherapy using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). The overall response rate for all patients was 87 % directly after and 88 % 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The mean VAS values before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after treatment for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 65.5 {+-} 22.1 and 64.0 {+-} 20.5 (p = 0.188), 34.8 {+-} 24.7 and 39.0 {+-} 26.3 (p = 0.122), and 25.1 {+-} 26.8 and 28.9 {+-} 26.8 (p = 0.156), respectively. The mean CPS before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after treatment was 10.1 {+-} 2.7 and 10.0 {+-} 3.0 (p = 0.783), 5.6 {+-} 3.7 and 6.0 {+-} 3.9 (p = 0.336), 4.0 {+-} 4.1 and 4.3 {+-} 3.6 (p = 0.257), respectively. No statistically significant differences between the two single dose trial arms for early (p = 0.216) and delayed response (p = 0.080) were found. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for the management of calcaneodynia. For radiation protection reasons, the dose for a radiotherapy series is recommended not to exceed 3-6 Gy. (orig.)

  15. The potential of radiotherapy of lymphoma infiltrations of the CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupek, P.; Hanova, I.; Pohankova, R.

    1997-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a very important element in the complex therapy of lymphomas of the central nervous system, significantly improving the results of the aggressive system chemotherapy. Irradiation of considerable tissue volumes and the application of rather high total doses are recommended. In view of the unfavorable prognosis and biological behavior of the tumor, the total treatment (including chemotherapy and radiotherapy) should be aggressive. (author)

  16. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitspatrick, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hyperthermia and radiotherapy have for long been used to assist in the control of tumours, either as separate entities, or, in a combined treatment scheme. This paper outlines why hyperthermia works, thermal dose and the considerations required in the timing when hyperthermia is combined with radiotherapy. Previously reported results for hyperthermia and radiotherapy used together are also presented. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  17. Transition from 2-D radiotherapy to 3-D conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    in number in the near future. Since these treatment techniques are perceived as the cutting-edge of development in the field, there is a concern that centres and countries need orientation as to the preparatory conditions and resources involved. In addition the current status of the evidence supporting the use of IMRT in terms of patient outcomes has to be kept in mind when planning to invest in these technologies. To respond to the needs of Member States to establish the guidelines for the transition from 2-D radiotherapy through 3-D CRT to IMRT several consultants and advisory group meetings were convened to discuss the necessary steps and the milestones for the transfer from 2-D to 3-D conformal radiotherapy and to IMRT. As a result, the present report serves as complementary recommendations to an IAEA recent publication on setting-up a basic radiotherapy programme. Both reports provide a comprehensive overview of the required radiotherapy infrastructure and processes for a broad spectrum of radiotherapy services. The current publication is addressed to those professionals and administrators involved in the development, implementation and management of radiation oncology programmes who seek to improve the conventional approach with the aim of achieving higher precision by transition from simpler radiation treatment approaches to advanced radiotherapy. This report provides the guidelines and highlights the milestones to be achieved by radiotherapy centres in the transition from 2-D to 3-D treatment planning and delivery and further, in transitioning to IMRT. These guidelines and milestones facilitate the process and represent continuation of the work at the IAEA for providing access to safer and better quality treatment for the steadily increasing number of cancer patients in Member States

  18. Practical recommendations for breathing-adapted radiotherapy; Bonnes pratiques pour la radiotherapie asservie a la respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, L.; Giraud, P.; Rosenwald, J.C. [Institut Curie, Dept. d' Oncologie-radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Dumas, J.L.; Lorchel, F. [CHU de Besancon, Hopital Jean-Minjoz, Service Radiotherapie, 25 - Besancon (France); Marre, D. [Institut Claudius-Regaud, Dept. des Radiations, 31 - Toulouse (France); Dupont, S. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' Oncoradiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Varmenot, N. [Centre Henri-Becquerel, UnitE de Physique Medicale, 76 - Rouen (France); Ginestet, C. [Centre Leon-Berard, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 69 - Lyon (France); Caron, J. [Institut Bergonie, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Marchesi, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Ferreira, I. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Dept. d' Oncologie Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Garcia, R. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Service de Radiotherapie, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2007-06-15

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath-hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active techniques, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily holds his/her breath. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. This work summarizes the different experiences of the centers of the STIC 2003 project. It describes the different techniques, gives an overview of the literature and proposes a practice based on our experience. (authors)

  19. Post surgical radiotherapy in colon neoplasm: preliminary results of the study in phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Lopez, M.; Garcia, S.; Tasende, B.

    1993-01-01

    Radiotherapy was not used profusely in the the cancer of the colon treatment be it in the therapy form or administration. In the actual moment for a better understandings in its history natural and the knowledge of the factors presage recurrence, the radiotherapy have precise indications about the surgery. It analyze the population of the patients with cancer of the colon to determine the value of the radiant proceeding in the regional control and it tolerance. Finally, is emphasized in the necessity of the integration of the other procedures, being a therapeutic method that diminishes the-regional results with a permissible toxicity (AU) [es

  20. T1 glottis radiotherapy: functional results and patients satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoury, F.; Nasr, E.; Nehme Nasr, D.; Ghorra, C.; Fares, G.; Tabchy, B.; Ghorra, C.; Haddad, A.

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective series confirms the efficiency of the radical radiotherapy for the T1 glottal cancers as well as its satisfying tolerance with a low toxicity; most of patients were satisfied of their voice quality. (N.C.)

  1. Radiation dose in radiotherapy from prescription to delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Cancer incidence is increasing in developed as well as in developing countries. Cancer may be expected to become a prominent problem and this will result in public pressure for higher priorities on cancer care. In some relatively advanced developing countries radiation therapy is applied in about 50% of all detected cancer cases. Approximately half of these treatments have curative intent. Surgery and radiotherapy applied individually or combined result in the cure of about 40% of all patients. The application of chemotherapy alone has curative effects only on a small percentage of cancer patients. It is encouraging to note that the results achieved by radiation therapy show continuous improvement. This can be traced back to a number of developments: increased knowledge regarding tumour and normal tissue response to radiation, early diagnosis with improved tumour localisation, improved dosimetry and dose planning. The introduction of modern equipment has been crucial in these developments and makes possible a more accurate target delineation, better treatment planning resulting in irradiation of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) with a highly uniform dose and, simultaneously, a reduction in dose to healthy tissues outside the PTV. Experience shows that high quality radiotherapy can only be achieved if its conducted by a skilled team working closely together with good communication between various categories of staff. Therefore, seminars and training courses covering all aspects of radiotherapy and dosimetry are of great importance and should be held regionally or nationally on a regular basis. Refs, figs, tabs.

  2. Radiation dose in radiotherapy from prescription to delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Cancer incidence is increasing in developed as well as in developing countries. Cancer may be expected to become a prominent problem and this will result in public pressure for higher priorities on cancer care. In some relatively advanced developing countries radiation therapy is applied in about 50% of all detected cancer cases. Approximately half of these treatments have curative intent. Surgery and radiotherapy applied individually or combined result in the cure of about 40% of all patients. The application of chemotherapy alone has curative effects only on a small percentage of cancer patients. It is encouraging to note that the results achieved by radiation therapy show continuous improvement. This can be traced back to a number of developments: increased knowledge regarding tumour and normal tissue response to radiation, early diagnosis with improved tumour localisation, improved dosimetry and dose planning. The introduction of modern equipment has been crucial in these developments and makes possible a more accurate target delineation, better treatment planning resulting in irradiation of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) with a highly uniform dose and, simultaneously, a reduction in dose to healthy tissues outside the PTV. Experience shows that high quality radiotherapy can only be achieved if its conducted by a skilled team working closely together with good communication between various categories of staff. Therefore, seminars and training courses covering all aspects of radiotherapy and dosimetry are of great importance and should be held regionally or nationally on a regular basis. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Results of Radiotherapy for the Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chul Yong; Choi, Myung Sun; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1988-01-01

    One hundred fifty-four patients with the carcinoma of the uterine cervix were studied retrospectively to assess the result and impact of treatment at Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University, Hae-Wha Hospital from Feb 1981 through Dec. 1986. Prior to radiotherapy, the patients were evaluated and staged by recommendation of FIGO including physical examination, pelvic examination, cystoscopy, rectosigmoidoscopy, chest X-ray, IVP, Ba enema. Also, an additional pelvic CT scan was obtained for some of the patients. The patients were treated by radiotherapy alone or adjuvant postoperative irradiation; In case of radiation therapy only, whole pelvic irradiation was given with C0-69 teletherapy unit via AP and PA parallel opposing fields or 4-oblique fields, 180 cGy per day, 5 days per week and intracavitary insertion was performed. Three dimensional quantitative demonstration of tumor volume is also important in planning radiation therapy. Another advantage of CT scan was detection of recurrent tumor after radiation or surgery. Local control rate of tumor according to the size was 91.3% for less than 5 cm in size and 44.6% in tumor over 5 cm (p<0.0068). Thirty out of 50 recurrent sites has locoregional failures and 17 cases has distant metastases. And the papa-aortic lymph nodes were the most common site for distant metastases. The most common complication was temporal rectal bleeding which was controlled most by conservative management. However, 4 patients required for endoscopic cauterization. The 5-year survival rates showed; stage la and lb 95%, stage lla 81% stage llb 67%, stage llla 37.7%, stage lllb 23%, and 3-year survival rate of stage lVa showed 11.6%, retrospectively

  4. Long-Term Results of Conformal Radiotherapy for Progressive Airway Amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Grillone, Gregory A. [Department of Otolaryngology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Bohrs, Harry K.; Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Berk, John L. [Department of Medicine, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of conformal external beam radiotherapy (RT) for local control of progressive airway amyloidosis. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of patients with biopsy-proven progressive airway amyloidosis treated with conformal RT between 2000 and 2006 at Boston Medical Center. The patients were evaluated for performance status and pulmonary function, with computed tomography and endoscopy after RT compared with the pretreatment studies. Local control was defined as the lack of progression of airway wall thickening on computed tomography imaging and stable endobronchial deposits by endoscopy. Results: A total of 10 symptomatic airway amyloidosis patients (3 laryngeal and 7 tracheobronchial) received RT to a median total dose of 20 Gy in 10 fractions within 2 weeks. At a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 1.5-10.3), 8 of the 10 patients had local control. The remaining 2 patients underwent repeat RT 6 and 8.4 months after initial RT, 1 for persistent bronchial obstruction and 1 for progression of subglottic amyloid disease with subsequent disease control. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status improved at a median of 18 months after RT compared with the baseline values, from a median score of 2 to a median of 1 (p = .035). Airflow (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) measurements increased compared with the baseline values at each follow-up evaluation, reaching a 10.7% increase (p = .087) at the last testing (median duration, 64.8 months). Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 esophagitis, occurring in 40% of patients. No late toxicity was observed. Conclusions: RT prevented progressive amyloid deposition in 8 of 10 patients, resulting in a marginally increased forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and improved functional capacity, without late morbidity.

  5. Radiotherapy Results of Midline Malignant Reticulosis (MMR)

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    Yun, Sang Mo; Kim, Jae Cheol

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : This study was performed to evaluate survival, failure patterns, and prognositc factors of MMR patients after radiation therapy. We also discussed the need for chemotherapy. Materials and Methods : A retrospective analysis was done for 23 patients with MMR who were treated with radiation therapy form June 1985 to November 1992. There were 19 male and 4 female patients. The patients age ranged from 17 to 71 years(median 39 years). Systemic symptoms including fever, weight loss, or malaise were found in 30% of the patients. He nasal cavity was most frequently involved. No patients had nodal involvement at diagnosis. There were 2 patients with distant metastasis at presentation. Radiation therapy was delivered five times a week, 1.8 Gy daily, total 45∼54 Gy(median 50.4 Gy) using 6 MV X-ray. No patients received chemotherapy as initial treatment. Results : Overall 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 52.4% and 44.1%, respectively. Seventy percent(12/17) of the patients achieved complete response to radiotherapy., and 29.4%(5/17) achieved partial response. The patients with complete response showed a better 5-year survival rate than those with partial response (66.9% vs. 20%, p-0.004). Symptom duration before diagnosis, the presence of systemic symptom, ad the number of primary sites had no influence on survival. The patterns of failure were as flows: local failure(1), failure in adjacent site(1), local and distant failure(1), distant metastasis(2), and conversion to malignant lymphoma(1). W could not find factors associated with the patterns of failure. Conclusion : The most important factor associated with survival was the response to radiotherapy. Seventeen percent of the patients had distant metastasis, and the salvage after distant metastasis was not successful. However, about 50% of the patients could achieve long-term survival with local radiation therapy alone. Therefore, chemotherapy of MMR should be done after a prospective randomized study for

  6. Results of patient specific quality assurance for patients undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Clements, Natalie; Cramb, Jim; Wanigaratne, Derrick M.; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Siva, Shankar; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Hypofractionated image guided radiotherapy of extracranial targets has become increasingly popular as a treatment modality for inoperable patients with one or more small lesions, often referred to as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). This report details the results of the physical quality assurance (QA) program used for the first 33 lung cancer SABR radiotherapy 3D conformal treatment plans in our centre. SABR involves one or few fractions of high radiation dose delivered in many small fields or arcs with tight margins to mobile targets often delivered through heterogeneous media with non-coplanar beams. We have conducted patient-specific QA similar to the more common intensity modulated radiotherapy QA with particular reference to motion management. Individual patient QA was performed in a Perspex phantom using point dose verification with an ionisation chamber and radiochromic film for verification of the dose distribution both with static and moving detectors to verify motion management strategies. While individual beams could vary by up to 7 %, the total dose in the target was found to be within ±2 % of the prescribed dose for all 33 plans. Film measurements showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between planned and measured isodose line shapes and dimensions. The QA process highlighted the need to account for couch transmission and demonstrated that the ITV construction was appropriate for the treatment technique used. QA is essential for complex radiotherapy deliveries such as SABR. We found individual patient QA helpful in setting up the technique and understanding potential weaknesses in SABR workflow, thus providing confidence in SABR delivery.

  7. Radiotherapy for Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Review of the Literature

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    Luluel Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare form of non-melanoma skin cancer of neuroendocrine origin. Optimal management of patients is controversial and the role of radiotherapy is unclear. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to review the efficacy of RT in the treatment of both local and distant metastatic disease from MCC. Methods. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE (1946—January Week 1 2012 and Embase (1980–2012 Week 2. Articles of interest analyze the efficacy of radiotherapy for treatment of metastatic MCC and did not exclude case reports. Results. All articles except one focusing on the role of radiotherapy were of retrospective origin or case series. Significant limitations applied in all studies due to limited sample sizes and the retrospective nature of these studies. Radiotherapy improves locoregional control in the adjuvant setting, and many series suggest an improvement in overall survival. In cases where surgery is not possible, definitive radiotherapy may be an as-efficacious alternative. The radiosensitive nature of MCC coupled with existing reports suggests that treatment via current protocols for other primary tumors is adequate. Conclusion. Further studies should be conducted prospectively to clarify the true role of radiotherapy in metastatic MCC.

  8. The Radiotherapy Result of the Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Charn Il; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Kim, Chong Sun; Kim, Noe Kyeong

    1983-01-01

    A total of 47 patients with a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was treated in Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital during last 4 years. Of the 47 patients, 23(49%) had undifferentiated carcinoma, 20(43%) had squamous cell carcinoma, while 4(8%) had lymphoepithelioma. Most of the patients(71%) has Stage IV disease, cervical lymph node metastases were found in 36(77%) and distant metastasis was found in 1 at the time of diagnosis. Complete response rate after radiotherapy for 47 patients of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was 85.1%. The overall actuarial 3 year survival rates was 0.718 and the disease free actuarial 3 year survival rates was 0.468. Nodal involvement and symptom duration were statistically significant influencing factors for actuarial survival rate. Treatment failures were found in 20 patients (42.6%), local recurrence only in 6(30%), local and neck recurrence in 3(15%), local recurrence with metastasis in 4(20%) and distant metastasis only in 7(35%). Local failures were more frequent in the patients with cranial nerve symptoms (P=0.032). Distant metastases were more frequent with T4 lesions (P=0.047), and with nodal involvement (P<0.01). Retreatment after the tumor recurrence was chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, two patients retreated for local recurrence were alive without evidence of disease for more than 19 and 44 months after retreatment

  9. Pre-Radiotherapy dental evaluation criteria and treatment needs of oral side effects after head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Arriagada, Wilfredo Alejandro; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Carvalho de Andrade, Marco Aurelio; De Andrade Elias, Rogerio; Ajudarte Lopes, Marcio

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to present pre-radiotherapy evaluation criteria and the main needs for treatment of these patients after the radiation therapy. Were revised articles in English, Spanish and Portuguese language between 1995 and 2009 indexed in Pubmed and Scielo. The keywords were oral cancer and radiotherapy, complications in head and neck radiotherapy, oral pre-radiotherapy evaluation.The adverse complications of radiotherapy in head and neck area could be temporary or late. The late effects, such as radiation caries and osteorradionecrosis could be directly associated with the fact that previous dental evaluation was not performed and can severely affect the post-operatory quality of life. The participation of the dentist in the multidisciplinary team and dental evaluation of the patients that will receive radiotherapy in the head and neck area are of vital importance to improve the post-operatory quality of life of these patients

  10. Changes in performance status of elderly patients after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of external radiation therapy for patients 80 years old and older. We analyzed changes in the performance status (PS) of 1353 patients by external radiotherapy at Osaka Teishin Hospital. In addition, factors influencing PS change and interruption of treatment were assessed in patients undergoing radical and palliative radiotherapy. Among elderly patients aged 80 years or more (n=67), two patients showed deterioration in PS (3%), whereas 128 (10%) did so among those 79 years old or younger. The rate of treatment completion was 90% (60/67) for patients aged 80 years and over compared with 89% (1146/1286) for younger patients. Changes in PS were more frequent for palliative treatment (improvement 83/683, 12%; deterioration 77/683, 11%) than for radical treatment (improvement 12/305, 4%:, deterioration 21/305, 7%) because patients with better performance status and early disease stages underwent radical treatment. For radical radiotherapy, patients with advanced disease (stages III and IV) showed more changes (improvement 4/108, 4%; deterioration 17/108, 16%) than those with early ones (stages I and II) (improvement 7/132, 5%; deterioration 3/132, 2%) (p<0.01). Better treatment results showed a higher treatment completion rate (CR 99%, PR 86%) than poor treatment results (NC 75%, PD 50%) (p<0.01). For palliative therapy, better performance status (PS 0-2) showed a better correlation with completion of treatment (403/451 or 89%) than did poor performance status (PS 3-4) (174/232, 75%) (p<0.01). Age is not a limiting factor for external radiation therapy. Poor performance status is a significant predisposing factor for interruption of palliative radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Treatment results of radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervical esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazunari; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kusumi, Fusako; Takakuwa, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Satoru; Murakami, Masao; Okamoto, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The methods and results of treatment for cancer of the cervical esophagus differ from those for cancer of the thoracic esophagus. Our objective was to retrospectively review the outcome for cervical esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with definitive radiotherapy from 1988 to 2002 were enrolled in the study. Clinical stage (UICC 1997) was stage I in five, II in six, III in 12 and IV in four. Concurrent head and neck malignancy was found in six patients (22%). The mean radiation dose was 66 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil) was performed in 23 patients. The actuarial overall survival rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 55.6%, 37.9% and 37.9%, respectively, with a median survival of 13.9 months. In the patients with stage I, the 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 75% and 75%, respectively. With univariate analysis, only two of the possible prognostic factors were found to actually influence survival: performance status (p<0.01) and tumor length (p<0.01). The survival of patients with cervical esophageal cancer remains poor. It is thought that organ preservation is possible by definitive chemoradiation for early cancer

  12. Treatment results and prognostic analysis of 47 patients with urethral transitional cell carcinoma treated with post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ke; Hou Xiaorong; Shen Jie; Lian Xin; Sun Shuai; Zhang Fuquan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors of 47 patients with primary urethral transitional cell carcinoma treated with post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: From October 1998 to October 2008, 47 patients with primary urethral transitional cell carcinoma received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. Thirty-one patients had stage T 3 /T 4 disease, 7 had lymph node metastasis. Thirty-nine patients had G3 tumor, 13 had stump-positive. The median radiotherapy dose was 60 Gy (36-64 Gy). 81% patients (38/47) were treated with regional irradiation. Results: The median follow-up time was 21 months (6 -88 months). The follow-up rate was 92%. The median overall survival time was 35 months (5 -88 months). The 2-and 5-year overall survival rates were 57% and 49%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the median overall survival time was better in patients with stage T 1 or T 2 compared with stage T 3 or T 4 tumor (42 months vs. 19 months, χ 2 =7.28, P=0.007), with age of ≤65 years compared with >65 years (28 mouths vs 18 months,χ 2 =8.23, P =0.004). There was no significant difference in the long term survival in patients with non-radical surgery compared with radical mastectomy (21 months vs. 20 months, χ 2 = 0.90, P = 0.344). In multivariate analysis, the stage T 3 or T 4 (χ 2 = 7.89, P =0.005), >65 years old (χ 2 = 4.85, P = 0.028), renal pelvis involvement (χ 2 = 5.65, P = 0.018), and tumor located in the mid or inferior segment (χ 2 =6.08,P =0.014) were factors associated with poorer prognosis. Conclusions: Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy can improve the efficacy of patients with locally advanced urethral transitional cell carcinoma. Advanced T stage and > 65 years age are associated with poorer prognosis. (authors)

  13. Radiotherapy following bronchial artery infusion (BAI) chemotherapy for lung cancer. Analysis of long-term treatment results of 168 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaji, Noriaki

    1995-01-01

    Local control is known to contribute to a better survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Radiotherapy with bronchial artery infusion (BAI) of anticancer agents was employed to improve the response rate and prognosis of lung cancer. One hundred and sixty-eight patients of lung cancer were treated by this combined therapy. There were 138 with NSCLC and 30 with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The overall cumulative 5-year survival rate of NSCLC was 11.3% and median survival time (MST) was 12 months. The response rate of 84% was obtained by this combined therapy. CR cases showed a better result of 35% of 5-year survival. Histology did not influence survival. Stage IIIA patients showed a significantly better survival than stage IIIB patients (p<0.05). No significant difference in survival was observed in the MMC/ADM group and the CDDP group. In SCLC patients, the overall cumulative 5-year survival was 4% and MST was 12 months. In limited disease (LD) group, MST was 13 months and extensive disease (ED) showed 11 months of MST. Two-year survival of LD was 18%. The response rate of this combined therapy was 94% and CR rate was 31%. On patterns of failure, the lower local recurrence rate of 6% (1/18) suggested contribution of BAI in SCLC. However, the long-term survival of SCLC was not greatly improved by radiotherapy combined with BAI. Thus these results suggest that it is necessary for improvement of survival to achieve CR in NSCLC patients, but local control may not contribute to it in SCLC patients. (author)

  14. Treatment results of non-operated lung cancer by radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy

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    Seino, Yasuo; Watarai, Jiro; Kobayashi, Mitsuru; Sashi, Ryuji; Shindo, Masaaki; Kato, Toshio

    1993-01-01

    The treatment results of 152 non-operated lung cancer patients were analyzed. Median survival times (MST; months) for all patients based on the stage (UICC'87) were 28 M (n=12) for stage I, 18 M (n=16) for stage II, 8 M (n=58) for stage III A, 6 M (n=46) for stage III B, and 4 M (n=20) for stage IV. The effect of combined radiochemotherapy was quite evident in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients. Here, the MST of the radiotherapy alone group (n=11) was 5 M, whereas that of radiochemotherapy group (n=14) was 12 M (p<0.05). In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the effect of radiochemotherapy was recognized only in stage III A and III B patients. In this case, the MST of the radiotherapy alone group (n=50) was 6 M, whereas that of the radiochemotherapy group (n=38) was 9 M (p<0.05). The duration of time from the initial therapy to the occurrence of distant metastasis in stage III A and III B patients was longer in the radiochemotherapy group than in the radiotherapy alone group (p<0.05). As for the metastatic sites, a delay in the occurrence of brain, lung and pleural metastasis was also recognized in the radiochemotherapy group (p<0.05). In this retrospective study, the value of combined radiochemotherapy was evident in SCLC and stage III-NSCLC patients. However, there was considerable case to case variation in the dosage, combination of agents and timing of chemotherapy. Recently, more aggressive chemotherapy is now being applied. (author)

  15. Radiotherapy treatment checking procedures throughout Australasia: results of a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, L.; Kron, T.; Howlett, S.

    1996-01-01

    In July 1995, a questionnaire was forwarded to thirty two physicists overseeing Radiation Oncology Departments and brachytherapy in hospitals throughout Australia and New Zealand. From the thirty seven hospitals reached by this survey, details were gathered on thirty hospitals, including the Newcastle In most radiotherapy centres where treatment planning is performed by radiation therapists, at least some of the treatment sheets and their calculations are double checked by radiotherapy physicists. While 23% checked the treatment sheets of all patients, in the majority of centres physicists were found to check only a minor selection, that is, less than 20% of all treatment sheets. Only in six centres physicists were not involved. 5 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  16. A prospective study of cognitive functions following conventional radiotherapy for supratentorial gliomas in young adults: 4-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigliani, Maria-Claudia; Sichez, Nicole; Poisson, Michel; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of limited field conventional cerebral radiotherapy (RT) on cognitive functions of adults. Methods and Materials: A prospective neuropsychological study was performed on 17 patients who underwent conventional limited field RT for a low-grade glioma or for a good-prognosis anaplastic glioma. Results were compared with 14 control patients with low-grade gliomas who did not receive radiotherapy. Results: A transient significant decrease of performances for the Reaction Time test was observed at 6 months in the irradiated group with return to baseline values 12 months post-RT. Subsequently, no other significant changes were observed over a 48-month follow-up period in the irradiated and nonirradiated groups. Nonetheless, when the scores of each patient were considered over time instead of the mean values of the group, one irradiated patient (5.8%) experienced progressive deterioration while two irradiated patients (11.7%) experienced long-lasting improvement. Individual changes did not occur in the control group. Conclusion: This study suggests that a transient early delayed drop of neuropsychological performances at 6 months is frequent following limited field conventional RT, but the risk of long-term cognitive dysfunction after irradiation is low, at least in the first 4 years after RT and when it is administered alone in young adults

  17. Radiotherapy equipment and departments in the European countries: Final results from the ESTRO-HERO survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau, Cai; Defourny, Noémie; Malicki, Julian; Dunscombe, Peter; Borras, Josep M.; Coffey, Mary; Slotman, Ben; Bogusz, Marta; Gasparotto, Chiara; Lievens, Yolande; Kokobobo, Arianit; Sedlmayer, Felix; Slobina, Elena; Feyen, Karen; Hadjieva, Tatiana; Odrazka, Karel; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Jaal, Jana; Bly, Ritva; Chauvet, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background: Documenting the distribution of radiotherapy departments and the availability of radiotherapy equipment in the European countries is an important part of HERO – the ESTRO Health Economics in Radiation Oncology project. HERO has the overall aim to develop a knowledge base of the provision of radiotherapy in Europe and build a model for health economic evaluation of radiation treatments at the European level. The aim of the current report is to describe the distribution of radiotherapy equipment in European countries. Methods: An 84-item questionnaire was sent out to European countries, principally through their national societies. The current report includes a detailed analysis of radiotherapy departments and equipment (questionnaire items 26–29), analyzed in relation to the annual number of treatment courses and the socio-economic status of the countries. The analysis is based on validated responses from 28 of the 40 European countries defined by the European Cancer Observatory (ECO). Results: A large variation between countries was found for most parameters studied. There were 2192 linear accelerators, 96 dedicated stereotactic machines, and 77 cobalt machines reported in the 27 countries where this information was available. A total of 12 countries had at least one cobalt machine in use. There was a median of 0.5 simulator per MV unit (range 0.3–1.5) and 1.4 (range 0.4–4.4) simulators per department. Of the 874 simulators, a total of 654 (75%) were capable of 3D imaging (CT-scanner or CBCT-option). The number of MV machines (cobalt, linear accelerators, and dedicated stereotactic machines) per million inhabitants ranged from 1.4 to 9.5 (median 5.3) and the average number of MV machines per department from 0.9 to 8.2 (median 2.6). The average number of treatment courses per year per MV machine varied from 262 to 1061 (median 419). While 69% of MV units were capable of IMRT only 49% were equipped for image guidance (IGRT). There was a clear

  18. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  19. Magneto-radiotherapy: using magnetic fields to guide dose deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nettelbeck, H.; Lerch, M.; Takacs, G.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Magneto-radiotherapy is the application of magnetic fields during radiotherapy procedures. It aims to improve the quality of cancer treatment by using magnetic fields to 1 g uide the dose-deposition of electrons in tissue. Monte Carlo (MC) studies have investigated magneto-radiotherapy applied to conventional photon and electron linac beams. In this study, a combination of MC PENELOPE simulations and physical experiments were done to investigate magneto-radiotherapy applied to MRT (Microbeam Radiation Therapy) and conventional linac radiotherapy.

  20. Results of radiotherapy of malignant tumors of the epi-, meso- and hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrcke, M.

    1980-01-01

    It is reported about the treatment results of 256 patients who suffered from a malign pharyngeal tumor and were irradiated with Gammatron and/or Betatron (19 MeV). The intended dosage for tumors was 6000 rd, for the usually also radiated cervical lymphatic passages 5000 rd. Radiotherapy was performed over 6 weeks in single fractions of 200 to 250 rd. All three pharyngeal regions together present a 3-year-survival rate of 28% and a 5-year-survival rate of 17%. Those patients who received surgical intervention and radiotherapy reached a 3-year-survival rate of 36% and a 5-year-survival rate of 22%, the exclusively irradiated patients achieved rates of 26% and 16%. In about the half of all malignant cases relapses and/or metastases developed within two years after therapeutic treatment had been finished. Today 40 of the 245 patients who were followed up live without any symptoms or signs. The best symptom-free survival time is 19 years. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Effective local control of vertebral metastases by simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy. Preliminary results

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    Lubgan, Dorota; Ziegaus, Anke; Semrau, Sabine; Lambrecht, Ulrike; Lettmaier, Sebastian; Fietkau, Rainer [Erlangen University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-11-14

    The primary endpoint was to improve local tumour control of patients with metastatic spinal tumours by stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and dose escalation by simultaneous, integrated boost (PTV-boost). We used a whole vertebral body (PTV-elective) contouring approach. Secondary endpoints were severity of acute and chronic adverse effects and overall survival. In all, 33 patients with metastases of the vertebral column were treated at Erlangen University Hospital. SBRT was given in 12 or 10 fractions. The metastatic lesion (PTV-boost) received 3.6 Gy (range 3.0-4.51 Gy) per fraction for a total of 42.0 Gy (24.36-48.0 Gy) and the whole vertebra (PTV-elective) received 2.85 Gy (range 1.8-3.6 Gy) per fraction for a total of 32.39 Gy (range 21.60-38.0 Gy). Patients were followed up every 3 months. Local control rate of all patients was 93 % at 12 and 24 months. The overall survival rate was 54 % at 12 months, 38 % at 24 months and 18 % at 36 months. No radiation myelopathy occurred. The most frequently observed adverse events in 3 cases was oesophagitis grade 2. SBRT with simultaneous, integrated boost was associated with excellent local control of 93 % after 24 months. This result shows the possibility of delivering escalated doses to the target while still keeping the incidence of side effects low. This study forms the basis for a future randomised controlled trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (10 fractions of 3 Gy) with hypofractionated dose intensified SBRT (12 fractions of 3 Gy + integrated boost 12 fractions of 4 Gy) for improvement of local tumour control and pain. (orig.) [German] Das primaere Ziel der Studie war die Verbesserung der lokalen Tumorkontrolle von Patienten mit Wirbelkoerpermetastasen mittels stereotaktischer Radiotherapie (SBRT) mit Dosiseskalation durch einen simultan integrierten Boost (PTV-Boost). Dabei wurde der ganze Wirbelkoerper konturiert (PTV-Elektive). Zu den sekundaeren Endpunkten der Studie gehoerten der Schweregrad von

  2. Benign painful shoulder syndrome. Initial results of a single-center prospective randomized radiotherapy dose-optimization trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, O.J.; Hertel, S.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare the efficacy of two different dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of patients with benign painful shoulder syndrome. Patients and methods: Between February 2006 and February 2010, 312 consecutive evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective randomized trial. All patients received radiotherapy with an orthovoltage technique. One radiotherapy course consisted of 6 single fractions in 3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks, a second radiation series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. The endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, right after, and 6 weeks after radiotherapy using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). Results: The overall response rate for all patients was 83% directly after and 85% 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The mean VAS values before, directly after, and 6 weeks after treatment for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 56.8 ± 23.7 and 53.2 ± 21.8 (p = 0.158), 38.2 ± 26.1 and 34.0 ± 24.5 (p = 0.189), and 33.0 ± 27.2 and 23.7 ± 22.7 (p = 0.044), respectively. The mean CPS before, directly after, and 6 weeks after treatment was 9.7 ± 3.0 and 9.5 ± 2.7 (p = 0.309), 6.1 ± 3.6 and 5.4 ± 3.6 (p = 0.096), 5.3 ± 3.7 and 4.1 ± 3.7 (p = 0.052), respectively. Despite a slight advantage in the VAS analysis for the 1.0 Gy group for delayed response, the CPS analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between the two single-dose trial arms for early (p = 0.652) and delayed response quality (p = 0.380). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for the management of benign painful shoulder syndrome. Concerning radiation protection, the dose for a radiotherapy series is recommended not to exceed 3-6 Gy. (orig.)

  3. Postoperative radiotherapy of uterine sarcoma: A multicentric retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champetier, C.; Cowen, D.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Resbeut, M.; Azria, D.; Salem, N.; Tessier, E.; Ellis, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Surgery is the treatment of choice for localized uterine sarcomas. We conducted a retrospective study to define prognostic factors. Patients and methods. - We studied 111 cases of patients treated by adjuvant radiotherapy for uterine sarcoma in seven French centers. The median decline was 31 months. We conducted a univariate analysis to identify factors correlated with local recurrence. The statistically significant factors were studied in multivariate analysis by Cox model. Results. - The median dose of external beam radiotherapy was 45 Gy. Forty-three percent of patients had vaginal vault brachytherapy and 21 % chemotherapy. Only 6.3 % of patients had complications of acute grade III and 8.1 % of long-term sequelae of radiotherapy. The survival rate at 5 years was 74.6 %. They noted 12.6 % of isolated locoregional recurrences, against 29.7 % for distant recurrences, 80 % were pulmonary. Factors correlated with the risk of locoregional relapse were menopausal status (P = 0.045) and surgical margins suspicious or not healthy (P = 0.0095). The chemotherapy did not improve overall survival or disease free survival but the numbers were low. Conclusion. - The postoperative radiotherapy provides good local control in this disease. Brachytherapy is sometimes done, but it does not improve local control. Chemotherapy is not a standard localized stage but the rate of metastatic recurrence calls for the development of strategies involving systemic treatment with radiotherapy. (authors)

  4. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  5. The IAEA/WHO TLD postal programme for radiotherapy hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Andreo, P.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1969 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), together with the World Health Organization (WHO), has performed postal TLD audits to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams in developing countries. A number of changes have recently been implemented to improve the efficiency of the IAEA/WHO TLD programme. The IAEA has increased the number of participants and reduced significantly the total turn-around time to provide results to the hospitals within the shortest possible time following the TLD irradiations. The IAEA has established a regular follow-up programme for hospitals with results outside acceptance limits of ±5%. The IAEA has, over 30 years, verified the calibration of more than 3300 clinical photon beams at approximately 1000 radiotherapy hospitals. Only 65% of those hospitals who receive TLDs for the first time have results within the acceptance limits, while more than 80% of the users that have benefited from a previous TLD audit are successful. The experience of the IAEA in TLD audits has been transferred to the national level. The IAEA offers a standardized TLD methodology, provides Guidelines and gives technical back-up to the national TLD networks. The unsatisfactory status of the dosimetry for radiotherapy, as noted in the past, is gradually improving however, the dosimetry practices in many hospitals in developing countries need to be revised in order to reach adequate conformity to hospitals that perform modern radiotherapy in Europe, USA and Australia. (author)

  6. Combined chemo/radiotherapy of cancer: present state and prospects for use with high-LET radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy added to low-LET radiotherapy has improved survival and in some cases local control. In some instances the combination has yielded increased normal tissue damage. Similar results can be expected, as confirmed by intestinal crypt cell experiments, with high-LET. Less interaction than with low-LET appears to occur with agents blocking sublethal damage repair or causing synchronization. (author)

  7. Dosimetric Feasibility of Hypofractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Neoadjuvant Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Adams, Judith C; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Alexander, Brian M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor and normal tissue dosimetry of a 5 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) x 5 fraction proton radiotherapy schedule, before initiating a clinical trial of neoadjuvant, short-course proton radiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: The first 9 pancreatic cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (1.8 Gy x 28) at the Massachusetts General Hospital had treatment plans generated using a 5 CGE x 5 fraction proton regimen. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant. Plans were optimized for target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Hypofractionated proton and conventionally fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans both provided acceptable target volume coverage and dose homogeneity. Improved dose conformality provided by the hypofractionated proton regimen resulted in significant sparing of kidneys, liver, and small bowel, evidenced by significant reductions in the mean doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, to these structures. Kidney and liver sparing was most evident in low-dose regions (≤20% prescribed dose for both kidneys and ≤60% prescribed dose for liver). Improvements in small-bowel dosimetry were observed in high- and low-dose regions. Mean stomach and duodenum doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, were similar for the two techniques. Conclusions: A proton radiotherapy schedule consisting of 5 fractions of 5 CGE as part of neoadjuvant therapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas seems dosimetrically feasible, providing excellent target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue sparing. Hypofractionated proton radiotherapy in this setting merits Phase I clinical trial investigation

  8. Upfront Chemotherapy and Involved-Field Radiotherapy Results in More Relapses Than Extended Radiotherapy for Intracranial Germinomas: Modification in Radiotherapy Volume Might Be Needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jin Ho.; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Seung Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Cho, Byung-Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won; Heo, Dae Seog; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the outcome of upfront chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (CRT) and the outcome of the use of extended radiotherapy (RT) only for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: Of 81 patients with tissue-confirmed intracranial germinoma, 42 underwent CRT and 39 underwent RT only. For CRT, one to five cycles of upfront chemotherapy was followed by involved-field or extended-field RT, for which the dose was dependent on the M stage. For RT only, all 39 patients underwent craniospinal RT alone. The median follow-up was 68 months. Results: The 5- and 10-year overall survival rate was 100% and 92.5% for RT alone and 92.9% and 92.9% for CRT, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 100.0% for RT and 88.1% for CRT (p = 0.0279). No recurrences developed in patients given RT, but four relapses developed in patients who had received CRT-three in the brain and one in the spine. Only one patient achieved complete remission from salvage treatment. The proportion of patients requiring hormonal replacement was greater for patients who received RT than for those who had received CRT (p = 0.0106). Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that the better quality of life provided by CRT was compensated for by the greater rate of relapse. The possible benefit of including the ventricles in involved-field RT after upfront chemotherapy, specifically for patients with initial negative seeding, should be addressed in a prospective study

  9. Imaging analysis of heart movement for improving the respiration-gated radiotherapy in patients with left sided breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelhamid, Rania; Farrag, A.; Khalifa, A. [Clinical Oncology Department, Assiut University (Egypt); Block, Andreas [Institut fuer Medizinische Strahlenphysik und Strahlenschutz, Klinikum Dortmund (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Respiration induced heart movement during radiotherapy exposes the heart to the inevitable risks of radio-exposure, and hence radiation injury, in cases of Lt. sided breast cancer. The impact of such a risk is additionally aggravated by the use of radiotherapy in combination with cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Radio-oncologists pay special attention to the coronary arteries that might be included in this small part of the heart exposed to radiation. The aim of this study was to include the internal heart movement for improving respiration-gated radiotherapy of left sided breast cancer. For 70 patients, all females left sided breast cancer, two planning CT's in inspiration and expiration, and one free breathing scan are performed. The heart motion was analyzed with the clinic-developed software ORAT in the simulator sequence for acquiring information of the cranio-caudal amplitude of heart movements in free breathing (respiration-induced amplitude) and a 15 seconds breath-hold phase (inherent amplitude). The role of inherent heart movement varies from one patient to another which should be taken in consideration during defining the parameters of respiration-gated radiotherapy. The inherent amplitude of the heart motion is the physiological lower limit of the respiration-gating window.

  10. Radiotherapy for hypersplenism from congestive splenomegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mu-Tai; Hsieh, Chang-Yo; Chang, Tung-Hao; Lin, Jao-Perng; Huang, Chia-Chun

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of splenic irradiation on the common hematological disorders of hypersplenism. From August 2002 to March 2003, five patients with hypersplenism due to congestive splenomegaly underwent splenic irradiation at the Department od Radiation Oncology, Changhua Chirstian Hospital, Taiwan. 3 were males and 2 were females aging from 38 to 66 years. All patients had history of liver cirrhosis. 4 patients underwent thee-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and received conventional radiotherapy with anterior-posterior parallel opposing fields. The followup-period ranged from 1 to 7 months. Thrombocytopenia and splenomegaly were found in all 5 patients by physical examination, hematological test, abdominal sonography and/or abdominal computed tomography. After radiotherapy, thrombocytopenia improved, but leukopenia and anemia did not. No complication due to radiotherapy was found during the follow-up period after splenic irradiation. 2 patients died of hepatocellular carcinoma with active bleeding. One patient died of renal failure due to end-stage renal disease. Based on our results, it seems that splenic irradiation might be effective in treating thrombocytopenia and splenomegaly. Splenic irradiatin seems to be effective for thrombocytopenia, splenomegaly and splenic pain associated with hypersplenism from congenstive splenomegaly. This approach is non-invasive and may be an alternative treatment for splenectomy and splenic embolization for patients with hypersplenism due to congestive splenomegaly. The shortcoming of this study are small sample size, short period of follow-up and lack of randomization. A randomized control trial with more cases and further follow-up of hematological tests and splenic size estimation are warranted to evaluate long term improvement of congestive splenomegaly with thrombocytopeniaafter splenic irradiation

  11. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged ≥70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  12. Practical recommendations for breathing-adapted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, L.; Giraud, P.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Dumas, J.L.; Lorchel, F.; Marre, D.; Dupont, S.; Varmenot, N.; Ginestet, C.; Caron, J.; Marchesi, V.; Ferreira, I.; Garcia, R.

    2007-01-01

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath-hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active techniques, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily holds his/her breath. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. This work summarizes the different experiences of the centers of the STIC 2003 project. It describes the different techniques, gives an overview of the literature and proposes a practice based on our experience. (authors)

  13. Evidence-based review: Quality of life following head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott-Brown, Martin; Miah, Aisha; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Inverse planned Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can minimize the dose to normal structures and therefore can reduce long-term radiotherapy-related morbidity and may improve patients' long-term quality of life. Despite overwhelming evidence that IMRT can reduce late functional deficits in patients with head and neck cancer, treated with radiotherapy, a review of the published literature produced conflicting results with regard to quality of life outcomes. Following a critical appraisal of the literature, reasons for the discrepant outcomes are proposed.

  14. Preliminary result in patients with primary hepatoma treated by stereotactic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ki Mun; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kim, In Ah; Choi, Byung Ock; Kang, Young Nam; Han, Sung Tae; Chung, Gyu Won [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Gyu Young [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National Univ., Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    It is not common to evaluate the response of the fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) to primary hepatoma as compared with conventional radiotherapy. The purpose of the study was to take the preliminary result on the clinical trial of primary hepatoma by SRT. From July 1999 to March 2000, thirty three patients were hospitalized in the St. Mary's Hospital, and treated with SRT for extracranial tumors. Among them, 13 patients were diagnosed to primary hepatoma and then applied by frameless SRT using 6 MV linac accelerator. There were 12 male and 1 female patients. They had the age of 44-66 year old (median: 59) and the tumor size of 10-825 cc (median: 185 cc). SRT was given to them 3-5 fractions a week (5 Gy/fraction, 90% isodose line) for 2-3 weeks. Median dose of SRT was 50 Gy and the range was 30-50 Gy. Follow-up period ranged from 3 months to 13 months with median of 8 months. After treating SRT to thirteen patients with primary hepatoma, the response of the tumor was examined by abdominal CT: they are classified by 1 complete regression (7.7%), 7 partial regression (53.8%), 4 minimal regression (30.8%), 1 stable disease (7.7%). The positive responses more than partial remission were 8 patients (61.5%) after the treatment. The level of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) after the treatment as compared with pretreatment had been 92.3% decreased. There was no severe complication except dyspepsia 84.6%, mild nausea 69.2%, transient decreased of hepatic function 15.4% and fever 7.7%. SRT to the patients with primary hepatoma was potentially suggested to become the safe and more effective tool than the conventional radiotherapy even though there were relatively short duration of follow-up and small numbers to be tested.

  15. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Tryggestad, Erik, E-mail: frank.verhaegen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research. (topical review)

  16. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  17. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research. (topical review)

  18. A review of results from patient experience surveys during the introduction of group pre-radiotherapy patient information sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, K.; James, S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the survey were to check that group pre-radiotherapy information sessions met patients' needs. The use of virtual technology (VT) through Patient Education And Radiotherapy Learning (PEARL) was incorporated part way through the survey period. Methods: Patients attending group pre-radiotherapy information sessions led by assistant practitioners between March and December 2014 were asked to complete questionnaires after they had attended at least five radiotherapy sessions. Key results: 305 patients attended sessions during the survey period. 129 questionnaires were distributed with 103 returned, resulting in an 80% response rate (Overall rate 34%). 102 (99%) patients responded that they were happy and comfortable to receive their radiotherapy information in a group setting. The majority of patients responded that they felt no additional information should be included. Conclusions and recommendations: The survey highlighted that almost all patients were happy to receive their information in a group setting. Patients attending non PEARL and PEARL sessions indicated high satisfaction levels with no notable differences between the groups. This has allayed MVCC staffs' original concerns that patients may find the use of VT as frightening in patient information sessions, so the centre is now confident to incorporate it in the future. The implementation of these sessions has seemed to be both feasible and an efficient use of staff time. All patients referred for radical breast radiotherapy are now invited to attend. It is recommended that regular patient experience surveys are conducted in the future to ensure they continue to meet patients' needs. - Highlights: • 102 (99%) patients responded happy to receive their information in a group setting. • 86 (83%) patients responded they felt no additional information should be included. • 58 (56%) patients provided complimentary comments about the sessions.

  19. Study for the development of a standardized system of incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, A.LC.; Silva, A.L. da; Moreira, J.G.R.; Silva, K.R.R. da

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a modality that, along with surgery, has become essential for the success of cancer treatment. Over the years, radiotherapy has been improved to increase the effectiveness of the chances of cure. The objective of this study was to capture data from on-site visits in two clinics that offer the radiotherapy service in the state of Rio de Janeiro. After observing that each clinic had similar procedures, however, with some different methods and in view of these data obtained, a model was developed for an institutional system of incident record with the purpose of sharing results to assist in the improvement of safety protocols to mitigate possible accidents in one or more units. We conclude that this system has everything to fulfill the proposal of assisting in learning incidents. However, it is primary and updates will be of utmost importance for your improvement

  20. External beam radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.E.; Kerr, G.R.; Arnott, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 243 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with radiotherapy is presented. Radiotherapy was combined with 5-fluorouracil, or given alone. Seventy-four patients were treated with radical external beam radiotherapy for recurrent or inoperable rectal adenocarcinoma. One hundred and forty-five patients with advanced pelvic tumours or metastases were treated with palliative pelvic radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients with small-volume residual pelvic tumour or who were felt to be at high risk of pelvic recurrence following radical resection received postoperative radiotherapy. Complete tumour regression was seen in 38% of radically treated patients, and 24% of palliatively treated patients. Partial regression was observed in 56% of radically treated patients, and 58% of palliatively treated patients. Long-term local tumour control was more commonly observed for small tumours (< 5 cm diameter). Fifty-eight % of patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy remained free of local recurrence. Survival was significantly better with small tumours. The addition of 5FU did not appear to improve survival or tumour control. (author)

  1. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Henrique Lima; Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  2. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Henrique Lima, E-mail: enriquecouto@hotmail.com [Santa Fe Women' s and Maternity Hospital, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital Geral; Ramires, Leandro Cruz; Castilho, Marcus Simoes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Dominguez, Lorena Lima Coto [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, EJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy for advanced carcinoma of the gallbladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Teppei; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Iijima, Mitsuharu; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1994-01-01

    The results of radiotherapy in 37 patients who were treated for carcinoma of the gallbladder from April 1975 to April 1992 are presented. To analyze the treatment results, patients were divided into four groups depending on treatment modality: intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with surgical resection in 9 (resection group), IORT with palliative surgery in 5 (palliative surgery group), hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for inoperable cases in 11 (HCR group), external irradiation for inoperable cases in 12 (ExRT alone group). Most of the patients in the resection group received ExRT. The HCR group showed better local response than the groups treated with palliative surgery and ExRT alone. The mean length of survival in the resection, palliative surgery, HCR and ExRT alone groups was 315 days, 144 days, 246 days and 74 days, respectively. Although no statistically significant difference in survival was observed between the resection and HCR groups, the relapse-free interval of the resection group was significantly longer than that of the other groups. The application of IORT for surgically resectable tumors contributed to improved prognosis and better quality of life. Although IORT for patients with unresectable tumors had little effect on survival, it was considered to play a palliative role in improving the quality of life. The HCR group had a significantly longer survival time and relapse-free interval than the palliative surgery and ExRT alone groups. In conclusion, the application of HCR for inoperable carcinoma of the gallbladder contributed to the improvement of prognosis and quality of life. (author)

  4. Towards multidimensional radiotherapy (MD-CRT): biological imaging and biological conformality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John; Larson, Steven; Amols, Howard; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The goals of this study were to survey and summarize the advances in imaging that have potential applications in radiation oncology, and to explore the concept of integrating physical and biological conformality in multidimensional conformal radiotherapy (MD-CRT). Methods and Materials: The advances in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) have greatly improved the physical conformality of treatment planning and delivery. The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has provided the 'dose painting' or 'dose sculpting' ability to further customize the delivered dose distribution. The improved capabilities of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, and of positron emission tomography, are beginning to provide physiological and functional information about the tumor and its surroundings. In addition, molecular imaging promises to reveal tumor biology at the genotype and phenotype level. These developments converge to provide significant opportunities for enhancing the success of radiotherapy. Results: The ability of IMRT to deliver nonuniform dose patterns by design brings to fore the question of how to 'dose paint' and 'dose sculpt', leading to the suggestion that 'biological' images may be of assistance. In contrast to the conventional radiological images that primarily provide anatomical information, biological images reveal metabolic, functional, physiological, genotypic, and phenotypic data. Important for radiotherapy, the new and noninvasive imaging methods may yield three-dimensional radiobiological information. Studies are urgently needed to identify genotypes and phenotypes that affect radiosensitivity, and to devise methods to image them noninvasively. Incremental to the concept of gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (GTV, CTV, and PTV), we propose the concept of 'biological target volume' (BTV) and hypothesize that BTV can be derived from biological images and that their use may incrementally improve

  5. An instrument dedicated for modelling of pulmonary radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niezink, Anne G.H.; Dollekamp, Nienke J.; Elzinga, Harriet J.; Borger, Denise; Boer, Eduard J.H.; Ubbels, Jan F.; Woltman-van Iersel, Marleen; Leest, Annija H.D. van der; Beijert, Max; Groen, Harry J.M.; Kraan, Jan; Hiltermann, Thijo J.N.; Wekken, Anthonie J. van der; Putten, John W.G. van; Rutgers, Steven R.; Pieterman, Remge M.; Hosson, Sander M. de; Roenhorst, Anke W.J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Widder, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in lung cancer treatment. Selection of patients for new (radio)therapeutic options aiming at improving outcomes requires reliable and validated prediction models. We present the implementation of a prospective platform for evaluation and development of lung radiotherapy (proPED-LUNG) as an instrument enabling multidimensional predictive modelling. Materials and methods: ProPED-LUNG was designed to comprise relevant baseline and follow up data of patients receiving pulmonary radiotherapy with curative intent. Patient characteristics, diagnostic and staging information, treatment parameters including full dose–volume-histograms, tumour control, survival, and toxicity are scored. Besides physician-rated data, a range of patient-rated data regarding symptoms and health-related quality-of-life are collected. Results: After 18 months of accrual, 315 patients have been included (accrual rate, 18 per month). Of the first hundred patients included, 70 received conformal (chemo)radiotherapy and 30 underwent stereotactic radiotherapy. Compliance at 3 and 6 months follow-up was 96–100% for patient-rated, and 81–94% for physician-rated assessments. For data collection, 0.4 FTE were allocated in a 183 FTE department (0.2%). Conclusions: ProPED-LUNG is feasible with high compliance rates and yields a large amount of high quality prospective disease-related, treatment-related, patient- and physician-rated data which can be used to evaluate new developments in pulmonary radiotherapy

  6. Non small cells stage I bronchial cancers: three-dimensional radiotherapy and radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions; Cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules de stade I: radiotherapie tridimensionnelle et radiotherapie en conditions stereotaxiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipman, B.; Bosset, J.F. [CHU, 25 - Besancon (France); Marchesi, V.; Beckendorf, V.; Desandes, E.; Peiffert, D. [CRLCC Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandaeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Bosset, M. [CHU, 26 - Valence (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a comparison between three-dimensional conformation radiotherapy and robotic irradiation in stereotactic conditions (with CyberKnife) for patients suffering from a bronchial cancer with no small cells of stage I. Acute and late toxicity have been recorded, and the monitoring comprised a clinic examination and a thoracic scanography. The external radiotherapy results in an important local control rate and an acceptable toxicity. Some prospective studies are still needed to compare three-dimensional conformation respiratory-gated radiotherapy and radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions. Short communication

  7. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology......This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  8. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouaf, Lucie [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Girard, Nicolas [Radiotherapy-Oncology Department, Lyon Sud Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Lefort, Thibaud [Neuro-Radiology Department, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); D' hombres, Anne [Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Mornex, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.mornex@chu-lyon.fr [Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  9. Hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer: results of a dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.; Duclos, Marie; Shamsa, Falah; Porter, Arthur T.; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to assess the incidence of chronic complications and histologic and biochemical control following hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1991 and October 1994, 49 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were entered on the first two dose levels of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated three dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum tumor dose of 78 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 6 weeks at 1.3 Gy, b.i.d. No increase in chronic toxicity compared with conventional radiotherapy was noted; therefore, an additional 24 patients were treated to a minimum tumor dose of 82.8 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 7 weeks at 1.15 Gy, b.i.d. Toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scale. Efficacy was assessed through scheduled postradiation prostate specific antigen values and ultrasound-guided biopsies. The median follow-up for the entire group was 20 months. Results: The hyperfractionated external radiation was well tolerated with minimal acute morbidity. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was 17%. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was 16%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two dose levels. No Grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was noted. At 12 months, 84% of patients had a prostate specific antigen ≤ 4; and 53%; ≤ 1 ng/ml. At 12 months, 71% of patients had post radiation biopsies that were either negative (55%) or showed a marked therapeutic effect (16%). Conclusion: The use of hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy facilitated dose escalation with no increase in chronic toxicity compared to standard doses. The initial tumor response based on prostate specific antigen measurements and

  10. EGFR-targeted anti-cancer drugs in radiotherapy: Preclinical evaluation of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Dittmann, Klaus; Doerr, Wolfgang; Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2007-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical results indicate that the EGFR can mediate radioresistance in different solid human tumours. Combination of radiotherapy and EGFR inhibitors can improve local tumour control compared to irradiation alone and has been introduced into clinical radiotherapy practice. So far several mechanisms have been identified in preclinical studies to contribute to improved local tumour control after radiation combined with EGFR inhibitors. These include direct kill of cancer stem cells by EGFR inhibitors, cellular radiosensitization through modified signal transduction, inhibition of repair of DNA damage, reduced repopulation and improved reoxygenation during fractionated radiotherapy. Effects and mechanisms may differ for different classes of EGFR inhibitors, for different tumours and for normal tissues. The mechanisms underlying this heterogeneity are currently poorly understood, and predictive assays are not available yet. Importantly, mechanisms and predictors for the combined effects of radiation with EGFR inhibitors appear to be considerably different to those for application of EGFR inhibitors alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Therefore to further evaluate the efficacy and mechanisms of EGFR-inhibition in combined treatments, radiotherapy-specific preclinical research strategies, which include in vivo experiments using local tumour control as an endpoint, as well as animal studies on normal tissue toxicity are needed

  11. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane (Dept. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)), e-mail: jhc@rn.dk; Holmberg, Mats (Dept. of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud (Dept. of Urology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)); Fisker, Rune V. (Dept. of Radiology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark))

    2011-05-15

    Purpose. A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods. The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. Results. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. Conclusions. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed

  12. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods. The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. Results. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. Conclusions. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed

  13. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Biedka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient’s sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning.

  14. Targeted radiotherapy: state of the art and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillez, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Internal targeted radiotherapy (previously called metabolic radiotherapy) consists in an in situ irradiation of small tumour lesions all through the body by mean of a radiolabeled agent. It is a more and more emerging technique of cancer treatment, as clearly demonstrated by theoretical and experimental considerations, but also impressive clinical results. Published results allowed the marketing authorization of several specialities at time. Main clinical results, i.e. these obtained with radiolabel antibodies, somatostatin analogs and bone seeking agents, already are very convincing. However, we must wonder if such conclusive results would remain anecdotal in the treatment of cancer, or take a larger and larger place. Recently published results and works in progress clearly show that there are a lot of possibilities which could be explored and many ways of improvement. These possibilities are related to the mechanisms of action, a better understanding of the relationship between injected activity and efficiency through dedicated dosimetry, new radiopharmaceuticals, new targets and a better definition of indications. The review of these different ways leads to an optimistic view of the future for internal radiotherapy, providing it will be thought through a pluri-disciplinary approach. (author)

  15. Bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg as adjuvant to radiotherapy in patients with localised or locally advanced prostate cancer: Results from the randomised Early Prostate Cancer Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyrrell, Chris J [Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Payne, Heather [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom); See, William A [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); McLeod, David G [Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Wirth, Manfred P [Department of Urology, Technical University of Dresden (Germany); Iversen, Peter [Department of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Armstrong, Jon [AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Morris, Clive [AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Background and purpose: The ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) programme is assessing bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with localised or locally advanced prostate cancer (n=8113). This paper presents an exploratory analysis of the subgroup of the EPC programme who received radiotherapy with curative intent (n=1370) in order to determine the efficacy (in terms of progression-free survival [PFS]) and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg in this setting. Patients and methods: 1370 patients with T1-4, M0, any N prostate cancer received bicalutamide 150 mg or placebo adjuvant to radiotherapy of curative intent. This analysis was undertaken at median 5.3 years' follow-up. Results: In patients with locally advanced disease (n=305), bicalutamide adjuvant to radiotherapy significantly increased PFS by 53% (event-time ratio 1.53; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.16, 2.02) compared with placebo and reduced the risk of disease progression by 42% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.58; 95% CI 0.41, 0.84; P=0.00348). In these patients, objective progression was experienced by 33.5% of those randomised to bicalutamide versus 48.6% for those randomised to placebo. The between-group difference in patients with localised disease (n=1065) failed to reach statistical significance (HR 0.80; 95% CI 0.62, 1.03; P=0.088). The most common adverse events were breast pain (74.8%) and gynaecomastia (66.6%), which were mild to moderate in >90% of cases. Conclusions: Bicalutamide 150 mg/day given as adjuvant to radiotherapy significantly improved PFS in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. For patients with localised disease, the results at this stage from the radiotherapy subgroup and the overall EPC programme suggest that adjuvant hormonal therapy is currently not appropriate. There were no unexpected tolerability findings.

  16. [Porting Radiotherapy Software of Varian to Cloud Platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lian; Zhang, Weisha; Liu, Xiangxiang; Xie, Zhao; Xie, Yaoqin

    2017-09-30

    To develop a low-cost private cloud platform of radiotherapy software. First, a private cloud platform which was based on OpenStack and the virtual GPU hardware was builded. Then on the private cloud platform, all the Varian radiotherapy software modules were installed to the virtual machine, and the corresponding function configuration was completed. Finally the software on the cloud was able to be accessed by virtual desktop client. The function test results of the cloud workstation show that a cloud workstation is equivalent to an isolated physical workstation, and any clients on the LAN can use the cloud workstation smoothly. The cloud platform transplantation in this study is economical and practical. The project not only improves the utilization rates of radiotherapy software, but also makes it possible that the cloud computing technology can expand its applications to the field of radiation oncology.

  17. Improved patient repositioning accuracy by integrating an additional jaw fixation into a high precision face mask system in stereotactic radiotherapy of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatta, E.; Liesenfeld, S.M.; Bank, P.; Guenther, R.; Wiezorek, T.; Wendt, T.G.; Wurm, R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: For high precision radiotherapy of the neurocranium a precise, reproducible positioning technique is the basic pre-requisite. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of a modification of the commercially available stereotactical BrainLab trademark -head mask system on accuracy in patient positioning during fractionated radiotherapy. Material and Methods: 29 patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy of the head. Immobilization was provided by a two layer thermoplastic mask system (BrainLab trademark). 18 of these patients received an additional custom made fixation either of the upper jaw (OKF) or of the mandibula (UKF). The positioning accuracy was assessed by measurements of the shifting of anatomical landmarks in relation to therigid mask system on biplanar simulator films using a digital imaging system. Before each measurement a fine adjustment of the simulator to an optical ring system was performed. The reference radiographs were done just before CT-planning. During a 2-7 weeks lasting course of radiotherapy displacement measurements in relation to the reference images for all three dimensions (z, y and x) were done once a week. In 29 patients 844 measurements were analyzed. Results: An additional jaw fixation improves the reproducibility of patient positioning significantly in all three spatial dimensions. The standard deviation in lateral direction (x) was 0.6 mm with jaw fixation vs. 0.7 mm without jaw fixation (p [de

  18. Radiotherapy for Graves' orbitopathy: results of a national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyd, R.; Zamboglou, N.; Heinrich Seegenschmiedt, M.; Strassmann, G.; Micke, O.; Makoski, H.B.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is a widely accepted indication for radiation therapy (RT). In conjunction with the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD), a national survey was conducted in order to assess whether or not there is a consensus on the indication for RT and various treatment factors which were studied. Material and Methods: A questionnaire was circulated to 190 RT institutions to obtain relevant data concerning the patients' workload, stage-dependent indication, and diagnostic procedures, which were considered to be necessary. Further questions addressed details on radiation technique and dose-fractionation schedules, the combined use of corticoids, and salvage RT after previous treatment failure following RT. Results: With a response rate of 152/190 (80%), the survey is nationally representative. Based on the case workload, an estimated annual number of 1,600 GO cases are treated in German radiotherapy departments. With an 88% consensus, stages II-V are the typical indications. 85% considered imaging studies necessary for indication and only 48% for laboratory tests. 76% of the institutions used total doses in the range of 15-20 Gy, and conventional fractionation was most common (57%). 82% used a face mask fixation and 67% CT-based treatment planning. Approximately 50% would prescribe salvage RT, and total doses in the range of 20-40 Gy were considered to be acceptable. Conclusions: The survey revealed a consensus concerning most of the factors studied. We recommend to review the patterns of care for RT of other entities of benign diseases and to implement a quality assurance program both on national and international levels. (orig.)

  19. Head and neck cancers: clinical benefits of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and of intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Jaulerry, C.; Brunin, F.; Zefkili, S.; Helfre, S.; Chauvet, I.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The conformal radiotherapy approach, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is based on modern imaging modalities, efficient 3-D treatment planning systems, sophisticated immobilization systems and rigorous quality assurance and treatment verification. The central objective of conformal radiotherapy is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume while reducing exposure of normal tissues. These techniques would then allow further tumor dose escalation. Head-and-neck tumors are some of the most attractive localizations to test conformal radiotherapy. They combine ballistic difficulties due to particularly complex shapes (nasopharynx, ethmoid) and problems due to the number and low tolerance of neighbouring organs like parotids, eyes, brainstem and spinal cord. The therapeutic irradiation of head-and-neck tumors thus remains a challenge for the radiation oncologist. Conformal radiotherapy does have a significant potential for improving local control and reducing toxicity when compared to standard radiotherapy. However, in the absence of prospective randomized trials, it is somewhat difficult at present to evaluate the real benefits drawn from 3DCRT and IMRT. The published clinical reports on the use of conformal radiotherapy are essentially dealing with dosimetric comparisons on relatively small numbers of patients. Recently, a few publications have emphasized the clinical experience several precursor teams with a suitable follow-up. This paper describes the current state-of-the-art of 3DCRT and IMRT in order to evaluate the impact of these techniques on head-and-neck cancers irradiation. (authors)

  20. Non-randomized clinical study comparing chemotherapy plus radiotherapy with radiotherapy alone in neoadjuvant therapy for oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayahara, Hiroaki; Okuda, Mamiko; Terakado, Nagaaki; Shintani, Satoru; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki [Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-06-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy plays an important role for organ preservation and survival rate in the treatment of oral cancer. We clinically compared the effect of neoadjuvant radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy in patients with oral cancer. We retrospectively examined 47 patients diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant therapy followed by curative surgery in the oral and maxillofacial surgery department of Ehime University Hospital. We divided them into two groups: radiotherapy alone (24 cases) and chemoradiotherapy (23 cases). The patients in the radiotherapy group underwent irradiation of 32.6{+-}5.0 Gy (mean {+-}SD). The patients in the chemoradiotherapy group received a low-dose fraction of cisplatin (8 mg/mm{sup 2}/day, 5 days a week; total dose: 139.4{+-}67.1 mg) and 5-fluorouracil (300 mg/mm{sup 2}/day, 5 days a week; total dose: 5,900{+-}1,839.8 mg) combined with simultaneous irradiation of 31.0{+-}3.2 Gy. None of the 24 patients had a complete response to radiotherapy alone and 12 (50%) had a partial response. Six (26%) of the 23 patients had a complete response to chemoradiotherapy and 12 (52%) had a partial response. The primary control rate (82.6%) to chemoradiotherapy was higher than that (67.5%) to radiotherapy alone although no significant difference was found. The 5-year survival rate was 64.3% in the radiotherapy group and 62.8% in the chemoradiotherapy group. The findings of the present study suggest that while the combination of radiation and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil in neoadjuvant therapy for oral cancer may not bring a significant benefit to improve survival rate, the primary local control rate is improved in comparison with radiotherapy alone. (author)

  1. External beam radiotherapy for head and neck carcinomas with preservation of parotid function: indications, techniques and long term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding-Jen, Lee; Fairbanks, Robert; Lee, Frank C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To reduce the incidence of radiotherapy induced xerostomia, we developed techniques of external beam irradiation with preservation of parotid function for patients with early to intermediate stage carcinomas of the head and neck. This analysis reports the efficacy of our methods. Materials and Methods: From 1985 to 1993, 42 patients with early to intermediate stage (T 1-3 N 0-2 M 0 ) head and neck carcinomas received a course of external beam radiotherapy. There were 13 patients with carcinoma of the oropharynx, 26 with carcinomas of the oral cavity and 3 with carcinomas of the hypopharynx (lateral wall). 7 patients received a course of definitive radiotherapy (66 to 72 Gy), while 35 patients received a course of postoperative radiotherapy (60-66 Gy). The fraction size was 2 Gy per day. In terms of treatment planning, the primary site (plus a margin) and the ipsilateral neck were covered by the irradiation volume. The ipsilateral parotid gland was within the treatment volume while the contralateral parotid gland was not. The most frequently used field arrangement was a paired wedge fields with an AP (medially just across the mid-line) and an ipsilateral posterior oblique field (usually 30 deg. off vertical axis with a spinal cord block). Multiple level of contours were taken and transmission blocks were used to improve dose homogeneity. In all patients, the ipsilateral parotid gland (and the neck) was irradiated while the contralateral parotid gland (and the neck) was not. Results: With a median follow up of 4 years (ranged from 1.5 to 9 years), only one patient developed symptomatic xerostomia. None had radiation induced dental caries. No patient developed recurrent disease in the contralateral neck. The local control rate was (38(42)) (90%) in the primary site and(41(42)) (98%) in the ipsilateral neck. Conclusion: With appropriate treatment planning, external beam irradiation with parotid function preservation can be achieved. Our results

  2. Bone damage of mandibles after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Motoyasu; Kubo, Kazuko; Furukawa, Sohei; Fuchihata, Hajime; Shimizutani, Kiminari; Inoue, Takehiro; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Masaki, Norie

    1987-10-01

    At Osaka University Hospital, the 5-year survival rate for carcinoma of the tongue, treated by radiotherapy, is almost 60 % and in early cases, around 80 %. However, with this improvement in the survival rate, an increase in the incidence of various complications (xerostomia, soft tissue ulcer, bone damage, etc.) has been observed. Because of these circumstances, a radiographic analysis on the bone damage of the mandibles after radiotherapy was made. Only those patients whose progress had been followed for more than one year and whose disease was well controlled were selected for this study. Early radiographic signs of bone damages showed an enlargement of the periodontal space and a loss of lamina dura. From the results of the study it has been found that bone damage is less common in patients treated by interstitial radiotherapy alone. Bone damage seems to develope more frequently in patients who receive about 30 Gy by external radiotherapy, followed by more than 2,000 mgh. Ra. eq. of interstitial radiotherapy.

  3. Role of radiotherapy fractionation in head and neck cancers (MARCH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacas, Benjamin; Bourhis, Jean; Overgaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Meta-Analysis of Radiotherapy in squamous cell Carcinomas of Head and neck (MARCH) showed that altered fractionation radiotherapy is associated with improved overall and progression-free survival compared with conventional radiotherapy, with hyperfractionated radiotherapy showing...... the greatest benefit. This update aims to confirm and explain the superiority of hyperfractionated radiotherapy over other altered fractionation radiotherapy regimens and to assess the benefit of altered fractionation within the context of concomitant chemotherapy with the inclusion of new trials. METHODS......: For this updated meta-analysis, we searched bibliography databases, trials registries, and meeting proceedings for published or unpublished randomised trials done between Jan 1, 2009, and July 15, 2015, comparing primary or postoperative conventional fractionation radiotherapy versus altered fractionation...

  4. Lymph Node Failure Pattern and Treatment Results of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Heui Kwan; Kim, Soo Geon

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the failure pattern of the celiac axis, gastric lymph node, and treatment outcome in the upper and mid-esophageal region of cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The study constituted the evaluation 108 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 1986 to December 2006. In total, 82 patients treated by planned radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, were analysed retrospectively. The study population consisted of 78 men and 2 women (mean age of 63.2 years). In addition, 51 patients received radiotherapy alone, whereas 31 patients received a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The primary cancer sites were located in the upper portion (17 patients), and mid portion (65 patients), respectively. Further, the patients were in various clinical stages including T1N0-1M0 (7 patients), T2N0-1M0 (18 patients), T3N0-1M0 (44 patients) and T4N0-1M0 (13 patients). The mean follow up period was 15 months. Results: The various treatment outcomes included complete response (48 patients), partial response (31 patients) and no response (3 patients). The failure patterns of the lymph node were comprised of the regional lymph node (23 patients) and the distance lymph node which included celiac axis and gastric lymph node (13 patients). However, metastasis was not observed in the regional and distant lymph node in 10 patients, whereas 36 patients were not evaluated. Furthermore, of the 13 patients who developed celiac axis and gastric lymph node metastases, 3 were in stage T1N0-1M0 and 10 were in stage T2-4N0-1M0. A complete response appeared in 12 patients, whereas a partial response appeared in 1 patient. The mean survival time of the

  5. Radiotherapy for Stage I seminoma testis: results of treatment and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.; Horwich, A.; Easton, D.; Peckham, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of treatment by infradiaphragmatic lymph node irradiation and orchiectomy in 232 patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are reported. Of this group, only five (2%) patients relapsed and none died from seminoma. Contralateral testicular tumours occurred in 12 patients and five developed second non-testicular malignancies. The acute and late morbidity of radiotherapy was low although 15 patients developed peptic ulceration. There was a significant association between prior abdominal surgery and a history of dyspepsia with ensuing peptic ulceration. Future management policy is discussed on the basis of these observations. (Auth.)

  6. An approach to radiotherapy under informed consent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Maehara, Tadayuki; Baba, Sadaaki; Nakamura, Yuji; Kamitani, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Over the past two years, we have attempted to practice radiotherapy in accordance with the principle of informed consent. The procedure used in our radiotherapy, which consists of informing the patient of the seriousness of his or her disease (malignant and benign) and receiving signed consent forms, is a new system in Japan. This is a report of our experience with this system and its advantages and disadvantages. We are satisfied with the clinical results of the attempt. Radiotherapy in accordance with informed consent has now become routine at our hospital. We feel that this practice will produce the mutual enhancement of our responsibility to patients and their trust in us, and improve cure rates. In promoting mutual understanding between our patients and ourselves, we must keep in mind that we, radiation oncologists, are not only radiotherapists but also health-care providers in our capacity as medical and surgical doctors. It is also necessary to achieve the best radiotherapeutic system in Japan. (author)

  7. Radiotherapy for Locoregional Recurrent Cervix Cancer after Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mi Gyoung

    1994-01-01

    Purpose: The role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with locoregional recurrent cervix cancer after radical surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Methods and materials: Twenty-eight patients treated with radiotherapy for locoregional recurrence after primary surgery for carcinoma of the cervix between 1989 and 1993 were analyzed. The median follow-up of survivors was 15 months (ranged 7-43 months). Eight patients had their disease confined to the vagina and 19 patients(68%) had pelvic mass as part of their locoregional recurrent disease. Within 24 months after the initial surgery, 82% of recurrences manifested themselves. All patients had whole pelvic irradiation with or without intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR). Results: Complete response(CR) was achieved in 18 patients(64%). Five of eighteen patients(28%) with initial CR developed second locoregional recurrence. Response to radiotherapy correlated strongly with tumor volume, site of recurrence and total radiation dose. The overall 2 year survival rate was 43% and the disease free survival was 31%. Survival rate was significantly influenced by the factors of interval from operation to recurrence, size and site of recurrent tumor, radiation dose, response of radiotherapy, lymph node status as initial presentation. The principal cause of death was lung metastasis(36%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is an excellent modality for control of locoregional recurrent cervix cancer. To improve local control and survival rate, whole pelvic external radiotherapy in addition to ICR with more than 75.0Gy at the depth of 1.0cm from vaginal mucosa is needed and frequent follow up and early detection of recurrence is suggested as well

  8. Safety Improvement in Radiotherapy Treatment Plan. Planning vs Redundant Check vs in vivo Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Diaz, J.; Ascencion Ybarra, Y.; La Fuentes Rosales, L. de; Lara Mas, E.; Larrinaga Cortinas, E.

    2013-01-01

    In Cuba it is mandatory to have an independent monitor units check before any radiotherapy treatment is started. The main objective of this paper is to enhance the safety of the radiotherapy planning by developing and testing a practical tool to double check the monitor units calculation for external beam high energy photon therapy. A software for monitor units (MUs) verification was designed and coded. It considers the common in clinical practice isocentric set-ups. The in vivo dosimetry measurements were done with a silicon diode system for 6 MV photon beams to support the validation of the software. The results show a discrepancy within 5% between the 3 methods which is in accordance with international recommendations. (Author)

  9. Radiotherapy of macular lesions in age-related macular degeneration (A.M.D.): preliminary results of a clinical study conducted in Lyon, France; Radiotherapie des degenerescences maculaires liees a l`age (DMLA): resultats preliminaires d`une etude lyonnaise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. [Centre oncologie radiotherapie Saint-Jean, 69 - Lyon (France); Mauget, M. [Centre ophtalmologique d`imagerie, laser, 69 - Lyon (France); Gerard, J.P. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, CHU Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France) (and others)

    1997-06-01

    To evaluate irradiation effects on functional signs and choroidal neo-vascular lesions in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) that does not respond to laser therapy. Since 1994, 250 consecutive AMD patients were treated by two radiotherapy teams for sub-foveal neo-vascular lesions. At the end of september 1996, 52 patients were evaluable with a 1-year follow-up. Group 1 (Department de Radiotherapie Oncologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Lyon Sud) included 26 patients who were treated with a lateral beam of 6 MV photons. The irradiation dose were 20 Gy in five fractions for small lesions and 28.8 Gy in eight fractions for larger lesions. Group 2 (Centre Oncologie Radiotherapie Saint-Jean) was composed of 26 patients treated with a mini-beam of 25 MV photons via lateral arc-therapy. Beam diameters (14 and 18 mm) were adapted to the lesion size. The total dose was 16 Gy in four fractions or 20 Gy in five fractions. Functional and anatomical results were assessed at 3, 6, 9 months and 1 year after radiation therapy. Stable visual acuity was observed in 44 % (23/52) of the patients and visual acuity was improved in 35 % (18/52) of the patients at 6 months. Good functional results reached 79 % (41/52) at 6 months and 74 % (17/23) at 12 months. There was no statistical difference between the two groups and dose levels. All severe complications (1 cataract, 3 dilated choroidal vessels, and 2 papillitis) occurred in group 1. Though it is too early to conclude on the best dose level, radiotherapy of sub-foveal neo-vascular lesions of AMD that cannot be treated via laser therapy provides encouraging results. The technique used must be very precise to adequately irradiate the fovea and spare surrounding sensitive areas. Further studies and trials involving patients` randomization are necessary to confirm these preliminary results. (author) 13 refs.

  10. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wagter, C [ed.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions.

  11. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wagter, C.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions

  12. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  13. Photodynamic therapy-generated vaccines prevent tumor recurrence after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbelik, M.; Sun, J.

    2003-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an established clinical modality for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases, inflicts photoreactive drug-mediated oxidative stress that prompts the engagement of host inflammatory and immune responses which contribute to the therapy outcome. Recently, it has become evident that in vitro PDT-treated tumor cells or their lysates can be utilized as an effective vaccine against established tumors of the same origin. The mechanism underlying the vaccine action appears to be based on eliciting immune recognition of the tumor and developing an efficient immune response even against poorly immunogenic tumors. This study examined whether PDT-generated vaccines can be effectively combined with radiotherapy. Subcutaneous SCCVII tumors (squamous cell carcinomas) growing in syngeneic C3H/HeN mice were treated by radiotherapy (60 Gy x-ray dose). PDT-vaccine treatment, done by peritumoral injection of in vitro PDT-treated SCCVII cells (20 million/mouse), was performed either immediately after radiotherapy or ten days later. The mice were then observed for tumor regression/recurrence. The tumors treated with radiotherapy alone shrunk and became impalpable for a brief period after which they all recurred. In contrast, vaccination performed at 10 days post radiotherapy delayed tumor recurrence and prevented it in one of six mice. Even better results were obtained with mice vaccinated immediately after radiotherapy, with mice showing not only a delayed tumor recurrence but also no sign of tumor in 50% of mice. The PDT-vaccine treatment without radiotherapy produced in this trial a significant tumor growth retardation but no complete regressions. These results indicate that PDT-generated vaccines can ensure immune rejection of cancer once the lesion size is reduced by radiotherapy. Even without obtaining a systemic immunity for the elimination of disseminated malignant deposits, these findings suggest that PDT-vaccines can improve local control

  14. Why Radiotherapy Works. Chapter 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, S.; Nishibuchi, I.; Wondergem, J.

    2017-01-01

    The history of radiotherapy began in 1895, when Röntgen discovered X rays, and in the following year, radiation was used for medical treatment. In the early days, the development of radiotherapy was based extensively on empiricism. Radiotherapists worked closely with radiation biologists in attempting to describe and understand the phenomena produced by ionizing radiation in the clinic and in biological systems. During the ensuing 120 years, radiotherapy has been improved significantly and, in addition to radiation biology, medical physics has played an important role in the design and development of equipment, quality assurance and dosimetry. Over recent decades, advances have been made in the field of molecular biology. Currently available techniques enable us to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cellular response to ionizing irradiation, and it is anticipated that the role and contributions of radiation biology in radiotherapy will remain relevant. This chapter describes the clinically important biological points, including knowledge from current molecular biology.

  15. Radiotherapy improves serum fatty acids and lipid profile in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Sana; Channa, Naseem Aslam; Talpur, Farha Naz; Younis, Muhammad; Tabassum, Naila

    2017-05-18

    Breast cancer is a disease with diverse clinical symptoms, molecular profiles, and its nature to response its therapeutic treatments. Radiotherapy (RT), along with surgery and chemotherapy is a part of treatment in breast cancer. The aim of present study was to investigate pre and post treatment effects of radiotherapy in serum fatty acids and its lipids profile in patients with breast cancer. In this comparative as well as follow up study, Serum fatty acids were performed by gas chromatography to investigate fatty acids and Microlab for analysis of lipid profile. Among serum free and total fatty acids the major saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in serum lipids of breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) were stearic acid (18:0) and palmitic acid (16:0). These fatty acids contributed about 35-50% of total fatty acids. The decreased concentrations of linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4) with a lower ratio of C18:2/C18:1 was found in pretreated breast cancer patients as compared to controls. The n-3/n-6 ratio of breast cancer patients was decreased before treatment but it was 35% increased after treatment. In addition, plasma activity of D6 desaturase was increased in the breast cancer patients, while the activity of D5 desaturase was decreased. Increased levels of SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and decreased polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) levels in breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) as compared to controls. Serum total cholesterol (TC) (224.4 mg/dL) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (142.9 mg/dL) were significantly increased in pretreated breast cancer patients but after the radiotherapy treatment, the TC (150.2 mg/dL) and LDL-C (89.8 mg/dL) were decreased. It seems that RT would have played a potential role in the treatment of BC. After RT the serum levels of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C are improved. Our study reinforces the important role of RT in the management of BC. The level of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C can be

  16. Cost-effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer: results from the Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, Michael; Stenborg, Anna; Paahlman, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial (SRCT) demonstrated that a short-term regimen of high-dose fractionated preoperative radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy) reduced the local recurrence rates and improved overall survival. This has had an impact on the primary treatment of rectal cancer. The current study investigated the cost-effectiveness of the new combined approach. Methods and Materials: After an 8-year follow-up, in-hospital and outpatient costs related to the treatment of rectal cancer and its complications were analyzed for 98 randomly allocated patients who participated in the SRCT from a single Swedish health care region. The costs were then related to the clinical data from the SRCT regarding complications, local and distant recurrences, and survival. Results: The total cost for a nonirradiated patient was US$30,080 compared with US$35,268 for an irradiated patient. The surgery-alone group had increased costs related to local recurrences, and the radiotherapy group had increased costs for irradiation and complications. With a survival benefit of 21 months (retrieved from the SRCT), the cost for a saved year was US$3654. Sensitivity analyses for different rates of local recurrences, the costs related to complications and less marked survival benefit showed that this figure could vary up to US$15,228. Conclusion: The cost for a life-year saved in these data was US$3654. This figure could reach US$15,228 in the most pessimistic setting of the sensitivity tests, a cost still comparable with other well-accepted medical interventions

  17. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced prostate cancer. The latest technological improvement is modulated rotational radiotherapy, where one single rotation of the treatment machine is used to conform the dose delivery to the target and spare organs at risk, requiring less than...

  18. Nasopharynx carcinoma treatment: from the conventional radiotherapy to the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation; Traitement du carcinome du nasopharynx: de la radiotherapie conventionnelle a la radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokaouim, K.; Grehange, G.; Truc, G.; Peingnaux, K.; Martin, E.; Zanetta, S.; Bruchon, Y.; Bonnetain, F.; Maingon, P. [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2009-10-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the impact of factors linked to the radiotherapy realisation on the local and locoregional control, the global survival, the survival without disease of patients suffering of naso-pharynx carcinoma. Conclusion: the patients suffering of a nasopharynx carcinoma treated by irradiation associated to chemotherapy have an improved global survival and an improved survival without disease. The conformal radiotherapy with or without modulated intensity reduce the risk of serous otitis, trismus and xerostomia at long term. It seems necessary to realize multi centric studies with a longer period of follow up before asserting the advantages of the I.M.R.T. in comparison to the classical and conformal technique in the treatment of naso-pharynx carcinomas. (N.C.)

  19. Relative significance of surgery and radiotherapy in treatment of brain metastases of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junkoh; Ohtsuka, Sinichi; Yamasaki, Toshiki; Gi, Hidefuku; Ha, Young-Soo; Handa, Hajime

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and sixteen cases of brain metastases of lung cancer were retrospectively analysed with special reference to the relative significance of surgery and radiotherapy. The median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastases was 1.2 months in 27 cases without treatment, 2.5 months in 51 cases treated by surgery alone, 4.2 months in 31 cases treated by radiotherapy alone and 6.5 months in 7 cases treated by surgery and radiotherapy. The survival rate in patients treated by radiotherapy was significantly better than in those not treated by radiotherapy. However, the effect of surgery was not significant in prolongation of survival time. On the other hand, the rate of improvement in neurological symptoms assessed at one month after the initiation of treatment was 80.9% in 47 cases treated by surgery and 19.4 % in 31 cases treated by radiotherapy. The result suggested that surgery is superior to radiotherapy in alleviating neurological symptoms. It is important to understand the nature of effect of each treatment. A better result will be anticipated by proper selection or combination of these treatments. (author)

  20. Oxygenation of cervical cancers during radiotherapy and radiotherapy + cis-retinoic acid/interferon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, Jeurgen; Heansgen, Gabriele; Lautenschleager, Christine; Feuchsel, Glenn; Becker, Axel

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the tumor tissue pO 2 in cervical cancers during radiotherapy with special emphasis on the course of the pO 2 in primarily hypoxic tumors and in patients treated with radiotherapy plus 13-cis-retinoic acid/interferon-α-2a. Methods and Materials: From June 1995 through April 1997, 49 patients with squamous cell carcinoma FIGO IIB-IVA of the cervix who were treated with definitve radiotherapy with curative intent underwent polarographic measurement of tumor tissue pO 2 with an Eppendorf pO 2 -histograph prior to and during radiation treatment. Radiotherapy consisted of external irradiation with 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy plus high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Twenty-two patients had additional treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid (cRA, isotretinoin) and interferon-α-2a (IFN-α-2a). Therapy with cRA/IFN in these patients started 2 weeks before radiotherapy; during this induction period, cRA was administered in a dosage of 1 mg per kilogram body weight orally daily and IFN-α-2a in a dosage of 6 x 10 6 I.U. subcutaneously daily. After start of external radiotherapy (XRT), cRA/IFN was continued concomitantly with radiotherapy in reduced doses (0.5 mg cRA per kg body weight orally daily plus 3 x 10 6 I.U. IFN-α-2a subcutaneously three times weekly until the end of the radiation treatment). pO 2 measurements were performed prior to radiotherapy, at 20 Gy, and at the end of radiotherapy. Results: A poor oxygenation defined as a median pO 2 of 10 mm Hg or less was present in 15/38 tumors (39%) in which measurements prior to any treatment were done. Low pO 2 readings below 5 mm Hg were present in 70% of all tumors prior to treatment. In 13 of 15 hypoxic tumors, pO 2 measurements at 19.8 Gy were performed. In these tumors, a significant increase of the median pO 2 from 6.0 ± 3.1 mm Hg to 20.7 ± 21.2 mm Hg was found, p 2 was more pronounced in patients with radiotherapy plus additional cRA/IFN treatment as compared to patients treated

  1. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Results of the patterns of care study for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomi, Kohtaro; Oguchi, Masahiko; Yamashita Takashi

    2001-01-01

    A Patterns of Care Study examined the records of patients with thoracic esophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy and surgery in 1995 through 1997. Thirty-one percent of patients received preoperative radiotherapy; 61% of these received chemotherapy. Sixty six percent of patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Significant variables for overall survival in multivariate analysis include presence of macroscopic residual tumors (risk ratio=2.66), sex female (0.49), photon energy higher than 4 MV (0.50), Karnofsky performance status greater than 70 (0.55) and the use of chemotherapy (1.64). The value of preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be tested in a randomized trial. (author)

  3. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nio, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasushi; Teramoto, Mutsumi; Nagami, Haruhiko; Yano, Seiji; Sumi, Shoichiro; Tamura, Katsuhiro; Kushima, Takeyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer has rarely been reported. In the present study, we investigated the objective response and histopathological effects of neoadjuvant radiotherapy in patients with primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer. Between 1992 and 1997, a total of 11 patients with primary or recurrent breast cancer (5 primary advanced and 6 locally recurrent breast cancers) were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy before surgery. Six patients received radiotherapy alone and 5 received radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy, and the objective response was assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Society of Cancer Therapy. After neoadjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy, all patients underwent surgery or biopsy, and histopathological effects were assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer Study. The overall objective response was 27% (3PR/11; 2PR in 5 primary cancers and 1PR in 6 recurrent cancers), and histopathological effects included 5 grade-3 or -2 responses (45%; 2 grade-3 and 1 grade-2 in primary cancers and 2 grade-2 in recurrent cancers). There were no correlations between total radiation dose and objective response or histopathological effects. The objective response rates were 40% (2/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 17% (1/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, histopathological effects higher than grade-2 were seen in 60% (3/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 33% (2/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, and a grade-3 response was seen only in the radiochemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer resulted in a high response rate and was more effective against primary cancer than recurrent cancer. Furthermore, chemotherapy may be beneficial in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nio, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasushi; Teramoto, Mutsumi; Nagami, Haruhiko; Yano, Seiji; Sumi, Shoichiro; Tamura, Katsuhiro; Kushima, Takeyuki

    1998-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer has rarely been reported. In the present study, we investigated the objective response and histopathological effects of neoadjuvant radiotherapy in patients with primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer. Between 1992 and 1997, a total of 11 patients with primary or recurrent breast cancer (5 primary advanced and 6 locally recurrent breast cancers) were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy before surgery. Six patients received radiotherapy alone and 5 received radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy, and the objective response was assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Society of Cancer Therapy. After neoadjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy, all patients underwent surgery or biopsy, and histopathological effects were assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer Study. The overall objective response was 27% (3PR/11; 2PR in 5 primary cancers and 1PR in 6 recurrent cancers), and histopathological effects included 5 grade-3 or -2 responses (45%; 2 grade-3 and 1 grade-2 in primary cancers and 2 grade-2 in recurrent cancers). There were no correlations between total radiation dose and objective response or histopathological effects. The objective response rates were 40% (2/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 17% (1/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, histopathological effects higher than grade-2 were seen in 60% (3/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 33% (2/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, and a grade-3 response was seen only in the radiochemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer resulted in a high response rate and was more effective against primary cancer than recurrent cancer. Furthermore, chemotherapy may be beneficial in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  6. Moving toward multi-dimensional radiotherapy and the role of radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oita, Masataka; Uto, Yoshihiro; Aoyama, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Recent radiotherapy for cancer treatment enable the high-precision irradiation to the target under the computed image guidance. Developments of such radiotherapy has played large role in the improved strategy of cancer treatments. In addition, the molecular mechanistic studies related to proliferations of cancer cell contribute the multidisciplinary fields of clinical radiotherapies. Therefore, the combination of the image guidance and molecular targeting of cancer cells make it possible for individualized cancer treatment. Especially, the use of particle beam or boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been spotlighted, and installations of such devices are planned widely. As the progress and collaborations of radiation biology and engineering physics, establishment of a new style of radiotherapy becomes available in post-genome era. In 2010s, the hi-tech machines controlling the spaciotemporal radiotherapy become in practice. Although, there still remains to be improved, e.g., more precise prediction of radiosensitivity or growth of individual tumors, and adverse outcomes after treatments, multi-dimensional optimizations of the individualized irradiations based on the molecular radiation biologies and medical physics are important for further development of radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Preoperative radiotherapy in esophageal carcinoma: a meta-analysis using individual patient data (oesophageal cancer collaborative group)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, Sydney J.; Duncan, William; Gignoux, Marc; Girling, David J.; Hansen, Hanne S.; Launois, B.; Nygaard, Knut; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Roussel, Alain; Spiliopoulos, G.; Stewart, Lesley A.; Tierney, Jayne F.; Wang Mei; Zhang Rugang

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The existing randomized evidence has failed to conclusively demonstrate the benefit or otherwise of preoperative radiotherapy in treating patients with potentially resectable esophageal carcinoma. This meta-analysis aimed to assess whether there is benefit from adding radiotherapy prior to surgery. Methods and Materials: This quantitative meta-analysis included updated individual patient data from all properly randomized trials (published or unpublished) comprising 1147 patients (971 deaths) from five randomized trials. Results: With a median follow-up of 9 years, the hazard ratio (HR) of 0.89 (95% CI 0.78-1.01) suggests an overall reduction in the risk of death of 11% and an absolute survival benefit of 3% at 2 years and 4% at 5 years. This result is not conventionally statistically significant (p 0.062). No clear differences in the size of the effect by sex, age, or tumor location were apparent. Conclusion: Based on existing trials, there was no clear evidence that preoperative radiotherapy improves the survival of patients with potentially resectable esophageal cancer. These results indicate that if such preoperative radiotherapy regimens do improve survival, then the effect is likely to be modest with an absolute improvement in survival of around 3 to 4%. Trials or a meta-analysis of around 2000 patients would be needed to reliably detect such an improvement (15→20%)

  8. Radiotherapy of breast fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heibel, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    In a retrospective study radiotherapy of breast fibrosis in hormone-treated men with histologically confirmed prostate carcinoma was examined. 10 patients had received hormones even before irradiation, 113 obtained hormone administration only after irradiation. The objective size of the glandular body and the overall size of the breast were measured with a special method developed by the author. 46 patients indicated complaints. With hypertrophic mamma and hypertrophic mamilla in 67 examined patients, 127 different symptoms resulted in total. Four patients of the group who had obtained hormones before irradiation, suffered from subjective symptoms. It resulted that radiotherapy of breast fibrosis carried out during hormone treatment is no gynecomastia prophylaxis, that already existent mamma hypertrophies are irreversible, but that existent sensations were notably reduced within 6 months after irradiation therapy. These results indicate the necessity of a radiotherapy of the mamma fibrosis before the hormone treatment is begun. Particularly in cases of higher operative risks, also the possibility of preferring radiotherapy to mastectomy should be fully utilized, in view of adequate or even better therapeutic results. (orig./MG) [de

  9. A case study of the neuropsychological outcomes following microsurgery, conventional radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy for an adult's recurrent craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, David; Allan, Alfred; Becerra, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the neuropsychological outcomes for an adult patient, 2 years after receiving microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy for a recurrent craniopharyngioma; and the impact of a further intervention, stereotactic radiotherapy, on this level of neuropsychological functioning. JD, a 30 year old male whose recurrent craniopharyngioma had 2 years earlier been treated with two operations and conventional radiotherapy. JD was assessed (using standardized clinical tests) before and after a course of stereotactic radiotherapy. Prior to stereotactic radiotherapy (and 2 years after microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy) JD's IQ was intact, but considerable impairments were present in executive functioning, memory, theory of mind and processing speed. Fifteen months after stereotactic radiotherapy, all neuropsychological domains remained largely static or improved, supporting the utility of this treatment option in the neuropsychological domain. However, deficits in executive functioning, memory and processing speed remained. These findings suggest that, even after multiple treatments, substantial cognitive impairments can be present in an adult patient with a recurrent craniopharyngioma. This profile of deficits underlines the inadequacy of relying purely on IQ as a marker for cognitive health in this population and emphasizes the need to include neuropsychological impairments as a focus of rehabilitation with these patients.

  10. Effect of pelvic radiotherapy for prostrate cancer on bowel, bladder and sexual functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif-ur-Rahman; Ali, N.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer on sexual, bowel and urinary functions. Study Design: a prospective cohort study. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital, Lahore from July 1998 to January 2000. Patients and Method: This study included 52 patients with diagnosis of prostate cancer who were given external beam pelvic radiotherapy. The effects of pelvic radiotherapy on their sexual, bowel and bladder functions were calculated at 6, 12 and 18 months and mean composite scores for each entity were examined. Results: Decrease in sexual function (up to 35%) was most significant observation followed by bowel dysfunction (10-12%). Bladder function deranged early during radiotherapy but there was no remarkable bladder dysfunction, overall a good proportion of patients (70 - 72%) felt satisfied with their treatment by external beam radiotherapy. By lapse of time there was gradual worsening of erectile function especially after a couple of months of pelvic radiotherapy, while bowel and bladder functions improved 8-12 months post radiotherapy. Conclusion: Proper counselling of patients regarding potential side effects of pelvic radiotherapy can make them understand the outcome of treatment. (author)

  11. Basis for new strategies in postoperative radiotherapy of bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, N.C.H.; Grillo, H.C.; Gardiello, M.; Scannel, J.G.; Wilkins, E.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the role of postoperative radiotherapy and to search for new strategies in the management of N 1 , N 2 , T 3 stage carcinoma of the lung, we analyzed results of treatment in 148 of 166 patients who were registered at the Massachusetts General Hospital Tumor Registry from 1971 to 1977 with a pathological diagnosis of N 1 , N 2 , T 3 carcinoma of the lung after pulmonary resection. Ninety-three patients received postoperative radiotherapy and another 55 were followed without further treatment. Patients with adenocarcinoma showed significant improvement of survival by postoperative radiotherapy; actuarial NED (no evidence of disease) survival rates were 85% and 51% at 1 year, and 43% and 8% at 5 years for S + RT (patients treated with surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy) and S (patients treated with surgery only) groups, respectively, (P 2 , T 3 stages. Regional recurrence was the most common failure in squamous cell carcinoma; 76% (13/17) and 45% (10/22) of all failures were in the regional area in S and S + RT groups. Regional failure in S + RT group was noted with radiation dose up to 5000 rad (TDF 82) which suggests radiation dose higher than 5000 rad in future trial

  12. Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Breast in Prone Position: Dosimetric Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Mitchell, James; Rosenstein, Barry; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the physics and dosimetry results of a trial of accelerated intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the whole breast with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in patients treated in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent computed tomography planning and treatment in the prone position on a dedicated treatment platform. The platform has an open aperture on the side to allow for the index breast to fall away from the chest wall. Noncontrast computed tomography images were acquired at 2.5- or 3.75-mm-thick intervals, from the level of the mandible to below the diaphragm. A dose of 40.5 Gy was delivered to the entire breast at 2.7-Gy fractions in 15 fractions. An additional dose of 0.5 Gy was delivered as a concomitant boost to the lumpectomy site, with a 1-cm margin, using inverse planning, for a total dose of 48 Gy in 15 fractions. No more than 10% of the heart and lung volume was allowed to receive >18 and >20 Gy, respectively. Results: Between September 2003 and August 2005, 91 patients were enrolled in the study. The median volume of heart that received ≥18 Gy was 0.5%, with a maximal value of 4.7%. The median volume of ipsilateral lung that received ≥20 Gy was 0.8%, with a maximum of 7.2%. Conclusion: This technique for whole breast radiotherapy is feasible and enables an accelerated regimen in the prone position while sparing the lung and heart

  13. Photochemical Internalization of Bleomycin Before External-Beam Radiotherapy Improves Locoregional Control in a Human Sarcoma Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norum, Ole-Jacob; Bruland, Oyvind Sverre; Gorunova, Ludmila; Berg, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the tumor growth response of the combination photochemical internalization and external-beam radiotherapy. Photochemical internalization is a technology to improve the utilization of therapeutic macromolecules in cancer therapy by photochemical release of endocytosed macromolecules into the cytosol. Methods and Materials: A human sarcoma xenograft TAX-1 was inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice. The photosensitizer AlPcS 2a and bleomycin were intraperitoneally administrated 48 h and 30 min, respectively, before diode laser light exposure at 670 nm (20 J/cm 2 ). Thirty minutes or 7 days after photochemical treatment, the animals were subjected to 4 Gy of ionizing radiation. Results: Using photochemical internalization of bleomycin as an adjunct to ionizing radiation increased the time to progression for the tumors from 17 to 33 days as compared with that observed with photodynamic therapy combined with ionizing radiation as well as for radiochemotherapy with bleomycin. The side effects observed when photochemical internalization of bleomycin was given shortly before ionizing radiation were eliminated by separating the treatment modalities in time. Conclusion: Photochemical internalization of bleomycin combined with ionizing radiation increased the time to progression and showed minimal toxicity and may therefore reduce the total radiation dose necessary to obtain local tumor control while avoiding long-term sequelae from radiotherapy.

  14. An international review of patient safety measures in radiotherapy practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Jesmin; Barton, Michael; Noble, Douglas; Lemer, Claire; Donaldson, Liam J.

    2009-01-01

    Errors from radiotherapy machine or software malfunction usually are well documented as they affect hundreds of patients, whereas random errors affecting individual patients are more difficult to be discovered and prevented. Although major clinical radiotherapy incidents have been reported, many more have remained unrecognised or have not been reported. The literature in this field is limited as it is mostly published as a result of investigation of major errors. We present a review of radiotherapy incidents internationally with the aim of identifying the domains where most errors occur through extensive review and synthesis of published reports, unpublished 'Grey literature' and departmental incident data. Our review of radiotherapy-related events in the last three decades (1976-2007) identified more than seven thousand (N = 7741) incidents and near misses. Three thousand one hundred and twenty-five incidents reported patient harm of variable intensity ranging from underdose increasing the risk of recurrence, to overdose causing toxicity, and even death for 1% (N = 38); 4616 events were near misses with no recognisable patient harm. Based on our review, a radiotherapy risk profile has been published by the WHO World Alliance for Patient Safety that highlights the role of communication, training and strict adherence to guidelines/protocols in improving the safety of radiotherapy process.

  15. Radiotherapy staffing in the European countries: Final results from the ESTRO-HERO survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, Yolande; Defourny, Noémie; Coffey, Mary; Borras, Josep M.; Dunscombe, Peter; Slotman, Ben; Malicki, Julian; Bogusz, Marta; Gasparotto, Chiara; Grau, Cai; Kokobobo, Arianit; Sedlmayer, Felix; Slobina, Elena; Coucke, Philippe; Gabrovski, Roumen; Vosmik, Milan; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Jaal, Jana; Dejean, Catherine; Polgar, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ESTRO Health Economics in Radiation Oncology (HERO) project has the overall aim to develop a knowledge base of the provision of radiotherapy in Europe and build a model for health economic evaluation of radiation treatments at the European level. The first milestone was to assess the availability of radiotherapy resources within Europe. This paper presents the personnel data collected in the ESTRO HERO database. Materials and methods: An 84-item questionnaire was sent out to European countries, through their national scientific and professional radiotherapy societies. The current report includes a detailed analysis of radiotherapy staffing (questionnaire items 47–60), analysed in relation to the annual number of treatment courses and the socio-economic status of the countries. The analysis was conducted between February and July 2014, and is based on validated responses from 24 of the 40 European countries defined by the European Cancer Observatory (ECO). Results: A large variation between countries was found for most parameters studied. Averages and ranges for personnel numbers per million inhabitants are 12.8 (2.5–30.9) for radiation oncologists, 7.6 (0–19.7) for medical physicists, 3.5 (0–12.6) for dosimetrists, 26.6 (1.9–78) for RTTs and 14.8 (0.4–61.0) for radiotherapy nurses. The combined average for physicists and dosimetrists is 9.8 per million inhabitants and 36.9 for RTT and nurses. Radiation oncologists on average treat 208.9 courses per year (range: 99.9–348.8), physicists and dosimetrists conjointly treat 303.3 courses (range: 85–757.7) and RTT and nurses 76.8 (range: 25.7–156.8). In countries with higher GNI per capita, all personnel categories treat fewer courses per annum than in less affluent countries. This relationship is most evident for RTTs and nurses. Different clusters of countries can be distinguished on the basis of available personnel resources and socio-economic status. Conclusions: The average personnel

  16. Intravitreal bevacizumab for macular edema due to proton beam radiotherapy: Favorable results shown after eighteen months follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Loukianou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Eleni Loukianou, Dimitrios Brouzas, Eleni Georgopoulou, Chrysanthi Koutsandrea, Michael ApostolopoulosEye Department, University of Athens, Athens, GreecePurpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravitreal injections of bevacizumab (Avastin® as a treatment option for radiation maculopathy secondary to proton beam radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma.Case: A 61-year-old woman presented with a gradual decrease in left eye visual acuity (VA 29 months after proton beam radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma. On presentation, her best-corrected VA (BCVA was 2/10 in the left eye and the intraocular pressure was 15 mmHg. Fundoscopy revealed cystoid macular edema, intraretinal hemorrhages, epiretinal membrane in the posterior pole, and residual tumor scar with exudative retinal detachment and hard exudates in the periphery of the superotemporal quadrant. A treatment with intravitreal injections of bevacizumab (Avastin® was recommended. The injections were performed on a six-weekly basis.Results: The central retinal thickness prior to the treatment was 458 μm. After the first intravitreal injection of bevacizumab, the retinal thickness at the centre of the fovea was reduced to 322 μm. After the third injection, the central retinal thickness was 359 μm and 18 months after presentation, it reduced to 334 μm. The BCVA increased to 3/10 after the intravitreal injections of bevacizumab and remained stable during the follow-up period. The intraocular pressure was within normal range during the follow-up period.Conclusion: Bevacizumab should be regarded as a treatment option for macular edema due to proton beam radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma. By reducing the central retinal thickness, intravitreal bevacizumab can improve VA or ameliorate further decline caused by radiation maculopathy.Keywords: bevacizumab (Avastin®, choroidal melanoma, macular edema, radiation retinopathy

  17. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-wook; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity

  18. Results of primary and postoperative radiotherapy of malignant tumours of the larynx and posterior pharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppele, G.

    1980-01-01

    In a study on the epidemiology of laryngeal and pharyngeal tumours, a coincidence was found between established alcohol abuse and tumours of the two organs. The results of surgery followed by gammatron radiotherapy (laryngeal tumours) or betatron therapy (pharyngeal tumours) are prescuted and discussed. (APR) [de

  19. The effect on the radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients quality of life and the related health education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xinli

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important means of cervical cancer, due to the specificity of tumor site and side effect of radiotherapy, lack of knowledge of radiotherapy for patients and relatives about the disease, It is particularly important during radiotherapy on health education. By the analysis of radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients quality of life, it is the purpose of patients during the period of radiotherapy of whole course health education. Including before radiotherapy, radiotherapy in health education and the guide of the leaving hospital. In order to improve the compliance of patients, reduce the complications. Further it is improved the clinical treatment effect. (author)

  20. Late normal tissue effects in the arm and shoulder following lymphatic radiotherapy: Results from the UK START (Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy) trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Joanne S; Mannino, Mariella; Griffin, Clare; Porta, Nuria; Sydenham, Mark; Bliss, Judith M; Yarnold, John R

    2018-01-01

    Adjuvant lymphatic radiotherapy (LNRT) is recommended for selected axillary node positive women with early breast cancer. We investigated whether hypofractionated LNRT is safe combined with similarly-hypofractionated breast/chest wall radiotherapy (RT). The Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) pilot, A and B trials randomised women with early breast cancer to schedules of 2.67-3.3 Gy versus 2.0 Gy fractions (control). RT adverse effects were assessed by patients using the EORTC QLQ-BR23 and protocol-specific questions, and by physicians. Rates of arm/shoulder effects were compared between schedules for patients given LNRT. 864/5861 (14.7%) patients received LNRT (385 START-pilot, 318 START-A, 161 START-B). Prevalences of moderate/marked arm/shoulder effects were low up to 10 years. There were no significant differences between the hypofractionated and control groups for patient- and physician-assessed symptoms in START-A or START-B. In START-pilot, adverse effect rates were higher after 13 fractions of 3.3 Gy, consistent with effects reported in the breast/chest wall (significant for shoulder stiffness, HR 3.07, 95%CI 1.62-5.83, p = 0.001). The START trial results suggest that appropriately-dosed hypofractionated LNRT is safe in the long-term, according to patient and physician-assessed arm and shoulder symptoms. These findings are consistent with those reported after the same schedules delivered to the breast/chest wall. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The future of personalised radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudell, Jimmy J; Torres-Roca, Javier F; Gillies, Robert J; Enderling, Heiko; Kim, Sungjune; Rishi, Anupam; Moros, Eduardo G; Harrison, Louis B

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy has long been the mainstay of treatment for patients with head and neck cancer and has traditionally involved a stage-dependent strategy whereby all patients with the same TNM stage receive the same therapy. We believe there is a substantial opportunity to improve radiotherapy delivery beyond just technological and anatomical precision. In this Series paper, we explore several new ideas that could improve understanding of the phenotypic and genotypic differences that exist between patients and their tumours. We discuss how exploiting these differences and taking advantage of precision medicine tools-such as genomics, radiomics, and mathematical modelling-could open new doors to personalised radiotherapy adaptation and treatment. We propose a new treatment shift that moves away from an era of empirical dosing and fractionation to an era focused on the development of evidence to guide personalisation and biological adaptation of radiotherapy. We believe these approaches offer the potential to improve outcomes and reduce toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiotherapy and skin tumors; Radiotherapie et tumeurs curanees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calitchi, E.; KIrova, Y.; Le bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    1998-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in treatment of skin tumours. For skin carcinomas, external irradiation (kilo-voltage X-rays or electrons according to clinical characteristics) is more valuable than interstitial brachytherapy, which is recommended for tumours of the lip and of the nasal vestibule. In mycosis fungoides, total cutaneous electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited superficial plaques. In the classical form of Kaposi`s sarcoma, radiotherapy can achieve local control-whereas it obtains good palliative results in the epidemic form. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy of degenerative joint disorders. Indication, technique and clinical results; Radiotherapie bei schmerzhaften degenerativ-entzuendlichen Gelenkerkrankungen. Indikation, Technik und klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keilholz, L.; Sauer, R. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik; Seegenschmiedt, M.H. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik]|[Alfred-Krupp-Krankenhaus, Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    1998-05-01

    From 1984 to 1994, 85 patients with painful osteoarthritis were treated. The mean follow-up was 4 (1 to 10) years. Seventy-three patients (103 joints) were available for long-term analysis: 17 patients (27 joints) with omarthrosis, 19 (20 joints) with rhizarthrosis, 31 (49 joints) with osteoarthritis of the knee and 6 patients (7 joints) with osteoarthritis of the hip. All patients were intensively pretreated over long time. Mean symptom duration prior to radiotherapy was 4 (1 to 10) years. Orthovoltage or linac photons were applied using some technical modifications depending upon the joint. Two radiotherapy series (6 x 1 Gy, total dose: 12 Gy, 3 weekly fractions) were prescribed. The interval between the 2 series was 6 weeks. The subjective pain profil was assessed prior to and 6 months after radiotherapy and at last follow-up. Forty-six (63%) patients (64 joints) achieved a reduction of pain symptoms; 16 of those had a `major pain relief` and 14 `complete pain relief`. Large joints - knee and hip - responded better (64% each) than the rhizarthrosis (53%). All pain categories and grades and their combined pain score were significantly reduced. The pain reduction was mostly pronounced for the symptom `pain at rest`. The orthopedic score correlated well with the subjective response of the patients. The thumb score improved in 11 (57%) joints, the shoulder score of Constant and Murley in 16 (59%), the Japonese knee score of Sasaki et al. in 33 (67%), the hip score of Harris in 5 (71%) joints. Only 9 of 19 patients which were treated to avoid surgery, had to be operated, and 3 of those received a total arthroplasty of the hip or knee. In multivariate analysis for the endpoint `complete` or `major pain relief` only the criterion `symptom duration {>=}2 years prior to radiotherapy` was an independent negative prognostic parameter. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Von 1984 bis 1994 wurden 85 Patienten wegen schmerzhaft arthrotischer Gelenkerkrankungen bestrahlt. 73 Patienten (103

  4. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated with Precision-Oriented Radiation Therapy Techniques Including Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shan Liu

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports preliminary results with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Between August 2000 and May 2001, we treated 19 patients with NPC using IMRT. Twelve patients had stage I-II disease and seven had stage III-IV disease. Six patients received 9.0-19.8 Gy three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT before IMRT and 18 patients received a brachytherapy boost after IMRT. The mean follow-up time was 13.0 months. All patients with stage II-IV disease except one received two cycles of chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU during radiotherapy, followed by two to four cycles of chemotherapy after radiotherapy. Tumor response was assessed using clinical examination and computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The mean doses administered to the gross tumor volume and clinical tumor volume were 70.9 Gy and 63.2 Gy, respectively. The mean doses administered to the right and left parotid glands were 38.1 Gy and 38.6 Gy, respectively. All 19 patients had a complete response of primary and lymph node disease. Grade III mucositis developed during chemoradiotherapy in 15 patients (79%. In addition, clinical grade I xerostomia was recorded in nine patients, grade II in nine, and grade III in one. This study demonstrated that 3D-CRT, IMRT, intracavitary brachytherapy, and chemotherapy are effective and safe methods to treat NPC. Although IMRT treatment spared parotid gland function, its efficacy may be significantly influenced by disease stage and location of the neck lymph nodes. More cases and a longer follow-up to assess survival and complications are planned.

  5. The radiotherapy affects the cognitive processes; La radiotherapie affecte la cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-10-15

    Researchers from the medical center of the free university of Amsterdam report that the radiotherapy can hinder the cognitive functions of patients affected by cerebral tumors treated after a surgery. Even low dose radiation could contribute in their opinion, to the progressive cognitive decline of patients suffering of low grade gliomas, the most commune cerebral tumor. To get these conclusions, 65 patients, whom half of them received a radiotherapy, had a neurological and psychological evaluation twelve years after their treatment. Results: 53% of patients treated by radiotherapy present disorders of attention, memory, execution and speed of information treatment against 27% of these ones that received an only surgery. The researchers conclude to the necessity to take into account this risk in the choice of treatment, or even to avoid radiotherapy in this precise case. (N.C.)

  6. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma treated with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaki M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare, highly vascular, benign, locally aggressive tumor, affecting boys of adolescent age. The aggressiveness and high vascularity makes surgery and even a biopsy difficult in majority of cases. Although surgery is the treatment of choice in early cases, considerable debate exists regarding the treatment of advanced disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy provides a good response and also avoids surgery-associated morbidity. We are herewith reporting a case of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma who showed complete hemostasis and improvement in vision to radiotherapy

  7. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy photons as a boost in patients with early-stage oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. Treatment feasibility and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, Tomasz; Wygoda, Andrzej; Hutnik, Marcin; Skladowski, Krzysztof; Wydmanski, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Boguslaw [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Maciejewski, Adam; Szymczyk, Cezary; Wierzgon, Janusz [Dept. of Surgery, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Orlef, Andrzej [Dept. of Physics, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy photons as a boost in patients with early-stage oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 2003 and 2006, 16 patients with early-stage cancer of mobile tongue (n = 10 [63%]) or floor of the mouth (n = 6 [37%]) treated at Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Poland, were evaluated for IORT boost with the INTRABEAM {sup registered} System (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH; IORT-PRS) because of the high risk of local recurrence due to positive margins on frozen pathologic section. After tumor resection, the applicator was positioned in the tumor bed. The applicator's diameter (range: 1.5-5 cm) was selected to encompass high-risk area of tumor recurrence. The dose (5 Gy, 7 Gy, or 7.5 Gy) was applied according to tumor volume and bone proximity. External-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was provided to the tumor bed in all patients (50 Gy) and to the nodal area, when needed. Toxicity and local tumor control were assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. IORT did not increase acute mucosal reaction. Local tumor control was found in all cases. Early mucosal reaction did not exceed 3 according to the RTOG scale and healed in median time of 35 days after completion of EBRT. No late adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: This preliminary report has demonstrated the feasibility of IORT-PRS for patients with early oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. This method may be considered an alternative boost technique, although additional studies are needed to establish long-term results in a larger group of patients. (orig.)

  8. Improving oncoplastic breast tumor bed localization for radiotherapy planning using image registration algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, Marek; Skalski, Andrzej; Ciepiela, Izabela; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about tumor bed localization and its shape analysis is a crucial factor for preventing irradiation of healthy tissues during supportive radiotherapy and as a result, cancer recurrence. The localization process is especially hard for tumors placed nearby soft tissues, which undergo complex, nonrigid deformations. Among them, breast cancer can be considered as the most representative example. A natural approach to improving tumor bed localization is the use of image registration algorithms. However, this involves two unusual aspects which are not common in typical medical image registration: the real deformation field is discontinuous, and there is no direct correspondence between the cancer and its bed in the source and the target 3D images respectively. The tumor no longer exists during radiotherapy planning. Therefore, a traditional evaluation approach based on known, smooth deformations and target registration error are not directly applicable. In this work, we propose alternative artificial deformations which model the tumor bed creation process. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the most commonly used deformable registration algorithms: B-Splines free form deformations (B-Splines FFD), different variants of the Demons and TV-L1 optical flow. The evaluation procedure includes quantitative assessment of the dedicated artificial deformations, target registration error calculation, 3D contour propagation and medical experts visual judgment. The results demonstrate that the currently, practically applied image registration (rigid registration and B-Splines FFD) are not able to correctly reconstruct discontinuous deformation fields. We show that the symmetric Demons provide the most accurate soft tissues alignment in terms of the ability to reconstruct the deformation field, target registration error and relative tumor volume change, while B-Splines FFD and TV-L1 optical flow are not an appropriate choice for the breast tumor bed localization problem

  9. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  10. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in brain tumors and cervical region. Experience of the Dean Funes Medical Center, first experience in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery inside the country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Vita, H.; Brunetto, M.; Derechinsky, V; Derechinsky, G.; Derechinsky, M.; Gonzalez, S.; Marinello, A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study to analyze the results of 53 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes' was performed. The patients had brain and head and neck tumors. Patients and methods: From November 1997 to March 2003, 53 patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes'. The daily dose administered varied from 1.8 to 2 Gy and the total dose from 30 to 70 Gy. The minimal follow up was 2 months, and the medium follow up 32 months. Local control and survival were analyzed in all patients, as well as tolerance and the complications of the treatment. Results: Since these series represented a very heterogeneous group of patients, the final results were very difficult to compare with other alternative treatments. However, an excellent tolerance to therapy was observed. Some subsets of patients had good results to treatment: patients with metastasis to the orbit, patients with lesions to the sellar and parasellar regions and some who relapsed following conventional radiotherapy, mainly lymphomas. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiotherapy is a valid therapeutic method to treat tumors of the brain and head and neck, as long as the tumor has a moderate size (6 cm. or less) and the shape is cylindrical or ellipsoid. Stereotactic radiation improves the therapeutic ratio as compared with the conventional radiotherapy. It has advantages over the 3D technique, and could compete with IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy). (author) [es

  11. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Value of radiotherapy of gastric carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duehmke, E.

    1985-01-01

    Radiotherapy of gastric carcinoma, in contrast to malignant lymphoma, is not commonly in use, until today. Provided that there is a close cooperation between surgeons and radiooncologists, radiotherapy with sufficient, tolerable doses should be considered in any case of complete resection in order to improve the control of subclinical disease as well as cure from cancer. But also in non-resectable carcinoma of the stomach suitable radiotherapeutic approaches may give helpful palliation. (orig.) [de

  13. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  14. Clinical results of a concomitant boost radiotherapy technique for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piet, A H.M.; Hulshof, M C.C.M.; Pieters, B R; Koning, C C.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pos, F J [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Inst., Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reijke, T.M. de [Dept. of Urology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    Purpose: to update the results of external radiotherapy with a focal concomitant boost technique on local control and bladder function in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively evaluated 92 elderly or disabled patients with localized T2-4 N0-1 M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and a median age of 79 years, not suitable for radical surgery and treated between 1994 and 2005. Treatment consisted of a dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy to the small pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 0.75 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 55 Gy in 4 weeks. Results: complete remission rate after evaluation by means of cystoscopy at 3 months was 78%. 3-year local control rate amounted to 56%, and 3-year overall survival to 36%. The posttreatment bladder capacity was comparable with the pretreatment capacity and was {>=} 200 ml in 81% of the cases. Mean bladder capacity did not deteriorate at longer follow-up. Conclusion: the local control rate after external beam radiotherapy in elderly patients with a focal concomitant boost for localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer was 56% at 3 years. Functional bladder outcome was good. (orig.)

  15. Clinical results of a concomitant boost radiotherapy technique for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, A.H.M.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Pieters, B.R.; Koning, C.C.E.; Pos, F.J.; Reijke, T.M. de

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to update the results of external radiotherapy with a focal concomitant boost technique on local control and bladder function in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively evaluated 92 elderly or disabled patients with localized T2-4 N0-1 M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and a median age of 79 years, not suitable for radical surgery and treated between 1994 and 2005. Treatment consisted of a dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy to the small pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 0.75 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 55 Gy in 4 weeks. Results: complete remission rate after evaluation by means of cystoscopy at 3 months was 78%. 3-year local control rate amounted to 56%, and 3-year overall survival to 36%. The posttreatment bladder capacity was comparable with the pretreatment capacity and was ≥ 200 ml in 81% of the cases. Mean bladder capacity did not deteriorate at longer follow-up. Conclusion: the local control rate after external beam radiotherapy in elderly patients with a focal concomitant boost for localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer was 56% at 3 years. Functional bladder outcome was good. (orig.)

  16. When palliative treatment achieves more than palliation: Instances of long-term survival after palliative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhup Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Palliative radiotherapy aims at symptom alleviation and improvement of quality of life. It may be effective in conferring a reasonable quantum of local control, as well as possibly prolonging survival on the short term. However, there can be rare instances where long-term survival, or even cure, results from palliative radiotherapy, which mostly uses sub-therapeutic doses. Aim: To categorize and characterize the patients with long-term survival and/or cure after palliative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of hospital records of patients treated with palliative radiotherapy from 2001 to 2006 at the Regional Cancer Centre, Shimla. Results: Of the analyzed 963 patients who received palliative radiotherapy, 2.4% (n = 23 survived at least 5 years, with a large majority of these surviving patients (73.9%, n = 17 being free of disease. Conclusions: In addition to providing valuable symptom relief, palliative radiotherapy utilizing sub-therapeutic doses may, in a small proportion of patients, bestow long-term survival, and possibly cure. Rationally, such a favorable, but rare outcome cannot be expected with supportive care alone.

  17. Experimental results and clinical implications of the four R's in fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H. Muenchen, Neuherberg

    1982-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data on the four R' in fractionated radiotherapy are reviewed. The clinical importance of redistribution has not been proven in the experiment yet. On reoxygenation no unequivocal data in human cancer exists and a lot of variability in rodent tumours. Repair and regeneration are the most important of the four R's in fractionated radiotherapy. The presented experimental and clinical evidence suggests a differential response between tumour and late responding normal tissues with regard to these two R's. Tumours appear to have, in general, a smaller capacity for repairing sublethal radiation damage but a higher capacity for repopulation than late responding normal tissues. (orig.)

  18. Results of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in microcellular bronchial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topuz, E.; Aldemir, O.; Toere, G.; Bilge, N.; Kural, N.

    1986-01-01

    At the Radiotherapeutic Department of the Faculty of Medicine in Istanbul, 35 masculine patients with microcellular bronchial carcinoma, limited disease, were treated for two years, i.e. between 1980 and 1981, with a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Nine out of these patients are tumor-free after at least 46 months, i.e. about four years. This corresponds to a tumor-free survival rate of 25.7%. (orig.) [de

  19. Efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuri; Niibe, Yuzuru; Terahara, Atsuro; Shimada, Hideaki; Yajima, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively assess the efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion at our institute, by evaluating change of Mellow-Pinkas-dysphagia score and subjective symptom. We confarmed radiotherapy for esophageal cancer help improve dysphagia. Change of Mel-low-Pinkas-dysphagia score throughout radiotherapy did not match with change of subjective dysphagia, which have relevancy to patients' quality of life. New evaluation criterion is required. (author)

  20. Stage report of the national radiotherapy survey committee May 2009; Rapport d'etape du Comite National de suivi de la radiotherapie mai 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This report proposes an assessment of the impact of the national radiotherapy measures present in the road map (November 2007 - March 2009) and describes the creation of a national support unit to manage the operating difficulties of 27 radiotherapy centres. It comments how a transition period between 2009 and 2011 must accompany radiotherapy before the implementation of opposable agreement criteria in 2011, notably through an improvement of recruitment, a support to cooperation between radiotherapy centres, the implementation of a radio-vigilance unit. Finally, it briefly discusses how to prepare the 2011-2013 period.

  1. Decreased tumor cell proliferation as an indicator of the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adell, Gunnar; Zhang Hong; Jansson, Agneta; Sun Xiaofeng; Staal, Olle; Nordenskjoeld, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy, with significant local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique can improve local control rates and disease-free survival. Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the tumor growth fraction in rectal cancer measured with Ki-67 and the outcome, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy. Method: Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry was used to measure tumor cell proliferation in the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen. Materials: Specimens from 152 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region were included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial 1987-1990. Results: Tumors with low proliferation treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significantly reduced recurrence rate. The influence on death from rectal cancer was shown only in the univariate analysis. Preoperative radiotherapy of tumors with high proliferation did not significantly improve local control and disease-free survival. The interaction between Ki-67 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was significant for the reduced recurrence rate (p=0.03), with a trend toward improved disease-free survival (p=0.08). In the surgery-alone group, Ki-67 staining did not significantly correlate with local recurrence or survival rates. Conclusion: Many Ki-67 stained tumor cells in the preoperative biopsy predicts an increased treatment failure rate after preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

  2. Conformal radiotherapy: principles and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.C.; Gaboriaud, G.; Pontvert, D.

    1999-01-01

    'Conformal radiotherapy' is the name fixed by usage and given to a new form of radiotherapy resulting from the technological improvements observed during the last ten years. While this terminology is now widely used, no precise definition can be found in the literature. Conformal radiotherapy refers to an approach in which the dose distribution is more closely 'conformed' or adapted to the actual shape of the target volume. However, the achievement of a consensus on a more specific definition is hampered by various difficulties, namely in characterizing the degree of 'conformality'. We have therefore suggested a classification scheme be established on the basis of the tools and the procedures actually used for all steps of the process, i.e., from prescription to treatment completion. Our classification consists of four levels: schematically, at level 0, there is no conformation (rectangular fields); at level 1, a simple conformation takes place, on the basis of conventional 2D imaging; at level 2, a 3D reconstruction of the structures is used for a more accurate conformation; and level 3 includes research and advanced dynamic techniques. We have used our personal experience, contacts with colleagues and data from the literature to analyze all the steps of the planning process, and to define the tools and procedures relevant to a given level. The corresponding tables have been discussed and approved at the European level within the Dynarad concerted action. It is proposed that the term 'conformal radiotherapy' be restricted to procedures where all steps are at least at level 2. (author)

  3. Long-term results of salvage radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent cervical carcinoma after prior surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Uitterhoeve, Apollonia L.J.; Velden, Jacobus van der; Gonzalez, Dionisio Gonzalez; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstarct: Background and purpose: Tumor recurrence after surgery for cervical carcinoma is associated with high fatality and morbidity, forming a major therapeutic challenge. This paper presents our experience with treatment of this patient group by salvage radiotherapy with curative intent. Materials and methods: Thirty-five patients with a pelvic recurrence after hysterectomy received high-dose radiotherapy. A retrospective analysis of long-term outcome and prognostic factors was performed. Results: After a median follow-up period of 12.1 years, actuarial 2-,5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 66%, 43% and 33%; disease-free survival rates were 62%, 45% and 41%, respectively. Pelvic control rates at 2-,5- and 10-years were 77%, 69% and 62%. Unfavorable prognostic factors on univariate analysis for survival were: recurrence extending to the pelvic wall versus central recurrence, early recurrence after surgery, external boost versus brachytherapy boost, low total dose and high age. Only a brachytherapy boost and a long interval between surgery and recurrence were significant on multivariate analysis. Severe complications (≥grade 3) were seen in 6 patients (17%; actuarial after 5 years, 21%). Conclusions: Salvage radiotherapy for recurrent cervical carcinoma following surgery may result in 40-50% long-term disease-free survival and an acceptable risk of severe treatment complications, even in patient with recurrences extending to the pelvic wall

  4. The MET/AXL/FGFR Inhibitor S49076 Impairs Aurora B Activity and Improves the Antitumor Efficacy of Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémenson, Céline; Chargari, Cyrus; Liu, Winchygn; Mondini, Michele; Ferté, Charles; Burbridge, Mike F; Cattan, Valérie; Jacquet-Bescond, Anne; Deutsch, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Several therapeutic agents targeting HGF/MET signaling are under clinical development as single agents or in combination, notably with anti-EGFR therapies in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, despite increasing data supporting a link between MET, irradiation, and cancer progression, no data regarding the combination of MET-targeting agents and radiotherapy are available from the clinic. S49076 is an oral ATP-competitive inhibitor of MET, AXL, and FGFR1-3 receptors that is currently in phase I/II clinical trials in combination with gefitinib in NSCLC patients whose tumors show resistance to EGFR inhibitors. Here, we studied the impact of S49076 on MET signaling, cell proliferation, and clonogenic survival in MET-dependent (GTL16 and U87-MG) and MET-independent (H441, H460, and A549) cells. Our data show that S49076 exerts its cytotoxic activity at low doses on MET-dependent cells through MET inhibition, whereas it inhibits growth of MET-independent cells at higher but clinically relevant doses by targeting Aurora B. Furthermore, we found that S49076 improves the antitumor efficacy of radiotherapy in both MET-dependent and MET-independent cell lines in vitro and in subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor models in vivo In conclusion, our study demonstrates that S49076 has dual antitumor activity and can be used in combination with radiotherapy for the treatment of both MET-dependent and MET-independent tumors. These results support the evaluation of combined treatment of S49076 with radiation in clinical trials without patient selection based on the tumor MET dependency status. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2107-19. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy for low rectal cancers: feasibility, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.; Soravia, C.; Gertsch, P.; Bieri, S.; Sprangers, M.A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In cancers of the distal rectum, preoperative radiotherapy is often associated with low anterior resection. This study assesses the choice of surgical procedure, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes in a retrospective cohort of patients with low-lying rectal cancers. The results obtained reinforce the notion of the feasibility, in routine practice, of sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy in a significant proportion of low rectal cancers. The oncological results seem to be unaffected by the choice of surgical procedure. However, with the possible exception of body image and sexual aspects in males, quality of life parameters were not necessarily better in the restorative surgery group. Prospective studies are mandatory to clarify the putative quality of life advantages of sphincter-conserving procedures in this context. (author)

  6. New era of radiotherapy: An update in radiation-induced lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benveniste, M.F.K.; Welsh, J.; Godoy, M.C.B.; Betancourt, S.L.; Mawlawi, O.R.; Munden, R.F.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, advances in radiotherapy (RT) technology have improved delivery of radiation therapy dramatically. Advances in treatment planning with the development of image-guided radiotherapy and in techniques such as proton therapy, allows the radiation therapist to direct high doses of radiation to the tumour. These advancements result in improved local regional control while reducing potentially damaging dosage to surrounding normal tissues. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the radiological findings from these advances in order to differentiate expected radiation-induced lung injury (RILD) from recurrence, infection, and other lung diseases. In order to understand these changes and correlate them with imaging, the radiologist should have access to the radiation therapy treatment plans

  7. Radiotherapy for the primary ocular adnexal lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dahai; Sun Sanyuan; Zhuo Shichao; Wang Haiwei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathological and clinical characteristics of primary lymphoma of ocular adnexae, analyze the treatment results and discuss the methods to prevent radiation complications. Methods: From Feb. 1995 to Feb. 2004, 25 patients with primary ocular adnexal lymphoma were treated in the second hospital and the forth hospital of Xuzhou, including 11 males and 14 females. The diagnosis was confirmed pathologically by biopsy in 19 patients and lumpectomy in 6 patients, including 22 mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and 3 non-MALT lymphoma. According to the Ann Arbor Staging System, there were 21 patients with tumor in stage I E, 3 in stage II E and 1 in stage III E. The primary tumor was found in the eyelid or conjunctiva in 19 eyes and orbit in 9 eyes. Radiotherapy were given to 22 patients (25 eyes) by deep X-rays, 60 Co γ-rays or mixed beams. The total irradiation dose ranged from 30.0 to 57.6 Gy. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the survival rate and Logrank test was used to detect the difference between the different groups. Results: The 5-, 10-year accumulated survival rates (SR) of the whole group were 90% and 82%. The 10-year SR of patients with primary, eyelid or conjunctiva tumor and orbit tumor were 100% and 58% (P=0.032). The local control rates of the radiotherapy group and non-radiotherapy group were 92% and 33 % (P=0.006). The 10-year SR of patients with tumor completely removed and those with residues were 83% and 82% (P=0.907). The 10-year SR of MALT lymphoma and non-MALT lymphoma were 90.0% and 33.3% (P=0.009). After radiotherapy, 8 eyes (36%) had cataract formation and 7 eyes (28%) had xerophalmic symptoms. Conclusions: The results of radiothera- py for the primary ocular adnexal lymphoma are satisactory. The prognosis of patients with primary, eyelid or conjunctiva tumor is better than those with orbit tumor. The vast majority of the primary ocular adnexal lymphomas are MALT lymphomas. The survival rate of

  8. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D.I.; Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

    1996-01-01

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  9. Skin markings in external radiotherapy by temporary tattooing with henna: Improvement of accuracy and increased patient comfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Sedlmayer, Felix; Kogelnik, H. Dieter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To guarantee invariable skin markings in patients undergoing a course of external radiotherapy, especially using conformal techniques. Cutaneous markings with henna also increase patient comfort, because washing and showering are allowed. Methods and Materials: Henna, a completely natural product, is a skin colorant with a history of 5,000 years. It is applied to the skin in the form of a paste. While drying, henna stains the superficial skin layers for several weeks, and the marked area can be exposed to water arbitrarily. In case of fading of the stain before the end of radiotherapy, the marking procedure can be repeated. From November 1998 until March 2000, we performed skin markings with henna in 158 patients with different tumor sites. The majority of patients received conformal radiotherapy techniques. All patients have been evaluated concerning durability of the markings, the required number of marking procedures per treatment course, and possible related side effects. Results: The median durability of henna staining is 23 days (range 12-48 days). On average, two marking procedures (range 1-4) are necessary for a patient treated with curative intent. Although washing and showering are freely permitted, no adverse cutaneous side effects (e.g., erythema, allergic reactions) have been observed. Conclusions: Skin marking by temporary tattooing with henna increases the accuracy of external radiotherapy. It yields stable and invariable markings for the entire course of radiotherapy and also increases the comfort of patients

  10. SU-F-T-231: Improving the Efficiency of a Radiotherapy Peer-Review System for Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S; Basavatia, A; Garg, M; Kalnicki, S; Tome, W [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of a radiotherapy peer-review system using a commercially available software application for plan quality evaluation and documentation. Methods: A commercial application, FullAccess (Radialogica LLC, Version 1.4.4), was implemented in a Citrix platform for peer-review process and patient documentation. This application can display images, isodose lines, and dose-volume histograms and create plan reports for peer-review process. Dose metrics in the report can also be benchmarked for plan quality evaluation. Site-specific templates were generated based on departmental treatment planning policies and procedures for each disease site, which generally follow RTOG protocols as well as published prospective clinical trial data, including both conventional fractionation and hypo-fractionation schema. Once a plan is ready for review, the planner exports the plan to FullAccess, applies the site-specific template, and presents the report for plan review. The plan is still reviewed in the treatment planning system, as that is the legal record. Upon physician’s approval of a plan, the plan is packaged for peer review with the plan report and dose metrics are saved to the database. Results: The reports show dose metrics of PTVs and critical organs for the plans and also indicate whether or not the metrics are within tolerance. Graphical results with green, yellow, and red lights are displayed of whether planning objectives have been met. In addition, benchmarking statistics are collected to see where the current plan falls compared to all historical plans on each metric. All physicians in peer review can easily verify constraints by these reports. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the improvement in a radiotherapy peer-review system, which allows physicians to easily verify planning constraints for different disease sites and fractionation schema, allows for standardization in the clinic to ensure that departmental policies are maintained, and

  11. SU-F-T-231: Improving the Efficiency of a Radiotherapy Peer-Review System for Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S; Basavatia, A; Garg, M; Kalnicki, S; Tome, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of a radiotherapy peer-review system using a commercially available software application for plan quality evaluation and documentation. Methods: A commercial application, FullAccess (Radialogica LLC, Version 1.4.4), was implemented in a Citrix platform for peer-review process and patient documentation. This application can display images, isodose lines, and dose-volume histograms and create plan reports for peer-review process. Dose metrics in the report can also be benchmarked for plan quality evaluation. Site-specific templates were generated based on departmental treatment planning policies and procedures for each disease site, which generally follow RTOG protocols as well as published prospective clinical trial data, including both conventional fractionation and hypo-fractionation schema. Once a plan is ready for review, the planner exports the plan to FullAccess, applies the site-specific template, and presents the report for plan review. The plan is still reviewed in the treatment planning system, as that is the legal record. Upon physician’s approval of a plan, the plan is packaged for peer review with the plan report and dose metrics are saved to the database. Results: The reports show dose metrics of PTVs and critical organs for the plans and also indicate whether or not the metrics are within tolerance. Graphical results with green, yellow, and red lights are displayed of whether planning objectives have been met. In addition, benchmarking statistics are collected to see where the current plan falls compared to all historical plans on each metric. All physicians in peer review can easily verify constraints by these reports. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the improvement in a radiotherapy peer-review system, which allows physicians to easily verify planning constraints for different disease sites and fractionation schema, allows for standardization in the clinic to ensure that departmental policies are maintained, and

  12. High-dose rate fractionated interstitial radiotherapy for oropharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Takayuki; Inoue, Toshihiko; Inoue, Takehiro; Teshima, Teruki; Murayama, Shigeyuki [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    The limitations of treating oropharyngeal cancer patients with definitive external radiotherapy are the complications of salivary glands, taste buds, mandible and temporomandibular joints. To avoid these complications we started interstitial radiotherapy as boost after 46 Gy of external radiotherapy. Ten cases (retromolar trigone; 1, soft palate; 1, base of tongue; 3, lateral wall; 5) were treated with this method and seven cases were controlled locally. With short follow-up period, xerostomia and dysgeusia are less than definitive external radiotherapy as clinical impression and no in-field recurrences have been experienced. With markedly increased tumor dose, the local control rate can be improved. This treatment method will be an alternative to definitive external radiotherapy to gain better QOL and higher control rate. (author).

  13. Impact of immunotherapy among patients with melanoma brain metastases managed with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, William A; Binder, David C; Jones, Bernard L; Oweida, Ayman J; Liu, Arthur K; Rusthoven, Chad G; Karam, Sana D

    2017-12-15

    Patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBM) have been excluded from trials evaluating immunotherapy in melanoma. As such, immunotherapy's role in MBM is poorly understood, particularly in combination with radiotherapy. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with MBM receiving brain radiotherapy. They were classified according to immunotherapy receipt. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to identify factors associated with survival. Among 1287 patients, 185 received immunotherapy. Factors associated with improved survival included younger age, academic facility, lower extracranial disease burden, stereotactic radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Adding immunotherapy to radiotherapy for MBM is associated with improved survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. There is no role for hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic brainstem tumors: results of a pediatric oncology group phase III trial comparing conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, Lynda R.; Kadota, Richard; Freeman, Carolyn; Douglass, Edwin C.; Fontanesi, James; Cohen, Michael E.; Kovnar, Edward; Burger, Peter; Sanford, Robert A.; Kepner, James; Friedman, Henry; Kun, Larry E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In June 1992, POG began accrual to a phase III study, POG-9239, designed to compare the time to disease progression, overall survival, and toxicities observed in children with newly diagnosed brainstem tumor treated with 100 mg/m 2 of infusional cisplatin and randomized to either conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for study were those between 3 and 21 years of age with previously untreated tumors arising in the pons. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis was not mandatory, provided that the clinical and MRI scan findings were typical for a diffusely infiltrating pontine lesion. Treatment consisted of a six-week course of local field radiotherapy with either once a day treatment of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy (arm 1) or a twice a day regimen of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy (the second of the three hyperfractionated dose escalation levels of POG-8495) (arm 2). Because of previously reported poor results with conventional radiotherapy alone, cisplatin was included as a potential radiosensitizer in an attempt to improve progression-free and ultimate survival rates. Based on results of the phase I cisplatin dose escalation trial, POG-9139, 100 mg/m 2 was chosen for this trial and was delivered by continuous infusion over a 120-hour period, beginning on the first day of radiotherapy and repeated during weeks 3 and 5. One hundred thirty eligible patients were treated on protocol, 66 on arm 1 and 64 on arm 2. Results: The results we report are from time of diagnosis through October 1997. For patients treated on arm 1, the median time to disease progression (defined as time to off study) was 6 months (range 2-15 months) and the median time to death 8.5 months (range 3-24 months); survival at 1 year was 30.9% and at 2 years, 7.1%. For patients treated on arm 2, the corresponding values were 5 months (range 1-12 months) and 8 months (range 1-23 months), with 1- and 2-year

  15. Experimental and clinical studies with intraoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Kinsella, T.; Tepper, J.; Travis, E.L.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Glatstein, E.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of normal tissue tolerance to intraoperative radiotherapy were done upon 65 dogs subjected to laparotomy and 11 million electron volt electron irradiation in doses ranging from zero to 5,000 rads. Results of studies indicated that intact aorta and vena cava tolerate up to 5,000 rads without loss of structural integrity. Ureteral fibrosis and stenosis develop at doses of 3,000 rads or more. Arterial anastomoses heal after doses of 4,500 rads, but fibrosis can lead to occlusion. Intestinal suture lines heal after doses of 4,500 rads. Bile duct fibrosis and stenosis develop at doses of 2,000 rads or more. Biliary-enteric anastomoses fail to heal at any dose level. A clinical trial of intraoperative radiotherapy combined with radical surgery was performed upon 20 patients with advanced malignant tumors which were considered unlikely to be cured by conventional therapies and which included carcinomas of the stomach, carcinomas of the pancreas, carcinomas involving the hilus of the liver, retroperitoneal sarcomas and osteosarcomas of the pelvis. All patients underwent resection of gross tumor, followed by intraoperative irradiation of the tumor bed and regional nodal basins. Some patients received additional postoperative external beam radiotherapy. Treatment mortality for combined operation and radiotherapy occurred in four of 20 patients. Postoperative complications occurred in four of the 16 surviving patients. Local tumor control was achieved in 11 of the 16 surviving patients, with an over-all median follow-up period of 18 months. The clinical trial suggested that intraoperative radiotherapy is a feasible adjunct to resection in locally advanced tumors, that the resulting mortality and morbidity is similar to that expected from operation alone and that local tumor control may be improved

  16. Radiotherapy and HER2: point on the association of ionizing radiation and trastuzumab; Radiotherapie et HER2: point sur l'association de radiations ionisantes et de trastuzumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liem, X.; Lartigau, E. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France)

    2009-10-15

    The addition of the two treatments (trastuzumab and radiotherapy) poses the problem of their toxicity addition, particularly at the cardiac level. The data speak in favour of trastuzumab continuation during radiotherapy, taken into account the benefits. Because of the technical advances in radiotherapy ( respiratory automatic control, intensity modulated radiotherapy, I.M.R.T.) it will be possible to avoid the mediastinum structures improving then the tolerance. (N.C.)

  17. Guidelines for equipment and staffing of radiotherapy facilities in the European countries: Final results of the ESTRO-HERO survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunscombe, Peter; Grau, Cai; Defourny, Noémie; Malicki, Julian; Borras, Josep M.; Coffey, Mary; Bogusz, Marta; Gasparotto, Chiara; Slotman, Ben; Lievens, Yolande; Kokobobo, Arianit; Sedlmayer, Felix; Slobina, Elena; De Hertogh, Olivier; Hadjieva, Tatiana; Petera, Jiri; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Jaal, Jana; Bly, Ritva; Azria, David

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: In planning to meet evidence based needs for radiotherapy, guidelines for the provision of capital and human resources are central if access, quality and safety are not to be compromised. A component of the ESTRO-HERO (Health Economics in Radiation Oncology) project is to document the current availability and content of guidelines for radiotherapy in Europe. Materials and methods: An 84 part questionnaire was distributed to the European countries through their national scientific and professional radiotherapy societies with 30 items relating to the availability of guidelines for equipment and staffing and selected operational issues. Twenty-nine countries provided full or partial evaluable responses. Results: The availability of guidelines across Europe is far from uniform. The metrics used for capital and human resources are variable. There seem to have been no major changes in the availability or specifics of guidelines over the ten-year period since the QUARTS study with the exception of the recent expansion of RTT staffing models. Where comparison is possible it appears that staffing for radiation oncologists, medical physicists and particularly RTTs tend to exceed guidelines suggesting developments in clinical radiotherapy are moving faster than guideline updating. Conclusion: The efficient provision of safe, high quality radiotherapy services would benefit from the availability of well-structured guidelines for capital and human resources, based on agreed upon metrics, which could be linked to detailed estimates of need

  18. QA programme in external radiotherapy in Romania - status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, A.; Milu, C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Recognizing the importance of quality assurance in radiotherapy and the need to make access to radiation standards traceable to the international measurement system for every radiotherapy center, the Romanian national secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) has started in 1999 - together with IAEA - a national quality audit programme in all the centers for external radiotherapy from Romania. At present, there are 17 radiotherapy centers in Romania, and a total of 19 teletherapy units and 4 LINCs. The programme has 3 phases: the first phase was to organize a survey in all radiotherapy centers, to collect general information on their radio therapists, medical physicists, type of equipment, dosimeters, etc. Following the survey, a quality assurance network was set up, and on-site dosimetry reviews were arranged according to a suitable timetable. The second phase consisted in performing the reference dosimetry and the calibration of the equipment. Then, a quality audit system based on mailed TLDs has been applied to all radiation beams produced by cobalt-60 therapy units and medical accelerators, in order to identify discrepancies in dosimetry larger than ± 3%. At the same time, the beam calibration performed by the SSDLs was verified. The results of the first survey were analyzed, and corrective actions were taken. A second survey was then organized, based on the mailed TLDs. This paper presents in detail the entire QA programme, its results, and the actions that are to be taken in order to improve the accuracy and consistency of the dosimetry in clinical radiotherapy in Romania. (author)

  19. Cost-effectiveness of modern radiotherapy techniques in locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James D; Chang, Daniel T; Abelson, Jon; Daly, Megan E; Yeung, Heidi N; Nelson, Lorene M; Koong, Albert C

    2012-02-15

    Radiotherapy may improve the outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer but at an increased cost. In this study, the authors evaluated the cost-effectiveness of modern radiotherapy techniques in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. A Markov decision-analytic model was constructed to compare the cost-effectiveness of 4 treatment regimens: gemcitabine alone, gemcitabine plus conventional radiotherapy, gemcitabine plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT); and gemcitabine with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Patients transitioned between the following 5 health states: stable disease, local progression, distant failure, local and distant failure, and death. Health utility tolls were assessed for radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatments and for radiation toxicity. SBRT increased life expectancy by 0.20 quality-adjusted life years (QALY) at an increased cost of $13,700 compared with gemcitabine alone (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER] = $69,500 per QALY). SBRT was more effective and less costly than conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. An analysis that excluded SBRT demonstrated that conventional radiotherapy had an ICER of $126,800 per QALY compared with gemcitabine alone, and IMRT had an ICER of $1,584,100 per QALY compared with conventional radiotherapy. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay of $50,000 per QALY was 78% for gemcitabine alone, 21% for SBRT, 1.4% for conventional radiotherapy, and 0.01% for IMRT. At a willingness to pay of $200,000 per QALY, the probability of cost-effectiveness was 73% for SBRT, 20% for conventional radiotherapy, 7% for gemcitabine alone, and 0.7% for IMRT. The current results indicated that IMRT in locally advanced pancreatic cancer exceeds what society considers cost-effective. In contrast, combining gemcitabine with SBRT increased clinical effectiveness beyond that of gemcitabine alone at a cost potentially acceptable by

  20. Health related quality of life in locally advanced NSCLC treated with high dose radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy or cetuximab – Pooled results from two prospective clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallqvist, Andreas; Bergman, Bengt; Nyman, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage III, data on patient reported health-related quality of life (HRQL) are scarce, especially regarding concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Aims: To evaluate HRQL in patients treated with high dose radiotherapy combined with concurrent chemotherapy or the antibody cetuximab. Methods: The study population comprised all patients enroled in either of two phase II trials in locally advanced NSCLC performed in Sweden 2002–2007. The RAKET trial investigated three different ways of increasing local control (accelerated hyperfractionated treatment or concurrent daily or weekly chemotherapy). The Satellite trial evaluated the addition of cetuximab to thoracic irradiation. HRQL was measured at four time points: At baseline, before radiotherapy, 4–6 weeks after radiotherapy and at 3 months follow-up, using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC14 set of questionnaires. Results: 154/220 patients (65%) who completed HRQL assessments at all time points were included in the longitudinal study. There was a significant decline over time regarding most functioning measures. Dyspnoea and fatigue gradually deteriorated without recovery after completed treatment. Chemotherapy related symptoms showed a transient deterioration, whereas radiotherapy related esophagitis had not fully recovered at 3 months. Patients with stage IIIA disease tended to recover better regarding global QL, fatigue and dyspnoea compared to patients with stage IIIB. Patients with WHO performance status (PS) 0 reported improved global QL and less fatigue over time compared with PS 1. Concurrent chemotherapy was associated with more pronounced fatigue and dysphagia, and worse global QL compared with concurrent cetuximab. Baseline physical functioning was an independent predictor of overall survival. Conclusion: Patients undergoing high dose thoracic radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy or cetuximab reported a gradual deterioration in functioning, dyspnoea and fatigue, while

  1. Radiotherapy-induced emesis. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyer, P.; Buchali, A.; Hinkelbein, M.; Budach, V.; Zimmermann, J.S.; Titlbach, O.J.

    1998-01-01

    Background: A significant number of patients receiving radiotherapy experience the distressing side effects of emesis and nausea. These symptoms are some of the most distressing problems for the patients influencing their quality of life. Methods: International study results concerning radiotherapy-induced emesis are demonstrated. A German multicenter questionnaire examining the strategies to prevent or to treat radiotherapy-induced nausea and emesis is presented. An international analysis concerning incidence of emesis and nausea in fractionated radiotherapy patients is discussed. Finally the consensus of the consensus conference on antiemetic therapy from the Perugia International Cancer Conference V is introduced. Results: Untreated emesis can lead to complications like electrolyte disorders, dehydration, metabolic disturbances and nutrition problems with weight loss. Prophylactic antiemetics are often given to patients receiving single high-dose radiotherapy to the abdomen. A survey has revealed that antiemetic prophylaxis is not routinely offered to the patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy. However, there is a need for an effective treatment of emesis for use in this group of patients, too. In 20% of patients nausea and emesis can cause a treatment interruption because of an inadequate control of symptoms. Like in chemotherapy strategies there exist high, moderate, and low emetogenic treatment regimens in radiotherapy as well. The most emetogenic potential has the total body irradiation followed by radiotherapy to the abdomen. Radiotherapy induced emesis can be treated effectively with conventional antiemetics up to 50%. Conclusions: Studies with total body irradiation, fractionated treatment and high-dose single exposures have cleary demonstrated the value of 5-HT3-receptor antagonist antiemetics. There is a response between 60 and 97%. There is no difference in the efficacy of the different 5-HT3-antagonists. High-risk patients should be prophylactic

  2. Complications of esophageal stenting after radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorozu, Atsunori; Dokiya, Takushi; Ogita, Mikio; Kutuki, Shoji; Oki, Yosuke [National Second Hospital of Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate safety and complications of stenting after radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Fifteen of 21 patients showed improvement of dysphagia by stenting. But 6 of 21 patients had perforation or massive bleeding relating to stents. The risk for perforation or hemorrhage appears to be even higher in patients who have previously undergone radical radiotherapy and brachytherapy within one month before stenting. Stenting at 6 months or more after radical radiotherapy seems to be an effective and safe method of long-lasting palliation for severe dysphagia with recurrent esophageal cancer. (author)

  3. Heavy-ion radiography applied to charged particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; Tobias, C.A.; Castro, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of the heavy-ion radiography research program applied to the clinical cancer research program of charged particle radiotherapy have a twofold purpose: (1) to explore the manner in which heavy-ion radiography and CT reconstruction can provide improved tumor localization, treatment planning, and beam delivery for radiotherapy with accelerated heavy charged particles; and (2) to explore the usefulness of heavy-ion radiography in detecting, localizing, and sizing soft tissue cancers in the human body. The techniques and procedures developed for heavy-ion radiography should prove successful in support of charged particle radiotherapy

  4. White paper of radiotherapy in France. Twelve objectives to improve one of the major cancer treatments -2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, Bruno; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Mahe, Marc-Andre; Maingon, Philippe; Mornex, Francoise; Azria, David; Barillot, Isabelle; Chauvet, Bruno; Denis, Fabrice; Lartigau, Eric; Lipinski, Francis; Maingon, Philippe; Mornex, Francoise; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Caudrelier, Valerie; Diaz, Olivia; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Martel, Catherine de; Dubray, Bernard; Estivalet, Stephane; Faivre, Jean-Christophe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Ferlay, Jacques; Fumagalli, Ingrid; Giraud, Philippe; Hennequin, Christophe; Henoch, Herve; Khodri, Mustapha; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Llacer, Carmen; Lorchel, Fabrice; Mahe, Marc-Andre; Meyrieux, Charlotte; Noel, Georges; Oozeer, Rashid; Peiffert, Didier; Pourel, Nicolas; Pradier, Olivier; Rocher, Francois; Thureau, Sebastien; Eschwege, Francois; Martin, Philippe; Parmentier Gerard; Eschwege, Francois

    2013-01-01

    This white paper aims at presenting the status and perspectives of radiotherapy in France, at proposing solutions for the improvement of treatment quality and safety. Along with surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy is one of the major techniques of cancer treatment and the first part gives an overview of increased needs due to population ageing, of the fast technical advances (better definition of target volumes and doses, better taking into account of anatomy variations and movements), of the impact of these advances on treatment results for various types of cancer, and of the current status of equipment (a slow evolution is noticed) and future needs. The second part addresses the various professions and their demography. The third part examines how to correct the unequal access to care with respect to geography, to equipment and treatment quality, or to delay before treatment. It also evokes collaborations between centres, the diffusion of good practices, specialisation, and makes some proposals for an equal access to care. The fourth part highlights quality and security improvements due to quality control practices, recommendations, prevention actions and risk management. The next part addresses the financial aspect and makes some proposals to reduce inequalities and archaisms. It also compares costs in France and in Europe. The report then gives an overview of the administrative and professional environment and of the different involved bodies, and outlines the need of a better coordination. Patient information is discussed (patients are better informed) as well as support cares. The last parts address activities of research and development and the organisation and possibilities offered by education and training

  5. Stage report of the national radiotherapy survey committee May 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report proposes an assessment of the impact of the national radiotherapy measures present in the road map (November 2007 - March 2009) and describes the creation of a national support unit to manage the operating difficulties of 27 radiotherapy centres. It comments how a transition period between 2009 and 2011 must accompany radiotherapy before the implementation of opposable agreement criteria in 2011, notably through an improvement of recruitment, a support to cooperation between radiotherapy centres, the implementation of a radio-vigilance unit. Finally, it briefly discusses how to prepare the 2011-2013 period

  6. Radiotherapy dosimetry audit: three decades of improving standards and accuracy in UK clinical practice and trials

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Catharine H; Aird, Edwin GA; Bolton, Steve; Miles, Elizabeth A; Nisbet, Andrew; Snaith, Julia AD; Thomas, Russell AS; Venables, Karen; Thwaites, David I

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetry audit plays an important role in the development and safety of radiotherapy. National and large scale audits are able to set, maintain and improve standards, as well as having the potential to identify issues which may cause harm to patients. They can support implementation of complex techniques and can facilitate awareness and understanding of any issues which may exist by benchmarking centres with similar equipment. This review examines the development of dosimetry audit in the UK...

  7. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V

    2011-05-01

    A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed.

  8. Radiotherapy Results of Breast Cancer Patients with Metastatic Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Dirier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer patients with bone metastasis who had admitted to Dicle University Department of Radiation Oncology for palliative radiation therapy between September 2001 and December 2003 were evaluated. There were 31 patients (26 female, 5 male. Median age was 43 years (range 23-79. Histopathological subtypes were infiltrating ductal carcinoma (88%, tubulolobuler carcinoma (6% and inflammatory carcinoma (6%. Loci of bone metastasis were vertebra only in twelve patients (39%, non-vertebral bones only in 8 patients (26% and both vertebral and nonvertebral bones in 11 patients (35%. Two patients had refused radiotherapy. Radiation doses were 3000 cGy with 10 fractions in 15 patients, 2000 cGy with 5 fractions in 6 patients and 800 cGy single fraction in eight patients. Complete palliation of pain was achieved in 18 patients (62% and partial palliation was achieved in 11 patients (38%. Treatment related toxicity was grade I-II dermatitis. In conclusion; same respons rates in terms of palliation can be achieved in the three radiotherapy schedules.

  9. Radiotherapy equipment and departments in the European countries: final results from the ESTRO-HERO survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Cai; Defourny, Noémie; Malicki, Julian; Dunscombe, Peter; Borras, Josep M; Coffey, Mary; Slotman, Ben; Bogusz, Marta; Gasparotto, Chiara; Lievens, Yolande; Kokobobo, Arianit; Sedlmayer, Felix; Slobina, Elena; Feyen, Karen; Hadjieva, Tatiana; Odrazka, Karel; Grau Eriksen, Jesper; Jaal, Jana; Bly, Ritva; Chauvet, Bruno; Willich, Normann; Polgar, Csaba; Johannsson, Jakob; Cunningham, Moya; Magrini, Stefano; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Untereiner, Michel; Pirotta, Martin; Karadjinovic, Vanja; Levernes, Sverre; Sladowski, Krystol; Lurdes Trigo, Maria; Šegedin, Barbara; Rodriguez, Aurora; Lagerlund, Magnus; Pastoors, Bert; Hoskin, Peter; Vaarkamp, Jaap; Cleries Soler, Ramon

    2014-08-01

    Documenting the distribution of radiotherapy departments and the availability of radiotherapy equipment in the European countries is an important part of HERO - the ESTRO Health Economics in Radiation Oncology project. HERO has the overall aim to develop a knowledge base of the provision of radiotherapy in Europe and build a model for health economic evaluation of radiation treatments at the European level. The aim of the current report is to describe the distribution of radiotherapy equipment in European countries. An 84-item questionnaire was sent out to European countries, principally through their national societies. The current report includes a detailed analysis of radiotherapy departments and equipment (questionnaire items 26-29), analyzed in relation to the annual number of treatment courses and the socio-economic status of the countries. The analysis is based on validated responses from 28 of the 40 European countries defined by the European Cancer Observatory (ECO). A large variation between countries was found for most parameters studied. There were 2192 linear accelerators, 96 dedicated stereotactic machines, and 77 cobalt machines reported in the 27 countries where this information was available. A total of 12 countries had at least one cobalt machine in use. There was a median of 0.5 simulator per MV unit (range 0.3-1.5) and 1.4 (range 0.4-4.4) simulators per department. Of the 874 simulators, a total of 654 (75%) were capable of 3D imaging (CT-scanner or CBCT-option). The number of MV machines (cobalt, linear accelerators, and dedicated stereotactic machines) per million inhabitants ranged from 1.4 to 9.5 (median 5.3) and the average number of MV machines per department from 0.9 to 8.2 (median 2.6). The average number of treatment courses per year per MV machine varied from 262 to 1061 (median 419). While 69% of MV units were capable of IMRT only 49% were equipped for image guidance (IGRT). There was a clear relation between socio-economic status, as

  10. Radiotherapy in fascial fibromatosis: a case series, literature review and considerations for treatment of early-stage disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenfell, Solveig; Borg, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Palmar and plantar fascial fibromatoses are benign hyperproliferative disorders of the deep fascia of the palm and sole. This study seeks to examine the role of radiotherapy in the management of fascial fibromatosis. Six consecutive cases of early-stage fascial fibromatosis treated with radiotherapy at the Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre between July 2008 and May 2011 were analysed. The results of the case series were compared with a systematic review of the literature. All six cases regressed or showed a reduction of symptoms following radiotherapy. Treatment was well tolerated with minor toxicities. Median follow-up for the case series was 38.5 months. The systematic review identified seven studies describing the use of radiotherapy as primary treatment for fascial fibromatosis between 1946 and 2013. The literature indicates that radiotherapy can prevent disease progression and improve symptoms for early-stage disease, with low likelihood of significant toxicities. Early results from our case series are consistent with the literature, showing that radiotherapy can provide an effective management option for patients with early-stage fascial fibromatosis, and justify consideration of radiotherapy as a primary treatment for early-stage disease.

  11. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldebawy, Eman [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Cancer Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Parker, William, E-mail: william.parker@mcgill.ca [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Abdel Rahman, Wamied [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Freeman, Carolyn R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  12. WE-AB-207A-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Advanced Scatter Correction and Iterative Reconstruction for Improved Cone-Beam CT Imaging On the TrueBeam Radiotherapy Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, A; Paysan, P; Brehm, M; Maslowski, A; Lehmann, M; Messmer, P; Munro, P; Yoon, S; Star-Lack, J; Seghers, D [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To improve CBCT image quality for image-guided radiotherapy by applying advanced reconstruction algorithms to overcome scatter, noise, and artifact limitations Methods: CBCT is used extensively for patient setup in radiotherapy. However, image quality generally falls short of diagnostic CT, limiting soft-tissue based positioning and potential applications such as adaptive radiotherapy. The conventional TrueBeam CBCT reconstructor uses a basic scatter correction and FDK reconstruction, resulting in residual scatter artifacts, suboptimal image noise characteristics, and other artifacts like cone-beam artifacts. We have developed an advanced scatter correction that uses a finite-element solver (AcurosCTS) to model the behavior of photons as they pass (and scatter) through the object. Furthermore, iterative reconstruction is applied to the scatter-corrected projections, enforcing data consistency with statistical weighting and applying an edge-preserving image regularizer to reduce image noise. The combined algorithms have been implemented on a GPU. CBCT projections from clinically operating TrueBeam systems have been used to compare image quality between the conventional and improved reconstruction methods. Planning CT images of the same patients have also been compared. Results: The advanced scatter correction removes shading and inhomogeneity artifacts, reducing the scatter artifact from 99.5 HU to 13.7 HU in a typical pelvis case. Iterative reconstruction provides further benefit by reducing image noise and eliminating streak artifacts, thereby improving soft-tissue visualization. In a clinical head and pelvis CBCT, the noise was reduced by 43% and 48%, respectively, with no change in spatial resolution (assessed visually). Additional benefits include reduction of cone-beam artifacts and reduction of metal artifacts due to intrinsic downweighting of corrupted rays. Conclusion: The combination of an advanced scatter correction with iterative reconstruction

  13. Effects of Aglumin on the rectal bleeding following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Michitaka; Tanaka, Motoshi; Yoshimura, Osamu; Matsubayashi, Shigeru

    1978-01-01

    Aglumin was administered to 20 cases which had rectal bleeding following radiotherapy. The results were as follows. Rectal bleeding decreased in 16 of 20 cases (80%): remarkably effective, 15%; effective, 25%; slightly effective, 40%. Bleeding time decreased in 11 cases (55%). Rumpel-Leede test gave remarkable improvement in 10 of 14 cases which had been abnormal (71.4%). Platelet increased in 18 of 20 cases (90%). Liver function test and peripheral blood findings showed no remarkable changes. No side effects such as intestinal disturbance etc were noted. In the series of symptomatic treatment for rectal disturbance resulting from radiotherapy, this drug had considerable effect of hemostasis. It was concluded that this drug is useful in combined use with other antiphlogistics, analgesic, and hematinic etc. (Ueda, J.)

  14. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques and standard wedged tangents for whole breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Andrew; Bromley, Regina; Beat, Mardi; Vien, Din; Dineley, Jude; Morgan, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Prior to introducing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) into our department we undertook a comparison of the dose parameters of several IMRT techniques and standard wedged tangents (SWT). Our aim was to improve the dose distribution to the breast and to decrease the dose to organs at risk (OAR): heart, lung and contralateral breast (Contra Br). Treatment plans for 20 women (10 right-sided and 10 left-sided) previously treated with SWT for WBRT were used to compare (a) SWT; (b) electronic compensators IMRT (E-IMRT); (c) tangential beam IMRT (T-IMRT); (d) coplanar multi-field IMRT (CP-IMRT); and (e) non-coplanar multi-field IMRT (NCP-IMRT). Plans for the breast were compared for (i) dose homogeneity (DH); (ii) conformity index (CI); (iii) mean dose; (iv) maximum dose; (v) minimum dose; and dose to OAR were calculated (vi) heart; (vii) lung and (viii) Contra Br. Compared with SWT, all plans except CP-IMRT gave improvement in at least two of the seven parameters evaluated. T-IMRT and NCP-IMRT resulted in significant improvement in all parameters except DH and both gave significant reduction in doses to OAR. As on initial evaluation NCP-IMRT is likely to be too time consuming to introduce on a large scale, T-IMRT is the preferred technique for WBRT for use in our department.

  15. Radiotherapy Results of Brain Astrocytoma and Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Chi, Je Geun

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 49 patients with astrocytoma of glioblastoma multiforme of brain who received postoperative radiotherapy in the period between February 1979 and December 1985. Fourteen patients had grade I astrocytoma, 11 patients grade II, 14 patients grade III, and 10 patients glioblastoma multiforme. Three year actuarial survival rates were 85.7%, 44.6% and 23.1% for grade I, II, and III astrocytomas, respectively. One and 2 year actuarial survival rates for patients with glioblastoma multiforme were 54.5% and 27.3%, respectively. Histologic grade, age, extent of operation and tumor location were revealed to be prognosticators

  16. Results of radiotherapy for cancer of head and neck region, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Noriharu; Shinzato, Jintetsu; Watanabe, Keikichi; Habu, Kenjiro; Hirayama, Haruyuki

    1988-01-01

    From 1967 through 1985, 86 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses and 6 patients with cancer of the nasal cavity (excluding sarcoma) were treated by irradiation at the Department of Radiology, Kumamoto National Hospital. The mean age was 60.7. The rate of men to women was 1.2 : 1. The results were as follows ; 1) Fifty-nine patients (51 cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma, 4 of ethmoid sinus carcinoma, and 4 of cancer of the nasal cavity) were treated with antrostomy followed by radiotherapy and regional arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil alone or a combination of 5-fluorouracil and bleomycin. In 11 cases of these, salvage with total maxillectomy was performed and 10 % of which were controlled for more than five years. In 9 cases of these, no case was salvaged with radiotherapy. An overall five-year survival rate was 32 %. 2) The survival rate of the postoperative irradiation (11 cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma, 1 of cancer of the nasal cavity) was 42 % at 2 and 4 years after the operations. 3) Twelve patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (11 cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma, 1 of ethmoid sinus carcinoma) survived more than five years. All of them were irradiated curatively with doses more than 40 Gy. In our series, there was no difference in long-term survival between 5-fluorouracil alone and a combination of 5-fluorouracil and bleomycin. (author)

  17. Post irradiation eardrum: a rare complication of the radiotherapy of naso-pharynx carcinomas; Necrose tympanique postradique: une complication rare de la radiotherapie des carcinomes nasopharynges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siala, W.; Mnejja, W.; Daoud, J. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Oncologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Khabir, A. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, A. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' ORL, Sfax (Tunisia); Frikha, M. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2009-10-15

    The eardrum necrosis is a serious and dreadful complication but rarely described after irradiation of cavum cancers. We report in this work five cases of eardrum necrosis after radiotherapy of nasopharynx carcinomas. Patients and methods: between february 1993 and december 2004 239 patients suffering of anon metastatic nasopharynx cancer have been treated by classical irradiation associated or not to a chemotherapy. The radiotherapy was delivered at the dose of 70 to 75 Gy in the cavum and the ganglions initially reached according a classical modality of hyperfractionated one. We analysed retrospectively the delayed complications occurred six months or more after the radiotherapy beginning. Results: Five cases of eardrum necrosis were reported sixty five months after the end of radiotherapy. these patients suffered of hypoacusia and buzzing. The clinical examination allowed to bring out the eardrum perforation that did not exist before radiotherapy. The total dose of irradiation was 75 Gy for a patient and 71.5 Gy according a hyperfractionated modality for four patients. Three patients had an hearing prosthesis in order to improve their quality of life. Conclusion: the eardrum necrosis after radiotherapy for nasopharynx cancer is a rare and unusual complication, very few reported in the literature. The total dose of irradiation is considered as the principal factor of occurrence risk in such complication. (N.C.)

  18. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O'Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-05-02

    Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct radiotherapy costs for long- (assumed at 45-50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over a 5 week period) and short-courses (assumed at 25 Gy in 5 daily fractions over a one week period). Following interviews and on-site visits to radiotherapy departments in two designated cancer centers, a radiotherapy care pathway for a typical rectal cancer patient was developed. Total direct costs were derived by applying fixed and variable unit costs to resource use within each care phase. Costs included labor, capital, consumables and overheads. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Radiotherapy treatment was estimated to cost between €2,080 (5-fraction course) and €3,609 (25-fraction course) for an average patient in 2012. Costs were highest in the treatment planning phase for the short-course (€1,217; 58% of total costs), but highest in the radiation treatment phase for the long-course (€1,974: 60% of total costs). By simultaneously varying treatment time, capacity utilization rates and linear accelerator staff numbers, the base cost fell by 20% for 5-fractions: (€1,660) and 35% for 25-fractions: (€2,354). Traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer is relatively inexpensive. Moreover, significant savings may be achievable through service organization and provision changes. These results suggest that a strong economic argument can be made for expanding the use of radiotherapy in rectal cancer treatment.

  19. Determinants of variability in waiting times for radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, Gauthier; Ingrand, Isabelle; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Ingrand, Pierre; Breton-Callu, Christel; Migeot, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine psycho-social and geographic determinants of delay in starting radiotherapy in early invasive breast cancer patients. Material and methods: Waiting time was defined as the time elapsed until the beginning of radiotherapy, starting from the date of surgery (in absence of chemotherapy) or from the end of chemotherapy. Results: Eight hundred and ninety six women aged 24-89 took part in the study. Mean waiting times were 52 days (sd = 19) between surgery and radiotherapy and 31 days (sd = 14) between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Differences between radiotherapy centres (p < 0.0001) accounted for 30% and 12%, respectively, of total variance in waiting times. Using a multivariate mixed analysis that took into account intra-centre correlation, the time between surgery and radiotherapy was shorter for young patients (p = 0.020), those who had sought information about their illness (p = 0.024) and those who had undergone surgery and radiotherapy in the same centre (p = 0.021). On the other hand, no patient characteristic was associated with the time between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusion: Centre is the major factor that explained longer waiting times in radiotherapy, emphasising the structural hypothesis. It is important to pursue initiatives to improve the organization within radiotherapy centres and then to verify that these initiatives have succeeded in shortening waiting times.

  20. Adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer—Dosimetric results from a prospective clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Shah, Shalin J.; Chronowski, Gregory; Sejpal, Samir; Rosenthal, David I.; Chen, Yipei; Zhang, Yongbin; Zhang, Lifei; Wong, Pei-Fong; Garcia, John A.; Kian Ang, K.; Dong, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct a clinical trial evaluating adaptive head and neck radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were prospectively enrolled. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted mapping of dose to avoidance structures and CTVs. We compared four planning scenarios: (1) original IMRT plan aligned daily to marked isocenter (BB); (2) original plan aligned daily to bone (IGRT); (3) IGRT with one adaptive replan (ART1); and (4) actual treatment received by each study patient (IGRT with one or two adaptive replans, ART2). Results: All 22 study patients underwent one replan (ART1); eight patients had two replans (ART2). ART1 reduced mean dose to contralateral parotid by 0.6 Gy or 2.8% (paired t-test; p = 0.003) and ipsilateral parotid by 1.3 Gy (3.9%) (p = 0.002) over the IGRT alone. ART2 further reduced the mean contralateral parotid dose by 0.8 Gy or 3.8% (p = 0.026) and ipsilateral parotid by 4.1 Gy or 9% (p = 0.001). ART significantly reduced integral body dose. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggests that head and neck ART dosimetrically outperforms IMRT. IGRT that leverages conventional PTV margins does not improve dosimetry. One properly timed replan delivers the majority of achievable dosimetric improvement. The clinical impact of ART must be confirmed by future trials

  1. Radiotherapy for Adult Medulloblastoma: Evaluation of Helical Tomotherapy, Volumetric Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy, and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and the Results of Helical Tomotherapy Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zong-wen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. All adult medulloblastoma (AMB patients should be treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI postoperatively. Because of the long irradiation range, multiple radiation fields must be designed for conventional radiotherapy technology. CSI can be completed in only one session with helical tomotherapy (HT. We evaluated the dose of HT, volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT, and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT of AMB and the results of 5 cases of AMB treated with HT. Methods. Complete craniospinal and posterior cranial fossa irradiation with HT, VMAT, and 3D-CRT and dose evaluation were performed. And results of 5 cases of AMB treated with HT were evaluated. Results. A large volume of tissue was exposed to low dose radiation in the organs at risk (OAR, while a small volume was exposed to high dose radiation with HT. The conformity and uniformity of the targets were good with HT and VMAT, and the volume of targets exposed to high dose with VMAT was larger than that of HT. The uniformity of 3D-CRT was also good, but the dose conformity was poor. The main toxicity was hematologic toxicity, without 4th-degree bone marrow suppression. There was 3rd-degree inhibition in the white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets. The three female patients suffered menstrual disorders during the course of radiation. Two female patients with heavy menstruation suffered 3rd-degree anemia inhibition, and 2 patients suffered amenorrhea after radiotherapy. Although menstrual cycle was normal, the third patient was not pregnant. Conclusion. CSI with HT is convenient for clinical practice, and the side effects are mild. With good conformity and uniformity, VMAT can also be used for selection in CSI. For poor conformity, 3D-CRT should not be the priority selection for CSI. In female patients, the ovaries should be protected.

  2. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  3. Locoregional post-mastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, G.; Mazeron, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is controversial after radical mastectomy. Recent clinical trials have shown an increase in survival with this irradiation and conclusions of previous meta-analyses should be reconsidered and conclusions of previous meta-analyses should be reconsidered. The results of a large number of randomized clinical trials in which women received post-mastectomy radiotherapy or not have been renewed. These trials showed a decrease in locoregional failure with the use of postoperative radiotherapy but survival advantages have not been clearly identified. A large number of randomized clinical trials compared postoperative radiotherapy alone, chemotherapy alone and the association of the two treatments. They showed that chemotherapy was less active locally than radiotherapy and that radiotherapy and chemotherapy significantly increased both disease-free and overall survival rates in the groups which received postoperative radiotherapy. These favourable results were, however, obtained with optimal radiotherapy techniques and a relative sparing of lung tissue and cardiac muscle. Many retrospective clinical analyses concluded that results obtained in locoregional failure rate were poor and that these failures led to an increase in future risks. Both radiotherapy and systemic treatment should be delivered after mastectomy, reserved for patients with a high risk of with a diameter ≥ 5 cm. However, radiotherapy could produce secondary effects, and techniques of radiotherapy should be optimal. (author)

  4. Nutritional assistance to patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Maria C.G.; Nadalin, Wladimir; Baxter, Yara C.; Faintuch, Joel; Waitzberg, Dan L.; Maculevicius, Janete

    1996-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the possible benefits of nutritional therapy , 140 patients were prospectively studied during radiotherapy of the head and neck (81%) and esophageal cancer (19%). Mean age was 56.0 (17-80), with 114 males and 26 females. Duration of both nutrition and radiotherapy was 78.0 ± 45 days. Tube feeding was the primary modality in 50.7% of the population, and oral regimens in the remaining 49.3%, but associations between the methods were also used. Enteral diets were supplied under the supervision of a specialized tem for home alimentation (PROSNED). Compliance to the program was 100% and a lymphocyte count diminished along this period (1933 ± 1033 vs 1265 ± 688, p.0.001). A subjective improvement was reported by 84% of the population, and total calorie intake, that was below 60% of estimated needs in 100% of the cases initially, significantly improved to just 40% inadequate at the end of the observations. Radiotherapy was associated with mucositis in 21% of the patients, taste changes in 79%, xerostomy in 81%, anorexia in 66% and odinophagia in 59%. In the individuals selected for enteral feeding, side effects were represented by technical problems (20%) and gastrointestinal disorders (13%). All patients completed the nutritional support program and there was no mortality in this series. It is conclude that: early nutritional support during radiotherapy was able to maintain or improve the nutritional status; tube feeding, alone or in combination with oral diets, was indicated whenever appropriate and contributed to fulfillment of the energy requirements; reduction of total lymphocytes could not be prevented by the mentioned therapy; complications of enteral alimentation were mild and affected a small proportion of the population; troubles induced by radiotherapy were as frequent as expected, and tended to disturb the intake of the food; the compliance of the therapeutic plan was excellent and can be attributed to the efforts of the

  5. A randomised comparison of radical radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer: Results from the Big Lung Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlamb, David; Milroy, Robert; Gower, Nicole; Parmar, Mahesh; Peake, Michael; Rudd, Robin; Souhami, Robert; Spiro, Stephen; Stephens, Richard; Waller, David

    2005-01-01

    Background: A meta-analysis of trials comparing primary treatment with or without chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer published in 1995 suggested a survival benefit for cisplatin-based chemotherapy in each of the primary treatment settings studied, but it included many small trials, and trials with differing eligibility criteria and chemotherapy regimens. Methods: The Big Lung Trial was a large pragmatic trial designed to confirm the survival benefits seen in the meta-analysis, and this paper reports the findings in the radical radiotherapy setting. The trial closed before the required sample size was achieved due to slow accrual, with a total of 288 patients randomised to receive radical radiotherapy alone (146 patients) or sequential radical radiotherapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy (142 patients). Results: There was no evidence that patients allocated sequential chemotherapy and radical radiotherapy had a better survival than those allocated radical radiotherapy alone, HR 1.07 (95% CI 0.84-1.38, P=0.57), median survival 13.0 months for the sequential group and 13.2 for the radical radiotherapy alone group. In addition, exploratory analyses could not identify any subgroup that might benefit more or less from chemotherapy. Conclusions: Despite not suggesting a survival benefit for the sequential addition of chemotherapy to radical radiotherapy, possibly because of the relatively small sample size and consequently wide confidence intervals, the results can still be regarded as consistent with the meta-analysis, and other similarly designed recently published large trials. Combining all these results suggests there may be a small median survival benefit with chemotherapy of between 2 and 8 weeks

  6. Epigenetics in radiotherapy: Where are we heading?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, Kim M.; Melotte, Veerle; Niessen, Hanneke E.C.; Dubois, Ludwig; Oberije, Cary; Troost, Esther G.C.; Starmans, Maud H.W.; Boutros, Paul C.; Vooijs, Marc; Engeland, Manon van; Lambin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component of anti-cancer treatment. However, not all cancer patients respond to radiotherapy, and with current knowledge clinicians are unable to predict which patients are at high risk of recurrence after radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need for biomarkers to guide clinical decision-making. Although the importance of epigenetic alterations is widely accepted, their application as biomarkers in radiotherapy has not been studied extensively. In addition, it has been suggested that radiotherapy itself introduces epigenetic alterations. As epigenetic alterations can potentially be reversed by drug treatment, they are interesting candidate targets for anticancer therapy or radiotherapy sensitizers. The application of demethylating drugs or histone deacetylase inhibitors to sensitize patients for radiotherapy has been studied in vitro, in vivo as well as in clinical trials with promising results. This review describes the current knowledge on epigenetics in radiotherapy

  7. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  8. Guidelines for equipment and staffing of radiotherapy facilities in the European countries: Final results of the ESTRO-HERO survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunscombe, Peter; Grau, Cai; Defourny, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    of guidelines for equipment and staffing and selected operational issues. Twenty-nine countries provided full or partial evaluable responses. RESULTS: The availability of guidelines across Europe is far from uniform. The metrics used for capital and human resources are variable. There seem to have been no major...... guidelines suggesting developments in clinical radiotherapy are moving faster than guideline updating. CONCLUSION: The efficient provision of safe, high quality radiotherapy services would benefit from the availability of well-structured guidelines for capital and human resources, based on agreed upon...

  9. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer (MRC ASTEC and NCIC CTG EN.5 randomised trials): pooled trial results, systematic review, and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P; Swart, Ann Marie; Orton, J; Kitchener, H; Whelan, T; Lukka, H; Eisenhauer, E; Bacon, M; Tu, D; Parmar, M K B; Amos, C; Murray, C; Qian, W

    2009-01-10

    Early endometrial cancer with low-risk pathological features can be successfully treated by surgery alone. External beam radiotherapy added to surgery has been investigated in several small trials, which have mainly included women at intermediate risk of recurrence. In these trials, postoperative radiotherapy has been shown to reduce the risk of isolated local recurrence but there is no evidence that it improves recurrence-free or overall survival. We report the findings from the ASTEC and EN.5 trials, which investigated adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in women with early-stage disease and pathological features suggestive of intermediate or high risk of recurrence and death from endometrial cancer. Between July, 1996, and March, 2005, 905 (789 ASTEC, 116 EN.5) women with intermediate-risk or high-risk early-stage disease from 112 centres in seven countries (UK, Canada, Poland, Norway, New Zealand, Australia, USA) were randomly assigned after surgery to observation (453) or to external beam radiotherapy (452). A target dose of 40-46 Gy in 20-25 daily fractions to the pelvis, treating five times a week, was specified. Primary outcome measure was overall survival, and all analyses were by intention to treat. These trials were registered ISRCTN 16571884 (ASTEC) and NCT 00002807 (EN.5). After a median follow-up of 58 months, 135 women (68 observation, 67 external beam radiotherapy) had died. There was no evidence that overall survival with external beam radiotherapy was better than observation, hazard ratio 1.05 (95% CI 0.75-1.48; p=0.77). 5-year overall survival was 84% in both groups. Combining data from ASTEC and EN.5 in a meta-analysis of trials confirmed that there was no benefit in terms of overall survival (hazard ratio 1.04; 95% CI 0.84-1.29) and can reliably exclude an absolute benefit of external beam radiotherapy at 5 years of more than 3%. With brachytherapy used in 53% of women in ASTEC/EN.5, the local recurrence rate in the observation group at 5 years

  10. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Kamada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon

  11. An evaluation of the utilisation of the virtual environment for radiotherapy training (VERT) in clinical radiotherapy centres across the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Sarah; Dumbleton, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the survey was to evaluate the utilisation of the Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training (VERT) in clinical radiotherapy centres across the UK. Methods: A survey questionnaire was constructed using the Survey Monkey™ tool to evaluate the utilisation of the Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training. Once constructed, an online link to the survey questionnaire was emailed to all radiotherapy centre managers in the UK (n = 67) who were invited to provide one response per centre. The survey comprised forty-five questions which were grouped into eleven sections. Key results: The results indicate that 61% of UK radiotherapy centres have VERT installed, twenty centres are currently without a VERT installation and only 1 centre is intending to install a system in the near future. The results also indicate that the use of VERT varies considerably in differing radiotherapy centres with the most frequent use of VERT being for the training of staff, specifically for the training of pre-registration therapeutic radiographers and preparation time for trainers. The majority of centres using VERT for any of the purposes investigated feel it provides benefits. Conclusions and recommendations: The survey highlighted the varied use of VERT in radiotherapy centres across the UK and indicated that when VERT is used in clinical radiotherapy centres, a wide variety of benefits are experienced. Because of the variation in use, it is concluded that the benefits of the VERT installations in radiotherapy centres across the UK are not being fully realised. It is recommended that all radiotherapy service managers commit adequate resources to develop and implement VERT fully and effectively so that its full potential is realised in all radiotherapy centres across the UK

  12. Management of anemia in patients undergoing curative radiotherapy. Erythropoietin, transfusions, or better nothing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.

    2004-01-01

    Background and results: anemia is a well-known risk factor for decreased local control and survival in patients undergoing curative radiotherapy. There is clear evidence from recent clinical investigations that anemia is an independent risk factor and hemoglobin (Hb) levels during radiotherapy are important (and not pretreatment Hb levels). The most likely explanation for the prognostic impact is the association with tumor hypoxia. An ''optimal'' Hb range with regard to tumor oxygenation seems to exist, and Hb levels ∝15 g/dl impair tumor oxygenation but have (over a broader range) no significant impact on normal tissue oxygenation. There is some evidence from retrospective and prospective studies that the response to radiotherapy and the prognosis, especially in cervical cancers, might be improved if the Hb levels during radiotherapy can be maintained in the optimal range, either by transfusions or by erythropoietin. The effect of any antianemic therapy should be analyzed according to whether or not treatment was successful with regard to achieving optimal Hb levels during irradiation. Erythropoietin is probably more effective in steadily increasing and stabilizing Hb levels, but bears the risk of overcorrection of Hb levels. The clinical relevance of erythropoietin receptors on tumor cells remains questionable. Conclusions: treatment of anemia with the objective of improving local control and survival in radiotherapy patients is probably more difficult and sophisticated than coping with symptoms of anemia or improving quality of life. Nevertheless, the potential of antianemic treatment is high on the basis of experimental and clinical data, and further clinical trials are warranted. (orig.)

  13. Improving radiotherapy quality and safety: a common objective of A.S.N. and the Ile de France Regional Hospital Agency. Thoughts on successful cooperation in Ile de France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solier, N.

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy recent development in cancer treatment needs strong procedures and quality assessment to improve safety both for patients and professionals. In Ile de France territory, a coordinated action between ASN inspectors and medical doctors specialized in public health (MISP), working as civil servants in health administration, was initiated at the end of 2007. An inspection guideline was implemented in a workshop between ASN and Regional Hospital Agency (ARH). The MISP as health administrator has to verify if care organisation responds to treatment cancer regulatory framework: as a doctor he is authorized to access to patient records to know which treatment was chosen. He has to assure if the therapeutic guidelines are respected. His comprehensive approach is essentially patient-oriented. The MISP inspection coordinated with ASN inspectors is a very pertinent pluri-disciplinary approach, undeniably necessary in such a medical technic. The effectiveness of the radiotherapy pluri-disciplinary team is funded on sharing procedures and experiences, respecting different knowledge and practices in daily work. This on site audit'. seems to be very fertile both for the radiotherapy team, the MISP and ASN inspectors. Continuous quality improvement in radiotherapy in the Ile de France region is a fertile issue between ANS and ARH teams. Confronting knowledge and procedures during the 'on site audit' in a transparent way will contribute improving radiotherapy for the 30.000 Francilian patients which receive this treatment each year. This challenge is our main concern to facilitate the patients access to the best standards treatments. (author)

  14. Who risk profile in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.; Sharfiq, J.; Nobleet, D.; Lemer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The different steps of a treatment in radiotherapy are: patient evaluation, decision to treat, prescription of the treatment protocol, positioning and immobilization, simulation, imaging and volume determination, planning and implementation of materials and software, transfer of treatment data, patient positioning, treatment realisation, treatment checking and follow-up. It exist processes of safety for any step of a radiotherapy realisation: patient identification, accreditation of equipment and processes, evaluation of the personnel competencies, quality assurance of equipment and management of the processes quality, redundancy during the data transfer, control of processes, errors reports and quality improvement, external controls, appropriateness of the workforce. (N.C.)

  15. The cost of radiotherapy in a decade of technology evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Werf, Evelyn; Verstraete, Jan; Lievens, Yolande

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify changes in radiotherapy costs occurring in a decade of medical–technological evolution. Materials and methods: The activity-based costing (ABC) model of University Hospitals Leuven (UHL) radiotherapy (RT) department was adapted to current RT standards. It allocated actual resource costs to the treatments based on the departmental work-flow and patient mix in 2009. A benchmark with the former model analyzed the cost increases related to changes in RT infrastructure and practice over 10 years. Results: A considerable increase in total RT costs was observed, resulting from higher capital investments (96%) and personnel cost (103%), the latter dominating the total picture. Treatment delivery remains the most costly activity, boosted by the cost of improved quality assurance (QA), 23% of total product costs, coming along with more advanced RT techniques. Hence, cost increases at the product level are most obvious for complex treatments, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), representing cost increases ranging between 38% and 88% compared to conformal approaches. Conclusions: The ABC model provides insight into the financial consequences of evolving technology and practice. Such data are a mandatory first step in our strive to prove RT cost-effectiveness and thus support optimal reimbursement and provision of radiotherapy departments.

  16. Computerised tomography in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badcock, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of computed tomography as an adjunct to radiotherapy planning. Until recently, acquisition of accurate data concerning tumour anatomy lagged behind other developments in radiotherapy. With the advent of computer-tomography (CT), these data can be displayed and transmitted to a treatment planning computer. It is concluded that the greatest inaccuracies in the radiation treatment of patients are to be found in both the inadequate delineation of the target volume within the patient and changes in body outline relative to the target volume over the length of the irradiated volume. The technique was useful in various subgroups (pelvic, intra-thoracic and chest-wall tumours) and for those patients being treated palliatively. With an estimated improvement in cure rate of 4.5% and cost-effective factors of between 3.3 and 5, CT-assisted radiotherapy planning appears to be a worthwhile procedure. (orig.)

  17. Progressive resistance training rebuilds lean body mass in head and neck cancer patients after radiotherapyResults from the randomized DAHANCA 25B trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lønbro, Simon; Dalgas, Ulrik; Primdahl, Hanne; Johansen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Jakob Lindberg; Aagaard, Per; Hermann, Anne Pernille; Overgaard, Jens; Overgaard, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The critical weight loss observed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients following radiotherapy is mainly due to loss of lean body mass. This is associated with decreases in muscle strength, functional performance and Quality of Life (QoL). The present study investigated the effect of progressive resistance training (PRT) on lean body mass, muscle strength and functional performance in HNSCC patients following radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Following radiotherapy HNSCC patients were randomized into two groups: Early Exercise (EE, n = 20) initiated 12 weeks of PRT followed by 12 weeks of self-chosen physical activity. Delayed Exercise (DE, n = 21) initiated 12 weeks of self-chosen physical activity followed by 12 weeks of PRT. Lean body mass, muscle strength, functional performance and QoL were evaluated at baseline and after week 12 and 24. Results: In the first 12 weeks lean body mass increased by 4.3% in EE after PRT and in the last 12 weeks by 4.2% in DE after PRT. These increases were significantly larger than the changes after self-chosen physical activity (p ⩽ 0.005). Regardless of PRT start-up time, the odds ratio of increasing lean body mass by more than 4% after PRT was 6.26 (p < 0.05). PRT significantly increased muscle strength, whereas functional performance increased significantly more than after self-chosen physical activity only after delayed onset of PRT. Overall QoL improved significantly more in EE than DE from baseline to week 12. Conclusion: PRT effectively increased lean body mass and muscle strength in HNSCC patients following radiotherapy, irrespectively of early or delayed start-up

  18. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riou, O.; Fenoglietto, P.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a technique allowing dose escalation and normal tissue sparing for various cancer types. For breast cancer, the main goals when using IMRT were to improve dose homogeneity within the breast and to enhance coverage of complex target volumes. Nonetheless, better heart and lung protections are achievable with IMRT as compared to standard irradiation for difficult cases. Three prospective randomized controlled trials of IMRT versus standard treatment showed that a better breast homogeneity can translate into better overall cosmetic results. Dosimetric and clinical studies seem to indicate a benefit of IMRT for lymph nodes irradiation, bilateral treatment, left breast and chest wall radiotherapy, or accelerated partial breast irradiation. The multiple technical IMRT solutions available tend to indicate a widespread use for breast irradiation. Nevertheless, indications for breast IMRT should be personalized and selected according to the expected benefit for each individual. (authors)

  19. [Principles of radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esik, Olga; Horváth, Akos; Bajcsay, András; Hideghéty, Katalin; Agócs, László; Pikó, Béla; Lengyel, Zsolt; Petrányi, Agota; Pisch, Julianna

    2002-01-01

    The long-term survival probability for Hungarian lung cancer patients is 10% worse than the best results published in the most highly developed countries (the mean 5-year survival probability in Hungary is 5%, in contrast with the 15% survival probability in the USA). On the basis of the international recommendations and personal experience, an attempt was made to formulate the guidelines for radiotherapy as one of the fundamental non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment modalities for national use. An expert panel was set up comprising physicians from 6 radiotherapeutic centers (the National Institute of Oncology / Semmelweis University, Budapest; the Beth Israel Medical Center, New York; the University of Kaposvár; the University of Essen; the University of Debrecen; and the County Hospital of Gyula). Experts in two important medical fields closely related to radiotherapy (surgery and diagnostic imaging) were also engaged in the elaboration of the manuscript. Discussion of the most important principles of the radiotherapy and an overview of the prognostic factors was followed by a critical analysis of the protocols applied in the radiotherapy of Hungarian NSCLC patients during recent decades. The new guidelines suggested for the radiotherapy of NSCLC are presented separately for the postoperative period, marginally resectable tumors, and the aggressive or non-aggressive radiotherapy of inoperable tumors. Detailed accounts are given of the techniques of external irradiation and brachytherapy, and of the acute and late radiation-induced damage of normal tissues. The authors believe that this document may be instrumental in improving the survival index of Hungarian NSCLC patients in the near future.

  20. The role of radiotherapy in the management of POEMS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Young-Suk; Suh, Chang-Ok; Kim, Yu Ri; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-11-28

    POEMS syndrome is a paraneoplastic syndrome caused by an underlying plasma cell proliferative disease. In this study, we examined the treatment outcomes and role of radiotherapy in the management of POEMS syndrome. In total, 33 patients diagnosed with POEMS syndrome were analyzed. These patients presented with osteosclerotic myeloma (OSM, n = 13), Castleman's disease (CD, n = 4), OSM with CD (n = 10), and vascular endothelial growth factor elevation without gross lesions (VEGFe, n = 6), respectively. The patients were treated by radiotherapy alone (n = 4), chemotherapy alone (n = 16), or a combination thereof (n = 9). The clinical response rates of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy plus chemotherapy were 75%, 69%, and 89%, respectively. In addition, the hematologic response rates were 50%, 69%, and 71%, respectively. Among the six patients with limited multiple lesions who underwent radiotherapy, the clinical symptoms were improved in five patients after radiotherapy. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 51 months, and the median overall survival (OS) was 65 months. In univariate analysis, the administration of chemotherapy was significantly associated with better PFS (p = 0.007) and OS (p = 0.020). In contrast, underlying VEGFe was a significant factor worsening PFS (p = 0.035) and OS (p = 0.008). Radiotherapy produces a reliable clinical response and is effective in improving POEMS-associated symptoms that are refractory to chemotherapy in selected patients with clustered or limited multiple lesions that can be covered by single radiation field.

  1. The role of radiotherapy in the management of POEMS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Young-Suk; Suh, Chang-Ok; Kim, Yu Ri; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a paraneoplastic syndrome caused by an underlying plasma cell proliferative disease. In this study, we examined the treatment outcomes and role of radiotherapy in the management of POEMS syndrome. In total, 33 patients diagnosed with POEMS syndrome were analyzed. These patients presented with osteosclerotic myeloma (OSM, n = 13), Castleman’s disease (CD, n = 4), OSM with CD (n = 10), and vascular endothelial growth factor elevation without gross lesions (VEGFe, n = 6), respectively. The patients were treated by radiotherapy alone (n = 4), chemotherapy alone (n = 16), or a combination thereof (n = 9). The clinical response rates of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy plus chemotherapy were 75%, 69%, and 89%, respectively. In addition, the hematologic response rates were 50%, 69%, and 71%, respectively. Among the six patients with limited multiple lesions who underwent radiotherapy, the clinical symptoms were improved in five patients after radiotherapy. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 51 months, and the median overall survival (OS) was 65 months. In univariate analysis, the administration of chemotherapy was significantly associated with better PFS (p = 0.007) and OS (p = 0.020). In contrast, underlying VEGFe was a significant factor worsening PFS (p = 0.035) and OS (p = 0.008). Radiotherapy produces a reliable clinical response and is effective in improving POEMS-associated symptoms that are refractory to chemotherapy in selected patients with clustered or limited multiple lesions that can be covered by single radiation field

  2. Prognostic factors, patterns of recurrence and toxicity for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, Matthias F.; Lang, Kristin; Krug, David; Koerber, Stefan A.; Debus, Juergen; Sterzing, Florian; Uhlmann, Lorenz; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of definitive chemo-radiation or radiotherapy alone in patients with esophageal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of n = 238 patients with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the esophagus treated with definitive radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy at our institution between 2000 and 2012. Patients of all stages were included to represent actual clinical routine. We performed univariate and multivariate analysis to identify prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Moreover, treatment-related toxicity and patterns of recurrence were assessed. Patients received either chemo-radiation (64%), radiotherapy plus cetuximab (10%) or radiotherapy alone (26%). In 69%, a boost was applied, resulting in a median cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy; the remaining 31% received a median total dose of 50 Gy. For the entire cohort, the median OS and PFS were 15.0 and 11.0 months, respectively. In multivariate analysis, important prognostic factors for OS and PFS were T stage (OS: P = 0.005; PFS: P = 0.006), M stage (OS: P = 0.015; PFS: P = 0.003), concomitant chemotherapy (P < 0.001) and radiation doses of >55 Gy (OS: P = 0.019; PFS: P = 0.022). Recurrences occurred predominantly as local in-field relapse or distant metastases. Toxicity was dominated by nutritional impairment (12.6% with G3/4 dysphagia) and chemo-associated side effects. Definitive chemo-radiation in patients with esophageal cancer results in survival rates comparable with surgical treatment approaches. However, local and distant recurrence considerably restrict prognosis. Further advances in radio-oncological treatment strategies are necessary for improving outcome. (author)

  3. Optimal timing of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: is ultra-early salvage radiotherapy beneficial?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Satoru; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Naito, Akihiro; Kakutani, Shigenori; Takeshima, Yuta; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Nakagawa, Tohru; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The optimal timing of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy is controversial. In particular, the prognostic significance of salvage radiotherapy delivered before a current definition of biochemical recurrence, i.e. ultra-early salvage radiotherapy, is unclear. We reviewed 76 patients with pT2-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent salvage radiotherapy for post-prostatectomy biochemical recurrence at the following three timings: ultra-early salvage radiotherapy (n = 20) delivered before meeting a current definition of biochemical recurrence (two consecutive prostate-specific antigen [PSA] values ≥0.2 ng/mL); early salvage radiotherapy (n = 40) delivered after meeting the definition but before PSA reached 0.5 ng/mL; and delayed salvage radiotherapy (n = 16) delivered after PSA reached 0.5 ng/mL. The primary endpoint was failure of salvage radiotherapy, defined as a PSA value ≥0.2 ng/mL. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. During the follow-up period (median: 70 months), four of 20 (20 %), nine of 40 (23 %) and seven of 16 (44 %) patients failed biochemically in the ultra-early, early and delayed salvage radiotherapy groups, respectively. On univariate analyses, the outcome of delayed salvage radiotherapy was worse than the others, while there was no significant difference between ultra-early and early groups. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the presence of Gleason pattern 5, perineural invasion and delayed salvage radiotherapy as independent predictors of poorer survival. No survival benefit of ultra-early salvage radiotherapy was demonstrated, whereas delayed salvage radiotherapy was associated with worse outcome as reported in previous studies. Our results may support the current recommendations that salvage radiotherapy should be undertaken after two consecutive PSA values ≥0.2 ng/mL and before reaching 0.5 ng/mL

  4. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity

  5. Prostatic cancer: intolerance and morbidity of external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douchez, J.; Fregevu, Y.; Allain, Y.M.; Cellier, P.; Fenton, J.; Hay, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Vincent, F.

    1985-01-01

    The pertherapeutic intolerance and morbidity are analyzed in a groupe of 597 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy between 1975 and 1982. Minimum follow-up is 2 years, median is 46 months. The results are compared to following parameters: associated diseases, associated surgical treatments, doses and irradiated target volumes. Pertherapeutic intolerance manifestations were found in 73% of patients and lead to complications. Urinary incontinence and chronic cystitis were more frequent after transurethral resection or prostatic target volume and by split course irradiation. Chronic diarrhea was more frequent when using large target volume. Leg edema was closely associated with pelvic lymphadenectomy. The control of pertherapeutic manifestations and the prevention of complications should improve survival in patients treated by external radiotherapy [fr

  6. Radiotherapy for testicular seminoma stage I: treatment results and long-term post-irradiation morbidity in 365 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossa, S.D.A.; Aass, N.; Kaalhus, O.

    1989-01-01

    After infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy the cancer-related 10 year survival was 99% in 365 patients with seminoma Stage I referred to the Norwegian Radium Hospital between 1970 and 1982. Thirteen patients relapsed, 11 of them within the first 3 years after treatment. Nine of the recurrent patients were cured by radiotherapy alone (4) or in combination with chemotherapy (5). There is no need to include the inguinal lymph nodes into the irradiation field or to give scrotal irradiation, not even to patients with tumor infiltration beyond the testicular tissue, or to those with prior scrotal or inguinal surgery. At least 1 year after radiotherapy moderate or more severe dyspepsia was observed in 16 patients. Nine patients developed a peptic ulcer. In general, there was no increased risk for development of a second non-germ cell cancer after radiotherapy. However, 4 patients developed a pulmonary cancer indicating a border-line significance of increased risk for this type of malignancy. (p:0.05). In conclusion, infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy remains the optimal routine treatment in seminoma patients with Stage I

  7. Two cases of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis alleviated with hange-shashin-to

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yuya; Yamashita, Taku; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) can result in a superior treatment response and survival outcome compared with radiotherapy alone in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and it has become the standard of care for locally advanced disease and organ preservation. However, the major limitation to radiotherapy or CCRT is locoregional treatment-related toxicities, particularly oral mucositis (OM). We experienced two cases of pain-uncontrolled OM in which the Traditional Oriental Medicine Hange-shashin-to (TJ-14) was effective. A 44-year-old man with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and neck metastases underwent CCRT and suffered from OM of grade 3 according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects (CTCAE). His pain was uncontrolled with a variety of analgesics, so we prescribed TJ-14 for him as a gargle. Even during CCRT, the pain significantly diminished and OM was improved to grade 1. TJ-14 contributed to completion of CCRT and improvement of the patient's nutrition status. A 67-year-old man with unknown primary and neck metastases underwent neck dissection and adjuvant radiotherapy. During adjuvant radiotherapy, he had OM of grade 3 and was unable to eat, so he was hospitalized and was started to have TJ-14. Although his OM remained grade 3 during the therapy, his pain was alleviated, leading to completion of the treatment. TJ-14 can be an effective supportive therapy for OM caused by radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Friedman, William A.; Bova, Francis J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1985 and June 1994, 70 adult patients with pathologically confirmed malignant glioma (75% glioblastoma multiforme, 25% anaplastic astrocytoma) suitable for high-dose therapy were selected for treatment with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy, 1.5 Gy twice daily to a total target dose of 60 Gy. Two patients were excluded from analysis (one patient had a fatal pulmonary embolism after 18 Gy; one patient discontinued therapy after 28.5 Gy against medical advice and without sequelae or progression). The 68 patients in the study group had a median age of 52 years and a median Karnofsky performance status of 90. Stereotactic implant ( 125 I) or stereotactic radiosurgery boosts were delivered to 16 patients (24%) in the study group. Minimum follow-up was 6 months. Results: Median survival was 13.8 months and median progression-free survival was 7.4 months. The absolute Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 16% at 2 years and 4% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis for the prognostic impact of age, gender, histology, Karnofsky performance status, symptomatology, surgical resection vs. biopsy, and boost vs nonboost therapy revealed that Karnofsky performance status ≥ 90, boost therapy, and surgical excision predicted significantly improved outcome. No severe toxicity occurred in patients treated with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone, although 5% required steroids temporarily for edema. Progression occurred during treatment in one patient (1.5%). Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy is well tolerated and leads to results comparable with those of standard therapy. The rate of disease progression during treatment is significantly better (p = 0.001) than is reported for patients treated with standard fractionation, with or without chemotherapy. This regimen is a reasonable starting point

  9. Results of radiotherapy in case of juvenile xanthogranuloma of the iris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.P.; Juenemann, G.

    1983-01-01

    The juvenile xanthogranuloma is a rare, benign, cutaneous disease occurring in infants and young children which can be situated in about 10% of the cases on the eye and preferentially on the iris. The reason for consulting an ophthalmologist is mostly a recurrent unilateral hyphemia which is typical for this disease. The diagnosis of the juvenile xanthogranuloma has to be established clinically, based on the characteristic alterations of the iris - heterochromia, vascularized tumor or diffuse thickening of the iris - and the possibly increased intraocular pressure. In order to avoid the deleting consequences of an uncontrollable secondary glaucoma, radiotherapy with a total dose of 300 to 400 cGy combined with a mild local steroid treatment has to be undertaken immediately, if possible. Taking into consideration the indications of literature, the value of a low-dose radiotherapy for this disease shall be demonstrated by five own cases in all of which the concerned eye could be healed and preserved. (orig.) [de

  10. An investigation of anxiety about radiotherapy deploying the radiotherapy categorical anxiety scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimotsu, Sakie; Karasawa, Kumiko; Ito, Kana; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Izawa, Hiromi; Kawase, Eri; Horikawa, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major methods for treating cancer, but many patients undergoing radiotherapy have deep concerns about receiving radiation treatment. This problem is not generally appreciated and has not been adequately studied. The objective of this investigation was to empirically investigate the anxieties that cancer patients feel towards radiotherapy by using questionnaires to classify and quantitatively measure their concerns. A preliminary interview to develop a questionnaire was carried out with 48 patients receiving radiotherapy to discover their anxieties about on-going treatments. Subsequently, a main study was performed using a questionnaire with 185 patients to classify their types of anxiety and to ascertain the reliability and validity of the responses. Confirmatory factor analysis was then carried out with a 17-item Radiotherapy Categorical Anxiety Scale. Three anxiety factors were abstracted by factor analysis: adverse effects of radiotherapy, environment of radiotherapy, and treatment effects of radiotherapy. Reliability, content validity, and concurrent validity were obtained. The adequacy of the three-factor model of anxiety concerning radiotherapy was confirmed. A 17-item Radiotherapy Categorical Anxiety Scale was formulated to quantitatively measure the specific types of anxiety among cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. (author)

  11. [Radiotherapy in node-positive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, D; Bartkowiak, D; Bolenz, C; Wiegel, T

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous randomized trials to guide the management of patients with localized (and metastatic) prostate cancer, but only a few (mostly retrospective) studies have specifically addressed node-positive patients. Therefore, there is uncertainty regarding optimal treatment in this situation. Current guidelines recommend long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) alone or radiotherapy plus long-term ADT as treatment options. This overview summarizes the existing literature on the use of radiotherapy for node-positive prostate cancer as definitive treatment and as adjuvant or salvage therapy after radical prostatectomy. In this context, we also discuss several PET tracers in the imaging evaluation of patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. As for definitive treatment, retrospective studies suggest that ADT plus radiotherapy improves overall survival compared with ADT alone. These studies also consistently demonstrated that many patients with node-positive prostate cancer can achieve long-term survival - and are likely curable - with aggressive therapy. The beneficial impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on survival in patients with pN1 prostate cancer seems to be highly influenced by tumor characteristics. Men with ≤ 2 positive lymph nodes in the presence of intermediate- to high-grade disease, or positive margins, and those with 3 or 4 positive lymph nodes are the ideal candidates for adjuvant radiotherapy (plus long-term ADT) after surgery. There is a need for randomized trials to further examine the potential role of radiotherapy as either definitive or adjuvant treatment, for patients with node-positive prostate cancer.

  12. Radiotherapy management of brain metastases using conventional linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzenauer, Marcel; Vrana, David; Vlachova, Zuzana; Cwiertka, Karel; Kalita, Ondrej; Melichar, Bohuslav

    2016-09-01

    As treatments for primary cancers continue to improve life expectancy, unfortunately, brain metastases also appear to be constantly increasing and life expectancy for patients with brain metastases is low. Longer survival and improved quality of life may be achieved using localised radiological and surgical approaches in addition to low dose corticosteroids. Stereotactic brain radiotherapy is one rapidly evolving localized radiation treatment. This article describes our experience with stereotactic radiotherapy using a linear accelerator. We reviewed patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy, from the time of its introduction into daily practice in our Department of Oncology in 2014. We collected the data on patient treatment and predicted survival based on prognostic indices and actual patient outcome. A total of 10 patients were treated by stereotactic radiotherapy, in one case in combination with whole brain radiotherapy and hippocampal sparing. There was no significant treatment related toxicity during the treatment or follow-up and due to the small number of fractions, the overall tolerance of the treatment was excellent. The patient intrafractional movement in all cases was under 1 mm suggesting that 1 mm margin around the CTV to create the PTV is sufficient and also that patient immobilization using the thermoplastic mask compared with invasive techniques, is feasible. We also found that prognostic indices such as the Graded Prognostic Assessment provide accurate predictions of patient survival. Based on our current evidence, patients with brain metastases fit enough, should be considered for stereotactic radiotherapy treatment.

  13. An analysis of two separate quality audits in UK radiotherapy centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aird, E G A

    1995-01-01

    The CHART quality assurance programme has been used to audit 2 groups of radiotherapy centres for the delivery of radiotherapy: 1. those involved in the CHART Clinical Trial (1991-1995) 2. all London radiotherapy centres (1994-1996) Machinery Tests This paper will seek to illustrate improvements in meeting the criteria set by the QA programme as older linear accelerators are replaced. Phantom Tests The residual errors between measured and calculated doses in anatomical phantoms will be analysed to demonstrate where there are still weaknesses in treatment planning and delivery of radiotherapy

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy in high-grade extremity sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, Carlos Antonio da Silva; Penna, Antonio Belmiro Rodrigues Campbell; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Vieira, Sergio Lannes

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the therapies utilized in the authors' institution for management of high-grade extremity sarcomas, analyzing the overall survival rates following multidisciplinary treatment. Materials and methods: retrospective study developed in the period from 1993 to 2007 with 36 patients diagnosed with stages IIb/III, submitted to postoperative external beam radiotherapy, with or without boost dose, utilizing high-dose brachytherapy. Results: thirty-six patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant external beam radiation therapy. Four patients (11%) received boost dose with brachytherapy, and seven (19%) received chemotherapy. The average dose for radiotherapy was 50 Gy (CI 95%: 47-53 Gy), and the four patients with brachytherapy boost received doses ranging from 16.2 to 35 Gy. Chemotherapy was indicated for seven patients (19%) with positive margins. Fifteen patients (42%) presented local or distant recurrence, and all of them progressed to death. Twenty-one patients (58%) remain with no clinical/radiological evidence of local/distant recurrence. The mean follow-up time was 88 months (IC 95%: 74-102). The overall seven years survival rate was 80%. Conclusion: combined surgery and radiotherapy is an effective treatment with excellent outcomes in cases where brachytherapy is associated, with improved overall survival rates. (author)

  15. Clinical studies for improving radiotherapy with 2-deoxy-D-glucose: Present status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwarakanath B

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Higher rates of glucose usage generally correlate with poor prognosis in several types of malignant tumours. Experimental studies (both in vitro and in vivo have shown that 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG, a glucose analog and glycolytic inhibitor, enhances radiation-induced damage selectively in tumor cells while protecting normal cells, thereby suggesting that 2-DG can be used as a differential radiomodifier to improve the efficacy of radiotherapy. Clinical trials undertaken to study the feasibility, safety, and validity of this suggested approach will be described. Based on 2-DG-induced radiosensitization observed in primary organ cultures of cerebral glioma tissues, clinical trials were designed taking into consideration the radiobiology of gliomas and pharmacokinetics of 2-DG. Phase I/II clinical trials have unequivocally demonstrated that a combination of 2-DG (200-300 mg 2-DG per kg body weight orally administered after overnight fasting, 20min before irradiation with large weekly fractions (5 Gy/fraction of low-LET radiotherapy is well tolerated without any acute toxicity or late radiation damage to the normal brain tissue. Nonserious transient side effects similar to hypoglycemia induced disturbances like restlessness, nausea, and vomiting were observed at the 2-DG doses used. Data from these trials involving more than 100 patients have clearly indicated a moderate increase in the survival, with a significant improvement in the quality of life with clinicopathological evidence of protection of normal brain tissue. A phase III multicentric trial to evaluate the efficacy of the combined treatment is in progress. Directions for future studies are discussed.

  16. Radiotherapy and HER2: point on the association of ionizing radiation and trastuzumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, X.; Lartigau, E.

    2009-01-01

    The addition of the two treatments (trastuzumab and radiotherapy) poses the problem of their toxicity addition, particularly at the cardiac level. The data speak in favour of trastuzumab continuation during radiotherapy, taken into account the benefits. Because of the technical advances in radiotherapy ( respiratory automatic control, intensity modulated radiotherapy, I.M.R.T.) it will be possible to avoid the mediastinum structures improving then the tolerance. (N.C.)

  17. A prospective study: current problems in radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in yogyakarta, indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon D Stoker

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC has a high incidence in Indonesia. Previous study in Yogyakarta revealed a complete response of 29% and a median overall survival of less than 2 years. These poor treatment outcome are influenced by the long diagnose-to-treatment interval to radiotherapy (DTI and the extended overall treatment time of radiotherapy (OTT. This study reveals insight why the OTT and DTI are prolonged. METHOD: All patients treated with curative intent radiotherapy for NPC between July 2011 until October 2012 were included. During radiotherapy a daily diary was kept, containing information on DTI, missed radiotherapy days, the reason for missing and length of OTT. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients were included. The median DTI was 106 days (95% CI: 98-170. Fifty-nine patients (87% finished the treatment. The median OTT for radiotherapy was 57 days (95% CI: 57-65. The main reason for missing days was an inoperative radiotherapy machine (36%. Other reasons were patient's poor condition (21%, public holidays (14%, adjustment of the radiation field (7%, power blackout (3%, inoperative treatment planning system (2% and patient related reasons (9%. Patient's insurance type was correlated to DTI in disadvantage for poor people. CONCLUSION: Yogyakarta has a lack of sufficient radiotherapy units which causes a delay of 3-4 months, besides the OTT is extended by 10-12 days. This influences treatment outcome to a great extend. The best solution would be creating sufficient radiotherapy units and better management in health care for poor patients. The growing economy in Indonesia will expectantly in time enable these solutions, but in the meantime solutions are needed. Solutions can consist of radiation outside office hours, better maintenance of the facilities and more effort from patient, doctor and nurse to finish treatment in time. These results are valuable when improving cancer care in low and middle income countries.

  18. Enhanced relative biological effectiveness of proton radiotherapy in tumor cells with internalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Gillin, Michael; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2011-01-01

    The development and use of sensitizing agents to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy have long been sought to improve our ability to treat cancer. In this letter, we have studied the relative biological effectiveness of proton beam radiotherapy on prostate tumor cells with and without internalized gold nanoparticles. The effectiveness of proton radiotherapy for the killing of prostate tumor cells was increased by approximately 15%-20% for those cells containing internalized gold nanoparticles.

  19. Radiotherapy of Painful Vertebral Hemangiomas: The Single Center Retrospective Analysis of 137 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miszczyk, Leszek; Tukiendorf, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: An evaluation of dose–response relationship and an attempt to define predictive factors. Methods and Materials: A total of 137 cases of painful vertebral hemangioma irradiations (101 patients). Fraction dose (fd) varied from 2 to 15 Gy (123 fractionated and 14 radiosurgical treatments), and total dose (TD) from 8 to 30 Gy (111 cases irradiated with fd of 2 GY to TD of 24 Gy). We evaluated pain relief, changes in analgesic requirements, and reossification. Results: Means of pain relief 1, 6, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy (defined as a decrease of primary pain level expressed in percent) were 60.5%, 65.4%, 68.3%, and 78.4%, respectively. Proportion of patients with no need for analgesics and patients using tramadol were 39%, 40%, 44%, 57%, and 20%, 17%, 22%, and 11% in these times. The proportion of patients experiencing complete/partial pain relief changed from 36/48% 1 month, to 64/22% 1.5 years after radiotherapy. No impact of radiotherapy on reossification was found. The positive impact of fd and TD increase for analgesics uptake reduction and pain relief was found. An increase of the fd by 1 Gy results in 27% chance of analgesics uptake reduction and 3.8% reduction of pain, whereas 14% analgesics uptake reduction and 2.2% of pain reduction in case of the TD. The predictive factors improving results were found: female gender, older age, better performance states (the chance of the lower analgesic treatment decreases over 2.5 times in comparison to the higher Zubrod degree), bigger Hb concentration, shorter symptoms duration and lower analgesics uptake before radiotherapy. Conclusions: The obtained data support the efficacy of radiotherapy in improving pain secondary to vertebral hemangioma, with the degree of pain amelioration being related to increasing fd and TD. The positive predictive factors were defined: female gender, older age, better performance status, increased Hb concentration, shorter symptoms duration, and lower analgesics uptake

  20. Interstitial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, P.T.; Bretas, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors now have 20 years of experience with modern techniques of brachytherapy. The large number of patients treated in medical centers around the world and the widespread use of this type of radiotherapy have provided us with substantial information about the indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, pitfalls and complications, as well as the results of these techniques. Although the focus of this review is the experience at Baylor using the combined technique of gold seed implantation plus external beam irradiation, the alternative forms of brachytherapy will be described and compared. The authors' intention is to provide the busy clinician with a succinct and informative review indicating the status of modern interstitial radiotherapy and describing day-to-day approach and results

  1. [Towards an improvement of the quality of life after radiotherapy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor-Goldschmidt, Charlotte; Bernier, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric radiotherapy did not differ technically from adult radiotherapy but its characteristics, its difficulties and challenges are specific. Thanks in part to this treatment, overall survival of French children with cancer is around 80%. It is therefore important to integrate in the elaboration of the treatment planning potential side long-term effects. Indeed, whatever the technique is, even the most sophisticated, it is usually inevitable that healthy nearby organs receive a dose of radiation. Dose limits on organs at risk come from adult data and are adapted for children. After the treatment, it is important to graduate the potential risks of side effects to propose a personalized monitoring protocol avoiding excessive medicalization. This article presents the medical thinking concerning radiotherapy in different anatomical areas (brain, head and neck, chest, abdomen) including concepts of dose level corresponding to side effects usually described. In parallel, we present follow-up recommendations with the aim to preserve an optimal quality of life for the adults cured of a childhood cancer, currently called survivors. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Advice concerning radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Dutch National cancer incidence figures were calculated by using the reliable data on cancer incidence in the Eindhoven area and population forecasts and information obtained from the Central Bureau of Statistics. Several radiotherapy departments suffer from under capacity (a lack of resources and understaffing). Data have also shown that 35% of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, instead of 50%. Calculations have been made by the committee on the present and future needs with regard to equipment and staff. In 1983, the number of megavoltage therapy units amounted to 38, but should have been 65. It should be 80 in 1990 and 90 in 2000. Since building and installing such equipment is a lengthy process a considerable effort is needed to make up for the arrears. The committee advocates the extension of the system of regional cooperation in cancer care (comprehensive cancer centres), in which radiotherapy departments play a crucial role. Working parties from the committee provided a comprehensive description of current radiotherapy practice with reference to physical, technical, clinical and management aspects. Another working party assessed the results of cancer treatment with regard to many different tumour sites. Recent and expected developments were analysed or indicated. The Radiotherapy Committee commissioned an external team to conduct a project to achieve a picture of future developments using methods different to those of the committee's. An interim advice has been added on this subject. (Auth.)

  3. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  4. Efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis: experiences from a retrospective East German bicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis. Methods We assessed the medical records of 1037 patients with painful gonarthritis who had undergone low-dose radiotherapy between 1981 and 2008. The subjective patient perception of the response to irradiation as graded immediately or up to two months after the completion of a radiotherapy series was evaluated and correlated with age, gender, radiological grading and the duration of symptoms before radiotherapy. Moreover, we performed a mail survey to obtain additional long-term follow-up information and received one hundred and six evaluable questionnaires. Results We assessed 1659 series of radiotherapy in 1037 patients. In 79.3% of the cases the patients experienced a slight, marked or complete pain relief immediately or up to two months after the completion of radiotherapy. Gender, age and the duration of pain before radiotherapy did not have a significant influence on the response to irradiation. In contrast, severe signs of osteoarthritis were associated with more effective pain relief. In more than 50% of the patients who reported a positive response to irradiation a sustained period of symptomatic improvement was observed. Conclusions Our results confirm that low-dose radiotherapy is an effective treatment for painful osteoarthritis of the knee. In contrast to an earlier retrospective study, severe signs of osteoarthritis constituted a positive prognostic factor for the response to irradiation. A randomized trial is urgently required to compare radiotherapy with other treatment modalities. PMID:23369282

  5. Efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis: experiences from a retrospective East German bicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis. Methods We assessed the medical records of 1037 patients with painful gonarthritis who had undergone low-dose radiotherapy between 1981 and 2008. The subjective patient perception of the response to irradiation as graded immediately or up to two months after the completion of a radiotherapy series was evaluated and correlated with age, gender, radiological grading and the duration of symptoms before radiotherapy. Moreover, we performed a mail survey to obtain additional long-term follow-up information and received one hundred and six evaluable questionnaires. Results We assessed 1659 series of radiotherapy in 1037 patients. In 79.3% of the cases the patients experienced a slight, marked or complete pain relief immediately or up to two months after the completion of radiotherapy. Gender, age and the duration of pain before radiotherapy did not have a significant influence on the response to irradiation. In contrast, severe signs of osteoarthritis were associated with more effective pain relief. In more than 50% of the patients who reported a positive response to irradiation a sustained period of symptomatic improvement was observed. Conclusions Our results confirm that low-dose radiotherapy is an effective treatment for painful osteoarthritis of the knee. In contrast to an earlier retrospective study, severe signs of osteoarthritis constituted a positive prognostic factor for the response to irradiation. A randomized trial is urgently required to compare radiotherapy with other treatment modalities.

  6. Dosimetry comparison of irradiation with conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, conformal radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions and robotic stereotactic radiotherapy for benign brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasic, E.; Noel, A.; Buchheit, I.; Bernier, V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To compare several techniques in order to determine the best treatment for benign brain tumours. Methods and patients. - A retrospective study was performed for five patients who received 3D-conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or CyberKnife R . These patients had a meningioma, a pituitary tumour, a cranio-pharyngioma or a neurinoma. In each case, these treatment plans were optimised and compared with the three other dosimetries. Radiobiological or positioning parameters were evaluated, as well as dosimetric parameters, in order to compare treatments with different characteristics. Results. - The dosimetric parameters showed that the choice of treatment seemed to be determined mostly by tumour size, shape and proximity with organs at risk (not tumour localisation). Whereas the results showed no significant deviations with regards to the radiobiological parameters. Therefore, with these parameters, it was difficult to give priority to a treatment. Conclusions. - With regards to benign brain tumours of medium or large size, intensity modulated radiotherapy seemed the recommended treatment. It enabled to obtain a good ratio between efficacy and toxicity for tumours that are really close to organs at risk. Concerning small benign brain tumours, the CyberKnife R was probably the best treatment. (authors)

  7. Combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagiri, S.; Gupta, B.D.; Dutta, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    In locally advanced oral cancer, the main modalities of treatment, e.g. surgery and radiotherapy, most often fail to control the disease when used singly. A combination policy of surgery and radiotherapy achieves adequate control of the disease. In order to improve the results in advanced oral cancer, chemotherapy given prior to and during radiation treatment and judicious combination of surgery offer the best possible approach in the management. The experience in the combination policy in the treatment of oral cancer in Northern India is dealt with. (auth.)

  8. Radiotherapy of bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy of branchogenic carcinoma comprises; palliative treatment, postoperative or pre-operative radiotherapy, radiotherapy as part of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy of small cell carcinoma and curative radiotherapy of non-operable non-small cell carcinoma. Atelectasis and obstruction are indications for palliative radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy is given only in cases of incomplete resection or mediastinal metastases. In the treatment of small cell carcinoma by combined irradiation and chemotherapy the mediastinum and primary tumour are irradiated, generally after chemotherapy, and the C.N.S. receives prophylactic radiotherapy. Curative radiotherapy is indicated in cases of non-operable small cell carcinoma. Irradiation with doses of 60-70 Gy produced 5-years-survival rates of 10-14% in cases classified as T 1 -T 2 N 0 M 0 . (orig.) [de

  9. Improving dose homogeneity in head and neck radiotherapy with custom 3-D compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, Linda K.; Harari, Paul M.; Sharda, Navneet N.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Anatomic contour irregularities and tissue inhomogeneities can lead to significant radiation dose variation across complex treatment volumes. Such dose non-uniformity occurs routinely in radiation of the head and neck (H and N) despite beam shaping with blocks or beam modification with wedges. Small dose variations are amplified by the high total doses delivered (often >70 Gy) which can thereby influence late normal tissue complications as well as tumor control. We have therefore implemented the routine use of 3-D custom tissue compensators for our H and N cancer patients fabricated directly from CT scan contour data obtained in the treatment position. The capacity of such compensators to improve dose uniformity in patients with tumors of the H and N is herein reported. Materials and Methods: Between July 1992 and March 1995, 80 patients receiving H and N radiotherapy had 3-D custom compensators fabricated for their treatment course. Detailed dosimetric records have been reviewed for thirty cases to date (60 custom compensators). Dose uniformity across the treatment volume, peak dose delivery and maximum doses to selected, clinically relevant, anatomic subsites were analyzed and compared with uncompensated and wedged plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated and volumes receiving greater than 5% and 10% of the prescribed dose noted. Phantom dose measurements were performed for compensated fields using a water chamber and were compared to calculated doses in order to evaluate the accuracy of isodoses generated by the Theraplan treatment planning system. Accuracy of the fabrication and positioning of the custom compensators was verified by direct measurement. Results: Custom compensators resulted in an average reduction of dose variance across the treatment volume from 13.8% (7-20%) for the uncompensated plans to 4.5% (2-7%) with the compensators. Wedged plans were variable but on average an 8% (3-15%) dose variance was noted. Maximum doses

  10. Correlative study on anemia and radiotherapy effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jinsheng; Jiang Yuanshi; Cao Xibiao; Zhan Yongzhong; Yang Liye; Chen Jianxiu; Chen Chengwu; Li Yang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of oxygen-carrying ability of blood efficacy of radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Altogether 161 cases of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were classified according to severity of anemia, and Hb, RBC, MCH, HCT, MCV, MCHC and RDW were tested before, during and after radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up for up to 5 years, the relationship and mechanism among anemia, radiotherapy effects and survival rate was discussed. Results: The survival rate between anemia group and non-anemia group was different significantly (P<0.05). Anemia before radiotherapy, anemia appearance or anemia deterioration during radiotherapy were sensitive factors affecting radiotherapy results. The anemia more severe, the radiotherapy worse. Conclusion: Anemia-hypohemoglobinemia leads to decrease of oxygen-carrying capacity of blood, resulting in oxygen deficiency of tumor cells and their radiotherapy resistance. Therefore this method is worthy of further studies

  11. Recommendations for safer radiotherapy: what’s the message?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eDunscombe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy, with close to a million courses delivered per year in North America, is a very safe and effective intervention for a devastating disease. However, although rare, several deeply regrettable incidents have occurred in radiotherapy and have rightly been the subject of considerable public interest. Partly in response to reports of these incidents a variety of authoritative organizations across the globe has harnessed the expertise amongst their members in attempts to identify the measures that will make radiotherapy safer. While the intentions of all these organizations are clearly good it is challenging for the health care providers in the clinic to know where to start with so much advice coming from so many directions. Through a mapping exercise we have identified commonalities between recommendations made in seven authoritative documents and identified those issues most frequently cited. The documents reviewed contain a total of 117 recommendations. Using the 37 recommendations in Towards Safer Radiotherapy as the initial base layer, recommendations in the other documents were mapped, adding to the base layer to accommodate all the recommendations from the additional six documents as necessary. This mapping exercise resulted in the distillation of the original 117 recommendations down to 61 unique recommendations. Twelve topics were identified in three or more of the documents as being pertinent to the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy. They are, in order of most to least cited: training, staffing, documentation, incident learning, communication, check lists, quality control and preventive maintenance, dosimetric audit, accreditation, minimizing interruptions, prospective risk assessment and safety culture. This analysis provides guidance for the selection of those activities most likely to enhance safety and quality in radiotherapy based on the frequency of citation in selected recent authoritative literature.

  12. Nutritional survey of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinli; Zhu Shengtao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: In order to know the nutriture of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy and give nutritional guidance properly, the authors make the following survey. Methods: A dietary survey of twenty-four-hour retrospective method was used; The patients' activity was recorded and their twenty-four hours caloric consumption was calculated. Results: Of all the patients, the intake of protein is more than recommended, percentage of calorific proportion is about 15%-19% of gross caloric. A larger portion of patients' caloric intake, especially female patients, is lower than caloric consumption. Among all the patients, the intake of vegetables is not enough; The consumption of milk and milky products is lower; it is common and serious that neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy have vitamine and mineral's scarcity. Conclusions: Nutriture of neoplasm patients is not optimistic, it is imperative to improve their nutriture

  13. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  14. [Can the prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis improve the time of performing radiotherapy in head and neck tumors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, A; Ferrarese, F; Tonetto, V; Coghetto, F; Marazzato, G; Zorat, P L

    1996-04-01

    Radiotherapy-related mucositis is the most frequent complication in the patients submitted to irradiation for head and neck cancers. Many such patients may develop mycotic infections which may lead to treatment discontinuation, with possible consequences on the local control of these cancers. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of fluconazole in preventing mycotic mucositis in 80 patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck cancers. The patients were randomized to two groups: 41 patients in group A received the supporting treatment we usually administer, plus fluconazole (50 mg/day) starting from the 6th irradiation session throughout the treatment; 39 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given the drug only when mycotic infections appeared. The clinical characteristics, treated sites, treatment doses and volumes were similar in the two groups of patients. Fluconazole was well tolerated and no early or late toxicity was observed. We had 1 mycotic mucositis and 14 non-scheduled treatment discontinuations in group A, vs. 19 and 30, respectively, in group B. Radiation therapy lasted 52.3 days (mean) in group A and 55.6 days (mean) in group B; the differences were statistically significant. In our experience, fluconazole, used prophylactically from the 6th radiotherapy session on, reduced the number of mycotic infections and improved radiotherapy schedule in our head and neck cancer patients.

  15. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldstein, Cora; Poetter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor; Doerr, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects. (orig.) [de

  16. Radiobiologically based assessments of the net costs of fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, Roger G.; Jones, Bleddyn

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how the long-term costs of radiation therapy may be influenced by modifications to fractionation schemes, and how any improvements in tumor control might, in principle, be translated into a potential cost saving for the responsible healthcare organization. Methods and Materials: Standard radiobiological modeling based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model is combined with financial parameters relating to the estimated costs of different aspects of radiotherapy treatment delivery. The cost model includes provision for the long-term costs of treatment failure and enables the extra costs of near optimal radiotherapy to be balanced against suboptimal alternatives, which are more likely to be associated with further radiotherapy, salvage surgery, and continuing care. Results: A number of caveats are essential in presenting a model such as this for the first time, and these are clearly stated. However, a recurring observation is that, in terms of the whole cost of supporting a patient from first radiotherapy treatment onwards, high quality radiotherapy (i.e., based on individual patterns of fractionation that are near optimal for particular subpopulations of tumor) will frequently be associated with the lowest global cost. Conclusions: This work adds weight to the case for identifying fast and accurate predictive assay techniques, and supports the argument that suboptimal radiotherapy is usually more costly in the long term. Although the article looks only at the cost-benefit consequences of altered patterns of fractionation, the method will, in principle, have application to other changes in the way radiotherapy can be performed, e.g., to examining the cost-benefit aspects of tumor dose escalation as a consequence of using advanced conformal treatment planning

  17. On-site visits to radiotherapy centres: Medical physics procedures. Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    The IAEA has a long standing history of providing support and assistance for radiotherapy dosimetry audits in Member States, for educating and training radiotherapy professionals, and for reviewing the radiotherapy process in a variety of situations. Since 1969, and in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), the IAEA has implemented a dosimetry audit service using mailed thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams in hospitals in Member States. The IAEA/WHO TLD service aims at improving the accuracy and consistency of clinical radiotherapy dosimetry worldwide. Detailed follow-up procedures have been implemented for correcting incorrect beam calibrations. When necessary, on-site visits by IAEA experts in radiotherapy physics are organized to identify and rectify dosimetry problems in hospitals. The IAEA has also been requested to organize expert missions in response to problems found during the radiation treatment planning process. Assessment of the doses received by affected patients and a medical assessment were undertaken when appropriate. Although vital for the radiotherapy process, accurate beam dosimetry and treatment planning alone cannot guarantee the successful treatment of a patient. The quality assurance (QA) of the entire radiotherapy process has to be taken into account. Hence, a new approach has been developed and named 'Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)'. The principal aim of QUATRO is to review the radiotherapy process, including the organization, infrastructure, clinical and medical physics aspects of the radiotherapy services. It also includes reviewing the hospital's professional competence, with a view to quality improvement. The QUATRO methodology is described in the IAEA publication Comprehensive Audits of Radiotherapy Practices: A Tool for Quality Improvement. QUATRO, in addition, offers assistance in the resolution of suspected or actual dose misadministrations (over

  18. Radiotherapy of presenile spinal osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, H.M.; Schiebusch, M.

    1982-01-01

    Painfull conditions of presenile spinal osteoporosis may no longer respond to medication or physical therapy. Analgesic radiotherapy coupled with mild physical therapy and if necessary supported by orthopedic measures frequently results in pain relief and physical stability. Fifty-two cases of osteoporosis and osteoporotic spinal fractures illustrate how better longterm results are achieved by increasing the customary dosage and speeding up radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  19. Feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to improve lung sparing in treatment planning for distal esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Anurag; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Liu, H. Helen; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Wang Xiaochun; Murshed, Hasan; Bonnen, Mark D.; Garg, Amit K.; Stevens, Craig W.; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melinda D.; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be used to reduce doses to normal lung than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in treating distal esophageal malignancies. Patients and methods: Ten patient cases with cancer of the distal esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. IMRT plans using four, seven, and nine beams (4B, 7B, and 9B) were developed for each patient and compared with the 3DCRT plan used clinically. IMRT and 3DCRT plans were evaluated with respect to PTV coverage and dose-volumes to irradiated normal structures, with statistical comparison made between the two types of plans using the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Results: IMRT plans (4B, 7B, 9B) reduced total lung volume treated above 10 Gy (V 1 ), 20 Gy (V 2 ), mean lung dose (MLD), biological effective volume (V eff ), and lung integral dose (P 1 , 5% for V 2 , and 2.5 Gy for MLD. IMRT improved the PTV heterogeneity (P<0.05), yet conformity was better with 7B-9B IMRT plans. No clinically meaningful differences were observed with respect to the irradiated volumes of spinal cord, heart, liver, or total body integral doses. Conclusions: Dose-volume of exposed normal lung can be reduced with IMRT, though clinical investigations are warranted to assess IMRT treatment outcome of esophagus cancers

  20. Enhanced relative biological effectiveness of proton radiotherapy in tumor cells with internalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Gillin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The development and use of sensitizing agents to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy have long been sought to improve our ability to treat cancer. In this letter, we have studied the relative biological effectiveness of proton beam radiotherapy on prostate tumor cells with and without internalized gold nanoparticles. The effectiveness of proton radiotherapy for the killing of prostate tumor cells was increased by approximately 15%–20% for those cells containing internalized gold nanoparticles. PMID:21915155

  1. The Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Gwi Eon; Lee, Hyung Sik; Suh, Chang Ok; Loh, John Ku; Lee, Jong Tae [Yonsei National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-12-15

    Twenty-seven patients with unresectable extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma (n=21) or with microscopic evidence of tumor rest after aggressive surgery for extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma(n=6) between 1985 and 1990 were given radiotherapy consisting intentionally external radiotherapy and /or intraluminal therapy using Gamma-Med 12i (192-lr) high dose rate (HDR) remote control afterloading system following bile drainage procedures and Gianturco stent insertion. The objectives of this study has been to assess the feasibility and effects on survival of a combination of external radiotherapy and brachytherapy with which we hope to achieve optimal loco-regional control for patients with unresectable extrahepatic bile duct tumors. Sixteen patients were men and eleven were women, and the mean age was 58 years (34-70 ). 10MV X-ray was used for radiation therapy, with the total dose ranging from 45 Gy to 55 Gy, and intraluminal brachytherapy performed after external radiotherapy, with the dose of total 15 Gy. The minimum follow up was 12 months. Failure were predominantly local-regional, without distant failure. Median survival was 10 months; 2-year actuarial survival rates was 21%. Median survival for common hepatic duct(CHD) cancer was 9 months; for common bile duct (CBD) cancer, was 16 months. And median survival for incomplete surgery/external radiotherapy group and external/intraluminal radiotherapy group was 10 months; for external radiotherapy alone group, was 6 months. Use of chemotherapy and/or hyperthermia were not affected in survival. Therefore, our result is that the survival rates in the group of external/intraluminal radiotherapy were comparable with ones in the group of incomplete resection/external radiotherapy, and so we believe that the aggressive local and regional radiotherapy can improve the quality of life and the survival length.

  2. Clinical research on cancer treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Eriko; Koyama, Kazuyuki; Morita, Kozo

    1993-01-01

    There are two purposes of using combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancers. One is to suppress distant metastasis, especially micrometastasis; the other is to improve localized control. As a trial of the utility of the former, systemic chemotherapy with CDDP and 5 FU was given successively with radiotherapy to treat nasopharyngeal cancer. The survival rate was significantly improved compared with historical control cases. The main reason for this effectiveness was the improvement of localized control. The suppression of distant metastasis is the subject of future research. As a trial of the utility of the latter, a super-selective intraarterial chemotherapy with CBDCA combined with radiotherapy was used to head and neck localized progressive cancers. The control of localized cancer was remarkably effective. This treatment is considered to be especially suitable for locally advanced tongue cancer and cancer of the root of the tongue. (author)

  3. Could 3-D conformal radiotherapy improve the overall survival for non-small cell lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Helfre, S.; Lavole, A.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The conformal radiotherapy approach, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is based on modern imaging modalities, efficient 3-D treatment planning systems, sophisticated immobilization devices and demanding quality assurance and treatment verification. The main goal of conformal radiotherapy is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume while reducing exposure of healthy tissues. These techniques would then allow a further dose escalation increasing local control and survival. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most difficult malignant tumors to be treated. It combines geometrical difficulties due to respiratory motion, and number of low tolerance neighboring organs, and dosimetric difficulties because of the presence of huge inhomogeneities. This localization is an attractive and ambitious example for the evaluation of new techniques. However, the published clinical reports in the last years described very heterogeneous techniques and, in the absence of prospective randomized trials, it is somewhat difficult at present to evaluate the real benefits drawn from those conformal radiotherapy techniques. After reviewing the rationale for 3DCRT for NSCLC, this paper will describe the main studies of 3DCRT, in order to evaluate its impact on lung cancer treatment Then the current state-of-the-art of IMRT and the last technical and therapeutic innovations in NSCL will be discussed. (authors)

  4. Base-of-tongue carcinoma: treatment results using concomitant boost radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Albert C.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, Kian K.; Goepfert, Helmuth; Peters, Lester J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of accelerated fractionated radiotherapy using the concomitant boost schedule for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue. Methods and Materials: Between September 1984 and July 1992, 54 patients with squamous carcinoma of the base of tongue were treated at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center using the concomitant boost schedule. The distribution of T and N stages was T1-4, T2-27, T3-22, and T4-1; N0-9, N1-11, N2-24, N3-7, and NX-3. American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage groupings were II-6, III-14, and IV-34. Before radiation, nodal excision and neck dissection were done in 5 and 10 patients, respectively; 5 patients had neck dissections after radiotherapy. Standard on and off spinal cord fields were irradiated with 1.8 Gy fractions to 54 Gy given over 6 weeks. The boost was given concomitantly during the large field treatment as a second daily (1.5 Gy) fraction, with an interfraction interval of 4-6 h. The median dose to the primary tumor was 72 Gy (range, 66-74 Gy). The median treatment duration was 42 days (range, 39-48 days). Only three patients had treatment interrupted for more than one scheduled treatment day. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival and disease-specific survival rates were 59 and 65%, respectively, with a median follow-up of 41 months. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 76%. The actuarial local control rates achieved with radiotherapy at 5 years for T1, T2, and T3 primary tumors were 100%, 96%, and 67%, respectively; including surgical salvage, the local control rate of T3 primary tumors was 70%. Six patients had regional failures, which in three patients occurred in conjunction with primary tumor recurrence. Twenty-six patients with regional adenopathy were treated with radiation alone to full dose and had a complete clinical response in the neck; no planned neck dissections were performed in these patients. Only 2 of these 26 patients

  5. Unilateral solitary choroid metastasis from breast cancer: Rewarding results of external radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraocular metastatic tumor is the commonest intraocular malignancy in adults, with uveal tract the commonest site. In nearly 85% of cases the choroid is the afflicted site due to its vascularity. Breast and lung are the common primaries. In breast primaries, this could be the first metastatic disease. This condition should always be kept in mind in patients with visual symptoms. Fundus examination, ultrasonography and CT/MRI of the orbit help in diagnosis. Early recognition and timely treatment can save the visual function thus imparting good quality of life to the patient. External beam radiotherapy is a good local form of treatment. Hormone therapy in hormone receptor positive tumors can have additional benefits. Here we report a case of unilateral solitary choroid metastasis in a case of breast cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy.

  6. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Guillermina; Villarreal, Jose E.; Garcia, Laura; Tendilla, Jose I.; Paredes, Lydia; Murphy, Consuelo A.; Pedraza, Martha

    2001-01-01

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry

  7. Investigation of anxiety about radiotherapy and development of the Categorical Anxiety Scale about Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimotsu, Sakie; Karasawa, Kumiko; Ito, Kana; Saito, Anne-yuko I; Kawase, Eri; Imasato, Sakae; Matsuki, Hideyuki; Horikawa, Naoshi

    2006-01-01

    There are many patients with anxiety for radiotherapy though it is one of most important treatments for cancer, to which attention has not been fully paid. Authors investigated this anxiety to classify and quantitatively evaluate the problems. Firstly they asked 48 patients with various cancers about the concrete anxiety items related with radiotherapy, and the items were examined by the expert doctor of consultation-liaison psychiatry and of radiology to make up questions of 25 items about radiotherapy. Then those questions together with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) were asked to in-(52 subjects) and out-(133) patients (106 males and 79 females of the mean age 62.58 years) to classify anxiety and to see the reliability and validity of items included. Factor analysis of the results revealed that three kinds of anxiety, i.e., adverse effects of radiation, environments at irradiation and effect of radiotherapy, were significant. Based on this, authors arranged the Categorical Anxiety Scale about Radiotherapy composed from 17 items, of which reliability and validity in contents and in parallelism with HAD had been assured. (T.I.)

  8. The Radiobiological Basis for Improvements in Radiotherapy and Low Dose Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hei, Tom K. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2009-12-09

    This conference grant was proposed to organize and host an international conference at Columbia University in New York to critically assess the cellular and molecular signaling events and tissue response following radiation damage. The conference would also serve as a venue to play tribute to the more than forty years contributions made by Professor Eric J. Hall to the radiation biology field. The goals of the meeting were to examine tumor hypoxia and sensitizer development; recent advances made in clinical radiotherapy; addressed several low dose phenomena, including genomic instability and bystander effects that are important in radiation risk assessment. Study and Results: The symposium was held on October 13th and 14th, 2008 at the Alfred Lerner Hall in the Morningside campus of Columbia University. The symposium, entitled “From Beans to Genes: A Forty Year Odyssey in Radiation Biology” was attended by more than 120 faculty, scientists, clinicians, fellows and students. The symposium, spanned over a day and a half, covered four scientific themes. These included tumor hypoxia and radiosensitizers; low dose radiation response; radiation biology in the practice of radiotherapy, and radiation hazard in space and genetic predisposition to cancer. The program of the symposium is as follow:

  9. Reinforcing of QA/QC programs in radiotherapy departments in Croatia: Results of treatment planning system verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurković, Slaven; Švabić, Manda; Diklić, Ana; Smilović Radojčić, Đeni; Dundara, Dea [Clinic for Radiotherapy and Oncology, Physics Division, University Hospital Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Kasabašić, Mladen; Ivković, Ana [Department for Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Faj, Dario, E-mail: dariofaj@mefos.hr [Department of Physics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia)

    2013-04-01

    Implementation of advanced techniques in clinical practice can greatly improve the outcome of radiation therapy, but it also makes the process much more complex with a lot of room for errors. An important part of the quality assurance program is verification of treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric verifications in anthropomorphic phantom were performed in 4 centers where new systems were installed. A total of 14 tests for 2 photon energies and multigrid superposition algorithms were conducted using the CMS XiO TPS. Evaluation criteria as specified in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Reports Series (IAEA TRS) 430 were employed. Results of measurements are grouped according to the placement of the measuring point and the beam energy. The majority of differences between calculated and measured doses in the water-equivalent part of the phantom were in tolerance. Significantly more out-of-tolerance values were observed in “nonwater-equivalent” parts of the phantom, especially for higher-energy photon beams. This survey was done as a part of continuous effort to build up awareness of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) importance in the Croatian radiotherapy community. Understanding the limitations of different parts of the various systems used in radiation therapy can systematically improve quality as well.

  10. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Plus Hypnosis for Distress During Breast Radiotherapy: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Guy H; Sucala, Madalina; Dillon, Matthew J; Schnur, Julie B

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a common and effective treatment for women with breast cancer. However, radiotherapy has also bee