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Sample records for improve glycemic control

  1. Pharmacist Glycemic Control Team Improves Quality of Glycemic Control in Surgical Patients with Perioperative Dysglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mularski, Karen SP; Yeh, Cynthia P; Bains, Jaspreet K; Mosen, David M.; Hill, Ariel K; Mularski, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Perioperative hyperglycemia is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. Improved glycemic control has been demonstrated to reduce surgical site infections, reduce perioperative morbidity, and reduce length of stay. However, safe and effective perioperative glycemic control can be limited by expert clinician availability.

  2. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanowski, John F; Varady, Krista A

    2015-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals.

  3. Almond consumption improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-wk randomized crossover clinical trial was that almond consumption would improve glycemic control and decrease risk to cardiovascular disease in 20 Chinese type ...

  4. Improved Glycemic Control With Intraperitoneal Versus Subcutaneous Insulin in Type 1 Diabetes A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Susan J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Gans, Reinold O.; van Ballegooie, Evert; Bilo, Henk J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) with an implantable pump has been available for the past 25 years. CIPII, with its specific pharmacodynamic properties, may be a viable treatment alternative to improve glycemic control in patients with type I diabetes for whom other th

  5. Improved Glycemic Control With Intraperitoneal Versus Subcutaneous Insulin in Type 1 Diabetes A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Susan J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Gans, Reinold O.; van Ballegooie, Evert; Bilo, Henk J.

    OBJECTIVE - Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) with an implantable pump has been available for the past 25 years. CIPII, with its specific pharmacodynamic properties, may be a viable treatment alternative to improve glycemic control in patients with type I diabetes for whom other

  6. Understanding basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load for improved glycemic control in Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Lidia Guadalupe Compeán; Berry, Diane C; Ruiz, Octelina Castillo; González, Eunice Reséndiz; Pérez, Paulina Aguilera; Rivas, Elva Del Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus generally have poor glycemic control. Constant hyperglycemia in individuals with type 2 diabetes can cause microvascular and macrovascular complications that lead to early morbidity and mortality. Good glycemic control requires a balance between diet, exercise, and medication, but dietary balance is difficult to achieve for many patients. Of the macronutrients, carbohydrates mostly affect blood glucose levels. Basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load are important tools for patients to master to control their blood glucose levels.

  7. A low-glycemic-load diet improves symptoms in acne vulgaris patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robyn N; Mann, Neil J; Braue, Anna; Mäkeläinen, Henna; Varigos, George A

    2007-07-01

    Although the pathogenesis of acne is currently unknown, recent epidemiologic studies of non-Westernized populations suggest that dietary factors, including the glycemic load, may be involved. The objective was to determine whether a low-glycemic-load diet improves acne lesion counts in young males. Forty-three male acne patients aged 15-25 y were recruited for a 12-wk, parallel design, dietary intervention incorporating investigator-blinded dermatology assessments. The experimental treatment was a low-glycemic-load diet composed of 25% energy from protein and 45% from low-glycemic-index carbohydrates. In contrast, the control situation emphasized carbohydrate-dense foods without reference to the glycemic index. Acne lesion counts and severity were assessed during monthly visits, and insulin sensitivity (using the homeostasis model assessment) was measured at baseline and 12 wk. At 12 wk, mean (+/-SEM) total lesion counts had decreased more (P=0.03) in the low-glycemic-load group (-23.5 +/- 3.9) than in the control group (-12.0 +/- 3.5). The experimental diet also resulted in a greater reduction in weight (-2.9 +/- 0.8 compared with 0.5 +/- 0.3 kg; Pdiet. The improvement in acne and insulin sensitivity after a low-glycemic-load diet suggests that nutrition-related lifestyle factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of acne. However, further studies are needed to isolate the independent effects of weight loss and dietary intervention and to further elucidate the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  8. Linagliptin increases incretin levels, lowers glucagon, and improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, Thomas; Graefe-Mody, Ulrike; Deacon, Carolyn F;

    2012-01-01

    Linagliptin is a xanthine-based dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor that is now available in numerous countries worldwide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to evaluate further the mechanisms underlying the improvements in glycemic control observed...

  9. Hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition improves glycemic control and promotes negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; McGrath, Lauren E; Koch-Laskowski, Kieran; Krawczyk, Joanna; Pham, Tram; Lhamo, Rinzin; Reiner, David J; Hayes, Matthew R

    2017-01-22

    The beneficial glycemic and food intake-suppressive effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) have made this neuroendocrine system a leading target for pharmacological approaches to the treatment of diabetes and obesity. One strategy to increase the activity of endogenous GLP-1 is to prevent the rapid degradation of the hormone by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). However, despite the expression of both DPP-IV and GLP-1 in the brain, and the clear importance of central GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling for glycemic and energy balance control, the metabolic effects of central inhibition of DPP-IV activity are unclear. To test whether hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition suppresses blood glucose, feeding, and body weight gain, the effects of 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of the FDA-approved DPP-IV inhibitor sitagliptin were evaluated. Results indicate that hindbrain delivery of sitagliptin improves glycemic control in a GLP-1R-dependent manner, suggesting that this effect is due at least in part to increased endogenous brainstem GLP-1 activity after sitagliptin administration. Furthermore, 4th ICV injection of sitagliptin reduced 24h body weight gain and energy intake, with a selective suppression of high-fat diet, but not chow, intake. These data reveal a novel role for hindbrain GLP-1R activation in glycemic control and also demonstrate that DPP-IV inhibition in the caudal brainstem promotes negative energy balance.

  10. Improving Glycemic Control and Insulin Ordering Efficiency for Hospitalized Patients With Diabetes Through Carbohydrate Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Kristina K; Reiland, Sarah A; Meara, John G O; Brown, Julie K; Fedraw, Leslie A; Mapes, David L

    2016-01-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients is challenging but important for optimal outcomes. Insulin dosing through carbohydrate counting may address patient, provider, and institutional factors that complicate hospital glycemic management. On two surgical units at a tertiary care teaching hospital, we pilot tested postmeal insulin dosing based on carbohydrate counting (plus basal insulin) rather than the current process of ordering scheduled premeal insulin without knowledge of the patient's consumption. Analysis assessed hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, insulin orders, and nurse and provider satisfaction and confidence. On general surgery, mean glucose level improved from 188 to 137 mg/dl (p satisfaction improved for providers (preintervention, 60%; postintervention, 100%), general surgery nurses (preintervention, 72%; postintervention, 100%), and cardiovascular surgery nurses (preintervention, 69%; postintervention, 84%). Confidence in insulin dose accuracy improved for providers (preintervention, 50%; postintervention, 100%), general surgery nurses (preintervention, 59%; postintervention, 100%), and cardiovascular surgery nurses (preintervention, 48%; postintervention, 84%). Carbohydrate counting is effective and efficient and improved staff satisfaction and confidence in hospital mealtime insulin dosing.

  11. Sotagliflozin improves glycemic control in nonobese diabetes-prone mice with type 1 diabetes

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    Powell DR

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available David R Powell, Deon Doree, Sabrina Jeter-Jones, Zhi-Ming Ding, Brian Zambrowicz, Arthur Sands Lexicon Pharmaceuticals, The Woodlands, TX, USA Purpose: Oral agents are needed that improve glycemic control without increasing hypoglycemic events in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D. Sotagliflozin may meet this need, because this compound lowers blood glucose through the insulin-independent mechanisms of inhibiting kidney SGLT2 and intestinal SGLT1. We examined the effect of sotagliflozin on glycemic control and rate of hypoglycemia measurements in T1D mice maintained on a low daily insulin dose, and compared these results to those from mice maintained in better glycemic control with a higher daily insulin dose alone. Materials and methods: Nonobese diabetes-prone mice with cyclophosphamide-induced T1D were randomized to receive one of four daily treatments: 0.2 U insulin/vehicle, 0.05 U insulin/vehicle, 0.05 U insulin/2 mg/kg sotagliflozin or 0.05 U insulin/30 mg/kg sotagliflozin. Insulin was delivered subcutaneously by micro-osmotic pump; the day after pump implantation, mice received their first of 22 once-daily oral doses of sotagliflozin or vehicle. Glycemic control was monitored by measuring fed blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels. Results: Blood glucose levels decreased rapidly and comparably in the 0.05 U insulin/sotagliflozin-treated groups and the 0.2 U insulin/vehicle group compared to the 0.05 U insulin/vehicle group, which had significantly higher levels than the other three groups from day 2 through day 23. A1c levels were also significantly higher in the 0.05 U insulin/vehicle group compared to the other three groups on day 23. Importantly, the 0.2 U insulin/vehicle group had, out of 100 blood glucose measurements, 13 that were <70 mg/dL compared to one of 290 for the other three groups combined. Conclusion: Sotagliflozin significantly improved glycemic control, without increasing the rate of hypoglycemia measurements, in

  12. Taking a Low Glycemic Index Multi-Nutrient Supplement as Breakfast Improves Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Di Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c. Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a −0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval, −0.38% to −0.07%, p = 0.004, while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005. The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032 due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007. These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM.

  13. Taking a low glycemic index multi-nutrient supplement as breakfast improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-12-10

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a -0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), -0.38% to -0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM.

  14. Oral salmon calcitonin improves fasting and postprandial glycemic control in lean healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigh, M; Nielsen, R H; Hansen, C; Henriksen, K; Christiansen, C; Karsdal, M A

    2012-02-01

    A novel oral form of salmon calcitonin (sCT) was recently demonstrated to improve both fasting and postprandial glycemic control and induce weight loss in diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant rats. To further explore the glucoregulatory efficacy of oral sCT, irrespective of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, the present study investigated the effect of chronic oral sCT treatment on fasting and postprandial glycemic control in male lean healthy rats. 20 male rats were divided equally into a control group receiving oral vehicle or an oral sCT (2 mg/kg) group. All rats were treated twice daily for 5 weeks. Body weight and food intake were monitored during the study period and fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and insulin sensitivity were determined and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed at study end. Compared with the vehicle group, rats receiving oral sCT had improved fasting glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance, as measured by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), with no change in body weight or fasting plasma insulin. In addition, the rats receiving oral sCT had markedly reduced glycemia and insulinemia during OGTT. This is the first report showing that chronic oral sCT treatment exerts a glucoregulatory action in lean healthy rats, irrespective of influencing body weight. Importantly, oral sCT seems to exert a dual treatment effect by improving fasting and postprandial glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. This and previous studies suggest oral sCT is a promising agent for the treatment of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Glycemic index, glycemic control and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derdemezis, Christos S; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    It is currently estimated that over 370 million individuals have diabetes, making diabetes a major public health issue contributing significantly to global morbidity and mortality. The steep rise in diabetes prevalence over the past decades is attributable, in a large part, to lifestyle changes, with dietary habits and behaviour as significant contributors. Despite the relatively wide availability of antidiabetic medicine, it is lifestyle approaches that still remain the cornerstone of diabetes prevention and treatment. Glycemic index (GI) is a nutritional tool which represents the glycemic response to carbohydrate ingestion. In light of the major impact of nutrition on diabetes pathophysiology, with the rising need to combat the escalating diabetes epidemic, this review will focus on the role of GI in glycemic control, the primary target of diabetic treatment and beyond. The review will present the evidence relating GI and diabetes treatment and prevention, as well as weight loss, weight maintenance and cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  16. Distinct lipid profiles predict improved glycemic control in obese, nondiabetic patients after a low-caloric diet intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsesia, Armand; Saris, Wim Hm; Astrup, Arne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An aim of weight loss is to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in obese subjects. However, the relation with long-term glycemic improvement remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the changes in lipid composition during weight loss and their association with long-term glycemic......, a lipid signature identified 2 groups of patients who were comparable at baseline but who differed in their capacities to lose weight and improve glycemic control. Six months after the LCD, one group had significant glycemic improvement [homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) mean...... and glucose concentrations). Significant differences between the 2 groups were shown in leptin gene expression in adipose tissue biopsies. Significant differences were also observed in weight-related endpoints (body mass index, weight, and fat mass). The lipid signature allowed prediction of which subjects...

  17. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinnosuke Murakami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition.

  18. Markedly Improved Glycemic Control in Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes following Direct Acting Antiviral Treatment of Genotype 1 Hepatitis C

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    Raymond Anthony Pashun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is often associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Successful HCV treatment may improve glycemic control and potentially induce remission of T2DM. We report a case of an obese 52-year-old woman with mixed genotype 1a/1b HCV infection with compensated cirrhosis and a 10-year history of poorly controlled T2DM on insulin therapy. Following successful therapy with sofosbuvir, simeprevir, and ribavirin, her insulin requirements decreased and her glycosylated hemoglobin (HgA1c normalized despite weight gain. This case suggests an association between HCV and T2DM and the potential for significant improvement in glycemic control with eradication of HCV.

  19. Exenatide once weekly: sustained improvement in glycemic control and cardiometabolic measures through 3 years

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    MacConell L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh MacConell, Richard Pencek, Yan Li, David Maggs, Lisa PorterAmylin Pharmaceuticals, LLC, San Diego, CA, USABackground: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a progressive metabolic disease necessitating therapies with sustained efficacy and safety over time. Exenatide once weekly (ExQW, an extended-release formulation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exenatide, has demonstrated improvements in glycemic and cardiometabolic measures from 30 weeks to 2 years of treatment. Here, the efficacy and safety of treatment with ExQW for 3 years are described.Methods: Patients were initially randomized to receive either ExQW (2 mg or exenatide twice daily for 30 weeks. Following the initial 30 weeks, all patients were treated with ExQW in an open-label extension. Analyses of primary glycemic endpoints, beta-cell function, and cardiometabolic measures were assessed for patients who completed 3 years of ExQW treatment and for the intention-to-treat population. Safety and tolerability analyses were provided for the intention-to-treat population.Results: Sixty-six percent of the intention-to-treat population (n = 295 completed 3 years of treatment (n = 194. At 3 years, a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (least squares mean ± standard error of -1.6% ± 0.08% was observed, with 55% and 33% of patients achieving hemoglobin A1c targets of <7% and ≤6.5%, respectively. Consistent with a sustained reduction in hemoglobin A1c, improvements in beta-cell function were also observed. Body weight was significantly reduced by -2.3 ± 0.6 kg. Reductions in blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were also observed. Adverse events reported most frequently during both controlled and uncontrolled periods included diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting of mostly mild intensity. The incidence of these adverse events decreased over time. Incidence of minor hypoglycemia was low and no major hypoglycemia was observed

  20. Chronic leucine supplementation improves glycemic control in etiologically distinct mouse models of obesity and diabetes mellitus

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    Hou Jue

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leucine may function as a signaling molecule to regulate metabolism. We have previously shown that dietary leucine supplementation significantly improves glucose and energy metabolism in diet-induced obese mice, suggesting that leucine supplementation could potentially be a useful adjuvant therapy for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Since the underlying cause for obesity and type 2 diabetes is multifold, we further investigated metabolic effects of leucine supplementation in obese/diabetes mouse models with different etiologies, and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Leucine supplementation was carried out in NONcNZO10/LtJ (RCS10 - a polygenic model predisposed to beta cell failure and type 2 diabetes, and in B6.Cg-Ay/J (Ay - a monogenic model for impaired central melanocortin receptor signaling, obesity, and severe insulin resistance. Mice in the treatment group received the drinking water containing 1.5% leucine for up to 8 months; control mice received the tap water. Body weight, body composition, blood HbA1c levels, and plasma glucose and insulin levels were monitored throughout and/or at the end of the study period. Indirect calorimetry, skeletal muscle gene expression, and adipose tissue inflammation were also assessed in Ay mice. Results Leucine supplementation significantly reduced HbA1c levels throughout the study period in both RCS10 and Ay mice. However, the treatment had no long term effect on body weight or adiposity. The improvement in glycemic control was associated with an increased insulin response to food challenge in RCS10 mice and decreased plasma insulin levels in Ay mice. In leucine-treated Ay mice, energy expenditure was increased by ~10% (p y mice whereas the expression levels of MCP-1 and TNF-alpha and macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue were significantly reduced. Conclusions Chronic leucine supplementation significantly improves glycemic control in multiple mouse models of

  1. Role of community pharmacists in improving knowledge and glycemic control of type 2 diabetes

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    R Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the role of the community pharmacists in improving knowledge and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes residing in villages of Coimbatore district, Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients were interviewed, of whom 39 subjects were included in the study. The literate and chronic diabetic patients were included in the study and illiterate, children below 12 years of age, pregnant women, nursing mothers and subjects with any other chronic disorders were excluded from the study. The subjects were interviewed and divided randomly into two groups. There were 20 subjects in the control group and 19 in the intervention group. The study protocol was explained to all the participants, and written informed consent was obtained from them. Before the initiation of the study, the subjects were interviewedfor 20-40 min to educate them about diabetes. Subjects in the intervention group received continuous counselling and medical advice to improve their awareness about the disease and drugs. During the study period, the Diabetes Care Profile (a questionnaire developed by J.J. Fitzgerald of the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Michigan was performed to each subject. The interval between visits was 2 months. All the values are expressed in mean ± standard deviation. Results: The intervention group showed better progress in the recovery of diabetics because of the continuous counselling and monitoring. There were significant changes in Diabetes Care Profile subscale scores in both the control and the intervention groups at the end of the study, viz. 1.8 ± 4.52 to 2.75 ± 6.62 and 3.10 ± 3.23 to 1.53 ± 2.66. Similarly, the knowledge test score was found to be increased in the intervention group compared with the baseline values (8.53 ± 1.81 to 12.16 ± 1.34. Conclusions: At the end of the study period, the patients of the intervention group had very good glycemic

  2. Alternative Assessment of Glycemic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease associated with development of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Optimal glycemic control, usually measured by HbA1c is the cornerstone for prevention of complications. In this thesis glycemic variability (which resembles actual glucose levels, gl

  3. Extended-release niacin/laropiprant significantly improves lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus irrespective of baseline glycemic control

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    Bays HE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Harold E Bays,1 Eliot A Brinton,2 Joseph Triscari,3 Erluo Chen,3 Darbie Maccubbin,3 Alexandra A MacLean,3 Kendra L Gibson,3 Rae Ann Ruck,3 Amy O Johnson-Levonas,3 Edward A O’Neill,3 Yale B Mitchel3 1Louisville Metabolic & Atherosclerosis Research Center (L-MARC, Louisville, KY, USA; 2Utah Foundation for Biomedical Research, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Merck & Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA Background: The degree of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM may alter lipid levels and may alter the efficacy of lipid-modifying agents. Objective: Evaluate the lipid-modifying efficacy of extended-release niacin/laropiprant (ERN/LRPT in subgroups of patients with T2DM with better or poorer glycemic control. Methods: Post hoc analysis of clinical trial data from patients with T2DM who were randomized 4:3 to double-blind ERN/LRPT or placebo (n=796, examining the lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT in patients with glycosylated hemoglobin or fasting plasma glucose levels above and below median baseline levels. Results: At Week 12 of treatment, ERN/LRPT significantly improved low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein (a, compared with placebo, with equal efficacy in patients above or below median baseline glycemic control. Compared with placebo, over 36 weeks of treatment more patients treated with ERN/LRPT had worsening of their diabetes and required intensification of antihyperglycemic medication, irrespective of baseline glycemic control. Incidences of other adverse experiences were generally low in all treatment groups. Conclusion: The lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT are independent of the degree of baseline glycemic control in patients with T2DM (NCT00485758. Keywords: lipid-modifying agents, hyperglycemia, LDL, HDL, triglycerides

  4. Efficacy of insulin lispro in improving glycemic control in gestational diabetes

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    M C Deepaklal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the safety and efficacy of insulin lispro in improving glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted at a single center on 201 gestational women with diabetes. Subjects who received insulin lispro performed blood glucose self-monitoring and recorded the readings in the fasting state and 1 h after each meal. At each contact (in person or telephonic contact, the insulin dose was adjusted based on the readings measured. A total of 53 subjects also recorded glucose levels post-partum. Pregnancy and post-delivery glucose level and insulin requirements of these 53 patients were compared. Results: Analysis of glucose levels both fasting and post-prandial glucose levels revealed that after using insulin lispro, the number of episodes of post-prandial hyperglycemia (1 h plasma glucose >120 mg/dL was minimal and so was the incidence of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia was defined as a blood sugar value of. There was neither any congenital abnormality except for a poorly formed pinna in the right ear of one baby nor any post-partum complications of note. Conclusion: Insulin lispro is an effective and safe treatment option in gestational diabetes.

  5. Eicosapentaenoic acid improves glycemic control in elderly bedridden patients with type 2 diabetes.

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    Ogawa, Susumu; Abe, Takaaki; Nako, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Masashi; Senda, Miho; Sakamoto, Takuya; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids mainly contained in the blue-backed fish oil, and are effective in decreasing the lipids disorder and the cardiovascular incidence among diabetic patients. Moreover, it has been suggested that EPA and DHA may improve the insulin resistance and glucose metabolism. However, the clinical effects of EPA and DHA on glucose metabolism remain unclear. We aimed to clarify the effects of EPA/DHA treatment on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study was a multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial involving 30 elderly type 2 diabetic patients on a liquid diet. Their exercises were almost zero and the content of their meals was strictly managed and understood well. Therefore, the difference by the individual's life was a minimum. The subjects were divided into two groups: those receiving EPA/DHA-rich liquid diet [EPA/DHA (+)] or liquid diet lacking EPA/DHA [EPA/DHA (-)]. Changes in factors related to glucose and lipid metabolism were assessed after the three-month study. Serum concentrations of EPA rose in EPA/DHA (+), although the levels of DHA and fasting C-peptide remained unchanged in EPA/DHA (+). In addition, there was a significant decline in the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting remnant-like particles and apolipoprotein (apo) B in EPA/DHA (+), compared with the values in EPA/DHA (-). EPA/DHA-rich diet might improve glucose metabolism in elderly type 2 diabetic patients on a liquid diet. This phenomenon may be due to the improved insulin resistance mediated by the rise in serum EPA concentrations.

  6. Acarbose improves glycemic control and reduces body weight: Subanalysis data of South Asia region

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    S Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs are widely used especially in Asian countries as a treatment option for type 2 diabetes patients with high postprandial glycaemia. However, data from South Asia region is very limited. In order to examine the effect of AGI in real-life setting, 10 PMS/NIS from all over the world from the launch of acarbose to date were pooled in one database and exploratory analysis was performed for glycemic parameters and weight. In total 62,905 patients were pooled from 21 countries and regions. Mean follow up (± SD was 12.2 ± 4.8 weeks (range 0.1-108.9. From South Asia region (India and Pakistan, 8,738 Asian patients were enrolled. Mean PPG decreased from 240.0 and 261.1 mg/dl at baseline by 70.26 ± 65.10 and 82.96 ± 56.59 mg/dl at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 53,883; n = 7,991, P < 0.0001 for both. Mean FPG decreased from 171.6 and 176.5 mg/dl at baseline by 38.48 ± 47.83 and 49.59 ± 41.41 mg/dl at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 56,672; n = 7,837, P < 0.0001 for both. Mean HbA1c decreased from 8.4 and 8.4% at baseline by 1.11 ± 1.31% and 0.91 ± 0.93% at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 38,843; n = 2,343, P < 0.0001 for both. Mean relative reduction of body weight (BW was 1.40 ± 3.28% and 1.10 ± 3.39% at the last visit for mean baseline BW 73.6 and 74.2 kg in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 54,760; n = 7,718, P < 0.0001 for both. Consistent with RCT meta-analyses, post-hoc analysis of real-life data showed acarbose treatment improved glycaemic control and reduced the BW. Acarbose treatment in real life setting showed significant reductions in all glycemic parameters and BW in Asian patients from South Asia region.

  7. Comparative effects of energy restriction and resveratrol intake on glycemic control improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton-Laskibar, I; Aguirre, L; Macarulla, M T; Etxeberria, U; Milagro, F I; Martínez, J A; Contreras, J; Portillo, M P

    2017-02-20

    Resveratrol (RSV) has been proposed as an energy restriction mimetic. This study aimed to compare the effects of RSV and energy restriction on insulin resistance induced by an obesogenic diet. Any additive effect of both treatments was also analyzed. Rats were fed a high-fat high-sucrose diet for 6 weeks. They were then distributed in four experimental groups which were either fed a standard control diet (C), or treated with RSV (30 mg/kg/d), or submitted to energy restriction (R, 15%), or treated with RSV and submitted to energy restriction (RR). A glucose tolerance test was performed, and serum glucose, insulin, fructosamine, adiponectin, and leptin concentrations determined. Muscle triacylglycerol content and protein expression of insulin receptor (IRβ), protein kinase B (Akt), Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4) were measured. In RSV rats, fructosamine concentrations were reduced, HOMA-IR remained unchanged, but glucose tolerance was improved, without changes in phosphorylation of IRβ, Akt, and AS160 or in GLUT-4 protein expression. Rats under energy restriction showed an improvement in all the markers related to glycemic control, as well as increased phosphorylation of AS160 and protein expression of GLUT-4. In rats from RR group the results were similar to R group, with the exception of IRβ and Akt phosphorylation, which were increased. In conclusion, mild energy restriction is more efficient than intake of RSV within a standard balanced diet, and acts by means of a different mechanism from that of RSV. No additive effects between RSV and energy restriction were observed. © 2016 BioFactors, 2016.

  8. Improved glycemic control by acarbose therapy in hypertensive diabetic patients: effects on blood pressure and hormonal parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was carried out on 44 hypertensive type 2 diabetic subjects previously treated by diet associated or not with sulfonylurea to assess the effects of acarbose-induced glycemic control on blood pressure (BP and hormonal parameters. Before randomization and after a 22-week treatment period (100 to 300 mg/day, the subjects were submitted to a standard meal test and to 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM and had plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, lipid profile, insulin, proinsulin and leptin levels determined. Weight loss was found only in the acarbose-treated group (75.1 ± 11.6 to 73.1 ± 11.6 kg, P<0.01. Glycosylated hemoglobin decreased only in the acarbose group (6.4 ± 1.7 to 5.6 ± 1.9%, P<0.05. Fasting proinsulin decreased only in the acarbose group (23.4 ± 19.3 to 14.3 ± 13.6 pmol/l, P<0.05, while leptin decreased in both (placebo group: 26.3 ± 6.1 to 23.3 ± 9.4 and acarbose group: 25.0 ± 5.5 to 22.7 ± 7.9 ng/ml, P<0.05. When the subset of acarbose-treated patients who improved glycemic control was considered, significant reductions in diurnal systolic, diastolic and mean BP (102.3 ± 6.0 to 99.0 ± 6.6 mmHg, P<0.05 were found. Acarbose monotherapy or combined with sulfonylurea was effective in improving glycemic control in hypertensive diabetic patients. Acarbose-induced improvement in metabolic control may reduce BP in these patients. Our data did not suggest a direct action of acarbose on insulin resistance or leptin levels.

  9. Color record in self-monitoring of blood glucose improves glycemic control by better self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Akiko; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Honda, Ikumi; Shimizu, Yoshiyuki; Harada, Norio; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Hosoda, Kiminori; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2014-07-01

    Color affects emotions, feelings, and behaviors. We hypothesized that color used in self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is helpful for patients to recognize and act on their glucose levels to improve glycemic control. Here, two color-indication methods, color record (CR) and color display (CD), were independently compared for their effects on glycemic control in less frequently insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. One hundred twenty outpatients were randomly allocated to four groups with 2×2 factorial design: CR or non-CR and CD or non-CD. Blood glucose levels were recorded in red or blue pencil in the CR arm, and a red or blue indicator light on the SMBG meter was lit in the CD arm, under hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, respectively. The primary end point was difference in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction in 24 weeks. Secondary end points were self-management performance change and psychological state change. HbA1c levels at 24 weeks were significantly decreased in the CR arm by -0.28% but were increased by 0.03% in the non-CR arm (P=0.044). In addition, diet and exercise scores were significantly improved in the CR arm compared with the non-CR arm. The exercise score showed significant improvement in the CD arm compared with the non-CD arm but without a significant difference in HbA1c reduction. Changes in psychological states were not altered between the arms. CR has a favorable effect on self-management performance without any influence on psychological stress, resulting in improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients using less frequent insulin injection. Thus, active but not passive usage of color-indication methods by patients is important in successful SMBG.

  10. Brief intervention to promote smoking cessation and improve glycemic control in smokers with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, William H. C.; Wang, M. P.; LAM, T. H.; Cheung, Yannes T. Y.; Cheung, Derek Y. T.; Suen, Y. N.; Ho, K. Y.; Tan, Kathryn C. B.; CHAN, Sophia S. C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a brief stage-matched smoking cessation intervention group compared with a control group (with usual care) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who smoked by randomized controlled trial. There were 557 patients, randomized either into the intervention group (n = 283) who received brief (20- minute) individualized face-to-face counseling by trained nurses and a diabetes mellitus-specific leaflet, or a control group (n = 274) who received standard care. Patient follow-ups were at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months via telephone, and assessment of smoking status from 2012 to 2014. Patients smoked an average of 14 cigarettes per day for more than 37 years, and more than 70% were in the precontemplation stage of quitting. The primary outcome showed that both the intervention and control groups had similar 7-day point-prevalence smoking abstinence (9.2% vs. 13.9%; p = 0.08). The secondary outcome showed that HbA1c levels with 7.95% [63 mmol/mol] vs. 8.05% [64 mmol/mol], p = 0.49 at 12 months, respectively. There was no evidence for effectiveness in promoting the brief stage-matched smoking cessation or improving glycemic control in smokers with type 2 diabetes mellitus, particularly those in the pre-contemplation stage. PMID:28378764

  11. Repaglinide/metformin fixed-dose combination to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Moses

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Robert G MosesClinical Trials and Research Unit, South East Sydney and Illawarra Area Health Service, New South Wales, AustraliaAbstract: Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality and for which there is both a large and growing prevalence worldwide. Lifestyle advice plus metformin is commonly recommended initially to manage hyperglycemia and to minimize the risk of vascular complications. However, additional agents are required when glycemic targets cannot be achieved or maintained due to the progressive nature of the disease. Repaglinide/metformin fixed-dose combination (FDC therapy (PrandiMet®; Novo Nordisk, Bagsværd, Denmark has been approved for use in the USA. This FDC is a rational second-line therapy given the complementary mechanisms of action of the components. Repaglinide is a rapidly absorbed, short-acting insulin secretagogue targeting postprandial glucose excursions; metformin is an insulin sensitizer with a longer duration of action that principally regulates basal glucose levels. A pivotal, 26-week, randomized study with repaglinide/metformin FDC therapy has been conducted in patients experiencing suboptimal control with previous oral antidiabetes therapy. Repaglinide/metformin FDC improved glycemic control and weight neutrality without adverse effects on lipid profiles. There were no major hypoglycemic episodes and patients expressed greater satisfaction with repaglinide/metformin FDC than previous treatments. Repaglinide/metformin FDC is expected to be more convenient than individual tablets for patients taking repaglinide and metformin in loose combination, and it is expected to improve glycemic control in patients for whom meglitinide or metformin monotherapies provide inadequate control.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, metformin, repaglinide, PrandiMet®, fixed-dose combination

  12. Diabetic nephropathy: new approaches for improving glycemic control and reducing risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Schernthaner, Gerit Holger

    2013-01-01

    Nephropathy is a common consequence of diabetes, with a high prevalence in patients with type 1 (15%-25%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; 30%-40%). Nephropathy is associated with a poor prognosis and high economic burden. The risk of developing nephropathy increases with the duration of diabetes, and early diagnosis and treatment of risk factors for nephropathy (e.g., tight control of glycemia and hypertension) can reduce the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal complications associated with diabetes and the etiology of nephropathy have identified additional risk factors for nephropathy, and novel therapeutic options are being explored. This review discusses the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and common risk factors. Furthermore, we discuss emerging treatments for T2DM that could potentially slow or prevent the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The use of incretin-based therapies, such as the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, is growing in patients with T2DM, due to their efficacy and tolerability profiles. As renal safety is a key factor when choosing treatment options to manage patients with T2DM, drugs that are suitable for use in patients with varying degrees of renal impairment without a requirement for dose adjustment, such as the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin, are of particular use. The ongoing advances in T2DM therapy may allow optimization of glycemic control in a wide range of patients, thereby helping to reduce the increasing morbidity and mortality associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Improving glycemic and cholesterol control through an integrated approach incorporating colesevelam – a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B Goldberg

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Ronald B GoldbergDivision of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Bile sequestrants have been used for almost 50 years to lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C. The advent of colesevelam in 2000 provided a more tolerable add-on LDL-C-lowering agent with an excellent safety record and with likely benefit for coronary heart disease events. Colesevelam lowers LDL-C approximately 15%, and has an additive effect when combined with statin or non-statin lipid-modifying agents. It also tends to increase triglyceride levels. The discovery that bile sequestrants also lower glucose levels led to definitive large-scale clinical trials testing the effect of colesevelam as a dual antihyperglycemic agent with LDL-C-lowering properties in type 2 diabetic subjects on metformin-, sulfonylurea- or insulin-based therapy with inadequate glycemic control. Colesevelam was found to lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c by approximately 0.5% compared to placebo over the 16- to 26-week period, and had similar effects on the lipid profile in these diabetic subjects, as had previously been demonstrated in non-diabetic individuals. Colesevelam was well tolerated, with constipation being the most common adverse effect, and did not cause weight gain or excessive hypoglycemia. Colesevelam thus combines antihyperglycemic action with LDL-C-lowering properties, and should be useful in the management of type 2 diabetes.Keywords: colesevelam, treatment, hyperglycemia, LDL-cholesterol

  14. Immunoneutralization of endogenous glucagon reduces hepatic glucose output and improves long-term glycemic control in diabetic ob/ob mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Heidi; Brand, Christian L; Neschen, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    synthesis. Glucagon mAb treatment for 5 days lowered plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, whereas 14 days of glucagon mAb treatment reduced A1C. In conclusion, acute and subchronic neutralization of endogenous glucagon improves glycemic control, thus supporting the contention that glucagon antagonism may...

  15. Improved Glycemic Control with Colesevelam Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Is Not Directly Associated with Changes in Bile Acid Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brufau Dones, Gemma; Stellaard, Frans; Prado, Kris; Bloks, Vincent W.; Jonkers, Elles; Boverhof, Renze; Kuipers, Folkert; Murphy, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for fat absorption and appear to modulate glucose and energy metabolism. Colesevelam, a BA sequestrant, improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We aimed to characterize the alterations in BA metabolism associated with T2DM and colesevelam treatmen

  16. Improved glycemic control induced by both metformin and repaglinide is associated with a reduction in blood levels of 3-deoxyglucosone in nonobese patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelen, Lian; Lund, Søren S; Ferreira, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Metformin has been reported to reduce a-dicarbonyls, which are known to contribute to diabetic complications. It is unclear whether this is due to direct quenching of a-dicarbonyls or to an improvement in glycemic control. We therefore compared the effects of metformin versus repaglinide, an anti...

  17. Frequent use of an automated bolus advisor improves glycemic control in pediatric patients treated with insulin pump therapy: results of the Bolus Advisor Benefit Evaluation (BABE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ralph; Rees, Christen; Jacobs, Nehle; Parkin, Christopher G; Lyden, Maureen R; Petersen, Bettina; Wagner, Robin S

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between frequency and sustained bolus advisor (BA) use and glycemic improvement has not been well characterized in pediatric populations. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of frequent and persistent BA use on glycemic control among pediatric type 1 diabetes patients. In this 6-month, single-center, retrospective cohort study, 104 children [61 girls, mean age: 12.7 yr, mean HbA1c 8.0 (1.6)% [64 (17.5) mmol/mol

  18. Ileal Interposition in Rats with Experimental Type 2 Like Diabetes Improves Glycemic Control Independently of Glucose Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ferdinand Jurowich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric operations in obese patients with type 2 diabetes often improve diabetes before weight loss is observed. In patients mainly Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass with partial stomach resection is performed. Duodenojejunal bypass (DJB and ileal interposition (IIP are employed in animal experiments. Due to increased glucose exposition of L-cells located in distal ileum, all bariatric surgery procedures lead to higher secretion of antidiabetic glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1 after glucose gavage. After DJB also downregulation of Na+-d-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 was observed. This suggested a direct contribution of decreased glucose absorption to the antidiabetic effect of bariatric surgery. To investigate whether glucose absorption is also decreased after IIP, we induced diabetes with decreased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in male rats and investigated effects of IIP on diabetes and SGLT1. After IIP, we observed weight-independent improvement of glucose tolerance, increased insulin sensitivity, and increased plasma GLP-1 after glucose gavage. The interposed ileum was increased in diameter and showed increased length of villi, hyperplasia of the epithelial layer, and increased number of L-cells. The amount of SGLT1-mediated glucose uptake in interposed ileum was increased 2-fold reaching the same level as in jejunum. Thus, improvement of glycemic control by bariatric surgery does not require decreased glucose absorption.

  19. Remote Health Consultations Supported by a Diabetes Management Web Application With a New Glucose Meter Demonstrates Improved Glycemic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Mike; Cameron, Hilary; Levy, Brian L; Katz, Laurence B

    2016-05-01

    Cloud-connected diabetes applications enable health care professionals (HCPs) to monitor patient progress and offer the potential for remote consultations. OneTouch Reveal (OTR) is a cloud-based web application that aggregates data from blood glucose (BG) meters or insulin pumps and provides analytics to help patients and HCPs make more informed treatment and lifestyle decisions. This study assessed the experience of patients using OTR and the OneTouch Verio (OTV) BG meter and determined the extent of changes in glycemic control. Subjects with T1DM (23) or T2DM (17) uploaded BG meter results to OTR for 12 weeks. HCPs remotely reviewed progress using OTR and delivered telephone consultations at 4 and 8 weeks based on OTR insights. After 12 weeks, mean HbA1c decreased by 0.4% (P web application in combination with the OTV meter helped subjects with T1DM and T2DM effectively manage their diabetes and was associated with improved BG control over 12 weeks. Real-time visibility to subject data may help HCPs deliver focused and effective remote consultations. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  20. Sodium Glucose Co-transporter Type 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors: Targeting the Kidney to Improve Glycemic Control in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Bays, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Although hyperglycemia is a key therapeutic focus in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), many patients experience sub-optimal glycemic control. Current glucose-lowering agents involve the targeting of various body organs. Sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors target the kidney, reduce renal glucose reabsorption, and increase urinary glucose elimination, thus lowering glucose blood levels. This review examines some of the key efficacy and safety d...

  1. A Novel Behavioral Intervention in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improves Glycemic Control: Preliminary Results from a Pilot Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranda, Louise; Lau, May; Stewart, Sunita M; Gupta, Olga T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to develop and pilot an innovative behavioral intervention in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) incorporating structured care of a pet to improve glycemic control. Methods Twenty-eight adolescents with A1C > 8.5% (69 mmol/mol) were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (care of a Betta splendens pet fish) or the control group (usual care). Adolescents in the intervention group were given instructions to associate daily and weekly fish care duties with diabetes self-management tasks including blood glucose testing and parent-adolescent communication. Results After 3 months the participants in the intervention group exhibited a statistically significant decrease in A1C levels (−0.5%) compared to their peers in the control group who had an increase in A1C levels (0.8%)(p = 0.04). The younger adolescents (ages 10–13) demonstrated a greater response to the intervention which was statistically significant (−1.5% vs. 0.6%, p = 0.04) compared with the older adolescents (ages 14–17). Conclusions Structured care of a pet fish can improve glycemic control in adolescents with T1DM, likely by providing cues to perform diabetes self-management behaviors. PMID:25614529

  2. Distinct lipid profiles predict improved glycemic control in obese, nondiabetic patients after a low-caloric diet intervention: the Diet, Obesity and Genes randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsesia, Armand; Saris, Wim Hm; Astrup, Arne; Hager, Jörg; Masoodi, Mojgan

    2016-09-01

    An aim of weight loss is to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in obese subjects. However, the relation with long-term glycemic improvement remains unknown. We evaluated the changes in lipid composition during weight loss and their association with long-term glycemic improvement. We investigated the plasma lipidome of 383 obese, nondiabetic patients within a randomized, controlled dietary intervention in 8 European countries at baseline, after an 8-wk low-caloric diet (LCD) (800-1000 kcal/d), and after 6 mo of weight maintenance. After weight loss, a lipid signature identified 2 groups of patients who were comparable at baseline but who differed in their capacities to lose weight and improve glycemic control. Six months after the LCD, one group had significant glycemic improvement [homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) mean change: -0.92; 95% CI: -1.17, -0.67)]. The other group showed no improvement in glycemic control (HOMA-IR mean change: -0.26; 95% CI: -0.64, 0.13). These differences were sustained for ≥1 y after the LCD. The same conclusions were obtained with other endpoints (Matsuda index and fasting insulin and glucose concentrations). Significant differences between the 2 groups were shown in leptin gene expression in adipose tissue biopsies. Significant differences were also observed in weight-related endpoints (body mass index, weight, and fat mass). The lipid signature allowed prediction of which subjects would be considered to be insulin resistant after 6 mo of weight maintenance [validation's receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC): 71%; 95% CI: 62%, 81%]. This model outperformed a clinical data-only model (validation's ROC AUC: 61%; 95% CI: 50%, 71%; P = 0.01). In this study, we report a lipid signature of LCD success (for weight and glycemic outcome) in obese, nondiabetic patients. Lipid changes during an 8-wk LCD allowed us to predict insulin-resistant patients after 6 mo of weight

  3. Cholecalciferol improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients: a 6-month prospective interventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada AM

    2017-07-01

    insignificant (P=0.069, 0.376, 0.058, respectively. FI decreased by 22%, HOMA-IR by 27.6%, and c-peptide by 1.83%. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, parathyroid hormone, alkaline phosphatase, serum creatinine, and pulse rate significantly decreased (4.3±0.9 vs 4.0±0.9 mmol/L, P=0.036; 2.5±0.8 vs 2.2±0.8 mmol/L, P=0.018; 4.6±2.1 vs 3.5±1.8 pmol/L, P=0.001; 82.1±26.2 vs 66.2±19.5 U/L, P<0.001; 74.6±15.6 vs 70.7±14.7 µmol/L, P=0.047; and 81.6±11.9 vs 77.5±12.0 bpm, P=0.045, respectively. Triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, both systolic and diastolic BP, and BMI did not show significant change.Conclusion: Cholecalciferol helps improve blood glucose control and cholesterol profile in vitamin D3-deficient type 2 diabetic patients. Keywords: vitamin D, type 2 diabetes, HbA1c, cholesterol, creatinine, parathyroid hormone

  4. Cholecalciferol improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients: a 6-month prospective interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Aml Mohamed; Shaheen, Dalia A

    2017-01-01

    significantly decreased (4.3±0.9 vs 4.0±0.9 mmol/L, P=0.036; 2.5±0.8 vs 2.2±0.8 mmol/L, P=0.018; 4.6±2.1 vs 3.5±1.8 pmol/L, P=0.001; 82.1±26.2 vs 66.2±19.5 U/L, P<0.001; 74.6±15.6 vs 70.7±14.7 μmol/L, P=0.047; and 81.6±11.9 vs 77.5±12.0 bpm, P=0.045, respectively). Triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, both systolic and diastolic BP, and BMI did not show significant change. Cholecalciferol helps improve blood glucose control and cholesterol profile in vitamin D3-deficient type 2 diabetic patients.

  5. Effect of glycemic control on periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction Diabetes mellitus and periodontitis are closely related. A huge number of reports has addressed the effect of periodontal intervention therapy on glycemic control, but no reports have addressed the effect of glycemic intervention therapy on periodontal disease in type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of improved glycemic control by glycemic intervention therapy on periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods A ...

  6. Hydrogen improves glycemic control in type1 diabetic animal model by promoting glucose uptake into skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Amitani

    Full Text Available Hydrogen (H(2 acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. However, there are few reports on H(2 function in other capacities in diabetes mellitus (DM. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of H(2 in glucose transport by studying cultured mouse C2C12 cells and human hepatoma Hep-G2 cells in vitro, in addition to three types of diabetic mice [Streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice, high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic mice, and genetically diabetic db/db mice] in vivo. The results show that H(2 promoted 2-[(14C]-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG uptake into C2C12 cells via the translocation of glucose transporter Glut4 through activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K, protein kinase C (PKC, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, although it did not stimulate the translocation of Glut2 in Hep G2 cells. H(2 significantly increased skeletal muscle membrane Glut4 expression and markedly improved glycemic control in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice after chronic intraperitoneal (i.p. and oral (p.o. administration. However, long-term p.o. administration of H(2 had least effect on the obese and non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mouse models. Our study demonstrates that H(2 exerts metabolic effects similar to those of insulin and may be a novel therapeutic alternative to insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus that can be administered orally.

  7. Vagal Blocking Improves Glycemic Control and Elevated Blood Pressure in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shikora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. An active device that downregulates abdominal vagal signalling has resulted in significant weight loss in feasibility studies. Objective. To prospectively evaluate the effect of intermittent vagal blocking (VBLOC on weight loss, glycemic control, and blood pressure (BP in obese subjects with DM2. Methods. Twenty-eight subjects were implanted with a VBLOC device (Maestro Rechargeable System at 5 centers in an open-label study. Effects on weight loss, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and BP were evaluated at 1 week to 12 months. Results. 26 subjects (17 females/9 males, 51±2 years, BMI 37±1 kg/m2, mean ± SEM completed 12 months followup. One serious adverse event (pain at implant site was easily resolved. At 1 week and 12 months, mean excess weight loss percentages (% EWL were 9±1% and 25±4% (P<0.0001, and HbA1c declined by 0.3±0.1% and 1.0±0.2% (P=0.02, baseline 7.8±0.2%. In DM2 subjects with elevated BP (n=15, mean arterial pressure reduced by 7±3 mmHg and 8±3 mmHg (P=0.04, baseline 100 ± 2 mmHg at 1 week and 12 months. All subjects MAP decreased by 3 ± 2 mmHg (baseline 95 ± 2 mmHg at 12 months. Conclusions. VBLOC was safe in obese DM2 subjects and associated with meaningful weight loss, early and sustained improvements in HbA1c, and reductions in BP in hypertensive DM2 subjects. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00555958.

  8. Improved Glycemic Control Without Hypoglycemia in Elderly Diabetic Patients Using the Ubiquitous Healthcare Service, a New Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo; Kang, Seon Mee; Shin, Hayley; Lee, Hak Jong; Won Yoon, Ji; Yu, Sung Hoon; Kim, So-Youn; Yoo, Soo Young; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Ryu, Jun Oh; Jang, Hak C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To improve quality and efficiency of care for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, we introduced elderly-friendly strategies to the clinical decision support system (CDSS)-based ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) service, which is an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a 6-month randomized, controlled clinical trial involving 144 patients aged >60 years. Participants were randomly assigned to receive routine care (control, n = 48), to the self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG, n = 47) group, or to the u-healthcare group (n = 49). The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving A1C <7% without hypoglycemia at 6 months. U-healthcare system refers to an individualized medical service in which medical instructions are given through the patient’s mobile phone. Patients receive a glucometer with a public switched telephone network-connected cradle that automatically transfers test results to a hospital-based server. Once the data are transferred to the server, an automated system, the CDSS rule engine, generates and sends patient-specific messages by mobile phone. RESULTS After 6 months of follow-up, the mean A1C level was significantly decreased from 7.8 ± 1.3% to 7.4 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in the u-healthcare group and from 7.9 ± 1.0% to 7.7 ± 1.0% (P = 0.020) in the SMBG group, compared with 7.9 ± 0.8% to 7.8 ± 1.0% (P = 0.274) in the control group. The proportion of patients with A1C <7% without hypoglycemia was 30.6% in the u-healthcare group, 23.4% in the SMBG group (23.4%), and 14.0% in the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS The CDSS-based u-healthcare service achieved better glycemic control with less hypoglycemia than SMBG and routine care and may provide effective and safe diabetes management in the elderly diabetic patients. PMID:21270188

  9. Oral magnesium supplementation improves glycemic control and lipid profile in children with type 1 diabetes and hypomagnesaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbah, Doaaa; Hassan, Tamer; Morsy, Saeed; Saadany, Hosam El; Fathy, Manar; Al-Ghobashy, Ashgan; Elsamad, Nahla; Emam, Ahmed; Elhewala, Ahmed; Ibrahim, Boshra; Gebaly, Sherief El; Sayed, Hany El; Ahmed, Hanan

    2017-03-01

    Dietary supplementation with magnesium (Mg) in addition to classical therapies for diabetes may help in prevention or delaying of diabetic complications.We aimed to evaluate the status of serum Mg in children with type 1 diabetes and assessing its relationship to glycemic control and lipid profile. Then evaluating the effect of oral Mg supplementation on glycemic control and lipid parameters.We included 71 children at Pediatric Endocrinology Outpatient Clinic, Zagazig University, Egypt with type 1 diabetes and assessed HBA1c, lipid profile, and serum Mg at the start of study. Patients with serum Mg level lipid profile, and serum Mg in all patients.The study included 71 patients with type 1 diabetes (32 males and 39 females); their mean age was 9.68 ± 3.99 years. The mean serum Mg level was 1.83 ± .27 mg/dL. Hypomagnesemia was detected in 28.2% study patients. Serum Mg was found to be positively correlated with high density lipoprotein, mean corpuscular volume and platelet count (P lipid parameters in hypomagnesemic diabetic patients before and after Mg supplementation with significant reduction in serum triglycerides, LDL, and total cholesterol following Mg supplementation with P lipid fraction as well as increase in protective lipid fraction.

  10. Orange Pomace Improves Postprandial Glycemic Responses: An Acute, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial in Overweight Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Oliver Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Orange pomace (OP, a fiber-rich byproduct of juice production, has the potential for being formulated into a variety of food products. We hypothesized that OP would diminish postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and lunch. We conducted an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind, crossover trial with 34 overweight men who consumed either a 255 g placebo (PLA, a low (35% OP (LOP, or a high (77% (HOP dose OP beverage with breakfast. Blood was collected at 0, 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5.5, 6, 6.5, 7, and 8 h. Lunch was consumed after the 5.5-h blood draw. OP delayed the time (Tmax1 to the maximum concentration (Cmax1 of serum glucose during the 2-h period post breakfast by ≥36% from 33 (PLA to 45 (HOP and 47 (LOP min (p = 0.055 and 0.013, respectively. OP decreased post-breakfast insulin Cmax1 by ≥10% and LOP delayed the Tmax1 by 14 min, compared to PLA at 46 min (p ≤ 0.05. HOP reduced the first 2-h insulin area under concentration time curve (AUC by 23% compared to PLA. Thus, OP diminishes postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and the second meal in overweight men.

  11. Orange Pomace Improves Postprandial Glycemic Responses: An Acute, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial in Overweight Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-Y. Oliver; Rasmussen, Helen; Kamil, Alison; Du, Peng; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.

    2017-01-01

    Orange pomace (OP), a fiber-rich byproduct of juice production, has the potential for being formulated into a variety of food products. We hypothesized that OP would diminish postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and lunch. We conducted an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind, crossover trial with 34 overweight men who consumed either a 255 g placebo (PLA), a low (35% OP (LOP)), or a high (77% (HOP)) dose OP beverage with breakfast. Blood was collected at 0, 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5.5, 6, 6.5, 7, and 8 h. Lunch was consumed after the 5.5-h blood draw. OP delayed the time (Tmax1) to the maximum concentration (Cmax1) of serum glucose during the 2-h period post breakfast by ≥36% from 33 (PLA) to 45 (HOP) and 47 (LOP) min (p = 0.055 and 0.013, respectively). OP decreased post-breakfast insulin Cmax1 by ≥10% and LOP delayed the Tmax1 by 14 min, compared to PLA at 46 min (p ≤ 0.05). HOP reduced the first 2-h insulin area under concentration time curve (AUC) by 23% compared to PLA. Thus, OP diminishes postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and the second meal in overweight men. PMID:28208806

  12. RYGB Produces more Sustained Body Weight Loss and Improvement of Glycemic Control Compared with VSG in the Diet-Induced Obese Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zheng; Townsend, R Leigh; Mumphrey, Michael B; Morrison, Christopher D; Münzberg, Heike; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2017-04-06

    Weight regain and type-2 diabetes relapse has been reported in a significant proportion of vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) patients in some studies, but definitive conclusions regarding the long-term comparative effectiveness of VSG and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery are lacking both in humans and rodent models. This study's objective was to compare the effects of murine models of VSG and RYGB surgery on body weight, body composition, food intake, energy expenditure, and glycemic control. VSG, RYGB, and sham surgery was performed in high-fat diet-induced obese mice, and the effects on body weight and glycemic control were observed for a period of 12 weeks. After the initial weight loss, VSG mice regained significant amounts of body weight and fat mass that were only marginally lower than in sham-operated mice. In contrast, RYGB produced sustained loss of body weight and fat mass up to 12 weeks and drastically improved fasting insulin and HOMA-IR compared with sham-operated mice. Using weight-matched control groups, we also found that the adaptive hypometabolic response to weight loss was blunted by both VSG and RYGB, and that despite large weight/fat regain, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR were markedly improved, but not reversed, in VSG mice. VSG is less effective to lastingly suppress body weight and improve glycemic control compared with RYGB in mice. Given similar observations in many human studies, the run towards replacing RYGB with VSG is premature and should await carefully controlled randomized long-term trials with VSG and RYGB.

  13. Eight Weeks of Cosmos caudatus (Ulam Raja) Supplementation Improves Glycemic Status in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi-Hui; Ismail, Amin; Anthony, Joseph; Ng, Ooi Chuan; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd Yusof

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Optimizing glycemic control is crucial to prevent type 2 diabetes related complications. Cosmos caudatus is reported to have promising effect in improving plasma blood glucose in an animal model. However, its impact on human remains ambiguous. This study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of C. caudatus on glycemic status in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods. In this randomized controlled trial with two-arm parallel-group design, a total of 101 subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to diabetic-ulam or diabetic controls for eight weeks. Subjects in diabetic-ulam group consumed 15 g of C. caudatus daily for eight weeks while diabetic controls abstained from taking C. caudatus. Both groups received the standard lifestyle advice. Results. After 8 weeks of supplementation, C. caudatus significantly reduced serum insulin (-1.16 versus +3.91), reduced HOMA-IR (-1.09 versus +1.34), and increased QUICKI (+0.05 versus -0.03) in diabetic-ulam group compared with the diabetic controls. HbA1C level was improved although it is not statistically significant (-0.76% versus -0.37%). C. caudatus was safe to consume. Conclusions. C. caudatus supplementation significantly improves insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Relationship between perioperative glycemic control and postoperative infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiro Hanazaki; Hiromichi Maeda; Takehiro Okabayashi

    2009-01-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia in critically ill surgery patients increases the risk of postoperative infection (POI), which is a common, and often costly, surgical complication. Hyperglycemia is associated with abnormalities in leukocyte function, including granulocyte adherence, impaired phagocytosis, delayed chemotaxis,and depressed bactericidal capacity. These leukocyte deficiencies are the cause of infection and improve with tight glycemic control, which leads to fewer POIs in critically ill surgical patients. Tight glycemic control, such as intensive insulin therapy, has a risk of hypoglycemia.In addition, the optimal targeted blood glucose range to reduce POI remains unknown. Since 2006, we have investigated tight perioperative blood glucose control using a closed-loop artificial endocrine pancreas system,to reduce POI and to avoid hypoglycemia. In this Topic Highlight, we review the relationship between perioperative glycemic control and POI, including the use of the artificial pancreas.

  15. Glycemic Control for Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-peng XIAO; Juan CHEN

    2009-01-01

    @@ The risk of myocardial infarction increases in patients with diabetes mellitus. The incidence of myocardial in-farction is similar in patients with type 2 diabetes without history of myocardial infarction and in non-diabetic pa-tients with history of myocardial infarction. Diabetes mellitus was considered as a coronary disease equivalent by the National Cholesterol Education Program. Strict glycemic control can improve the long-term outcome of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Whatever with diabetic or non-diabetic, strict glycemic control with in-tensive insulin therapy can reduce the mortality of criti-cally ill patients in hospital. After myocardial infarction, there would be a worse outcome for patients with poor glycemic control, whatever in diabetic or non-diabetic patients with stress hyperglycemia.

  16. Effects of regular exercise on obesity and type 2 diabete mellitus in Korean children: improvements glycemic control and serum adipokines level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Soo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to clarify the effects of regular exercise on lipid profiles and serum adipokines in Korean children. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were divided into controls (n=10), children who were obese (n=10), and children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=10). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), body composition, lipid profiles, glucagon, insulin and adipokines (leptin, resistin, visfatin and retinol binding protein 4) were measured before to and after a 12-week exercise program. [Results] Body weight, body mass index, and percentage body fat were significantly higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycemic control levels were significantly decreased after the exercise program in the obese and diabetes groups, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly increased. Adipokines were higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group prior to the exercise program, and were significantly lower following completion. [Conclusion] These results suggest that regular exercise has positive effects on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korean children by improving glycemic control and reducing body weight, thereby lowering cardiovascular risk factors and adipokine levels. PMID:26180345

  17. Effects of regular exercise on obesity and type 2 diabete mellitus in Korean children: improvements glycemic control and serum adipokines level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Soo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to clarify the effects of regular exercise on lipid profiles and serum adipokines in Korean children. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were divided into controls (n=10), children who were obese (n=10), and children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=10). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), body composition, lipid profiles, glucagon, insulin and adipokines (leptin, resistin, visfatin and retinol binding protein 4) were measured before to and after a 12-week exercise program. [Results] Body weight, body mass index, and percentage body fat were significantly higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycemic control levels were significantly decreased after the exercise program in the obese and diabetes groups, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly increased. Adipokines were higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group prior to the exercise program, and were significantly lower following completion. [Conclusion] These results suggest that regular exercise has positive effects on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korean children by improving glycemic control and reducing body weight, thereby lowering cardiovascular risk factors and adipokine levels.

  18. Targeting blood glucose management in school improves glycemic control in children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh M; Mason, Kimberly J; Sanders, Cynthia G; Yazdani, Parvin; Heptulla, Rubina A

    2008-10-01

    We hypothesized that school nurse supervision of glucose and insulin-dose adjustment significantly improves the hemoglobinA(1c) (HbA(1c)) level in pediatric patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (HbA(1c) > or = 9%). A total of 36 subjects were enrolled and 18 subjects were randomized to receive the 3-month intervention. Their average HbA(1c) was lowered by 1.6%, suggesting that this intervention helps this difficult group of patients.

  19. Use of a Combined Blood-Glucose- and ß-Ketone-Measuring Device Improves Glycemic Control in Insulin-Treated Patients With Diabetes: The Gold Plus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ralph; Eichholz, Rudolf; Schulz, Birgit

    2015-05-18

    Using self-measurements of blood glucose (SMBG) is daily routine for patients with insulin-treated diabetes, however measuring ß-ketones in blood is not widespread. How the use of a combined device, which can measure both, is accepted in daily routine by patients and will lead to better glycemic control is not well studied. This multicenter, prospective, noninterventional study assessed the impact of routine use of the GlucoMen® LX Plus on patient acceptance, usage and glycemic control among insulin-treated patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. A1c and self-reported frequency of SMBG were evaluated at baseline and also postprandial SMBG, ß-ketone measurements, and use of reminders after 3 and 6 months of use. A total of 631 patients, 254 type 1/350 type 2 (27 no type specified), with mean (SD) baseline A1c 8.5% (1.5), age 54.6 (15.6) years, and 47.3% female were studied. Frequent use of SMBG at baseline led to a higher decrease in A1c at 6 month (V3): -0.3% if SMBG measured up to 1/day versus -0.9% in 4-6/day. Increase of SMBG frequency during the study showed also a negative correlation to A1c, 9.2% at V1 versus 7.6% at V3. Postprandial SMBG was done by 77.7% and ß-ketone measurements by 45.5% of all patients; the reminders were used by 33.4% and led to an increased frequency of SMBG at 6 months. A combined device for SMBG and ß-ketone measurements is well accepted by patients with insulin-treated diabetes and can lead through the avoidance or detection of ketoacidosis/increased frequency of SMBG and increased awareness of the patients to an improved glycemic outcome. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  20. Use of a Combined Blood-Glucose- and ß-Ketone-Measuring Device Improves Glycemic Control in Insulin-Treated Patients With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ralph; Eichholz, Rudolf; Schulz, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Using self-measurements of blood glucose (SMBG) is daily routine for patients with insulin-treated diabetes, however measuring ß-ketones in blood is not widespread. How the use of a combined device, which can measure both, is accepted in daily routine by patients and will lead to better glycemic control is not well studied. Methods: This multicenter, prospective, noninterventional study assessed the impact of routine use of the GlucoMen® LX Plus on patient acceptance, usage and glycemic control among insulin-treated patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. A1c and self-reported frequency of SMBG were evaluated at baseline and also postprandial SMBG, ß-ketone measurements, and use of reminders after 3 and 6 months of use. A total of 631 patients, 254 type 1/350 type 2 (27 no type specified), with mean (SD) baseline A1c 8.5% (1.5), age 54.6 (15.6) years, and 47.3% female were studied. Results: Frequent use of SMBG at baseline led to a higher decrease in A1c at 6 month (V3): –0.3% if SMBG measured up to 1/day versus −0.9% in 4-6/day. Increase of SMBG frequency during the study showed also a negative correlation to A1c, 9.2% at V1 versus 7.6% at V3. Postprandial SMBG was done by 77.7% and ß-ketone measurements by 45.5% of all patients; the reminders were used by 33.4% and led to an increased frequency of SMBG at 6 months. Conclusions: A combined device for SMBG and ß-ketone measurements is well accepted by patients with insulin-treated diabetes and can lead through the avoidance or detection of ketoacidosis/increased frequency of SMBG and increased awareness of the patients to an improved glycemic outcome. PMID:25986628

  1. Diabetes, Glycemic Control, and Risk of Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Leegaard, Anne; Riis, Anders; Kornum, Jette B; Prahl, Julie B.; Thomsen, Vibeke Ø; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Horsburgh, C. Robert; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between diabetes, glycemic control, and risk of tuberculosis (TB). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark. Cases of active TB were all individuals with a first-time principal hospital diagnosis of TB between 1980 and 2008. Each case subject was matched with up to five population control subjects with similar age, sex, place and length of residence in Denmark, and country of emigration. We computed...

  2. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  3. Orange pomace improves postprandial glycemic responses: an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial in overweight men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange pomace (OP), a fiber-rich byproduct of juice production, has the potential for being formulated into a variety of food products. We hypothesized that OP would diminish postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and lunch. We conducted an acute, randomized, placebo-co...

  4. Suboptimal glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, F; Denollet, J

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies examining the relationship between depression and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes have yielded mixed findings. One explanation may lie in the heterogeneity of depression. Therefore, we examined whether distinct features of depression...... were differentially associated with suboptimal glycemic control. Cross-sectional baseline data from a dynamic cohort study of primary care patients with type 2 diabetes from the Eindhoven region, The Netherlands, were analyzed. A total of 5772 individuals completed baseline measurements of demographic......, clinical, lifestyle and psychological factors between 2005 and 2009. The Edinburgh Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of depressed mood, anhedonia and anxiety. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as HbA(1c) values ≥7%, with 29.8% of the sample (n=1718) scoring above this cut...

  5. A low-fat vegan diet improves glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in a randomized clinical trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Neal D; Cohen, Joshua; Jenkins, David J A; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Gloede, Lise; Jaster, Brent; Seidl, Kim; Green, Amber A; Talpers, Stanley

    2006-08-01

    We sought to investigate whether a low-fat vegan diet improves glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Individuals with type 2 diabetes (n = 99) were randomly assigned to a low-fat vegan diet (n = 49) or a diet following the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines (n = 50). Participants were evaluated at baseline and 22 weeks. Forty-three percent (21 of 49) of the vegan group and 26% (13 of 50) of the ADA group participants reduced diabetes medications. Including all participants, HbA(1c) (A1C) decreased 0.96 percentage points in the vegan group and 0.56 points in the ADA group (P = 0.089). Excluding those who changed medications, A1C fell 1.23 points in the vegan group compared with 0.38 points in the ADA group (P = 0.01). Body weight decreased 6.5 kg in the vegan group and 3.1 kg in the ADA group (P vegan group and 10.7% in the ADA group (P = 0.02). After adjustment for baseline values, urinary albumin reductions were greater in the vegan group (15.9 mg/24 h) than in the ADA group (10.9 mg/24 h) (P = 0.013). Both a low-fat vegan diet and a diet based on ADA guidelines improved glycemic and lipid control in type 2 diabetic patients. These improvements were greater with a low-fat vegan diet.

  6. Structured self-monitoring of blood glucose regimens improve glycemic control in poorly controlled Chinese patients on insulin therapy: Results from COMPASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Linong; Su, Qing; Feng, Bo; Shan, Zhongyan; Hu, Renming; Xing, Xiaoping; Xue, Yaoming; Yang, Tao; Hua, Yanyin

    2017-05-01

    The use of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) among patients with insulin-treated, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in China is suboptimal. Herein we evaluated the effectiveness of structured SMBG for improving glycemic control and increasing the frequency of SMBG. Insulin-treated (>3 months) T2DM patients aged ≥18 years with HbA1c >8.0 % (64 mmol/mol) were recruited to the study. They received SMBG materials and were advised on a structured SMBG regimen for their insulin therapy. Patients were trained to self-adjust insulin dosage according to SMBG readings and were seen by physicians at Months 3 and 6. Endpoints included changes in HbA1c, SMBG frequency, and hypoglycemia frequency. The study enrolled 820 patients, with mean (± SD) age 55.1 ± 9.8 years, body mass index 24.9 ± 3.6 kg/m(2) , HbA1c 9.7 ± 1.6 % (83 mmol/mol), and diabetes duration 9.8 ± 7.1 years, with median insulin therapy of 30.3 (3.0-274.1) months, from 19 Chinese clinics. By Month 3, 99.9 % of patients performed daily SMBG. At Months 3 and 6, HbA1c had decreased from baseline (-1.81 % and -1.73 %, respective; P insulin therapy. A structured SMBG regimen, with training on interpretation of and responses to SMBG readings, increased SMBG frequency and improved HbA1c and the management of insulin-treated T2DM. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Low-carbohydrate diet in type 2 diabetes. Stable improvement of bodyweight and glycemic control during 22 months follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joensson Eva

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-carbohydrate diets in the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes seem intuitively attractive due to their potent antihyperglycemic effect. We previously reported that a 20 % carbohydrate diet was significantly superior to a 55–60 % carbohydrate diet with regard to bodyweight and glycemic control in 2 non-randomised groups of obese diabetes patients observed closely over 6 months. The effect beyond 6 months of reduced carbohydrate has not been previously reported. The objective of the present study, therefore, was to determine to what degree the changes among the 16 patients in the low-carbohydrate diet group at 6-months were preserved or changed 22 months after start, even without close follow-up. In addition, we report that, after the 6 month observation period, two thirds of the patients in the high-carbohydrate changed their diet. This group also showed improvement in bodyweight and glycemic control. Method Retrospective follow-up of previously studied subjects on a low carbohydrate diet. Results The mean bodyweight at the start of the initial study was 100.6 ± 14.7 kg. At six months it was 89.2 ± 14.3 kg. From 6 to 22 months, mean bodyweight had increased by 2.7 ± 4.2 kg to an average of 92.0 ± 14.0 kg. Seven of the 16 patients (44% retained the same bodyweight from 6 to 22 months or reduced it further; all but one had lower weight at 22 months than at the beginning. Initial mean HbA1c was 8.0 ± 1.5 %. After 6 and 12 months it was 6.6 ± 1.0 % and 7.0 ± 1.3 %, respectively. At 22 months, it was still 6.9 ± 1.1 %. Conclusion Advice on a 20 % carbohydrate diet with some caloric restriction to obese patients with type 2 diabetes has lasting effect on bodyweight and glycemic control.

  8. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load, and breast cancer risk: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, L S; Dal Maso, L; La Vecchia, C; Parpinel, M; Negri, E; Vaccarella, S; Kendall, C W; Jenkins, D J; Francesch, S

    2001-11-01

    Certain types of carbohydrates increase glucose and insulin levels to a greater extent than others. In turn, insulin may raise levels of insulin-like growth factors, which may influence breast cancer risk. We analyzed the effect of type and amount of carbohydrates on breast cancer risk, using the glycemic index and the glycemic load measures in a large case-control study conducted in Italy. Cases were 2,569 women with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer interviewed between 1991 and 1994. Controls were 2588 women admitted to the same hospital network for a variety of acute, non-neoplastic conditions. Average daily glycemic index and glycemic load were calculated from a validated 78-item food frequency questionnaire. Direct associations with breast cancer risk emerged for glycemic index (odds ratio, OR for highest vs. lowest quintile = 1.4; P for trend breast cancer (OR = 1.3) while the intake of pasta, a medium glycemic index food, seemed to have no influence (OR = 1.0). Findings were consistent across different strata of menopausal status, alcohol intake, and physical activity level. This study supports the hypothesis of moderate, direct associations between glycemic index or glycemic load and breast cancer risk and, consequently, a possible role of hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance in breast cancer development.

  9. Intermittent Vagal Nerve Block for Improvements in Obesity, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: 2-Year Results of the VBLOC DM2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikora, Scott A; Toouli, James; Herrera, Miguel F; Kulseng, Bård; Brancatisano, Roy; Kow, Lilian; Pantoja, Juan P; Johnsen, Gjermund; Brancatisano, Anthony; Tweden, Katherine S; Knudson, Mark B; Billington, Charles J; Billingto, Charles J

    2016-05-01

    One-year results of the VBLOC DM2 study found that intermittent vagal blocking (VBLOC therapy) was safe among subjects with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and led to significant weight loss and improvements in glycemic parameters and cardiovascular risk factors. Longer-term data are needed to determine whether the results are sustained. VBLOC DM2 is a prospective, observational study of 28 subjects with T2DM and body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 40 kg/m(2) to assess mid-term safety and weight loss and improvements in glycemic parameters, and other cardiovascular risk factors with VBLOC therapy. Continuous outcome variables are reported using mixed models. At 24 months, the mean percentage of excess weight loss was 22% (95% CI, 15 to 28, p obesity and glycemic control were largely sustained after 2 years of treatment with VBLOC therapy with a well-tolerated risk profile.

  10. Utility of different glycemic control metrics for optimizingmanagement of diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus-Dieter Kohnert; Peter Heinke; Lutz Vogt; Eckhard Salzsieder

    2015-01-01

    continuousglucose monitoring (CGM) systems, which have shownusefulness in clinical practice, are presently on themarket. They can broadly be divided into systemsproviding retrospective or real-time information onglucose patterns. The widespread clinical applicationof CGM is still hampered by the lack of generally Kohnert KD et al . Glycemic control metrics accepted measures for assessment of glucose profiles and standardized reporting of glucose data. In this article, we will discuss advantages and limitations of various metrics for glycemic control as well as possibilities for evaluation of glucose data with the special focus on glycemic variability and application of CGM to improve individual diabetes management.

  11. The diterpene glycoside, rebaudioside A, does not improve glycemic control or affect blood pressure after eight weeks treatment in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrskog, Stig E U; Jeppesen, Per B; Chen, Jianguo; Christensen, Lars P; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2005-01-01

    The plant, Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni (SrB), has been used for the treatment of diabetes in traditional medicine. Previously, we have demonstrated that long-term administration of the glycoside stevioside has insulinotropic, glucagonostatic, anti-hyperglycemic and blood pressure-lowering effects in type 2 diabetic animal models. The aim of this study was to elucidate if long-term administration of rebaudioside A, another glycoside isolated from the plant SrB, could improve glycemic control and lower blood pressure in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. We divided male Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats into two groups which were fed a standard laboratory chow diet for eight weeks. The diet was supplemented with oral rebaudioside A (0.025 g/kg BW/day) in the experimental group. Blood glucose, weight, blood pressure and food intake were measured weekly. Animals were equipped with an intra-arterial catheter, and at week eight the conscious rats underwent an intra-arterial glucose tolerance test (IAGTT) (2.0 g/kg BW). During the IAGTT, the level of glucose, glucagon, and insulin responses did not differ significantly between the two groups. Fasting levels of glucose, glucagon, insulin or levels of blood lipids did not differ between the groups throughout the study period. We observed no effect on blood pressure or weight development. In conclusion, oral supplementation with rebaudioside A (0.025 g/kg BW/day) for eight weeks did not influence blood pressure or glycemic control in GK rats. Rebaudioside A failed to show the beneficial effects in diabetic animals previously demonstrated for stevioside.

  12. The Diterpene Glycoside, Rebaudioside A, Does not Improve Glycemic Control or Affect Blood Pressure After Eight Weeks Treatment in the Goto-Kakizaki Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrskog, Stig E.U.; Jeppesen, Per B.; Chen, Jianguo; Christensen, Lars P.; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2005-01-01

    The plant, Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni (SrB), has been used for the treatment of diabetes in traditional medicine. Previously, we have demonstrated that long-term administration of the glycoside stevioside has insulinotropic, glucagonostatic, anti-hyperglycemic and blood pressure-lowering effects in type 2 diabetic animal models. The aim of this study was to elucidate if long-term administration of rebaudioside A, another glycoside isolated from the plant SrB, could improve glycemic control and lower blood pressure in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. We divided male Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats into two groups which were fed a standard laboratory chow diet for eight weeks. The diet was supplemented with oral rebaudioside A (0.025 g/kg BW/day) in the experimental group. Blood glucose, weight, blood pressure and food intake were measured weekly. Animals were equipped with an intra-arterial catheter, and at week eight the conscious rats underwent an intra-arterial glucose tolerance test (IAGTT) (2.0 g/kg BW). During the IAGTT, the level of glucose, glucagon, and insulin responses did not differ significantly between the two groups. Fasting levels of glucose, glucagon, insulin or levels of blood lipids did not differ between the groups throughout the study period. We observed no effect on blood pressure or weight development. In conclusion, oral supplementation with rebaudioside A (0.025 g/kg BW/day) for eight weeks did not influence blood pressure or glycemic control in GK rats. Rebaudioside A failed to show the beneficial effects in diabetic animals previously demonstrated for stevioside. PMID:17491683

  13. Glycemic goals in diabetes: trade-off between glycemic control and iatrogenic hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryer, Philip E

    2014-07-01

    The selection of a glycemic goal in a person with diabetes is a compromise between the documented upside of glycemic control-the partial prevention or delay of microvascular complications-and the documented downside of glycemic control-the recurrent morbidity and potential mortality of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. The latter is not an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with drugs that do not cause hypoglycemia or with substantial weight loss. However, hypoglycemia becomes an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with a sulfonylurea, a glinide, or insulin, particularly in the setting of absolute endogenous insulin deficiency with loss of the normal decrease in circulating insulin and increase in glucagon secretion and attenuation of the sympathoadrenal response as plasma glucose concentrations fall. Then the selection of a glycemic goal should be linked to the risk of hypoglycemia. A reasonable individualized glycemic goal is the lowest A1C that does not cause severe hypoglycemia and preserves awareness of hypoglycemia, preferably with little or no symptomatic or even asymptomatic hypoglycemia, at a given stage in the evolution of the individual's diabetes.

  14. Three 15-min bouts of moderate postmeal walking significantly improves 24-h glycemic control in older people at risk for impaired glucose tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three 15-min bouts of postmeal walking with 45 min of sustained walking on 24-h glycemic control in older persons at risk for glucose intolerance. Inactive older (=60 years of age) participants (N = 10) were recruited from the community a...

  15. Health literacy, diabetes self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Bains, Sujeev S; Egede, Leonard E

    2010-11-01

    Although limited health literacy is a barrier to disease management and has been associated with poor glycemic control, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between health literacy and diabetes outcomes are unknown. We examined the relationships between health literacy, determinants of diabetes self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic. We collected information on demographics, health literacy, diabetes knowledge, diabetes fatalism, social support, and diabetes self-care, and hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Structural equation models tested the predicted pathways linking health literacy to diabetes self-care and glycemic control. No direct relationship was observed between health literacy and diabetes self-care or glycemic control. Health literacy had a direct effect on social support (r = -0.20, P diabetes self-care (r = -0.07) and on glycemic control (r = -0.01). More diabetes knowledge (r = 0.22, P diabetes self-care and through self-care were related to glycemic control (r = -0.20, P literacy has an indirect effect on diabetes self-care and glycemic control through its association with social support. This suggests that for patients with limited health literacy, enhancing social support would facilitate diabetes self-care and improved glycemic control.

  16. Glycemic control in critically ill: A moving target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Todi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycemic control targets in intensive care units (ICUs have three distinct domains. Firstly, excessive hyperglycemia needs to be avoided. The upper limit of this varies depending on the patient population studied and diabetic status of the patients. Surgical patients particularly cardiac surgery patients tend to benefit from a lower upper limit of glycemic control, which is not evident in medically ill patient. Patient with premorbid diabetic status tends to tolerate higher blood sugar level better than normoglycemics. Secondly, hypoglycemia is clearly detrimental in all groups of critically ill patient and all measures to avoid this catastrophe need to be a part of any glycemic control protocol. Thirdly, glycemic variability has increasingly been shown to be detrimental in this patient population. Glycemic control protocols need to take this into consideration and target to reduce any of the available metrics of glycemic variability. Newer technologies including continuous glucose monitoring techniques will help in titrating all these three domains within a desirable range.

  17. Improvement of cardiovascular risk markers by pioglitazone is independent from glycemic control - Results from the pioneer study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfutzner, A; Marx, N; Lubben, G; Langenfeld, M; Walcher, D; Konrad, T; Forst, T

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study was performed to assess whether the anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects of pioglitazone suggested by animal experiments are reproducible in man and independent from improvements in metabolic control. BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased cardiovascul

  18. Effect of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on low-density lipoprotein size, electronegative low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Vinagre, Irene; de Juan-Franco, Elena; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Pérez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intensified hypoglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the distribution of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity between high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its relation with the lipid profile and other qualitative properties of LDL. Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of poor glycemic control and normal or near normal LDL cholesterol were recruited. Lifestyle counseling and pharmacologic hypoglycemic therapy were intensified to improve glycemic control, but lipid-lowering therapy was unchanged. At 4 ± 2 months, glycosylated hemoglobin had decreased by a mean of 2.1%, but the only effect on the lipid profile were statistically significant decreases in nonesterified fatty acids and apolipoprotein B concentration. LDL size increased and the proportion of electronegative LDL decreased significantly. In parallel, total Lp-PLA2 activity decreased significantly, promoting a redistribution of Lp-PLA2 activity toward a higher proportion in high-density lipoprotein. Improvements in glycemic control led to more marked changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and distribution in patients with diabetes who had not received previous lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes promotes atheroprotective changes, including larger LDL size, decreased electronegative LDL, and a higher proportion of Lp-PLA2 activity in high-density lipoprotein.

  19. Fixed-dose combination of alogliptin/pioglitazone improves glycemic control in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Chie; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Kuroda, Hisamoto; Sagara, Masaaki; Shimizu, Masanori; Kasai, Kikuo; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigated the effects of switching from combination therapy with either alogliptin (Alo) or pioglitazone (Pio) to fixed-dose combination therapy (FDCT) with alogliptin and pioglitazone (Alo-Pio FDCT). The usefulness and efficacy of Alo-Pio FDCT were investigated. A total of 50 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with Alo and 47 outpatients with T2DM treated with Pio were switched to Alo-Pio FDCT, and its efficacy and usefulness were evaluated. Significant improvements were observed in hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c), alanine transaminase (ALT), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels after switching to Alo-Pio FDCT for 16 weeks in both groups. Only the group switching from Alo to Alo-Pio FDCT showed significant improvements in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels and triglyceride levels. In a multivariate logistic regression model of the variation in the change of HbA1c at 16 weeks, ALT and GGT were independent predictors of the change of HbA1c at 16 weeks. In addition, the switch to Alo-Pio FDCT improved glycemic control to a certain degree regardless of BMI. Switching from either Alo or Pio to Alo-PIO FDCT may, unlike monotherapy with a DPP-4 inhibitor, be effective for patients with T2DM regardless of whether they are obese or lean. PMID:28303056

  20. Fixed-dose combination of alogliptin/pioglitazone improves glycemic control in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Chie; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Kuroda, Hisamoto; Sagara, Masaaki; Shimizu, Masanori; Kasai, Kikuo; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of switching from combination therapy with either alogliptin (Alo) or pioglitazone (Pio) to fixed-dose combination therapy (FDCT) with alogliptin and pioglitazone (Alo-Pio FDCT). The usefulness and efficacy of Alo-Pio FDCT were investigated. A total of 50 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with Alo and 47 outpatients with T2DM treated with Pio were switched to Alo-Pio FDCT, and its efficacy and usefulness were evaluated. Significant improvements were observed in hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c), alanine transaminase (ALT), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels after switching to Alo-Pio FDCT for 16 weeks in both groups. Only the group switching from Alo to Alo-Pio FDCT showed significant improvements in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels and triglyceride levels. In a multivariate logistic regression model of the variation in the change of HbA1c at 16 weeks, ALT and GGT were independent predictors of the change of HbA1c at 16 weeks. In addition, the switch to Alo-Pio FDCT improved glycemic control to a certain degree regardless of BMI. Switching from either Alo or Pio to Alo-PIO FDCT may, unlike monotherapy with a DPP-4 inhibitor, be effective for patients with T2DM regardless of whether they are obese or lean.

  1. Glycemic control in diabetes in three Danish counties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lone G M; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Heickendorff, Lene;

    2005-01-01

    monitoring of diabetes using HbA1c-DCCT aligned was initiated in 2001. We estimated the incidence of monitored patients in the population. The progress in patients with originally diabetic HbA1c levels was investigated by cumulative probability plots, and the individual trend in clinical outcome...... percentage above the treatment target (>or=6.62% HbA1c) was 51% in 2003 compared to 59% in 2001, and the percentage with poor glycemic control (>or=10.0% HbA1c) was reduced from 19% to 4%. Of patients with originally diabetic HbA1c levels, 15% showed progress in glycemic control, and 28% reached treatment...... targets. In patients with originally normal HbA1c, 75% showed an upward trend in HbA1c levels, which reached diabetic concentrations in 17%. CONCLUSION: Patients with diabetic first HbA1c concentrations (>or=6.62% HbA1c) showed on average 15% improved glycemic control in the first year. Further...

  2. The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Mavropoulos John C; Yancy William S; Westman Eric C; Marquart Megan; McDuffie Jennifer R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research design and methods Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were ra...

  3. An observational study of glycemic control in canagliflozin treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckley, L M; Miyasato, G; Kokkotos, F; Bumbaugh, J; Bailey, R A

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate changes in glycemic control following the initial canagliflozin pharmacy claim in a real-world population. A retrospective cohort analysis of adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was conducted using 2013 medical, pharmacy and laboratory claims from the Inovalon MORE 2 Registry. Patients with T2DM aged ≥18 years with ≥60 days of canagliflozin supply and HbA1c test results within 120 days before and ≥60 days after initial canagliflozin claim (defined as index date) were included. The differences between HbA1c levels pre- and post-index were assessed. Changes pre- and post-index in Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) glycemic control criteria of HbA1c 9% were evaluated. Subgroup analyses of patients with HbA1c >7% at baseline and patients aged ≥65 were also conducted. Among the 268 patients meeting the study criteria, mean HbA1c pre-index was 8.3% and post-index was 7.6%; the mean reduction in HbA1c pre-post index was 0.7% (95% CI: 0.6%, 0.9%). The proportions of patients meeting the HEDIS glycemic control measures (HbA1c 9%) improved and was significantly different pre- and post-index (all p 7% prior to index (81% of the cohort; mean pre-index HbA1c = 8.8%), HbA1c was reduced by 0.9% (95% CI: 0.8%, 1.1%). The aged ≥65 subgroup consisted of 15% of the cohort, with a pre-index HbA1c of 8.3%. The mean reduction in HbA1c test results pre- and post-canagliflozin index was 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4%, 0.9%). This analysis did not adjust for changes in antihyperglycemic agents during the study period. Patients with T2DM were observed to have improved glycemic control following initial canagliflozin pharmacy claim as measured by HbA1c change and attainment of specific glycemic control criteria.

  4. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements.

  5. Upper gastrointestinal function and glycemic control in diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reawika Chaikomin; Christopher K Rayner; Karen L Jones; Michael Horowitz

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the impact of glycemic control on the incidence and progression of diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications, and on cardiovascular risk in the non-diabetic population.Postprandial blood glucose concentrations make a major contribution to overall glycemic control, and are determined in part by upper gastrointestinal function.Conversely, poor glycemic control has an acute,reversible effect on gastrointestinal motility. Insights into the mechanisms by which the gut contributes to glycemia have given rise to a number of novel dietary and pharmacological strategies designed to lower postprandial blood glucose concent rations.

  6. Interaction between functional health literacy, patient activation, and glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodard LD

    2014-07-01

    interval 1.01–1.09], P=0.02. Controlling for age, illness burden, and number of primary care visits, the combined effect of these measures on glycemic control remained significant (odds ratio 1.05 [95% confidence interval 1.01–1.09], P=0.02.Conclusion: The interaction between FHL and patient activation is associated with HbA1c control beyond the independent effects of these parameters alone. A personalized approach to diabetes management incorporating these characteristics may increase patient-centered care and improve outcomes for patients with diabetes. Keywords: health literacy, diabetes mellitus, self-care, veterans

  7. A Randomized Trial about Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Improves Outcomes among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla K.; Gutschall, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic index (GI) represents the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate foods, and glycemic load (GL) represents the quantity and quality of carbohydrate consumed. A diet lower in GI and GL may improve diabetes management. A 9-week intervention regarding GI and GL was evaluated among adults in the age range of 40-70 years who had had type…

  8. COH-SR4 reduces body weight, improves glycemic control and prevents hepatic steatosis in high fat diet-induced obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lester Figarola

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, and is one of the principal causative factors in the development of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cancer. COH-SR4 ("SR4" is a novel investigational compound that has anti-cancer and anti-adipogenic properties. In this study, the effects of SR4 on metabolic alterations in high fat diet (HFD-induced obese C57BL/J6 mice were investigated. Oral feeding of SR4 (5 mg/kg body weight. in HFD mice for 6 weeks significantly reduced body weight, prevented hyperlipidemia and improved glycemic control without affecting food intake. These changes were associated with marked decreases in epididymal fat mass, adipocyte hypertrophy, increased plasma adiponectin and reduced leptin levels. SR4 treatment also decreased liver triglycerides, prevented hepatic steatosis, and normalized liver enzymes. Western blots demonstrated increased AMPK activation in liver and adipose tissues of SR4-treated HFD obese mice, while gene analyses by real time PCR showed COH-SR4 significantly suppressed the mRNA expression of lipogenic genes such as sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (Srebf1, acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase (Acaca, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg, fatty acid synthase (Fasn, stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr, as well as gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1 and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc in the liver of obese mice. In vitro, SR4 activates AMPK independent of upstream kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1 and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ. Together, these data suggest that SR4, a novel AMPK activator, may be a promising therapeutic compound for treatment of obesity, fatty liver disease, and related metabolic disorders.

  9. COH-SR4 reduces body weight, improves glycemic control and prevents hepatic steatosis in high fat diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figarola, James Lester; Singhal, Preeti; Rahbar, Samuel; Gugiu, Bogdan Gabriel; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, and is one of the principal causative factors in the development of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cancer. COH-SR4 ("SR4") is a novel investigational compound that has anti-cancer and anti-adipogenic properties. In this study, the effects of SR4 on metabolic alterations in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese C57BL/J6 mice were investigated. Oral feeding of SR4 (5 mg/kg body weight.) in HFD mice for 6 weeks significantly reduced body weight, prevented hyperlipidemia and improved glycemic control without affecting food intake. These changes were associated with marked decreases in epididymal fat mass, adipocyte hypertrophy, increased plasma adiponectin and reduced leptin levels. SR4 treatment also decreased liver triglycerides, prevented hepatic steatosis, and normalized liver enzymes. Western blots demonstrated increased AMPK activation in liver and adipose tissues of SR4-treated HFD obese mice, while gene analyses by real time PCR showed COH-SR4 significantly suppressed the mRNA expression of lipogenic genes such as sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (Srebf1), acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase (Acaca), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), fatty acid synthase (Fasn), stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a) and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr), as well as gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc) in the liver of obese mice. In vitro, SR4 activates AMPK independent of upstream kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Together, these data suggest that SR4, a novel AMPK activator, may be a promising therapeutic compound for treatment of obesity, fatty liver disease, and related metabolic disorders.

  10. Adiposity and Glycemic Control in Children Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie G.; Rossing, Laura I.; Grontved, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to explore whether childhood exposure to perfluorinated and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), widely used stain- and grease-repellent chemicals, is associated with adiposity and markers of glycemic control. Materials and Methods: Body mass index, skinfold thickness...

  11. Impact of Phone Call Intervention on Glycemic Control in Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telephone-delivered intervention can provide many supports in diabetes self-management to improve glycemic control. Several trials showed that telephone intervention was positively associated with glycemic outcomes in diabetes. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the impact of telephone contact intervention (intervention group) on glycemic control compared with standard clinical care (control group). METHODS: Randomized control studies of telephone intervention in di...

  12. The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavropoulos John C

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research design and methods Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were randomized to either a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (1c. Results Forty-nine (58.3% participants completed the study. Both interventions led to improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and weight loss. The LCKD group had greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.5% vs. -0.5%, p = 0.03, body weight (-11.1 kg vs. -6.9 kg, p = 0.008, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+5.6 mg/dL vs. 0 mg/dL, p Conclusion Dietary modification led to improvements in glycemic control and medication reduction/elimination in motivated volunteers with type 2 diabetes. The diet lower in carbohydrate led to greater improvements in glycemic control, and more frequent medication reduction/elimination than the low glycemic index diet. Lifestyle modification using low carbohydrate interventions is effective for improving and reversing type 2 diabetes.

  13. Low-carbohydrate diet in type 2 diabetes: stable improvement of bodyweight and glycemic control during 44 months follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joensson Eva A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-carbohydrate diets, due to their potent antihyperglycemic effect, are an intuitively attractive approach to the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes. We previously reported that a 20% carbohydrate diet was significantly superior to a 55–60% carbohydrate diet with regard to bodyweight and glycemic control in 2 groups of obese diabetes patients observed closely over 6 months (intervention group, n = 16; controls, n = 15 and we reported maintenance of these gains after 22 months. The present study documents the degree to which these changes were preserved in the low-carbohydrate group after 44 months observation time, without close follow-up. In addition, we assessed the performance of the two thirds of control patients from the high-carbohydrate diet group that had changed to a low-carbohydrate diet after the initial 6 month observation period. We report cardiovascular outcome for the low-carbohydrate group as well as the control patients who did not change to a low-carbohydrate diet. Method Retrospective follow-up of previously studied subjects on a low carbohydrate diet. Results The mean bodyweight at the start of the initial study was 100.6 ± 14.7 kg. At six months it was 89.2 ± 14.3 kg. From 6 to 22 months, mean bodyweight had increased by 2.7 ± 4.2 kg to an average of 92.0 ± 14.0 kg. At 44 months average weight has increased from baseline g to 93.1 ± 14.5 kg. Of the sixteen patients, five have retained or reduced bodyweight since the 22 month point and all but one have lower weight at 44 months than at start. The initial mean HbA1c was 8.0 ± 1.5%. After 6, 12 and 22 months, HbA1c was 6.1 ± 1.0%, 7.0 ± 1.3% and 6.9 ± 1.1% respectively. After 44 months mean HbA1c is 6.8 ± 1.3%. Of the 23 patients who have used a low-carbohydrate diet and for whom we have long-term data, two have suffered a cardiovascular event while four of the six controls who never changed diet have suffered several

  14. Bile acid sequestrants for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Mikkelsen, Kristian H

    2017-01-01

    by the control group and no evidence of publication bias or small study effects. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses found that BAS treatment improves glycemic control. The size of the effect was clinically relevant and despite limited safety data, our findings support the inclusion of BASs in current diabetes management...

  15. Frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in an African diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibirige D

    2017-02-01

    .001. Conclusion: Suboptimal glycemic control was highly prevalent in this study population with an association to metformin monotherapy and insulin therapy. Strategies aimed at improving glycemic control in diabetes care in Uganda should be enhanced. Keywords: suboptimal glycemic control, frequency, predictors, Africa, Uganda

  16. Achieving glycemic control differs between patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus starting on metformin and sulfonylureas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Egbert J.F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G.; Nijpels, Giel; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antidiabetic medication is aimed at attaining tight glycemic control, but patients do not always achieve guideline recommended targets. Available observational studies focusing on both drug treatment and glycemic control have some methodological limitations. Objectives: To describe the r

  17. Role of betahistine in glycemic control of obese subjects: a placebo- controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hayder H. Al-Anbari; Ahmed S. Sahib; Amer O. Al-Mukhtar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor glycemic control, insulin resistance and abnormal beta cell function are of the most important complications that associated with obesity, targeting of such complications with pharmacological agents depending on the already existing central mechanism may decrease the incidence of morbidity and mortality among obese subjects. Betahistine is an anti-vertigo drug, commonly prescribed to patients with balance disorders or to improve vertigo symptoms associated with Meniere's dise...

  18. Fruit and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Allan Stubbe; Viggers, Lone; Gregersen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Health professionals often advise subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) to restrict fruit intake. We show here that there is no supportive scientific evidence for this. At least 19 studies have tested intake of fruit on postprandial glucose in T2D. Only two long-term intervention studies have...... investigated the impact of fruit intake on glycemic control in T2D. The studies show that fruit has neutral or positive glycemic effects. By restraining fruit intake, T2D subjects add an additional risk of disease and premature death. Further, there is no evidence to support that fructose contained in fruit...

  19. Adiposity and Glycemic Control in Children Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie G.; Rossing, Laura I.; Grontved, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to explore whether childhood exposure to perfluorinated and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), widely used stain- and grease-repellent chemicals, is associated with adiposity and markers of glycemic control. Materials and Methods: Body mass index, skinfold thickness, w...

  20. Metabolic responses to high glycemic index and low glycemic index meals: a controlled crossover clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bressan Josefina; Cecon Paulo R.; Marins João CB; Pereira Letícia G; Cocate Paula G; Alfenas Rita CG

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The consumption of low glycemic index (LGI) foods before exercise results in slower and more stable glycemic increases. Besides maintaining an adequate supply of energy during exercise, this response may favor an increase in fat oxidation in the postprandial period before the exercise compared to high glycemic index (HGI) foods. The majority of the studies that evaluated the effect of foods differing in glycemic index on substrate oxidation during the postprandial period b...

  1. The combination of colesevelam with sitagliptin enhances glycemic control in diabetic ZDF rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Quan; Liu, Matthew K; Saumoy, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Bile acid sequestrants have been shown to reduce glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. We previously reported that the bile acid sequestrant colesevelam HCl (Welchol) (COL) induced the release of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and improved glycemic control in insulin-resistant rats. In ...

  2. Glycemic control in diabetic children and adolescents after attending diabetic camp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin P. Soenggono

    2011-10-01

    Conclusion Glycemic control in T1DM children and adolescents was significantly improved 3 months after attending diabetic camp compared to that before attending camp. According to subjects’ self-assessment by PedsQL questionnaire, no subjects indicated a poor quality of life for the duration of their illness. [Paediatr Indones. 2011;51:294-7].

  3. The effectiveness of peer health coaching in improving glycemic control among low-income patients with diabetes: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ellen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although self-management support improves diabetes outcomes, it is not consistently provided in health care settings strained for time and resources. One proposed solution to personnel and funding shortages is to utilize peer coaches, patients trained to provide diabetes education and support to other patients. Coaches share similar experiences about living with diabetes and are able to reach patients within and beyond the health care setting. Given the limited body of evidence that demonstrates peer coaching significantly improves chronic disease care, this present study examines the impact of peer coaching delivered in a primary care setting on diabetes outcomes. Methods/Design The aim of this multicenter, randomized control trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of utilizing peer coaches to improve clinical outcomes and self-management skills in low-income patients with poorly controlled diabetes. A total of 400 patients from six primary health centers based in San Francisco that serve primarily low-income populations will be randomized to receive peer coaching (n = 200 or usual care (n = 200 over 6 months. Patients in the peer coach group receive coaching from patients with diabetes who are trained and mentored as peer coaches. The primary outcome is change in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include change in: systolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI, LDL cholesterol, diabetes self-care activities, medication adherence, diabetes-related quality of life, diabetes self-efficacy, and depression. Clinical values (HbA1c, LDL cholesterol and blood pressure and self-reported diabetes self-efficacy and self-care activities are measured at baseline and after 6 months for patients and coaches. Peer coaches are also assessed at 12 months. Discussion Patients with diabetes, who are trained as peer health coaches, are uniquely poised to provide diabetes self management support and education to patients. This study is designed to

  4. A randomized controlled trial to prevent glycemic relapse in longitudinal diabetes care: Study protocol (NCT00362193

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Dianne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a common disease with self-management a key aspect of care. Large prospective trials have shown that maintaining glycated hemoglobin less than 7% greatly reduces complications but translating this level of control into everyday clinical practice can be difficult. Intensive improvement programs are successful in attaining control in patients with type 2 diabetes, however, many patients experience glycemic relapse once returned to routine care. This early relapse is, in part, due to decreased adherence in self-management behaviors. Objective This paper describes the design of the Glycemic Relapse Prevention study. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal frequency of maintenance intervention needed to prevent glycemic relapse. The primary endpoint is glycemic relapse, which is defined as glycated hemoglobin greater than 8% and an increase of 1% from baseline. Methods The intervention consists of telephonic contact by a nurse practitioner with a referral to a dietitian if indicated. This intervention was designed to provide early identification of self-care problems, understanding the rationale behind the self-care lapse and problem solve to find a negotiated solution. A total of 164 patients were randomized to routine care (least intensive, routine care with phone contact every three months (moderate intensity or routine care with phone contact every month (most intensive. Conclusion The baseline patient characteristics are similar across the treatment arms. Intervention fidelity analysis showed excellent reproducibility. This study will provide insight into the important but poorly understood area of glycemic relapse prevention.

  5. Effects of periodontal therapy on glycemic control and inflammatory markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Patricia A A; Taba, Mario; Nomizo, Auro; Foss Freitas, Maria C; Suaid, Flavia A; Uyemura, Sergio A; Trevisan, Glauce L; Novaes, Arthur B; Souza, Sergio L S; Palioto, Daniela B; Grisi, Marcio F M

    2008-05-01

    Periodontitis, a complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), can induce or perpetuate systemic conditions. This double-masked, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing [SRP]) on the serum levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and on inflammatory biomarkers. Thirty subjects with type 2 DM and periodontitis were treated with SRP + placebo (SRP; N = 15) or with SRP + doxycycline (SRP+Doxy; N = 15), 100 mg/day, for 14 days. Clinical and laboratory data were recorded at baseline and at 3 months after treatment. After 3 months, the reduction in probing depth was 0.8 mm for the SRP group (P Doxy group (P Doxy; P <0.01) reduction in HbA1c levels. A significant reduction in interleukin (IL)-6; interferon-inducible protein 10; soluble fas ligand; granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; RANTES; and IL-12 p70 serum levels were also verified (N = 30). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the effects of periodontal therapy on multiple systemic inflammatory markers in DM. Periodontal therapy may influence the systemic conditions of patients with type 2 DM, but no statistical difference was observed with the adjunctive systemic doxycycline therapy. Moreover, it is possible that the observed improvement in glycemic control and in the reduction of inflammatory markers could also be due to diet, which was not controlled in our study. Therefore, a confirmatory study with a larger sample size and controlled diet is necessary.

  6. Nigella sativa improves glycemic control and ameliorates oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: placebo controlled participant blinded clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Kaatabi

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Our previous study has shown glucose lowering effect produced by 3 months supplementation of Nigella sativa (NS in combination with oral hypoglycemic drugs among type 2 diabetics. This study explored the long term glucose lowering effect (over one year of NS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on oral hypoglycemic drugs and to study its effect on redox status of such patients.114 type 2 diabetic patients on standard oral hypoglycemic drugs were assigned into 2 groups by convenience. The control group (n = 57 received activated charcoal as placebo and NS group (n = 57 received 2g NS, daily, for one year in addition to their standard medications. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, C- peptide, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS at the baseline, and every 3 months thereafter were determined. Insulin resistance and β-cell activity were calculated using HOMA 2 calculator.Comparison between the two groups showed a significant drop in FBG (from 180 ± 5.75 to 180 ± 5.59 in control Vs from 195 ± 6.57 to 172 ± 5.83 in NS group, HbA1c (from 8.2 ± 0.12 to 8.5 ± 0.14 in control VS from 8.6 ± 0.13 to 8.2 ± 0.14 in NS group, and TBARS (from 48.3 ± 6.89 to 52.9 ± 5.82 in control VS from 54.1 ± 4.64 to 41.9 ± 3.16 in NS group, in addition to a significant elevation in TAC, SOD and glutathione in NS patients compared to controls. In NS group, insulin resistance was significantly lower, while β-cell activity was significantly higher than the baseline values during the whole treatment period.Long term supplementation with Nigella sativa improves glucose homeostasis and enhances antioxidant defense system in type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs.Clinical Trials Registry-India (CTRI CTRI/2013/06/003781.

  7. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and risk of pancreatic cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marta; Lipworth, Loren; Polesel, Jerry; Negri, Eva; Bosetti, Cristina; Talamini, Renato; McLaughlin, Joseph K; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Carbohydrates and dietary glycemic index (GI) influence the secretion of insulin and insulin-related growth factors and may play a role in the development of diabetes and obesity, both of which have been related to pancreatic cancer risk. We examined the association between dietary GI and glycemic load (GL) and pancreatic cancer by conducting a hospital-based case-control study in Italy in 1991-2008 of 326 cases of pancreatic cancer and 652 control patients. Dietary data were obtained with the use of a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were computed with the use of multiple logistic regression. GI was positively associated with pancreatic cancer, with ORs of 1.56 (95% CI, 1.06-2.30) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.20-2.62) for the second and third tertiles, respectively, compared with the lowest. No significant association was observed between GL and pancreatic cancer. Consumption of sugar, candy, honey, and jam was positively associated with pancreatic cancer, whereas consumption of fruit was inversely associated. In conclusion, the positive association with high GI, in the absence of an association with dietary GL, fruit, or total carbohydrates, likely reflects the positive association between sweets or refined carbohydrates and pancreatic cancer in this study population. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sleep and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Barone,Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Wey,Daniela; Schorr, Fabiola; Franco,Denise Reis; Carra, Mario Kehdi; LORENZI FILHO,GERALDO; Menna-Barreto,Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim in the present study was to elucidate how type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and sleep parameters interact, which was rarely evaluated up to the moment. Materials and methods Eighteen T1DM subjects without chronic complications, and 9 control subjects, matched for age and BMI, were studied. The following instruments used to evaluate sleep: the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep diaries, actimeters, and polysomnography in a Sleep Lab. Glycemic control in T1DM individuals was evalua...

  9. Utility of different glycemic control metrics for optimizing management of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnert, Klaus-Dieter; Heinke, Peter; Vogt, Lutz; Salzsieder, Eckhard

    2015-02-15

    glucose dynamics. Several continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems, which have shown usefulness in clinical practice, are presently on the market. They can broadly be divided into systems providing retrospective or real-time information on glucose patterns. The widespread clinical application of CGM is still hampered by the lack of generally accepted measures for assessment of glucose profiles and standardized reporting of glucose data. In this article, we will discuss advantages and limitations of various metrics for glycemic control as well as possibilities for evaluation of glucose data with the special focus on glycemic variability and application of CGM to improve individual diabetes management.

  10. Evaluating the Effect of U-500 Insulin Therapy on Glycemic Control in Veterans With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawarskas, Ann D.; Resch, Nina D.; Vigil, Justina M.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF This article describes a single-center, retrospective chart review to determine the glycemic effect of converting from U-100 to U-500 regular insulin in veterans with type 2 diabetes and the effect of this change, if any, on the frequency of provider contacts. Results showed that U-500 insulin improved glycemic control without significantly increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or total daily insulin dose, even when follow-up contacts with providers were not structured or frequent. PMID:25653468

  11. Effect of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucalo, Iva; Rahelić, Dario; Jovanovski, Elena; Bozikov, Velimir; Romić, Zeljko; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2012-12-01

    Since diabetes tends to progressively worsen over time, glycemic control often deteriorates in spite of taking regular therapy. Therefore, numerous research studies are by and large focused on finding more efficient therapy, both new medicines for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as supplements that could serve as an addition to conventional treatment modalities. A variety of herbal preparations have been shown to have modest short-term beneficial effects on glycemia, but of these, the best studied is American ginseng (AG). AG has been shown to be effective in improving glycemic control in type 2 diabetes through increasing post-prandial insulin levels and decreasing postprandial glycemic response. However, high variability in ginsenosides may result in just as high variability in antidiabetic efficacy of over-the-counter ginseng products. Therefore, the availability of standardized extracts of AG could assist greatly in advancing our knowledge on the role of this traditionally used herb and result in a wider application of ginseng product in diabetes management. The aim of this review is to outline the efficacy and safety of American ginseng for AG preparations on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes as well as to increase awareness of the evidence supporting the use of these therapies in diabetes care.

  12. Low Glycemic Index Carbohydrates versus All Types of Carbohydrates for Treating Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Glycemic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otilia Perichart-Perera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM, more pregnant women complicated with diabetes are in need of clinical care. Purpose. Compare the effect of including only low glycemic index (GI carbohydrates (CHO against all types of CHO on maternal glycemic control and on the maternal and newborn’s nutritional status of women with type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods. Women (n=107, ≤29 weeks of gestation were randomly assigned to one of two nutrition intervention groups: moderate energy and CHO restriction (Group 1: all types of CHO, Group 2: low GI foods. Results. No baseline differences in clinical data were observed. Capillary glucose concentrations throughout pregnancy were similar between groups. Fewer women in Group 2 exceeded weight gain recommendations. Higher risk of prematurity was observed in women in Group 2. No differences in glycemic control were observed between women with type 2 DM and those with GDM. Conclusions. Inclusion of low GI CHO as part of a comprehensive nutrition intervention is equally effective in improving glycemic control as compared to all types of CHO. This strategy had a positive effect in preventing excessive maternal weight gain but increased the risk of prematurity.

  13. Low Glycemic Index Carbohydrates versus All Types of Carbohydrates for Treating Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Glycemic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Rodríguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Legorreta-Legorreta, Jennifer; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Background. Due to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM), more pregnant women complicated with diabetes are in need of clinical care. Purpose. Compare the effect of including only low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (CHO) against all types of CHO on maternal glycemic control and on the maternal and newborn's nutritional status of women with type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. Women (n = 107, ≤29 weeks of gestation) were randomly assigned to one of two nutrition intervention groups: moderate energy and CHO restriction (Group 1: all types of CHO, Group 2: low GI foods). Results. No baseline differences in clinical data were observed. Capillary glucose concentrations throughout pregnancy were similar between groups. Fewer women in Group 2 exceeded weight gain recommendations. Higher risk of prematurity was observed in women in Group 2. No differences in glycemic control were observed between women with type 2 DM and those with GDM. Conclusions. Inclusion of low GI CHO as part of a comprehensive nutrition intervention is equally effective in improving glycemic control as compared to all types of CHO. This strategy had a positive effect in preventing excessive maternal weight gain but increased the risk of prematurity. PMID:23251152

  14. Tight glycemic control in the ICU - is the earth flat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steil, Garry M; Agus, Michael S D

    2014-06-27

    Tight glycemic control in the ICU has been shown to reduce mortality in some but not all prospective randomized control trials. Confounding the interpretation of these studies are differences in how the control was achieved and underlying incidence of hypoglycemia, which can be expected to be affected by the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). In this issue of Critical Care, a consensus panel provides a list of the research priorities they believe are needed for CGM to become routine practice in the ICU. We reflect on these recommendations and consider the implications for using CGM today.

  15. Significance of intensive glycemic control on early diabetic nephropathy patients with microalbuminuria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect of intensive glycemic control on patients with early diabetic nephropathy. Methods A total of 41 type 2 diabetes patients who developed microalbuminuria were divided into two groups randomly. Patients in Group A received intensive glycemic control and the blood glucose in Group B was regularly controlled. Glycemic monitoring and control were followed for 12 weeks to observe the changes of microalbuminuria in both groups; meanwhile the levels of serum lipids an...

  16. Glycemic control in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is common in critically ill patients and can be caused by various mechanisms, including nutrition, medications, and insufficient insulin. In the past, hyperglycemia was thought to be an adaptive response to stress, but hyperglycemia is no longer considered a benign condition in patients with critical illnesses. Indeed, hyperglycemia can increase morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Correction of hyperglycemia may improve clinical outcomes. To date, a definite answ...

  17. Periodontitis and glycemic control in diabetes: NHANES 2009 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Dina; Tarima, Sergey; Okunseri, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the association between periodontitis, diabetes (DM), and glycemic control. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data for 2009 to 2012 were analyzed. Periodontitis status of each participant was assessed using the full-mouth periodontal examination protocol, classified using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology surveillance case definition for total periodontitis. Self-reported DM status was defined as yes or no. Glycemic control was assessed using glycohemoglobin data at cutoff points of 7.0%, 7.5%, 8.0%, 8.5%, and 9.0%. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed, and all analyses were adjusted for the survey design. Overall, 7,042 adults ≥30 years old with complete data were included in the study. The mean glycohemoglobin levels for individuals with and without periodontitis were 5.9% and 5.6%, respectively, and increased to 7.4% and 7.0% for participants with DM. The majority of participants with and without periodontitis were aged 50 to 64 and 35 to 49 years (37.4% versus 44.5%), respectively. In the bivariate analysis, several demographic factors were significantly associated with having periodontitis, including self-reported DM status and glycemic control. In the multivariate analysis, demographic factors, glycohemoglobin cutoff values of 8.0%, 8.5%, and 9.0%, and mean glycohemoglobin level remained significant, but self-reported DM status was not. This study demonstrates that glycohemoglobin and demographic factors are significantly associated with periodontitis, but not self-reported status.

  18. HDL as a Target for Glycemic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Boris; Jenkins, Alicia J; Sullivan, David; Ng, Martin K C; Keech, Anthony C

    2017-01-01

    HDL has long been known for its role in reverse cholesterol transport, thought in part to explain the well-recognized links between low levels of HDL-C and cardiovascular disease. The past decade has seen increasing evidence from epidemiological, basic science and early human intervention studies that HDL biology is more complex and may influence the onset and progression of type 2 diabetes. Research has identified multiple potential pathways by which higher HDL particle concentrations or functional improvements may ameliorate the development and progression of the disease. These include promotion of insulin secretion and pancreatic islet beta-cell survival, promotion of peripheral glucose uptake, and suppression of inflammation. The relationships between HDL-C levels, commonly used in clinical practice, and HDL particle number, size and various HDL functions is complex, and is intimately linked with triglyceride metabolism. The complexity of these relationships is amplified in diabetes, which negatively impacts multiple aspects of lipoprotein biology. This article reviews the rationale for, and potential of, HDL-based anti-diabetic pharmacotherapy, with an emphasis on the particular challenges posed by diabetes-related HDL dysfunction, and on the difficulties of selecting appropriate targets and HDL-related biomarkers for research and for clinical practice. We discuss aspects of HDL metabolism that are known to be altered in type 2 diabetes, potentially useful measures of HDL-targeted therapy in diabetes, and review early intervention studies in humans. These areas provide a firm foundation for further research and knowledge expansion in this intriguing area of human health and disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Impact of postoperative glycemic control and nutritional status on clinical outcomes after total pancreatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao-Jun; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of glycemic control and nutritional status after total pancreatectomy (TP) on complications, tumor recurrence and overall survival. METHODS Retrospective records of 52 patients with pancreatic tumors who underwent TP were collected from 2007 to 2015. A series of clinical parameters collected before and after surgery, and during the follow-up were evaluated. The associations of glycemic control and nutritional status with complications, tumor recurrence and long-term survival were determined. Risk factors for postoperative glycemic control and nutritional status were identified. RESULTS High early postoperative fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels (OR = 4.074, 95%CI: 1.188-13.965, P = 0.025) and low early postoperative prealbumin levels (OR = 3.816, 95%CI: 1.110-13.122, P = 0.034) were significantly associated with complications after TP. Postoperative HbA1c levels over 7% (HR = 2.655, 95%CI: 1.299-5.425, P = 0.007) were identified as one of the independent risk factors for tumor recurrence. Patients with postoperative HbA1c levels over 7% had much poorer overall survival than those with HbA1c levels less than 7% (9.3 mo vs 27.6 mo, HR = 3.212, 95%CI: 1.147-8.999, P = 0.026). Patients with long-term diabetes mellitus (HR = 15.019, 95%CI: 1.278-176.211, P = 0.031) and alcohol history (B = 1.985, SE = 0.860, P = 0.025) tended to have poor glycemic control and lower body mass index levels after TP, respectively. CONCLUSION At least 3 mo are required after TP to adapt to diabetes and recover nutritional status. Glycemic control appears to have more influence over nutritional status on long-term outcomes after TP. Improvement in glycemic control and nutritional status after TP is important to prevent early complications and tumor recurrence, and improve survival.

  20. Evaluation of a novel artificial pancreas: closed loop glycemic control system with continuous blood glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Munekage, Eri; Takezaki, Yuka; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yamazaki, Rie; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Tarumi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Mishina, Suguru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2013-04-01

    A closed-loop glycemic control system using an artificial pancreas has been applied with many clinical benefits in Japan since 1987. To update this system incorporating user-friendly features, we developed a novel artificial pancreas (STG-55). The purpose of this study was to evaluate STG-55 for device usability, performance of blood glucose measurement, glycemic control characteristics in vivo in animal experiments, and evaluate its clinical feasibility. There are several features for usability improvement based on the design concepts, such as compactness, display monitor, batteries, guidance function, and reduction of the preparation time. All animal study data were compared with a clinically available artificial pancreas system in Japan (control device: STG-22). We examined correlations of both blood glucose levels between two groups (STG-55 vs. control) using Clarke's error grid analysis, and also compared mean glucose infusion rate (GIR) during glucose clamp. The results showed strong correlation in blood glucose concentrations (Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient: 0.97; n = 1636). Clarke's error grid analysis showed that 98.4% of the data fell in Zones A and B, which represent clinically accurate or benign errors, respectively. The difference in mean GIRs was less than 0.2 mg/kg/min, which was considered not significant. Clinical feasibility study demonstrated sufficient glycemic control maintaining target glucose range between 80 and 110 (mg/dL), and between 140 and 160 without any hypoglycemia. In conclusion, STG-55 was a clinically acceptable artificial pancreas with improved interface and usability. A closed-loop glycemic control system with STG-55 would be a useful tool for surgical and critical patients in intensive care units, as well as diabetic patients.

  1. Glycemic control in diabetic children: role of mother's knowledge and socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirovic, Husref; Toromanovic, Alma

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of mother's knowledge and socioeconomic status (SES) of the family on glycemic control in diabetic children. Our sample was taken from successive admissions to the outpatient's diabetes clinics in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Diabetes knowledge was assessed using the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center Diabetes Knowledge Test. Glycemic control was assessed by glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1C)). The mother's demographics were obtained by self-report. To categorize families' SES, parents' level of education, and current employment were recorded and analyzed using the Hollingshed two-factor index of social position. As expected, higher mother's knowledge was significantly associated with lower HbA(1C) (r = -0.2861705, p = 0.0442). Also, a significant correlation was found between the families' SES and HbA(1C) levels (r = 0.4401921; p = 0.0015). Mothers with more knowledge have children with better metabolic control, and low SES is significantly associated with higher levels of HbA1c. Improvement of mothers' knowledge and family SES may improve glycemic control and ultimately decrease acute and chronic complications of diabetes in children.

  2. Acute Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Continuous Moderate-Intensity Exercise Elicit a Similar Improvement in 24-h Glycemic Control in Overweight and Obese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Banting, Lauren; Levinger, Itamar; Hill, Karen M.; McAinch, Andrew J.; Stepto, Nigel K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress and glycemia; however, the effects of exercise intensity are unclear. We investigated the effect of acute low-volume high-intensity interval-exercise (LV-HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE) on glycemic control and oxidative stress in overweight and obese, inactive adults. Methods: Twenty-seven adults were randomly allocated to perform a single session of LV-HIIE (9 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 1 years; BMI: 29 ± 1 kg·m−2; mean ± SEM) or CMIE (8 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 2.0; BMI: 30 ± 2.0) 1 h after consumption of a standard breakfast. Plasma redox status, glucose and insulin were measured. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was conducted during the 24-h period before (rest day) and after exercise (exercise day). Results: Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; 29 ±13%, p < 0.01; mean percent change ±90% confidence limit), hydrogen peroxide (44 ± 16%, p < 0.01), catalase activity (50 ± 16%, p < 0.01), and superoxide dismutase activity (21 ± 6%, p < 0.01) significantly increased 1 h after breakfast (prior to exercise) compared to baseline. Exercise significantly decreased postprandial glycaemia in whole blood (−6 ± 5%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Only CMIE significantly decreased postprandial TBARS (CMIE: −33 ± 8%, p < 0.01; LV-HIIE: 11 ± 22%, p = 0.34) and hydrogen peroxide (CMIE: −25 ± 15%, p = 0.04; LV-HIIE: 7 ± 26%; p = 0.37). Acute exercise provided a similar significant improvement in 24-h average glucose levels (−5 ± 2%, p < 0.01), hyperglycemic excursions (−37 ± 60%, p < 0.01), peak glucose concentrations (−8 ± 4%, p < 0.01), and the 2-h postprandial glucose response to dinner (−9 ± 4%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Conclusion: Despite elevated postprandial oxidative stress compared to CMIE, LV-HIIE is an equally effective exercise mode for improving 24-h glycemic control in

  3. Continuous glucose monitors: use of waveform versus glycemic values in the improvements of glucose control, quality of life, and fear of hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tomas C; Yucha, Carolyn B

    2014-05-01

    How patients are benefitting from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) remains poorly understood. The focus on numerical glucose values persists, even though access to the glucose waveform and rate of change may contribute more to improved control. This pilot study compared outcomes of patients using CGMs with or without access to the numerical values on their CGM. Ten persons with type 1 diabetes, naïve to CGM use, enrolled in a 12-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to either unmodified CGM receivers, or to CGM receivers that had their numerical values obscured but otherwise functioned normally. HbA1c, quality of life (QLI-D), and fear of hypoglycemia (HFS) were assessed, at baseline and at week 12. Baseline HbA1c for the entire group was 7.46 ± 1.27%. At week 12 the experimental group HbA1c reduction was 1.5 ± 0.9% (p control group's reduction was 0.06 ± 0.61% (p > .05). Repeated measures testing revealed no significant difference in HbA1c reduction between groups. Both groups had reductions in HFS; these reductions were statistically significant within groups (p quality of life. The display of a numerical glucose value did not improve control when compared to numerically blinded units. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. Glycemic control and implant stabilization in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, T W; Dowell, S; Robinson, M; McMahan, C A

    2009-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered a relative contra-indication for implant therapy. However, the effect of glycemic level on implant integration in persons with diabetes remains poorly understood. The hypothesis of this research was that poor glycemic control is directly related to short-term-impairment implant stabilization. This prospective clinical study evaluated 10 non-diabetic individuals (12 implants) and 20 persons with type 2 diabetes (30 implants). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ranged from 4.7-12.6%. Implant stability was assessed by resonance frequency analysis over 4 months following placement. Minimum stability levels were observed 2-6 weeks following placement for all 42 implants. Persons with HbA1c > or = 8.1% had a greater maximum decrease in stability from baseline and required a longer time for healing, as indicated by return of stability level to baseline. This study demonstrates alterations in implant stability consistent with impaired implant integration for persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus in direct relation to hyperglycemic conditions.

  5. Is there a need to optimize glycemic control in hemodialyzed diabetic patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    2006-01-01

    The report of Williams et al. gives rise to at least two important questions regarding diabetic patients on maintenance hemodialysis: (1) Does glycemic control play a significant role? (2) Is HbA1c a reliable measure of glycemic control? These questions are discussed. It is recommended that you...

  6. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kunihiko; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-07-25

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucose tolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications, and so the definition and diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricter glycemic control than before is required to reduce the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications. Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without an indicator of glycemic control; this review proposes a reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator of glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstrated that HbA1c does not reflect glycemic control accurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency. It has also become clear that glycated albumin, another indicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by iron deficiency and therefore might be a better indicator of glycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. However, large-population epidemiological studies are necessary in order to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline the most recent findings about the indicators of glycemic control during pregnancy including fructosamine and 1,5-anhydroglucitol.

  7. Glycemic control in cardiac surgery: implementing an evidence-based insulin infusion protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargraves, Joelle D

    2014-05-01

    Acute hyperglycemia following cardiac surgery increases the risk of deep sternal wound infection, significant early morbidity, and mortality. Insulin infusion protocols that target tight glycemic control to treat hyperglycemia have been linked to hypoglycemia and increased mortality. Recently published studies examining glycemic control in critical illness and clinical practice guidelines from professional organizations support moderate glycemic control. To measure critical care nurses' knowledge of glycemic control in cardiac surgery before and after education. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an evidence-based insulin infusion protocol targeting moderate glycemic control in cardiac surgery patients. This evidence-based practice change was implemented in the cardiovascular unit in a community teaching hospital. Nurses completed a self-developed questionnaire to measure knowledge of glycemic control. Blood glucose data, collected (retrospectively) from anesthesia end time through 11:59 PM on postoperative day 2, were compared from 2 months before to 2 months after the practice change. Nurses' knowledge (test scores) increased significantly after education (pretest mean = 53.10, SD = 11.75; posttest mean = 79.10, SD = 12.02; t54 = -8.18, P nurses' knowledge of glycemic control and implementing an insulin infusion protocol targeting moderate glycemic control were effective for treating acute hyperglycemia following cardiac surgery with decreased incidence of hypoglycemia.

  8. Propolis Improves Periodontal Status and Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Hesham M; Anees, Mohamed M; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2016-12-01

    Propolis is a natural resin made by bees from various plant sources and exerts antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antioxidant, and antidiabetic properties. The purpose of this study is to assess adjunctive benefit of propolis supplementation in individuals with chronic periodontitis (CP) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMt2) receiving scaling and root planing (SRP). A 6-month masked, randomized clinical trial comparing SRP with placebo (placebo + SRP group, n = 26) or SRP combined with a 6-month regimen of 400 mg oral propolis once daily (propolis + SRP group, n = 24) was performed in patients with long-standing DMt2 and CP. Treatment outcomes included changes in hemoglobin (Hb) A1c (primary outcome), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), serum N(€)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML), and periodontal parameters (secondary outcomes). After 3 and 6 months, average HbA1c levels in the propolis group decreased significantly by 0.82% and 0.96% units, respectively (P periodontal parameters of CP were significantly improved in both groups. The propolis group showed significantly greater probing depth reduction and clinical attachment level gain than the control group after 3 and 6 months. A 6-month regimen of 400 mg propolis once daily is a potentially viable adjunct to SRP that significantly reduces levels of HbA1c, FPG, and CML, and improves periodontal therapy outcome in people with DMt2 and CP.

  9. Glycemic Control among Pregnant Diabetic Women on Insulin Who Fasted During Ramadan

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    Nor Azlin Mohamed Ismail

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ramadan fasting for pregnant women with diabetes remains controversial and underreported. The objective of this study was to determine the glycemic control in pregnant diabetic women on insulin who fasted during Ramadan.Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out over a period of three years including pregnant diabetic women, who were on short-acting, intermediate-acting, or a combination of them, and opted to carry out Ramadan fasting. Glycemic control was assessed before, middle and after Ramadan fasting.Results: Thirty seven women opted to fast with 24 (64.9% of them had type 2 diabetes mellitus and 83.8% of them required combined insulin (short- acting, intermediate-acting therapy. The age of the participants was 32.13±4.68 years, and the age of their pregnancies was 25.60±7.12 weeks when the study was performed. The median number of days fasted was 25 days, and most of the women were able to fast for more than 15 days. There was no difference between glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes mellitus women prior to fasting. In the middle of Ramadan, serum fructosamine decreased in both groups. However, only serum HbA1c reduced in gestational diabetes mellitus after Ramadan. Conclusion: the findings indicate that pregnant diabetic women on insulin were able to fast during Ramadan and that their glycemic control was improved during fasting period. They may also suggest that instead of absolute ban on fasting for pregnant diabetic women more practical approach and close consultation with health care providers might be more helpful.

  10. Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics

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    Arunpreet Singh Kahlon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. Objective : To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. Materials and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Results : Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3% had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came

  11. Clinical nurse specialists lead teams to impact glycemic control after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkner, Gwen; Murray, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this evidence-based practice improvement project was to improve patients' blood glucose control after cardiac surgery, specifically aiming to keep blood glucose levels less than 200 mg/dL. Glycemic control is essential for wound healing and infection prevention. Multiple factors including the use of corticosteroids and the stress of critical illness put cardiac surgery patients at greater risk for elevated blood glucose levels postoperatively. A Surgical Care Improvement Project measure related to infection prevention calls for the morning blood glucose level (closest to 6:00 AM) to be less than 200 mg/dL on postoperative days 0 to 2. Patients on our cardiothoracic surgery unit were experiencing blood glucose levels greater than benchmark goals. A practice improvement effort was designed to decrease the number of blood glucose results greater than 200 mg/dL after cardiac surgery. The clinical nurse specialists for diabetes and cardiac surgery worked with nursing staff and the interdisciplinary team to implement a 4-pronged approach to improve efficiency in care processes: (1) increase frequency of glucose monitoring, (2) improve accessibility of insulin orders, (3) develop delegation protocol to facilitate nurse-initiated insulin infusion, and (4) implement revised insulin infusion protocol. Hyperglycemia was identified more quickly, and a nurse-initiated protocol prompted more timely use of revised insulin infusion orders and involvement of the diabetes specialty team. Clinically significant improvement in postoperative glycemic control was achieved. Empowering nurses to initiate hyperglycemia treatment and consultation by diabetes specialists may greatly improve efficiency in care processes and clinical outcomes for cardiac surgery patients. Clinical nurse specialists are well positioned to plan and implement interventions that facilitate an evidence-based approach to glycemic management after cardiac surgery.

  12. Effect of Probiotics on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials.

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    Yuting Ruan

    Full Text Available Previous clinical trials indicate that probiotic consumption may improve blood glucose control, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent.To investigate the effects of probiotics on glycemic control in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrial.gov through October 2014.Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and expressed as mean differences (MD with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic and quantified (I2.Seventeen randomized controlled trials were included, in which 17 fasting blood glucose (n = 1105, 11 fasting plasma insulin (n = 788, 8 homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (n = 635 comparisons were reported. Probiotic consumption, compared with placebo, significantly reduced fasting glucose (MD = -0.31 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.56, 0.06; p = 0.02, fasting plasma insulin (MD = -1.29 μU/mL; 95% CI -2.17, -0.41; p = 0.004, and HOMA-IR (MD = 0.48; 95% CI -0.83, -0.13; p = 0.007.Probiotic consumption may improve glycemic control modestly. Modification of gut microbiota by probiotic supplementation may be a method for preventing and control hyperglycemia in clinical practice.

  13. Predictors of poor glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients attending public hospitals in Dar es Salaam

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    Kamuhabwa AR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Appolinary R Kamuhabwa, Emmanuel CharlesUnit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, TanzaniaBackground: Tanzania has recently experienced a significant rise in the burden of diabetes, and it is estimated that more than 400,000 people are living with diabetes. A major concern in the management of diabetes is the occurrence of diabetic complications that occur as a result of poor glycemic control. Identification of the factors associated with poor glycemic control is important in order to institute appropriate interventions for the purpose of improving glycemic control and prevention of chronic complications.Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the level of glycemic control and explore the factors associated with poor glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Methodology: A cross-sectional study was carried out at the diabetic clinics for T2DM patients at the national and municipal hospitals in Dar es Salaam. A total of 469 patients were enrolled over a period of 8 weeks from March 2013 to May 2013. Patients' information such as sociodemographic characteristics, self-care management behaviors, and medication adherence were obtained through interviews. Blood pressure, weight, and height were measured during the day of the interview. All available last readings for fasting blood glucose (FBG measurements, lipid profile, and other clinical characteristics were obtained from patients' records.Results: The mean age of patients was 54.93 years. The majority (63.5% of patients were females and only eight patients had records of lipid profile measurements. Out of 469 patients, 69.7% had FBG of ≥7.2 mmol/L, indicating poor glycemic control. Females aged between 40 years and 59 years had significantly higher poor glycemic control (76.1% as compared with their male counterparts. Thirty-eight percent of patients had poor medication adherence

  14. Metabolic responses to high glycemic index and low glycemic index meals: a controlled crossover clinical trial

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    Bressan Josefina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The consumption of low glycemic index (LGI foods before exercise results in slower and more stable glycemic increases. Besides maintaining an adequate supply of energy during exercise, this response may favor an increase in fat oxidation in the postprandial period before the exercise compared to high glycemic index (HGI foods. The majority of the studies that evaluated the effect of foods differing in glycemic index on substrate oxidation during the postprandial period before the exercise are acute studies in which a single meal is consumed right before the exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of consuming two daily HGI or LGI meals for five consecutive days on substrate oxidation before the exercise and in the concentrations of glucose, insulin and free fatty acids before and during a high intensity exercise. Methods Fifteen male cyclists, aged 24.4 ± 3.8 years, with body mass index of 21.9 ± 1.4 kg.m-2 and a VO2 max of 70.0 ± 5.3 mL.kg-1.min-1, participated in this crossover study. All test meals were consumed in the laboratory. On days 1 and 5, substrate oxidation (30 minutes before and 90 minutes after breakfast (HGI or LGI and diet-induced thermogenesis (90 minutes postprandial were assessed before the exercise. The levels of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids were determined during 2 h after breakfast on these same days. Ninety minutes after breakfast, subjects completed a 30 min cycloergometric exercise at 85 to 95% of their maximum heart rate, during which lactate concentrations were assessed. Results The consumption of HGI meals resulted in higher areas under the glycemic and insulinemic curves in the postprandial period. However, glycemia did not differ by study treatment during exercise. There were no differences in free fatty acids in the postprandial period or in lactate levels during exercise. LGI meals resulted in lower fat oxidation and higher carbohydrate oxidation than the

  15. Effects of depression, diabetes distress, diabetes self-efficacy, and diabetes self-management on glycemic control among Chinese population with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keke; Park, Chang; Li, Mingzi; Wang, Xiudong; Li, Xiushu; Li, Wei; Quinn, Laurie

    2017-09-01

    To examine the direct and indirect effects of depression, diabetes distress, diabetes self-efficacy and diabetes self-management on glycemic control among a group of T2DM patients in China. A convenience sample of 254 participants were selected from three outpatient departments in Beijing, China. They were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Diabetes-related information was retrieved from their medical records. Descriptive statistics, independent student t tests, Chi-square tests, correlation analyses and Generalized Structural Equation Modeling were used. Only 91 (35.82%) participants achieved optimal glycemic control of HbA1c<7.0% (53mmol/mol). Only diabetes self-management had a direct effect on glycemic control (OR=0.95, P<0.001). Depression and diabetes distress had only indirect effects on glycemic control through both diabetes self-efficacy and diabetes self-management. Diabetes self-efficacy only had an indirect effect on glycemic control through diabetes self-management. Glycemic control among Chinese population with T2DM was suboptimal. Future interventions should focus on decreasing depressive symptoms and diabetes distress levels, and, therefore, improve diabetes self-efficacy and self-management practices and, ultimately, reach the optimal goal of glycemic control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Whole grains, bran, and germ in relation to homocysteine and markers of glycemic control, lipids, and inflammation 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majken K; Koh-Banerjee, Pauline; Franz, Mary;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intake of whole grains is inversely associated with risk of diabetes and ischemic heart disease in observational studies. The lower risk associated with high whole-grain intakes may be mediated through improvements in glycemic control, lipid profiles, or reduced inflammation. OBJECTIV...

  17. Subjecting Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients to Continuous Tube Feeding and an Intensive Computerized Protocol Establishes Tight Glycemic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N. D.; Biessels, G. J.; Vriesendorp, T. M.; DeVries, J. H.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Elbers, P. W.; Kappelle, L. J.; Portegies, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tight glycemic control (TGC) after ischemic stroke may improve clinical outcome but previous studies failed to establish TGC, principally because of postprandial glucose surges. The aim of the present study was to investigate if safe, effective and feasible TGC can be achieved with cont

  18. Vegetarian diets and glycemic control in diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yoko; Barnard, Neal D; Levin, Susan M; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested an association between vegetarian diets and improvements in glycemic control in diabetes, although this relationship is not well established. No meta-analysis of these studies has been performed. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials examining the association between vegetarian diets and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. The electronic databases Medline, Web of Science, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for articles published in any language through December 9, 2013. The following criteria were used for study inclusion: (I) age of participants >20 years; (II) vegetarian diet as intervention; (III) mean difference in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and/or fasting blood glucose levels used as outcomes; and (IV) controlled trials, duration ≥4 weeks. Exclusion criteria were: (I) not an original investigation; (II) duplicate samples; (III) diabetes other than type 2; (IV) multiple interventions; and (V) uncontrolled studies. The data collected included study design, baseline population characteristics, dietary data, and outcomes. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. Differences in HbA1c and fasting blood glucose levels associated with vegetarian diets were assessed. Of 477 studies identified, six met the inclusion criteria (n=255, mean age 42.5 years). Consumption of vegetarian diets was associated with a significant reduction in HbA1c [-0.39 percentage point; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.62 to -0.15; P=0.001; I(2)=3.0; P for heterogeneity =0.389], and a non-significant reduction in fasting blood glucose concentration (-0.36 mmol/L; 95% CI, -1.04 to 0.32; P=0.301; I(2)=0; P for heterogeneity =0.710), compared with consumption of comparator diets. Consumption of vegetarian diets is associated with improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. PROSPERO registration number is CRD42013004370.

  19. Early enhancements of hepatic and later of peripheral insulin sensitivity combined with increased postprandial insulin secretion contribute to improved glycemic control after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Jørgensen, Nils Bruun;

    2014-01-01

    to an intravenous glucose-glucagon challenge as well as an oral glucose load. Already within 1 week, RYGB reduced basal glucose production, improved basal hepatic insulin sensitivity and increased insulin clearance highlighting the liver as an important organ responsible for the early effects on glucose metabolism...

  20. Clinical review: Strict or loose glycemic control in critically ill patients - implementing best available evidence from randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M.J.; Harmsen, R.E.; Spronk, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Glycemic control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as 'strict glycemic control' (SGC), decreased mortality and morbidity of adult critically ill patients in two randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Five successive RCTs, however, failed to show benefit of SGC with one trial even reporti

  1. Impact of phone call intervention on glycemic control in diabetes patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

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    Naeti Suksomboon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telephone-delivered intervention can provide many supports in diabetes self-management to improve glycemic control. Several trials showed that telephone intervention was positively associated with glycemic outcomes in diabetes. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the impact of telephone contact intervention (intervention group on glycemic control compared with standard clinical care (control group. METHODS: Randomized control studies of telephone intervention in diabetes were searched on Medline (Pubmed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Web of Science (ISI, and Scopus. Electronic search was done from inception to April 2013. The following MeSH terms were used: diabetes mellitus, randomized control trials and telemedicine, together with keywords including phone intervention, diabetes, and glycemic control. Historical search was also conducted on the references of relevant articles. The quality of the trials was assessed using Maastricht-Amsterdam scale. Treatment effect was estimated with mean difference in the change of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c from baseline between the intervention and control groups. RESULTS: A total of 203 articles were examined. Five trials involving 953 patients met the inclusion criteria and contributed to the meta-analysis. Telephone contact intervention was no more effective than standard clinical care in improving glycemic control (pooled mean difference in HbA1c -0.38%, 95%CI -0.91 to 0.16%. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis showed that the phone contact intervention was no more effective than standard clinical care in improving glycemic control in diabetes. However, telephone intervention may still have potential benefits especially for low-and middle-income countries; thus further large sample size and well-controlled studies are needed to evaluate the impact of the intervention.

  2. C1q/TNF-related Protein-12 (CTRP12), a Novel Adipokine That Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Glycemic Control in Mouse Models of Obesity and Diabetes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhikui; Peterson, Jonathan M.; Lei, Xia; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Wolfgang, Michael J.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Wong, G. William

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, their underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Many secreted endocrine factors and the intertissue cross-talk they mediate are known to be dysregulated in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we describe CTRP12, a novel adipokine with anti-diabetic actions. The mRNA and circulating levels of CTRP12 were decreased in a mouse model of obesity, but its expression in adipocytes was increased by the anti-diabetic drug rosiglitazone. A modest rise in circulating levels of CTRP12 by recombinant protein administration was sufficient to lower blood glucose in wild-type, leptin-deficient ob/ob, and diet-induced obese mice. A short term elevation of serum CTRP12 by adenovirus-mediated expression improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, normalized hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, and lowered postprandial insulin resistance in obese and diabetic mice. CTRP12 improves insulin sensitivity in part by enhancing insulin signaling in the liver and adipose tissue. Further, CTRP12 also acts in an insulin-independent manner; in cultured hepatocytes and adipocytes, CTRP12 directly activated the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway to suppress gluconeogenesis and promote glucose uptake, respectively. Collectively, these data establish CTRP12 as a novel metabolic regulator linking adipose tissue to whole body glucose homeostasis through insulin-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:22275362

  3. Assessing inpatient glycemic control: what are the next steps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Curtiss B; Wellik, Kay E; Kongable, Gail L; Shu, Jianfen

    2012-03-01

    Despite the emergence of glucometrics (i.e., systematic analysis of data on blood glucose levels of inpatients) as a subject of high interest, there remains a lack of standardization on how glucose parameters are measured and reported. This dilemma must be resolved before a national benchmarking process can be developed that will allow institutions to track and compare inpatient glucose control performance against established guidelines and that can also be supported by quality care organizations. In this article, we review some of the questions that need to be resolved through consensus and review of the evidence, and discuss some of the limitations in analyzing and reporting inpatient glucose data that must be addressed (or at least accepted as limitations) before hospitals can commit resources to gathering, compiling, and presenting inpatient glucose statistics as a health care quality measure. Standards must include consensus on which measures to report, the unit of analysis, definitions of targets for hyperglycemia treatment, a definition of hypoglycemia, determination of how data should be gathered (from chart review or from laboratory information systems), and which type of sample (blood or point of care) should be used for analysis of glycemic control. Hospitals and/or their representatives should be included in the discussion. For inpatient glucose control to remain a focus of interest, further dialogue and consensus on the topic are needed.

  4. Trace elements, oxidative stress and glycemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Chiang; Huang, Hsiu-Hua; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chong, Inn-Wen; Chao, Yu-Ying; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements and oxidative stress are associated with glycemic control and diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we analyzed the levels of serum copper, zinc, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and urinary MDA and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in 33 type 1 diabetic patients with optimal and suboptimal glycemic control (HbA1Cdiabetic controls to evaluate the differences between these markers in different glycemic control states. Diabetic patients, especially poor-glycemic-control subjects (HbA1C≥9%), exhibited significantly lower levels of serum zinc and increased levels of serum copper (and, therefore, increased serum copper-to-zinc ratios), serum SOD, blood MDA, and urinary MDA and 8-OHdG, relative to non-diabetic subjects. Furthermore, significant correlations existed in these patients between the serum copper, serum copper-to-zinc ratio, and urinary MDA (all pdiabetic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Improved Postprandial Glycemic Control with Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Bruce W; Johnson, Joseph A; Hyveled, Liselotte; Tamer, Søren C; Demissie, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Faster aspart is insulin aspart (IAsp) in a new formulation, which in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in subjects with type 1 diabetes has shown a faster onset and offset of glucose-lowering effect than IAsp. This double-blind, randomized, crossover active-controlled trial compared 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) response, following 2 weeks of CSII with faster aspart or IAsp. Primary endpoint: mean change in PPG 2 h after a standardized meal test (ΔPGav,0-2h). Subjects (n = 43) had masked continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) throughout. Faster aspart provided a statistically significantly greater glucose-lowering effect following the meal versus IAsp: ΔPGav,0-2h: 3.03 mmol/L versus 4.02 mmol/L (54.68 mg/dL vs. 72.52 mg/dL); estimated treatment difference (ETD) [95% CI]: -0.99 mmol/L [-1.95; -0.03] (-17.84 mg/dL [-35.21; -0.46]; P = 0.044). One hour postmeal, PG levels were -1.64 mmol/L (-29.47 mg/dL) lower with faster aspart versus IAsp (P = 0.006). Interstitial glucose (IG) profiles supported these findings; the largest differences were observed at breakfast: 9.08 versus 9.56 mmol/L (163.57 vs. 172.19 mg/dL; ETD [95% CI]: -0.48 mmol/L [-0.97; 0.01]; -8.62 mg/dL [-17.49; 0.24]; P = 0.057). Duration of low IG levels (≤3.9 mmol/L [70 mg/dL] per 24 h) was statistically significantly shorter for faster aspart versus IAsp (2.03 h vs. 2.45 h; ETD [95% CI]: -0.42 [-0.72; -0.11]; P = 0.008). No unexpected safety findings were observed. CSII delivery of faster aspart had a greater glucose-lowering effect than IAsp after a meal test. CGM results recorded throughout all meals supported this finding, with less time spent with low IG levels.

  6. The glycemic index: methodology and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Augustin, Livia S A; Emam, Azadeh; Josse, Andrea R; Saxena, Nishta; Jenkins, David J A

    2006-01-01

    The glycemic index concept owes much to the dietary fiber hypothesis that fiber would reduce the rate of nutrient absorption and increase the value of carbohydrate foods in the maintenance of health and treatment of disease. However, properties and components of food other than its fiber content contribute to the glycemic and endocrine responses postprandially. The aim of the glycemic index classification of foods was therefore to assist in the physiological classification of carbohydrate foods which, it was hoped, would be of relevance in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Over the past two decades low glycemic index diets have been reported to improve glycemic control in diabetic subjects, to reduce serum lipids in hyperlipidemic subjects and possibly to aid in weight control. In large cohort studies, low glycemic index or glycemic load diets (glycemic index multiplied by total carbohydrate) have also been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, reduced C-reactive protein concentrations and with a decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. More recently, some case-control and cohort studies have also found positive associations between the dietary glycemic index and the risk of colon, breast and other cancers. While the glycemic index concept continues to be debated and there remain inconsistencies in the data, sufficient positive findings have emerged to suggest that the glycemic index is an aspect of diet of potential importance in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  7. The relationship between breakfast skipping, chronotype, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Hood, Megan M; Crowley, Stephanie J; Morgan, Mary K; Teodori, Marsha; Knutson, Kristen L

    2014-02-01

    Breakfast skipping is associated with obesity and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Later chronotypes, individuals who have a preference for later bed and wake times, often skip breakfast. The aim of the study was to explore the relationships among breakfast skipping, chronotype, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients. We collected sleep timing and 24-h dietary recall from 194 non-shift-working type 2 diabetes patients who were being followed in outpatient clinics. Mid-sleep time on free days (MSF) was used as an indicator of chronotype. Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) values were obtained from medical records. Hierarchical linear regression analyses controlling for demographic, sleep, and dietary variables were computed to determine whether breakfast skipping was associated with HbA1C. Additional regression analyses were performed to test if this association was mediated by chronotype. There were 22 participants (11.3%) who self-reported missing breakfast. Breakfast skippers had significantly higher HbA1C levels, higher body mass indices (BMI), and later MSF than breakfast eaters. Breakfast skipping was significantly associated with higher HbA1C values (B = 0.108, p = 0.01), even after adjusting for age, sex, race, BMI, number of diabetes complications, insulin use, depressive symptoms, perceived sleep debt, and percentage of daily caloric intake at dinner. The relationship between breakfast skipping and HbA1C was partially mediated by chronotype. In summary, breakfast skipping is associated with a later chronotype. Later chronotype and breakfast skipping both contribute to poorer glycemic control, as indicated by higher HbA1C levels. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and determine whether behavioral interventions targeting breakfast eating or sleep timing may improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Glycemic control, compliance, and satisfaction for diabetic gravidas in centering group care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Laura I; Jelin, Angie C; Iqbal, Sara N; Belna, Sarah L; Fries, Melissa H; Patel, Misbah; Desale, Sameer; Ramsey, Patrick S

    2017-05-01

    To determine if diabetic gravidas enrolled in Centering® group care have improved glycemic control compared to those attending standard prenatal care. To compare compliance and patient satisfaction between the groups. We conducted a prospective cohort study of diabetics enrolled in centering group care from October 2013 to December 2015. Glycemic control, compliance and patient satisfaction (five-point Likert scale) were evaluated. Student's t-test, Chi-Square and mixed effects model were used to compare outcomes. We compared 20 patients in centering to 28 standard prenatal care controls. Mean fasting blood sugar was lower with centering group care (91.0 versus 105.5 mg/dL, p =0.017). There was no difference in change in fasting blood sugar over time between the two groups (p = 0.458). The percentage of time patients brought their blood glucose logs did not differ between the centering group and standard prenatal care (70.7 versus 73.9%, p = 0.973). Women in centering group care had better patient satisfaction scores for "ability to be seen by a physician" (5 versus 4, p = 0.041) and "time in waiting room" (5 versus 4, p =0.001). Fasting blood sugar was lower for patients in centering group care. Change in blood sugar over time did not differ between groups. Diabetic gravidas enrolled in centering group care report improved patient satisfaction.

  9. Hypovitaminosis D in type 2 diabetes: relation with features of the metabolic syndrome and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñambres, Inka; Sánchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Vinagre, Irene; Sánchez-Hernández, Joan; Urgell, Eulalia; de Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association of hypovitaminosis D with clinical and biochemical characteristics of type 2 diabetic patients and to determine the effect of glycemic control optimization on 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. Cross-sectional study of 63 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age 60 ± 9.8 years, 69.8% men). Twenty of the 63 patients were also studied before and after glycemic control optimization. Mean 25(OH)D concentrations were 63.64 ± 25.51 nmol/L and 74.6% of patients had hypovitaminosis D. Compared with patients with vitamin D sufficiency, patients with hypovitaminosis D had higher prevalence of overweight or obesity (72.3% versus 37.5%; p = 0.012) and higher VLDL cholesterol (VLDL-c) (0.71 (0.24-3.59) versus 0.45 (0.13-1.6) mmol/L; p = 0.011) and C-reactive protein (3.28 (0.36-17.69) versus 1.87 (0.18-17.47) mg/L; p = 0.033) concentrations. The composition of HDL particles also differed in both groups, with higher relative content of triglycerides and lower of cholesterol in patients with hypovitaminosis D. After adjustment for age, seasonality and BMI, differences remained significant for VLDL-c and triglyceride content of HDL. No differences were found regarding other diabetes characteristics. Improvement of glycemic control (HbA1c 9.4 (7.6-14.8) versus 7.3 (6.2-8.7)%; p = 0.000) was accompanied by a decrease in 25(OH)D concentrations (72.7 ± 33.3 to 59.0 ± 21.0 nmol/L; p = 0.035). Correlation analysis revealed that changes in 25(OH)D concentrations were negatively associated to changes in HbA1c (r - 0.482; p = 0.032). Hypovitaminosis D is associated with features of the metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes and improvement of glycemic control decreases 25(OH)D concentrations.

  10. Self-Efficacy Links Health Literacy and Numeracy to Glycemic Control

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Cavanaugh, Kerri; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Russell L Rothman

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the relationship between health literacy, numeracy, and glycemic control are unclear. We explored the role of self-efficacy in the predicted pathway linking health literacy and numeracy to glycemic control (A1C). Adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=383) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study at primary care and diabetes clinics at three medical centers. Data collected included demographic information, health literacy, general numeracy, and A1C. Path a...

  11. Nurses' perceptions of glycemic control in patients who have undergone cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Linda; Dunning, Elizabeth; Halpin, Linda; Stanger, Debra; Martin, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Previous work investigating the effect of glycemic control in patients who underwent cardiac surgery has demonstrated that obtaining and maintaining blood glucose values between 80 and 120 is imperative in achieving excellent clinical outcomes in a patient who have undergone cardiac surgery. However, the caregiver's workload associated with meeting this goal is only now beginning to be understood. This qualitative study used focus groups held on 3 consecutive days to interview nurses in the cardiovascular intensive care unit and cardiovascular step-down unit about their thoughts on glycemic control.Three research questions were developed to help guide the focus group discussions. Ten nurses, 3 from cardiovascular intensive care unit and 7 from cardiovascular step-down unit, participated in the focus groups and saturation was accomplished. The essence of the nurses' message was that they recognize glycemic control as a very important part of their patient care. However, to be able to perform this intervention, they need available equipment, a designated person to obtain all blood glucose values, periodic updates on patient outcomes related to glycemic control, and a less intrusive way to draw the patients' blood. The ability of the nurses to obtain glycemic control is hindered by the lack of time, lack of necessary resources/equipment, lack of knowledge about the long-term outcomes resulting from glycemic control, and the discomfort to patients caused by the frequent blood draws. Hospitals need to investigate alternative mechanisms that will assist the nurse in meeting this goal.

  12. Evaluation of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese communities: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shan; Gu, Liubao; Lou, Qinglin; Ouyang, Xiaojun; Yu, Yun; Wu, Haidi; Bian, Rongwen

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the glycemic levels in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to explore the factors related to the results of glycemic control. A total of 2454 T2DM patients from 11 communities were examined for glycosylated hemoglobin levels and glycemic control options. Potential factors related to the results of glycemic control were analyzed using logistic regression. Of all the patients, 55.3 % achieved the glycemic control target of HbA1c lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.181, 95 % CI 1.020-1.367; P = 0.026) were significantly associated with poor glycemic control. The complexity of antidiabetics was also associated with poor glycemic control (P lipoprotein cholesterol, or longer diabetic durations showed poor glycemic control, which was not found in female patients. Glycemic control was not satisfactory in T2DM patients of Nanjing communities. Various factors are associated with poor results of glycemic control.

  13. Self-Efficacy Links Health Literacy and Numeracy to Glycemic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Cavanaugh, Kerri; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Rothman, Russell L.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the relationship between health literacy, numeracy, and glycemic control are unclear. We explored the role of self-efficacy in the predicted pathway linking health literacy and numeracy to glycemic control (A1C). Adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=383) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study at primary care and diabetes clinics at three medical centers. Data collected included demographic information, health literacy, general numeracy, and A1C. Path analytic models estimated relations among health literacy, numeracy, and self-efficacy as predictors of A1C. Health literacy (r=0.14, pdiabetes self-efficacy was associated with lower A1C levels (r=−0.25, pliteracy on self-efficacy was reduced to non-significance (r=0.06, p=0.30). Health literacy and numeracy are each associated with greater diabetes self-efficacy; and greater diabetes self-efficacy is associated with lower A1C levels. Diabetes self-efficacy may be an important target of interventions to improve diabetes control and promote health equity related to health literacy and general numeracy skills needed for diabetes management. PMID:20845200

  14. Effect of current glycemic control on qualitative body composition in sedentary ambulatory Type 2 diabetics

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    Jayesh Dalpatbhai Solanki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus are on rise with cause–effect relationship. Diabetics monitor blood sugar, neglecting qualitative body composition, leaving residual threat of ectopic fat unattended. We tried to correlate glycemic triad with parameters of body composition derived objectively by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA. Materials and Methods: A sample of 78 under treatment sedentary Type 2 diabetics of either sex with known glycemic and lipidemic control from our city. Following baseline assessment measurement was done by instrument Omron Karada Scan (Model HBF-510, China using the principle of tetra poplar BIA to derive parameters of body composition. We tried to correlate glycemic triad with these parameters, both directly as well as after defining them as per established cutoff norms. Results: We found poor glycemic control in the study group (20% for Hb1AC, high body mass index, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat (VF, total body fat (TBF, and lesser mass of skeletal muscle in Type 2 diabetics. However, there were small, insignificant, and inconsistent difference of these parameters while directly correlating with the fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, and glycosylated hemoglobin. On qualitative assessment, the impact of glycemic control as per standard norms, the risk of high VF, high TBF, low skeletal muscle mass was though high (between 1 and 2 in Type 2 diabetics with poor glycemic control as compared to good glycemics, but each strength lacks statistical significance. Conclusion: BIA reveals that Type 2 diabetics have more ectopic fat on expense of skeletal muscle that do not correlate with current glycemic status, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Measurement of body composition can be included and subjects can be motivated for lifestyle modification strategies while managing metabolic derangements of Type 2 diabetes.

  15. Dietary starch type affects body weight and glycemic control in freely fed but not energy-restricted obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Alfred A; Kenney, Laura S; Goulet, Benoit; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed

    2009-10-01

    This study comprised 2 experiments that tested the hypothesis that a high-amylose starch diet (AMO) would improve body weight and glycemic control relative to a high-amylopectin starch diet (AMN) in rats with diet-induced obesity. After inducing obesity with a high-fat and -energy diet (Expt. 1), male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 46) were divided into 4 groups and given free or restricted access to either an AMN or an AMO diet for 4 wk (Expt. 2). After 3 wk, rats from each group underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. At the end of the experiment, food-deprived rats were killed by decapitation and blood and tissues were collected for analyses. AMO led to lower total energy intake, weight gain, fat pad mass, and glycemic response but higher insulin sensitivity index than AMN, only when consumed ad libitum (AL) (P resistant starch content rather than its glycemic index. We conclude that starches high in AMO can be effective in weight and glycemic control in obesity.

  16. Association between glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with cardiovascular complications

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    Huri HZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasniza Zaman Huri,1,2 Doris Yew Hui Ling,1 Wan Azman Wan Ahmad2,3 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Clinical Investigation Centre, University Malaya Medical Centre, Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Purpose: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a macrovascular complication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. To date, glycemic control profiles of antidiabetic drugs in cardiovascular (CV complications have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, this study was conducted retrospectively to assess the association of antidiabetic drugs and glycemic control with CV profiles in T2DM patients. The association of concurrent medications and comorbidities with glycemic control was also investigated.Methods: A total of 220 T2DM patients from the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, who had at least one CV complication and who had been taking at least one antidiabetic drug for at least 3 months, were included. The associations of antidiabetics, cardiovascular diseases, laboratory parameters, concurrent medications, comorbidities, demographics, and clinical characteristics with glycemic control were investigated.Results: Sulfonylureas in combination (P=0.002 and sulfonylurea monotherapy (P<0.001 were found to be associated with good glycemic control, whereas insulin in combination (P=0.051, and combination biguanides and insulin therapy (P=0.012 were found to be associated with poor glycemic control. Stroke (P=0.044 was the only type of CVD that seemed to be significantly associated with good glycemic control. Other factors such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (P=0.026, elderly patients (P=0.018, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P=0.021, and fasting plasma glucose (P<0.001 were found to be significantly correlated with good glycemic control

  17. The influence of carbohydrate consumption on glycemic control in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asbjörnsdóttir, Björg; Akueson, Cecelia E.; Ronneby, Helle

    2017-01-01

    , as a part of routine care. The total daily carbohydrate consumption from the major sources (e.g. bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, dairy products, fruits, candy) was calculated. A dietician estimated the overall glycemic index score (scale 0–7). Results At least two days of diet recording were available in 75...... g carbohydrates consumed daily, when adjusted for insulin dose/bodyweight and use of insulin pump treatment. The median (IQR) glycemic index score was 2 (0–3). An adjusted association between HbA1c and glycemic index score was not demonstrated. The women using carbohydrate counting daily (45%) had......Aims To study the influence of the quantity and the quality of carbohydrate consumption on glycemic control in early pregnancy among women with type 1 diabetes. Methods A retrospective study of 107 women with type 1 diabetes who completed 1–3 days of diet recording before first antenatal visit...

  18. Lowering physical activity impairs glycemic control in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikus, Catherine R; Oberlin, Douglas J; Libla, Jessica L; Taylor, Angelina M; Booth, Frank W; Thyfault, John P

    2012-02-01

    Postprandial glucose (PPG) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and death, regardless of diabetes status. Whereas changes in physical activity produce changes in insulin sensitivity, it is not clear whether changes in daily physical activity directly affect PPG in healthy free-living persons. We used continuous glucose monitors to measure PPG and PPG excursions (ΔPPG, postmeal - premeal blood glucose) at 30-min increments after meals in healthy habitually active volunteers (n = 12, age = 29 ± 1 yr, body mass index = 23.6 ± 0.9 kg·m(-2), VO2max = 53.6 ± 3.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) during 3 d of habitual (≥10,000 steps per day) and reduced (physical activity. Diets were standardized across monitoring periods, and fasting-state oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed on the fourth day of each monitoring period. During 3 d of reduced physical activity (12,956 ± 769 to 4319 ± 256 steps per day), PPG increased at 30 and 60 min after a meal (6.31 ± 0.19 to 6.68 ± 0.23 mmol·L(-1) and 5.75 ± 0.16 to 6.26 ± 0.28 mmol·L(-1), P active time point), and ΔPPG increased by 42%, 97%, and 33% at 30, 60, and 90 min after a meal, respectively (P activity (P physical activity in otherwise healthy free-living individuals. These data indicate that daily physical activity is an important mediator of glycemic control, even among healthy individuals, and reinforce the utility of physical activity in preventing pathologies associated with elevated PPG.

  19. The Effect of Educational Interventions on Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Mohammad Javad Zibaeenezhad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with many serious complications. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the effect of educational interventions on glycemic control represented by changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels in the patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods: This study was performed on 100 adults with type 2 diabetes using computerized randomization based on registration numbers from June to November 2012. An educational course of diabetes together with exercise training and nutritional education was designed for the study population in order to increase the patients’ knowledge and attitude toward diabetes and to increase their participation in self-monitoring of blood glucose. Results: All the 100 diabetic patients completed the educational course. The mean age of the participants was 57.76 ± 10.03 years (range: 40 - 75 years. HbA1c changes three months after completion of the educational interventions were compared to baseline values using paired sample t-test. According to the results, the mean level of HbA1C was significantly lower at the 3-month follow-up compared to the baseline (8.09 ± 0.31 versus 8.51 ± 0.26, P < 0.001. Conclusions: The educational interventions effectively improved the diabetic patients’ glycemic control and are, thus, highly recommended for diabetic patients.

  20. Vegetarian diets and glycemic control in diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Neal D.; Levin, Susan M.; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have suggested an association between vegetarian diets and improvements in glycemic control in diabetes, although this relationship is not well established. No meta-analysis of these studies has been performed. Methods To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials examining the association between vegetarian diets and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Data source: The electronic databases Medline, Web of Science, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for articles published in any language through December 9, 2013. Study selection: The following criteria were used for study inclusion: (I) age of participants >20 years; (II) vegetarian diet as intervention; (III) mean difference in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and/or fasting blood glucose levels used as outcomes; and (IV) controlled trials, duration ≥4 weeks. Exclusion criteria were: (I) not an original investigation; (II) duplicate samples; (III) diabetes other than type 2; (IV) multiple interventions; and (V) uncontrolled studies. Data extraction and synthesis: The data collected included study design, baseline population characteristics, dietary data, and outcomes. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. Main outcomes and measures: Differences in HbA1c and fasting blood glucose levels associated with vegetarian diets were assessed. Results Of 477 studies identified, six met the inclusion criteria (n=255, mean age 42.5 years). Consumption of vegetarian diets was associated with a significant reduction in HbA1c [−0.39 percentage point; 95% confidence interval (CI), −0.62 to −0.15; P=0.001; I2=3.0; P for heterogeneity =0.389], and a non-significant reduction in fasting blood glucose concentration (−0.36 mmol/L; 95% CI, −1.04 to 0.32; P=0.301; I2=0; P for heterogeneity =0.710), compared with consumption of comparator diets. Conclusions Consumption of vegetarian diets is

  1. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

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    Huri HZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasniza Zaman Huri,1,2 Lay Peng Lim,1 Soo Kun Lim3 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 2Clinical Investigation Centre, University Malaya Medical Centre, 3Renal Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established.Purpose: This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD.Patients and methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7% or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7% based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association.Results: Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%. Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9% was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%. Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001, insulin therapy (P=0.005, and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038 were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004, comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024 and retinopathy (P=0.033, concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047, a-blockers (P=0.033, and antigouts (P=0.003 were also correlated with A1C.Conclusion: Identification of

  2. Role of Vitamin D on glycemic control and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Mostafa Saif-Elnasr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D deficiency may play a key role in the development of impaired glucose tolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and metabolic syndrome. Several studies have shown that Vitamin D has an antioxidant property. We aimed to investigate 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25[OH]D levels in patients with T2DM and in nondiabetic healthy controls and to ascertain the impact of 25(OHD levels on glycemic control and oxidative stress in T2DM patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty male patients with T2DM and twenty age- and socioeconomic status-matched male healthy controls were included in the study. Fasting and postprandial blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were measured. Enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx was determined by spectrophotometric assay, and serum levels of 25(OHD were measured using radioimmunoassay. Results: Serum Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in patients with T2DM than healthy controls (P = 0.015. There was a significantly lower GPx activity in patients with T2DM than controls (P = 0.048, but the difference in SOD activity did not reach statistical significance. There was a significant negative correlation between serum Vitamin D levels and HbA1c (P = 0.016, but no statistical correlation was shown between serum Vitamin D levels and GPx and SOD. Conclusion: We conclude that low level of Vitamin D might play a significant role in T2DM pathogenesis. Hence, Vitamin D supplementation may improve glycemic control and oxidative stress in T2DM.

  3. The association between diabetes related medical costs and glycemic control: A retrospective analysis

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    Barron John

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this research is to quantify the association between direct medical costs attributable to type 2 diabetes and level of glycemic control. Methods A longitudinal analysis using a large health plan administrative database was performed. The index date was defined as the first date of diabetes diagnosis and individuals had to have at least two HbA1c values post index date in order to be included in the analyses. A total of 10,780 individuals were included in the analyses. Individuals were stratified into groups of good (N = 6,069, fair (N = 3,586, and poor (N = 1,125 glycemic control based upon mean HbA1c values across the study period. Differences between HbA1c groups were analyzed using a generalized linear model (GLM, with differences between groups tested by utilizing z-statistics. The analyses allowed a wide range of factors to affect costs. Results 42.1% of those treated only with oral agents, 66.1% of those treated with oral agents and insulin, and 57.2% of those treated with insulin alone were found to have suboptimal control (defined as fair or poor throughout the study period (average duration of follow-up was 2.95 years. Results show that direct medical costs attributable to type 2 diabetes were 16% lower for individuals with good glycemic control than for those with fair control ($1,505 vs. $1,801, p Conclusion Almost half (44% of all patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are at sub-optimal glycemic control. Evidence from this analysis indicates that the direct medical costs of treating type 2 diabetes are significantly higher for individuals who have fair or poor glycemic control than for those who have good glycemic control. Patients under fair control account for a greater proportion of the cost burden associated with antidiabetic prescription drugs.

  4. Convergence of continuous glucose monitoring and in-hospital tight glycemic control: closing the gap between caregivers and industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michaela; Skladany, Matthew J; Ludwig, Christopher R; Guthermann, Joshua S

    2007-11-01

    The convergence of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and tight glycemic control protocols is approaching. As with the diffusion of any innovative technology, there will be challenges that will likely delay widespread adoption. With the objective of assessing the current mindset of health care professionals toward CGM adoption in the hospital intensive care unit (ICU) setting and resulting implications to industry, Boston Biomedical Consultants surveyed >60 U.S. ICU managers and nurses during Spring 2007. The underlying sentiment expressed by survey respondents toward CGM was positive, with many citing potential benefits of CGM adoption, such as labor savings, improved glycemic control, and assistance with insulin dosing. While the demand for CGM in the hospital clearly exists, early stage product acceptance will remain limited given the substantial education, market development, and economic hurdles.

  5. Current Status of Glycemic Control of Patients with Diabetes in Korea: The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

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    Ja Young Jeon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES III (2005 reported that 22.9% of individuals with diabetes have a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c 5 years. HbA1c in the group taking only oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs was significantly lower than that in the group administered only insulin or OHA and insulin in combination. In logistic regression analysis, a longer duration of diabetes, insulin use and the absence of chronic renal failure were associated with HbA1c levels >6.5%.ConclusionThe level of adequate glycemic control was similar to but slightly improved compared with previous levels. The glycemic control of long-standing diabetes patients is more difficult even though they receive insulin treatment.

  6. Current Status of Glycemic Control of Patients with Diabetes in Korea: The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ja Young; Kim, Dae Jung; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Lim, Soo; Choi, Sung Hee; Kim, Chul Sik; An, Jee Hyun; Kim, Nan Hee; Won, Jong Chul; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Cha, Bong-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) III (2005) reported that 22.9% of individuals with diabetes have a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 5 years. HbA1c in the group taking only oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) was significantly lower than that in the group administered only insulin or OHA and insulin in combination. In logistic regression analysis, a longer duration of diabetes, insulin use and the absence of chronic renal failure were associated with HbA1c levels >6.5%. Conclusion The level of adequate glycemic control was similar to but slightly improved compared with previous levels. The glycemic control of long-standing diabetes patients is more difficult even though they receive insulin treatment. PMID:25003073

  7. Evaluation of glycemic control, quality of life and psychological characteristics in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Yuliya Andreevna Shishkova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify psychological characteristics associated with better glycemic control and higher quality of life (QoL in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.Materials and Methods. The study included 140 T1DM patients (47 males aged 18 to 28 years. Assessment of the QoL and associated emotional state (ES was performed by validated localized questionnaires, supplemented with the inventories for evaluation of psychological characteristics. Based on the acquired data we performed a trilateral analysis of glycemic control, QoL and ES, followed by testing of these parameters for correlation with certain psychological characteristics, including disease attitude, mindfulness, self-attitude and self-assessment, coping strategies, autoregulation parameters and the locus of control.Results. In the studied sample, better glycemic control was associated with higher QoL and more favourable ES. We also identified several psychological characteristics associated with an improvement in all three primary parameters, namely: higher level of mindfulness, internal locus of control and ergopathic attitude.Conclusion. The diagnostic inventory for QoL and ES evaluation used in the present study may be helpful for psychological testing in patients with T1DM.

  8. Factors Influencing Glycemic Control in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

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    Seher Çakır

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are a plenty of factors influencing glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. The aim of this study was to determine the factors influencing metabolic control in children with type 1 DM. Materials and Method: The study was performed in 200 children with type 1 DM between the ages 6 months to 18 years. This study was conducted by interviewing individually with the children and their families and completing the questionnaires related to their demographic features and data associated with their illness. The laboratory findings and medical information of the patients from the charts were also retrospectively recorded. Results: There were a total of 200 patients including 104 (52% girls and 96 (48% boys. The mean age of the patients was 11.7 (±4.26 years. The mean duration of diabetes was 3.8 years (6 months to 14 years. Eighty-nine percent of all patients and all of the patients between 12 and 18 years of age were on intensive insulin therapy. Mean insulin dose was 0.84±0.19 units/kg/day. The mean HbA1c value was 8.8%. Body mass index (BMI mean z-score was -0.06±1.19. There were no correlations between HbA1c and the duration of diabetes or age although a positive correlation was found with insulin dose (r=0.27 p<0.01. It was found that intensive therapy did not lower HbA1c values or the risk of severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, there was a decrease in HbA1c values of 72 (36% patients whose therapy was converted from conventional therapy to intensive therapy (p<0.05. HbA1c values were found to be higher in patients who lived with more than 4 persons in the house, who were non-compliant to follow-up or diet, who had more than 3 symptomatic hypoglycemia in the last 6 months, who had episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA, who were adolescent at the time of diagnosis, and who were admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis at the time of diagnosis (p<0.05. Although there was a correlation between insulin doses and

  9. Exercise and Glycemic Control: Focus on Redox Homeostasis and Redox-Sensitive Protein Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Stepto, Nigel K.; Levinger, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity, excess energy consumption, and obesity are associated with elevated systemic oxidative stress and the sustained activation of redox-sensitive stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Sustained SAPK activation leads to aberrant insulin signaling, impaired glycemic control, and the development and progression of cardiometabolic disease. Paradoxically, acute exercise transiently increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet postexercise glycemic control and skeletal muscle function are enhanced. Furthermore, regular exercise leads to the upregulation of antioxidant defense, which likely assists in the mitigation of chronic oxidative stress-associated disease. In this review, we explore the complex spatiotemporal interplay between exercise, oxidative stress, and glycemic control, and highlight exercise-induced reactive oxygen species and redox-sensitive protein signaling as important regulators of glucose homeostasis. PMID:28529499

  10. Severe Type 2 Diabetes Induces Reversible Modifications of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Which are Ameliorate by Glycemic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Bruzzese, Giuseppe; Crimi, Ettore; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Liguori, Antonio; Brongo, Sergio; Barbieri, Michelangela; Picascia, Antonietta; Schiano, Concetta; Sommese, Linda; Ferrara, Nicola; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating endothelial progenitors cells (EPCs) play a critical role in neovascularization and endothelial repair. There is a growing evidence that hyperglycemia related to Diabetes Mellitus (DM) decreases EPC number and function so promoting vascular complications. Aim of the Study This study investigated whether an intensive glycemic control regimen in Type 2 DM can increase the number of EPCs and restores their function. Methods Sixty-two patients with Type 2 DM were studied. Patients were tested at baseline and after 3 months of an intensive regimen of glycemic control. The Type 2 DM group was compared to control group of subjects without diabetes. Patients with Type 2 DM (mean age 58.2±5.4 years, 25.6% women, disease duration of 15.4±6.3 years) had a baseline HgA1c of 8.7±0.5% and lower EPC levels (CD34+/KDR+) in comparison to healthy controls (p<0.01). Results The intensive glycemic control regimen (HgA1c decreased to 6.2±0.3%) was coupled with a significant increase of EPC levels (mean of 18%, p<0.04 vs. baseline) and number of EPCs CFUs (p<0.05 vs. baseline). Conclusion This study confirms that number and bioactivity of EPCs are reduced in patients with Type 2 DM and, most importantly, that the intensive glycemic control in Type 2 DM promotes EPC improvement both in their number and in bioactivity. PMID:27426095

  11. Group visits in the management of diabetes and hypertension: effect on glycemic and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loney-Hutchinson, Lisel M; Provilus, Alfrede D; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Zizi, Ferdinand; Ogedegbe, Olugbenga; McFarlane, Samy I

    2009-06-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem that is reaching epidemic proportions in the United States and worldwide. Over 22 million Americans currently have diabetes and it is forecast that over 350 million people worldwide will be affected by 2030. Furthermore, the economic cost of diabetes care is enormous. Despite current efforts on the part of health care providers and their patients, outcomes of care remain largely suboptimal, with only 3% to 7% of the entire diabetes population meeting recommended treatment goals for glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid control. Therefore, alternative approaches to diabetes care are desperately needed. Group visits may provide a viable option for patients and health care providers, with the potential to improve outcomes and cost effectiveness. In this review, we highlight the magnitude of the diabetes epidemic, the barriers to optimal diabetes care, and the utility of the concept of group visits as a chronic disease management strategy for diabetes care.

  12. Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes: Patients' and Caregivers' Perceptions of Glycemic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosolowsky, Elizabeth; Yaskina, Maryna; Couch, Robert

    2017-08-23

    (1) to describe pediatric patients with T1D and their caregivers' perceptions of measures of glycemic control (hemoglobin [A1C] and blood glucose [BG] levels) and (2) to determine the relationship between patients' and caregivers' perceptions of measures of glycemic control with actual A1C levels and adherence to diabetes self-care behaviors. Patients (8 to 18 years) with T1D and caregivers completed questionnaires that queried their perceptions of (1) what the A1C level assesses, (2) the ideal A1C target, and (3) the ideal BG range. Point-of-care A1C levels were measured for each patient. They also completed the Self-Care Inventory Revised (SCI-R) to assess adherence to diabetes self-care behaviors. Among 253 dyads, the frequencies of patients compared to caregivers who could accurately describe what the A1C level assesses, identify the ideal A1C target, and identify the ideal BG range were 20 vs. 66, 31 vs. 56, and 72 vs. 76%, respectively. Patients' accuracy in reporting ideal targets for glycemic control was significantly associated with caregivers' accuracy. There was a trend for lower median A1C levels in patients who were part of a dyad wherein both had accurate perceptions of glycemic control. Patients and caregivers had accurate knowledge of ideal BG range but were less knowledgeable about the meaning of A1C levels and ideal A1C targets. Nevertheless, whether glycemic control was perceived as an A1C measurement or a BG range, A1C levels trended lower for patients when both they and their caregivers had accurate perceptions of glycemic control. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient perception of understanding health education and instructions has moderating effect on glycemic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Whether health literacy is independently associated with processes or outcomes of diabetes-related care is controversial. We tried to demonstrate the interaction of health literacy and understanding of health education and instructions in achieving glycemic control. Methods Five hundred and one consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in the outpatient clinic of the metabolism department were recruited into this pilot study. The demographic data were collected from patients’ self-reports. The clinical background information was collected through electronic medical records. A questionnaire derived from part of the Mandarin Health Literacy Scale was used to measure numeracy and functional health literacy of people with diabetes. Health literacy levels were categorized into inadequate, marginal and adequate. Patient self-ratings of their perceived understanding of the health education information and instructions provided by their case manager in the past were categorized into two subgroups: better and poor. Patients with an HbA1c level equal to or below 7% were considered to have good glycemic control. Multivariate logistic regression was used to find associated factors of health literacy and understanding of health education and instructions. GENMOD procedures were used to analyze repeated outcome measurements of glycemic control. Results Higher educational attainment and higher household income (odds ratios were 2.23 and 2.22, respectively) were significantly associated with patients who had adequate health literacy. Higher educational attainment and patients with a family history of DM (odds ratios were 4.99 and 1.85, respectively) were significantly associated with better understanding of health education and instructions. Adequate health literacy is not the only factor associated with good glycemic control. The effect of adequate health literacy in achieving good glycemic control might be masked by patients with better understanding

  14. Tight glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas may play an important role in preventing infection after pancreatic resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiro Hanazaki

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that perioperative hyperglycemia is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery.To improve perioperative glycemic control,we wish to highlight and comment on an interesting paper published recently by the Annals of Surgery entitled:"Early postoperative hyperglycemia is associated with postoperative complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD)" by Eshuis et al.The authors concluded that early postoperative glucose levels more than 140mg/dL was significantly associated with complications after PD.Since we recommend that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) is an effective method to prevent postoperative complications including surgical site infection after distal,proximal,and total pancreatic resection,we support strongly this conclusion drawn in this article.However,if early postoperative glucose control in patients undergoing PD was administrated by conventional method such as sliding scale approach as described in this article,it is difficult to maintain TGC.Therefore,we introduce a novel perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas against pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection including PD.

  15. Quantifying the Effect of Metformin Treatment and Dose on Glycemic Control

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer A Hirst; Farmer, Andrew J.; Ali, Raghib; Roberts, Nia W.; Stevens, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Metformin is the first-line oral medication recommended for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We reviewed the literature to quantify the effect of metformin treatment on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in all types of diabetes and examine the impact of differing doses on glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched from 1950 to June 2010 for trials of at least 12 weeks’ duration in which diabetic patients w...

  16. Perception of family support is correlated with glycemic control in Greeks with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilias, I; Hatzimichelakis, E; Souvatzoglou, A; Anagnostopoulou, T; Tselebis, A

    2001-06-01

    We studied 98 native Greek patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Their degree of glycemic control, evaluated with glycated hemoglobin A1c levels, was correlated with perceived family support, assessed with the Family Support Scale. The different social context of Greece--and its corresponding perception of family support--influence glycemic control in a way that is at variance from data of some studies of Anglo-Saxon families. In conclusion, family support should be taken into consideration in the management of native Greek patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Nasogastric aspiration as an indicator for feed absorption in model-based glycemic control in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Cameron A; Dickson, Jennifer L; Hewett, James N; Lynn, Adrienne; Rose, Hamish J; Clarkson, Sooji H; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    STAR (stochastic targeted) is a glycemic control model-based framework for critically ill neonates that has shown benefits in reducing hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. STAR uses a stochastic matrix method to forecast future changes in a patient's insulin sensitivity and then applies this result to a physiological model to select an optimal insulin treatment. Nasogastric aspiration may be used as an indicator to suggest periods of care when enteral feed absorption is compromised, improving the performance of glycemic control. An analysis has been carried out to investigate the effect of poorly absorbed feeds on glycemic control. Clinical data were collected from eight patients on insulin therapy and enteral feed, which included large or significantly milky aspirates. Patients had a median gestational age of 25 weeks and postnatal age of 5.5 days. Virtual patients were created using the NICING model, and insulin sensitivity (SI) profiles were fit. Alternative feed profiles were generated whereby enteral feed absorption was redistributed with time to account for poor feed absorption. The effect of poor feed absorption, as indicated by aspirates, is investigated. The average percentage change of SI 4 h before a significant aspirate was 1.16%, and 1.49% in the 4 h following the aspirate. No distinct relationship was found between the fractional change in SI and the volume of the aspirate. Accounting for aspirates had a clinically negligible impact on glycemic control in virtual trials. Accounting for aspirates by manipulating enteral feed profiles had a minimal influence on both modeling and controlling glycemia in neonates. The impact of this method is clinically insignificant, suggesting that a population constant for the rate of glucose absorption in the gut adequately models feed absorption within the STAR framework. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  18. Language barriers, physician-patient language concordance, and glycemic control among insured Latinos with diabetes: the Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alicia; Schillinger, Dean; Warton, E Margaret; Adler, Nancy; Moffet, Howard H; Schenker, Yael; Salgado, M Victoria; Ahmed, Ameena; Karter, Andrew J

    2011-02-01

    language-concordant care improve glycemic control among US Latinos with LEP.

  19. Effect of bromocriptine-QR therapy on glycemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus whose dysglycemia is inadequately controlled on insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamarthi, Bindu; Cincotta, Anthony H

    2017-05-01

    The concurrent use of an insulin sensitizer in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal-bolus insulin may help improve glycemic control while limiting further insulin requirement. Bromocriptine-QR (B-QR), a quick release, sympatholytic, dopamine D2 receptor agonist therapy for T2DM, is a postprandial insulin sensitizer. This study evaluated the effect of B-QR on dysglycemia in T2DM subjects with suboptimal glycemic control on basal-bolus insulin plus metformin. The effect of once-daily morning administration of B-QR on dysglycemia was evaluated in 60 T2DM subjects derived from the Cycloset Safety Trial, with HbA1c >7% on basal-bolus insulin plus metformin at baseline, randomized to B-QR (N = 44) versus placebo (N = 16) and completed 12 weeks of study drug treatment. The analyses also included a subset of subjects on high-dose insulin (total daily insulin dose (TDID) ≥70 units; N = 36: 27 B-QR; 9 placebo). Subjects were well matched at baseline. After 12 weeks of B-QR treatment, mean % HbA1c decreased by -0.73% relative to baseline (p insulin subset, B-QR therapy resulted in % HbA1c reductions of -0.95 and -1.49 relative to baseline (p insulin subset). B-QR therapy improves glycemic control in T2DM subjects whose glycemia is poorly controlled on metformin plus basal-bolus insulin, including individuals on high-dose basal-bolus insulin. This glycemic impact occurred without significant change in FPG, suggesting a postprandial glucose lowering mechanism of action. Cycloset Safety Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00377676.

  20. Alternative biomarkers for assessing glycemic control in diabetes: fructosamine, glycated albumin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Eun

    2015-06-01

    The growing attention to alternative glycemic biomarkers including fructosamine, glycated albumin (GA), 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), is attributable to the limitations of the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) assay. It is important to recognize the conditions in which HbA1c levels may be difficult to interpret. Serum fructosamine and GA have been proposed useful tools for monitoring of short-term glycemic control. These biomarkers not only reflect well glycemic control in hematologic disorder, but also represent postprandial glucose fluctuation. Serum 1,5-AG may be useful for estimating within-day glucose variation. Use of these nontraditional tests can be more helpful in the management of diabetes as complement traditional measures. Further larger cohort studies are warranted to determine whether nontraditional biomarkers have potential utility for early diagnosis, management of diabetes, and prevention of diabetic complications.

  1. The Importance of Social Support on Glycemic Control in Low-Income Latinos with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Britt; Junqueira, Yasmine; Gosdin, Lucas; Mejia, Roberto; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Latino population exhibits poorer glycemic control than the white population, leading to more frequent health complications and greater disease severity. Social support has been shown a significant factor in health and well-being. Purpose: To determine the association between glycemic control and social support in patients…

  2. The Importance of Social Support on Glycemic Control in Low-Income Latinos with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Britt; Junqueira, Yasmine; Gosdin, Lucas; Mejia, Roberto; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Latino population exhibits poorer glycemic control than the white population, leading to more frequent health complications and greater disease severity. Social support has been shown a significant factor in health and well-being. Purpose: To determine the association between glycemic control and social support in patients…

  3. Effects of High Performance Inulin Supplementation on Glycemic Control and Antioxidant Status in Women with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Pourghassem Gargari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of high performance inulin supplementation on blood glycemic control and antioxidant status in women with type 2 diabetes.MethodsIn a randomized, triple-blind controlled trial, 49 females (fiber intake <30 g/day, 25control, n=25 for 2 months. Fasting blood samples were obtained and both glycemic control and antioxidant status were determined at baseline and at the end of the study.ResultsAt the end of the study period, there were significant decreases in fasting plasma glucose (8.47%, glycosylated hemoglobin (10.43%, and malondialdehyde (37.21% levels and significant increases in total antioxidant capacity (18.82% and superoxide dismutase activity (4.36% in the inulin group when compared to the maltodextrin group (P<0.05. Changes in fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and catalase activity were not significant in the inulin group when compared with the maltodextrin group. Glutathione peroxidase activity remained unchanged in both groups.ConclusionInulin supplementation may improve some glycemic and antioxidant indices and decrease malondialdehyde levels in women with type 2 diabetes. Further investigations are needed in order to confirm the positive effects that inulin may have on the glycemic and antioxidant indices of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Enhanced fitness: a randomized controlled trial of the effects of home-based physical activity counseling on glycemic control in older adults with prediabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Miriam C; Pieper, Carl F; Edelman, David E; Yancy, William S; Green, Jennifer B; Lum, Helen; Peterson, Matthew J; Sloane, Richard; Cowper, Patricia A; Bosworth, Hayden B; Huffman, Kim M; Cavanaugh, James T; Hall, Katherine S; Pearson, Megan P; Taylor, Gregory A

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether a home-based multicomponent physical activity counseling (PAC) intervention is effective in reducing glycemic measures in older outpatients with prediabetes mellitus. Controlled clinical trial. Primary care clinics of the Durham Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center between September 29, 2008, and March 25, 2010. Three hundred two overweight (body mass index 25-45 kg/m(2) ), older (60-89) outpatients with impaired glucose tolerance (fasting blood glucose 100-125 mg/dL, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) fasting insulin and glucose levels at baseline and 3 and 12 months. HbA1c was the secondary indicator of glycemic control. Other secondary outcomes were anthropometric measures and self-reported physical activity, health-related quality of life, and physical function. There were no significant differences between the PAC and control groups over time for any of the glycemic indicators. Both groups had small declines over time of approximately 6% in fasting blood glucose (P physical activity increased significantly in the PAC group (P physical activity levels but was insufficient to improve glycemic indicators in older outpatients with prediabetes mellitus. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Inflammatory biomarkers in type 2 diabetic patients: effect of glycemic control and impact of LDL subfraction phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Irene; Sánchez-Quesada, José Luis; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Santos, David; Ordoñez-Llanos, Jordi; De Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2014-02-04

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with higher cardiovascular risk partly related to an increase in inflammatory parameters. The aim of this study was to determine the association of inflammatory biomarkers with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction phenotype and glycemic control in subjects with T2D and poor glycemic control. A cross-sectional study was performed comparing 122 subjects with T2D (59 ± 11 years old, body mass index 30.2 ± 5.6 kg/m2) with 54 control subjects. Patients with T2D were classified according to their LDL subfraction phenotype and inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein, Interleukin-6, Interleukin-8, Transforming growth factor β1, Monocyte chemotactic protein 1, Leptin, Adiponectin) were evaluated according to the degree of glycemic control, LDL phenotype and other clinical characteristics. Forty-two subjects with T2D were studied before and after 3 months of improving glycemic control by different strategies. Patients with T2D had higher C-reactive protein (CRP) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1) levels and lower adiponectin concentration, compared to controls. T2D subjects with body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 had higher CRP levels (5.2 ± 4.8 mg/l vs 3.7 ± 4.3 mg/l; p < 0.05). The presence of LDL phenotype B was related to higher levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) (53.92 ± 52.82 ng/l vs 31.35 ± 33.74 ng/l; p < 0.05) and lower levels of adiponectin (3663 ± 3044 ng/l vs 2723 ± 1776 ng/l; p < 0.05). The reduction of HbA1c from 9.5 ± 1.8% at baseline to 7.4 ± 0.8% was associated with a significant reduction of TGF-β1 (41.86 ± 32.84 ng/l vs 26.64 ± 26.91 ng/l; p = 0.02). Subjects with T2D, especially those with LDL phenotype B and obesity, have higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. Improvement of glycemic control reduces TGF-β1 levels, which may contribute partly to its renoprotective role.

  6. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestationaldiabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetesmellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucosetolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternalinfantcomplications, and so the definition and diagnosticcriteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) havebeen changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM andpregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricterglycemic control than before is required to reduce theincidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications.Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without anindicator of glycemic control; this review proposesa reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator ofglycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus ishemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstratedthat HbA1c does not reflect glycemic controlaccurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency.It has also become clear that glycated albumin, anotherindicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by irondeficiency and therefore might be a better indicator ofglycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnantwomen with diabetes mellitus. However, largepopulationepidemiological studies are necessary inorder to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline themost recent findings about the indicators of glycemiccontrol during pregnancy including fructosamine and1,5-anhydroglucitol.

  7. Erectile function in men with diabetes type 2: correlation with glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, H; Salem, A; Gadalla, A; El Wafa, N Abou; Mohamed, O A

    2010-01-01

    Men with diabetes have an increased risk for erectile dysfunction (ED) than those without diabetes. The diabetes control and complications trial clearly showed that better long-term control of blood glucose in diabetes type 1 is associated with decreased frequency and delayed the onset of microvascular complications. The aim of this study is to explore the role of glycemic control, and its correlation to sexual function in patients with diabetes type 2. One hundred patients were selected for the study according to the following criteria: all the cases were presenting with diabetes type 2 as a single risk factor for ED, age being between 35 and 50 years and free of liver and kidney failure, and blood dyscrasis. The selected patients were evaluated for sexual function by asking the patients to complete the abridged form of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). The evaluation of glycemic control was based on the measurement of hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) values. Our results showed that the level of HbA(1c) is significantly higher with declining degrees of potency (P-value=0.003). Also, there is an association between potency degree and glycemic control (P=0.002). We conclude that glycemic control is independently and inversely associated with ED in men with diabetes type 2.

  8. Interactions between Starch, Lipids, and Proteins in Foods: Microstructure Control for Glycemic Response Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Javier; Santos, Jose L

    2016-10-25

    In real food, starch is usually forming part of a matrix with lipids and proteins. However, research on this ternary system and interactions between such food components has been scarce so far. The control of food microstructure is crucial to determine the product properties, including sensorial and nutritionals ones. This paper reviews the microstructural principles of interactions between starch, lipids, and proteins in foods as well as their effect on postprandial glycemic response, considering human intrinsic differences on postprandial glycemic responses. Several lines of research support the hypothesis that foods without rapidly digestible starch will not mandatorily generate the lowest postprandial glycemic response, highlighting that the full understanding of food microstructure, which modulates starch digestion, plays a key role on food design from a nutritional viewpoint.

  9. Factors associated with glycemic control in adult type 1 diabetes patients treated with insulin pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejko, Bartłomiej; Skupien, Jan; Mrozińska, Sandra; Grzanka, Małgorzata; Cyganek, Katarzyna; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Malecki, Maciej T; Klupa, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by insulin pump seems to improve glycemia and quality of life as compared to conventional insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). However, while many T1DM subjects achieve excellent glycemic control, some others cannot reach recommended goals. In a retrospective analysis, we searched for factors associated with glycemic control in T1DM patients treated with insulin pump therapy. Data from 192 patients (133 women and 59 men) treated with personal insulin pumps at the Department of Metabolic Diseases, University Hospital, Krakow, Poland were analyzed. Sources of information included medical records, memory read-outs from insulin pumps and data from glucose meters. Univariate, multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis for the association with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level were performed. The mean age of the subjects was 28.9 (±11.2) years, the mean duration of T1DM-14.6 (±7.6) years, mean body mass index-23.5 (±3.1) kg/m2. The mean HbA1c level in the entire study group was 7.4% (57 mmol/mol). In the multivariate linear regression analysis, HbA1c correlated with the mean number of daily blood glucose measurements, number of hypoglycemic episodes per 100 blood glucose measurements, age at the examination, and continuous glucose monitoring system use. Multivariate logistic regression analysis for reaching the therapeutic target of HbA1cpump-treated T1DM subjects.

  10. Achieving glycemic control in special populations in hospital: perspectives in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alice Y Y

    2014-04-01

    Achieving and maintaining glycemic control in patients with diabetes admitted to hospital is challenging because of the many competing factors of nutrition, pharmacotherapy and other patient-related and systemic factors. For patients receiving enteral or parenteral feeding, eating irregularly or receiving glucocorticoid therapy, the challenges are even greater. The basic principles to follow when managing glycemia in these populations are as follows: 1) Recognition of those at risk for hyperglycemia; 2) frequent bedside glucose monitoring; 3) a proactive approach with routine insulin administration based on the predicted glucose patterns; 4) constant reassessment of the glycemic status and titration of the routine insulin accordingly.

  11. Four weeks of treatment with liraglutide reduces insulin dose without loss of glycemic control in type 1 diabetic patients with and without residual beta-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielgast, Urd; Holst, Jens Juul; Madsbad, Sten

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of 4 weeks of treatment with liraglutide on insulin dose and glycemic control in type 1 diabetic patients with and without residual ß-cell function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ten type 1 diabetic patients with residual ß-cell function (C-peptide positive) and 19.......1]; P type 1 diabetic patients reduces insulin dose with improved or unaltered glycemic control.......-peptide-positive patients and from 0.72 ± 0.08 to 0.59 ± 0.06 units/kg per day (P correlated with ß...

  12. Association between Social Relationship and Glycemic Control among Older Japanese: JAGES Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Ichiro; Kondo, Katsunori; Kondo, Naoki; Nagamine, Yuiko; Tani, Yukako; Shirai, Kokoro; Tazuma, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Aim The present study examined whether social support, informal socializing and social participation are associated with glycemic control in older people. Methods Data for this population-based cross-sectional study was obtained from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) 2010 linked to the annual health check-up data in Japan. We analyzed 9,554 individuals aged ≥65 years without the certification of needed long-term care. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of social support, informal socializing and social participations on glycemic control. The outcome measure was HbA1c ≥8.4%. Results 1.3% of the participants had a level of HbA1c over 8.4%. Better glycemic control was significantly associated with meeting with friends one to four times per month (odds ratio [OR] 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]0.30–0.89, compared to meeting with friends a few times per year or less) and participation in sports groups (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.26–0.97) even after adjusting for other variables. Meeting with friends more than twice per week, receiving social support, and being married were not associated with better control of diabetes. Conclusions Meeting with friends occasionally is associated with better glycemic control among older people. PMID:28060887

  13. Adiponectin and cardiovascular risk factors in relation with glycemic control in type 2 diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniebetabasi S. Obot

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adiponectin has been associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in Type 2 diabetes, though the mechanism of association is still uncertain. The adiponectin levels and lipid profile in relation to glycemic control were investigated in type 2 diabetics. Methods: Forty two diabetic subjects (35-64 years and 33 age-matched non-diabetic subjects were recruited into this case control study. Socio-demographic characteristics, anthropometric indices and blood pressure were obtained. Total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low density lipoprotein (LDL, high density lipoprotein, (HDL, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were estimated using colorimetric methods, atherogenic index (AI was calculated, while serum adiponectin was determined by ELISA method. Results: Adiponectin levels of type 2 diabetics were not significantly different from the non-diabetics studied (p>0.05. Higher TG levels were observed in diabetics with poor glycemic control compared with those with good glycemic control (p0.05. Conclusion: Type 2 diabetics do not have lower adiponectin levels. Gender, duration of diabetes and glycemic control does not seem to exert any influence on adiponectin levels in type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin may be associated with reduced risk of atherosclerosis through its effects on HDL cholesterol metabolism. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 563-570

  14. Impact of type 1 diabetes and glycemic control on fetal aneuploidy biochemical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helen Nordahl; Ekelund, Charlotte; Tørring, Niels

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:  To determine the influence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on the first trimester serum markers of fetal aneuploidy; pregnancy-associated plasmaprotein-A (PAPP-A) and free beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (freeβ-hCG) and to evaluate the influence of glycemic control on ...

  15. Magnesium in type 2 diabetes mellitus and its correlation with glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehal Hamdy El-said

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: hypomagnesaemia is closely linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and it is strongly correlated to glycemic control. We recommend to measure serum Mg in type 2 diabetes and patients who need supplementation should be considered. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1958-1963

  16. Impact of type 1 diabetes and glycemic control on fetal aneuploidy biochemical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helen Nordahl; Ekelund, Charlotte Kvist; Tørring, Niels;

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on the first trimester serum markers of fetal aneuploidy; pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and free beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (free β-hCG) and to evaluate the influence of glycemic control on...

  17. Glycemic Control in a Clinic-Based Sample of Diabetics in M'Bour Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    BeLue, Rhonda; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; NDao, Fatou; Ba, Fatou Niass Niang; Diaw, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Senegal is faced with a significant and increasing burden of type 2 diabetes. However, little information is available about diabetes management among Senegalese diabetics. Purpose: The current study aims to describe the level of glycemic control among a convenience sample of diabetics who receive…

  18. Exercise strategies to optimize glycemic control in type 2 diabetes : a continuing glucose monitoring perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Jan-Willem; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF The introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) several years ago enabled researchers to investigate the impact of exercise strategies on 24-hour glycemic control. Such unique information on the glucoregulatory properties of exercise will ultimately lead to more effective exercise p

  19. Glycemic control and long-acting insulin analog utilization in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Heintjes (Edith); T.L. Thomsen (Trine Lyager); F.J.A. Penning-Van Beest (Fernie); T.E. Christensen (Torsten); R.M.C. Herings (Ron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The objective was to compare glycemic control, insulin utilization, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) initiated on insulin detemir (IDet) or insulin glargine (IGlar) in a real-life setting in the Netherlands. Methods: Insulin-naïve patients with T2D, st

  20. 无缝隙优质护理在提高糖尿病患者血糖控制效果及生活质量的作用%Efficacy of Seamless Quality Care in Improve Glycemic Control and Quality of Life of Diabetic Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙妹

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析无缝隙优质护理在提高糖尿病患者血糖控制效果及生活质量中的作用。方法将本院2011年5~6月收治的80例糖尿病患者,随机成为两组,各组40例,对照组采用常规的护理形式,观察组采取无缝隙优质护理,对比两组的血糖控制效果和生活质量。结果观察组血糖控制水平及生活质量均优于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论无缝隙优质护理在提高糖尿病患者血糖控制效果及生活质量有着良好的作用,能够有效帮助患者康复。%Objective To analyze the seamless quality care in improving glycemic control and quality of life of diabetic patients.Methods From May 2011 to June 2011,80 cases of diabetes were randomized to two groups,each group of 40 patients in the control group received routine care form,the observation group to take seamless quality care,compared two groups of blood glucose control effectiveness and quality of life.Results The levels of blood glucose control and quality of life than the control group,the difference was significant(P<0.05).ConclusionThe seamless quality care in improving glycemic control and quality of life of patients with diabetes have a good role,can effectively help patients recover.

  1. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauwecker Paula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure

  2. Prevalence of microalbuminuria in relation to glycemic control in type-2 diabetic patients in Mymensingh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M J; Muqueet, A; Sharmeen, A; Hoque, M R

    2015-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is a renal marker of generalized vascular endothelial damage and early atherosclerosis. Patients with microalbuminuria are at increased risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus like myocardial infarction, stroke and nephropathy. Poor glycemic control increases the risk of microalbuminuria. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes and compare the frequency of microalbuminuria in poor and good glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. One Hundred and twenty two type 2 diabetic patients were included in the study. Data on age, gender, duration of diabetes, microalbuminuria and HbA1c were recorded. Urine and blood samples were collected and analyzed for microalbuminuria, blood glucose and HbA1c. All patients of both genders with type 2 diabetes for over 2 years were selected in this study. Patients with other causes of proteinuria were excluded. Out of 120 cases 93(77.5%) were male and 27(22.5%) were female. Mean age of patients was 57.8±14.7 years and average duration of diabetes was 9.2 years. Microalbuminuria was found 76.9% of male and 23.1% of female. Patients with poor glycemic control and good glycemic control have frequency of microalbuminuria of 55% and 54% respectively. Uncontrolled diabetes is strongly associated with prevalence of microalbuminuria. Screening for microalbuminuria and HbA1c test should be done both in newly and already diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients as an early marker of renal dysfunction and glycemic control.

  3. Practical strategies for developing the business case for hospital glycemic control teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Michelle F; Beck, Adam

    2008-09-01

    Many business models may be used to make the business case for support of a multidisciplinary team to implement targeted glucose control in the hospital. Models may be hospital-supported or self-supporting. In the former, the hospital provides financial support based on improved documentation opportunities, reduction in length of stay, and improved resource utilization. In the latter, clinical revenues for diabetes management offsets costs of salary, fringe benefits, and overheads. A combination of these strategies may also be used. The business plan presented to administration must justify return on investment. It is imperative to involve hospital administration, particularly representatives from coding, billing, and finance, in the development of the business plan. The business case for hospital support will be based on opportunities related to improving accuracy of documentation and coding for diabetes-related diagnoses, including level of control and complications present, on reduction in length of stay and on optimization of resource utilization through reduction in morbidity and mortality (cost aversion). The case for revenue generation through billing for clinical services will be based on opportunities to increase the provision of glycemic management services in the hospital. Examples from the literature and of analyses to support each of these models are presented. (c) 2008 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  4. Magnesium in type 2 diabetes mellitus and its correlation with glycemic control

    OpenAIRE

    Nehal Hamdy El-said; Noha Adly Sadik; Nagwa Abd EL-Ghaffar Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypomagnesaemia may have negative impact on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. This study was done to compare serum Mg levels in type 2 diabetic patients with non diabetic healthy control subjects and to assess the correlation between serum Mg levels and glycemic control in Egyptian patients. Methods: 60 type 2 diabetic patients attending the outpatient clinic of diabetes at Kasr Al Aini hospital faculty of medicine Cairo University and 30 healthy age matched control ...

  5. Abnormal nocturnal blood pressure fall in normotensive adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes is ameliorated following glycemic improvement

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    S.R.G. Ferreira

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Lack of the physiological nocturnal fall in blood pressure (BP has been found in diabetics and it seems to be related to the presence of diabetic complications. The present study examined the changes in the nocturnal BP pattern of 8 normotensive insulin-dependent diabetic adolescents without nephropathy following improvement in glycemic control induced by an 8-day program of adequate diet and exercise. The same number of age- and sex-matched control subjects were studied. During the first and eighth nights of the program, BP was obtained by ambulatory BP monitoring. After a 10-min rest, 3 BP and heart rate (HR recordings were taken and the mean values were considered to represent their awake values. The monitor was programmed to cuff insufflation every 20 min from 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. The glycemic control of diabetics improved since glycemia (212.0 ± 91.5 to 140.2 ± 69.1 mg/dl, P<0.03, urine glucose (12.7 ± 11.8 to 8.6 ± 6.4 g/24 h, P = 0.08 and insulin dose (31.1 ± 7.7 to 16.1 ± 9.7 U/day, P<0.01 were reduced on the last day. The mean BP of control subjects markedly decreased during the sleeping hours of night 1 (92.3 ± 6.4 to 78.1 ± 5.0 mmHg, P<0.001 and night 8 (87.3 ± 6.7 to 76.9 ± 3.6 mmHg, P<0.001. Diabetic patients showed a slight decrease in mean BP during the first night. However, the fall in BP during the nocturnal period increased significantly on the eighth night. The average awake-sleep BP variation was significantly higher at the end of the study (4.2 vs 10.3%, P<0.05 and this ratio turned out to be similar to that found in the control group (10.3 vs 16.3%. HR variation also increased on the eighth night in the diabetics. Following the metabolic improvement obtained at the end of the period, the nocturnal BP variation of diabetics was close to the normal pattern. We suggest that amelioration of glycemic control may influence the awake-sleep BP and HR differences. This effect may be due at least in part to an attenuated

  6. The impact of low-carbohydrate diet on glycemic control in Native Americans

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    Khairi S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Shafaq Khairi,1 Babak Torabi Sagvand,2 Syed Kamal Nasser3 1Southeastern Regional Physician Services, Lumberton, NC, 2Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Southeastern Regional Medical Center, Lumberton, NC, USA Abstract: Many studies have shown that a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD is a safe and effective intervention to improve glycemic control. However, published data are limited regarding the use of carbohydrate restriction in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in the Native Americans, in a real-world clinical practice setting. We evaluated the efficacy of an LCD on 50 obese Native Americans with either type 2 DM or impaired fasting blood glucose (IFG in a primary care/obesity medicine practice. The primary intervention was an LCD defined as an intake of <20 g of carbohydrates per day. The intervention involved providing an educational handout and behavioral counseling assisted by a dedicated weight loss coordinator. We evaluated the effects of this intervention on hemoglobin A1c, body weight, blood pressure, and lipid parameters. The subjects were evaluated at baseline and 6 months. The subjects underwent additional safety and counseling visits throughout the study. Subjects were considered completers if they had baseline and 6-month measurements. The mean age was 55.0±10.9 years, and 66.7% were female. Subjects had significant improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.4%±0.9%, in subjects with DM, P<0.0001, fasting blood glucose (-15±4.9 mg/dL, in subjects with IFG, P<0.0001, and body mass index (-4.0±1.7 kg/m2, P<0.0001. An LCD can lead to clinically and statistically significant improvement in glycemic control and body weight among obese subjects with type 2 DM or IFG over a 6-month period. The results suggest that carbohydrate restriction can be an effective real-world intervention in a primarily Native American clinical practice. However, further studies are needed

  7. A Low-Glycemic Diet Lifestyle Intervention Improves Fat Utilization during Exercise in Older Obese Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M; Cook, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    lipid was reduced (P foods for reversing metabolic defects in obesity.......Objective: To determine the influence of dietary glycemic index on exercise training-induced adaptations in substrate oxidation in obesity. Design and Methods: Twenty older, obese individuals undertook 3 months of fully supervised aerobic exercise and were randomized to low- (LoGIX) or high....... Results: Weight loss (-8.6 ± 1.1%) and improvements (P fasting lipemia, and metabolic flexibility were similar for both LoGIX and HiGIX groups. During submaximal exercise, energy expenditure was higher following the intervention (P

  8. The influence of carbohydrate consumption on glycemic control in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ásbjörnsdóttir, Björg; Akueson, Cecelia E; Ronneby, Helle; Rytter, Ane; Andersen, Jens R; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2017-05-01

    To study the influence of the quantity and the quality of carbohydrate consumption on glycemic control in early pregnancy among women with type 1 diabetes. A retrospective study of 107 women with type 1 diabetes who completed 1-3days of diet recording before first antenatal visit, as a part of routine care. The total daily carbohydrate consumption from the major sources (e.g. bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, dairy products, fruits, candy) was calculated. A dietician estimated the overall glycemic index score (scale 0-7). At least two days of diet recording were available in 75% of the 107 women at mean 64 (SD±14) gestational days. The quantity of carbohydrate consumption from major sources was 180 (±51)g/day. HbA1c was positively associated with the quantity of carbohydrate consumption (β=0.41; 95% CI 0.13-0.70, P=0.005), corresponding to an increase of 0.4% in HbA1c per 100g carbohydrates consumed daily, when adjusted for insulin dose/bodyweight and use of insulin pump treatment. The median (IQR) glycemic index score was 2 (0-3). An adjusted association between HbA1c and glycemic index score was not demonstrated. The women using carbohydrate counting daily (45%) had lower HbA1c compared to the remaining women (6.4 (±0.5) vs. 6.8 (±0.9)% (47±6 vs. 51±10mmol/mol), P=0.01). HbA1c in early pregnancy was positively associated with the quantity of carbohydrate consumption regardless of insulin treatment. Carbohydrate counting is probably important for glycemic control in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pilot proof of concept clinical trials of Stochastic Targeted (STAR) glycemic control

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Alicia; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Le Compte, Aaron; Tan, Chia*-Siong; Ward, Logan; Steel, James,; Pretty, Christopher G; Pfeifer, Leesa; Penning, Sophie; Suhaimi, Fatanah; Signal, Matthew; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to achieve consistently. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a flexible, model-based TGC approach directly accounting for intra- and inter- patient variability with a stochastically derived maximum 5% risk of blood glucose (BG) < 4.0 mmol/L. This research assesses the safety, efficacy, and clinical burden of a STAR TGC controller modulating both insulin and nutrition inputs in pilot trials. METHODS: Seven...

  10. Effects of zinc and multimineral vitamin supplementation on glycemic and lipid control in adult diabetes

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    Priyanka Gunasekara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Priyanka Gunasekara1, Manjula Hettiarachchi2, Chandrani Liyanage2, Sarath Lekamwasam21Coronary Care Unit, Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya, Galle, Sri Lanka; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, Sri LankaAims: To evaluate the effects of zinc with or without other antioxidants on blood glucose, lipid profile, and serum creatinine in adult diabetics on long-term follow-up.Materials and methods: Patients (n = 96 were randomly allocated to three groups: group A (n = 29 was supplemented with oral zinc sulfate (22 mg/day and multivitamin/mineral (zinc+MVM preparation; group B (n = 31 was given the same preparation without zinc (MVM; and group C (n = 36 was given a matching placebo for a period of 4 months in a single-blinded study. Blood samples were taken at baseline and after 4 months of supplementation to assess blood glucose (fasting and postprandial and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C% and serum levels of zinc, creatinine, and lipids.Results: The zinc+MVM group had a mean change of fasting blood sugar -0.33 mmol/L (standard error of the mean 0.21 mmol/L and was significant (P = 0.05 when compared with the other two groups (mean change in the MVM group +0.19 (0.31 mmol/L and +0.43 (0.23 mmol/L in the control group, respectively. The HbA1C% level reduced significantly, irrespective of the baseline level, in zinc+MVM-supplemented individuals. In the other two groups, the change of HbA1C% level was not significant. Serum lipid levels reduced significantly in the zinc+MVM and MVM groups.Conclusions: Zinc+MVM supplementation showed beneficial effects in the metabolic control of adult diabetics in addition to elevating their serum zinc level. Zinc supplementation improved glycemic control measured by HbA1C% and fasting and postprandial glucose. Furthermore, zinc supplementation lowered serum cholesterol and cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein ratio.Keywords: zinc, multivitamin mineral supplementation, diabetes, glycemic control

  11. Intraoperative glycemic control procedures and the use of an artificial pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koichi Yamashita; Tomoaki Yatabe

    2009-01-01

    Strict intraoperative glycemic control can significantly decrease the incidence of postoperative infection;however, anesthesiologists must carefully control blood glucose levels as well as properly manage the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. However,standard blood glucose measurement systems and insulin dosing algorithms, which are necessary for achieving strict glycemic control, have not yet been developed. An artificial pancreas (STG-22TM;Nikkiso Co., Tokyo, Japan) is considered a highly accurate blood glucose monitoring system capable of closedloopcontrol of blood glucose. The device has, however,many problems to be addressed since it is a large and expensive system with little versatility, and it requires a large amount of blood to be collected. Therefore,the development of less invasive and inexpensive systems with future technological progress is greatly anticipated.

  12. Effect of Insulin Dilution on Lowering Glycemic Variability in Pump-Treated Young Children with Inadequately Controlled Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mianowska, Beata; Fendler, Wojciech; Tomasik, Bartłomiej; Młynarski, Wojciech; Szadkowska, Agnieszka

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether in young children with inadequately controlled type 1 diabetes and technical problems with continuous subcutaneous infusion of insulin at 100 units/mL the switch to insulin diluted to 10 units/mL (U10) can limit technical problems and improve glycemic control. Diluted U10 insulin was started in three children 3.8, 3.2, and 1.3 years old with a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level (mean±SD) of 8.1±0.17% (65±1.7 mmol/mol) and insulin dose of 8.80±2.93 units/day. Patients were evaluated with continuous glucose monitoring (iPro™2; Medtronic Minimed, Northridge, CA) and a quality of life questionnaire (PedsQL™; www.pedsql.org/ ) and surveyed for pump-related problems at baseline and after 3 and 9 months of U10 insulin therapy. Continuous glucose monitoring records showed that glycemic variability assessed by SD and M100 decreased significantly (P=0.0085 and P=0.0482, respectively). HbA1c levels dropped to 7.3±1.00% (56±11.0 mmol/mol) after 3 months and to 6.7±0.55% (50±6.1 mmol/mol) after 9 months (P=0.12). Technical difficulties were minimized. These results suggest that the use of U10 insulin decreases glycemic variability and improves hampered pump therapy in young children with inadequately controlled type 1 diabetes.

  13. Telemedicine for the Management of Glycemic Control and Clinical Outcomes of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Studies

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    Shaun W. H. Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Importance: Telemedicine has been shown to be an efficient and effective means of providing care to patients with chronic disease especially in remote and undeserved regions, by improving access to care and reduce healthcare cost. However, the evidence surrounding its applicability in type 1 diabetes remains scarce and conflicting.Objective: To synthesize evidence and quantify the effectiveness of telemedicine interventions for the management of glycemic and clinical outcomes in type 1 diabetes patients, relative to comparator conditions.Data Sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched for published articles since inception until December 2016.Study Selection: Original articles reporting the results of randomized controlled studies on the effectiveness of telemedicine in people with type 1 diabetes were included.Data Extraction and Synthesis: Two reviewers independently extracted data, assessed quality, and strength of evidence. Interventions were categorized based upon the telemedicine focus (monitoring, education, consultation, case-management, and peer mentoring.Main Outcome and Measure: Absolute change in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c from baseline to follow-up assessment.Results: A total of 38 studies described in 41 articles were identified. Positive effects on glycemic control were noted with studies examining telemedicine, with a mean reduction of 0.18% at the end of intervention. Studies with longer duration (>6 months who had recruited patients with a higher baseline HbA1c (≥9% were associated with larger effects. Telemedicine interventions that involve individualized assessments, audit with feedback and skill building were also more effective in improving glycemic control. However, no benefits were observed on blood pressure, lipids, weight, quality of life, and adverse events.Conclusions and Relevance: There is insufficient evidence to support telemedicine use for glycemic

  14. Effect of tree nuts on glycemic control in diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled dietary trials.

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    Effie Viguiliouk

    Full Text Available Tree nut consumption has been associated with reduced diabetes risk, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent.To provide better evidence for diabetes guidelines development, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to assess the effects of tree nuts on markers of glycemic control in individuals with diabetes.MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases through 6 April 2014.Randomized controlled trials ≥3 weeks conducted in individuals with diabetes that compare the effect of diets emphasizing tree nuts to isocaloric diets without tree nuts on HbA1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR.Two independent reviewer's extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as mean differences (MD with 95% CI's. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic and quantified (I2.Twelve trials (n = 450 were included. Diets emphasizing tree nuts at a median dose of 56 g/d significantly lowered HbA1c (MD = -0.07% [95% CI:-0.10, -0.03%]; P = 0.0003 and fasting glucose (MD = -0.15 mmol/L [95% CI: -0.27, -0.02 mmol/L]; P = 0.03 compared with control diets. No significant treatment effects were observed for fasting insulin and HOMA-IR, however the direction of effect favoured tree nuts.Majority of trials were of short duration and poor quality.Pooled analyses show that tree nuts improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, supporting their inclusion in a healthy diet. Owing to the uncertainties in our analyses there is a need for longer, higher quality trials with a focus on using nuts to displace high-glycemic index carbohydrates.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01630980.

  15. An isocaloric low glycemic index diet improves insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Suzanne; Reeves, Sue; Sharp, Kay; Jeanes, Yvonne M

    2013-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder affecting 5% to 10% of women worldwide. Approximately half of women with PCOS are lean, yet may still present with central obesity and metabolic disturbances. Low-glycemic index (GI) dietary intervention studies have demonstrated improvements in insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant populations; however, there is little evidence of this effect in women with PCOS. This research aimed to determine the efficacy of an isocaloric low-GI dietary intervention on insulin sensitivity, independent of weight change, in women with PCOS. A nonrandomized 12-week low-GI dietary intervention, preceded by a 12-week habitual diet control phase and proceeded by a 12-week follow-up phase was conducted. Dietary intake, body composition, and metabolic risk markers were determined at baseline, after completion of the habitual diet control phase, and after the low-GI dietary intervention. Twenty-six participants were recruited at baseline, 22 commenced and 21 participants completed the low-GI dietary intervention phase. The primary outcome was change in insulin sensitivity. Secondary outcomes included assessment of changes to lipids, body composition, and estimated macronutrient intake. Repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction were used to detect changes to outcomes across study timepoints. Twenty-one women with PCOS with mean (± standard deviation) age of 32.1±6.7 years completed the 12-week low-GI dietary intervention. As expected, no significant changes occurred during the 12-week habitual diet control phase. However, during the dietary intervention phase, dietary GI decreased from 54.5±3.5 to 48.6±5.1 (P<0.001) with a concurrent small reduction in saturated fat intake (12.4%±3% to 11.7%±3% contribution from energy, P=0.03), despite no specific recommendations to modify fat intake. Measures of insulin sensitivity and nonesterified fatty acid improved after intervention (P=0.03 and P=0

  16. A nationwide survey of diabetes education, self-management and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-hui; YUAN Li; LOU Qing-qing; SHEN Li; SUN Zi-lin; ZHAO Fang; DAI Xia; HUANG Jin; YANG Hui-ying

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes management could be improved by diabetes education,through influencing attitudes towards diabetes,knowledge and behaviors of patients.The purpose of this study was to characterize the impact of diabetes education on glycemic control,and to assess the attitude,knowledge and self-care behavior in patients with type 2 diabetes in China.Methods This questionnaire-based survey was conducted in 50 medical centers across China from April to July of 2010.The patients with type 2 diabetes were eligible for the study.The information of glycemic control and diabetes education was collected.The diabetes attitude scale-3 formulae,a questionnaire of diabetes knowledge and Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities scale were used to assess attitude,knowledge and the self-care of patients,respectively.Results Among the 5961 eligible respondents (3233 males; mean age (59.50±12.48) years; mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (8.27±2.23)%),most patients (79.8%) considered themselves educated on diabetes.Compared with patients without diabetes education,their educated counterparts showed significant lower value of HbA1c,after controlling for age,gender,body mass index and duration of diabetes (P <0.01).The patients who received diabetes education also performed significant higher scores on attitude,knowledge and self-care than their uneducated counterparts.Patients with lower income or education level tended to have higher glucose levels,and showed lower percentage of patients received diabetic education.Conclusions Chinese patients with diabetes education achieved better glycemic control than un-educated patients.Our study indicates effort is required to provide professional education to patients,with emphasis on lower income and lower education level populations.

  17. Supported Telemonitoring and Glycemic Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes: The Telescot Diabetes Pragmatic Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Sarah H Wild

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-monitoring of blood glucose among people with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin does not appear to be effective in improving glycemic control. We investigated whether health professional review of telemetrically transmitted self-monitored glucose results in improved glycemic control in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.We performed a randomized, parallel, investigator-blind controlled trial with centralized randomization in family practices in four regions of the United Kingdom among 321 people with type 2 diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c >58 mmol/mol. The supported telemonitoring intervention involved self-measurement and transmission to a secure website of twice-weekly morning and evening glucose for review by family practice clinicians who were not blinded to allocation group. The control group received usual care, with at least annual review and more frequent reviews for people with poor glycemic or blood pressure control. HbA1c assessed at 9 mo was the primary outcome. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. 160 people were randomized to the intervention group and 161 to the usual care group between June 6, 2011, and July 19, 2013. HbA1c data at follow-up were available for 146 people in the intervention group and 139 people in the control group. The mean (SD HbA1c at follow-up was 63.0 (15.5 mmol/mol in the intervention group and 67.8 (14.7 mmol/mol in the usual care group. For primary analysis, adjusted mean HbA1c was 5.60 mmol/mol / 0.51% lower (95% CI 2.38 to 8.81 mmol/mol/ 95% CI 0.22% to 0.81%, p = 0·0007. For secondary analyses, adjusted mean ambulatory systolic blood pressure was 3.06 mmHg lower (95% CI 0.56-5.56 mmHg, p = 0.017 and mean ambulatory diastolic blood pressure was 2.17 mmHg lower (95% CI 0.62-3.72, p = 0.006 among people in the intervention group when compared with usual care after adjustment for baseline differences and minimization strata. No significant differences were identified

  18. Perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas in patients undergoing total pancreatectomy: tight glycemic control may be justified in order to avoid brittle diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    I dedicate this paper to the late Prof. Yukihiko Nosé with all my heart. In 2001, under the direction of Prof. Nosé and Prof. Brunicardi at Baylor College of Medicine, we published a review article entitled "Artificial endocrine pancreas" in JACS. Subsequently, we reported that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) using an artificial pancreas (AP) with a closed-loop system could stably maintain near-normoglycemia in total-pancreatectomized dogs. Based on this experimental study in Houston, since 2006, we have introduced perioperative TGC using an AP into clinical use in Kochi. As of 2011, this novel TGC method has provided safe and stable blood glucose levels in more than 400 surgical patients. In this paper, we report new clinical findings regarding perioperative TGC using an AP in total-pancreatectomized patients. TGC using an AP enables us to achieve stable glycemic control not only without hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia but also with less variation in blood glucose concentration from the target blood glucose range, even in patients with the most serious form of diabetes, so-called "brittle diabetes", undergoing total pancreatectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of TGC using an AP in patients undergoing total pancreatic resection.

  19. The Association of Binge Eating Disorder with Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Canan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to assess the prevalence of binge eating disorder (BED in individuals with type 2 diabetes and to investigate whether a comorbidity with BED would affect glycemic control in these patients. Materials and Methods: Eighty-two type 2 diabetic patients were enrolled. The participants were assessed for eating disorders by a psychiatrist. Blood samples were drawn and HbA1c and other biochemical parameters were measured. Results: Of the 82 subjects, 27 (34.1% met the criteria for BED. No other types of eating disorders were detected. HbA1c was significantly higher in individuals with BED (p<0.05. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that BED is highly prevalent among type 2 diabetic patients and it impairs glycemic control. Thus, patients with type 2 diabetes should be assessed carefully for eating disorders. Turk Jem 2011; 15: 26-7

  20. Study of Adiponectin Level in Diabetic Adolescent Girls in Relation to Glycemic Control and Complication of Diabetes

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    Soha M. Abd El Dayem

    2015-10-01

    CONCLUSION: Serum adiponectin level is high in adolescent type 1 diabetic girls. It can be used as a predictor of diabetes complications rather than a sensitive biochemical marker for glycemic control.

  1. The association between glycemic control and microalbuminuria in Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showail, Anwar Ali; Ghoraba, Medhat

    2016-05-01

    Microalbuminuria is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and renal out- come in a patient with Type 2 diabetes. The evidence that intensive glycemic control reduces the microvascular complications of diabetes is based almost exclusively on prevention of micro- albuminuria. To evaluate the association between microalbuminuria and glycemic control and other factors in Type 2 diabetes, we studied retrospectively 551 patients with Type 2 diabetes. The patients were divided into two groups: 175 patients with microalbuminuria in the case group and 376 with normal urine albumin-creatinine ratio in the control group. Our data indicated that there was a significant association between the uncontrolled glycemia and development of microalbuminuria and that was more obvious if HbA1c level was >11%. Our data also indicate that there was a statistical significant association between male gender, age, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels, and the microalbuminuria in crude odds ratios (ORs). We conclude that there was a clear association between the glycemic control and microalbuminuria, and microalbuminuria was associated with older age, male gender, and systolic and DBP in crude ORs.

  2. Glycemic Control after Total Pancreatectomy for Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith H. Jamil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Glycemic control following total pancreatectomy (TP has been thought to be difficult to manage. Diffuse intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN is a potentially curable precursor to pancreatic adenocarcinoma, best treated by TP. Objective. Compare glycemic control in patients undergoing TP for IPMN to patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. Design/Setting. Retrospective cohort. Outcome Measure. Hemoglobin A1C(HbA1C at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after TP. In the control group, baseline was defined as 6 months prior to the first HbA1c measure. Results. Mean HgbA1C at each point of interest was similar between TP and type I DM patients (6 months (7.5% versus 7.7%, P=0.52, 12 months (7.3% versus 8.0%, P=0.081, 18 months (7.7% and 7.6%, P=0.64, and at 24 months (7.3% versus 7.8%, P=0.10. Seven TP patients (50% experienced a hypoglycemic event compared to 65 type 1 DM patients (65%, P=0.38. Limitations. Small number of TP patients, retrospective design, lack of long-termfollowup. Conclusion. This suggests that glycemic control following TP for IPMNcan be well managed, similar to type 1 DM patients. Fear of DM following TP for IPMN should not preclude surgery when TP is indicated.

  3. Glycemic acute changes in type 2 diabetics caused by low and high glycemic index diets Las variaciones de la glucosa aguda en individuos con diabetes tipo 2 causada por las dietas de bajo y alto índice glucémico

    OpenAIRE

    C. E. Gonçalves Reis; J. Dullius

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Low-glycemic index diets may improve the glycemic control in type 2 diabetes but the debate over their effectiveness continues. Objectives: To test the effects of low-glycemic index diets on acute glycemic control (2 days) by measuring capillary blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: This was a crossover randomized clinical trial with 12 type 2 diabetics which were randomly divided into 2 groups and targeted the following draft diets for low and high glycemic i...

  4. Effects of exercise on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus in Koreans: the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Young-Eun

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise on glycemic control using data from fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and to provide appropriate exercise guidelines for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea. [Subjects and Methods] We selected 1,328 patients from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database who had type 2 diabetes and ranged in age from 30 to 90 years. Statistical analyses included χ(2) tests, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression. [Results] Factors found to be significantly related to glycemic control included income level, physical activity based on intensity of aerobic exercise, use of diabetes medicine, presence of hypertension, duration of diabetes, and waist circumference. In addition, engaging in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise when adjusted for resistance exercise was found to lower the risk of glycemic control failure. [Conclusion] Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea should engage in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise such as walking for 30 minutes or more five times a week. Physical activity is likely to improve glycemic control and thus prevent the acute and chronic complications of diabetes mellitus.

  5. Adverse effects of depression on glycemic control and health outcomes in people with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Francois; Nefs, Giesje; Nouwen, Arie

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, important advances have been achieved in the psychological aspects of diabetes. This article reviews the associations between diabetes, depression, and adverse health outcomes. The article provides an update on the literature regarding the prevalence of depression in diabetes......, discusses the impact of depression on diabetes self-care and glycemic control in people with diabetes, and summarizes the results of longitudinal studies that have investigated depression as a risk factor for adverse health outcomes....

  6. Diabetes knowledge and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Niessen, Louis; Seissler, Jochen; Ferrari, Uta; Biswas, Tuhin; Islam, Anwar; Lechner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Aims\\ud To explore the association between knowledge on diabetes and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in Bangladesh.\\ud \\ud Methods\\ud A cross-sectional study was conducted among 515 patients with type 2 diabetes attending a tertiary hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Trained interviewers were used to collect data on socioeconomic status, time since the onset of diabetes, co-morbidities, anthropometric measurements, blood tests, knowledge and perceptions about the causes, mana...

  7. Exercise Strategies to Optimize Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: A Continuing Glucose Monitoring Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Jan-Willem; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF The introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) several years ago enabled researchers to investigate the impact of exercise strategies on 24-hour glycemic control. Such unique information on the glucoregulatory properties of exercise will ultimately lead to more effective exercise programs to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes. This article reviews the role of exercise and physical activity in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, complemented by recent data obtained by CGM.

  8. Determinants of glycemic control and quality of Life in type 2 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Rodrigo A. P.; Cassyano J. Correr; Melchiors,Ana Carolina; Sanches, Andreia C. C.; Wiens, Astrid; Pontarolo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of socio-economic, clinical and pharmacotherapeutic determinants, adherence to therapy on the quality of life and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional study exploratory. Data collection was conducted through structured interviews and analysis of medical records. We interviewed 146 adult patients. Increasing age, body mass index, number of antidiabetic medications used and blacks, were rel...

  9. Diabetes, glycemic control and risk of medical glaucoma treatment: A population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte G Welinder

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lotte G Welinder1, Anders H Riis2, Lars L Knudsen1, Reimar W Thomsen21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aalborg hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkPurpose: To examine the association between diabetes and risk of medical glaucoma treatment and to assess the role of long-term glycemic control in the putative association. Design: Population-based case-control study.Methods: Cases of treated glaucoma were all persons filling at least three prescriptions for glaucoma medication for the first time within one year between 2001 and 2006 in Northern Jutland, Denmark. We used risk set sampling to select 10 gender- and age-matched general population controls per case using the Danish Civil Registration System. Data on diabetes, comorbidities, and laboratory tests, including glycosylated hemoglobin (as a measure of glycemic control were obtained from population-based medical registries. We calculated odds ratio (OR as an estimate of relative risk for treated glaucoma comparing patients with and without diabetes, adjusted for comorbid conditions and medication use.Results: We included 5,991 persons with incident medical glaucoma treatment and 59,910 population controls. The adjusted OR for treated glaucoma for patients with diabetes was 1.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.65–1.98. The strength of the association between diabetes and glaucoma risk did not vary by diabetes duration or by the level of glycemic control. Conclusions: Regardless of glycemic control, diabetes is associated with a substantially increased risk for medical glaucoma treatment.Keywords: diabetes, glaucoma, glycemic control, prescriptions, population-based case-control study

  10. Association Between Cardiorespiratory Fitness and the Determinants of Glycemic Control Across the Entire Glucose Tolerance Continuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas P. J.; Malin, Steven K.; Karstoft, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) is associated with glycemic control, yet the relationship between VO2max and the underlying determinants of glycemic control is less clear. Our aim was to determine whether VO2max is associated with insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion...... underwent measurements of body composition, HbA1c, fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance (OGTT), and VO2max. OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity (SiOGTT), glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSISOGTT), and the disposition index (DIOGTT) (the product of SiOGTT and GSISOGTT) were measured, and associations...... between VO2max and these determinants of glycemic control were examined. RESULTS: A low VO2max was associated with high HbA1c (r = -0.33), high fasting glucose (r = -0.34), high 2-h OGTT glucose (r = -0.33), low SiOGTT (r = 0.73), and high early-phase (r = -0.34) and late-phase (r = -0.36) GSISOGTT...

  11. The Role of Prestroke Glycemic Control on Severity and Outcome of Acute Ischemic Stroke

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    Clara Hjalmarsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Relatively few studies have investigated the association of prestroke glycemic control and clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke (IS patients, regardless of presence of diabetes mellitus (DM. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of prestroke glycemic control on survival, stroke severity, and functional outcome of patients with acute IS. Methods. We performed a retrospective survival analysis of 501 patients with IS admitted to Sahlgrenska University Hospital from February 15, 2005, through May 31, 2009. The outcomes of interest were acute and long-term survival; the stroke severity (NIHSS and the functional outcome, mRS, at 12 months. Results. HbA1c was a good predictor of acute (HR 1.45; CI, 1.09 to 1.93, P=0.011 and long-term mortality (HR 1.29; CI 1.03 to 1.62; P=0.029. Furthermore, HbA1c >6% was significantly correlated with acute stroke severity (OR 1.29; CI 1.01 to 1.67; P=0.042 and predicted worse functional outcome at 12 months (OR 2.68; CI 1.14 to 6.03; P=0.024. Conclusions. Our study suggests that poor glycemic control (baseline HbA1c prior to IS is an independent risk factor for poor survival and a marker for increased stroke severity and unfavorable long-term functional outcome.

  12. Acceleration of biliary cholesterol secretion restores glycemic control and alleviates hypertriglyceridemia in obese db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kai; Sabeva, Nadezhda S; Wang, Yuhuan; Liu, Xiaoxi; Lester, Joshua D; Liu, Jingjing; Liang, Shuang; Graf, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies support a role for cholesterol in the development of obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Mice lacking the ABCG5 ABCG8 (G5G8) sterol transporter have reduced biliary cholesterol secretion and are more susceptible to steatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and loss of glycemic control when challenged with a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that accelerating G5G8-mediated biliary cholesterol secretion would correct these phenotypes in obese mice. Obese (db/db) male and their lean littermates were administered a cocktail of control adenovirus or adenoviral vectors encoding ABCG5 and ABCG8 (AdG5G8). Three days after viral administration, measures of lipid and glucose homeostasis were determined, and tissues were collected for biochemical analyses. AdG5G8 increased biliary cholesterol and fecal sterol elimination. Fasting glucose and triglycerides declined, and glucose tolerance improved in obese mice expressing G5G8 compared with mice receiving control adenovirus. These changes were associated with a reduction in phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in liver, suggesting alleviation of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Phosphorylated insulin receptor and protein kinase B were increased, indicating restored hepatic insulin signaling. However, there was no reduction in hepatic triglycerides after the 3-day treatment period. Accelerating biliary cholesterol secretion restores glycemic control and reduces plasma triglycerides in obese db/db mice.

  13. Comparison between a novel and conventional artificial pancreas for perioperative glycemic control using a closed-loop system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Maeda, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Hirano, Kenichi; Asano, Takuji; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    This clinical study aimed to compare a novel and conventional artificial pancreas (AP) used in surgical patients for perioperative glycemic control, with respect to usability, blood glucose measurements, and glycemic control characteristics. From July in 2010 to March in 2015, 177 patients underwent perioperative glycemic control using a novel AP. Among them, 166 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) targeting a blood glucose range of 80-110 mg/dL was implemented in 82 patients (49 %), and the remaining 84 patients (51 %) received a less-intensive regime of insulin therapy. Data were collected prospectively and were reviewed or analyzed retrospectively. A comparison study of 324 patients undergoing IIT for glycemic control using a novel (n = 82) or conventional AP (n = 242) was conducted retrospectively. All patients had no hypoglycemia. The comparison study revealed no significant differences in perioperative mean blood glucose level, achievement rates for target blood glucose range, and variability in blood glucose level achieved with IIT between the novel AP and conventional AP groups. The usability, performance with respect to blood glucose measurement, and glycemic control characteristics of IIT were comparable between novel and conventional AP systems. However, the novel AP was easier to manipulate than the conventional AP due to its smaller size, lower weight, and shorter time for preparation. In the near future, this novel AP system might be accepted worldwide as a safe and useful device for use in perioperative glycemic control.

  14. Impact of walking on glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanhu Qiu

    optimal glycemic control. Walking also reduces BMI and lowers DBP, however, it remains insufficient regarding the association of walking with lowered SBP or improved lipoprotein profiles. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42014009515.

  15. Importance of Perioperative Glycemic Control in General Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Steve; Thompson, Rachel; Dellinger, Patchen; Yanez, David; Farrohki, Ellen; Flum, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship of perioperative hyperglycemia and insulin administration on outcomes in elective colon/rectal and bariatric operations. Background There is limited evidence to characterize the impact of perioperative hyperglycemia and insulin on adverse outcomes in patients, with and without diabetes, undergoing general surgical procedures. Methods The Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program is a Washington State quality improvement benchmarking-based initiative. We evaluated the relationship of perioperative hyperglycemia (>180 mg/dL) and insulin administration on mortality, reoperative interventions, and infections for patients undergoing elective colorectal and bariatric surgery at 47 participating hospitals between fourth quarter of 2005 and fourth quarter of 2010. Results Of the 11,633 patients (55.4 ± 15.3 years; 65.7% women) with a serum glucose determination on the day of surgery, postoperative day 1, or postoperative day 2, 29.1% of patients were hyperglycemic. After controlling for clinical factors, those with hyperglycemia had a significantly increased risk of infection [odds ratio (OR) 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.63–2.44], reoperative interventions (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.41–2.3), and death (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.72–4.28). Increased risk of poor outcomes was observed both for patients with and without diabetes. Those with hyperglycemia on the day of surgery who received insulin had no significant increase in infections (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.72–1.42), reoperative interventions (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.89–1.89), or deaths (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.61–2.42). A dose-effect relationship was found between the effectiveness of insulin-related glucose control (worst 180–250 mg/dL, best surgery patients with and without diabetes. However, patients with hyperglycemia who received insulin were at no greater risk than those with normal blood glucoses. Perioperative glucose evaluation and insulin administration in patients with

  16. Sedentary Patterns, Physical Activity, and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Association to Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís B. Sardinha

    2017-04-01

    study suggest that sedentary time and patterns are relevant for the glycemic control in patients with T2D. Still, MVPA and CRF counteracted most of the associations for total sedentary time but not for the BST. MVPA was not associated with metabolic outcomes, and CRF lost some of the associations with glycemic indicators when adjusted for total sedentary time. Future interventions aiming to control/improve T2D must consider reducing and breaking up sedentary time as a viable strategy to improve glycemic control.

  17. The glycemic index: physiological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Amin; Wong, Julia M W; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2009-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a physiological assessment of a food's carbohydrate content through its effect on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Evidence from trials and observational studies suggests that this physiological classification may have relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with overconsumption and inactivity leading to central obesity and insulin resistance. The glycemic index classification of foods has been used as a tool to assess potential prevention and treatment strategies for diseases where glycemic control is of importance, such as diabetes. Low GI diets have also been reported to improve the serum lipid profile, reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and aid in weight control. In cross-sectional studies, low GI or glycemic load diets (mean GI multiplied by total carbohydrate) have been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), with reduced CRP concentrations, and, in cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, some case-control and cohort studies have found positive associations between dietary GI and risk of various cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and prostate. Although inconsistencies in the current findings still need to be resolved, sufficient positive evidence, especially with respect to renewed interest in postprandial events, suggests that the glycemic index may have a role to play in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  18. Improved glycemic control with no weight increase in patients with type 2 diabetes after once-daily treatment with the long-acting glucagon-like peptide 1 analog liraglutide (NN2211): a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten; Schmitz, Ole; Ranstam, Jonas

    2004-01-01

    -group, placebo-controlled trial with an open-label comparator arm was conducted among 193 outpatients with type 2 diabetes. The mean age was 56.6 years and the mean HbA(1c) was 7.6% across the treatment groups. Patients were randomly assigned to one of five fixed-dosage groups of liraglutide (0.045, 0.225, 0....... Patients treated with glimepiride had decreased HbA(1c) and fasting glucose, but slightly increased body weight. No safety issues were raised for liraglutide; observed adverse events were mild and transient. CONCLUSIONS: A once-daily dose of liraglutide provides efficacious glycemic control...

  19. Glycemic and blood pressure control in older patients with hypertension and diabetes: association with carotid atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Wei Du; Jia-Yue Li; Yao He

    2011-01-01

    Backgroud Numerous studies have confirmed the effectiveness of slowing the progression of atherosclerosis by blood pressure (Bp)control in patients with hypertension and several studies also showed the efficacy of intensive glycemic control in decreasing progression of carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.However, few studies have compared the relative importance of glycemic vs.Bp control in patients with diabetes and hypertension.We aimed to investigate the association between Bp and glycemic control and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in older patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes.Methods In a cross-sectional study, B-mode high-resolution ultrasonography of the carotid artery was performed in 670 subjects (508 males and 162 females) aged 60 years or over who had self-reported hypertension and diabetes but no history of coronary heart disease or stroke.Subjects were categorized by their systolic blood pressure: tight control, < 130 mmHg; usual control, 130-139 mmHg; or uncontrolled, > 140 mmHg,and by their hemoglobin Alc (HbAlc) level: tight control, < 6.5%; usual control, 6.5%-7.5%; or uncontrolled, ≥ 7.5%, respectively.Results The mean CIMT was 8.20 ± 0.11 mm, and carotid plaque was found in 52.5% (352/670) subjects.Overall, 62.1% of the subjects had subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, defined as having either carotid plaque or elevated CIMT (≥1.1 mm).The mean CIMT was significantly different between Bp control categories (7.60 ± 0.09 mm, 7.90 ± 0.08 mm, and 8.60 ± 0.12 mm, respectively, P = 0.03) but not between glycemic control categories (8.20 ± 0.10 mm, 8.1 ± 0.08 mm, and 8.40 ± 0.14 mm, respectively, P = 0.13) using ANCOVA analysis.Multivariable logistic regression adjusting for potential confounding factors showed that usual or uncontrolled Bp control were associated with having carotid plaque (OR = 1.08 and OR = 1.42, respectively), or elevated CIMT [Odd ratio (OR) = 1

  20. Glycemic control and periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic, noncommunicable disease with concomitant oral manifestations that impact on dental care. Aim: To determine the correlation between glycemic control and periodontitis among 35-45 years aged patients with DM type 2 (DM2. Materials and Methods: A convenient sample of 40 subjects aged 35-45 years with DM2 on oral medication were recruited for the study. Glycosylated, hemoglobin(HbA1c, probing pocket depth (PPD, gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, and the relevant drug history were recorded. The data were analyzed using unpaired student t-test to compare the means of PPD, GI, PI between different HbA1c levels, gender, and duration of drug, and the Pearson correlation was used to find correlation between HbA1c and PPD, GI, PI, duration of drug. Results: With the increase in HbA1c values there was a significant rise in PPD, PI scores, and GI scores (P < 0.001. Diabetic males had a higher PPD, PI, and GI score as compared to females. With the increase in duration of the drug, there was an increase in PPD, which was found to be statistically nonsignificant. Conclusion: Patients are having poor glycemic level had more severe periodontitis as compared to patients having a fair glycemic level.

  1. Glycemic control promotes pancreatic beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Grossman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic beta-cells proliferate following administration of the beta-cell toxin streptozotocin. Defining the conditions that promote beta-cell proliferation could benefit patients with diabetes. We have investigated the effect of insulin treatment on pancreatic beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and, in addition, report on a new approach to quantify beta-cell regeneration in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic were treated with either syngeneic islets transplanted under the kidney capsule or subcutaneous insulin implants. After either 60 or 120 days of insulin treatment, the islet transplant or insulin implant were removed and blood glucose levels monitored for 30 days. The results showed that both islet transplants and insulin implants restored normoglycemia in the 60 and 120 day treated animals. However, only the 120-day islet and insulin implant groups maintained euglycemia (<200 mg/dl following discontinuation of insulin treatment. The beta-cell was significantly increased in all the 120 day insulin-treated groups (insulin implant, 0.69+/-0.23 mg; and islet transplant, 0.91+/-0.23 mg compared non-diabetic control mice (1.54+/-0.25 mg. We also show that we can use bioluminescent imaging to monitor beta-cell regeneration in living MIP-luc transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results show that insulin treatment can promote beta-cell regeneration. Moreover, the extent of restoration of beta-cell function and mass depend on the length of treatment period and overall level of glycemic control with better control being associated with improved recovery. Finally, real-time bioluminescent imaging can be used to monitor beta-cell recovery in living MIP-luc transgenic mice.

  2. Effect of a short-term exercise program on glycemic control measured by fructosamine test in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Bruno P; Amorim, Paulo Rs; Silva, Bruno Pp; Franceschini, Sylvia Cc; Reis, Janice S; Marins, João Cb

    2014-02-11

    Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) are the two monitoring blood glucose tests most frequently used. However, both methods are shown to be insensitive to detect glycemic variations in short duration periods. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effect of a short-term exercise program on glycemic levels measured by fructosamine concentrations in type 2 diabetes patients. Eight volunteers (51.1 ± 8.2 years) underwent a supervised exercise program during eight weeks (3 d.wk-1, 50-60% of VO2 peak for 30-60 minutes). The body composition, VO2 peak, A1C, FPG, fructosamine and capillary blood glucose (CBG) were evaluated. We used ANOVA - One Way for repeated measures followed by Tukey post-hoc test and paired t test. P values <0.05 were considered significant. We found statistical differences on the concentrations of fructosamine, VO2 peak and CBG. However, A1C and FPG showed no statistical difference. Fructosamine declined by 15% (57 μmol/L) between the beginning and the end of the study. Individually, 50% of the sample reached the reference values for the normality in fructosamine test. VO2 peak increased by 14.8% (3.8 ml.kg-1.min-1) and CBG decreased on an average of 34.4% (69.3 mg/dL). Fructosamine test is effective in the evaluation of glucose with type 2 diabetes patients when undergoing a short exercise program, alternatively to the traditional A1C and FPG assessment. Our results are relevant in clinical practice, because the significant improvement in glycemic status can help to evaluate the inclusion of exercise as adjunct therapy to replace the prescription of additional drugs in poorly controlled patients.

  3. Effects of RYGB on energy expenditure, appetite and glycemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Julie Berg; Pedersen, Susie Dawn; Gregersen, Nikolaj Ture

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Increased energy expenditure (EE) has been proposed an important mechanism for weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). However, this has never been investigated in a controlled setting independent of changes in energy balance. Likewise, only few studies have investigated...... different between the groups, but RYGB operated had lower fasting glucose (Pafter RYGB. More likely, RYGB promotes weight loss by reducing appetite, partly mediated...... by changes in gastrointestinal hormone secretion. Furthermore, we found that the early changes in glycaemic control after RYGB is to a large extent mediated by caloric restriction....

  4. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia and Its Association with Glycemic Control in Indian Type 2 Diabetes Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaithala Charitha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Diabetes mellitus is considered as one of the major health problems in India. With nearly one million diabetic deaths every year, India turned out as the “diabetic capital of the world”. Diabetes is considered as one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Dyslipidemia is considered as one of the most important cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetic population. In the current study we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of dyslipidemia and its association with glycemic control among the type 2 diabetic population.

  5. Maternal glycemic control and hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Kinsley, Brendan; Amiel, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    with HI. A1C was comparable with human insulin in second (IAsp-HI -0.04 [-0.18 to 0.11]) and third (-0.08 [-0.23 to 0.06]) trimesters. A total of 80% of subjects achieved an A1C ... in basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and may potentially offer some benefits in terms of postprandial glucose control and preventing severe hypoglycemia....

  6. The role of parent-adolescent attachment in the glycemic control of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Tziporah; Shields, Cleveland G

    2009-09-01

    This pilot study explored the associations between parent and adolescent reports of adolescent attachment and glycemic control in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that more secure attachment would correlate with more optimal diabetes control. Thirty-one families completed written self-report questionnaires about adolescent attachment, demographic data, and diabetes control. Adolescents and parents reported on their perceptions of adolescents' attachment to mothers and fathers. Mean HbA1c for the sample was 7.6% (SD = 1.14). Mothers' perceptions of adolescents' attachment were significantly correlated with adolescents' hemoglobin A1c (r = -.42, p = .022), indicating that maternal perceptions of more secure attachment was associated with better glycemic control. Neither fathers' perceptions nor adolescents' reports of attachment was significantly correlated with glycemic control. Attachment appears to be associated with glycemic control in this population though the mechanisms are unclear. Mothers' perceptions of attachment had the strongest associations with control, not adolescent reports. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which parent reports of adolescent attachment are associated with glycemic control.

  7. Glycemic control in patients receiving insulin critics: integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Texeira Paixão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Discutir o conhecimento produzido sobre o controle glicêmico de pacientes críticos que recebem infusão contínua de insulina. Método: Revisão integrativa de literatura de publicações nas bases Ovid, Science e Scopus que abordassem a infusão contínua de insulina em pacientes hospitalizados, entre 2003 a 2013 e texto completo disponível on line. Selecionados onze publicações. Resultados: O controle glicêmico com insulina intravenosa apresentou maiores taxas de hipoglicemia apesar de permitir alcançar a meta alvo mais rápido  e protocolos informatizados são recursos eficazes na prevenção de eventos hipoglicêmicos apesar de caros e ainda pouco disponíveis na realidade brasileira. Conclusão: É importante fornecer subsídios para o enfermeiro sobre as implicações da hipoglicemia grave durante a infusão contínua de insulina para  o controle dos riscos nos processos assistenciais de enfermagem.

  8. Assessment of an educational intervention in the management of non-critical inpatient glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Huelgas, R; Lopez-Carmona, M D; Jansen-Chaparro, S; Sobrino, B; Chaves, M; Martin-Gallardo, P; Garcia-Fernandez, C; Bernal-Lopez, M R

    2014-01-01

    In hospitalized diabetic patients, the recommended insulin therapy is basal bolus plus correction-dose regimen instead of sliding-scale insulin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the implementation of a new protocol based on basal bolus therapy on managing diabetes in a university hospital setting. We performed a cross-sectional study before and 12 months after a 4-month intervention period to implement a basal bolus regimen in hospitalized patients. Non-critical patients admitted into the hospital for at least 72 h were included. Changes in prescribing habits, glucose control and incidence of hypoglycemia were evaluated. An increase in the use of the new protocol and a decrease in sliding scale were observed after the intervention. In the pre-intervention group, a total of 59.2% glucose readings were between 70 and 180 mg/dL versus 57.1% after the intervention, without observing statistical differences. Significant reductions in hypoglycemia between pre- and post-intervention (13.04 vs. 4.08%, p = 0.0215) were observed. The percentage of hospitalized diabetic patients who had HbA1c was 10.43 and 4.08% in pre- and post-intervention phases, respectively. The protocol showed beneficial outcomes in terms of fewer hypoglycemia episodes and reflected a change in prescription habits, but it did not improve glycemic control. Furthermore, the percentage of patients who had an HbA1c test during their hospitalization remained very low after the intervention. This fact may seriously limit the correct management of hyperglycemia after the hospital discharge.

  9. Glycemic control in pediatric type 1 diabetes: role of caregiver literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Krishnavathana; Heptulla, Rubina A

    2010-05-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes may occur because caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes fail to comprehend provided diabetes education. We hypothesized that poorly controlled diabetes is associated with lower literacy/numerical skills of caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes. Primary caregivers were evaluated by using Newest Vital Sign (NVS) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. The NVS identifies individuals who are at risk for low health literacy by measuring general literacy/numeracy skills and yields an overall estimate of health literacy. The NVS scores are interpreted to suggest inadequate, limited, or adequate literacy. Two hundred caregivers of children who had type 1 diabetes with mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 8.8 +/- 1.9%, age of 11.8 +/- 3.7 years, duration of disease of 4.8 +/- 3.3 years, and BMI of 20.8 +/- 4.4 kg/m(2) participated. HbA1c in those of inadequate literacy (10.4 +/- 2.2%) was significantly higher than in those of adequate literacy (8.6 +/- 1.7%; P literacy (9.5 +/- 2.2%) did not differ significantly from the other 2 groups. On adjusting for independent covariates, we found that children whose caregivers had at least 50% correct math answers had better glycemic control (8.5 +/- 1.7%) than those who failed (9.8 +/- 2.1%; P Literacy and numerical skills of caregivers significantly influence glycemic control of their children with type 1 diabetes. Assessing literacy/numeracy skills of caregivers and addressing these deficiencies may be crucial in optimizing glycemic control.

  10. Long-term effects of fluoxetine on glycemic control in obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Leif; Bjerre, U; Bak, J F;

    1995-01-01

    Fluoxetine (F) is a specific serotonin-reuptake inhibitor that has been shown to promote weight loss and improve glycemic control in obese diabetic patients. To study its long-term metabolic effect, 40 obese patients with non-insulin -dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or impaired glucose...... tolerance (IGT) were included in a 12-month, randomized, placebo controlled study. Patients were assigned to receive either 60 mg F or placebo (P) daily in conjunction with a 5.0-MJ/d diet (> 50% carbohydrate). Both groups showed a significant weight loss, with a nadir after 6 months without group...... differences (mean +/- SD: F, 10.1 +/- 10.0 kg; P, 9.4 +/- 11.5 kg). Fifteen patients from the F group and 14 from the P group completed the 12-month study without weight loss differences. Glycemic regulation improved along with the weight loss, but with a larger decline in plasma C-peptide and fasting glucose...

  11. Bromocriptine mesylate: Food and Drug Administration approved new approach in therapy of non-insulin dependant diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control

    OpenAIRE

    Yogendra Keche

    2010-01-01

    Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved bromocriptine mesylate, a quick release formulation, 0.8 mg tablets, as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bromocriptine products were previously approved by the FDA for the treatment of pituitary tumors and Parkinson's disease. Bromocriptine is thought to act on circadian neuronal activities within the hypothalamus to reset abnormally elevated hypothalamic drive for increased plasma ...

  12. α-2-Macroglobulin in Saliva Is Associated with Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Juan Pablo Aitken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 require an adequate glycemic control to avoid diabetic complications. Currently, saliva biomarkers are used as a diagnostic tool and can be indicative of the degree of progression and control of various diseases. Several studies indicate that α-2-macroglobulin levels are elevated in diabetic patients. Methods. 120 subjects with DM2 were enrolled and classified into two groups according to their glycemic control (percentage of glycated hemoglobin-A1c (HbA1c, 7% inadequate glycemic control group. The relationship between α-2-macroglobulin levels from saliva samples and HbA1c was subsequently evaluated. Results. We found a positive correlation between α-2-macroglobulin and HbA1c (r=0.778 and P<0.0001. Area under the receivers operating characteristic (ROC curve of α-2-macroglobulin indicated a positive discrimination threshold of α-2-macroglobulin (AUC = 0.903, CI 95%: 0.847–0.959, P<0.0001 to diagnose glycemic control. Conclusions. Our data strongly suggest that the level of saliva α-2-macroglobulin is an indicator for the degree of glycemic control in diabetic patients and represents a promising alternative method to evaluate this parameter.

  13. Serum protein-bound hexose in diabetes: the effect of glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A L; Kandell, T W; Merimee, T J

    1979-11-01

    To determine whether the carbohydrate content of serum proteins is related to overall glycemic control, we studied serum protein-bound hexose and glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1(a+b+c)] in 37 ambulant diabetic patients and 32 nondiabetic controls. Protein-bound hexose was correlated with HbA1(a+b+c) in the diabetic patients (r = 0.36, P less than 0.025). The mean protein-bound hexose level of the diabetic patients was greater than that of the controls (190.8 versus 174.7 mg/dl, P less than 0.01), but diabetic patients with HbA1(a+b+c) less than 12% had a mean protein-bound hexose similar to the controls. In nine of the diabetic patients, mean protein-bound hexose and HbA1(a+b+c) were significantly reduced during a period of intensive outpatient care, while two major serum glycoproteins, haptoglobins and alpha-1-antitrypsin, were unchanged. Our findings support the hypothesis that increased glycosylation of serum proteins may occur in diabetes mellitus; this abnormality in serum protein-bound hexose may be corrected by close attention to overall glycemic control.

  14. Glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in patients with diabetes in pregnancy: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badurudeen Mahmood Buhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Diabetes in pregnancy (DIP is either pregestational or gestational. Aims: To determine the relationship between glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of DIP patients. Settings and Design: In this 12-month retrospective study, a total of 325 Saudi women with DIP who attended the outpatient clinics at a tertiary center Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were included. Subjects and Methods: The patients were divided into two groups, those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c ≤6.5% (48 mmol/mol and those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c above 6.5%. The two groups were compared for differences in maternal and fetal outcomes. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent Student's t-test and analysis of variance were performed for comparison of continuous variables and Chi-square test for frequencies. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Patients with higher HbA1c were older (P = 0.0077, had significantly higher blood pressure, proteinuria (P < 0.0001, and were multiparous (P = 0.0269. They had significantly shorter gestational periods (P = 0.0002, more preterm labor (P < 0.0001, more perineal tears (P = 0.0406, more miscarriages (P < 0.0001, and more operative deliveries (P < 0.0001. Their babies were significantly of greater weight, had more Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU admissions, hypoglycemia, and macrosomia. Conclusions: Poor glycemic control during pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes (shortened gestational period, greater risk of miscarriage, increased likelihood of operative delivery, hypoglycemia, macrosomia, and increased NICU admission. Especially at risk are those with preexisting diabetes, who would benefit from earlier diabetes consultation and tighter glycemic control before conception.

  15. Adherence to oral diabetes medications and glycemic control during and following breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calip, Gregory S; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Stergachis, Andy; Malone, Kathleen E; Gralow, Julie R; Boudreau, Denise M

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated changes in oral diabetes mellitus medication adherence and persistence, as well as glycemic control for the year prior to breast cancer (BC) diagnosis (Year -1), during BC treatment, and in subsequent years. Cohort study of 4216 women diagnosed with incident early stage (I and II) invasive BC from 1990-2008, enrolled in Group Health Cooperative. Adherence was measured in prevalent users at baseline (N = 509), during treatment, and 1-3 years post-diagnosis using medication possession ratio (MPR), % adherent (MPR ≥0.80) and discontinuation rates. Laboratory data on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c ) was obtained for the corresponding periods. Compared with Year -1, mean MPR for metformin/sulfonylureas (0.86 vs 0.49, p adherent (75.3% vs 24.6%, p adherent rose slightly during Years 1-3 post-diagnosis but never returned to baseline. Discontinuation rates increased from treatment to Year +1 (59.3% vs 75.6%, p 7.0% (34.9% vs 51.1%, p adherence. Diabetes mellitus medication adherence declined following BC diagnosis, whereas discontinuation rates were relatively stable but poor overall. The proportion of adherent users increased only marginally following treatment, whereas the proportion of women meeting goals for HbA1c decreased considerably. These data support the hypothesis that adherence and subsequent glycemic control are sensitive to BC diagnosis and treatment. Confirmatory studies in other settings, on reasons for reduced adherence post-cancer diagnosis, and on subsequent indicators of glycemic control are warranted. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Effect of low-glycemic load diet on changes in cardiovascular risk factors in poorly controlled diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Afaghi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One dietary strategy aimed at improving both diabetes control and control of cardiovascular risk factors is the use of low glycemic index diets. These diets have been reported to be beneficial in controlling diabetes, and also increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, lower serum triglyceride, and reduce glycated protein. Aim: Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effect of a low glycemic index-low glycemic load (GL = 67-77 diet on lipids and blood glucose of poorly controlled diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: In an intervention study, 100 poorly controlled diabetic patients (age 52.8 ± 4.5 years who were taking insulin or on oral medication underwent administration of low GL diet (GL = 67-77; energy = 1800-2200 kcal, total fat = 36%, fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%, carbohydrate = 41%, protein = 22% for 10 weeks. Patients were recommended to follow their regular lifestyle. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL, HDL, triglyceride, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, weight, and body mass index (BMI were measured before and 10 weeks after the intervention. Results: Before intervention, initial blood cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were 205.9 ± 21.6 and 181.5 ± 22.2, respectively, and were reduced to 182.6 ± 18.2 and 161.6 ± 16.7, respectively, after 10 weeks intervention (P < 0.001. LDL reduced and HDL increased significantly. The HbA1c percentage reduced by 12% (from 8.85 ± 0.22% to 7.81 ± 0.27% (P < 0.001, and also their weight significantly reduced from 74.0 ± 5 kg to 70.7 ± 4.6 kg (P < 0.001. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that low GL diet having lower carbohydrate amount and higher fat content is an appropriate strategy in blood lipid and glucose response control of poorly controlled diabetic patients.

  17. Interface design and human factors considerations for model-based tight glycemic control in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan; Steel, James; Le Compte, Aaron; Evans, Alicia; Tan, Chia-Siong; Penning, Sophie; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to implement. Model-based methods and computerized protocols offer the opportunity to improve TGC quality and compliance. This research presents an interface design to maximize compliance, minimize real and perceived clinical effort, and minimize error based on simple human factors and end user input. The graphical user interface (GUI) design is presented by construction based on a series of simple, short design criteria based on fundamental human factors engineering and includes the use of user feedback and focus groups comprising nursing staff at Christchurch Hospital. The overall design maximizes ease of use and minimizes (unnecessary) interaction and use. It is coupled to a protocol that allows nurse staff to select measurement intervals and thus self-manage workload. The overall GUI design is presented and requires only one data entry point per intervention cycle. The design and main interface are heavily focused on the nurse end users who are the predominant users, while additional detailed and longitudinal data, which are of interest to doctors guiding overall patient care, are available via tabs. This dichotomy of needs and interests based on the end user's immediate focus and goals shows how interfaces must adapt to offer different information to multiple types of users. The interface is designed to minimize real and perceived clinical effort, and ongoing pilot trials have reported high levels of acceptance. The overall design principles, approach, and testing methods are based on fundamental human factors principles designed to reduce user effort and error and are readily generalizable. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  18. Family Density and SES Related to Diabetes Management and Glycemic Control in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavale, Laura J; Weaver, Patrick; Chen, Rusan; Streisand, Randi; Holmes, Clarissa S

    2015-06-01

    Youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) from single-parent families have poorer glycemic control; a finding confounded with socioeconomic status (SES). Family density (FD), or youth:adult ratio, may better characterize family risk status. Structural equation modeling assessed the relation of single-parent status, SES, and FD to parenting stress, diabetes-related conflict, parental monitoring, adherence, and glycemic control using cross-sectional parent and youth data (n = 257). Single-parent status exhibited similar relations as SES and was removed. Lower FD was associated with better glycemic control (β = -.29, p = .014) via less conflict (β = .17, p = .038) and greater adherence (β = -.54, p Beyond SES, FD plays a significant role in adherence and glycemic control via diabetes-related conflict. In contrast, the effects of single-parent status were indistinguishable from those of SES. FD provides distinct information related to adolescent glycemic control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Glycosylated Hemoglobin and Albumin-Corrected Fructosamine Are Good Indicators for Glycemic Control in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, I-Chieh; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chueh, Shu-Neng; Chuang, Hsueh-Fang; Wu, Hon-Yen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is an important risk factor for morbidity and mortality after dialysis. However, glycemic control among such patients is difficult to assess. The present study examined glycemic control parameters and observed glucose variation after refilling different kinds of fresh dialysate in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Methods A total of 25 DM PD patients were recruited, and continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) was applied to measure interstitial fluid (ISF) glucose levels at 5-min intervals for 3 days. Patients filled out diet and PD fluid exchange diaries. The records measured with CGMS were analyzed and correlated with other glycemic control parameters such as fructosamine, albumin-corrected fructosamine (AlbF), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and glycated albumin levels. Results There were significant correlations between mean ISF glucose and fructosamine (r = 0.45, Picodextrin dialysate which kept ISF glucose levels unchanged. Conclusion HbA1c and AlbF significantly correlated with the mean ISF glucose levels, indicating that they are reliable indices of glycemic control in DM PD patients. Icodextrin dialysate seems to have a favorable glycemic control effect when compared to the other glucose-containing dialysates. PMID:23469230

  20. Effect of low glycemic load diet on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in poorly-controlled diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaee, Amir; Afaghi, Ahmad; Sarreshtehdari, Majied

    2011-12-29

    Different carbohydrate diets have been administrated to diabetic patients to evaluate the glycemic response, while Poor-controlled diabetes is increasing world wide. To investigate the role of an alternative carbohydrate diet on glycemic control, we explored the effect of a low glycemic load (Low GL)-high fat diet on glycemic response and also glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of poor-controlled diabetes patients. Hundred poorly-controlled diabetes patients, HbA1c > 8, age 52.8 ± 4.5 y, were administrated a low GL diet , GL = 67 (Energy 1800 kcal; total fat 36%; fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%; carbohydrate 42%; protein 22%) for 10 weeks. Patients did their routine life style program during intervention. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c before and after intervention with significant reduction were: 169 ± 17, 141 ± 12; 8.85% (73 mmol/mol) ± 0.22%, and 7.81% (62 mmol/mol) ± 0.27%; respectively (P HbA1c by 1.1% (11 mmol/mol) ± 0.3% (P=0.001). There was positive moderate correlation between HbA1c concentration before intervention and FBS reduction after intervention (P diet can be effective in glycemic control.

  1. Association of blindness to intensification of glycemic control in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalets, E; Galstyan, G; Starostina, E; Antsiferov, M; Chantelau, E

    1994-01-01

    Intensive glycemic control (IGC) in previously hyperglycemic insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients is associated with a decreased long-term risk of progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR); up to 12 months after institution of IGC, however, the risk of progression of DR transiently increases. In an observational study, a cohort of 122 patients with IDDM was followed prospectively for changes in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1, normal 2% per year is associated with a high risk of progression of antecedent diabetic retinopathy to blindness in IDDM patients with an extremely high initial HbA1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Metabolic effects of resistance or high-intensity interval training among glycemic control-nonresponsive children with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, C; Ramírez-Campillo, R; Ramírez-Vélez, R; Martínez, C; Castro-Sepúlveda, M; Alonso-Martínez, A; Izquierdo, M

    2017-07-31

    Little evidence exists on which variables of body composition or muscular strength mediates more glucose control improvements taking into account inter-individual metabolic variability to different modes of exercise training. We examined 'mediators' to the effects of 6-weeks of resistance training (RT) or high-intensity interval training (HIT) on glucose control parameters in physically inactive schoolchildren with insulin resistance (IR). Second, we also determined both training-induce changes and the prevalence of responders (R) and non-responders (NR) to decrease the IR level. Fifty-six physically inactive children diagnosed with IR followed a RT or supervised HIT program for 6 weeks. Participants were classified based on ΔHOMA-IR into glycemic control R (decrease in homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) training-induced changes to glucose control parameters; and third the report of R and NR to improve body composition, cardiovascular, metabolic and performance variables. Mediation analysis revealed that improvements (decreases) in abdominal fat by the waist circumference can explain more the effects (decreases) of HOMA-IR in physically inactive schoolchildren under RT or HIT regimes. The same analysis showed that increased one-maximum repetition leg-extension was correlated with the change in HOMA-IR (β=-0.058; P=0.049). Furthermore, a change in the waist circumference fully mediated the dose-response relationship between changes in the leg-extension strength and HOMA-IR (β'=-0.004; P=0.178). RT or HIT were associated with significant improvements in body composition, muscular strength, blood pressure and cardiometabolic parameters irrespective of improvement in glycemic control response. Both glucose control RT-R and HIT-R (respectively), had significant improvements in mean HOMA-IR, mean muscular strength leg-extension and mean measures of adiposity. The improvements in the lower body strength and the decreases in waist circumference can explain more

  3. Response to Acute Psychophysical Stress and 24-Hour Glycemic Control in Healthy Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta DiPietro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the relation between stress reactivity and 24 h glycemic control in 17 inactive, healthy older people (≥60 years under both a novel psychophysical stress and a seated control condition. Plasma cortisol was measured over the course of the stress and recovery periods. Glycemic control was determined over the subsequent 3 h from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and over 24 h via continuous glucose monitoring (CGM. We observed significant (P<0.05 elevations in perceived stress, cardiovascular activity, and peak cortisol response at 30 min (10.6±3.1 versus 8.6±2.6 μg·dL−1, resp. during the stress compared with the control condition; however, 3 h OGTT glucose and insulin responses were similar between conditions. The CGM data suggested a 30–40 min postchallenge delay in peak glucose response and attenuated glucose clearance over the 6 h following the stress condition, but these alterations were not statistically significant. Healthy older people may demonstrate minimal disruption in metabolic resiliency following everyday psychological stress.

  4. Glycemic control in diabetic patients in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) - Riyadh - Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rowais, Norah Abdullah

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate glycemic control of diabetic patients at the King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A cross sectional study was conducted among diabetic patients attending KKUH, Riyadh. Patients were identified through the hospital pharmacy records, over a one year period (January-December, 2009). A total of 20,000 patients were identified, and 1520 patients were selected by a simple random method. Medical charts were reviewed, the data were collected in a specially designed data sheet: and entered in a computer, and finally analyzed using a SPSS program. About 90% of patients were older than 40 years old and 90% were overweight or obese. Fasting blood sugar was above 7.2 mmol/L in 60% of the patients and random blood sugar was more than 10 mmol/L in about 70% of patients. The overall glycemic control as evaluated by HBA1C was acceptable in about 40% of the patients. Cholesterol level was normal in more than 70% of patients while triglyceride was normal in 56% of patients. In about half of the patients systolic blood pressure was not controlled, while in 27% the diastolic blood pressure was above the target level. The control of diabetes and its associated cardiovascular risk factors in this hospital - based survey, in Riyadh is far from optimal. Further studies are needed to find out the possible causes for this defective care of diabetic patients.

  5. Influence of the glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet in the glycemic control of diabetic children and teenagers Influencia del índice glicémico y la carga glucémica de la dieta en el control glucémico de niños y adolescentes diabéticos

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, K.C.; I. Novato Silva; R. de Cássia Gonçalves Alfenas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the influence of the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of the diet in the glycemic control of children and teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). Methods: A total of 146 subjects, aged 7-19 years, monitored at the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology at the HC/UFMG participated in the study. The consumed diet was evaluated using a quantitative food frequency questionnaire previously validated and tested in a pilotproject. The GI of the participant´s diet wa...

  6. Effect of Replacing Animal Protein with Plant Protein on Glycemic Control in Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effie Viguiliouk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on the effect of replacing sources of animal protein with plant protein on glycemic control has been inconsistent. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs to assess the effect of this replacement on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases through 26 August 2015. We included RCTs ≥ 3-weeks comparing the effect of replacing animal with plant protein on HbA1c, fasting glucose (FG, and fasting insulin (FI. Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data, assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as mean differences (MD with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic and quantified (I2-statistic. Thirteen RCTs (n = 280 met the eligibility criteria. Diets emphasizing a replacement of animal with plant protein at a median level of ~35% of total protein per day significantly lowered HbA1c (MD = −0.15%; 95%-CI: −0.26, −0.05%, FG (MD = −0.53 mmol/L; 95%-CI: −0.92, −0.13 mmol/L and FI (MD = −10.09 pmol/L; 95%-CI: −17.31, −2.86 pmol/L compared with control arms. Overall, the results indicate that replacing sources of animal with plant protein leads to modest improvements in glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Owing to uncertainties in our analyses there is a need for larger, longer, higher quality trials. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT02037321.

  7. Mulberry (Morus alba L.) Fruit Extract Containing Anthocyanins Improves Glycemic Control and Insulin Sensitivity via Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Diabetic C57BL/Ksj-db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung Ha; Lee, Hyun Ah; Park, Mi Hwa; Han, Ji-Sook

    2016-08-01

    The effect of mulberry (Morus alba L.) fruit extract (MFE) on hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity in an animal model of type 2 diabetes was evaluated. C57BL/Ksj-diabetic db/db mice were divided into three groups: diabetic control, rosiglitazone, and MFE groups. Blood glucose, plasma insulin, and intraperitoneal glucose were measured, and an insulin tolerance test was performed after MFE supplementation in db/db mice. In addition, the protein levels of various targets of insulin signaling were measured by western blotting. The blood levels of glucose and HbA1c were significantly lower in the MFE-supplemented group than in the diabetic control group. Moreover, glucose and insulin tolerance tests showed that MFE treatment increased insulin sensitivity. The homeostatic index of insulin resistance significantly decreased in the MFE-supplemented group relative to the diabetic control group. MFE supplementation significantly stimulated the levels of phosphorylated (p)-AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) and p-Akt substrate of 160 kDa (pAS160) and enhanced the level of plasma membrane-glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscles. Further, dietary MFE significantly increased pAMPK and decreased the levels of glucose 6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the liver. MFE may improve hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity via activation of AMPK and AS160 in skeletal muscles and inhibition of gluconeogenesis in the liver.

  8. Diet, Inflammation, and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: An Integrative Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Y. Nowlin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a growing national health problem affecting 35% of adults ≥20 years of age in the United States. Recently, diabetes has been categorized as an inflammatory disease, sharing many of the adverse outcomes as those reported from cardiovascular disease. Medical nutrition therapy is recommended for the treatment of diabetes; however, these recommendations have not been updated to target the inflammatory component, which can be affected by diet and lifestyle. To assess the current state of evidence for which dietary programs contain the most anti-inflammatory and glycemic control properties for patients with T2D, we conducted an integrative review of the literature. A comprehensive search of the PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Web of Science databases from January 2000 to May 2012 yielded 786 articles. The final 16 studies met the selection criteria including randomized control trials, quasiexperimental, or cross-sectional studies that compared varying diets and measured inflammatory markers. The Mediterranean and DASH diets along with several low-fat diets were associated with lower inflammatory markers. The Mediterranean diet demonstrated the most clinically significant reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Information on best dietary guidelines for inflammation and glycemic control in individuals with T2D is lacking. Continued research is warranted.

  9. Pilot study on the additive effects of berberine and oral type 2 diabetes agents for patients with suboptimal glycemic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Villanova, Nicola; Agostini, Federica; Marzocchi, Rebecca; Soverini, Valentina; Marchesini, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Background Suboptimal glycemic control is a common situation in diabetes, regardless of the wide range of drugs available to reach glycemic targets. Basic research in diabetes is endeavoring to identify new actives working as insulin savers, use of which could delay the introduction of injectable insulin or reduce the insulin dose needed. Commonly available as a nutraceutical, berberine is a potential candidate. Methods and results Because its low oral bioavailability can be overcome by P-glycoprotein inhibitors like herbal polyphenols, we have tested the nutraceutical combination of Berberis aristata extract and Silybum marianum extract (Berberol®) in type 2 diabetes in terms of its additive effect when combined with a conventional oral regimen for patients with suboptimal glycemic control. After 90 days of treatment, the nutraceutical association had a positive effect on glycemic and lipid parameters, significantly reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. A relevant effect was also observed in terms of liver function by measuring aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. The product had a good safety profile, with distinctive gastrointestinal side effects likely due to its acarbose-like action. Conclusion Although further studies should be carried out to confirm our data, Berberol could be considered a good candidate as an adjunctive treatment option in diabetes, especially in patients with suboptimal glycemic control. PMID:22924000

  10. The Effect of Glycemic Control on Plasma Ghrelin and Serum IGF-1 Levels in Type 1 Diabetic Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Altuğ Şen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of glycemic control on plasma ghrelin levels and serum IGF-1 levels in girls with type 1 diabetes. Materials and Method: The study group composed of 32 diabetic girls between the ages of 14.0-20.0 years with Tanner pubertal stage 5; and 15 healthy girls in similar ages with Tanner pubertal stage 5 formed the control group. Diabetic girls were classified as well glycemic controlled (n=18 and poor glycemic controlled (n=14 according to last year’s mean glycosylated hemoglobin levels. All subjects were tested for fasting plasma ghrelin and serum IGF-1 levels. Results: The mean fasting plasma ghrelin levels in girls with well controlled diabetes, in girls wtih poor controlled diabetes and in control group were 483.4±221.9 pg/ml, 310.7±110.2 pg/ml, 471.9±175.0 pg/ml respectively. The mean serum IGF-1 levels in girls with well controlled diabetes was 233.9±59.2 ng/ml, in girls with poor controlled diabetes 183.9±36.7 ng/ml, and in healthy controls 247.3±48.5 ng/ml. Plasma ghrelin levels and serum IGF-1 levels were similar in girls with well controlled diabetes and in the control group, however it was significantly supressed in those with poorly controlled diabetes. Conclusion: The metabolic control may be a determinative factor on plasma ghrelin and serum IGF-1 levels of type 1 diabetics. Plasma ghrelin and serum IGF-1 levels were similar in well glycemic controlled diabetics and control group, while they were suppressed in only poor glycemic controlled diabetics. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2009; 7: 104-10

  11. The Benefit of a Glucose-Sparing PD Therapy on Glycemic Control Measured by Serum Fructosamine in Diabetic Patients in a Randomized, Controlled Trial (IMPENDIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Philip K T; Dorval, Marc; Johnson, David W; Rutherford, Peter; Shutov, Evgeny; Story, Ken; Bargman, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Poor glycemic control can lead to increased morbidity and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Serum fructosamine may be a more reliable marker of glycemic control than HbA1c in dialysis patients. We evaluated the effects of a glucose-sparing PD regimen on serum fructosamine. In the multicenter, controlled IMPENDIA trial, eligible diabetic PD patients were randomized (1:1) to a 24-hour combination of a glucose sparing regimen (n = 89) or a glucose-based therapy (n = 91). Serum fructosamine and HbA1c were measured at baseline, 3 months and 6 months; fructosamine measurements were corrected for serum albumin (AlbF). Serum fructosamine decreased from 297 to 253 µmol/l in the glucose-sparing group (95% confidence interval [CI] for the difference, -26 to -68, p < 0.001), and increased from 311 to 314 µmol/l in the glucose-only group (95% CI for the difference, -23 to +19, p = 0.87). The mean difference in change of fructosamine levels between groups at 6 months was 64 µmol/l (95% CI 29-99, p < 0.001). HbA1c decreased versus baseline in both groups (treatment difference 0.3%, p = 0.07). The correlation between AlbF and baseline fasting serum glucose was stronger than that seen between HbA1c and baseline fasting serum glucose (r = 0.47, p < 0.0001 and r = 0.31, p < 0.0001, respectively). A glucose-sparing regimen (P-E-N) improved glycemic control as measured by serum fructosamine. Further studies are needed to establish fructosamine targets that will reduce the morbidity risk related to hyperglycemia in PD patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Association of Helicobacter pylori Infection with Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Horikawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP infection and glycemic control in patients with diabetes through a meta-analytic approach. Research Design and Methods. Electronic literature searches were conducted for cross-sectional studies that examined the hemoglobin A1c (A1C level by whether patients with diabetes were or were not carriers of HP. Mean differences in A1C between groups with and without HP infection were pooled with a random-effects model. Results. Thirteen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, the HP carriers did not have significantly higher A1C levels compared with HP noncarriers (mean difference (95% CI, 0.19% (−0.18 to 0.46, P = 0.16. When the analysis was limited to studies targeting patients with type 1 diabetes, there was also no significant difference in A1C (0.69% (−0.31 to 1.68, P = 0.18. Conclusions. There was insufficient evidence that HP infection worsened glycemic control in patients with diabetes.

  13. Impact of Glycemic Control on Risk of Infections in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mor, Anil; Dekkers, Olaf M; Nielsen, Jens S

    2017-01-01

    Infections are a major clinical challenge for type 2 diabetes patients, but little is known about the impact of glycemic control. We used Cox regression analyses to examine the association between baseline and time-varying HbA1c values and development of community antiinfective-treated and hospit.......51, 1.79) for the latest updated HbA1c. Our findings provide evidence for an association of current hyperglycemia with infection risk in type 2 diabetes patients.......Infections are a major clinical challenge for type 2 diabetes patients, but little is known about the impact of glycemic control. We used Cox regression analyses to examine the association between baseline and time-varying HbA1c values and development of community antiinfective-treated and hospital......-treated infections in 69,318 patients with type 2 diabetes diagnosed between 2000 and 2012 in Northern Denmark. Incidence rates were 394/1,000 patient-years for community-treated infections and 63/1,000 patient-years for hospital-treated infections. The adjusted hazard ratios for community-treated infection at an Hb...

  14. Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV inhibitors and glycemic control in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Lokendra Bahadur Sapkota

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a progressive disease, characterized by insulin resistance, impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, inappropriately elevated glucagon concentrations, and hyperglycemia. Many patients cannot obtain satisfactory glycemic control with current therapies. New and more effective agents, targeted not only at treatment, but also at prevention of the disease, its progression, and its associated complications, are, therefore, required. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are a newer class of oral drugs for the treatment of T2DM. They inhibit the breakdown of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP thereby increasing the incretin effect in patients with T2DM. In clinical practice they are associated with significant reductions in HbA1c, no weight gain and a low risk of hypoglycemia. Since incretin response is markedly diminished in Asian populations, these agents can be used to achieve satisfactory glycemic control in Nepalese T2DM patients.JCMS Nepal. 2016;12(1:28-32.

  15. Successful Implementation of a Perioperative Glycemic Control Protocol in Cardiac Surgery: Barrier Analysis and Intervention Using Lean Six Sigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elizabeth A.; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F.; Grogan, Kelly L.; Khalifeh, Katherine W.; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E.; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U.

    2011-01-01

    Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200 mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200 mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period. PMID:22091218

  16. Successful Implementation of a Perioperative Glycemic Control Protocol in Cardiac Surgery: Barrier Analysis and Intervention Using Lean Six Sigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200 mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200 mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period.

  17. Successful implementation of a perioperative glycemic control protocol in cardiac surgery: barrier analysis and intervention using lean six sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elizabeth A; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F; Grogan, Kelly L; Khalifeh, Katherine W; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2011-01-01

    Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200 mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200 mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period.

  18. Effect of the carbohydrate counting method on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Viviane M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of achieving and maintaining an appropriate metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 has been established in many studies aiming to prevent the development of chronic complications. The carbohydrate counting method can be recommended as an additional tool in the nutritional treatment of diabetes, allowing patients with DM1 to have more flexible food choices. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of nutrition intervention and the use of multiple short-acting insulin according to the carbohydrate counting method on clinical and metabolic control in patients with DM1. Methods Our sample consisted of 51 patients with DM1, 32 females, aged 25.3 ± 1.55 years. A protocol of nutritional status evaluation was applied and laboratory analysis was performed at baseline and after a three-month intervention. After the analysis of the food records, a balanced diet was prescribed using the carbohydrate counting method, and short-acting insulin was prescribed based on the total amount of carbohydrate per meal (1 unit per 15 g of carbohydrate. Results A significant decrease in A1c levels was observed from baseline to the three-month evaluation after the intervention (10.40 ± 0.33% and 9.52 ± 0.32%, respectively, p = 0.000. It was observed an increase in daily insulin dose after the intervention (0.99 ± 0.65 IU/Kg and 1.05 ± 0.05 IU/Kg, respectively, p = 0.003. No significant differences were found regarding anthropometric evaluation (BMI, waist, hip or abdominal circumferences and waist to hip ratio after the intervention period. Conclusions The use of short-acting insulin based on the carbohydrate counting method after a short period of time resulted in a significant improvement of the glycemic control in patients with DM1 with no changes in body weight despite increases in the total daily insulin doses.

  19. Higher glycemic index and glycemic load diet is associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Ghazaleh; Jessri, Mahsa; Hajizadeh, Bahareh; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Rashidkhani, Bahram

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have indicated the association between intake of foods high in dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with an increased risk of digestive tract cancers. We hypothesized that GI and GL may be associated with risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a high-risk population in Iran. In total, we interviewed 47 cases with incident of ESCC and 96 frequency-matched hospital controls, then calculated the average dietary GI and GL via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Dietary GL was calculated as a function of GI, carbohydrate content, and frequency of intake of certain foods. Dietary GI and GL levels were significantly higher among the ESCC cases compared with the controls (P < .05). After adjustment for potential confounders, those in the highest tertile of dietary GI had 2.95 times higher risk of ESCC compared with those in the lowest (95% confidence interval, 1.68-3.35; P for trend = .002). In addition, being in the highest tertile of dietary GL was positively associated with an ESCC risk (odds ratio, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.98-4.41; P for trend = .001). Findings of the present study indicate that diets with high GI and GL might have potentially unfavorable effects on ESCC risk and suggest a possible role for excess circulating insulin and related insulin-like growth factor 1 in esophageal cancer development.

  20. Family Density and SES Related to Diabetes Management and Glycemic Control in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Caccavale, Laura J.; Weaver, Patrick; Chen, Rusan; Streisand, Randi; Holmes, Clarissa S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) from single-parent families have poorer glycemic control; a finding confounded with socioeconomic status (SES). Family density (FD), or youth:adult ratio, may better characterize family risk status. Methods Structural equation modeling assessed the relation of single-parent status, SES, and FD to parenting stress, diabetes-related conflict, parental monitoring, adherence, and glycemic control using cross-sectional parent and youth data (n = 257). Res...

  1. Carbohydrate intake and glycemic index affect substrate oxidation during a controlled weight cycle in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlhöfer, J; Lagerpusch, M; Enderle, J; Eggeling, B; Braun, W; Pape, D; Müller, M J; Bosy-Westphal, A

    2014-09-01

    Because both, glycemic index (GI) and carbohydrate content of the diet increase insulin levels and could thus impair fat oxidation, we hypothesized that refeeding a low GI, moderate-carbohydrate diet facilitates weight maintenance. Healthy men (n=32, age 26.0±3.9 years; BMI 23.4±2.0 kg/m(2)) followed 1 week of controlled overfeeding, 3 weeks of caloric restriction and 2 weeks of hypercaloric refeeding (+50, -50 and +50% energy requirement) with low vs high GI (41 vs 74) and moderate vs high CHO intake (50% vs 65% energy). We measured adaptation of fasting macronutrient oxidation and the capacity to supress fat oxidation during an oral glucose tolerance test. Changes in fat mass were measured by quantitative magnetic resonance. During overfeeding, participants gained 1.9±1.2 kg body weight, followed by a weight loss of -6.3±0.6 kg and weight regain of 2.8±1.0 kg. Subjects with 65% CHO gained more body weight compared with 50% CHO diet (Pregain in fat mass (r=0.43, Pweight (r=0.35; P=0.051). Both higher GI and higher carbohydrate content affect substrate oxidation and thus the regain in body weight in healthy men. These results argue in favor of a lower glycemic load diet for weight maintenance after weight loss.

  2. Dietary compliance and its association with glycemic control among poorly controlled type 2 diabetic outpatients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S L; Juliana, S; Sakinah, H

    2011-12-01

    Compliance with medical nutrition therapy is important to improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine dietary compliance and its association with glycemic control among outpatients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). In this cross-sectional study, patients who had a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of at least 6.5%, after attending a diet counseling session at the Outpatient Dietetic Clinic, HUSM, were enrolled. Out of 150 diabetic patients reviewed between 2006 and 2008, 61 adults (32 men and 29 women) agreed to participate in this study. A questionnaire-based interview was used to collect socio-demographic, clinical and diabetes self-care data. The patient's dietary compliance rate was determined by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) measure. Anthropometric and biological measurements were also taken. Only 16.4% of the respondents adhered to the dietary regimen provided by dietitians. Among the 7 dietary self-care behaviours, item number 6 (eat lots of food high in dietary fibre such as vegetable or oats) had the highest compliant rate (54.1%); whereas item number 3 (eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day) had the lowest compliant rate (23.0%). There was a significant association between gender (p = 0.037) and fasting blood sugar (FBS) (p = 0.007) with the compliance status. Dietary non-compliance is still common among T2DM patients. Dietitians need to improve their skills and use more effective intervention approaches in providing dietary counseling to patients.

  3. In search of quality evidence for lifestyle management and glycemic control in children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jetha Mary M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to evaluate the impact of lifestyle behavior modification on glycemic control among children and youth with clinically defined Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies (randomized trials, quasi-experimental studies evaluating lifestyle (diet and/or physical activity modification and glycemic control (HbA1c. Our data sources included bibliographic databases (EMBASE, CINAHL®, Cochrane Library, Medline®, PASCAL, PsycINFO®, and Sociological Abstracts, manual reference search, and contact with study authors. Two reviewers independently selected studies that included any intervention targeting diet and/or physical activity alone or in combination as a means to reduce HbA1c in children and youth under the age of 18 with T2D. Results Our search strategy generated 4,572 citations. The majority of citations were not relevant to the study objective. One study met inclusion criteria. In this retrospective study, morbidly obese youth with T2D were treated with a very low carbohydrate diet. This single study received a quality index score of Conclusions There is no high quality evidence to suggest lifestyle modification improves either short- or long-term glycemic control in children and youth with T2D. Additional research is clearly warranted to define optimal lifestyle behaviour strategies for young people with T2D.

  4. THE CONTENT OF MICROELEMENTS IN BLOOD SERUM AND ERYTHROCYTES IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE I DEPENDING ON LEVEL OF GLYCEMIC CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluschenko, N; Vasylyshyn, Kh; Roschupkin, A; Lekishvili, S; Gladchenko, O

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the content of chromium, cobalt and nickel in serum and erythrocytes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, depending on the level of glycemic control. The study was conducted on 68 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The patients were divided into four groups based on glycemic control. Group I was composed of 9 children with optimal level of glycemic control. Group II - 25 children with suboptimal level of glycemic control. Group III - 34 children with a high risk to life level of glycemic control. Group IV (control group) consisted of 30 healthy children. Compensation state of type 1 diabetes was evaluated according to ISPAD (Consensus for the Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescens 2000). The content of trace elements in biological agents was determined by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry method with C-115M1 mass-spectrophotometer, manufactured by «Selmi» enterprise (Ukraine). It is found that there is a decrease in serum concentrations of chromium and erythrocyte content of cobalt in patients with optimal level of glycemic control. The deficiency of chromium is accompanied by the deficiency of cobalt in patients with suboptimal level of glycemic control. The lower levels of cobalt and nickel are recorded simultaneously, but there is theexcess of chromium in the erythrocytes of these patients. Patients, who suffer from 1 type diabetes mellitus and high risk for life level of glycemic control have considerable polideficiency of cobalt, nickel and chromium in serum.The increasing level of chromium was recorded only in the erythrocytes. The level of glycemic control and the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus are important in the forecasting of the development of chronic diabetic complications. It is found that the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus influences the levels of cobalt and nickel in serum mostly, while the level of glycemic control influences the chromium content.

  5. Diabetes and tuberculosis: a review of the role of optimal glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niazi Asfandyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Developing countries shoulder most of the burden of diabetes and tuberculosis. These diseases often coexist. Suboptimal control of diabetes predisposes the patient to tuberculosis, and is one of the common causes of poor response to anti-tubercular treatment. Tuberculosis also affects diabetes by causing hyperglycemia and causing impaired glucose tolerance. Impaired glucose tolerance is one of the major risk factors for developing diabetes. The drugs used to treat tuberculosis (especially rifampicin and isoniazid interact with oral anti-diabetic drugs and may lead to suboptimal glycemic control. Similarly some of the newer oral anti-diabetic drugs may interact with anti-tuberculosis drugs and lower their efficacy. Therefore diabetes and tuberculosis interact with each other at multiple levels – each exacerbating the other. Management of patients with concomitant tuberculosis and diabetes differs from that of either disease alone. This article reviews the association between diabetes and tuberculosis and suggests appropriate management for these conditions.

  6. The Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Glycemic Control and Lipid Profile in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Magda I; El-Sherbeny, Enas E; Bekhet, Meram M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D supplementation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with regard to their glycemic control and lipid profile. One hundred subjects with T2DM were recruited and given 4500 IU/day of vitamin D for 2 months. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and lipid profile were measured pre- and postsupplementation. There was a significant increase in the mean value of 25(OH)D level after supplementation (baseline level 16 ± 5.3 ng/ml vs. after supplement level 49.2 ± 17.7 ng/ml, p lipid profile were significantly decreased after supplementation. However, the univariate general linear model between 25(OH)D percentiles and lipid profile levels showed that diabetic subjects with high 25(OH)D levels (>61 ng/ml) had significantly lower levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in comparison to those in the low or middle percentiles. Furthermore, participants in a higher percentile had a significantly higher level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) than those in the middle percentile. Lipid profile levels were not affected by the supplement except for triglycerides (TG) levels in females, which were significantly decreased. Vitamin D supplementation may be beneficial to diabetic subjects because it improved glycemic control. Diabetic subjects with high 25(OH)D levels (>61 ng/ml) had better lipid profiles.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea in Type 2 diabetes and impact of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on glycemic control

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    Javid Ahmad Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are two interacting epidemics both with high prevalence and morbidity. Both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that the majority of patients with T2DM also have OSA and untreated OSA in these patients results in poor glycemic control leading to acceleration of diabetes-related complications. Objectives: To assess the prevalence and severity of OSA in T2DM patients and to assess the impact of OSA treatment on presenting symptoms and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c. Methods: We performed polysomnography (PSG studies and measured HbA1c in 62 consecutive patients with T2DM that were referred from various subspecialty clinics from July 2011 to August 2013. Results: In our 62 diabetic patients, 59 (95.2% had abnormal PSG. Based on Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI score, 3 (5.1% patients had mild, 28 (47.5% had moderate, and 28 (47.5% had severe OSA. The mean AHI of diabetic patients was significantly more than nondiabetic patients, i.e., 25.7 versus 19.7 (P = 0.001. Variables that significantly correlated with the presence of OSA include age, gender, body mass index (BMI, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (P < 0.05; however, on logistic regression only BMI, hypertension, and nocturia correlated with OSA. Overall, 59% of diabetic patients showed improvement in their glycemic control as measured by HbA1c with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment. Significant, moderate, and mild categories of treatment response were respectively observed in 7%, 20%, and 32% of patients. Conclusion: Treatment of OSA with CPAP reduces HbA1c in a significant number of diabetics.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea in Type 2 diabetes and impact of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on glycemic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Javid Ahmad; Masoodi, Shariq Rashid; Shoib, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two interacting epidemics both with high prevalence and morbidity. Both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that the majority of patients with T2DM also have OSA and untreated OSA in these patients results in poor glycemic control leading to acceleration of diabetes-related complications. Objectives: To assess the prevalence and severity of OSA in T2DM patients and to assess the impact of OSA treatment on presenting symptoms and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Methods: We performed polysomnography (PSG) studies and measured HbA1c in 62 consecutive patients with T2DM that were referred from various subspecialty clinics from July 2011 to August 2013. Results: In our 62 diabetic patients, 59 (95.2%) had abnormal PSG. Based on Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI) score, 3 (5.1%) patients had mild, 28 (47.5%) had moderate, and 28 (47.5%) had severe OSA. The mean AHI of diabetic patients was significantly more than nondiabetic patients, i.e., 25.7 versus 19.7 (P = 0.001). Variables that significantly correlated with the presence of OSA include age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (P < 0.05); however, on logistic regression only BMI, hypertension, and nocturia correlated with OSA. Overall, 59% of diabetic patients showed improvement in their glycemic control as measured by HbA1c with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Significant, moderate, and mild categories of treatment response were respectively observed in 7%, 20%, and 32% of patients. Conclusion: Treatment of OSA with CPAP reduces HbA1c in a significant number of diabetics. PMID:28217508

  9. Glycemic control and lipid profile of children and adolescents undergoing two different dietetic treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haline Dalsgaard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the glycemic control and lipid profile of children and adolescents undergoing two different dietetic treatments for type 1 Diabetes Mellitus assisted at the Children and Adolescent´s Diabetes Mellitus Health Center-UFRJ. Methods: A retrospective longitudinal study conducted between 2002 and 2006. We evaluated the same subjects in two different periods: after 1 year in TD and subsequently after 1 year in CCHO. The evolution of the nutritional status during the dietary treatments was evaluated using Body Mass Index (BMI for age. The lipid panel was evaluated according to the 1st Guideline for Prevention of Atherosclerosis in Childhood and Adolescence, used in Brazil, and the glycemic control was evaluated by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Results: We evaluated 93 individuals, 38.7% children and 61.3% adolescents. The mean age at study entry was 11.1 (± 2.66 years and the mean disease duration was 6.1 (± 3.2 years. A significant difference in the percentage of adequacy of HbA1c (p = 0.000 and in the values of total plasma cholesterol (p = 0.043 was found after 1 year of CCHO diet, which did not happen during the observation time of TD. The evolution of anthropometric nutritional status showed no significant difference between the beginning and the end of both dietary treatments. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that a more flexible food orientation program can contribute to the improvement of blood glucose levels without causing deterioration of the lipid profile when compared to TD.

  10. Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacha, Fida; Pyle, Laura; Nadeau, Kristen; Cuttler, Leona; Goland, Robin; Haymond, Morey; Levitsky, Lynne; Lynch, Jane; Weinstock, Ruth S; White, Neil H; Caprio, Sonia; Arslanian, Silva

    2012-08-01

    To investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivity [1/fasting insulin (1/I(F)), fasting glucose/insulin (G(F) /I(F)), 1/fasting C-peptide (1/C(F)), G(F) /C(F)], β-cell function [insulinogenic index (ΔI30/ΔG30), and ΔC30/ΔG30], and disposition index (DI) in the TODAY cohort of 704 youth (14.0 ± 2.0 yr; diabetes duration 7.8 ± 5.8 months; 64.9% female; 41.1% Hispanic, 31.5% Black, 19.6% White, 6.1% American Indian, and 1.7% Asian) according to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) quartiles at study randomization. The randomization visit followed a run-in period (median 71 d) during which glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 8% for at least 2 months) was achieved with metformin alone. These measures were also examined in relation to screening HbA1c levels before run-in. Insulin secretion indices declined with increasing HbA1c quartiles, at randomization (ΔC30/ΔG30: 0.11 ± 0.09, 0.10 ± 0.19, 0.07 ± 0.06, and 0.03 ± 0.03 ng/mL per mg/dL, p DI: 0.03 ± 0.03, 0.03 ± 0.05, 0.02 ± 0.02, and 0.01 ± 0.01 mg/dL(-1) , p DI (r = -0.3, p < 0.001), with ΔC30/ΔG30, but not with insulin sensitivity estimates. In youth with recent-onset T2DM treated with metformin, glycemic control, as measured by HbA1c, appears to be associated with residual β-cell function and not insulin sensitivity. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Second pilot trials of the STAR-Liege protocol for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients

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    Penning Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Critically ill patients often present increased insulin resistance and stress-induced hyperglycemia. Tight glycemic control aims to reduce blood glucose (BG levels and variability while ensuring safety from hypoglycemia. This paper presents the results of the second Belgian clinical trial using the customizable STAR framework in a target-to-range control approach. The main objective is reducing measurement frequency while maintaining performance and safety of the glycemic control. Methods The STAR-Liege 2 (SL2 protocol targeted the 100–140 mg/dL glycemic band and offered 2-hourly and 3-hourly interventions. Only insulin rates were adjusted, and nutrition inputs were left to the attending clinicians. This protocol restricted the forecasted risk of BG  Results During the SL2 trial, 91 measurements were taken over 194 hours. BG levels were tightly distributed: 54.9% of BG within 100–140 mg/dL, 40.7% were ≥ 140 mg/dL and 4.4% were  0.05 with significantly reduced measurement frequency for SL2 (p  Conclusions The SL2 protocol succeeded in reducing clinical workload while maintaining safety and effectiveness of the glycemic control. SL2 was also shown to be safer and tighter than hospital control. Overall results validate the efficacy of significantly customizing the STAR framework.

  12. Diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control increases bladder cancer recurrence risk in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chung-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Tai, Huai-Chin; Wang, Sho-Mon; Pu, Yeong-Shiau

    2015-03-01

    The association of diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer recurrence following radical nephroureterectomies (RNUs) in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) was investigated. Between January 1996 and March 2009, 538 patients with UTUC who received RNU and had no previous bladder cancer histories were enrolled. The clinicopathological characteristics were obtained and used for the analysis of metachronous bladder recurrence by using Cox proportional hazard model. The diabetic patients (N = 104, 19.3%) were elderly (72 vs 67 years, p diabetic patients. There was no significant difference in the rest of clinicopathological characteristics between patient groups. During the median follow-up duration of 51 months, bladder recurrences were discovered in 47.1 and 33.1% of diabetic and non-diabetic patients with UTUC, respectively. Poorly controlled diabetic patients (HbA1c  ≥ 7.0%) exhibited a shorter duration of bladder cancer recurrence-free survival as compared with those with good glycemic controlled diabetes mellitus and without diabetes mellitus (log-rank test, p diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control (HR = 2.10, p Diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control (HbA1c  ≥ 7.0%) increases the risk of subsequent bladder cancer recurrence. These results underscore the need for intensive glycemic control and close follow-up for diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Effect of low glycemic load diet with and without wheat bran on glucose control in gestational diabetes mellitus: A randomized trial

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    Ahmad Afaghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A low-glycemic index diet is effective in blood glucose control of diabetic subjects, reduces insulin requirement in women with gestation diabetes mellitus (GDM and improves pregnancy outcomes when used from beginning of the second trimester. However there are limited reports to examine the effect of low glycemic load (LGL diet and fiber on blood glucose control and insulin requirement of women with GDM. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of low glycemic load diet with and without fiber on reducing the number of women with GDM requiring insulin. Materials and Methods: All GDM women (n = 31 were randomly allocated to consume either a LGL diet with Fiber or LGL diet. Results: We found that 7 (38.9% of 18 women with GDM in Fiber group and 10 (76.9% in "Without Fiber" group required insulin treatment. Conclusion: The LGL diet with added fiber for women with GDM dramatically reduced the number needing for insulin treatment.

  14. Expression Profile of Genes Potentially Associated with Adequate Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Sâmia Cruz Tfaile Corbi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing research in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D, there are few studies showing the impact of the poor glycemic control on biological processes occurring in T2D. In order to identify potential genes related to poorly/well-controlled patients with T2D, our strategy of investigation included a primary screen by microarray (Human Genome U133 in a small group of individuals followed by an independent validation in a greater group using RT-qPCR. Ninety patients were divided as follows: poorly controlled T2D (G1, well-controlled T2D (G2, and normoglycemic individuals (G3. After using affy package in R, differentially expressed genes (DEGs were prospected as candidate genes potentially relevant for the glycemic control in T2D patients. After validation by RT-qPCR, the obtained DEGs were as follows—G1 + G2 versus G3: HLA-DQA1, SOS1, and BRCA2; G2 versus G1: ENO2, VAMP2, CCND3, CEBPD, LGALS12, AGBL5, MAP2K5, and PPAP2B; G2 versus G3: HLA-DQB1, MCM4, and SEC13; and G1 versus G3: PPIC. This demonstrated a systemic exacerbation of the gene expression related to immune response in T2D patients. Moreover, genes related to lipid metabolisms and DNA replication/repair were influenced by the glycemic control. In conclusion, this study pointed out candidate genes potentially associated with adequate glycemic control in T2D patients, contributing to the knowledge of how the glycemic control could systemically influence gene expression.

  15. Predicting the Glycemic Response to Gastric Bypass Surgery in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    John B Dixon; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chong, Keong; Chen, Shu-Chun; Lambert, Gavin W; Straznicky, Nora E.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Lee, Wei-Jei

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To find clinically meaningful preoperative predictors of diabetes remission and conversely inadequate glycemic control after gastric bypass surgery. Predicting the improvement in glycemic control in those with type 2 diabetes after bariatric surgery may help in patient selection. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Preoperative details of 154 ethnic Chinese subjects with type 2 diabetes were examined for their influence on glycemic outcomes at 1 year after gastric bypass. Remission was defi...

  16. Factors Predicting Glycemic Control in Middle-Aged and Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

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    Ching-Ju Chiu, PhD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFew studies have prospectively assessed the explanatory effects of demographics, clinical conditions, treatment modality, and general lifestyle behaviors on glycemic control in large heterogeneous samples of middle-aged and older adults with type 2 diabetes. We hierarchically examined these factors, focused especially on the effects of modifiable factors (ie, general lifestyle behaviors, and compared predictive patterns between middle-aged and older adults.MethodsWe used nationally representative data from the 1998 and 2000 Health and Retirement Study (HRS and the HRS 2003 Diabetes Study. We analyzed data from 379 middle-aged adults (aged 51-64 y and 430 older adults (aged ≥65 y who self-reported having type 2 diabetes at baseline.ResultsAmong middle-aged adults, demographic factors and clinical conditions were the strongest predictors of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels. However, among older adults, treatment modality (diet only, oral medication, or insulin only or in combination with other regimens significantly affected HbA1c levels. Lifestyle (physical activity, smoking, drinking, and body weight control, independent of the effects of demographics, clinical conditions, and treatment modality, significantly affected HbA1c levels. An increase of 1 healthy behavior was associated with a decrease in HbA1c levels of more than 1 percentage point.ConclusionOur findings provide support for current diabetes guidelines that recommend a lifestyle regimen across the entire span of diabetes care and highlight the need to help both sociodemographically and clinically disadvantaged middle-aged adults with type 2 diabetes as well as older adults who exhibit poor adherence to medication recommendations to achieve better glycemic control.

  17. Sleep Duration and Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu Kyung; Kim, Bong Sun; An, So-Yeon; Lee, Min Suk; Choi, Yong Jun; Han, Seung Jin; Chung, Yoon-sok; Lee, Kwan-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been reported to increase the risk of diabetes. However, the influence of sleep duration on glycemic control in diabetic patients has not been clarified. In this study we evaluated the association between sleep duration and glycemic control in diabetic patients. We analyzed the data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2007-2010. Sleep duration was classified into five groups: <6, 6, 7, 8, and ≥9 h/day. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c showed a U-shaped trend according to sleep duration. Sleep duration of 7 h/day had the lowest HbA1c (7.26%) among the subjects (P=0.026). In the older age group (≥65 yr), a sleep duration of 6 h/day was associated with the lowest HbA1c (7.26%). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of worse glycemic control (HbA1c ≥7.0%) in group of sleep duration of ≥9 h/day was 1.48 (1.04-2.13) compared with the group of 7 h/day. This relationship disappeared after adjusting duration of diabetes (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 0.93-2.03). Our results suggest that sleep duration and glycemic control in diabetic patients has U-shaped relationship which was mainly affected by duration of diabetes. PMID:24015039

  18. Long-Term Glycemic Control as a Result of Initial Education for Children With New Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Susanne M.; Srivastava, Nayan T.; Behzadi, Jennifer M.; Pottorff, Tina M.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Walvoord, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the role of initial diabetes education delivery at an academic medical center (AMC) versus non-AMCs on long-term glycemic control. Methods We performed a retrospective study of children with type 1 diabetes referred to an AMC after being educated at non-AMCs. These children were matched to a group of children diagnosed and educated as inpatients at an AMC. The A1C levels at 2, 3, and 5 years from diagnosis were compared between the 2 groups of children. Results Records were identified from 138 children. Glycemic control was comparable in the non-AMC-educated versus AMC-educated patients at 2, 3, and 5 years from diagnosis. The A1C was also highly consistent in each patient over time. Conclusions Long-term glycemic control was independent of whether initial education was delivered at an AMC or non-AMC. Formal education and location at time of diagnosis do not appear to play a significant role in long-term glycemic control. Novel educational constructs, focusing on developmental stages of childhood and reeducation over time, are likely more important than education at time of diagnosis. PMID:23427241

  19. Effect of tighter glycemic control on cardiac function, exercise capacity, and muscle strength in heart failure patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent Roni Ranghøj; Wiggers, Henrik; Thomsen, Henrik Holm;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart failure (HF), the optimal glycemic target is uncertain, and evidence-based data are lacking. Therefore, we performed a randomized study on the effect of optimized glycemic control on left ventricular function, exercise capacity, muscle...

  20. Nutritional status, glycemic control and its associated risk factors among a sample of type 2 diabetic individuals, a pilot study

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    Somayyeh Firouzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in Malaysia, with most patients poorly controlled. Hence, this study aimed to determine nutritional and metabolic status as well as blood pressure of Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and identify associated risk factors for poor glycemic control. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 type 2 diabetic patients were recruited and completed a questionnaire covering socio-demographic status, 3-day diet records, and physical activity. Anthropometry and glycemic control parameters, lipid profile and blood pressure were also measured. Results: Subjects were on average 56.7±9.9 years old with a mean duration of diabetes of 6.5 ± 5.0 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c of the subjects was 7.6% ± 1.4%, with only 20.2% achieving the target goal of <6.5% with no significant differences between genders. The mean body mass index was 26.9 ± 4.7 kg/m 2 , with 86.5% either were overweight or obese. Only 10.6% of the subjects exercised daily. The proportions of macronutrients relative to total energy intake were consistent with the recommendations of most diabetes associations. The adjusted odds of having poor glycemic control were 3.235 (1.043-10.397 (P < 0.05 higher among those who had high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels below the normal range. Those taking one or two types of oral anti-diabetic drugs had 19.9 (2.959-87.391 (P < 0.01 and 14.3 (2.647-77.500 (P < 0.01 higher odds of poor glycemic control respectively compared to those who were being treated by diet alone. Conclusion: Poor glycemic control was prevalent among Malaysian diabetic patients, and this could be associated with low levels of HDL and being treated with oral anti-diabetes agents.

  1. Effect of glycemic control on microalbuminuria development among type 2 diabetes with high-normal albuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Zhi; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Wen, Yu-Wen; Ning, Hsiao-Chen; Gau, Bing-Ru; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2014-03-01

    This study was aimed at revealing the factors and the interrelationships between factors on microalbuminuria development among type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Between 2004 and 2011, 461 T2D patients with a baseline urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) of 60 mL/min were evaluated retrospectively. Sixty-eight (14.8%) subjects had developed microalbuminuria in a mean follow-up of 6.82 years. Statistical analysis had revealed that the higher baseline UACR (10 mg/g; sensitivity, 80.9%, specificity, 63.6%; AUC = 0.774) and glycohemoglobin level (HbA1c) (8%; sensitivity, 72.1%, specificity, 61.6%; AUC = 0.698) were the two independent microalbuminuria risk factors. When considering the risk of microalbuminuria, the data were normalized with respect to subjects with low-normal UACR ( 8%, high-normal UACR/HbA1c 8% were 2.59 (p = 0.107), 6.15 (p = 0.001), and 16.96 (p 10%) showed a progressively increase of the hazard risk in baseline high-normal UACR group. But the same correlation was not shown in the low-normal UACR group. This study identified the relationships of high-normal albuminuria and glycemic control on microalbuminuria development among T2D patients. Glycemic control is especially beneficial for T2D patients with baseline high-normal UACR in preventing microalbuminuria development.

  2. Long-term effects of fluoxetine on glycemic control in obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Leif; Bjerre, U; Bak, J F

    1995-01-01

    Fluoxetine (F) is a specific serotonin-reuptake inhibitor that has been shown to promote weight loss and improve glycemic control in obese diabetic patients. To study its long-term metabolic effect, 40 obese patients with non-insulin -dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or impaired glucose...... tolerance (IGT) were included in a 12-month, randomized, placebo controlled study. Patients were assigned to receive either 60 mg F or placebo (P) daily in conjunction with a 5.0-MJ/d diet (> 50% carbohydrate). Both groups showed a significant weight loss, with a nadir after 6 months without group...

  3. Glycosylated hemoglobin and albumin-corrected fructosamine are good indicators for glycemic control in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Szu-Ying; Chen, Yin-Cheng; Tsai, I-Chieh; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chueh, Shu-Neng; Chuang, Hsueh-Fang; Wu, Hon-Yen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is an important risk factor for morbidity and mortality after dialysis. However, glycemic control among such patients is difficult to assess. The present study examined glycemic control parameters and observed glucose variation after refilling different kinds of fresh dialysate in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. A total of 25 DM PD patients were recruited, and continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) was applied to measure interstitial fluid (ISF) glucose levels at 5-min intervals for 3 days. Patients filled out diet and PD fluid exchange diaries. The records measured with CGMS were analyzed and correlated with other glycemic control parameters such as fructosamine, albumin-corrected fructosamine (AlbF), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and glycated albumin levels. There were significant correlations between mean ISF glucose and fructosamine (r = 0.45, P<0.05), AlbF (r = 0.54, P<0.01), and HbA1c (r = 0.51, P<0.01). The ISF glucose levels in glucose-containing dialysate increased from approximately 7-8 mg/dL within 1 hour of exchange in contrast to icodextrin dialysate which kept ISF glucose levels unchanged. HbA1c and AlbF significantly correlated with the mean ISF glucose levels, indicating that they are reliable indices of glycemic control in DM PD patients. Icodextrin dialysate seems to have a favorable glycemic control effect when compared to the other glucose-containing dialysates.

  4. Glycosylated hemoglobin and albumin-corrected fructosamine are good indicators for glycemic control in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ying Lee

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Diabetes mellitus (DM is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is an important risk factor for morbidity and mortality after dialysis. However, glycemic control among such patients is difficult to assess. The present study examined glycemic control parameters and observed glucose variation after refilling different kinds of fresh dialysate in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. METHODS: A total of 25 DM PD patients were recruited, and continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS was applied to measure interstitial fluid (ISF glucose levels at 5-min intervals for 3 days. Patients filled out diet and PD fluid exchange diaries. The records measured with CGMS were analyzed and correlated with other glycemic control parameters such as fructosamine, albumin-corrected fructosamine (AlbF, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and glycated albumin levels. RESULTS: There were significant correlations between mean ISF glucose and fructosamine (r = 0.45, P<0.05, AlbF (r = 0.54, P<0.01, and HbA1c (r = 0.51, P<0.01. The ISF glucose levels in glucose-containing dialysate increased from approximately 7-8 mg/dL within 1 hour of exchange in contrast to icodextrin dialysate which kept ISF glucose levels unchanged. CONCLUSION: HbA1c and AlbF significantly correlated with the mean ISF glucose levels, indicating that they are reliable indices of glycemic control in DM PD patients. Icodextrin dialysate seems to have a favorable glycemic control effect when compared to the other glucose-containing dialysates.

  5. Glycemic Control Among Individuals with Self-Reported Diabetes in India—The ICMR–INDIAB Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Deepa, Mohan; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Joshi, Shashank R.; Bhansali, Anil; Dhandania, Vinay K.; Joshi, Prashant P.; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Rao, Paturi Vishnupriya; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Jayashri, Ramamurthy; Velmurugan, Kaliaperumal; Nirmal, Elangovan; Subashini, Radhakrishnan; Vijayachandrika, Venkataraman; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, Deepak Kumar; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: This study estimated the levels of glycemic control among subjects with self-reported diabetes in urban and rural areas of four regions in India. Research Design and Methods: Phase I of the Indian Council of Medical Research–India Diabetes (ICMR–INDIAB) Study was conducted in a representative population of three states of India (Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, and Jharkhand) and one Union Territory (Chandigarh) and covering a population of 213 million people. Using a stratified multistage sampling design, individuals ≥20 years of age were recruited. Glycemic control among subjects with self-reported diabetes was assessed by measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), estimated by the Variant™ II Turbo method (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA). Results: Among the 14,277 participants in Phase I of INDIAB, there were 480 subjects with self-reported diabetes (254 urban and 226 rural). The mean HbA1c levels were highest in Chandigarh (9.1±2.3%), followed by Tamil Nadu (8.2±2.0%), Jharkhand (8.2±2.4%), and Maharashtra (8.0±2.1%). Good glycemic control (HbA1c <7%) was observed only in 31.1% of urban and 30.8% of rural subjects. Only 22.4% of urban and 15.4% of rural subjects had reported having checked their HbA1c in the past year. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed younger age, duration of diabetes, insulin use, and high triglyceride levels to be significantly associated with poor glycemic control. Conclusions: The level of glycemic control among subjects with self-reported diabetes in India is poor. Urgent action is needed to remedy the situation. PMID:25101698

  6. Integrating chronic care with primary care activities: enriching healthcare staff knowledge and skills and improving glycemic control of a cohort of people with diabetes through the First Line Diabetes Care Project in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Marie V. Ku

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigated the effects of integrating primary chronic care with current healthcare activities in two local government health units (LGHU of the Philippines on knowledge and skills of the LGHU staff and clinical outcomes for people with diabetes. Design: Integration was accomplished through health service reorganization, (redistribution of chronic care tasks, and training of LGHU staff. Levels of the staff's pre- and post-training diabetes knowledge and of their self-assessment of diabetes care-related skills were measured. Primary diabetes care with emphasis on self-care development was provided to a cohort of people with diabetes. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and obesity measures were collected prior to and one year after full project implementation. Results: The training workshop improved diabetes knowledge (p<0.001 and self-assessed skills (p<0.001 of the LGHU staff. Significant reductions in HbA1c (p<0.001, waist–hip ratio (p<0.001 and waist circumference (p=0.011 of the cohort were noted. Although the reduction in HbA1c was somewhat greater among those whose community-based care providers showed improvement in knowledge and self-assessed skills, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Primary care for chronic conditions such as diabetes may be integrated with other healthcare activities in health services of low-to-middle-income countries such as the Philippines, utilizing pre-existing human resources for health, and may improve clinical endpoints.

  7. Pilot study on the additive effects of berberine and oral type 2 diabetes agents for patients with suboptimal glycemic control

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    Di Pierro F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Nicola Villanova,2 Federica Agostini,2 Rebecca Marzocchi,2 Valentina Soverini,2 Giulio Marchesini21Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milano, 2Diseases of Metabolism, S Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, ItalyBackground: Suboptimal glycemic control is a common situation in diabetes, regardless of the wide range of drugs available to reach glycemic targets. Basic research in diabetes is endeavoring to identify new actives working as insulin savers, use of which could delay the introduction of injectable insulin or reduce the insulin dose needed. Commonly available as a nutraceutical, berberine is a potential candidate.Methods and results: Because its low oral bioavailability can be overcome by P-glycoprotein inhibitors like herbal polyphenols, we have tested the nutraceutical combination of Berberis aristata extract and Silybum marianum extract (Berberol® in type 2 diabetes in terms of its additive effect when combined with a conventional oral regimen for patients with suboptimal glycemic control. After 90 days of treatment, the nutraceutical association had a positive effect on glycemic and lipid parameters, significantly reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. A relevant effect was also observed in terms of liver function by measuring aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. The product had a good safety profile, with distinctive gastrointestinal side effects likely due to its acarbose-like action.Conclusion: Although further studies should be carried out to confirm our data, Berberol could be considered a good candidate as an adjunctive treatment option in diabetes, especially in patients with suboptimal glycemic control.Keywords: berberine, silymarin, glycosylated hemoglobin, diabetes

  8. The effect of full-mouth debridement versus quadrant scaling and root planning on the improvement of periodontal index and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus%两种刮治方案对糖尿病伴有牙周炎患者的临床疗效评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易文; 贾洪诚; 王璇; 刘静明

    2012-01-01

    -mouth ultrasonic debridement could achieve a comparable clinical effcacy and improvement of glycemic control to conventional quadrant scaling and root planning.

  9. Liraglutide therapy beyond glycemic control: An observational study in Indian patients with type 2 diabetes in real world setting

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    Kesavadev J

    2012-04-01

    improved overall glycemic control and was well tolerated. Clinically significant reduction in body weight, systolic blood pressure and improvement in lipid profile were noticed with liraglutide therapy in addition to glycemic control.Keywords: liraglutide, weight loss, type 2 diabetes, obesity, GLP-1 analog, lipid profile, blood pressure, India

  10. Improvement of dietary quality with the aid of a low glycemic index diet in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakatun Nisak, Mohd Yusof; Ruzita, Abd Talib; Norimah, A Karim; Gilbertson, Heather; Nor Azmi, Kamaruddin

    2010-06-01

    This randomized controlled study was conducted to determine the effect of low glycemic index (GI) dietary advice on eating patterns and dietary quality in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Asian patients with T2DM (N  =  104) were randomized into 2 groups that received either low GI or conventional carbohydrate exchange (CCE) dietary advice for 12 weeks. Nutritional prescriptions were based on the medical nutrition therapy for T2DM, with the difference being in the GI component of the carbohydrates. Dietary intake and food choices were assessed with the use of a 3-day food record. At week 12, both groups achieved the recommendations for carbohydrate (52 ± 4% and 54 ± 4% of energy) and fat (30 ± 4% and 28 ± 5% of energy) intake. There were no significant differences in the reported macronutrient intake in both groups. With the low GI diet, crude fiber and dietary calcium intake increased, while the dietary GI reduced. Subjects in the lowest dietary glycemic index/glycemic load (GI/GL) quartile consumed more parboiled/basmati rice, pasta, milk/dairy products, fruits, and dough, which are foods from the low GI category. There was a significant reduction in the hemoglobin A(1c) level at week 12 for patients in the lowest GI/GL quartile (Δ  =  -0.7 ± 0.1%) compared with those in the highest GI/GL quartile (Δ  =  -0.1 ± 0.2%). These results demonstrate the ability of low GI dietary advice to improve the dietary quality of Asian patients with T2DM.

  11. Interaction of sleep quality and sleep duration on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Yunzhao; Meng lingling; Li Daiqing; Yang Min; Zhu Yanjuan; Li Chenguang; Jiang Zhenhuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Copious evidence from epidemiological and laboratory studies has revealed that sleep status is associated with glucose intolerance,insulin resistance,thus increasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.The aim of this study was to reveal the interaction of sleep quality and sleep quantity on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods From May 2013 to May 2014,a total of 551 type 2 diabetes patients in Tianjin Metabolic Diseases Hospital were enrolled.Blood samples were taken to measure glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c),and all the patients completed the Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire to evaluate their sleep status."Good sleep quality" was defined as PQSI <5,"average sleep quality" was defined as PQSI 6-8,and "poor sleep quality" was defined as PQSI >8.Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA1c >7%.Sleep quantity was categorized as <6,6-8,and >8 hours/night.Short sleep time was defined as sleep duration <6 hours/night.Results In the poor glycemic control group,the rate of patients who had insufficient sleep was much higher than that in the other group (x2=11.16,P=0.037).The rate of poor sleep quality in poor glycemic control group was much greater than that in the average control group (x2=9.79,P=0.007).After adjusted by gender,age,body mass index,and disease duration,the adjusted PSQI score's OR was 1.048 (95% CI 1.007-1.092,P=0.023) for HbA1c level.The sleep duration's OR was 0.464 (95% CI 0.236-0.912,P=0.026) for HbA1c level.One-way analysis of variance showed that the poor sleep quality group had the highest homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (P <0.01).Conclusions Inadequate sleep,in both quality and quantity,should be regarded as a plausible risk factor for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.Poor sleep might bring much more serious insulin resistance and could be the reason for bad glycemic control.A good night's sleep should be seen as a critical

  12. Status of serum magnesium in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and its correlation to glycemic control and lipid profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbah, Doaa; El Naga, Amr Abo; Hassan, Tamer; Zakaria, Marwa; Beshir, Mohamed; Al Morshedy, Salah; Abdalhady, Mohamed; Kamel, Ezzat; Rahman, Doaa Abdel; Kamel, Lamiaa; Abdelkader, May

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be the most common metabolic disorder associated with magnesium deficiency, having 25% to 39% prevalence. This deficit could be associated with the development of late diabetic complications, especially macroangiopathy.We aimed to evaluate the status of serum Mg in children with type 1 diabetes and assess its relation to glycemic control and lipid profile.We included 71 Egyptian children with type 1diabetes having their follow-up at Pediatric Endocrinology outpatient clinic, Zagazig University Hospital and 71 age- and sex-matched control. We measured Serum magnesium, HbA1c, and lipid profile in all study subjects.Diabetic children had significantly lower serum magnesium level compared to control children (1.83 ± .27 mg/dL in diabetic children versus 2.00 ± .16 mg/dL in control children). Taking cut-off level of serum magnesium lipid profile. Hypomagnesemia was more evident in patients with poor diabetic control and those with higher atherogenic lipid parameters. We suggest that low serum magnesium may be included in pathogenesis of poor glycemic control and abnormal lipid profile in children with type 1 diabetes. We need to perform further studies on giving magnesium supplements in diabetic children with hypomagnesemia to observe the effect of correction of serum magnesium on glycemic control, lipid profile, and the risk of diabetic complications.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF POOR GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND OF NON-SURGICAL PERIODONTAL THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Cornelia OANȚĂ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the diabetic status and severity of the periodontal involvement, and also of the non-surgical periodontal therapy on the periodontal status of patients with diabetes mellitus. Materials and method: The study was conducted on 21 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (study group and 10 systemically healthy subjects (control group. We examined: the degree of glycemic control (by measuring the glycated hemoglobin, the periodontal and oral hygiene parameters at the baseline and 4 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after the periodontal treatment (scaling and root planning. Results and discussion: Subjects with a poor glycemic control presented a higher percentage of sites with attachment loss, significantly higher amounts of bacterial plaque, sub-gingival calculus and gingival bleeding - when compared with the control group or with subjects with good or moderated glycemic control. In the same group, a rapid recurrence of the deep periodontal pockets was observed after 12 months. Conclusions: A prolonged poor control of glycemia and the time elapsed from the debut of diabetes were closely related with its complications. The comparison between the diabetes and the control groups demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for the periodontal disease.

  14. Effect of glycemic control on self-perceived oral health, periodontal parameters, and alveolar bone loss among patients with prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Thafeed Alghamdi, Ali Saad; Mikami, Toshinari; Mehmood, Abid; Ahmed, Hameeda Bashir; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Tenenbaum, Howard C

    2014-02-01

    The effect of glycemic control on severity of periodontal inflammatory parameters in patients with prediabetes is unknown. The aim of the present study is to assess the effects of glycemic control on self-perceived oral health, periodontal parameters, and marginal bone loss (MBL) in patients with prediabetes. A total of 303 individuals were included. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose levels (FBGLs) were recorded. Participants were divided into three groups: 1) group A: 75 patients with prediabetes (FBGLs = 100 to 125 mg/dL [HbA1c ≥5%]); 2) group B: 78 individuals previously considered prediabetic but having FBGLs control; and 3) control group: 150 medically healthy individuals. Self-perceived oral health, socioeconomic status, and education status were determined using a questionnaire. Plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment loss (AL) were recorded. Premolar and molar MBLs were measured on panoramic radiographs. Periodontal parameters (PI, BOP, PD, and AL) (P Self-perceived gingival bleeding (P self-perceived oral symptoms among patients with prediabetes in group B and healthy controls. Self-perceived oral health, severity of periodontal parameters, and MBL are worse in patients with prediabetes than controls. Glycemic control significantly reduces the severity of these parameters as well as the state of prediabetes in affected individuals.

  15. The relation of intake fibers and glycemic load over glycemic, anthropometric and dietetic markers in pre-diabetic patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrícia Molz; Camila Schreiner Pereira; Tânia Leonir Gassen; Daniel Prá; Silvia Isabel Rech Franke

    2015-01-01

    .... Evidences suggest that the glycemic control is directly associated to the fibers intake. This study correlated the influence of fibers intake and glycemic load with glycemic, anthropometric and dietetic markers in pre-diabetic patients. Methods...

  16. Prevalence of ketosis, ketonuria, and ketoacidosis during liberal glycemic control in critically ill patients with diabetes: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Luethi, Nora; Cioccari, Luca; Crisman, Marco; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Eastwood, Glenn M; Mårtensson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether liberal glucose control in critically ill diabetic patients leads to increased ketone production and ketoacidosis. Therefore, we aimed to assess the prevalence of ketosis, ketonuria and ketoacidosis in critically ill diabetic patients treated in accordance with a liberal glycemic control protocol. Methods We performed a prospective observational cohort study of 60 critically ill diabetic patients with blood and/or urine ketone bodies tested in ICU. All patie...

  17. Poor glycemic control of diabetes mellitus is associated with higher risk of prostate cancer detection in a biopsy population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Park

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of glycemic control of diabetes mellitus (DM on prostate cancer detection in a biopsy population.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,368 men who underwent prostate biopsy at our institution. We divided our biopsy population into three groups according to their history of DM, and their Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c level: a no-DM (DM- group; a good glycemic control (DM+GC group (HbA1c <6.5%; and a poor glycemic control (DM+PC group (HbA1c ≥6.5%. For sub-analyses, the DM+PC group was divided into a moderately poor glycemic control (DM+mPC group (6.5≤ HbA1c <7.5% and a severely poor glycemic control (DM+sPC group (HbA1c ≥7.5%.Among 1,368 men, 338 (24.7% had a history of DM, and 393 (28.7% had a positive biopsy. There was a significant difference in prostatic specific antigen density (PSAD (P = 0.037 and the frequency of abnormal DRE findings (P = 0.031 among three groups. The occurrence rate of overall prostate cancer (P<0.001 and high-grade prostate cancer (P = 0.016 also presented with a significantly difference. In the multivariate analysis, the DM+PC group was significantly associated with a higher rate of overall prostate cancer detection in biopsy subjects compared to the DM- group (OR = 2.313, P = 0.001 but the DM+PC group was not associated with a higher rate of high-grade (Gleason score ≥7 diseases detected during the biopsy (OR = 1.297, P = 0.376. However, in subgroup analysis, DM+sPC group was significantly related to a higher risk of high-grade diseases compared to the DM- group (OR = 2.446, P = 0.048.Poor glycemic control of DM was associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer detection, including high-grade disease, in the biopsy population.

  18. Poor glycemic control as a reason for referral of diabetes patients to specialists in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacov Fogelman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims/introduction: Family physicians face the dilemma of when to refer patients with diabetes to specialists. This study examined attitudes of family physicians to referring patients with poor glucose control to diabetes specialists. Materials and methods: At continuous medical education courses, family physicians were asked to respond anonymously, as to whether they generally manage the diabetes of their patients, and specifically those with poor glycemic control (HbA1c>9.0%. Results: Of 470 respondents, 426 (90% reported that they generally manage their patients’ diabetes; 202 (43% reported that they manage the diabetes of patients with HbA1c>9.0%. Board certification in family medicine and affiliation to a health maintenance organization, but not sex, age, years of professional experience, or the proportion of patients with diabetes at their clinics, were associated with referral practices. Conclusions: Family medicine residency and organizational support appear to promote treatment by family physicians of patients with poorly controlled diabetes in the primary care setting.

  19. Pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Lin, Kun-Der; Lee, Yu-Li; Wang, Yi-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    To validate a hypothesized model exploring the influencing pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Overall, 295 patients with T2DM were recruited from five endocrine clinics in Taiwan through convenience sampling. Data regarding personal characteristics, empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, self-care behaviors, and HbA1c levels were collected. A structural equation modeling was used to validate the hypothesized model. Significant direct pathways were determined from empowerment perceptions to health literacy, from health literacy to self-efficacy, from self-efficacy to self-care behaviors, and from self-care behaviors to HbA1c levels. The empowerment perceptions and health literacy relatively influenced self-efficacy and self-care behaviors. Self-efficacy and self-care behaviors relatively influenced glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Modifying self-care behaviors have been demonstrated to be the most essential for improving glycemic control. To improve self-care behaviors, healthcare providers should target improving self-efficacy, and enhancing health literacy can be considered to be a potential strategy for improving self-efficacy. To enhance health literacy, healthcare providers could use an empowerment approach rather than an authoritative approach that emphasizes patient compliance in managing patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. First pilot trial of the STAR-Liege protocol for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Sophie; Le Compte, Aaron J; Moorhead, Katherine T; Desaive, Thomas; Massion, Paul; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    stochastic models relevant to the patient's particular day of ICU stay were seen to be more accurate in capturing the observed variability. This analysis indicated that equivalent control and safety could be obtained with similar or lower glycemic variability in control using more specific stochastic models. STAR effectively controlled all patients to target. Observed patient variability in response to insulin and thus prediction errors were higher than expected, likely due to the recent insult of cardiac surgery or a major cardiac event, and their immediate recovery. STAR effectively managed this variability with no hypoglycemia. Improved stochastic models will be used to prospectively test these outcomes in further ongoing clinical pilot trials in this and other units.

  1. Effects of high performance inulin supplementation on glycemic status and lipid profile in women with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dehghan, Parvin; Pourghassem Gargari, Bahram; Asgharijafarabadi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    ... mellitus.It is claimed that functional foods may improve complications of diabetes mellitus, so this study was designed to evaluate the effects of high performance inulin on glycemic status and lipid profile...

  2. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Sanz-Paris

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001, days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001 and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001. Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001 during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026. In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention.

  3. Effects of a pharmaceutical care model on medication adherence and glycemic control of people with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wen Wei; Chua, Siew Siang; Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Chan, Siew Pheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong chronic condition that requires self-management. Lifestyle modification and adherence to antidiabetes medications are the major determinants of therapeutic success in the management of diabetes. Purpose To assess the effects of a pharmaceutical care (PC) model on medication adherence and glycemic levels of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients and methods A total of 241 people with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a major teaching hospital in Malaysia and allocated at random to the control (n=121) or intervention (n=120) groups. Participants in the intervention group received PC from an experienced pharmacist, whereas those in the control group were provided the standard pharmacy service. Medication adherence was assessed using the Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale, and glycemic levels (glycated hemoglobin values and fasting blood glucose [FBG]) of participants were obtained at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 months. Results At baseline, there were no significant differences in demographic data, medication adherence, and glycemic levels between participants in the control and intervention groups. However, statistically significant differences in FBG and glycated hemoglobin values were observed between the control and intervention groups at months 4, 8, and 12 after the provision of PC (median FBG, 9.0 versus 7.2 mmol/L [P<0.001]; median glycated hemoglobin level, 9.1% versus 8.0% [P<0.001] at 12 months). Medication adherence was also significantly associated with the provision of PC, with a higher proportion in the intervention group than in the control group achieving it (75.0% versus 58.7%; P=0.007). Conclusion The provision of PC has positive effects on medication adherence as well as the glycemic control of people with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the PC model used in this study should be duplicated in other health care settings for the benefit of more patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25214772

  4. Effects of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control: a randomized controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waling, Maria; Isaksson, Andreas; Tellström, Anna; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor; Brage, Søren; Ryberg, Mats; Svensson, Michael; Olsson, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Background Means to reduce future risk for cardiovascular disease in subjects with type 2 diabetes are urgently needed. Methods Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes (age 59±8 years) followed a Paleolithic diet for 12 weeks. Participants were randomized to either standard care exercise recommendations (PD) or 1-h supervised exercise sessions (aerobic exercise and resistance training) three times per week (PD-EX). Results For the within group analyses, fat mass decreased by 5.7 kg (IQR: −6.6, −4.1; pPaleolithic diet improves fat mass and metabolic balance including insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and leptin in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Supervised exercise training may not enhance the effects on these outcomes, but preserves lean mass in men and increases cardiovascular fitness. PMID:27235022

  5. Benefits of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control: a randomized controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Julia; Stomby, Andreas; Waling, Maria; Isaksson, Andreas; Tellström, Anna; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor; Brage, Søren; Ryberg, Mats; Svensson, Michael; Olsson, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Means to reduce future risk for cardiovascular disease in subjects with type 2 diabetes are urgently needed. Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes (age 59 ± 8 years) followed a Paleolithic diet for 12 weeks. Participants were randomized to either standard care exercise recommendations (PD) or 1-h supervised exercise sessions (aerobic exercise and resistance training) three times per week (PD-EX). For the within group analyses, fat mass decreased by 5.7 kg (IQR: -6.6, -4.1; p Paleolithic diet improves fat mass and metabolic balance including insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and leptin in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Supervised exercise training may not enhance the effects on these outcomes, but preserves lean mass in men and increases cardiovascular fitness. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effects of High Performance Inulin Supplementation on Glycemic Status and Lipid Profile in Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Dehghan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus, as a noncommunicable disease, is the main public health challenge in the 21st century. The prevalence of di¬abetes mellitus adjusted for the world population in Iran was 8% until the year 2010. Lipid levels are considered as important parameters to be eva¬luated, as high serum lipid levels are often reported as a complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. It is claimed that functional foods may im¬prove complications of diabetes mellitus, so this study was designed to evaluate the effects of high performance inulin on glycemic status and lipid profile of women with type 2 diabetes.Methods: The study was a randomized controlled clinical trial. Forty-nine type 2 diabetic females (fiber intake <30g/d, 25control group (n=25 received 10g/d maltodextrin for 8 weeks. Glycemic status and lipid profile indices were measured pre and post intervention. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (verision11.5. Paired, unpaired t-test and ANCOVA were used to compare quantitative variables.Results: Supplementation with inulin caused a significant reduction in FBS (8.50%, HbA1c (10.40%, total cholesterol (12.90%, triglyceride (23.60 %, LDL-c (35.30 %, LDL-c/HDL-c ratio (16.25% and TC/HDL-c ratio (25.20% and increased HDL-c (19.90%. The changes for the control group parameters were not significant at the end of study. Conclusion: Inulin may help to control diabetes and its complications via improving glycemic and lipid parameters.

  7. Influence of the informal primary caretaker on glycemic control among prepubertal pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Nallely Zurita-Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: In prepubertal type 1 diabetic patients (DM1, the availability of an informal primary caregiver (ICP is critical to making management decisions; in this study, the ICP-related risk factors associated with glycemic control were identified. Patients, materials, and methods: A comparative cross-sectional study was performed. Fifty-five patients with DM1 under the age of 11 years were included. The patient-related factors associated with glycemic control evaluated were physical activity, DM1 time of evolution, and adherence to medical indications. The ICP-related factors evaluated were education, employment aspects, depressive traits (Beck questionnaire, family functionality (family APGAR, support of another person in patient care, stress (Perceived Stress Scale, and socioeconomic status (Bronfman questionnaire. Multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were performed. Results: The patients' median age was 8 years; 29 patients had good glycemic control, and 26 were uncontrolled. The main risk factor associated with glycemic dyscontrol was stress in the ICP (OR 24.8; 95% CI 4.06-151.9, p = 0.001. While, according to the linear regression analysis it was found that lower level of education (β 0.991, 95% CI 0.238-1.743, p = 0.011 and stress (β 1.918, 95% CI 1.10-2.736, p = 0.001 in the ICP, as well as family dysfunction (β 1.256, 95% CI 0.336-2.177, p = 0.008 were associated with higher levels of glycated hemoglobin. Conclusions: Level of education and stress in the ICP, as well as family dysfunction, are factors that influence the lack of controlled blood glucose levels among prepubertal DM1 patients.

  8. Glycemic Control in the Burn Intensive Care Unit: Focus on the Role of Anemia in Glucose Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Challenges Current methods to maintain euglycemia in the critically ill are immature at best. Future success for optimal glycemic control rests in our...channel glucometers: methods of reducing patient risk. Crit Care Med. 2009 Sept 28, epub ahead of print. DOI: 10.1097/ CCM.0b013e3181bc826f. 57. Cook A...Abstract]. AACC /ASCLS 1999 Annual Meeting; July 25-29, 1999; New Orleans, LA: Medical Pathology and Clinical Chemistry, University of California Davis

  9. The effects of free-living interval-walking training on glycemic control, body composition, and physical fitness in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Kristian; Winding, Kamilla; Knudsen, Sine H

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of free-living walking training in type 2 diabetic patients and to investigate the effects of interval-walking training versus continuous-walking training upon physical fitness, body composition, and glycemic control.......To evaluate the feasibility of free-living walking training in type 2 diabetic patients and to investigate the effects of interval-walking training versus continuous-walking training upon physical fitness, body composition, and glycemic control....

  10. Lifestyle and glycemic control in Japanese adults receiving diabetes treatment: an analysis of the 2009 Japan Society of Ningen Dock database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Eiko; Moriyama, Kengo; Yamakado, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the level of glycemic control in 7020 patients treated with diabetes medications. We found that the overall mean HbA1c was 7.3% (56 mmol/mol). Over half had HbA1c levels ≥7.0% (53 mmol/mol) and poorer glycemic control was associated with unhealthy lifestyle habits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glycemic control in young children with diabetes: the role of parental health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulgarón, Elizabeth R; Sanders, Lee M; Patiño-Fernandez, Anna Maria; Wile, Diana; Sanchez, Janine; Rothman, Russell L; Delamater, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    This cross sectional study examined the relationship between parental health literacy (HL), diabetes related numeracy, and parental perceived diabetes self-efficacy on glycemic control in a sample of young children with Type 1 DM. Seventy primary caregivers of children (age 3-9 years) with Type 1 DM were recruited and surveyed at diabetes outpatient clinic visits. Patients' medical histories were obtained by medical chart review. Parental diabetes related numeracy (r=-.52, pdiabetes self-efficacy was also negatively correlated to their child's HbA1c (r=-.47, pdiabetes self-efficacy were included as predictors of HbA1c, the model was significant (F=12.93, pdiabetes self-efficacy (β=-.36, p=.01) as significant predictors of HbA1c. Data from this study highlight the importance of considering the role of parental numeracy, in health outcomes for children with Type 1 DM. Practitioners should assess parental health literacy and consider intervention when needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C.R. Betônico

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: “diabetes kidney disease” and “renal failure” in combination with “diabetes treatment” and “oral antidiabetic drugs” or “oral hypoglycemic agents.” The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population.

  13. The optimal target for acute glycemic control in critically ill patients: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, Tomoaki; Inoue, Shigeaki; Sakaguchi, Masahiko; Egi, Moritoki

    2017-01-01

    The optimal target blood glucose concentration for acute glycemic control remains unclear because few studies have directly compared 144-180 with 110-144 or >180 mg/dL. Accordingly, we performed a network meta-analysis to compare four different target blood glucose levels (180 mg/dL) in terms of the benefit and risk of insulin therapy. We included all of the studies from three systematic reviews and searched the PubMed and Cochrane databases for other studies investigating glucose targets among critically ill patients. The primary outcome was hospital mortality, and the secondary outcomes were sepsis or bloodstream infection and the risk of hypoglycemia. Network meta-analysis to identify an optimal target glucose concentration. The network meta-analysis included 18,098 patients from 35 studies. There were no significant differences in the risk of mortality and infection among the four blood glucose ranges overall or in subgroup analysis. Conversely, target concentrations of 180 mg/dL. However, there were no significant differences between the target concentrations of 144-180 and >180 mg/dL. This network meta-analysis found no significant difference in the risk of mortality and infection among four target blood glucose ranges in critically ill patients, but indicated that target blood glucose levels of target levels of 144-180 and >180 mg/dL. Further studies are required to refute or confirm our findings.

  14. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: "diabetes kidney disease" and "renal failure" in combination with "diabetes treatment" and "oral antidiabetic drugs" or "oral hypoglycemic agents." The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population.

  15. Association of periodontal disease with glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanuja, Palka Kaur; Narula, Satish Chander; Rajput, Rajesh; Sharma, Rajinder Kumar; Tewari, Shikha

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the link between glycated hemoglobin and diabetic complications with chronic periodontitis. A total of 207 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis (CP) were divided according to tertiles of mean PISA (periodontal inflamed surface area) scores as low, middle and high PISA groups. Simultaneously a group of 67 periodontally healthy individuals (PH) was recruited. Periodontal examinations, including full-mouth assessment of probing depths (PPD), bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level and plaque scores were determined. Blood analyses were carried out for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h post parandial glucose (PPG). Individuals in PH group had significantly better glycemic control than CP group. Upon one-way analysis of variance, subjects with increased PISA had significantly higher HbA1c levels, retinopathy and nephropathy (P diabetes and periodontitis, duration of diabetes, the mean PISA in mm(2), PPD 4-6 mm (%) and PPD ≥ 7 mm (%) emerged as significant predictors for elevated HbA1c in regression model (P diabetic complications with periodontitis was observed.

  16. [Factors associated with glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus on an insulin pump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xu, Wen; Ai, Heying; Lü, Jing; Zhu, Yanhua; Yang, Daizhi; Lin, Shuo; Liu, Li; Zheng, Xueying; Yan, Jinhua; Yao, Bin; Weng, Jianping

    2014-12-02

    To explore the factors associated with glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) on an insulin pump. A total of 108 patients aged over 18 years and on an insulin pump therapy for >6 months were selected from 16 centers of Guangdong Type 1 diabetes Translational Medicine Study. They were classified into two groups according to the (American Diabetes Association) ADA Hemoglobin A1c target (7.0%). Those reaching the target (n = 59) were compared with those failed (n = 49) using ANOVA and Logistic regression. There were 75 females and 33 males with a median age of 32.0 (25.9-40.9) years and a median disease duration of 7.9(4.2-12.3) years. Logistic regression analysis revealed an odds ratio of 4.48(95%CI 1.53-13.15, P = 0.00) for total daily basal insulin dose within 0.2-0.3 units per kilogram, an OR of 1.31 (95%CI 1.05-1.63, P = 0.01) for self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and an OR of 3.43 (95%CI 1.18-10.01, P = 0.02) for males. Higher frequencies of SMBG and appropriate basal insulin dose are essential for adult patients with T1D on an insulin pump.

  17. ASSOCIATION OF MICROALBUMINURIA IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS WITH DURATION OF DISEASE AND GLYCEMIC CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Diabetic nephropathy is a dreaded complication of type2 diabetes mellitus. However in the early stages, also known as incipient nephropathy, it can be detected by the presence of microalbuminuria. The aim of our study was to know the occurrence of microal buminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to note its associations with duration of diabetes since diagnosis and its association with glycemic control. METHODOLOGY: This study was undertaken in our institution from October 2010 to April 2012. A total of 100 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients satisfying the inclusion criteria were selected by systematic random sampling for the study. All patients were evaluated in detail along with the testing of microalbuminuria by calculating albumin - creatini ne ratio of spot urine sample. RESULTS: The overall occurrence of microalbuminuria was 31%. The occurrence of microalbuminuria showed a direct relationship with increasing duration of diabetes since diagnosis (p=0.001. Patients with HbA1C value above 7% i s associated with 42.2% of microalbuminuria (p=0.001. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of microalbuminuria in type2 diabetic patients in this study was quite high. During the initial evaluation of patients with type 2 diabetes, and also during follow up visits, estimation of microalbuminuria should be routinely done, as it wil l help in early diagnosis and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  18. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: “diabetes kidney disease” and “renal failure” in combination with “diabetes treatment” and “oral antidiabetic drugs” or “oral hypoglycemic agents.” The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population. PMID:26872083

  19. Glucose meter performance criteria for tight glycemic control estimated by simulation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karon, Brad S; Boyd, James C; Klee, George G

    2010-07-01

    Glucose meter analytical performance criteria required for safe and effective management of patients on tight glycemic control (TGC) are not currently defined. We used simulation modeling to relate glucose meter performance characteristics to insulin dosing errors during TGC. We used 29,920 glucose values from patients on TGC at 1 institution to represent the expected distribution of glucose values during TGC, and we used 2 different simulation models to relate glucose meter analytical performance to insulin dosing error using these 29,920 initial glucose values and assuming 10%, 15%, or 20% total allowable error (TEa) criteria. One-category insulin dosing errors were common under all error conditions. Two-category insulin dosing errors occurred more frequently when either 20% or 15% TEa was assumed compared with 10% total error. Dosing errors of 3 or more categories, those most likely to result in hypoglycemia and thus patient harm, occurred infrequently under all error conditions with the exception of 20% TEa. Glucose meter technologies that operate within a 15% total allowable error tolerance are unlikely to produce large (>or=3-category) insulin dosing errors during TGC. Increasing performance to 10% TEa should reduce the frequency of 2-category insulin dosing errors, although additional studies are necessary to determine the clinical impact of such errors during TGC. Current criteria that allow 20% total allowable error in glucose meters may not be optimal for patient management during TGC.

  20. Current topics in glycemic control by wearable artificial pancreas or bedside artificial pancreas with closed-loop system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Munekage, Eri; Shiga, Mai; Maeda, Hiromichi; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing at an unprecedented pace and has become a serious health concern worldwide during the last two decades. Despite this, adequate glycemic control using an artificial pancreas has not been established, although the 21st century has seen rapid developments in this area. Herein, we review current topics in glycemic control for both the wearable artificial pancreas for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and the bedside artificial pancreas for surgical diabetic patients. In type 1 diabetic patients, nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with insulin therapy remains a serious problem that could be addressed by the recent development of a wearable artificial pancreas. This smart phone-like device, comprising a real-time, continuous glucose monitoring system and insulin pump system, could potentially significantly reduce nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with conventional glycemic control. Of particular interest in this space are the recent inventions of a low-glucose suspend feature in the portable systems that automatically stops insulin delivery 2 h following a glucose sensor value artificial pancreas with the closed-loop system has also proved safe and effective for not only avoiding hypoglycemia, but also for reducing blood glucose level variability resulting in good surgical outcomes. We hope that a more sophisticated artificial pancreas with closed-loop system will now be taken up for routine use worldwide, providing enormous relief for patients suffering from uncontrolled hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and/or variability in blood glucose concentrations.

  1. The effect of flour from the rind of the yellow passion fruit on glycemic control of people with diabetes mellitus type 2: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; Veras, Vivian Saraiva; de Freitas, Roberto Wagner Júnior Freire; de Paula, Maria do Livramento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Uchôa, Lilian Raquel Alexandre; Gaspar, Maria Wendiane Gueiros; Cunha, Maria da Conceição do Santos Oliveira; Serra, Maria Aparecida Alves de Oliveira; Carvalho, Carolina Maria de Lima; Costa, Edmara Chaves; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho

    2017-01-01

    The single or combined use of herbal and dietary products with medications has shown benefits in the metabolic modulation of carbohydrates, in the restoring of the function of pancreatic beta cells, and in insulin resistance. To analyze the effect of the use of flour made from the rind of the yellow passion fruit on the glycemic control of people with diabetes mellitus type 2. An open, prospective, randomized clinical trial was undertaken with 54 participants over an eight-week period. The participants from the case group were advised to ingest 12 g of the flour, three times daily; before breakfast, lunch and dinner. After eight weeks of use of the flour made from the rind of the yellow passion fruit, we did not identify significant statistical differences in the values for capillary blood glucose (p = 0.562), fasting blood glucose (p = 0.268) or glycated hemoglobin (p = 0.229) between the study groups. In the case group, we identified an increase (29.6%-37%) of the people with normal HbA1c; however, this did not have statistical relevance (p = 0.274). Based in our findings, we believe it is important to extend the time of exposure to the intervention and increase the rigor in the monitoring of adherence in future studies on this topic. Only in this way will we be able to make confident inferences in relation to the use of flour made from the rind of theyellow passion fruit as a therapeutic tool for glycemic and/or metabolic control in persons with DM 2. In the sample in question, the use of the flour made from the rind of the yellow passion fruit, over an eight-week period, did not improve the glycemic control of people with type 2 diabetes. Trial registration: U1111.1187.3616. Registered 6 September, retrospectively registered, in the Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry.

  2. Glycemic index: overview of implications in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Augustin, Livia S A; Franceschi, Silvia; Hamidi, Maryam; Marchie, Augustine; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Axelsen, Mette

    2002-07-01

    The glycemic index concept is an extension of the fiber hypothesis, suggesting that fiber consumption reduces the rate of nutrient influx from the gut. The glycemic index has particular relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with central obesity and insulin resistance. Early studies showed that starchy carbohydrate foods have very different effects on postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses in healthy and diabetic subjects, depending on the rate of digestion. A range of factors associated with food consumption was later shown to alter the rate of glucose absorption and subsequent glycemia and insulinemia. At this stage, systematic documentation of the differences that exist among carbohydrate foods was considered essential. The resulting glycemic index classification of foods provided a numeric physiologic classification of relevant carbohydrate foods in the prevention and treatment of diseases such as diabetes. Since then, low-glycemic-index diets have been shown to lower urinary C-peptide excretion in healthy subjects, improve glycemic control in diabetic subjects, and reduce serum lipids in hyperlipidemic subjects. Furthermore, consumption of low-glycemicindex diets has been associated with higher HDL-cholesterol concentrations and, in large cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Case-control studies have also shown positive associations between dietary glycemic index and the risk of colon and breast cancers. Despite inconsistencies in the data, sufficient, positive findings have emerged to suggest that the dietary glycemic index is of potential importance in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  3. Exercise at lunchtime: effect on glycemic control and oxidative stress in middle-aged men with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhi, Jonida; Leto, Gaetano; di Palumbo, Alessandro Scotto; Sbriccoli, Paola; Guidetti, Laura; Fantini, Cristina; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Caporossi, Daniela; Di Luigi, Luigi; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic oscillations have been associated with increased oxidative stress. We sought to investigate the effect of two walking exercise protocols performed during lunchtime on glycemic control and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients. Nine T2D patients participated in three randomized crossover trials; a control trial (Con), with participants having a standard lunch followed by their normal daily activities and two exercise trials (ContEx and Splitex). In ContEx, subjects performed 40 min of brisk walking 40 min after lunch, whereas in SplitEx the walking exercise was divided in two 20-min isoenergetic bouts, before and 40 min after meal. 24-h glycemic control was monitored by continuous glucose monitoring. 24-h urinary levels of 8-iso PGF2ɑ were measured as a marker of oxidative stress. SplitEx resulted in less time spent in moderate hyperglycemia after lunch vs ContEx (42.4 ± 38.7% vs 68.2 ± 32.7%, P = 0.04). ContEx reduced hyperglycemic time after breakfast consumed the morning after the exercise session (58.3 ± 29.6 Con vs 40.2 ± 33.4% ContEx, P = 0.02). Compared with Con, 24-h urinary isoprostanes were decreased both in ContEx (-68%, P = 0.02) and SplitEx (-63%, P = 0.04). Splitting an exercise session into two bouts, pre- and post-lunch, affects mainly the glycemic response to lunch, while a single-continuous isoenergetic session exerts its effect later in the 24-h period. Both exercise modalities effectively attenuate systemic oxidative stress with similar overall benefits.

  4. The potent synergistic effects of the combination of liraglutide and canagliflozin on glycemic control and weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David S.H.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 57 Final Diagnosis: Diabetes mellitus type 2 Symptoms: Weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Studies of the efficacy of the combination of the incretin mimetic liraglutide and the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin or indeed studies of the combination of any incretin mimetic with an SGLT2 inhibitor have neither been performed nor published. Pharmacologically, the combination of an incretin-mimetic and an SGLT2-receptor blocker should result in a more significant weight loss and a greater reduction in postprandial glucose and HbA1c. Case Report: An insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic patient with multiple diabetic complications was placed on the combination of liraglutide and canagliflozin and 4 weeks later was able to discontinue insulin. In addition, in spite of discontinuing insulin, his HbA1c dropped from 7.0% to 6.8%, and he had reductions in body (weight from 247 to 218 lbs), BMI (from 34 to 29.5 Kg/m2), waist circumference (from 47 to 44 ½ inches), and neck circumference (from 19 ½ to 18 ¼ inches). Conclusions: The combination of an SGLT2 inhibitor and an incretin mimetic/analog results in improved glycemic control accompanied by significant weight loss. This combination needs to be studied in a prospective randomized trial because the effect of each of the components of this combination is synergistically magnified by the addition of the partner drug. PMID:24753783

  5. Prestroke glycemic control is associated with the functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke: the Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hata, Jun; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Ago, Tetsuro; Sambongi, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Yoshihisa; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Kitazono, Takanari

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for stroke. However, it is uncertain whether prestroke glycemic control (PSGC) status affects clinical outcomes of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between PSGC status and neurological or functional outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. From the Fukuoka Stroke Registry (FSR), a multicenter stroke registry in Japan, 3627 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke within 24 hours after onset were included in the present analysis. The patients were categorized into 4 groups based on their PSGC status: excellent (hemoglobin [Hb] A1c on admissionStroke Scale [NIHSS] score during hospitalization or 0 points on NIHSS score at discharge), neurological deterioration (≥1 point increase in NIHSS score) and poor functional outcome (death or dependency at discharge, modified Rankin Scale 2-6). The age- and sex-adjusted ORs for neurological improvement were lower, and those for neurological deterioration and a poor functional outcome were higher in patients with poorer PSGC status. After adjusting for multiple confounding factors, these trends were unchanged (all probability values for trends were ischemic stroke patients, HbA1c on admission was an independent significant predictor for neurological and functional outcomes.

  6. Effects of a palatinose-based liquid diet (Inslow) on glycemic control and the second-meal effect in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Akira; Sakuma, Masae; Fukaya, Makiko; Matsuo, Kaoru; Muto, Kazusa; Sasaki, Hajime; Matsuura, Motoi; Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Taketani, Yutaka; Doi, Toshio; Takeda, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia induces prolonged hyperinsulinemia, which is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Foods with a low glycemic index blunt the rapid rise in postprandial plasma glucose and insulin levels. We herein investigated the effects of a novel, palatinose-based liquid diet (Inslow, Meiji Dairy Products, Tokyo, Japan) on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin levels and on the rate of substrate oxidation in 7 healthy men. Furthermore, to examine the effects of Inslow on the second-meal effect, we quantified our subjects' postprandial plasma glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid levels for up to 7 hours after they ingested a breakfast containing Inslow or control formula, followed by a standard lunch 5 hours later. Our results showed that peak plasma glucose and insulin levels 30 minutes after Inslow loading were lower than after control formula loading. Postprandial fat oxidation rates in the Inslow group were higher than in the control formula group (P formula group (P formula group (P < .05). In conclusion, consumption of Inslow at breakfast appears to improve patient glycemic control by reducing their postprandial plasma glucose and insulin levels after lunch (second-meal effect).

  7. Total Energy Intake May Be More Associated with Glycemic Control Compared to Each Proportion of Macronutrients in the Korean Diabetic Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Mi Kang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMajor macronutrients for energy intake vary among countries and cultures. Carbohydrates, including rice, are the major component of daily energy intake in Korea. The aim of this study was to examine the association of daily energy intake or each proportion of macronutrients, especially carbohydrates, with glycemic control in diabetic Koreans.MethodsA total of 334 individuals with diabetes (175 men, age 57.4±0.8 years; 159 women, age 60.9±0.9 years who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were examined. Glycemic control was categorized based on concentration of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; HbA1c ≤6.5%; 6.6% to 8.0%; ≥8.1%. Dietary intake was assessed by using a 24-recall item questionnaire.ResultsHigh total energy intake was associated with poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≤6.5%, 1,824±75 kcal; 6.6% to 8.0%, 1,990±57 kcal; ≥8.1%, 2,144±73 kcal; P value for trend=0.002. Each proportion of protein, fat, or carbohydrate was not associated with glycemic control. Even after adjusting for several parameters, the association of daily energy intake with glycemic control still persisted.ConclusionTotal energy intake may be more closely related to glycemic control than each proportionof macronutrients in Korean diabetics.

  8. Assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practices about tight glycemic control in the critically ill among endocrinologists and intensivists practicing in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopichandran Vijayaprasad

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tight glycemic control in the critically ill is known to reduce both the morbidity and the mortality. It is essential that intensivists and endocrinologists involved in the care of these patients have a good understanding of the concepts related to this condition. Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices about achieving tight glycemic control in the critically ill among the endocrinologists and intensivists practicing in the city of Chennai. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires containing ten questions pertaining to clinical outcomes, drawbacks, target levels of glycemic control and insulin regimen in achieving tight glycemia in the critically ill were sent to a total of six endocrinologists and 52 intensivists practicing in Chennai. Results: All those who were administered the questionnaires responded. Majority of the responders (88% believed in tight glycemic control in the critically ill because of better outcomes from hospitalization. A minority did not for fear of hypoglycemia. Fifty percent agreed on the cut off value of 110 mg/dL as followed in the Van den Berghe study. Seventy percent used glucometer for monitoring sugar levels. Most preferred using regular insulin as infusion. Conclusions: There seems to be a good understanding and standard practices among the endocrinologists and intensivists in achieving strict glycemic control in the critically ill. Setting up of standard intensive care unit glycemic control protocols will settle all the methodological differences and make the practices more uniform.

  9. Effects of a pharmaceutical care model on medication adherence and glycemic control of people with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung WW

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wen Wei Chung,1,2 Siew Siang Chua,1 Pauline Siew Mei Lai,3 Siew Pheng Chan4 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Pharmacy Department, University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Department of Primary Care Medicine, University Malaya Primary Care Research Group, 4Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong chronic condition that requires self-management. Lifestyle modification and adherence to antidiabetes medications are the major determinants of therapeutic success in the management of diabetes.Purpose: To assess the effects of a pharmaceutical care (PC model on medication adherence and glycemic levels of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients and methods: A total of 241 people with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a major teaching hospital in Malaysia and allocated at random to the control (n=121 or intervention (n=120 groups. Participants in the intervention group received PC from an experienced pharmacist, whereas those in the control group were provided the standard pharmacy service. Medication adherence was assessed using the Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale, and glycemic levels (glycated hemoglobin values and fasting blood glucose [FBG] of participants were obtained at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 months. Results: At baseline, there were no significant differences in demographic data, medication adherence, and glycemic levels between participants in the control and intervention groups. However, statistically significant differences in FBG and glycated hemoglobin values were observed between the control and intervention groups at months 4, 8, and 12 after the provision of PC (median FBG, 9.0 versus 7.2 mmol/L [P<0.001]; median glycated hemoglobin level, 9.1% versus 8.0% [P<0.001] at 12 months. Medication adherence was also significantly associated with the

  10. The one year exercise and lifestyle intervention program KLAKS: Effects on anthropometric parameters, cardiometabolic risk factors and glycemic control in childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüher, Susann; Petroff, David; Wagner, Antje; Warich, Katja; Gausche, Ruth; Klemm, Thorsten; Wagner, Mario; Keller, Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Regular physical exercise within structured lifestyle programs may improve weight status and minimize metabolic risk factors in childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the one-year combined physical exercise/lifestyle program KLAKS on anthropometric and metabolic parameters and glycemic control in childhood obesity. 142 overweight/obese (BMI>90th percentile) candidates (7-18years) were enrolled, 115 participants completed the program. Anthropometrics and biochemical parameters were obtained at beginning and completion. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in a subgroup of participants. Course of glucose and insulin levels within OGTT was correlated with several parameters and is reported here for those who completed the program. The mean standard deviation scores (SDS) decreased significantly for BMI, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and percentage body fat (all p≤0.01). Improved metabolic risk markers included mean glucose levels within an OGTT at follow-up compared to baseline (pobesity and glycemic control. Impaired cardiometabolic risk markers, even subclinical, are also favorably influenced by program participation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. THE EFFECT OF INTENSIVE GLYCEMIC CONTROL ON THE FACTORS DETERMINING PREDICTION COMPLICATIONS OF ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Fedotova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine predictors of complications of myocardial infarction (MI in patients with type 2 diabetes (2TDM and it’s value of intensive glycemic control during insulin infusion.Methods. The study included 112 patients with MI and 2TDM at first day of hospital admission with blood glucose level above 7.8 mmol/l. Prognosis of combined study endpoint included the death and ma-jor complications of MI for the hospital and long-term (6-month stages. The statistical analysis was per-formed (Statistica 6.0 for Windows. The predictive value was assessed with ROC-curves analysis meth-od.Results. Intensive glycemic control with insulin infusion reduced the activity of lipid peroxidation and improve prediction of study endpoint. Predictors of adverse hospital prognosis of MI in association with type 2 diabetes were hyperglycemia on admission above 10 mmol/l, and increase of C-peptide. The in-crease of C-peptide in the 1st and 7th day, hs-CRP on day 1, diene conjugates on the 7th day and glucose level on admission above 8.9 mmol/l (patients without 2TDM and 14.3 mmol/l (patients with 2TDM had the 6-month predictive value.Conclusion. The strict achievement of the target level of glucose in acute MI improves it’s prognosis at the hospital and at a 6-month prospective study.

  12. A protein-enriched low glycemic index diet with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation exerts beneficial effects on metabolic control in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosheer, Simone M; Waldschütz, Wolfgang; Itariu, Bianca K; Brath, Helmut; Stulnig, Thomas M

    2014-12-01

    The current study aims to investigate practicability and effects of a combined dietary intervention with increased relative protein content supplemented with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on metabolic control and inflammatory parameters in a real life situation in type 2 diabetes patients. In this observational study we advised thirty mostly obese patients with type 2 diabetes to follow a protein-enriched diet with carbohydrates of low glycemic index (low GI) and moderate fat reduction supplemented with omega-3 PUFA for 24 weeks. Primary efficacy parameter was the change in HbA1c; secondary parameters included changes in systemic inflammation (measured by ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, usCRP), body weight, waist circumference, fat mass. The study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01474603). The dietary intervention significantly reduced the primary efficacy variable HbA1c from a baseline value of 63±11mmol/mol to 59±14mmol/mol (P=0.033) and 56±12mmol/mol (P=0.001) after 12 and 24 weeks, respectively. In addition, usCRP decreased significantly at 24 weeks (P=0.039). Waist circumference, an important indicator for cardiometabolic-risk and silent inflammation, decreased from baseline 116.0±14.1cm to 114.9±13.5cm (P=0.019), 114.0±14.4cm (P=0.001), and 112.7±13.4cm (P=0.049), after 3, 12 and 24 weeks, respectively. Counseling a protein enriched and low glycemic index diet supplemented with long-chain omega-3 PUFA in a real-life clinical setting improves glycemic control and also reduces waist circumference and silent inflammation in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sleep Pattern, Duration and Quality in Relation with Glycemic Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Mohammad Hossein Gozashti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances have been shown to be associated with diabetes control, but the relation between planned wakings or napping with glycemic indices has not been evaluated yet. This study evaluated the relation between sleep quality, duration, and pattern, including daytime napping of people with diabetes and their glycemic control. A cross-sectional correlation research design was used for this study. We enrolled 118 people with type 2 diabetes receiving oral agents without major complications at the Shahid Bahonar Center, Kerman. The age, weight, height, serum HbA1c, as well as other glycemic indices and lipid profile were measured. BMI was also calculated. All participants were requested to fill in the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI questionnaire to evaluate their sleep quality. In addition, they were inquired about their sleep schedule during day and night. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the correlation between HbA1c and sleep pattern variables. The variables were also compared between participants with or without napping using t-test. All analyses were performed with the SPSS version 19 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA. The mean age was 58±11 years and mean HbA1c (% was 7.8±11 (62±13 mmol/mol. Sleep duration and the number of sleep segments significantly predicted HbA1c (F (2,114=5.232, P=0.007, R2=0.084. A one-hour increment in sleep duration was associated with a 0.174% (1.4 mmol/mol decrement in HbA1c. PSQI score did not contribute to the regression model. Moreover, participants who napped (66% had a lower HbA1c (7.6±1 compared to others (8.1±1.3 (P=0.04. We concluded that napping and segmented sleep are associated with a better glycemic control in type 2 diabetes and there is a linear correlation between sleep duration and better glycemic control.

  14. Impact of insulin pump therapy on long-term glycemic control in a pediatric Spanish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colino, Esmeralda; Martín-Frías, María; Yelmo, Rosa; Álvarez, M Ángeles; Roldán, Belén; Barrio, Raquel

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) in a pediatric cohort and to determine if the ISPAD/IDF/ADA criteria for good metabolic control are achieved during long periods of time. Retrospective longitudinal study including ninety patients [10.5 (6.5-13.9) years of age, 58% males]. Age at debut, type 1 diabetes mellitus duration, pubertal stage, HbA1c, insulin dose, mean number of glycemic controls, number of basal rates, % basal/total insulin, severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis events were analyzed. Subgroup analysis based on age and pubertal stage was performed. HbA1c decreased from 6.9% [52 mmol/mol] to 6.7% [50 mmol/mol] after one year of CSII. Afterwards, it remained less than 7% during the follow-up period (median 3.5 ± 1.8 years (range 1-8). Prior to CSII, 76% of the subjects met ISPAD/ADA criteria. One year after initiating CSII, 96% of children had HbA1cinsulin dose decreased from 0.89 to 0.73 UI/kg/day (pinsulin changed significantly (47 to 42% (p<0.05)). Number of fractions of the basal rate increased from 5.6 ± 1.8 at one year of CSII to 6.7 ± 2.1 five years later. Incidence of severe hypoglycemic events decreased from 19 to 6.9 episodes/100 patient-year. Only 2 episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis occurred. CSII allows reaching ISPAD/IDF/ADA goals safely during an extended follow-up period in a diabetic pediatric cohort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Glycemic Responses, Appetite Ratings and Gastrointestinal Hormone Responses of Most Common Breads Consumed in Spain. A Randomized Control Trial in Healthy Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Gonzalez-Anton; Rico, Maria C.; Estefania Sanchez-Rodriguez; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D.; Angel Gil; Maria D. Mesa

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-...

  16. A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the...

  17. Effect of guided self-determination youth intervention integrated into outpatient visits versus treatment as usual on glycemic control and life skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Gitte R; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Providing care for adolescents with type 1 diabetes is complex, demanding, and often unsuccessful. Guided self-determination (GSD) is a life skills approach that has been proven effective in caring for adults with type 1 diabetes. To improve care, GSD was revised for adolescents...... of the adolescents' visits (P = 0.05) compared with control parents. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with treatment-as-usual, GSD-Y did not improve HbA1c levels, but it did decrease adolescents' amotivation for diabetes self-management.Trial registration: ISRCTN 54243636, registered on 10 January 2010. Life skills......, their parents, and interdisciplinary healthcare providers (HCP) to create GSD-Youth (GSD-Y). We evaluated the impact of GSD-Y after it was integrated into pediatric outpatient visits versus treatment-as-usual, focusing on glycemic control and the development of life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes...

  18. Soluble CD40L in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: relation to microvascular complications and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Asrar, Mohamed A; Adly, Amira Am; Ismail, Eman A

    2012-12-01

    CD40-soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) interactions might constitute an important mediator for vascular inflammation that initiates diabetic microangiopathy. Little is known about the relation between sCD40L and glycemic control. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate sCD40L levels in patients with type 1 diabetes and its relation to microvascular complications and metabolic control. Sixty patients with type 1 diabetes were compared with 30 healthy control subjects. Detailed medical history, thorough clinical examination, and laboratory assessment of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, glycemic control, and the presence of microvascular complications were performed. Measurement of serum sCD40L levels was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of microvascular complications. Serum sCD40L levels were significantly elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes in both groups compared with healthy controls (p < 0.001). Patients with microvascular complications had higher serum sCD40L concentrations than non-complicated cases (median, 13 000 vs. 450 pg/mL; p < 0.001). Serum sCD40L cutoff value of 530 pg/mL was able to differentiate complicated from non-complicated cases (p < 0.001). Patients with microalbuminuria or peripheral neuropathy showed higher levels of sCD40L when compared with patients without these complications (p < 0.05). Serum sCD40L levels were positively correlated with hemoglobin A1c and urinary albumin excretion (p < 0.001). We suggest that serum sCD40L levels are elevated in type 1 diabetes, particularly in patients with microvascular complications and a significant correlation with glycemic control exists. Therefore, measurement of serum sCD40L levels in poorly controlled patients would help to identify those at high risk of developing microvascular complications.

  19. Alexithymia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the role of anxiety, depression, and glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avci D

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dilek Avci,1 Meral Kelleci2 1Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bandirma Onyedi Eylul University, Balikesir, 2Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey Objective: This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of alexithymia in patients with type 2 DM and the factors affecting it.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted with 326 patients with type 2 DM. Study data were collected with the Personal Information Form, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Glycemic control was assessed by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c results. The analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, chi-square test, Pearson’s correlation, and logistic regression analysis.Results: Of the patients, 37.7% were determined to have alexithymia. A significant relationship was determined between alexithymia and HbA1c, depression, and anxiety. According to binary logistic regression analyses, alexithymia was 2.63 times higher among those who were in a paid employment than those who were not, 2.09 times higher among those whose HbA1c levels were ≥7.0% than those whose HbA1c levels were <7.0%, 3.77 times higher among those whose anxiety subscale scores were ≥11 than those whose anxiety subscale scores were ≤10, and 2.57 times higher among those whose depression subscale scores were ≥8 than those whose depression subscale scores were ≤7.Conclusion: In this study, it was determined that two out of every five patients with DM had alexithymia. Therefore, their treatment should be arranged to include mental health care services. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, alexithymia, mental symptoms, HbA1c

  20. Clinical assessment of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes mellitus and its correlation with glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday B Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Clinical assessment of the autonomic nervous system in Diabetes mellitus (DM and its correlation with glycemic control. STUDY DESIGN: Cross sectional study of 50 adult diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with DM who were on regular treatment with either insulin and/or oral hypoglycemic agents were studied. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN score was calculated using the clinical test variables. Results: Of the 50 patients 30 had no CAN, 10 had early CAN and 10 had severe CAN. The mean of CAN score increased with duration of diabetes. The mean HbA 1C was 7.73. The mean CAN score was higher in patients who had complication of diabetes as compared to patients without complications. The heart rate variability with respiration was found to be 15.84 ± 7.02/min. The mean valsalva ratio was 1.31 ± 0.23. The mean drop in BP on standing was 7.30 ± 7.24 mmHg. The mean 30:15 ratio was 1.06 ± 0.04. The mean rise in diastolic BP on sustained hand grip was 16.04 ± 4.11 mmHg. Conclusions: The prevalence of autonomic neuropathy in DM as assessed by CAN score was 40%. The CAN score did not correlate with the duration of DM. The HbA 1C had a significant correlation with the severity of autonomic neuropathy. Occurrence of CAN correlated with the presence of peripheral neuropathy but not with the presence of retinopathy or nephropathy. All individual tests in the battery of CAN score were significantly associated with the presence of autonomic neuropathy, except 30:15 ratio.

  1. Acute effects of dietary glycemic index on antioxidant capacity in nutrient-controlled feeding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evalua...

  2. Impact of initial active engagement in self-monitoring with a telemonitoring device on glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Kyung; Lee, Kwang-Hyeon; Yoo, Seung-Hyun; Park, Cheol-Young

    2017-06-20

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of patient engagement in self-monitoring with a telemonitoring device on glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a subanalysis of the telemonitoring device study in Kaiser Permanente Northern California members. We divided the telemonitoring group into 53 frequent and 54 infrequent users based on self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) frequency of the first 6 weeks. The frequency of SMBG transmitted from the telemonitoring device was examined over 24 weeks. Clinic and laboratory tests were collected at baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months. There was no significant difference in baseline HbA1c level between the two groups. After 6 months, change in HbA1c was -2.4 ± 1.6% among frequent users and -1.5 ± 1.5% among infrequent users (p = 0.003). The proportion of patients achieving target HbA1C level at 6 months was significantly higher among frequent users than among infrequent users. An increased frequency of SMBG was significantly correlated with a reduction in HbA1c at 6 months. In conclusion, initial active engagement in self-monitoring with a telemonitoring device could provide incremental improvement of glycemic control over 6 months.

  3. Short-term use of continuous glucose monitoring system adds to glycemic control in young type 1 diabetes mellitus patients in the long run: A clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukara-Radujković Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Balancing strict glycemic control with setting realistic goals for each individual child and family can optimize growth, ensure normal pubertal development and emotional maturation, and control long term complications in children with type 1 diabetes (T1DM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of short-term continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS application in improvement of glycemic control in pediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM patients. Methods. A total of 80 pediatric T1DM patients were randomly assigned into the experimental and the control group. The experimental group wore CGMS sensor for 72 hours at the beginning of the study. Self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG levels and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels were obtained for both groups at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months. Results. There was a significant improvement in HbA1c (p < 0.001, in both the experimental and the control group, without a significant difference between the groups. Nevertheless, after 6 months the improvement of mean glycemia was noticed only in the experimental group. This finding was accompanied with a decrease in the number of hyperglycemic events and no increase in the number of hypoglycemic events in the experimental group. Conclusions. The results suggest that the CGMS can be considered as a valuable tool in treating pediatric T1DM patients, however further research is needed to more accurately estimate to what extent, if any, it outperforms intensive self-monitoring of blood glucose.

  4. Effects of diets differing in glycemic index and glycemic load on cardiovascular risk factors: review of randomized controlled-feeing trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD r...

  5. Depressive Symptoms, Age at Diagnosis and A Clinically Defined Metabolic Syndrome as Independent Correlates of Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Elias Andreoulakis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The findings concerning the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS and depression with glycemic control are controversial. Recently, age at type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM diagnosis has attracted particular attention but the relevant findings are limited. This study aimed to further assess the association between age at T2DM diagnosis, depressive symptoms and MetS with glycemic control in T2DM patients. Methods: In 116 T2DM patients we assessed disease-related and MetS-related variables as well as depressive symptom severity (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale - CES-D. Glycemic control, as assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c levels, was the dependent variable. Results: Suboptimal HBA1c levels, i.e. 7% (53 mmol/mol or higher, were found in 35.3% of the patients. Elevated CES-D scores indicative of clinically relevant depressive symptoms (CES-D?16 or possible major depression (CES-D>23 where found in 31.9% and 11.2% of the patients, respectively. Younger age at T2DM diagnosis (p=0.004, greater treatment intensity (p=0.009, higher levels of depressive symptoms (p=0.011 and the presence of a clinically defined MetS (p=0.012 were the variables independently associated with glycemic control in multiple regression analysis after adjusting for sex, education, marital status, family history of diabetes and disease duration. Conclusion: In T2DM patients, the linear association found between depressive symptom severity and glycemic control points to the need of depressive symptoms being timely addressed. Younger age at T2DM onset may also be an important correlate of suboptimal glycemic control, independent of disease duration. Finally, classification of MetS in T2DM by clinical severity might help delineate its impact on glycemic control.

  6. Impact of poor glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus on serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Hasan Anıl; Akarsu, Murat; Canat, Lutfi; Ülker, Volkan; Alkan, İlter; Ozkuvancı, Unsal

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of poor glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations in men. We performed a prospective analysis of 215 consecutive patients affected by erectile dysfunction (ED). ED was evaluated using the IIEF-5 questionnaire and the poor glycemic control (PGC) of T2DM was assessed according to the HbA1c criteria (International Diabetes Federation). Patients were divided into PGC group (HbA1c ≥ 7%) and control group (CG) (HbA1c < 6%). Correlations between serum HbA1c levels and various variables were evaluated and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify variables for PGC. We compared 110 cases to 105 controls men ranging from 44 to 81 years of age, lower PSA concentrations were observed in men with PGC (PGC mean PSA: 0.9 ng/dl, CG mean PSA: 2.1 ng/dl, p < 0.001). Also mean prostate volume was 60% was smaller among men with PGC compared with men with CG (PGC mean prostate volume: 26 ml, CG prostate volume: 43 ml, p < 0.001). A strong negative correlation was found between serum HbA1c levels and serum PSA (p < 0.001 and r = -0.665) concentrations in men with PGC. We also found at the multivariate logistic regression model that PSA, prostate volume and peak systolic velocity were independent predictors of PGC. Our results suggest that there is significant impact of PGC on serum PSA levels in T2DM. Poor glycemic control of type 2 diabetes was associated with lower serum PSA levels and smaller prostate volumes.

  7. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Glycemic Control in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Ahmadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing anxiety and depression and glycemic control in children with type I diabetes. Methods and Matherials: The study was quasi- experimental with a pre-test, post-test design with control group. For this purpose, 30 children with diabetes were selected from Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad. The children were randomly assigned into two experimental group (15 and control group (15. The experimental group was undergone eight 2-hour sessions of cognitive-behavioral training. Before and after the intervention, the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, which included four components of social anxiety, physical symptoms, harm avoidance, and separation anxiety, and Children Depression Inventory was administrated in both groups. Results: The findings from the covariance analysis test revealed that depression and anxiety and glycemic control in experimental group was controlled at post-test and depression score in experimental group compared to the control group at post-test was decreased. The findings from the multivariate covariance analysis test between components of, physical symptoms, harm avoidance, separation anxiety, and social anxiety revealed meaningful differences between the two groups in social anxiety post-test score. Conclusions: According to the article, cognitive behavior therapy can be effective for depression, anxiety, and blood sugar control in children.

  8. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive Bbehavioral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Glycemic Control in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ahmadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing anxiety and depression and glycemic control in children with type I diabetes. The study was quasi- experimental with a pre-test, post-test design with control group. For this purpose, 30 children with diabetes were selected from Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad. The children were randomly assigned into two experimental group (15 and control group (15. The experimental group was undergone eight 2-hour sessions of cognitive-behavioral training. Before and after the intervention, the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, which included four components of social anxiety, physical symptoms, harm avoidance, and separation anxiety, and Children Depression Inventory was administrated in both groups. The findings from the covariance analysis test revealed that depression and anxiety and glycemic control in experimental group was controlled at post-test and depression score in experimental group compared to the control group at post-test was decreased. The findings from the multivariate covariance analysis test between components of, physical symptoms, harm avoidance, separation anxiety, and social anxiety revealed meaningful differences between the two groups in social anxiety post-test score. Thus, cognitive behavior therapy can be effective for depression, anxiety, and blood sugar control in children.

  9. Associations between nocturnal urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, obstructive sleep apnea severity and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Siwasaranond, Nantaporn; Nimitphong, Hataikarn; Saetung, Sunee; Chirakalwasan, Naricha; Chailurkit, La-Or; Srijaruskul, Kriangsuk; Ongphiphadhanakul, Boonsong; Thakkinstian, Ammarin

    2017-01-01

    Reduced nocturnal secretion of melatonin, a pineal hormone under circadian control, and obstructive sleep apnea have been both identified as risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Whether they interact to impact glycemic control in patients with existing type 2 diabetes is not known. Therefore, this study explores the relationships between obstructive sleep apnea, melatonin and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. As diabetic retinopathy may affect melatonin secretion, we also explore the relationship between retinopathy, melatonin and glycemic control. Fifty-six non-shift workers with type 2 diabetes, who were not using beta-blockers, participated. Most recent hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and the results of ophthalmologic examinations were obtained from medical records. Obstructive sleep apnea was diagnosed using an ambulatory device. Sleep duration and fragmentation were recorded by 7-day wrist actigraphy. The urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratio, an indicator of nocturnal melatonin secretion, was measured in an overnight urine sample. Mediation analyses were applied to explore whether low nocturnal urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratio could be a causal link between increasing obstructive sleep apnea severity [as measured by an Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI)] and poorer glycemic control, and between the presence of retinopathy and glycemic control. AHI and HbA1c were log-scale (ln) transformed. Obstructive sleep apnea was found in 76.8%, and 25.5% had diabetic retinopathy. The median (interquartile range) of urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratio was 12.3 (6.0, 20.1) ng/mg. Higher lnHbA1c significantly correlated with lower 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratio (p = 0.04) but was not directly associated with OSA severity. More severe obstructive sleep apnea (lnAHI, p = 0.01), longer diabetes duration (p = 0.02), retinopathy (p = 0.01) and insulin use (p = 0.03) correlated with lower urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin

  10. GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN WOMEN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES: RESULTS FROM THE DCCT/EDIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenherr, Sara M.; Clemens, J. Quentin; Braffett, Barbara H.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Hotaling, James M.; Jacobson, Alan M.; Kim, Catherine; Herman, William; Brown, Jeanette S.; Wessells, Hunter; Sarma, Aruna V.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We examined the relationship between glycemic control and urinary tract infections (UTI) in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. MATERIALS AND METHODS Women enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, the observational follow-up of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) were surveyed to assess the rate of physician-diagnosed UTI in the preceding 12 months. The relationship between HbA1c levels and number of UTIs in the previous 12 months was assessed using a multivariable Poisson regression model. RESULTS At EDIC Year 17, 572 women were evaluated: mean age 50.7 ± 7.2 years, mean body mass index (BMI) 28.6 ± 5.9 kg/m2, type 1 diabetes duration 29.8 ± 5.0 years, and mean HbA1c 8.0 ± 0.9%. Of these, 86 (15.0%) reported at least one physician diagnosed UTI during the past 12 months. Higher HbA1c levels were significantly associated with number of UTIs, such that for every unit increase (1%) in recent HbA1c level, there was a 21% (p=0.02) increase in UTI frequency in the previous 12 months after adjusting for race, hysterectomy status, urinary incontinence (UI), sexual activity in the past 12 months, peripheral and autonomic neuropathy and nephropathy. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of UTI increases with poor glycemic control in women with type 1 diabetes. This relationship is independent of other well-described predictors of UTI and suggests that factors directly related to glycemic control may influence the risk of lower urinary tract infections. PMID:27131462

  11. Intensive glycemic control and thiazolidinedione use: effects on cortical and trabecular bone at the radius and tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann V; Vittinghoff, Eric; Margolis, Karen L; Scibora, Lesley M; Palermo, Lisa; Ambrosius, Walter T; Hue, Trisha F; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2013-05-01

    Factors that contribute to bone fragility in type 2 diabetes are not well understood. We assessed the effects of intensive glycemic control, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), and A1C levels on bone geometry and strength at the radius and tibia. In a substudy of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes trial, peripheral quantitative computed tomographic (pQCT) scans of the radius and tibia were obtained 2 years after randomization on 73 participants (intensive n = 35, standard n = 38). TZD use and A1C levels were measured every 4 months during the trial. Effects of intervention assignment, TZD use, and A1C on pQCT parameters were assessed in linear regression models. Intensive, compared with standard, glycemic control was associated with 1.3 % lower cortical volumetric BMD at the tibia in men (p = 0.02) but not with other pQCT parameters. In women, but not men, each additional year of TZD use was associated with an 11 % lower polar strength strain index (SSIp) at the radius (p = 0.04) and tibia (p = 0.002) in models adjusted for A1C levels. In women, each additional 1 % increase in A1C was associated with an 18 % lower SSIp at the ultradistal radius (p = 0.04) in models adjusted for TZD use. There was no consistent evidence of an effect of intensive, compared with standard, glycemic control on bone strength at the radius or tibia. In women, TZD use may reduce bone strength at these sites. Higher A1C may also be associated with lower bone strength at the radius, but not tibia, in women.

  12. Quality of life and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes and the impact of an education intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    et al

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh1,*, Mofida M Kamal2,*, Mohamed D El-Bourgy2,*, Sherine G Mohamed2,*1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Health Administration and Behavioral Sciences, High Institute of Public Health, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt; *All authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To assess quality of life (QoL and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes and to investigate the impact of an educational program.Methods: A quasiexperimental study with nonrandomized experimental and control groups was conducted in which a total of 503 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed a questionnaire using the Diabetes Quality of Life Instrument for Youth. Adolescents were then assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group was subjected to four 120-minute sessions of an educational program over a period of 4 months. Extracted medical chart data included the duration of diabetes, insulin dosage, and most recent hemoglobin A1c levels. Analysis of covariance was used to detect the impact of intervention.Results: The overall mean QoL score (% was 76.51 ± 9.79, with good QoL in 38% of all adolescents. Poorer QoL was significantly associated with older age (P < 0.001, more hospital admissions in the last 6 months (P = 0.006, higher levels of depression (P < 0.001, poor self-esteem (P < 0.001, and poor self-efficacy (P < 0.001. There was significant deterioration in all domains of QoL in the experimental group after intervention. However, this deterioration was significantly less severe than in the control group. Between-group effects on total knowledge, adherence to exercise, glucose monitoring, treatment, self-efficacy, family contribution to management, glycemic control, and satisfaction with life were significantly in favor of the experimental group

  13. Effect of Tocotrienols enriched canola oil on glycemic control and oxidative status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

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    Mohammadreza Vafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tocotrienols have been shown to improve glycemic control and redox balance in an animal study, but their effects on patients with diabetes are unknown. The study aimed to investigate whether tocotrienols improves glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and oxidative stress in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. A total of 50 patients, aged 35-60 years, with T2DM treated by noninsulin hypoglycemic drugs were randomly assigned to receive either 15 mL/day tocotrienols (200 mg enriched canola oil (n = 25 or pure canola oil (n = 25 for 8 weeks. Fasting blood sugar (FBS, fasting insulin, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, malondialdehyde (MDA, and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were determined before and after the intervention. The data were compared between and within groups, before and after the intervention. Results: Baseline characteristics of participants including age, sex, physical activity, disease duration, and type of drug consumption were not significantly different between the two groups. In tocotrienol enriched canola oil, FBS (mean percent change: -15.4% vs. 3.9%; P = 0.006 and MDA (median percent change: -35.6% vs. 16.3%; P = 0.003 were significantly reduced while TAC was significantly increased (median percent change: 21.4% vs. 2.3%; P = 0.001 compared to pure canola oil. At the end of the study, patients who treated with tocotrienols had lower FBS (P = 0.023 and MDA (P = 0.044 compared to the pure canola oil group. However, tocotrienols had no effect on insulin concentrations and HOMA-IR. Conclusion: Tocotrienols can improve FBS concentrations and modifies redox balance in T2DM patients with poor glycemic control and can be considered in combination with hypoglycemic drugs to better control of T2DM.

  14. Impact of lifestyle modification on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita B Sanghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current treatment guidelines support the role of lifestyle modification, in terms of increasing the quantity and quality of physical activity to achieve target glycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Objective: To assess the effect of structured exercise training and unstructured physical activity interventions on glycemic control. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized six-month exercise intervention study conducted with previously inactive 279 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Before randomization, all enrolled T2DM participants (n: 300; 30 to 60 year old, having diabetes for more than a year with HbA1c levels of 6.5% or higher entered a one-month run-in phase to reduce dropout and maintain adherence. Results: A recommendation to increase physical activity was beneficial (0.14% HbA1c reduction; P = 0.12, but was not bringing significantly declines in HbA1c, whereas, structured exercise training is associated with a significant HbA1c decline of 0.59%. ( P = 0.030. In a subgroup analysis limited to participants with a baseline HbA1c value > 7%, both the unstructured (0. 48%; P = 0.04 and structured exercise training (0.77%; P < 0.01 groups experienced significant decline in HbA1c Vs the control, whereas among participants with baseline hemoglobin A1c values less than 7%, significant reduction occurred only in the structured exercise training group. Changes in blood pressure; total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein and the atherogenic index factors did not statistically significantly differ within (baseline to follow-up and among groups. Conclusion: Supervised structured training was more efficacious than unstructured activity in achieving declines in HbA1c. Although both structured and unstructured training provide benefits, only the former was associated with significant reductions in HbA1c levels. Therefore, T2DM patients should be stimulated to

  15. The Effect of Ginseng (The Genus Panax) on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishtar, Esra'; Sievenpiper, John L.; Djedovic, Vladimir; Cozma, Adrian I.; Ha, Vanessa; Jayalath, Viranda H.; Jenkins, David J. A.; Meija, Sonia Blanco; de Souza, Russell J.; Jovanovski, Elena; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Importance Despite the widespread use of ginseng in the management of diabetes, supporting evidence of its anti-hyperglycemic efficacy is limited, necessitating the need for evidence-based recommendations for the potential inclusion of ginseng in diabetes management. Objective To elucidate the effect of ginseng on glycemic control in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in people with and without diabetes. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library (through July 3, 2013). Study selection Randomized controlled trials ≥30 days assessing the glycemic effects of ginseng in people with and without diabetes. Data extraction Relevant data were extracted by 2 independent reviewers. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. The Heyland Methodological Quality Score and the Cochrane risk of bias tool were used to assess study quality and risk of bias respectively. Data synthesis Sixteen trials were included, in which 16 fasting blood glucose (n = 770), 10 fasting plasma insulin (n = 349), 9 glycated hemoglobin (n = 264), and 7 homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (n = 305) comparisons were reported. Ginseng significantly reduced fasting blood glucose compared to control (MD =  −0.31 mmol/L [95% CI: −0.59 to −0.03], P = 0.03). Although there was no significant effect on fasting plasma insulin, glycated hemoglobin, or homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, a priori subgroup analyses did show significant reductions in glycated hemoglobin in parallel compared to crossover trials (MD = 0.22% [95%CI: 0.06 to 0.37], P = 0.01). Limitations Most trials were of short duration (67% trialsGinseng modestly yet significantly improved fasting blood glucose in people with and without diabetes. In order to address the uncertainty in our effect estimates and provide better assessments of ginseng's anti-diabetic efficacy, larger and longer randomized controlled trials using

  16. Association between poor glycemic control, impaired sleep quality, and increased arterial thickening in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Yoda

    Full Text Available Poor sleep quality is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the association between glycemic control and objective sleep architecture and its influence on arteriosclerosis in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM. The present study examined the association of objective sleep architecture with both glycemic control and arteriosclerosis in type-2 DM patients.Cross-sectional study in vascular laboratory.The subjects were 63 type-2 DM inpatients (M/F, 32/31; age, 57.5±13.1 without taking any sleeping promoting drug and chronic kidney disease. We examined objective sleep architecture by single-channel electroencephalography and arteriosclerosis by carotid-artery intima-media thickness (CA-IMT.HbA1c was associated significantly in a negative manner with REM sleep latency (interval between sleep-onset and the first REM period (β=-0.280, p=0.033, but not with other measurements of sleep quality. REM sleep latency associated significantly in a positive manner with log delta power (the marker of deep sleep during that period (β=0.544, p=0.001. In the model including variables univariately correlated with CA-IMT (REM sleep latency, age, DM duration, systolic blood pressure, and HbA1c as independent variables, REM sleep latency (β=-0.232, p=0.038, but not HbA1c were significantly associated with CA-IMT. When log delta power was included in place of REM sleep latency, log delta power (β=-0.257, p=0.023 emerged as a significant factor associated with CA-IMT.In type-2 DM patients, poor glycemic control was independently associated with poor quality of sleep as represented by decrease of REM sleep latency which might be responsible for increased CA-IMT, a relevant marker for arterial wall thickening.

  17. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Boj-Carceller, Diana; Lardies-Sanchez, Beatriz; Perez-Fernandez, Leticia; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-03-09

    Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF) for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention.

  18. Dyadic measures of the parent-child relationship during the transition to adolescence and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barbara J; Holmbeck, Grayson; Iannotti, Ronald J; McKay, Siripoom V; Lochrie, Amanda; Volkening, Lisa K; Laffel, Lori

    2009-06-01

    To identify aspects of family behavior associated with glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus during the transition to adolescence, the authors studied 121 9- to 14-year-olds (M = 12.1 yrs) and their parents, who completed the Diabetes Family Conflict Scale (DFCS) and the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire (DFRQ). From the DFRQ, the authors derived 2 dyadic variables, frequency of agreement (exact parent and child concurrence about who was responsible for a task) and frequency of discordance (opposite parent and child reports about responsibility). The authors divided the cohort into Younger (n = 57, M = 10.6 yrs) and Older (n = 64, M = 13.5 yrs) groups. Family conflict was significantly related to glycemic control in the entire cohort and in both the Younger and Older groups. However, only in the Younger group was Agreement related to glycemic control, with higher Agreement associated with better glycemic control. Findings suggest that Agreement about sharing of diabetes responsibilities may be an important target for family-based interventions aiming to optimize glycemic control in preteen youth.

  19. Corrected Hemoglobin A1c as an Index of Glycemic Control in the Preceding One Month

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The corrected hemoglobin A1c(cHbA1c) value was calculated on the basis of HbA1c data obtained over 4 months in 19 patients with type 2 diabetes. The usefulness of cHbA1c as a short-term glycemic control index was compared with that of glycated albumin. Both the HbA1c value (measured by immunoassay) and the calculated cHbA1c value showed significant positive correlations with glycated albumin. However, cHbA1c showed a stronger correlation with glycated albumin. In each patient,the variation of...

  20. Serum fructosamine versus glycosylated hemoglobin as an index of glycemic control, hospitalization, and infection in diabetic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittman, Neal; Desiraju, Brinda; Fazil, Irfan; Kapupara, Hiteshkumar; Chattopadhyay, Jyoti; Jani, Chinu M; Avram, Morrell M

    2010-08-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and an important risk factor for morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Glycemic control, utilizing serial measurement of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), is generally recommended to limit end-organ damage, including cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We, along with others, have previously suggested that HbA1c may not be a reliable measure of glycemic control in dialysis patients, and have therefore explored the use of serum fructosamine (SF) as an alternative marker. The objective of this study was to compare HbA1c levels with SF in monitoring glycemic control and associated morbidity (infection and hospitalization) in diabetic patients in a large urban hemodialysis (HD) center. We enrolled 100 diabetic HD patients and followed them up prospectively for 3 years. Data on demographics, as well as biochemical and clinical data, including hospitalizations and infections, were recorded. The mean age was 63 years. In all 54% were women and the majority were African Americans (72%). As expected, HbA1c and albumin-corrected fructosamine (AlbF) levels were highly correlated and both were significantly associated with serum glucose. AlbF, however, was more highly correlated with mean glucose values when less than 150 mg/dl and was a more useful predictor of morbidity. By univariate logistic regression and by Poisson regression analysis, AlbF, but not HbA1c, was a significant predictor of hospitalization. Additionally, in patients dialyzed by arteriovenous (AV) access (that is, excluding those dialyzed via vascular catheters), AlbF, but not HbA1c, was a significant predictor of infection. In conclusion, AlbF is as reliable a marker as HbA1c for glycemic control in diabetic patients on HD, and may be advantageous for patients with serum glucose in a desirable therapeutic range (<150 mg/dl). In addition, AlbF, but not HbA1c, is associated with morbidity (hospitalizations and infections) in diabetic

  1. Do eating behaviors in the general population account for country variance in glycemic control among adolescents with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Pernille; de Beaufort, Carine; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab

    2013-01-01

    . The frequency of intake of fruit, vegetables, sweets, sugary soft drinks, and daily breakfast was compared between the two groups. The glycemic control of the adolescents in the HSG cohort was determined by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS: Across countries in the HSBC survey....... METHODS: The study involved adolescents from 18 countries from (i) the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study (HBSC) and (ii) the HSG. There were 94 387 participants from representative HBSC samples of 11-, 13- and 15-yr-olds and 1483 11- to 15-yr-old adolescents with diabetes from the HSG...

  2. Effect of two intensive insulin therapy regimens on perioperative glycemic control in bone fracture patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Wei; HUO Li-li; LAN Ling; L(U) Yan-wei; WANG Man-yi

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently,there are no uniform standards and methods for perioperative glycemic control in bone fracture patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).We retrospectively analyzed the efficacy and safety of two intensive insulin therapy regimens administered to bone fracture patients with T2DM in the perioperative period,to explore the best method of achieving perioperative glycemic control.Methods A number of 159 bone fracture patients with T2DM were divided into two groups.One group (n=81) received multiple subcutaneous insulin injections (MSⅡ group) and the other (n=78) received continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSⅡ group).Blood glucose (BG) levels,time to achieve glycemic target,insulin dosage,and the incidence of hypoglycemia and complications were compared between groups.Results Both regimens reduced BG to desired levels before surgery.The time to reach glycemic target in CSⅡ group (2.5 days) was significantly shorter than that in the MSII group (7.3 days; P<0.001).Mean insulin dosage in the CSⅡ group (0.66 IU·kg-1·d-1) was significantly lower than that in the MSⅡ group (0.74 IU·kg1·d-1; P=0.005),as were the incidences of hypoglycemia (15.4% vs 32.1%) and infection (6.4% vs.23.5%).Multiple regression analysis showed that the time to reach glycemia target was associated with the insulin therapy regimen and dosage.The insulin dosage on reaching glycemia target was positively associated with body mass index (BMI),diabetes mellitus course,glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c),and β-hydroxybutyric acid,and was negatively associated with age.Conclusion The efficacy and safety of CSⅡ was superior to that achieved with MSⅡ,suggesting that CSⅡ should be considered as initial therapy to control perioperative BG in bone fracture patients with T2DM.

  3. Influence of the glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet in the glycemic control of diabetic children and teenagers Influencia del índice glicémico y la carga glucémica de la dieta en el control glucémico de niños y adolescentes diabéticos

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    K. C. Queiroz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the influence of the glycemic index (GI and glycemic load (GL of the diet in the glycemic control of children and teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1. Methods: A total of 146 subjects, aged 7-19 years, monitored at the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology at the HC/UFMG participated in the study. The consumed diet was evaluated using a quantitative food frequency questionnaire previously validated and tested in a pilotproject. The GI of the participant´s diet was estimated according to the equation described by Wolever and Jenkins (1986. The GL was estimated using the equation proposed by Foster-Powell et al. (2002. The glycemic control was classified as good, intermediate or poor according to the average of two HbA1c values obtained six months prior to the dietary evaluation date. Results: Subjects that had good glycemic control consumed diets with significantly (Tukey test, p = 0.000 lower GI/GL (54.8 ± 2.7/118.3 ± 29.8 than the ones with intermediate (60.1 ± 3.8/142.5 ± 27.3 and poor (60.3 ± 4.1/153.7 ± 40.7 glycemic control. The diet consumed by 75.5% of diabetics with good glycemic control was classified as medium GL, suggesting that the consumption of medium GL diet may favor an adequate glycemic control. The low GI diet consumed by these participants also presented higher protein content, which might have contributed to the attenuation of the postprandial glycemic response and better glycemic control of these patients. Conclusion: The intake of a reduced GI/GL diet favors the glycemic control of the studied population.Objetivo: Evaluar la influencia del índice glucémico (IG y de la carga glucémica (CG de la dieta en el control glucémico de los diabéticos. Métodos: El estudio incluyó 146 individuos con edades comprendidas entre 7-19 años, visto en la División de Endocrinología Pediátrica del HC/UFMG. La dieta fue evaluada utilizando un cuestionario de frecuencia alimentaria cuantitativa

  4. Insulin pump therapy started at the time of diagnosis: effects on glycemic control and pancreatic β-cell function in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M; Moreau, Cynthia S; Swearingen, Christopher; Rettiganti, Mallik; Edwards, Kathy; Morales, Alba E; Kemp, Stephen F; Frindik, J Paul; Fowlkes, John L

    2011-10-01

    In the interest of preserving residual insulin secretory capacity present at the time of diagnosis with type 1 diabetes (T1D), we compared the efficacy of starting insulin pump therapy at diagnosis with standard multiple daily insulin injections (MDIs). We conducted a prospective, randomized, pilot trial comparing MDI therapy with continuous subcutaneous insulin therapy (pump therapy) in 24 patients, 8-18 years old, with newly diagnosed T1D. Subjects were evaluated at enrollment and 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after initial diagnosis of T1D. Preservation of insulin secretion, measured by mixed-meal-stimulated C-peptide secretion, was compared after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Between-group differences in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), continuous glucose sensor data, insulin utilization, anthropometric measures, and patient satisfaction with therapy were also compared at multiple time points. Initiation of pump therapy within 1 month of diagnosis resulted in consistently higher mixed-meal tolerance test-stimulated C-peptide values at all time points, although these differences were not statistically significant. Nonetheless, improved glycemic control was observed in insulin pump-treated subjects (more time spent with normoglycemia, better mean HbA1c), and pump-treated subjects reported comparatively greater satisfaction with route of treatment administration. Initiation of insulin pump therapy at diagnosis improved glycemic control, was well tolerated, and contributed to improved patient satisfaction with treatment. This study also suggests that earlier use of pump therapy might help to preserve residual β-cell function, although a larger clinical trial would be required to confirm this.

  5. The deleterious effect of cholesterol and protection by quercetin on mitochondrial bioenergetics of pancreatic β-cells, glycemic control and inflammation: In vitro and in vivo studies

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    Catalina Carrasco-Pozo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying rats fed high cholesterol diet and a pancreatic β-cell line (Min6, we aimed to determine the mechanisms by which quercetin protects against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and impairments in glycemic control. Quercetin prevented the increase in total plasma cholesterol, but only partially prevented the high cholesterol diet-induced alterations in lipid profile. Quercetin prevented cholesterol-induced decreases in pancreatic ATP levels and mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction in Min6 cells, including decreases in mitochondrial membrane potentials and coupling efficiency in the mitochondrial respiration (basal and maximal oxygen consumption rate (OCR, ATP-linked OCR and reserve capacity. Quercetin protected against cholesterol-induced apoptosis of Min6 cells by inhibiting caspase-3 and -9 activation and cytochrome c release. Quercetin prevented the cholesterol-induced decrease in antioxidant defence enzymes from pancreas (cytosolic and mitochondrial homogenates and Min6 cells and the cholesterol-induced increase of cellular and mitochondrial oxidative status and lipid peroxidation. Quercetin counteracted the cholesterol-induced activation of the NFκB pathway in the pancreas and Min6 cells, normalizing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Quercetin inhibited the cholesterol-induced decrease in sirtuin 1 expression in the pancreas and pancreatic β-cells. Taken together, the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of quercetin, and its ability to protect and improve mitochondrial bioenergetic function are likely to contribute to its protective action against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, thereby preserving glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS and glycemic control. Specifically, the improvement of ATP-linked OCR and the reserve capacity are important mechanisms for protection of quercetin. In addition, the inhibition of the NFκB pathway is an important

  6. Glycemic control and variability in association with body mass index and body composition over 18months in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Leah M; Gee, Benjamin; Liu, Aiyi; Nansel, Tonja R

    2016-10-01

    The impact of adiposity on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients has important implications for preventing complications. This study examined associations of glycemic outcomes with body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) and body composition in youth with type 1 diabetes. This is a secondary analysis of an 18-month randomized controlled dietary intervention trial (N=136, baseline age=12.3±2.5y, HbA1c=8.1±1.0% (65±11mmol/mol)). Measured height and weight every 3months were abstracted from medical records. Body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at baseline, 12 and 18months. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycemic variability assessed by masked 3-day continuous blood glucose monitoring (CGM) were obtained every 3months. 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) was assessed every 6months. Adjusted random effects models for repeated measures estimated associations of time-varying BMI and body composition with time-varying glycemic outcomes. There was no treatment effect on glycemic outcomes. HbA1c was not associated with BMI or body composition indicators. 1,5-AG was inversely associated with BMI and adiposity indicators (%fat, trunk fat mass and trunk %fat), adjusting for developmental covariates. Adiposity indicators were positively associated with %glucose >180mg/dL and >126mg/dL when adjusting for developmental covariates, and %glucose >126mg/dL when additionally adjusting for diabetes-related covariates. Fewer consistent relationships were observed for 3-day mean glucose and %glucose BMI and body composition variables were not associated with standard deviation of glycemic values or mean amplitude of glycemic excursions. The role of greater BMI and adiposity in diabetes management in youth with type 1 diabetes may relate specifically to increased hyperglycemic excursions. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Low glycemic index treatment for seizure control in Angelman syndrome: A case series from the Center for Dietary Therapy of Epilepsy at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

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    Grocott, Olivia R; Herrington, Katherine S; Pfeifer, Heidi H; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Thibert, Ronald L

    2017-03-01

    The low glycemic index treatment, a dietary therapy that focuses on glycemic index and reduced carbohydrate intake, has been successful in reducing seizure frequency in the general epilepsy population. Epilepsy is a common feature of Angelman syndrome and seizures are often refractory to multiple medications, especially in those with maternal deletions. Dietary therapy has become a more frequently used option for treating epilepsy, often in combination with other antiepileptic drugs, due to its efficacy and favorable side effect profile. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the low glycemic index treatment for seizure control in Angelman syndrome. Through a retrospective medical record review of 23 subjects who utilized the low glycemic index treatment at the Clinic and Center for Dietary Therapy of Epilepsy at the Massachusetts General Hospital, we found that the high level of seizure control and favorable side effect profile make the low glycemic index treatment a viable treatment for seizures in Angelman syndrome. The majority of subjects in our cohort experienced some level of seizure reduction after initiating the diet, 5 (22%) maintained complete seizure freedom, 10 (43%) maintained seizure freedom except in the setting of illness or non-convulsive status epilepticus, 7 (30%) had a decrease in seizure frequency, and only 1 (4%) did not have enough information to determine seizure control post-initiation. The low glycemic index treatment monotherapy was successful for some subjects in our cohort but most subjects used an antiepileptic drug concurrently. Some subjects were able to maintain the same level of seizure control on a liberalized version of the low glycemic index treatment which included a larger amount of low glycemic carbohydrates. No correlation between the level of carbohydrate restriction and level of seizure control was found. Few subjects experienced side effects and those that did found them to be mild and easily treated. The

  8. Associations between health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care behaviors, and glycemic control in a low income population with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Sujeev S; Egede, Leonard E

    2011-03-01

    This study assessed associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care, and glycemic control in a low income, predominately minority population with type 2 diabetes. One hundred twenty-five adults with diabetes were recruited from a primary care clinic. Subjects completed validated surveys to measure health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-care (medication adherence, diet, exercise, blood sugar testing, and foot care). Hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Spearman's correlation and multiple linear regression were used to assess the relationship among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care, and glycemic control controlling for covariates. Cronbach's α was 0.95 for the Revised Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. The majority of the sample was literacy, diabetes knowledge, medication adherence, and self-care, health literacy was only significantly associated with diabetes knowledge (β = 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.82). In the final adjusted model for independent factors associated with glycemic control, both diabetes knowledge (β = 0.12; 95% CI 0.01, 0.23) and perceived health status (β = 1.14; 95% CI 0.13, 2.16) were significantly associated with glycemic control, whereas health literacy was not associated with glycemic control (β = -0.03; 95% CI -0.19, 0.13). Diabetes knowledge and perceived health status are the most important factors associated with glycemic control in this population. Health literacy appears to exert its influence through diabetes knowledge and is not directly related to self-care or medication adherence.

  9. Associations Between Health Literacy, Diabetes Knowledge, Self-Care Behaviors, and Glycemic Control in a Low Income Population with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Sujeev S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study assessed associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care, and glycemic control in a low income, predominately minority population with type 2 diabetes. Methods One hundred twenty-five adults with diabetes were recruited from a primary care clinic. Subjects completed validated surveys to measure health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-care (medication adherence, diet, exercise, blood sugar testing, and foot care). Hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Spearman's correlation and multiple linear regression were used to assess the relationship among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care, and glycemic control controlling for covariates. Results Cronbach's α was 0.95 for the Revised Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. The majority of the sample was literacy, diabetes knowledge, medication adherence, and self-care, health literacy was only significantly associated with diabetes knowledge (β = 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.82). In the final adjusted model for independent factors associated with glycemic control, both diabetes knowledge (β = 0.12; 95% CI 0.01, 0.23) and perceived health status (β = 1.14; 95% CI 0.13, 2.16) were significantly associated with glycemic control, whereas health literacy was not associated with glycemic control (β = −0.03; 95% CI −0.19, 0.13). Conclusions Diabetes knowledge and perceived health status are the most important factors associated with glycemic control in this population. Health literacy appears to exert its influence through diabetes knowledge and is not directly related to self-care or medication adherence. PMID:21299402

  10. Bromocriptine mesylate: Food and Drug Administration approved new approach in therapy of non-insulin dependant diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keche, Yogendra

    2010-04-01

    Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved bromocriptine mesylate, a quick release formulation, 0.8 mg tablets, as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bromocriptine products were previously approved by the FDA for the treatment of pituitary tumors and Parkinson's disease. Bromocriptine is thought to act on circadian neuronal activities within the hypothalamus to reset abnormally elevated hypothalamic drive for increased plasma glucose, triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels in fasting and postprandial states in insulin-resistant patients. Adverse events most commonly reported in clinical trials of bromocriptine included nausea, fatigue, vomiting, headache, and dizziness. These events lasted a median of 14 days and were more likely to occur during initial titration of the drug. Due to novel mechanism of action, single daily dose, and lower incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction and vascular events, bromocriptine may act as landmark in treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  11. A Review of Closed-Loop Algorithms for Glycemic Control in the Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes

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    Joseph El Youssef

    2009-03-01

    intermittent blood glucose data. In addition, it is important to acknowledge that an “automated” closed loop pancreas cannot approach the complexity of the normal human endocrine pancreas, which takes continuous data from substrates, hormones, paracrine compounds and autonomic neural inputs, and in response, secretes four hormones. Another major issue is the substantial absorption/action delay of insulin given by the subcutaneous route. Because of this delay, some researchers have recently given a portion of the meal-related insulin in an open loop manner before the meal and found this hybrid approach to be superior to closed loop control. Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID systems adapted from the industrial sector utilize control algorithms that alter output based on proportional (difference between actual and target levels, derivative (rate of change and integral (time-related summative errors in glucose. These algorithms have proven to be very promising in limited clinical trials. Related algorithms include a “fading memory” system that combines the proportional-derivative components of a classic PID system with time-relating decay of input signals that allow greater emphasis on more recent glucose values, a characteristic noted in mammalian beta-cells. Model Predictive Control (MPC systems are highly adaptive methods that utilize mathematical models based on observations of biological behavior patterns using system identification and are now undergoing testing in humans. The application of further mathematical models, such as fuzzy control and artificial neural networks, are also promising, but are largely clinically untested. In summary, the prospects for closed loop control of glycemia in persons with diabetes have improved considerably. Major limitations include the delayed absorption/action of subcutaneous insulin and the imperfect stability of currently-available continuous glucose sensors. The potential for improved glycemic control in persons with

  12. Motor vehicle crashes in diabetic patients with tight glycemic control: a population-based case control analysis.

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    Donald A Redelmeier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complications from diabetes mellitus can compromise a driver's ability to safely operate a motor vehicle, yet little is known about whether euglycemia predicts normal driving risks among adults with diabetes. We studied the association between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and the risk of a motor vehicle crash using a population-based case control analysis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified consecutive drivers reported to vehicle licensing authorities between January 1, 2005 to January 1, 2007 who had a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and a HbA1c documented. The risk of a crash was calculated taking into account potential confounders including blood glucose monitoring, complications, and treatments. A total of 57 patients were involved in a crash and 738 were not involved in a crash. The mean HbA1c was lower for those in a crash than controls (7.4% versus 7.9%, unpaired t-test, p = 0.019, equal to a 26% increase in the relative risk of a crash for each 1% reduction in HbA1c (odds ratio = 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.54. The trend was evident across the range of HbA1c values and persisted after adjustment for measured confounders (odds ratio = 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.55. The two other significant risk factors for a crash were a history of severe hypoglycemia requiring outside assistance (odds ratio = 4.07, 95% confidence interval 2.35-7.04 and later age at diabetes diagnosis (odds ratio per decade = 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.57. CONCLUSIONS: In this selected population, tighter glycemic control, as measured by the HbA1c, is associated with an increased risk of a motor vehicle crash.

  13. Morus nigra leaf extract improves glycemic response and redox profile in the liver of diabetic rats.

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    Araujo, Carolina Morais; Lúcio, Karine de Pádua; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Isoldi, Mauro César; de Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Schulz, Richard; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia and alterations in the carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. DM is associated with increased oxidative stress and pancreatic beta cell damage, which impair the production of insulin and the maintenance of normoglycemia. Inhibiting oxidative damage and controlling hyperglycemia are two important strategies for the prevention of diabetes. The pulp and leaf extracts of mulberry (Morus nigra L.) have abundant total phenolics and flavonoids, and its antioxidant potential may be an important factor for modulating oxidative stress induced by diabetes. In this study, DM was induced by intraperitoneal injection of alloxan monohydrate (135 mg kg(-1)). Female Fischer rats were divided into four groups: control, diabetic, diabetic pulp, and diabetic leaf extract. Animals in the diabetic pulp and diabetic leaf extract groups were treated for 30 days with M. nigra L. pulp or leaf extracts, respectively. At the end of treatment, animals were euthanized and, liver and blood samples were collected for analysis of biochemical and metabolic parameters. Our study demonstrated that treatment of diabetic rats with leaf extracts decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase (CAT) ratio and carbonylated protein levels by reducing oxidative stress. Moreover, the leaf extract of M. nigra L. decreased the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity, increased insulinemia, and alleviated hyperglycemia-induced diabetes. In conclusion, our study found that the leaf extract of M. nigra L. improved oxidative stress and complications in diabetic rats, suggesting the utility of this herbal remedy in the prevention and treatment of DM.

  14. Emblica officinalis improves glycemic status and oxidative stress in STZ induced type 2 diabetic model rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aneesa Ansari; Md Shahed Zaman Shahriar; Md Mehedi Hassan; Shukla Rani Das; Begum Rokeya; Md Anwarul Haque; Md Enamul Haque; Nirupam Biswas; Tama Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of Emblica officinalis (E. officinalis) fruit on normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Methods: Type 2 diabetes was induced into the male Long-Evans rats. The rats were divided into nine groups including control groups receiving water, type 2 diabetic controls, type 2 diabetic rats treated with glibenclamide (T2GT) and type 2 diabetic rats treated with aqueous extract of fruit pulp of E. officinalis. They were fed orally for 8 weeks with a single feeding. Blood was collected by cutting the tail tip on 0 and 28 days and by decapitation on 56 day. Packed red blood cells and serum were used for evaluating different biochemical parameters. Results: Four weeks administration of aqueous extract of E. officinalis improved oral glucose tolerance in type 2 rats and after 8 weeks it caused significant (P<0.007) reduction in fasting serum glucose level compared to 0 day. Triglycerides decreased by 14% but there was no significant change in serum ALT, creatinine, cholesterol and insulin level in any group. Furthermore, reduced erythrocyte malondialdehyde level showed no significant change (P<0.07) but reduced glutathione content was found to be increased significantly (P<0.05).Conclusions:The aqueous extract of E. officinalis has a promising antidiabetic and antioxidant properties and may be considered for further clinical studies in drug development.

  15. Physical excercises on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus Ejercicios físicos sobre el control glucémico en la diabetes mellitus tipo 1

    OpenAIRE

    D. Lopes Souto; M. Paes de Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia, results from the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Diabetes management usually by insulin, dietary and physical activity. Aim: Assess the relationship between physical activity and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes subjects. Methods: The literature search conducted in Pubmed and ScienceDirect databases and was initially identified 24 articles and we applied the inclusion criteria that considered or...

  16. Effects of metformin on the glycemic control, lipid profile, and arterial blood pressure of type 2 diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome already on insulin

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    C.A. Mourão-Júnior

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-seven type 2 diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome and on insulin were assessed by a paired analysis before and 6 months after addition of metformin as combination therapy to evaluate the impact of the association on glycemic control, blood pressure, and lipid profile. This was a historical cohort study in which the files of type 2 diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome on insulin were reviewed. The body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, lipid profile, A1C level, fasting blood glucose level, daily dose of NPH insulin, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure were assessed in each patient before the start of metformin and 6 months after the initiation of combination therapy. Glycemic control significantly improved (P < 0.001 after the addition of metformin (1404.4 ± 565.5 mg/day, with 14% of the 57 patients reaching A1C levels up to 7%, and 53% reaching values up to 8%. There was a statistically significant reduction (P < 0.05 of total cholesterol (229.0 ± 29.5 to 214.2 ± 25.0 mg/dL, BMI (30.7 ± 5.4 to 29.0 ± 4.0 kg/m², waist circumference (124.6 ± 11.7 to 117.3 ± 9.3 cm, and daily necessity of insulin. The reduction of total cholesterol occurred independently of the reductions of A1C (9.65 ± 1.03 to 8.18 ± 1.01% and BMI and the reduction of BMI and WC did not interfere with the improvement of A1C. In conclusion, our study showed the efficacy of the administration of metformin and insulin simultaneously without negative effects. No changes were detected in HDL-cholesterol or blood pressure.

  17. THE EFFECT OF TELE-MONITORING ON EXERCISE TRAINING ADHERENCE, FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY, QUALITY OF LIFE AND GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES

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    Tracy Marios

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We used tele-monitoring to attempt to improve exercise adherence (number of hours of exercise completed, peak VO2, HbA1c% and quality of life in an unsupervised, home based exercise program in people with type II diabetes, a cost analysis was also conducted. Thirty-nine patients with type II diabetes were randomized to tele-monitoring (TELE or control (CON groups. All patients were asked to complete 6 months exercise training and complete an exercise activity diary. The TELE group was instructed to record their exercise heart rates using a monitor and received weekly telephone calls from an exercise physiologist. Six TELE patients and seven CON patients did not complete the 6 month testing. TELE patients completed a mean weekly volume of 138 minutes, moderate intensity exercise, while CON patients completed 58 minutes weekly (p < 0.02. Neither group achieved the American Heart Association statement guideline for weekly exercise volume of 150 minutes. TELE patients improved peak VO2 (5.5 %, but neither group improved HbA1c% or quality of life. The CON group showed a 4.9% reduction in peak VO2. While tele-monitored patients completed more hours of exercise and demonstrated improved peak VO2 compared to controls, the exercise volume completed was insufficient to improve glycemic control. There is the potential via tele-monitoring to enable people with diabetes to meet exercise training guidelines.

  18. The effect of a high-protein, low glycemic-load diet versus a conventional, high glycemic-load diet on biochemical parameters associated with acne vulgaris: a randomized, investigator-masked, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robyn N; Mann, Neil J; Braue, Anna; Mäkeläinen, Henna; Varigos, George A

    2007-08-01

    No previous study has sought to examine the influence of dietary composition on acne vulgaris. We sought to compare the effect of an experimental low glycemic-load diet with a conventional high glycemic-load diet on clinical and endocrine aspects of acne vulgaris. A total of 43 male patients with acne completed a 12-week, parallel, dietary intervention study with investigator-masked dermatology assessments. Primary outcomes measures were changes in lesion counts, sex hormone binding globulin, free androgen index, insulin-like growth factor-I, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. At 12 weeks, total lesion counts had decreased more in the experimental group (-21.9 [95% confidence interval, -26.8 to -19.0]) compared with the control group (-13.8 [-19.1 to -8.5], P = .01). The experimental diet also reduced weight (P = .001), reduced the free androgen index (P = .04), and increased insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (P = .001) when compared with a high glycemic-load diet. We could not preclude the role of weight loss in the overall treatment effect. This suggests nutrition-related lifestyle factors play a role in acne pathogenesis. However, these preliminary findings should be confirmed by similar studies.

  19. Health and economic impact of combining metformin with nateglinide to achieve glycemic control: Comparison of the lifetime costs of complications in the U.K

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    Salas Maribel

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce the likelihood of complications in persons with type 2 diabetes, it is critical to control hyperglycaemia. Monotherapy with metformin or insulin secretagogues may fail to sustain control after an initial reduction in glycemic levels. Thus, combining metformin with other agents is frequently necessary. These analyses model the potential long-term economic and health impact of using combination therapy to improve glycemic control. Methods An existing model that simulates the long-term course of type 2 diabetes in relation to glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c and post-prandial glucose (PPG was used to compare the combination of nateglinide with metformin to monotherapy with metformin. Complication rates were estimated for major diabetes-related complications (macrovascular and microvascular based on existing epidemiologic studies and clinical trial data. Utilities and costs were estimated using data collected in the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS. Survival, life years gained (LYG, quality-adjusted life years (QALY, complication rates and associated costs were estimated. Costs were discounted at 6% and benefits at 1.5% per year. Results Combination therapy was predicted to reduce complication rates and associated costs compared with metformin. Survival increased by 0.39 (0.32 discounted and QALY by 0.46 years (0.37 discounted implying costs of £6,772 per discounted LYG and £5,609 per discounted QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed the results to be consistent over broad ranges. Conclusion Although drug treatment costs are increased by combination therapy, this cost is expected to be partially offset by a reduction in the costs of treating long-term diabetes complications.

  20. Effect of scaling and root planing on serum interleukin-10 levels and glycemic control in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Anirudh Balakrishna Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Chronic periodontal disease (CPD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM share common pathogenic pathways involving the cytokine network resulting in increased susceptibility to both diseases, leading to increased inflammatory destruction, insulin resistance, and poor glycemic control. Periodontal treatment may improve glycemic control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP of T2DM patients with CPD on hyperglycemia and the levels of serum interleukin-10 (IL-10. Materials and Methods: Forty-five subjects were divided into three groups comprising 15 subjects each as Group 1 (healthy controls, Group 2 (CPD patients, and Group 3 (T2DM patients with CPD. Plaque index, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depths (PPD, clinical attachment loss (AL, bleeding on probing (BoP, random blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C, and serum IL-10 were measured at baseline; SRP was performed on Groups 2 and 3 and the selected parameters recorded again at 6 months. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05 differences were observed in the variables at baseline and 6 months after SRP between the three groups using one-way ANOVA. The paired samples t-test for PPD and AL in Group 3 was statistically significant. Group 3 revealed positive correlations between PPD and HbA1C, BoP and IL-10, respectively, at 6 months and a predictable association of HbA1C with PPD and GI, and IL-10 levels with BoP, respectively, at 6 months. Conclusion: Scaling and root planing is effective in reducing blood glucose levels in T2DM patient with pocket depths and effective in elevating systemic IL-10 levels in CPD patients and CPD patients with T2DM.

  1. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on clinical response and glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis: Controlled clinical trial

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    Ajitha Kanduluru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. Once periodontal disease is established, the chronic nature of this infection may contribute to worsening of diabetic status leading to more severe diabetes-related complications. It has been proposed that the relation of periodontitis and diabetes is bidirectional. Objectives: The objective was to compare the clinical response and glycemic control in type 2 DM patients with periodontitis, before and after the nonsurgical periodontal treatment with controls. Materials and Methods: A total 70 type 2 DM patients with chronic generalized moderate periodontitis was divided into 2 groups. Treatment group (35 received one stage full mouth scaling and root planning plus oral hygiene instructions; the control group (35 received only oral hygiene instructions. At baseline, 1 st month and 3 rd month, the clinical periodontal parameters (plaque index [PI], gingival index [GI], pocket depth [PD], clinical attachment loss [CAL], gingival recession [GR], and bleeding on probing [BOP] and glycemic parameters (fasting blood sugar [FBS], and postprandial blood sugar [PPBS] were recorded, whereas the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c was recorded only at baseline and 3rd month. The collected data were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: When comparing the mean scores of clinical parameters for both the groups, there was a significant difference in all clinical parameters, that is, mean PI, GI, BOP, PD, CAL scores except mean GR, whereas for the glycemic parameters, there was a significant difference in mean FBS; PPBS values and no significant difference in mean percentage of HbA1c for treatment group at 3 rd month follow-up. Conclusion: Findings of the present study showed that nonsurgical periodontal treatment resulted in lower glycemic levels and the reduction of clinical parameters of periodontal infection, confirming the

  2. Multinational study in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes: association of age, ketoacidosis, HLA status, and autoantibodies on residual beta-cell function and glycemic control 12 months after diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik B; Swift, Peter G F; Holl, Reinhard W;

    2010-01-01

    To identify predictors of residual beta-cell function and glycemic control during the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D).......To identify predictors of residual beta-cell function and glycemic control during the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D)....

  3. Implementation of a referral to discharge glycemic control initiative for reduction of surgical site infections in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura; Brown-Broderick, Jennifer; Hearn, James; Malcolm, Janine; Chan, James; Hicks-Boucher, Wendy; De Sousa, Filomena; Walker, Mark C; Gagné, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of surgical site infections before and after implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perioperative glycemic control initiative. As part of a CUSP (Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program) initiative, between January 5 and December 18, 2015, we implemented comprehensive, multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative to reduce SSI rates in patients undergoing major pelvic surgery for a gynecologic malignancy ('Group II'). Key components of this quality of care initiative included pre-operative HbA1c measurement with special triage for patients meeting criteria for diabetes or pre-diabetes, standardization of available intraoperative insulin choices, rigorous pre-op/intra-op/post-op glucose monitoring with control targets set to maintain BG ≤10mmol/L (180mg/dL) and communication/notification with primary care providers. Effectiveness was evaluated against a similar control group of patients ('Group I') undergoing surgery in 2014 prior to implementation of this initiative. We studied a total of 462 patients. Subjects in the screened (Group II) and comparison (Group I) groups were of similar age (avg. 61.0, 60.0years; p=0.422) and BMI (avg. 31.1, 32.3kg/m(2); p=0.257). Descriptive statistics served to compare surgical site infection (SSI) rates and other characteristics across groups. Women undergoing surgery prior to implementation of this algorithm (n=165) had an infection rate of 14.6%. Group II (n=297) showed an over 2-fold reduction in SSI compared to Group I [5.7%; p=0.001, adjRR: 0.45, 95% CI: (0.25, 0.81)]. Additionally, approximately 19% of Group II patients were newly diagnosed with either prediabetes (HbA1C 6.0-6.4) or diabetes (HbA1C≥6.5) and were referred to family or internal medicine for appropriate management. Implementation of a comprehensive multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative can lead to a significant reduction in surgical site infections in addition to early identification of an important health

  4. Impact of an education program on patient anxiety, depression, glycemic control, and adherence to self-care and medication in Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A Al Hayek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM requires continuous medical care, patients′ self-management, education, and adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risk of long-term complications. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of an education program on diabetes, patient self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, depression and glycemic control in type 2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study, conducted among 104 diabetic patients at a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between May 2011 and October 2012. Education materials given to diabetic patients included pamphlets/handouts written in Arabic, the national language. Special videotapes about DM were made and distributed to all participants. In addition, specific educational programs through the diabetes educators and one-on-one counseling sessions with the doctor were also arranged. Patients were interviewed using a structured interview schedule both during the baseline, and after 6 months of the program. The interview schedule included, socio-demographics, clinical characteristics, diabetes self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, and depression. Glycemic control was considered poor, if hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c was ≥ 7%. Results: The mean age of the study population was 57.3 ΁ 14.4 years. Seventy one were males (68.3% and 33 (31.7% were females. After six months of the diabetes education program, there were significant improvements in patients′ dietary plan (P = 0.0001, physical exercise (P = 0.0001, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG (P = 0.0001, HbA1c (P = 0.04, adherence to medication (P = 0.007, and depression (P = 0.03. Conclusions: Implementation of education programs on diabetes among type 2 diabetic patients is associated with better outcomes such as their dietary plan, physical exercise, SMBG, adherence to medication, HbA1c and depression.

  5. Relationships between obesity, glycemic control, and cardiovascular risk factors: a pooled analysis of cross-sectional data from Spanish patients with type 2 diabetes in the preinsulin stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Luis A; Rodríguez, Ángel; Salvador, Javier; Ascaso, Juan F; Petto, Helmut; Reviriego, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), but reports conflict regarding the association between obesity and macrovascular complications. In this study, we investigated associations between cardiovascular risk factors and body mass index (BMI) and glycemic control in non-insulin-treated patients with T2D. Authors gathered cross-sectional data from five observational studies performed in Spain. Generalized logit models were used to analyze the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors (independent variables) and 5 BMI strata (6.5-7%, >7-8%, >8-9%, >9%) (dependent outcomes). In total, data from 6442 patients were analyzed. Patients generally had mean values of investigated cardiovascular risk factors outside recommended thresholds. Younger patients had higher BMI, triglyceride levels and HbA1c than their older counterparts. Diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure and triglyceride levels were directly correlated with BMI strata, whereas an inverse correlation was observed between BMI strata and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, patient age, and duration of T2D. Increased duration of T2D and total cholesterol levels, and decreased HDL-C levels were associated with a higher HbA1c category. BMI and HbA1c levels were not associated with each other. As insulin-naïve patients with T2D became more obese, cardiovascular risk factors became more pronounced. Higher BMI was associated with younger age and shorter duration of T2D, consistent with the notion that obesity at an early age may be key to the current T2D epidemic. Glycemic control was independent of BMI but associated with abnormal lipid levels. Further efforts should be done to improve modifiable cardiovascular risk factors.

  6. Impact of an education program on patient anxiety, depression, glycemic control, and adherence to self-care and medication in Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hayek, Ayman A.; Robert, Asirvatham A.; Al Dawish, Mohamed A.; Zamzami, Marwan M.; Sam, Asirvatham E.; Alzaid, Aus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) requires continuous medical care, patients’ self-management, education, and adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risk of long-term complications. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of an education program on diabetes, patient self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, depression and glycemic control in type 2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study, conducted among 104 diabetic patients at a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between May 2011 and October 2012. Education materials given to diabetic patients included pamphlets/handouts written in Arabic, the national language. Special videotapes about DM were made and distributed to all participants. In addition, specific educational programs through the diabetes educators and one-on-one counseling sessions with the doctor were also arranged. Patients were interviewed using a structured interview schedule both during the baseline, and after 6 months of the program. The interview schedule included, socio-demographics, clinical characteristics, diabetes self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, and depression. Glycemic control was considered poor, if hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was ≥ 7%. Results: The mean age of the study population was 57.3 ± 14.4 years. Seventy one were males (68.3%) and 33 (31.7%) were females. After six months of the diabetes education program, there were significant improvements in patients’ dietary plan (P = 0.0001), physical exercise (P = 0.0001), self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) (P = 0.0001), HbA1c (P = 0.04), adherence to medication (P = 0.007), and depression (P = 0.03). Conclusions: Implementation of education programs on diabetes among type 2 diabetic patients is associated with better outcomes such as their dietary plan, physical exercise, SMBG, adherence to medication, HbA1c and depression. PMID:23983558

  7. Association between glycemic control and morning blood surge with vascular endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Kumari Nuthalapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Morning blood pressure surge (MBPS is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the association between glycemic control and MBPS, and its effect on vascular injury in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The current study examined the association between glycemic control and MBPS and the involvement of MBPS in the development of vascular dysfunction in T2DM patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-two consecutive T2DM outpatients from the Department of Cardiology and Endocrinology were enrolled in this study. We did MBPS in T2DM patients, 85 (male (69.7% patients and 37 (female patients (30.3%; mean age 60.1 ± 9.39; (n = 122 using 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and assessed vascular function by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD. Results: The correlation between MBPS and various clinical variables were examined by single regression analysis in all subjects. MBPS showed significant and positive correlation with pulse rate (P = 0.01, fasting blood sugar (P = 0.002, and postprandial blood sugar (P = 0.05. To further confirm the association of insulin resistance (IR with MBPS in T2DM patients, we examined the correlation between homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR, an established marker of IR and MBPS in diabetic (DM patients who were not taking insulin no significant association with MBPS in T2DM patients (P = 0.41, angiotensin-converting enzyme/angiotensin receptor blocker (P = 0.07. We examined the relationship between MBPS and vascular injury by measuring endothelium-dependent FMD and endothelium-independent NMD in T2DM patients. Among the various traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis such as DM duration (P = 0.04, platelet reactivity (P = 0.04 and morning surge (P = 0.002 emerged as significant factors. HOMA-IR was a negative correlation with FMD. Conclusions: The current study demonstrated that

  8. Hemoglobin A(1c) and fructosamine for assessing glycemic control in diabetic patients with CKD stages 3 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Harn-Shen; Wu, Tzu-En; Lin, Hong-Da; Jap, Tjin-Shing; Hsiao, Li-Chuan; Lee, Shen-Hung; Lin, Shu-Hsia

    2010-05-01

    Hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) and fructosamine can be used to monitor glycemic control in diabetic patients with normal kidney function, but their validity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been evaluated. In this study, we evaluated the correlation and accuracy of these 2 measures of glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients with CKD stages 3-4. Diagnostic test study. Type 2 diabetic patients with normal (n = 30) and abnormal kidney function (n = 30) were recruited in Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. HbA(1c) and fructosamine. Self-monitoring of blood glucose levels. Blood glucose measurements consisted of 6 preprandial, 6 postprandial, and 2 bedtime assessments in a week with a cycle of 4-week intervals for 12 weeks. Correlation coefficients between HbA(1c) level or fructosamine-albumin ratio and mean blood glucose levels were 0.836 and 0.645 in participants with normal kidney function and 0.813 and 0.649 in participants with CKD stages 3-4, respectively. In patients with CKD stages 3-4, mean blood glucose levels in weeks 1-12 were 21.9 mg/dL (95% CI, 11.6-32.5) higher than estimated average glucose (eAG) levels calculated from HbA(1c) levels in participants with normal kidney function. In patients with CKD stages 3-4, mean blood glucose levels in weeks 10-12 were 15.5 mg/dL (95% CI, 5.2-30.5) higher than eAG levels calculated from fructosamine levels in participants with normal kidney function, but without statistical significance when eAG calculated from fructosamine level was corrected for serum albumin level (difference of 5.6 mg/dL; 95% CI, -8.6 to 19.8). Relatively small number of participants with limited amount of blood glucose measurement data. Our data show that eAG calculated from HbA(1c) and fructosamine levels might underestimate mean blood glucose levels in patients with CKD stages 3-4. References ranges may need to be modified when interpreting results of measurements of glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients with

  9. Poor glycemic control impacts linear and non-linear dynamics of heart rate in DM type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Bassi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: It is well known that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM produces cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, which may affect the cardiac autonomic modulation. However, it is unclear whether the lack of glycemic control in T2DM without CAN could impact negatively on cardiac autonomic modulation. Objective: To evaluate the relationship between glycemic control and cardiac autonomic modulation in individuals with T2DM without CAN. Descriptive, prospective and cross sectional study.METHODS: Forty-nine patients with T2DM (51±7 years were divided into two groups according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c: G1≤7% and G2>7.0%. Resting heart rate (HR and RR interval (RRi were obtained and calculated by linear (Mean iRR; Mean HR; rMSSD; STD RR; LF; HF; LF/HF, TINN and RR Tri, and non-linear (SD1; SD2; DFα1; DFα2, Shannon entropy; ApEn; SampEn and CD methods of heart rate variability (HRV. Insulin, HOMA-IR, fasting glucose and HbA1c were obtained by blood tests.RESULTS: G2 (HbA1c≤7% showed lower values for the mean of iRR; STD RR; RR Tri, TINN, SD2, CD and higher mean HR when compared with G1 (HbA1c > 7%. Additionally, HbA1c correlated negatively with mean RRi (r=0.28, p=0.044; STD RR (r=0.33, p=0.017; RR Tri (r=-0.35, p=0.013, SD2 (r=-0.39, p=0.004 and positively with mean HR (r=0.28, p=0.045. Finally, fasting glucose correlated negatively with STD RR (r=-0.36, p=0.010; RR Tri (r=-0.36, p=0.010; TINN (r=-0.33, p=0.019 and SD2 (r=-0.42, p=0.002.CONCLUSION: We concluded that poor glycemic control is related to cardiac autonomic modulation indices in individuals with T2DM even if they do not present cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

  10. Walking behaviour and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: seasonal and gender differences-Study design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strachan Ian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high glucose levels typically occurring among adults with type 2 diabetes contribute to blood vessel injury and complications such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, and stroke. Higher physical activity levels are associated with improved glycemic control, as measured by hemoglobin A1C. A 1% absolute increase in A1C is associated with an 18% increased risk for heart disease or stroke. Among Canadians with type 2 diabetes, we postulate that declines in walking associated with colder temperatures and inclement weather may contribute to annual post-winter increases in A1C levels. Methods During this prospective cohort study being conducted in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 100 men and 100 women with type 2 diabetes will undergo four assessments (once per season over a one-year period of observation. These assessments include (1 use of a pedometer with a concealed viewing window for a two-week period to measure walking (2 a study centre visit during which venous blood is sampled for A1C, anthropometrics are assessed, and questionnaires are completed for measurement of other factors that may influence walking and/or A1C (e.g. food frequency, depressive symptomology, medications. The relationship between spring-fall A1C difference and winter-summer difference in steps/day will be examined through multivariate linear regression models adjusted for possible confounding. Interpretation of findings by researchers in conjunction with potential knowledge "users" (e.g. health professionals, patient groups will guide knowledge translation efforts. Discussion Although we cannot alter weather patterns to favour active lifestyles, we can design treatment strategies that take seasonal and weather-related variations into account. For example, demonstration of seasonal variation of A1C levels among Canadian men and women with T2D and greater understanding of its determinants could lead to (1 targeting physical activity levels to remain

  11. Optimizing glycemic control and minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley S Schwartz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications arise from hyperglycemia, presenting an increasing healthcare burden as the diabetic population continues to grow. Clinical trial evidence indicates that antihyperglycemic medications are beneficial with regard to microvascular disease (retinopathy, renal impairment, and perhaps neuropathy; however, the benefit of aggressive use of these medications with regard to cardiovascular risk has been less clear in recent studies. These studies were confounded by the propensity of the antihyperglycemic medications involved to cause hypoglycemia, which itself presents cardiovascular risk. This article presents additional context for these seemingly discordant results and maintains that the achievement of glycemic targets is warranted in most patients and provides cardiovascular benefit, provided that hypoglycemia is avoided and the treatment regimen is tailored to the needs of the individual patient. A treatment approach that is driven by these principles and emphasizes diet and exercise, a combination of noninsulin antidiabetic agents, not including sulfonylureas and glinides, and judicious use of insulin is also presented.

  12. Multiple indicators of poor diet quality in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes are associated with higher body mass index percentile but not glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansel, Tonja R; Haynie, Denise L; Lipsky, Leah M; Laffel, Lori M B; Mehta, Sanjeev N

    2012-11-01

    Diet is a cornerstone of type 1 diabetes treatment, and poor diet quality may affect glycemic control and other health outcomes. Yet diet quality in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes remains understudied. To evaluate multiple indicators of diet quality in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their associations with hemoglobin A1c and body mass index percentile. In this cross-sectional study, participants completed 3-day diet records, and data were abstracted from participants' medical records. Diet quality indicators included servings of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains; Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) score; Nutrient Rich Foods 9.3 score (NRF 9.3); and glycemic index. Children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes ≥ 1 year, aged 8 to 18 years, were recruited at routine clinic visits. Of 291 families enrolled, 252 provided diet data. Associations of diet quality indicators to HbA1c and body mass index percentile were examined using analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression. Participants demonstrated low adherence to dietary guidelines; mean HEI-2005 score was 53.4 ± 11.0 (range = 26.7 to 81.2). Intake of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains was less than half the recommended amount. Almost half of the participants' daily energy intake was derived from refined-grain products, desserts, chips, and sweetened beverages. Higher fruit (P = 0.04) and whole-grain (P = 0.03) intake were associated with lower HbA1c in unadjusted, but not adjusted analyses; vegetable intake, HEI-2005 score, NRF 9.3 score, and glycemic index were not associated with HbA1c. Higher fruit (P = 0.01) and whole-grain (P = 0.04) intake and NRF 9.3 score (P = 0.02), but not other diet quality indicators, were associated with lower body mass index percentile in adjusted analyses. Data demonstrate poor diet quality in youth with type 1 diabetes and provide support for the importance of diet quality for weight management. Future research on determinants of

  13. Attitude, complications, ability of fasting and glycemic control in fasting Ramadan by children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Al Qahtani, Nabras; Akle, Mariette; Singh, Himanshi; Assadi, Rifah; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Hussain, Tara; Naglekerke, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Sick individuals and children are exempted from fasting Ramadan. Fasting by type 1 diabetes patients might predispose to acute complications. There are no guidelines on fasting safety or its impact on diabetes control in children and adolescents. We aim to assess patients' attitude towards fasting, frequency of complications and impact on glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. 65 children with type 1 diabetes were enrolled. The study involved 2 hospital visits. Questionnaires were filled in each visit and HbA1c was recorded. Log books indicating symptomatic hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia leading to breaking fast were obtained. Majority of subjects were willing to fast and 75% were encouraged by parents to do. 57% and 26% fasted more than half and all through the month respectively. 52% had, at least, one episode of hypoglycemia and 29% had hyperglycemia with one episode of ketoacidosis. All patients broke fast in response to symptomatic hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia. There was no significant difference between the frequency of complications in the pump or the Multiple Daily Injection (MDI) groups. Mean HbA1c increased from 70mmol/mol to 73mmol/mol. The difference was not statistically significant. Children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes are keen to fast Ramadan and they are able to fast a significant number of days. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are not uncommon with no difference between Pump or in MDI users. Breaking fast on occurrence of complications makes fasting safe. Glycemic control might deteriorate during the month and the following Eid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of depression in consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of 5-year duration and its impact on glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Susan Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type 2 diabetes mellitus doubles the odds of suffering from depressive illness. Co-morbid depression is associated with poorer outcomes in diabetes mellitus in terms of glycemic control, medication adherence, quality of life, physical activity, and blood pressure control. Aim: The present study aims to estimate the prevalence of depression among a consecutive group of patients with type 2 diabetes and assess its impact on glycemic and blood pressure control. Setting: Outpatient department of the endocrinology department of a university affiliated teaching hospital in north India. Subjects: Consecutive adult patients (18-65 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus of over 5-year duration with no prior history of psychiatric illnesses or intake of anti-depressants. Materials and Methods: A semi-structured questionnaire was used for demographic data, HbA1c was obtained to assess glycemic control, and blood pressure was recorded twice during patient interview to assess blood pressure control. Depression was assessed with the Major Depression Inventory and scores obtained were classified as consistent with mild, moderate and severe depression. Data was analyzed with SPSS v16, and multiple logistical regression test was done to compare the effect of depression on glycemic control after adjusting for age and sex. Results: Of the 80 patients interviewed, 31 (38.8% had depressive symptoms. Among them 20 (25% had mild depression, 10 (12.5% had moderate depression, and 1 (1.3% had severe depression. Conclusions: Over one third of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of over 5-year duration had depressive symptoms. The presence of depressive symptoms was associated with a significant worsening of glycemic control.

  15. Efficacy of pioglitazone on glycemic control and carotid intima-media thickness in type 2 diabetes patients with inadequate insulin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Eisuke; Takeno, Kageumi; Funayama, Hideaki; Tomioka, Setsuko; Tamaki, Motoyuki; Fujitani, Yoshio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka; Hirose, Takahisa

    2011-01-24

    Aims/Introduction:  The present study was designed to determine the effects of pioglitazone on glycemic control and atherosclerosis in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy.   The study was a prospective, randomized controlled trial involving 48 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes treated with insulin. We assigned patients to oral pioglitazone titrated from 15-30 mg (n = 22) or no pioglitazone (n = 26), to be taken in addition to their glucose-lowering drugs and other medications. Daily insulin doses and numbers were recorded during the study period.   The adjusted mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values decreased significantly by 1.13 ± 1.50% and 0.55 ± 0.76% in the pioglitazone and control groups, respectively. Significant decrease of HbA1c level was observed in the pioglitazone group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The insulin dose lowered by 0.04 ± 0.10 units/kg/day in the pioglitazone group and increased by 0.03 ± 0.10 units/kg/day in the control group (P < 0.05). The number of insulin injections decreased by 0.1 ± 0.6 times/day in the pioglitazone group and increased by 0.2 ± 0.4 times/day in the control group (P < 0.05). The carotid intima-media thickness estimated by B-mode echography was carried out in both groups and decreased significantly at the end-point only in the pioglitazone group, relative to the baseline.   These findings show that pioglitazone is useful in improving glycemic control and preventing the progression of atherosclerosis in poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics on insulin therapy. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.2010.00064.x, 2010).

  16. Associations between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and glycemic control in a large cohort of adolescents with type 1 diabetes : the Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aman, J.; Skinner, T. C.; de Beaufort, C. E.; Swift, P. G. F.; Aanstoot, H-J; Cameron, F.

    2009-01-01

    angstrom man J, Skinner TC, de Beaufort CE, Swift PGF, Aanstoot H-J, Cameron F, for and on behalf of the Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes. Associations between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and glycemic control in a large cohort of adolescents with type 1 diabetes: the Hvidoere St

  17. Effect of metformin added to insulin on glycemic control among overweight/obese adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies assessing the effect of metformin on glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes have produced inconclusive results. To assess the efficacy and safety of metformin as an adjunct to insulin in treating overweight adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Multicenter (26 pediatric en...

  18. Risk factors for childhood overweight in offspring of type 1 diabetic women with adequate glycemic control during pregnancy: Nationwide follow-up study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rijpert; I.M. Evers; M.A.M.J. de Vroede; H.W. de Valk; C.J. Heijnen; G.H.A. Visser

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Pregnancy in type 1 diabetic women remains a high-risk situation for both mother and child. In this study, we investigated long-term effects on body composition, prevalence of overweight, and insulin resistance in children of type 1 diabetic women who had had adequate glycemic control du

  19. Long-term glycemic control as a result of initial education for children with new onset type 1 diabetes: does the setting matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Susanne M; Srivastava, Nayan T; Behzadi, Jennifer M; Pottorff, Tina M; Dimeglio, Linda A; Walvoord, Emily C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of initial diabetes education delivery at an academic medical center (AMC) versus non-AMCs on long-term glycemic control. We performed a retrospective study of children with type 1 diabetes referred to an AMC after being educated at non-AMCs. These children were matched to a group of children diagnosed and educated as inpatients at an AMC. The A1C levels at 2, 3, and 5 years from diagnosis were compared between the 2 groups of children. Records were identified from 138 children. Glycemic control was comparable in the non-AMC-educated versus AMC-educated patients at 2, 3, and 5 years from diagnosis. The A1C was also highly consistent in each patient over time. Long-term glycemic control was independent of whether initial education was delivered at an AMC or non-AMC. Formal education and location at time of diagnosis do not appear to play a significant role in long-term glycemic control. Novel educational constructs, focusing on developmental stages of childhood and reeducation over time, are likely more important than education at time of diagnosis.

  20. Interaction of maternal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 Pro12Ala polymorphism with fetal sex affects maternal glycemic control during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocher, Berthold; Schlemm, Ludwig; Haumann, Hannah; Poralla, Christine; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jian; Guthmann, Florian; Bamberg, Christian; Kalache, Karim D; Pfab, Thiemo

    2010-02-01

    It was suggested that fetal sex may substantially affect maternal glycemic control during pregnancy in genetically susceptible mothers. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 (PPARgamma2) Pro12Ala polymorphism is known to affect glycemic control and may act in a sex-specific manner. This polymorphism is thus an attractive candidate to test this hypothesis using a second independent functionally relevant polymorphism. We analyzed the impact of fetal sex on maternal glycemic control during pregnancy in relation to the maternal PPARgamma2 Pro12Ala polymorphism. Two-thousand fourteen Caucasian women without preexisting diabetes and preexisting hypertension with singleton pregnancies delivering consecutively at the Charité obstetrics department were genotyped. Glycemic control was analyzed by measuring total glycated hemoglobin at birth. Correction for confounding factors and multiple testing was considered in the analysis. The maternal PPARgamma2 Pro12Ala polymorphism without consideration of fetal sex had no effect on blood pressure, new onset of proteinuria and total glycated hemoglobin at delivery. Mothers carrying both G alleles (GG genotype) delivering a girl had a higher (P = 0.015) total glycated hemoglobin (6.81 or - 0.50%) versus mothers carrying the same alleles but delivering boys (5.85 + or - 0.58%). Comparing mothers with the GG genotype delivering girls with mothers with CC or CG genotypes also delivering girls (6.32 + or - 0.72%) revealed a significantly higher maternal total glycated hemoglobin at delivery in the former group (P Pro12Ala polymorphism.

  1. Treatment with the human once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 analog taspoglutide in combination with metformin improves glycemic control and lowers body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin alone: a double-blind placebo-controlled study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nauck, Michael A; Ratner, Robert E; Kapitza, Christoph; Berria, Rachele; Boldrin, Mark; Balena, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of taspoglutide (R1583/BIM51077), a human once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin. Type 2 diabetic (n = 306...

  2. The Diabetes Telemonitoring Study Extension: an exploratory randomized comparison of alternative interventions to maintain glycemic control after withdrawal of diabetes home telemonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Roslyn A; Sevick, Mary Ann; Rao, R Harsha; Macpherson, David S; Cheng, Chunrong; Kim, Sunghee; Hough, Linda J; DeRubertis, Frederick R

    2012-01-01

    Telemonitoring interventions featuring transmission of home glucose records to healthcare providers have resulted in improved glycemic control in patients with diabetes. No research has addressed the intensity or duration of telemonitoring required to sustain such improvements. The DiaTel study (10 January 2005 to 1 November 2007) compared active care management (ACM) with home telemonitoring (n=73) to monthly care coordination (CC) telephone calls (n=77) among veterans with diabetes and suboptimal glycemic control. The purpose of the DiaTel Extension was to assess whether initial improvements could be sustained with interventions of the same or lower intensity among participants who re-enrolled in a 6-month extension of DiaTel. DiaTel participants receiving ACM were re-assigned randomly to monthly CC calls with continued telemonitoring but no active medication management (ACM-to-CCHT, n=23) or monthly CC telephone calls (ACM-to-CC, n=21). DiaTel participants receiving CC were re-assigned randomly to continued CC (CC-to-CC, n=28) or usual care (UC, ie, CC-to-UC, n=29). Hemaglobin A1c (HbA1c) was assessed at 3 and 6 months following re-randomization. Marked HbA1c improvements observed in DiaTel ACM participants were sustained 6 months after re-randomization in both ACM-to-CCHT and ACM-to-CC groups. Lesser HbA1c improvements observed in DiaTel CC participants were sustained in both CC-to-CC and CC-to-UC groups. No benefit was apparent for continued transmission of glucose data among DiaTel ACM participants or continued monthly telephone calls among DiaTel CC participants 6 months after re-randomization. Significant improvements in HbA1c achieved using home telemonitoring and active medication management for 6 months were sustained 6 months later with interventions of decreased intensity in VA Health System-qualified veterans. CLINICAL TRIAL REG. NO: NCT00245882, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  3. Trajectories in glycemic control over time are associated with cognitive performance in elderly subjects with type 2 diabetes.

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    Ramit Ravona-Springer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the relationships of long-term trajectories of glycemic control with cognitive performance in cognitively normal elderly with type 2 diabetes (T2D. METHODS: Subjects (n = 835 pertain to a diabetes registry (DR established in 1998 with an average of 18 HbA1c measurements per subject, permitting identification of distinctive trajectory groups of HbA1c and examining their association with cognitive function in five domains: episodic memory, semantic categorization, attention/working memory, executive function, and overall cognition. Analyses of covariance compared cognitive function among the trajectory groups adjusting for sociodemographic, cardiovascular, diabetes-related covariates and depression. RESULTS: Subjects averaged 72.8 years of age. Six trajectories of HbA1c were identified, characterized by HbA1c level at entry into the DR (Higher/Lower, and trend over time (Stable/Decreasing/Increasing. Both groups with a trajectory of decreasing HbA1c levels had high HbA1c levels at entry into the DR (9.2%, 10.7%, and high, though decreasing, HbA1c levels over time. They had the worst cognitive performance, particularly in overall cognition (p<0.02 and semantic categorization (p<0.01, followed by that of subjects whose HbA1c at entry into the DR was relatively high (7.2%, 7.8% and increased over time. Subjects with stable HbA1c over time had the lowest HbA1c levels at entry (6.0%, 6.8% and performed best in cognitive tests. CONCLUSION: Glycemic control trajectories, which better reflect chronicity of T2D than a single HbA1c measurement, predict cognitive performance. A trajectory of stable HbA1c levels over time is associated with better cognitive function.

  4. Zinc transporter gene expression and glycemic control in post-menopausal women with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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    Foster, Meika; Chu, Anna; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2014-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated often with underlying zinc deficiency and nutritional supplements such as zinc may be of therapeutic benefit in the disease. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial in postmenopausal women (n=48) with Type 2 DM we investigated the effects of supplementation with zinc (40mg/d) and flaxseed oil (FSO; 2g/d) on the gene expression of zinc transporters (ZnT1, ZnT5, ZnT6, ZnT7, ZnT8, Zip1, Zip3, Zip7, and Zip10) and metallothionein (MT-1A, and MT-2A), and markers of glycemic control (glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c]). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. No significant effects of zinc or FSO supplementation were observed on glycemic marker concentrations, HOMA-IR or fold change over 12 weeks in zinc transporter and metallothionein gene expression. In multivariate analysis, the change over 12 weeks in serum glucose concentrations (P=0.001) and HOMA-IR (P=0.001) predicted the fold change in Zip10. In secondary analysis, marginal statistical significance was observed with the change in both serum glucose concentrations (P=0.003) and HOMA-IR (P=0.007) being predictive of the fold change in ZnT6. ZnT8 mRNA expression was variable; HbA1c levels were higher (P=0.006) in participants who exhibited ZnT8 expression compared to those who did not. The significant predictive relationships between Zip10, ZnT6, serum glucose and HOMA-IR are preliminary, as is the relationship between HbA1c and ZnT8; nevertheless the observations support an association between Type 2 DM and zinc homeostasis that requires further exploration.

  5. Long-term efficacy of insulin pump therapy on glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

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    Orr, Christine J; Hopman, Wilma; Yen, Joy L; Houlden, Robyn L

    2015-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is an effective method of intensive therapy for patients with type 1 diabetes; however, most studies have not examined long-term glycemic control. We evaluated the long-term efficacy of CSII in a cohort of adult patients with type 1 diabetes. This was a retrospective observational study of 200 patients with type 1 diabetes who initiated CSII at a single outpatient clinic in Kingston, ON, Canada between January 1998 and December 2012. Data were collected from 3 months prior to and up to 15 years after initiation of CSII and included glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level and demographic factors potentially associated with glycemic control. Mean age and duration of diabetes at CSII initiation were 35.4 years and 22.4 years, respectively. Mean duration of CSII at the time of analysis was 6 years. Mean HbA1c at initiation of CSII was 8.7% and decreased to a nadir of 7.5% 6 months post-initiation (SD = 1.0) (P diabetes prior to CSII initiation, history of missed appointments, mental illness, and active smoking were predictors of higher HbA1c on CSII. Pre-CSII HbA1c predicted long-term HbA1c on CSII. The data demonstrate that in a clinic setting, patients on CSII maintain lower HbA1c values over a 1-10-year period compared with pre-CSII values. Poor pre-CSII HbA1c, history of missed appointments, mental illness, and active smoking are predictors of those less likely to achieve an HbA1c target of ≤ 7.0%.

  6. Effect of adding the novel fiber, PGX®, to commonly consumed foods on glycemic response, glycemic index and GRIP: a simple and effective strategy for reducing post prandial blood glucose levels - a randomized, controlled trial

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    Lyon Michael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reductions in postprandial glycemia have been demonstrated previously with the addition of the novel viscous polysaccharide (NVP, PolyGlycopleX® (PGX®, to an OGTT or white bread. This study explores whether these reductions are sustained when NVP is added to a range of commonly consumed foods or incorporated into a breakfast cereal. Methods Ten healthy subjects (4M, 6F; age 37.3 ± 3.6 y; BMI 23.8 ± 1.3 kg/m2, participated in an acute, randomized controlled trial. The glycemic response to cornflakes, rice, yogurt, and a frozen dinner with and without 5 g of NVP sprinkled onto the food was determined. In addition, 3 granolas with different levels of NVP and 3 control white breads and one white bread and milk were also consumed. All meals contained 50 g of available carbohydrate. Capillary blood samples were taken fasting and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the start of the meal. The glycemic index (GI and the glycemic reduction index potential (GRIP were calculated. The blood glucose concentrations at each time and the iAUC values were subjected to repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA examining for the effect of test meal. After demonstration of significant heterogeneity, differences between individual means was assessed using GLM ANOVA with Tukey test to adjust for multiple comparisons. Results Addition of NVP reduced blood glucose response irrespective of food or dose (p Conclusion Sprinkling or incorporation of NVP into a variety of different foods is highly effective in reducing postprandial glycemia and lowering the GI of a food. Clinical Trial registration NCT00935350.

  7. Efficacy of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogue, on body weight, eating behavior, and glycemic control, in Japanese obese type 2 diabetes

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    Fujishima Yuya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently reported that short-term treatment with liraglutide (20.0 ± 6.4 days reduced body weight and improved some scales of eating behavior in Japanese type 2 diabetes inpatients. However, it remained uncertain whether such liraglutide-induced improvement is maintained after discharge from the hospital. The aim of the present study was to determine the long-term effects of liraglutide on body weight, glycemic control, and eating behavior in Japanese obese type 2 diabetics. Methods Patients with obesity (body mass index (BMI >25 kg/m2 and type 2 diabetes were hospitalized at Osaka University Hospital between November 2010 and December 2011. BMI and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were examined on admission, at discharge and at 1, 3, and 6 months after discharge. For the liraglutide group (BMI; 31.3 ± 5.3 kg/m2, n = 29, patients were introduced to liraglutide after correction of hyperglycemic by insulin or oral glucose-lowering drugs and maintained on liraglutide after discharge. Eating behavior was assessed in patients treated with liraglutide using The Guideline For Obesity questionnaire issued by the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity, at admission, discharge, 3 and 6 months after discharge. For the insulin group (BMI; 29.1 ± 3.0 kg/m2, n = 28, each patient was treated with insulin during hospitalization and glycemic control maintained by insulin after discharge. Results Liraglutide induced significant and persistent weight loss from admission up to 6 months after discharge, while no change in body weight after discharge was noted in the insulin group. Liraglutide produced significant improvements in all major scores of eating behavior questionnaire items and such effect was maintained at 6 months after discharge. Weight loss correlated significantly with the decrease in scores for recognition of weight and constitution, sense of hunger, and eating style. Conclusion Liraglutide

  8. Virgin coconut oil maintains redox status and improves glycemic conditions in high fructose fed rats.

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    Narayanankutty, Arunaksharan; Mukesh, Reshma K; Ayoob, Shabna K; Ramavarma, Smitha K; Suseela, Indu M; Manalil, Jeksy J; Kuzhivelil, Balu T; Raghavamenon, Achuthan C

    2016-01-01

    Virgin Coconut Oil (VCO), extracted from fresh coconut kernel possess similar fatty acid composition to that of Copra Oil (CO), a product of dried kernel. Although CO forms the predominant dietary constituent in south India, VCO is being promoted for healthy life due to its constituent antioxidant molecules. High fructose containing CO is an established model for insulin resistance and steatohepatitis in rodents. In this study, replacement of CO with VCO in high fructose diet markedly improved the glucose metabolism and dyslipidemia. The animals fed VCO diet had only 17 % increase in blood glucose level compared to CO fed animals (46 %). Increased level of GSH and antioxidant enzyme activities in VCO fed rats indicate improved hepatic redox status. Reduced lipid peroxidation and carbonyl adducts in VCO fed rats well corroborate with the histopathological findings that hepatic damage and steatosis were comparatively reduced than the CO fed animals. These results suggest that VCO could be an efficient nutraceutical in preventing the development of diet induced insulin resistance and associated complications possibly through its antioxidant efficacy.

  9. OPTIMIZING LIFESTYLE IMPROVES GLYCEMIC PROFILE IN PATIENTS AT RISK FOR DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Rucsandra Dănciulescu Miulescu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a pandemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus due to urban and sedentary lifestyle, ageing and obesity.The most important means to prevent this disease is to optimize the lifestyle.Our study aimed to follow-up the effect of moderate caloric restriction and increase of physical activityon clinical and metabolic parameters in persons at risk to develop type 2 diabetes.Twenty-three overweight or obese patients with either altered fasting glucose or altered glucosetolerance were included in this study. They were followed up for 2 years for clinical progress and metabolicprofile, while on lifestyle counseling.The dietary and physical recommendations to improve lifestyle were followed by a small reduction inthe BMI, total cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, together with an increase of HDL at 1 and 2years of dietary counseling. However there was a significant reduction in abdominal circumference, fastingglycemia and glycemia at 2 hours during oral glucose tolerance test.The small reduction in BMI indicates the need of a more intensive lifestyle conseling.

  10. ROLE OF COUNSELING ON MEDICAL ADHERENCE AND GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Anoop Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes Mellitus (DM refers to a group of common metabolic disorders that share the phenotype of hyperglycemia. It is the leading cause of of end stage renal disease, non-traumatic limb amputation and adult blindness. The studies have shown that complications of DM can be prevented by the proper control of blood glucose, which is dependent on the patient’s adherence to medication, life style modification, frequent monitoring of blood glucose etc. and can be influenced by proper education and counseling of the patient. The patients with DM should receive education about exercise, care of DM during illness and medications to lower plasma glucose1 . This study aims to assess the impact of patients counseling on the medication adherence in type 2DM. METHOD: This is a prospective randomized study that includes 100 patients with type 2 DM in the out-patient department of internal medicine in a tertiary care teaching hospital, north Kerala. After getting informed consent, they were kept in two groups by simple randomization technique and were assessed and followed at 4 weeks interval. Data related to the medication adherence was collected using Morisky Medication Adherence Scale questionnaire (MMAS-8. RESULTS: Out of 100 patients 33% were male and 67% female. Both baseline and 1st follow up showed a low adherence value (<6 both in control and intervention group. In the second follow up most of the patients in intervention group showed a moderate adherence (6-8, whereas control group did not show any improvement. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that there is a stastically significant improvement in the adherence level after patient counseling and education. Knowledge about the disease and treatment has improved the patient’s adherence to medication.

  11. A pilot study to determine the short-term effects of a low glycemic load diet on hormonal markers of acne: a nonrandomized, parallel, controlled feeding trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robyn; Mann, Neil; Mäkeläinen, Henna; Roper, Jessica; Braue, Anna; Varigos, George

    2008-06-01

    Observational evidence suggests that dietary glycemic load may be one environmental factor contributing to the variation in acne prevalence worldwide. To investigate the effect of a low glycemic load (LGL) diet on endocrine aspects of acne vulgaris, 12 male acne sufferers (17.0 +/- 0.4 years) completed a parallel, controlled feeding trial involving a 7-day admission to a housing facility. Subjects consumed either an LGL diet (n = 7; 25% energy from protein and 45% from carbohydrates) or a high glycemic load (HGL) diet (n = 5; 15% energy from protein, 55% energy from carbohydrate). Study outcomes included changes in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index (FAI), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and its binding proteins (IGFBP-I and IGFBP-3). Changes in HOMA-IR were significantly different between groups at day 7 (-0.57 for LGL vs. 0.14 for HGL, p = 0.03). SHBG levels decreased significantly from baseline in the HGL group (p = 0.03), while IGFBP-I and IGFBP-3 significantly increased (p = 0.03 and 0.03, respectively) in the LGL group. These results suggest that increases in dietary glycemic load may augment the biological activity of sex hormones and IGF-I, suggesting that these diets may aggravate potential factors involved in acne development.

  12. Annona montana fruit and leaves improve the glycemic and lipid profiles of Wistar rats.

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    Barbalho, Sandra Maria; Soares de Souza, Maricelma da Silva; dos Santos Bueno, Patrícia Cincotto; Guiguer, Elen Landgraf; Farinazzi-Machado, Flávia Maria Vasques; Araújo, Adriano Cressoni; Meneguim, Carla Omete; Pascoal Silveira, Eliane; de Souza Oliveira, Natalia; da Silva, Beatriz Clivati; Barbosa, Sara da Silva; Mendes, Claudemir Gregório; Gonçalves, Priscilla Rodrigues

    2012-10-01

    Species of the family Annonaceae has been used traditionally as a medicinal plant in tropical regions of South and North America and in Africa. Annona montana is known popularly as false graviola and originates from tropical America and can be cultivated throughout Brazil. There are no studies in the literature that associate A. montana with the metabolic profile of animals. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to assess the effects of the consumption of pulp and leaves of this plant on the metabolic profile of Wistar rats. The animals, which were treated for 40 days, were divided into two control groups--treated with water via gavage and ad libitum, respectively, and two treated groups--one treated with leaf juice and the other with pulp juice of the fruit. Glycemia, lipids, and body weight were found to decrease and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) levels to increase in the animals treated with leaf juice. The group treated with pulp juice showed a reduction in lipids and augmented HDL-c. The use of A. montana may have beneficial effects in the prevention of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia and may thus contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. High endogenous salivary amylase activity is associated with improved glycemic homeostasis following starch ingestion in adults.

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    Mandel, Abigail L; Breslin, Paul A S

    2012-05-01

    In the current study, we determined whether increased digestion of starch by high salivary amylase concentrations predicted postprandial blood glucose following starch ingestion. Healthy, nonobese individuals were prescreened for salivary amylase activity and classified as high (HA) or low amylase (LA) if their activity levels per minute fell 1 SD higher or lower than the group mean, respectively. Fasting HA (n = 7) and LA (n = 7) individuals participated in 2 sessions during which they ingested either a starch (experimental) or glucose solution (control) on separate days. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after the participants drank each solution. The samples were analyzed for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations as well as diploid AMY1 gene copy number. HA individuals had significantly more AMY1 gene copies within their genomes than did the LA individuals. We found that following starch ingestion, HA individuals had significantly lower postprandial blood glucose concentrations at 45, 60, and 75 min, as well as significantly lower AUC and peak blood glucose concentrations than the LA individuals. Plasma insulin concentrations in the HA group were significantly higher than baseline early in the testing session, whereas insulin concentrations in the LA group did not increase at this time. Following ingestion of the glucose solution, however, blood glucose and insulin concentrations did not differ between the groups. These observations are interpreted to suggest that HA individuals may be better adapted to ingest starches, whereas LA individuals may be at greater risk for insulin resistance and diabetes if chronically ingesting starch-rich diets.

  14. Impact of symptomatic hypoglycemia on medication adherence, patient satisfaction with treatment, and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Walz L

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lotta Walz,1,3 Billie Pettersson,2,3 Ulf Rosenqvist,4 Anna Deleskog,3,5 Gunilla Journath,6 Per Wändell7 1Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 2Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, 3Merck Sharp and Dohme (Sweden AB, Sollentuna, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Motala Hospital, Motala, 5Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, 6Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 7Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Centre for Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of symptomatic hypoglycemia on medication adherence, satisfaction with treatment, and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes based on the treatment goals stated in the Swedish national guidelines. Methods: This cross-sectional, multicenter study was carried out between January and August 2009 in 430 consecutive primary health care patients on stable doses of metformin and sulfonylureas for at least 6 months. The patients completed questionnaires covering their experiences of low blood glucose and adherence, as well as barriers to and satisfaction with drug treatment (using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication. Physicians collected the data from medical records. Results: Patients who experienced moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia reported poorer adherence to medication (46% versus 67%; P<0.01 and were more likely to perceive barriers such as “bothered by medication side effects” (36% versus 14%; P<0.001 compared with patients with no or mild symptoms. Patients with moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia were less satisfied with their treatment than those with no or mild symptoms as determined by the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-Global satisfaction (67.0 versus 71.2; P<0.05. Overall, achievement of target glycated hemoglobin

  15. Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert A; Fonseca, Vivian; Katholi, Richard E; McGill, Janet B; Messerli, Franz H; Bell, David S H; Raskin, Philip; Wright, Jackson T; Iyengar, Malini; Anderson, Karen M; Lukas, Mary Ann; Bakris, George L

    2008-01-01

    In the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial, carvedilol added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers had neutral or beneficial effects on glycemic measures compared with metoprolol tartrate. For the 1235 diabetic hypertensive GEMINI patients, the authors assessed treatment differences by race (white/black/other), age (continuous variable), and sex on hemoglobin A(1c), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and blood pressure. Both treatments significantly reduced blood pressure in all subgroups, but the metabolic effects of carvedilol were more beneficial in subgroups of race and sex. Carvedilol did not affect hemoglobin A(1c) but improved HOMA-IR results in all subgroups, significantly in males and "other race" subgroups. Metoprolol significantly increased hemoglobin A(1c) in all subgroups except "other race," with no effect on HOMA-IR findings. Differences vs metoprolol significantly favored carvedilol for hemoglobin A(1c) in white and female subgroups and favored carvedilol for HOMA-IR in black, "other race," and male subgroups. Carvedilol effects were favorable to adjustment of age as a covariate. In hypertensive patients with diabetes, carvedilol may be a more appropriate choice when beta-blockade is indicated.

  16. Glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes declines as early as two years after diagnosis.

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    Levitt Katz, Lorraine E; Magge, Sheela Natesh; Hernandez, Marcia L; Murphy, Kathryn M; McKnight, Heather M; Lipman, Terri

    2011-01-01

    To determine the course of glycemic decline in a pediatric cohort with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by defining longitudinal changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and insulin requirement. We also followed markers of insulin reserve (fasting C-peptide and IGFBP-1) over time. Participants included two groups: (1) T2DM Nonacidotic (NA) (n = 46); and (2) T2DM diabetic ketoacidosis (n = 13). HbA1c, insulin dose, and fasting C-peptide and IGFBP-1 were obtained at baseline and every 6 months for 4 years. At baseline, Mann Whitney tests demonstrated that the diabetic ketoacidosis group had higher HbA1c (P = .002), required more insulin (P = .036), and had lower C-peptide (P = .003) than the NA group. Baseline insulin dose (Spearman r = -0.424, P = .009) and baseline IGFBP-1 (Spearman r = -0.349, P = .046) correlated negatively with C-peptide. Over time, HbA1c, insulin dose, and C-peptide changed significantly in a complex manner, with group differences. HbA1c reached a nadir at 6 to 12 months and began to rise after 1.5 years. Insulin requirements reached a nadir at 1 year and began to rise after 2 years. Unlike adults, children with T2DM require increasing insulin doses over a 4-year period, and diabetic ketoacidosis at diagnosis predicts greater β-cell decline over time. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A 6-month "self-monitoring" lifestyle modification with increased sunlight exposure modestly improves vitamin D status, lipid profile and glycemic status in overweight and obese Saudi adults with varying glycemic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Alfawaz, Hanan; Aljohani, Naji J; Al-Saleh, Yousef; Wani, Kaiser; Alnaami, Abdullah M; Alharbi, Mohammad; Kumar, Sudhesh

    2014-05-26

    The over-all age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) in Saudi Arabia is unprecedented at 31%. Aggressive measures should be done to curb down increasing incidence. In this prospective 6-month study we aim to determine whether a self-monitoring, life-style modification program that includes increased sunlight exposure confer improvement in vitamin D status and health benefits among adult Saudi overweight and obese patients with varying glycemic status. A total of 150 overweight and obese Saudi adults with varying glycemic status aged 30-60 years were included in this study. They were divided into 3 groups (Non-DMT2, Pre-diabetes and DMT2). Baseline anthropometrics and blood glucose were taken at baseline and after 6 months. Fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, calcium, albumin and phosphate were measured routinely. Serum 25(OH) vitamin D was measured using standard assays. Within the time period they were instructed to reduce total intake of fat, increased fiber intake and increase sun exposure. In all groups there was a significant improvement in vitamin D levels as well as serum triglycerides, LDL- and total cholesterol. However, a significant increase in serum glucose levels was noted in the non-DMT2 group, and a significant decrease in HDL-cholesterol in both non-DMT2 and pre-diabetes group. In the pre-diabetes group, 53.2% were able to normalize their fasting blood levels after 6 months, with 8.5% reaching the DMT2 stage and 38.3% remaining pre-diabetic. In all groups there was a significant increase in the prevalence of hypertension. Improving vitamin D status with modest lifestyle modifications over a short-period translates to improvement in lipid profile except HDL-cholesterol among overweight and obese Saudi adults, but not BMI and blood pressure. Findings of the present study merit further investigation as to whether full vitamin D status correction can delay or prevent onset of DMT2.

  18. Glycated albumin may be a choice, but not an alternative marker of glycated hemoglobin for glycemic control assessment in diabetic patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Feng-kun; SUN Xue-feng; ZHANG Dong; CUI Shao-yuan; CHEN Xiang-mei; WEI Ri-bao; LU Ju-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) underestimate the actual glycemic control levels in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients,because of anemia and the using of erythropoietin (EPO); it was recommended that glycated albumin (GA) should be an alternative marker.Therefore,the assessment performances of glycemic control were compared between GA and HbA1c in this research by referring to mean plasma glucose (MPG)in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients undergoing MHD or not.Methods MPG was calculated according to the data registered at enrollment and follow-up 2 months later and corresponding HbA1c,albumin (ALB),GA,etc.were measured in 280 cases.A case-control study for comparing GA and HbA1c was done among the groups of MHD patients with DM (n=88) and without DM (NDM; n=90),and non-MHD ones with DM (n=102) using MPG for an actual glycemic control standard.Results In these 3 groups,only for DM patients' (whether undergoing MHD or not),GA and HbA1c correlated with MPG significantly (P <0.01).Through linear regression analysis,it could be found that the regression curves of GA almost coincided in MHD and non-MHD patients with DM,because the intercepts (2.418 vs.2.329) and slopes (0.053vs.0.057) were very close to each other.On the contrary,regression curves of HbA1c did not coincide in the two groups,because variance of the slopes (0.036 vs.0.052) were relatively large.Through comparing receiver operating characteristic (ROC) areas under the curve (AUC),it could be understood that the assessment performances of GA and HbA1c in MHD patients were lower than those in non-MHD ones,and assessment performance of HbA1c in MHD patients was better than GA (P <0.05).In addition,the effects of Hb and EPO dose on HbA1c,or that of ALB on GA were unobvious in our study.Conclusions Actual glycemic control level in MHD patients with DM may be underestimated by HbA1c,and it could be avoided by GA; however,glycemic evaluating performance of HbA1c may be still

  19. "The impact of vitamin C and E, Magnesium and Zinc on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type II diabetic patients "

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    Farvid MS

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study designed to assess the effect of Mg+Zn, vitamin C+E, and combination of these micronutrients on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial, 69 type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into four groups, each group receiving one of the following daily supplement for 3 months; group M: 200 mg and 30 mg Zn (n=16, group V: 200 mg vitamin C and 150 mg vitamin E (n=18, group MV: minerals plus vitamins (n=17, group P: placebo (n=18.Fasting blood glucose, fructosamine, HbA1c and serum insulin were measured at the beginning and at the end of 3 months supplementation. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA score. Treatment effects were analyzed by general linear modeling. Results: After 3 months of supplementation fasting blood glucose decreased in MV group (165±46 vs 177±41 mg/dl, p=0.035. There was no significant change in fructoseamin, HbA1c, serum insulin or insulin resistance in treatment groups. Conclusion: The results of the present study provide evidence for the effects of combination of Mg, Zn and vitamin C and E supplementations on improvement of fasting blood glucose but not fructosamine, HbA1c, serum insulin or insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients.

  20. Glycemic index and diabetes

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000941.htm Glycemic index and diabetes To use the sharing features on ... GI diet also may help with weight loss. Glycemic Index of Certain Foods Low GI foods (0 to ...

  1. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to HbA1c in Japanese obese adults: a cross-sectional analysis of the Saku Control Obesity Program

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    Goto Maki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary glycemic index or load is thought to play an important role in glucose metabolism. However, few studies have investigated the relation between glycemic index (GI or load (GL and glycemia in Asian populations. In this cross-sectional analysis of a randomized controlled trial, the Saku Control Obesity Program, we examined the relation between the baseline GI or GL and glycemia (HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose [FPG] levels, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, β-cell function (HOMA-β, and other metabolic risk factors (lipid levels, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, and adiposity measures. Methods The participants were 227 obese Japanese women and men. We used multiple linear regression models and logistic regression models to adjust for potential confounding factors such as age, sex, visceral fat area, total energy intake, and physical activity levels. Results After adjustments for potential confounding factors, GI was not associated with HbA1c, but GL was positively associated with HbA1c. For increasing quartiles of GI, the adjusted mean HbA1c were 6.3%, 6.7%, 6.4%, and 6.4% (P for trend = 0.991. For increasing quartiles of GL, the adjusted mean HbA1c were 6.2%, 6.2%, 6.6%, and 6.5% (P for trend = 0.044. In addition, among participants with HbA1c ≥ 7.0%, 20 out of 28 (71% had a high GL (≥ median; the adjusted odds ratio for HbA1c ≥ 7.0% among participants with higher GL was 3.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2 to 8.1 compared to the participants with a lower GL ( Conclusions Our findings suggest that participants with poor glycemic control tend to have a higher GL in an obese Japanese population.

  2. Health-care climate, perceived self-care competence, and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Koponen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 2866 was strongly associated with perceived self-care competence, which in turn was associated with autonomous motivation and autonomy-supportive health-care climate. These associations remained after adjusting for the effect of important life-context factors. Autonomous motivation partially mediated the effect of health-care climate on perceived competence, which fully mediated the effect of autonomous motivation on glycemic control. The results of the study emphasize health-care personnel’s important role in supporting patients’ autonomous motivation and perceived self-care competence.

  3. Health-care climate, perceived self-care competence, and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Koponen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes ( n  = 2866 was strongly associated with perceived self-care competence, which in turn was associated with autonomous motivation and autonomy-supportive health-care climate. These associations remained after adjusting for the effect of important life-context factors. Autonomous motivation partially mediated the effect of health-care climate on perceived competence, which fully mediated the effect of autonomous motivation on glycemic control. The results of the study emphasize health-care personnel’s important role in supporting patients’ autonomous motivation and perceived self-care competence.

  4. Metabolic Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Correlated Glycemic Control/Complications: A Cross-Sectional Study between Rural and Urban Uygur Residents in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Du, Guo-Li; Su, Yin-Xia; Yao, Hua; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Qi; Tuerdi, Ablikm; He, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Li; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Xiao, Shan; Wang, Shu-Xia; Su, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    .... To describe the differences of metabolic risk factors of type 2 diabetes, as well as glycemic control and complicated diabetic complications between rural and urban Uygur residents in Xinjiang Uygur...

  5. Glycemic control with insulin glargine plus insulin glulisine versus premixed insulin analogues in real-world practices: a cost-effectiveness study with a randomized pragmatic trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Philip A; Zhang, Quanwu; Mersey, James H; Lee, Francis Y; Bromberger, Lee A; Bhushan, Madhu; Bhushan, Rajat

    2011-07-01

    ) were $841 with glargine/glulisine and $1308 with premixed analogues. Overall, treatment with glargine/glulisine provided greater improvement in glycemic control and may represent a more cost-effective treatment option than premixed regimens for patients with type 2 diabetes in real-world clinical practice. However, due to the pragmatic trial design, the study concluded before follow-up assessments were available for all randomized patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of adherence to a Mediterranean diet with glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in youth with type 1 diabetes: The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Victor W.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Couch, Sarah C.; Liese, Angela D.; The, Natalie S.; Tzeel, Benjamin A.; Dabelea, Dana; Lawrence, Jean M.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Kim, Grace; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives This study aimed to determine the association between a Mediterranean diet and glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors among youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects/Methods Incident T1D cases aged <20 years at diagnosis between 2002 and 2005 were included. Participants were seen at baseline (N=793), 1-year (N=512) and 5-year follow-up visits (N=501). Mediterranean diet score was assessed using a modified KIDMED index (mKIDMED). Multivariate linear regression and longitudinal mixed model were applied to determine the association between mKIDMED score and log-HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure (BP), and obesity. Results In cross-sectional analyses using baseline data, for individuals with an HbA1c of 7.5%, a two-point higher mKIDMED score (one standard deviation) was associated with 0.15% lower HbA1c (P=0.02). A two-point higher mKIDMED score was associated with 4.0 mg/dL lower total cholesterol (TC) (P=0.006), 3.4 mg/dL lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-C (P=0.004), 3.9 mg/dL lower non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL)-C (P=0.004), and 0.07 lower LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (P=0.02). Using longitudinal data, a two-point increase in mKIDMED score was associated with 0.01% lower log-HbA1c (P=0.07), 1.8 mg/dL lower TC (P=0.05), 1.6 mg/dL lower LDL-C (P=0.03), and 1.8 mg/dL lower non-HDL-C (P=0.03) than would otherwise have been expected. HbA1c mediated about 20% of the association for lipids in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models. An unexpected positive association between mKIDMED score and systolic BP was found among non-Hispanic white youth in cross-sectional analyses (P=0.009). Mediterranean diet was not associated with obesity. Conclusions Mediterranean diet may improve glycemic control and cardiovascular health in T1D youth. PMID:26908421

  7. The Emerging Role of Telemedicine in Managing Glycemic Control and Psychobehavioral Aspects of Pregnancy Complicated by Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Cristiano Chilelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a gradual decline in concern of specialists who follow up the care of pregnant women with diabetes. In addition, due to the dwindling economic resources allocated to health services, access to specialized healthcare facilities is becoming more difficult. Telemedicine, or medicine practiced at a distance, is inserted in this context with applications differing for type of interaction (real-time or deferred, i.e., videoconferencing versus store-and-forward data transmission, type of monitoring (automatic versus requesting cooperation from the patient, and type of devices used (web connections and use of mobile phones or smartphones. Telemedicine can cope with the current lack of ability to ensure these patients frequent direct contact with their caregivers. This approach may have an impact not only on the classical maternal-fetal outcome, but also on some underestimated aspects of patients with diabetes in pregnancy, in this case their quality of life, the perception of “diabetes self-efficacy,” and the glycemic variability. In this paper, we will analyze the current evidence regarding the use of telemedicine in pregnancies complicated by diabetes, trying to highlight the main limitations of these studies and possible strategies to overcome them in order to improve the effectiveness of future clinical interventions with these medical applications.

  8. The effect of insurance status and parental education on glycemic control and cardiovascular disease risk profile in youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Majidi, Shideh; Wadwa, R. Paul; Bishop, Franziska K.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J; Rewers, Marian; McFann, Kim; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adult studies have shown a correlation between low socioeconomic status and Type 1 Diabetes complications, but studies have not been done in children to examine the effect of socioeconomic status on risk for future complications. This study investigates the relationship between insurance status and parental education and both glycemic control and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in youth with type 1 diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional study of 295 youth with established ty...

  9. Influence of glycemic control on pulmonary function and heart rate in response to exercise in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Bogaty, Peter; Desmeules, Marc; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2006-11-01

    Conflicting results exist regarding the impact of glycemic control on peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The influence of glycemic control on submaximal oxygen uptake (VO2) in these subjects is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of fasting blood glucose (FBG) (short-term glycemic control) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (long-term glycemic control) on submaximal VO2 and VO2peak during exercise in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus without cardiovascular disease. FBG and HbA1c levels and exercise tolerance in 30 sedentary men with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with oral hypoglycemic agents and/or diet were evaluated. VO2, carbon dioxide production (VCO2), heart rate, pulmonary ventilation (VE), and the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were measured throughout the exercise protocol. Subjects were separated into 2 groups of the same age, weight, and body mass index according to median FBG and HbA1c levels (6.5 mmol/L and 6.1%, respectively). Per protocol design, there was a significant difference in FBG and HbA1c levels (P exercise parameters between the 2 groups according to median FBG or median HbA1c levels. However, the subjects with elevated HbA1c level had lower submaximal V e throughout the exercise protocol (P heart rate pattern during submaximal exercise (P type 2 diabetes mellitus without cardiovascular disease, they may influence pulmonary function and the chronotropic response during submaximal exercise in these subjects.

  10. Magnetic Anastomosis for Glycemic Insulin Control (MAGIC): A Pilot Study of Minimally Invasive (Endoscopic/Laparoscopic) Side-to-Side Duodeno-Distal Ileal Anastomosis in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-08

    17 OCT 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 01 NOv 2012 - 17 Oct 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FDG20130001A entitled Magnetic Anastomosis ...for Glycemic Insulin Control (MAGIC): A pilot study of minimally invasive (endoscopic/laparoscopic) side-to-side duodeno-distal ileal anastomosis in...Compression Anastomosis Corrects Insulin Resistance in Diabetic Pigs. PURPOSE: Bariatric surgery corrects insulin resistance independent of weight loss

  11. Effects of Low Glycemic Index Diets on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jinhua; Heng, Weijun; Gao, Jianbo

    2016-05-01

    Studies of the effects of low glycemic index (LGI) diets on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have reported conflicting findings.The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effects of LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on maternal and neonatal outcomes in GDM patients.We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO, Springer, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases for studies of the effects of LGI diets in GDM patients. We performed a meta-analysis of the effects of the LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on GDM outcomes. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- and fixed-effects models.Five RCTs involving 302 participants were included in our meta-analysis. No statistically significant differences in the risks of cesarean section delivery, large for gestational age, and small for gestational age were observed. The risk of macrosomia in the LGI groups was significantly lower (RR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10-0.71; P = 0.008) than that in the control groups. Our subgroup analysis of the effects of DF showed that LGI diets with an increased level of DF, relative to the control diet, reduced the risk of macrosomia beyond that of the LGI diets alone (RR: 0.17 vs 0.47, respectively). The subgroup analysis also showed that LGI diets in which the level of DF was approximately equivalent to that in the control diets significantly reduced the risk of insulin usage (RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.52-0.92; P = 0.01).The LGI diets reduced the risk of macrosomia in GDM patients, and LGI diets with added DF reduced the risk of macrosomia further. The LGI diets with levels of DF approximately equivalent to that in the control diets reduced the risk of insulin usage in GDM patients.

  12. Correlation of binge eating disorder with level of depression and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Selime; Kayar, Yusuf; Önem Akçakaya, Rabia; Türkyılmaz Uyar, Ece; Kalkan, Kübra; Yazısız, Veli; Aydın, Çiğdem; Yücel, Başak

    2015-01-01

    It is reported that eating disorders and depression are more common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of binge eating disorder (BED) in T2DM patients and examine the correlation of BED with level of depression and glycemic control. One hundred fifty-two T2DM patients aged between 18 and 75 years (81 females, 71 males) were evaluated via a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorder, Clinical Version in terms of eating disorders. Disordered eating attitudes were determined using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and level of depression was determined using the Beck Depression Scale. Patients who have BED and patients who do not were compared in terms of age, gender, body mass index, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, depression and EAT scores. Eight of the patients included in the study (5.26%) were diagnosed with BED. In patients diagnosed with BED, depression and EAT scores were significantly high (PEAT scores and depression scores (r = +0.196, Peating attitudes. Psychiatric treatments should be organized for patients diagnosed with BED by taking into consideration comorbid depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors of social support, acceptance, health-promoting behaviors, and glycemic control in African-Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Patricia E; Wykle, May L; Misra, Ranjita; Suwonnaroop, Nantawon; Burant, Christopher J

    2002-07-01

    Chronic illness is particularly important in older African-Americans because this population comprises the fastest growing segment of that ethnic group. This study explored relationships among personal factors (education and co-morbidity), mental health, and physical functioning on social support, social support on acceptance and health-promoting behaviors, acceptance on health-promoting behaviors, and health-promoting behaviors on HgbA1c. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a convenience sample of 63 African-Americans from a community clinic. Participants were asked their highest level of education and to indicate their chronic conditions. Other instruments used were: Health Survey (SF-36), Personal Resource Questionnaire (PRQ-85), Revised (IAD-R) scale (Acceptance), and Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II. Glycemic control was measured using glycosylated hemoglobin. Physical functioning was the only significant predictor of social support (beta = .30, p = .03). In turn, social support predicted acceptance (beta = .32, p = .01) and health behaviors beta = .39, p = .002).

  14. Glycemic control with insulin prevents progression of dental caries and caries-related periodontitis in diabetic WBN/KobSlc rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Yutaka; Sano, Tomoya; Kodama, Yasushi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2013-07-01

    We have previously reported that dental caries progress in spontaneously and chemically induced diabetic rodent models. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between hyperglycemia and dental caries by evaluating the preventive effect of glycemic control with insulin on the progression of the lesions in diabetic rats. Male WBN/KobSlc rats aged 15 weeks were divided into groups of spontaneously diabetic rats (intact group), spontaneously diabetic rats with insulin treatment (INS group), alloxan-induced prolonged diabetic rats (AL group), and alloxan-induced prolonged diabetic rats with insulin treatment (AL + INS group). The animals were killed at 90 weeks of age, and their oral tissue was examined. Dental caries and periodontitis were frequently detected in the intact group, and the lesions were enhanced in the AL group (in which there was an increased duration of diabetes). Meanwhile, glycemic control with insulin reduced the incidence and severity of dental caries and periodontitis in the INS group, and the effects became more pronounced in the AL + INS group. In conclusion, glycemic control by insulin prevented the progression of dental caries and caries-related periodontitis in the diabetic rats.

  15. Plasma Proteins Modified by Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) Reveal Site-specific Susceptibilities to Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greifenhagen, Uta; Frolov, Andrej; Blüher, Matthias; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-04-29

    Protein glycation refers to the reversible reaction between aldoses (or ketoses) and amino groups yielding relatively stable Amadori (or Heyns) products. Consecutive oxidative cleavage reactions of these products or the reaction of amino groups with other reactive substances (e.g. α-dicarbonyls) yield advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that can alter the structures and functions of proteins. AGEs have been identified in all organisms, and their contents appear to rise with some diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Here, we report a pilot study using highly sensitive and specific proteomics approach to identify and quantify AGE modification sites in plasma proteins by reversed phase HPLC mass spectrometry in tryptic plasma digests. In total, 19 AGE modification sites corresponding to 11 proteins were identified in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus under poor glycemic control. The modification degrees of 15 modification sites did not differ among cohorts of normoglycemic lean or obese and type 2 diabetes mellitus patients under good and poor glycemic control. The contents of two amide-AGEs in human serum albumin and apolipoprotein A-II were significantly higher in patients with poor glycemic control, although the plasma levels of both proteins were similar among all plasma samples. These two modification sites might be useful to predict long term, AGE-related complications in diabetic patients, such as impaired vision, increased arterial stiffness, or decreased kidney function.

  16. GPS Control Segment Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Systems Center GPS Control Segment Improvements Mr. Tim McIntyre GPS Product Support Manager GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division Peterson...DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment Improvements 5a. CONTRACT...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Space Command,Space and Missile Systems Center, GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division,Peterson AFB,CO,80916 8

  17. Excretion rates of 1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol, uric acid and microalbuminuria as glycemic control indexes in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Sheng, Junqin; Liu, Zhiwen; Guo, Minghao

    2017-01-01

    1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), uric acid and urinary proteins are excreted into the urine with increasing glucosuria. In the present retrospective study we analyzed whether these factors could be used as indicators for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) glucose control in 6,766 (T2DM) patients. There were 3,988 cases (58.9%) with HbA1c ≤ 6.5%, 853 cases (12.61%) with HbA1c levels ranging from 6.5% to 7% and 1,925 cases (28.5%) with HbA1c > 7%. HbA1c percentages were correlated with age, MA and 1,5-AG serum concentrations (P 10 mg/L. With a derived receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, a 1,5-AG cut-off value of 11.55 mg/L for hyperglycemia could be diagnosed with a specificity of 71.2 (69.7–72.6) and a sensitivity of 75.3 (73.6–76.9). The serum 1,5-AG concentration is a marker for hyperglycemia and may be particularly useful as an indicator for short-term glycemic excursions in order to improve treatments in T2DM patients. PMID:28281675

  18. The Effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing on