WorldWideScience

Sample records for implementing training programs

  1. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was $1000 US, and the yearly maintenance cost was <$500 with funds typically allocated from existing school resources. The facilitator was a school official or volunteer for 81% of schools. Average estimated training time commitment per student was <2 hours. Automated external defibrillators are available in 98% of schools, and 61% include automated external defibrillator training in their curriculum. Despite perceived barriers, school CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementing the LifeSkills Training drug prevention program: factors related to implementation fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalic, Sharon F; Fagan, Abigail A; Argamaso, Susanne

    2008-01-18

    Widespread replication of effective prevention programs is unlikely to affect the incidence of adolescent delinquency, violent crime, and substance use until the quality of implementation of these programs by community-based organizations can be assured. This paper presents the results of a process evaluation employing qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the extent to which 432 schools in 105 sites implemented the LifeSkills Training (LST) drug prevention program with fidelity. Regression analysis was used to examine factors influencing four dimensions of fidelity: adherence, dosage, quality of delivery, and student responsiveness. Although most sites faced common barriers, such as finding room in the school schedule for the program, gaining full support from key participants (i.e., site coordinators, principals, and LST teachers), ensuring teacher participation in training workshops, and classroom management difficulties, most schools involved in the project implemented LST with very high levels of fidelity. Across sites, 86% of program objectives and activities required in the three-year curriculum were delivered to students. Moreover, teachers were observed using all four recommended teaching practices, and 71% of instructors taught all the required LST lessons. Multivariate analyses found that highly rated LST program characteristics and better student behavior were significantly related to a greater proportion of material taught by teachers (adherence). Instructors who rated the LST program characteristics as ideal were more likely to teach all lessons (dosage). Student behavior and use of interactive teaching techniques (quality of delivery) were positively related. No variables were related to student participation (student responsiveness). Although difficult, high implementation fidelity by community-based organizations can be achieved. This study suggests some important factors that organizations should consider to ensure fidelity, such as

  3. Implementing the LifeSkills Training drug prevention program: factors related to implementation fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagan Abigail A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread replication of effective prevention programs is unlikely to affect the incidence of adolescent delinquency, violent crime, and substance use until the quality of implementation of these programs by community-based organizations can be assured. Methods This paper presents the results of a process evaluation employing qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the extent to which 432 schools in 105 sites implemented the LifeSkills Training (LST drug prevention program with fidelity. Regression analysis was used to examine factors influencing four dimensions of fidelity: adherence, dosage, quality of delivery, and student responsiveness. Results Although most sites faced common barriers, such as finding room in the school schedule for the program, gaining full support from key participants (i.e., site coordinators, principals, and LST teachers, ensuring teacher participation in training workshops, and classroom management difficulties, most schools involved in the project implemented LST with very high levels of fidelity. Across sites, 86% of program objectives and activities required in the three-year curriculum were delivered to students. Moreover, teachers were observed using all four recommended teaching practices, and 71% of instructors taught all the required LST lessons. Multivariate analyses found that highly rated LST program characteristics and better student behavior were significantly related to a greater proportion of material taught by teachers (adherence. Instructors who rated the LST program characteristics as ideal were more likely to teach all lessons (dosage. Student behavior and use of interactive teaching techniques (quality of delivery were positively related. No variables were related to student participation (student responsiveness. Conclusion Although difficult, high implementation fidelity by community-based organizations can be achieved. This study suggests some important factors that

  4. [Healthy eating: implementation of a practice-oriented training program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakova, E N; Nastausheva, T L; Usacheva, E A

    2016-01-01

    Health professionals need to have current knowledge and skills in nutrition. The knowledge and skills have to be acquired in programs of continuing medical education, but also in undergraduate medical education. The main purpose of this work was to develop and implement a practice-oriented training program in nutrition and healthy eating for medical students. The subject named "Nutrition" was implemented into second-year medical curriculum. We defined a theoretical framework and terms such as nutrition, healthy eating, and evidence-based nutrition. In order to get learning outcomes we constructed a method of patients counseling and training "Individual food pyramid". The making of "Individual food pyramid" is a key integrate element of the program. It helps to memorize, understand and apply the basic principles of healthy eating in real life contexts. The final program consists of two sections: "General Nutrition" and "Special Nutrition". The most important intended learning outcome is student's lifestyle improvement. The program is practice-oriented and outcome-based.

  5. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April eJohnson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan’s disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens, although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program’s effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed.

  6. Disseminating contingency management: Impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program

    OpenAIRE

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T. Ron; Jones, Brinn E.; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (interventio...

  7. The implementation and evaluation of a communication skills training program for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Smita C; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Penn, Stacey; Gallegos, Tess E; Zaider, Talia; Krueger, Carol A; Bialer, Philip A; Bylund, Carma L; Parker, Patricia A

    2017-09-01

    Many nurses express difficulty in communicating with their patients, especially in oncology settings where there are numerous challenges and high-stake decisions during the course of diagnosis and treatment. Providing specific training in communication skills is one way to enhance the communication between nurses and their patients. We developed and implemented a communication skills training program for nurses, consisting of three teaching modules: responding empathically to patients; discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care; and responding to challenging interactions with families. Training included didactic and experiential small group role plays. This paper presents results on program evaluation, self-efficacy, and behavioral demonstration of learned communication skills. Three hundred forty-two inpatient oncology nurses participated in a 1-day communication skills training program and completed course evaluations, self-reports, and pre- and post-standardized patient assessments. Participants rated the training favorably, and they reported significant gains in self-efficacy in their ability to communicate with patients in various contexts. Participants also demonstrated significant improvement in several empathic skills, as well as in clarifying skill. Our work demonstrates that implementation of a nurse communication skills training program at a major cancer center is feasible and acceptable and has a significant impact on participants' self-efficacy and uptake of communication skills.

  8. Mapping training needs for dissemination and implementation research: lessons from a synthesis of existing D&I research training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David A; Proctor, Enola K; Brownson, Ross C; Straus, Sharon E

    2017-09-01

    With recent growth in the field of dissemination and implementation (D&I) research, multiple training programs have been developed to build capacity, including summer training institutes, graduate courses, degree programs, workshops, and conferences. While opportunities for D&I research training have expanded, course organizers acknowledge that available slots are insufficient to meet demand within the scientific and practitioner community. In addition, individual programs have struggled to best fit various needs of trainees, sometimes splitting coursework between specific D&I content and more introductory grant writing material. This article, stemming from a 2013 NIH workshop, reviews experiences across multiple training programs to align training needs, career stage and role, and availability of programs. We briefly review D&I needs and opportunities by career stage and role, discuss variations among existing training programs in format, mentoring relationships, and other characteristics, identify challenges of mapping needs of trainees to programs, and present recommendations for future D&I research training.

  9. Training of Teachers and Teaching Services Specialists for the Design and Implementation of the "School Psychology Master Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimova L.A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of organizing the training courses for teachers and teaching services specialists for design and implementation of the basic professional educational pedagogical master program in a psycho-pedagogical training direction (educational psychologist with enhanced internship for students in a context of networking. The authors submit a modular design of training program. The first module includes methodological bases of the design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program. The second module includes legal coverage of the design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program. The third module consists of design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program in a psycho-pedagogical training direction (educational psychologist. The program involves a variety of active and interactive educational technology, providing the development of professional activities: remote technology, expert seminars, design stations, panels and plenary discussions, business games, round-table discussions.

  10. Improving MC and A Oversight in Russia by Implementing Measurement and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2004-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia (GAN) determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilities. Last year, GAN developed and implemented their Nuclear Material Measurement Program Plan which documents current non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement capability in all regions of GAN; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This Program Plan has helped to give the GAN inspection measurements more legal and official status as an oversight tool, and has also helped to improve other GAN MC and A oversight activities. These improvements include developing a tamper-indicating device program, conducting NDA workshops at specific Russian nuclear facilities to better train MC and A inspectors, and developing training evaluation programs. The Program is an important tool to address the GAN role in oversight of the Russian Federal Information System nuclear material database. This paper describes the feedback received from the GAN regional offices on the implementation of the Program Plan during its first year in operation and how the Program Plan has affected other GAN inspection activities to improve MC and A oversight.

  11. Evaluating the Implementation of a Training Program for Improving Quality Service: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Ketly Dieudonne

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to implement a comprehensive training program to build employees' knowledge, skills, and attitudes in order to improve quality service at ABC Restaurant because of a surge in customer complaints. The purpose of this study was to develop a training program that included an employee handbook as a training tool, a handbook designed…

  12. Disseminating contingency management: impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T Ron; Jones, Brinn E; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A

    2014-04-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability) were assessed at study conclusion in a qualitative interview with OTP management. Intervention effectiveness was also assessed via independent chart review of trial CM implementation vs. a historical control period. Results included: 1) robust, durable increases in delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness among trained staff; 2) positive managerial perspectives of intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability; and 3) significant clinical impacts on targeted patient indices. Collective results offer support for the study's collaborative intervention design and the applied, skills-based focus of staff training processes. Implications for CM dissemination are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Barriers to the implementation and uptake of simulation-based training programs in general surgery: a multinational qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Shady G; Johnston, Maximilian J; Pucher, Philip H; Erridge, Simon; Darzi, Ara

    2017-12-01

    Despite evidence demonstrating the advantages of simulation training in general surgery, it is not widely integrated into surgical training programs worldwide. The aim of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation and uptake of surgical simulation training programs. A multinational qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews of general surgical residents and experts. Each interview was audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and underwent emergent theme analysis. All data were anonymized and results pooled. A total of 37 individuals participated in the study. Seventeen experts (Program Directors and Surgical Attendings with an interest in surgical education) and 20 residents drawn from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, and Japan were interviewed. Barriers to simulation-based training were identified based on key themes including financial cost, access, and translational benefit. Participants described cost (89%) and access (76%) as principal barriers to uptake. Common facilitators included a mandatory requirement to complete simulation training (78%) and on-going assessment of skills (78%). Participants felt that simulation training could improve patient outcomes (76%) but identified a lack of evidence to demonstrate benefit (38%). There was a consensus that simulation training has not been widely implemented (70%). There are multiple barriers to the implementation of surgical simulation training programs, however, there is agreement that these programs could potentially improve patient outcomes. Identifying these barriers enable the targeted use of facilitators to deliver simulation training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Methods for evaluation of industry training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisseau, D.S.; Roe, M.L.; Persensky, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The NRC Policy Statement on Training and Qualification endorses the INPO-managed Training Accreditation Program in that it encompasses the elements of effective performance-based training. Those elements are: analysis of the job, performance-based learning objectives, training design and implementation, trainee evaluation, and program evaluation. As part of the NRC independent evaluation of utilities implementation of training improvement programs, the staff developed training review criteria and procedures that address all five elements of effective performance-based training. The staff uses these criteria to perform reviews of utility training programs that have already received accreditation. Although no performance-based training program can be said to be complete unless all five elements are in place, the last two, trainee and program evaluation, are perhaps the most important because they determine how well the first three elements have been implemented and ensure the dynamic nature of training. This paper discusses the evaluation elements of the NRC training review criteria. The discussion will detail the elements of evaluation methods and techniques that the staff expects to find as integral parts of performance-based training programs at accredited utilities. Further, the review of the effectiveness of implementation of the evaluation methods is discussed. The paper also addresses some of the qualitative differences between what is minimally acceptable and what is most desirable with respect to trainee and program evaluation mechanisms and their implementation

  15. Nuclear criticality safety department training implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The NCSD Qualification Program is described in Y/DD-694, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSD personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This document supersedes Y/DD-696, Revision 2, dated 3/27/96, Training Implementation, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department. There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document

  16. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  17. Cost analysis of large-scale implementation of the 'Helping Babies Breathe' newborn resuscitation-training program in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sumona; Arlington, Lauren; Brenan, Shelby; Kairuki, Allan Kaijunga; Meda, Amunga Robson; Isangula, Kahabi G; Mponzi, Victor; Bishanga, Dunstan; Thomas, Erica; Msemo, Georgina; Azayo, Mary; Molinier, Alice; Nelson, Brett D

    2016-12-01

    Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) has become the gold standard globally for training birth-attendants in neonatal resuscitation in low-resource settings in efforts to reduce early newborn asphyxia and mortality. The purpose of this study was to do a first-ever activity-based cost-analysis of at-scale HBB program implementation and initial follow-up in a large region of Tanzania and evaluate costs of national scale-up as one component of a multi-method external evaluation of the implementation of HBB at scale in Tanzania. We used activity-based costing to examine budget expense data during the two-month implementation and follow-up of HBB in one of the target regions. Activity-cost centers included administrative, initial training (including resuscitation equipment), and follow-up training expenses. Sensitivity analysis was utilized to project cost scenarios incurred to achieve countrywide expansion of the program across all mainland regions of Tanzania and to model costs of program maintenance over one and five years following initiation. Total costs for the Mbeya Region were $202,240, with the highest proportion due to initial training and equipment (45.2%), followed by central program administration (37.2%), and follow-up visits (17.6%). Within Mbeya, 49 training sessions were undertaken, involving the training of 1,341 health providers from 336 health facilities in eight districts. To similarly expand the HBB program across the 25 regions of mainland Tanzania, the total economic cost is projected to be around $4,000,000 (around $600 per facility). Following sensitivity analyses, the estimated total for all Tanzania initial rollout lies between $2,934,793 to $4,309,595. In order to maintain the program nationally under the current model, it is estimated it would cost $2,019,115 for a further one year and $5,640,794 for a further five years of ongoing program support. HBB implementation is a relatively low-cost intervention with potential for high impact on perinatal

  18. Implementation of a Regional Training Program on African Swine Fever As Part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program across the Caucasus Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco De Nardi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A training and outreach program to increase public awareness of African swine fever (ASF was implemented by Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Ministries of Agriculture in Armenia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine. The implementing agency was the company SAFOSO (Switzerland. Integration of this regional effort was administered by subject matter experts for each country. The main teaching effort of this project was to develop a comprehensive regional public outreach campaign through a network of expertise and knowledge for the control and prevention of ASF in four neighboring countries that experience similar issues with this disease. Gaps in disease knowledge, legislation, and outbreak preparedness in each country were all addressed. Because ASF is a pathogen with bioterrorism potential and of great veterinary health importance that is responsible for major economic instability, the project team developed public outreach programs to train veterinarians in the partner countries to accurately and rapidly identify ASF activity and report it to international veterinary health agencies. The project implementers facilitated four regional meetings to develop this outreach program, which was later disseminated in each partner country. Partner country participants were trained as trainers to implement the outreach program in their respective countries. In this paper, we describe the development, execution, and evaluation of the ASF training and outreach program that reached more than 13,000 veterinarians, farmers, and hunters in the partner countries. Additionally, more than 120,000 booklets, flyers, leaflets, guidelines, and posters were distributed during the outreach campaign. Pre- and post-ASF knowledge exams were developed. The overall success of the project was demonstrated in that the principles of developing and conducting a public outreach program were established, and these foundational teachings can be applied within a single country or

  19. Training implementation matrix. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EATON, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    This Training Implementation Matrix (TIM) describes how the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.20A, Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. The TIM defines the application of the selection, qualification, and training requirements in DOE Order 5480.20A at the SNFP. The TIM also describes the organization, planning, and administration of the SNFP training and qualification program(s) for which DOE Order 5480.20A applies. Also included is suitable justification for exceptions taken to any requirements contained in DOE Order 5480.20A. The goal of the SNFP training and qualification program is to ensure employees are capable of performing their jobs safely and efficiently

  20. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  1. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzen, K.K.

    1998-01-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets

  2. Development and implementation of a technical and didactical training program for student tutors in the dissection course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Thomas; Hirt, Bernhard; Celebi, Nora; Baur, Friederike; Weyrich, Peter; Lammerding-Köppel, Maria

    2010-12-20

    student tutors have a long tradition in gross anatomy instruction. However, the full potential of the tutors is generally not tapped, since little attention is paid to their technical and didactical training. The aim of this paper is to report a systematic approach to the development, didactic reasoning and implementation of a curriculum for training student tutors in gross anatomy. the training program was developed using the six-step approach of Kern's curriculum development model. For needs assessment, the literature research was amended by a survey among the 1st and 2nd year students of the dissection course (n=167) and two independent 90 min focus group interviews with the tutors who supervised these students (n=15). Protocols were transcribed and analyzed by margin coding. The training curriculum was setup on the basis of these data. corresponding to the literature, the students want student tutors with good teaching competence as well as adequate content knowledge and technical competence. Supporting that, the tutors request a training program enhancing their didactic skills as well as their knowledge of content and working using relevant methods. Thus, a combined didactic and professional training program has been developed. Six professional and 11 didactic learning objectives were defined. A 3 weeks training curriculum was implemented, using microteaching and group exercises for didactics and active dissection for technical training. Both parts were interlocked on a contextual and practical level. our focus group analyses revealed that a specific training program for student tutors in the dissection course is necessary. We describe a feasible task-oriented training curriculum combining didactic and professional objectives. 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization training implementation. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSO personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This Training Implementation document is applicable to all technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who are in a qualification program

  4. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization training implementation. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-05-19

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSO personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This Training Implementation document is applicable to all technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who are in a qualification program.

  5. Criteria to evaluate SAT-based training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona, O.; Venegas, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Lopez, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper present some coefficients of error obtained to evaluate the quality of the design development and implementation of SAT-based personnel training programs. With the attainment of these coefficients, with the use of the GESAT system, is facilitated the continuos evaluation of training programs and the main deficiencies in the design, development and implementation of training programs are obtained, through the comparison between the program features and their standards or wanted features and doing an statistics analysis of the data kept in the GESAT system

  6. Development of a training assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palchinsky, J.; Waylett, W.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear industry has made a significant commitment to improve training through the implementation of accredited performance-based training programs. Senior management expects that human performance will improve as a result of significant resource allocations. How do they know if training is effective in achieving improved human performance? Florida Power and Light Company is developing a Training Assurance Program to track indicators of training performance and future trends. Integrating the company's Quality Improvement Program processes with systematic training processes is resulting in personnel functioning in a proactive mode and increased customer satisfaction with training performance

  7. Training Programs for Managing Well-being in Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treven Sonja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discussed the significance of well-being (WB and well-being management (WBM. As successful WBM requires the implementation of different training programs, such programs are presented in detail. The cause–effect relationship between training and individual/organizational performance is researched as well. The aim of the research to support this article was to present WBM, its training programs, as well as the determination of WBM activities concerning the mentioned programs implemented in Slovenian organizations.

  8. BWR Services maintenance training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.H.; Chittenden, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    BWR Services has implemented a five-phase program to increase plant availability and capacity factor in operating BWR's. One phase of this program is establishing a maintenance training program on NSSS equipment; the scope encompasses maintenance on both mechanical equipment and electrical control and instrumentation equipment. The program utilizes actual product line equipment for practical Hands-on training. A total of 23 formal courses will be in place by the end of 1979. The General Electric Company is making a multimillion dollar investment in facilities to support this training. These facilities are described

  9. Training Program Handbook: A systematic approach to training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This DOE handbook describes a systematic method for establishing and maintaining training programs that meet the requirements and expectations of DOE Orders 5480.18B and 5480.20. The systematic approach to training includes 5 phases: Analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation.

  10. BLENDED LEARNING STRATEGY IN TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian F. Byrka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the implementation of blended learning strategy in teacher training programs as an innovation in online learning. The blended learning idea comes from blending elements which use online technology with more traditional face-to-face teaching in the same course. The article analyses teacher training programs offered by Chernivtsi Regional Institute of Postgraduate Pedagogical Education. Additional data were gathered through a questionnaire administered to teachers who attended training courses. The characteristics of blended learning strategy, its benefits and limitations for teacher training are supported by a review of literature. The article closes with the comparison of curriculum components (content delivery, learner activities, materials, and required competences between traditional and blended learning teacher training programs. Having obvious benefits in teacher training programs, the implementation of blended learning strategy sets some additional requirements to a learner, as well as to course instructors and lectors.

  11. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  12. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  13. TAP 1, Training Program Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Training programs at DOE nuclear facilities should provide well-trained, qualified personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. A need has been identified for guidance regarding analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of consistent and reliable performance-based training programs. Accreditation of training programs at Category A reactors and high-hazard and selected moderate-hazard nonreactor nuclear facilities will assure consistent, appropriate, and cost-effective training of personnel responsible for the operation, maintenance, and technical support of these facilities. Training programs that are designed and based on systematically determined job requirements, instead of subjective estimation of trainee needs, yield training activities that are consistent and develop or improve knowledge, skills, and abilities that can be directly related to the work setting. Because the training is job-related, the content of these programs more efficiently meets the needs of the employee. Besides a better trained work force, a greater level of operational reactor safety can be realized. This manual is intended to provide an overview of the accreditation process and a brief description of the elements necessary to construct and maintain training programs that are based on the requirements of the job. Two companion manuals provide additional information to assist contractors in their efforts to accredit training programs

  14. General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training: Program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) and Radiological Worker I and II (RW I and II) Training programs. It includes material development requirements, standards and policies, and program administration. This manual applies to General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training at all DOE contractor sites. The training materials of both GERT and RW I and II training reflect the requirements identified in the DOE Radiological Control Manual and DOE Order 5480.11. The training programs represent the minimum requirement for the standardized core materials. Each contractor shall implement the program in its entirety and may augment the standardized core materials to increase the general employee and radiological worker level of competency

  15. System for the quality assurance of personnel training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rjona, Orison; Venegas, Maria del C.; Rodriguez, Lazaro; Lopez, Miguel A.; Armenteros, Ana L.

    1999-01-01

    In this work are described the fundamental possibilities and characteristics of a software that allows to carry out the management and automatic evaluation of all data gotten during jobs analysis and design, development, implementation and evaluation of personnel training programs of nuclear and radioactive installations and risk industries. The system that is introduced, GESAT, proportion a tool of centralized managerial control of training data and the obtaining of the quality objectives of each installation in the training of their personnel. GESAT includes all phases of SAT method (Systematic Approach to Training). It constitutes the necessary practical support for the elaboration, implementation and evaluation of training programs, allowing the establishment of restrictions and controls and avoiding inconsistencies in the process. It offers the possibility of automatic evaluation that identify fundamental deficiencies in the planning and implementation of training programs. This evaluation facilitates the systematic feed back and the continuous improvement of the training programs.(author)

  16. Building capacity in implementation science research training at the University of Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanjo, George O; Oyugi, Julius O; Kibwage, Isaac O; Mwanda, Walter O; Ngugi, Elizabeth N; Otieno, Fredrick C; Ndege, Wycliffe; Child, Mara; Farquhar, Carey; Penner, Jeremy; Talib, Zohray; Kiarie, James N

    2016-03-08

    Health care systems in sub-Saharan Africa, and globally, grapple with the problem of closing the gap between evidence-based health interventions and actual practice in health service settings. It is essential for health care systems, especially in low-resource settings, to increase capacity to implement evidence-based practices, by training professionals in implementation science. With support from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative, the University of Nairobi has developed a training program to build local capacity for implementation science. This paper describes how the University of Nairobi leveraged resources from the Medical Education Partnership to develop an institutional program that provides training and mentoring in implementation science, builds relationships between researchers and implementers, and identifies local research priorities for implementation science. The curriculum content includes core material in implementation science theory, methods, and experiences. The program adopts a team mentoring and supervision approach, in which fellows are matched with mentors at the University of Nairobi and partnering institutions: University of Washington, Seattle, and University of Maryland, Baltimore. A survey of program participants showed a high degree satisfaction with most aspects of the program, including the content, duration, and attachment sites. A key strength of the fellowship program is the partnership approach, which leverages innovative use of information technology to offer diverse perspectives, and a team model for mentorship and supervision. As health care systems and training institutions seek new approaches to increase capacity in implementation science, the University of Nairobi Implementation Science Fellowship program can be a model for health educators and administrators who wish to develop their program and curricula.

  17. Customer satisfaction with training programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this contribution, a model of evaluation of customer satisfaction about training programs is described. The model is developed and implemented for an association of training companies. The evaluation has been conducted by an independent organisation to enhance the thrustworthiness of the

  18. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The cornerstone of safe operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is personnel performing the day-to-day functions which accomplish the facility mission. Training that is conducted efficiently and effectively and is directly related to the needs of the job (i.e. performance-based training) is fundamental to safe operation. Responsibility for the safe operation of these facilities is a line management function. Therefore, achieving performance-based training requires commitment from the organization for which training is provided. This commitment includes making subject matter experts available for participation in and review of the products of the performance-based training process. It also includes budgeting and scheduling the time required for both initial and continuing training. This commitment must be made by corporate and facility senior management from the beginning. Management must get involved at the start to ensure that they are not only cognizant of ongoing activities, but are also involved to the degree necessary to thoroughly understand the process. Policies implemented and support demonstrated by senior management provide the driving force to ensure that training programs receive the attention that is imperative if facility training programs are to be successful

  19. Methods and results of implementing a commercially available videotaped health physics training program in a multi-disciplined DOE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia, a prime contractor for DOE, is a multi-disciplined research and development laboratory. Its various activities include the operations of two nuclear reactors, several multi-kilocurie gamma irradiation facilities, a transuranic hot cell facility, various and numerous particle accelerators and x-ray generators, and many other areas involving employees working with or around radioactive materials or radiation producing machines. Since March 1979, Sandia has conducted a formalized basic radiation safety training program using a commercially available videotaped training package. The videotapes are generic in nature and are accompanied with hard copy text material, vu-graphs, quizzes, and an instructor's guide. Sandia's overall training program and the methods, results, and problem areas of implementing an off the shelf, commercially available videotaped training program are described. Results are summarized using an instructor/course/student evaluation form

  20. TAP 3, Training Program Support Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should provide well-trained, qualified personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. A need has been identified for guidance regarding analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of consistent and reliable performance-based training programs. Accreditation of training programs at Category A reactors and high-hazard and selected moderate-hazard nonreactor nuclear facilities will assure consistent, appropriate, and cost-effective training of personnel responsible for the operation, maintenance, and technical support of these facilities. Training programs that are designed and based on systematically determined job requirements, instead of subjective estimation of trainee needs, yield training activities that are consistent and develop or improve knowledge, skills, and abilities that can be directly related to the work setting. Because the training is job-related, the content of these programs more efficiently and effectively meets the needs of the employee. Besides a better trained work force, a greater level of operational reactor safety can be realized. This manual is intended to provide an overview of the accreditation process and a brief description of the elements necessary to construct and maintain training programs that are based on the requirements of the job. Two companion manuals provide additional information to assist contractors in their efforts to accredit training programs

  1. Development and implementation of on-the-job training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of an effective on-the-job training (OJT) program is to ensure that nuclear power station personnel possess the required job-related knowledge and skills. Effective OJT consists of four elements: 1) the objectives, 2) the standards, 3) trainer/evaluator, 4) documentation. Once appropriate objectives and standards are established, training on each task or grouping of like tasks is conducted in two distinct steps; the trainee is taught, and the trainee is evaluated. The teaching step may be accomplished by trainee self-study, observation, discussion, simulation, and/or performance under the supervision of a qualified job incumbent or trainer. The evaluation step is typically a 'checkout' in which the trainee performs or simulates a task under the scrutiny of an evaluator and/or discusses the task if necessary. Both the teaching and evaluation steps are essential to effective OJT programs. The results of these steps are then documented to satisfy training record requirements and to provide input to the formal qualification process as appropriate. An example program that addresses the major elements of OJT has been attached

  2. THE INTERIM RESULTS AND THE WAYS TO IMPLEMENT THE PROGRAMS TEACHER TRAINING IN NETWORK FORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tolsteneva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of approbation of new modules primary educational undergraduate specialties Group expanded education and pedagogy (training areas-economics, involving academic mobility of students of universities in terms of networking of Novosibirsk and Nizhny Novgorod pedagogical universities. The article describes the structure of established affiliate networks, conducted pedagogical and methodical analysis modules have passed testing, recommendations for improvement and suggested ways for the development of a modular approach to building educational programs in teacher education system. The implementation of educational modules require their integration into the curricula of the Nizhny Novgorod State Pedagogical University, with no loss of content, giving the existing curriculum structure saturation. Thus, it was achieved 100% consistency of curriculum, opening further opportunities for the implementation of educational programs in terms of networking.

  3. SAT for instructor training. An experience in implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioujakov, A.Yu.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the main approaches for Instructor Training are presented been verified and approved by practice within Russian NPP Training organisations during last 5 years. The instructor selection, recruitment and followed training activities are an essential strategy plan for any NPP training organisation if the latter wants to provide effective training of NPP personnel. The strategy how to reach and maintain the competencies of instructors (or trainers) is explained; key points of instructor training programmes, both initial and continuing, are also discussed. The approaches concerned Instructor Training Programs being in compliance with the best of the Russian and international practice are defined and presented; these approaches in the field of instructor training. Initial and continuous training parts of whole program are discussed including specific modules/parts and principles to be used. Some examples extracted from verified and implemented training courses are presented and discussed. (author)

  4. Design of training programs for a positive youth development program: Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Chak, Yammy L Y

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate the implementation of the Secondary 1 to Secondary 3 program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong, systematic training programs are designed for the potential program implementers. The rationales, objectives and design of the Secondary 1 to Secondary 3 training programs are outlined in this paper. The training programs cover theories of adolescent development, positive youth development, background and curricula of the Project P.A.T.H.S., factors affecting program implementation quality and evaluation of the project. Besides introducing the curriculum units, the training programs also focus on nature of learning and related theories (particularly experiential learning), teaching methods and instructional techniques, motivating students, and classroom management.

  5. DOE Radiological Control Manual Core Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, H.L.; Maisler, J.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past year, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health (EH-40) has taken a leading role in the development of new standardized radiological control training programs for use throughout the DOE complex. The Department promulgated its Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual in June 1992. To ensure consistent application of the criteria presented in the RadCon Manual, standardized radiological control core training courses and training materials have been developed for implementation at all DOE facilities. In producing local training programs, standardized core courses are to be supplemented with site-specific lesson plans, viewgraphs, student handbooks, qualification standards, question banks, and wallet-sized training certificates. Training programs for General Employee Radiological Training, Radiological Worker I and II Training, and Radiological Control Technician Training have been disseminated. Also, training committees under the direction of the Office of Health (EH-40) have been established for the development of additional core training courses, development of examination banks, and the update of the existing core training courses. This paper discusses the current activities and future direction of the DOE radiological control core training program

  6. Personalized Training in Romanian SME’s ERP Implementation Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana DOROBAT

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many practitioners and IS researchers have stated that the overwhelming majority of Enter-prise Resource Planning (ERP systems implementations exceed their training budget and their time allocations. In consequence many Romanian SMEs that implement an ERP system are looking to new approaches of knowledge transfer and performance support that are better aligned with business goals, deliver measurable results and are cost effective. Thus, we have begun to analyze the training methods used in ERP implementation in order to provide a so-lution that could help us maximize the efficiency of an ERP training program. We proposed a framework of an ERPTraining module that can be integrated with a Romanian ERP system and which provides a training management that is more personalized, effective and less ex-pensive.

  7. Pilot implementation of training modules of the EMERALD program in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paulo R.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Okuno, Emico; Nersissian, Denise Y.; Terini, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    A research cooperation program was established between the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo and the King's College of London to conduct the translation to Portuguese language, adaptation and update of the X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology training module of the Emerald Program (www.emerald2.eu/cd/Emerald2/). The Emerald Program teaching material in X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology is divided in ten topics covering the basics of Diagnostic Radiology, Quality Control and Radiation Protection. The referred work, besides the translation of the texts into Portuguese, comprised the review of the previously produced material. During the review process, it was decided to update some of the training tasks and add more information related to current topics, such as digital X-ray imaging modalities, multislice computed tomography and tomosynthesis. These new additions will also be available in English. The translated or written texts have been submitted to a cross-reviewing process by the co-authors in order to standardize the language. Moreover, national radiological protection recommendations were included to assist the users of the teaching material with the Brazilian rules of radiation safety and quality control in X-ray medical applications. Part of the material was submitted to a validation and also to a practical assessment process by means of a critical analysis by experts in Medical Physics education during a workshop held in Sao Paulo in March 2014. Finally, a pilot implementation has been organized in order to do the last adjustments before making the material available to other users in Portuguese language. Further assessment and feedback procedures were planned in both London and Sao Paulo, aiming to evaluate and disseminate the final product. (author)

  8. Implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy in a Psychiatry Residency Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtmacher, Jonathan; Eisendrath, Stuart J.; Haller, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for depression is a brief, well researched treatment for acute major depression. This article describes the implementation of IPT as an evidence-based treatment for depression in a psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors tracked the implementation process over 5 years as interpersonal…

  9. Developing educational competencies for dissemination and implementation research training programs: an exploratory analysis using card sorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padek, Margaret; Colditz, Graham; Dobbins, Maureen; Koscielniak, Nikolas; Proctor, Enola K; Sales, Anne E; Brownson, Ross C

    2015-08-12

    With demand increasing for dissemination and implementation (D&I) training programs in the USA and other countries, more structured, competency-based, and tested curricula are needed to guide training programs. There are many benefits to the use of competencies in practice-based education such as the establishment of rigorous standards as well as providing an additional metrics for development and growth. As the first aim of a D&I training grant, an exploratory study was conducted to establish a new set of D&I competencies to guide training in D&I research. Based upon existing D&I training literature, the leadership team compiled an initial list of competencies. The research team then engaged 16 additional colleagues in the area of D&I science to provide suggestions to the initial list. The competency list was then additionally narrowed to 43 unique competencies following feedback elicited from these D&I researchers. Three hundred additional D&I researchers were then invited via email to complete a card sort in which the list of competencies were sorted into three categories of experience levels. Participants had previous first-hand experience with D&I or knowledge translation training programs in the past. Participants reported their self-identified D&I expertise level as well as the country in which their home institution is located. A mean score was calculated for each competency based on their experience level categorization. From these mean scores, beginner-, intermediate-, and advanced-level tertiles were created for the competencies. The card sort request achieved a 41 % response rate (n = 124). The list of 43 competencies was organized into four broad domains and sorted based on their experience level score. Eleven competencies were classified into the "Beginner" category, 27 into "Intermediate," and 5 into "Advanced." Education and training developers can use this competency list to formalize future trainings in D&I research, create more evidence

  10. Sustained Implementation Support Scale: Validation of a Measure of Program Characteristics and Workplace Functioning for Sustained Program Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Lauren M; Turner, Karen M T; Sanders, Matthew R; Filus, Ania

    2017-07-01

    An evaluation measure of enablers and inhibitors to sustained evidence-based program (EBP) implementation may provide a useful tool to enhance organizations' capacity. This paper outlines preliminary validation of such a measure. An expert informant and consumer feedback approach was used to tailor constructs from two existing measures assessing key domains associated with sustained implementation. Validity and reliability were evaluated for an inventory composed of five subscales: Program benefits, Program burden, Workplace support, Workplace cohesion, and Leadership style. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis with a sample of 593 Triple P-Positive Parenting Program-practitioners led to a 28-item scale with good reliability and good convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity. Practitioners sustaining implementation at least 3 years post-training were more likely to have supervision/peer support, reported higher levels of program benefit, workplace support, and positive leadership style, and lower program burden compared to practitioners who were non-sustainers.

  11. An e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer program to implement a suicide practice guideline. Rationale, content and dissemination in Dutch mental health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M. de; Beurs, D.P. de; Keijser, J. de; Kerkhof, A.F.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    An e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer program was developed to implement the Dutch suicide practice guideline inmental health care. Literature on implementation strategies has been restricted to the final reporting of studieswith little opportunity to describe relevant contextual, developmental

  12. Resilience Training for Healthcare Staff (RTHS) Implementation Evaluation Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-05

    healthcare, Master Resilience Training, MRT, MTF, medical treatment facility, program evaluation , implementation evaluation , OPORD 14-43, resilience...RTHS-certified Master Resilience Trainers (MRTs) among 73 MRTs whose status was confirmed. Seventy-one percent (n = 52) of these MRTs were fulfilling...Healthcare Staff (RTHS) Implementation Evaluation Phase 1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Start, Amanda

  13. Ontario Hydro's experience in implementing on-the-job training for chemical technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1989, Ontario Hydro Nuclear has been developing and implementing formalized On-the-Job Training for qualifying its nuclear power plant chemical laboratory staff. This paper focuses on the process followed in designing, developing and implementing this training, with emphasis on the strengths and weaknesses of the program. 7 refs, 3 figs

  14. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  15. Simulator program as a form of implementation of electronic teaching tools for self-study of foreign students at the stage of pre-university training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy O. Savel'ev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Questions of empowerment the organization of classroom and extracurricular self-study of foreign students at the stage of pre-university training through the implementation of electronic teaching tools as a component of computer training facilities in educational process are considered. Classification of modern electronic teaching tools as a component of computer hardware training, developed on the basis of modern information and communication technologies is offered. Version of program-simulator "Introductory course" is offered. The program is created by means of WEB-programming and uses training material of introductory course. Introductory course is one of the most important elements of teaching of scientific style of speech within the language training for the foreign students at the preparatory faculty.

  16. Training Veterans to Provide Peer Support in a Weight-Management Program: MOVE!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Carr, Carol; Orr, Melinda; Kahwati, Leila C.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Kinsinger, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has implemented MOVE!, a weight-management program for veterans designed to address the increasing proportion of overweight and obese veterans. The objective of our study was to determine whether peer support employing motivational interviewing (MI) could positively influence lifestyle changes, thus expanding the reach of the MOVE! program. We describe the initial evaluation of the peer training program. Methods We developed an MI peer counselor training program for volunteer veterans, the “Buddies” program, to provide one-on-one telephone support for veterans enrolled in MOVE!. Buddies were recruited at 5 VHA sites and trained to provide peer support for the 6-month MOVE! intervention. We used a DVD to teach MI skills and followed with 2 to 3 booster sessions. We observed training, conducted pre- and posttraining surveys, and debriefed focus groups to assess training feasibility. Results Fifty-six Buddies were trained. Results indicate positive receipt of the program (89% reported learning about peer counseling and 87% reported learning communication skills). Buddies showed a small improvement in MI self-efficacy on posttraining surveys. We also identified key challenges to learning MI and training implementation. Conclusions MI training is feasible to implement and acceptable to volunteer Buddies. Trainers must assess how effectively volunteers learn MI skills in order to enhance its effective use in health promotion. PMID:24199738

  17. ISO training program mixes lectures, hands-on exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakofsky, S.; Vitale, D.

    1994-01-01

    Early in 1990, the Dresser-Rand Co., made the decision to upgrade its purchased material quality program and pursue ISO 9000 registration for all product divisions. A joint quality-purchasing council from all US based divisions met and developed a new strategy that included: developing and maintaining a common external audit schedule eliminating duplicate audits; development of a formal training program for auditors; implementing a rule for all divisions that called for internal and external audits to be conducted by certified auditors; implementing an aggressive internal audit program for each division preparing for ISO 9001 or 9002 registration. Development of a formal training program began with educating and training future instructors. Two people were selected who had previous audit and quality system experience. Both were sent to various seminars on ISO 9000, attended a lead assessor course, passed the examination, and became registered with the Institute of Quality Assurance (IQA) in the United Kingdom. The original course was developed by a consultant along with one future instructor. Course content used traditional auditing methodology, but included many team exercises including an actual factory audit. The paper describes the methods and contents of this training course

  18. Implementation of radiation safety program in a medical institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanca, Elena D.

    1999-01-01

    A medical institution that utilizes radiation for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of malignancies develops and implements a radiation safety program to keep occupational exposures of radiation workers and exposures of non-radiation workers and the public to the achievable and a more achievable minimum, to optimize the use of radiation, and to prevent misadministration. The hospital radiation safety program is established by a core medical radiation committee composed of trained radiation safety officers and head of authorized users of radioactive materials and radiation machines from the different departments. The radiation safety program sets up procedural guidelines of the safe use of radioactive material and of radiation equipment. It offers regular training to radiation workers and radiation safety awareness courses to hospital staff. The program has a comprehensive radiation safety information system or radsis that circularizes the radiation safety program in the hospital. The radsis keeps the drafted and updated records of safety guides and policies, radioactive material and equipment inventory, personnel dosimetry reports, administrative, regulatory and licensing activity document, laboratory procedures, emergency procedures, quality assurance and quality control program process, physics and dosimetry procedures and reports, personnel and hospital staff training program. The medical radiation protection committee is tasked to oversee the actual implementation of the radiation safety guidelines in the different radiation facilities in the hospital, to review personnel exposures, incident reports and ALARA actions, operating procedures, facility inspections and audit reports, to evaluate the existing radiation safety procedures, to make necessary changes to these procedures, and make modifications of course content of the training program. The effective implementation of the radiation safety program provides increased confidence that the physician and

  19. Implementation of Mindfulness Training for Mental Health Staff: Organizational Context and Stakeholder Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Gerard; Ziedonis, Douglas M; McGrath, Caroline; Frazier, Jean A; deTorrijos, Fernando; Fulwiler, Carl

    2015-08-01

    Occupational stress and burnout adversely impacts mental health care staff well-being and patient outcomes. Mindfulness training reduces staff stress and may improve patient care. However, few studies explore mental health setting implementation. This qualitative study used focus groups to evaluate stakeholders' perceptions of organizational factors affecting implementation of an adapted version of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) for staff on adolescent mental health units. Common facilitators included leadership securing buy-in with staff, allocating staff time to participate, and quiet space for training and practice. Other facilitators were past staff knowledge of mindfulness, local champions, and acculturating staff with mindfulness through a non-mandatory training attendance policy. Common barriers were limited staff time to attend training sessions and insufficient training coverage for some staff. Staff also reported improved focus when interacting with adolescents and improved social cohesion on the units. We conclude that a mindfulness-based program for reducing occupational stress can be successfully implemented on adolescent mental health units. Implementation appeared to change the social context of the units, including staff and patient interactions. More broadly, our findings highlight the importance of environmental factors in shaping attitudes, diffusion of innovation, and acculturation of wellness program implementations.

  20. Middle East Studies Teacher Training Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefein, Naim A.

    This guide presents a teacher training program in Middle Eastern studies and procedures for program implementation. Details concerning program announcement, participant selection, and travel accommodations are included. Participants attended an orientation and registration workshop and an intensive academic workshop before flying to Egypt for the…

  1. Quality Assurance Plan for Transportation Management Division Transportation Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) implemented new rules requiring minimum levels of training for certain key individuals who handle, package, transport, or otherwise prepare hazardous materials for transportation. In response to these rules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Transportation Management Division (TMD), has developed a transportation safety training program. This program supplies designed instructional methodology and course materials to provide basic levels of DOT training to personnel for whom training has become mandatory. In addition, this program provides advanced hazardous waste and radioactive material packaging and transportation training to help personnel achieve proficiency and/or certification as hazardous waste and radioactive material shippers. This training program does not include site-specific or task-specific training beyond DOT requirements

  2. Training programming: revisiting terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário C. Marques

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Does the way the literature presents the classic periodization or programming make sense? In our opinion, the answer is clearly no. To get started, periodization and programming are terms used interchangeably (as synonyms in scientific literature when they actually have different meanings. Thus, to periodize is to set periods for a process (e.g., to a season or the sports life, whereas programming is defined as to devise and order the necessary actions to carry out a project. Accordingly, coaches and physical conditioning professionals should divide or periodize the season in different cycles and then, within each cycle, programming the training sessions. The periodization should not only help to structure the training process, but also to express the goals to achieve, to control the training process evolution and allow a great execution of the action plan. When designing a plan, we simply organize all the “ingredients” that should be part of the work/training design in a concrete and detailed way. From a scientific point of view, the programming is nothing more than an adequate interpretation of the training biological laws (Tschione, 1992; Latonov, 1997, Issurin, 2008 and must have the performance improvement as the major reference criteria (Issurin 2010. In practice, during the last decades, we have followed a set of instructions mainly based on experienced coaches (Matveyev, 1981, Bompa, 1994, Zatsiorsky, 1995 who have obtained relevant results. As a consequence, it is very difficult to accept another solid scientific based vision or proposal since the accumulation of systematic experiences has led to the construction of a theoretical model, even though there are no scientific evidences. The multiplication and implementation of the traditional programming models (Matveyev, 1981, Bompa, 1994 have guided us to a set of erroneous terms, among which we highlight the “micro”, the “meso” and the “macro” cycles, that were never

  3. The manpower training and development programs of NUCLEBRAS for the Brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.; Lerner Neto, C.; Stilben, V.; Botelho, O.

    1984-01-01

    As technology transfer is one of the main objectives of the Brazilian Nuclear Program, the principal aim of manpower training has been to provide the conditions for absorbing this technology. The strategy used for such a program required a quantitative and qualitative planning of manpower needs, through medium-range and long-term forecasts, with the condition of maximum utilization of the existing educational infra-structure. On-the-job training which is considered one of the most important means for technology transfer, was given highest priority. Also, management development was considered very important for the implementation of the Nuclear Program. This paper shows the results achieved from 1973 up to now by the manpower training and development programs. (Author) [pt

  4. Systematic review of the implementation of simulation training in surgical residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Yo; Hirano, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    We reviewed the literature regarding the specific methods and strategies for implementing simulation-based training into the modern surgical residency curriculum. Residency programs are still struggling with how best to implement it into their curricula from a practical viewpoint. A systematic review was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and other resources for studies involving the use of simulation for technical skills training in the surgical residency curriculum. Studies were selected based on the integration of simulation into the curriculum and/or a description of the details of implementation and the resources required. In total, 2533 unique citations were retrieved based on this search, and 31 articles met the inclusion criteria. Most simulators were focused on laparoscopic procedures, and training occurred most often in a skills lab. The assessment of skills consisted mostly of speed of task completion. Only 4 studies addressed issues of cost, and 6 programs mentioned human resources without any mention of skills center personnel or administrative support. All of the studies described the nature of the simulation training, but very few commented on how it was actually implemented and what was needed from organizational, administrative and logistical perspectives.

  5. [Training program in endourological surgery. Future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Federico; Villacampa, Felipe; Serrano, Alvaro; Moreno, Jesús; Rioja, Jorge; Sánchez, Francisco Miguel

    2018-01-01

    Current training in urological endoscopy lacks a specific training program. However, there is a clear need for a specific and uniform program, which will ensure the training, regardless of the unit where it is carried out. So, the goal is to first evaluate the current model and then bring improvements for update. The hospital training accreditation programme are only the adjustment of the official program of the urology specialty to the specific circumstances of each center, which causes variability in training of residents. After reviewing 19 training programs belonging to 12 Spanish regions. The current outlook shows that scarcely 10% of hospitals quantify the number of procedures/ year, although the Spanish program emphasizes that the achievement of the residents should be quantified. Urology residents, sense their training as inadequate and therefore their level of satisfaction is moderate. The three main problems detected by residents as an obstacle on their training are: the lack of supervision, tutors completing their own learning. Finally, the lack of quantification in surgical activities is described as a threat. This has no easy solution, since the learning curve of the most common techniques in endourology is not correctly established. Regarding aspects that can improve the current model, they highlight the need to design a specific program. The need to customize the training, the ineludible accreditation of tutors and obviously dignify the tutor's teaching activity. Another basic aspect is the inclusion of new technologies as training tools, e-learning. As well as the implementation of an adequate competency assessment plan and the possibility of relying on simulation systems. Finally, they highlight the need to attend monographic meetings and external clinic rotations to promote critical training.

  6. Exploring Effects of Organizational Culture upon Implementation of Information Security Awareness and Training Programs within the Defense Industry Located in the Tennessee Valley Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Robert Luther

    2017-01-01

    Data breaches due to social engineering attacks and employee negligence are on the rise. The only known defense against social engineering attacks and employee negligence is information security awareness and training. However, implementation of awareness and training programs within organizations are lagging in priority. This research used the…

  7. Implementing Expertise-Based Training Methods to Accelerate the Development of Peer Academic Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The field of expertise studies offers several models from which to develop training programs that accelerate the development of novice performers in a variety of domains. This research study implemented two methods of expertise-based training in a course to develop undergraduate peer academic coaches through a ten-week program. An existing…

  8. Evaluation of training programs: A pragmatic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Canadian nuclear regulatory agency endorses the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) as the most reliable method of providing effective, efficient training to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) personnel. However the benefits of SAT cannot be realized unless all five phases of SAT are implemented. This is particularly true with respect to evaluation. Although each phase of SAT builds on the preceding one, the evaluation phase continuously feeds back into each of the others and also provides the means to verify the entire training programme building process. It is useful, therefore, to examine the issues relating to the what, why, who, when and how of training programme evaluation. ''What'' identifies the various aspects of the training programme to be evaluated, including the need for training, the training standard, the task list, trainer competence, test results, training results, program acceptance and numerous indicators that identify a need for evaluation. ''Why'' addresses legal and regulatory aspects, resource management, worker and public safety, worker and trainer competence and morale, and the cost/benefit of the training program. ''Who'' examines the need to involve trainers, trainees, plant subject matter experts (SMEs), and both plant and training centre supervisory and management staff. ''When'' addresses time-related concerns such as the importance of ensuring at the outset that the training program is actually needed, the necessity of responding promptly to local, national and world events, changes in legal and regulatory responsibilities, and the overriding importance of timely, routine training program evaluations. ''How'' describes the process of conducting a training program evaluation, and addresses the relationships of these five aspects of evaluation to each other. (author). 10 refs

  9. Implementation of a Cognitive Skills Training Program in ROTC: The Leadership Enrichment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    IMPLEMENTATION ..................... B-i C. LEP BRIDGING MANUAL . ............... ..... C-I D. ROTC INSTRUCTORS TRAINED IN IE ............... D-1 E. BASIC...cognitive ability. The importance of thinking ability is em- phasized throughout the leadership field manual , FM-22-100, particularly in the sections...haplamtation * Qonfeaumos Calls, * Gonctmetr Site Visits * instrutor 4-5/85 questionnaires Got Feeback an * Conference Camll * Ref ruskur Session 2/85 Frolow

  10. Training for successful lean manufacturing implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Ichimura, Maki; Jahankhani, Hamid; Arunachalam, Subramaniam

    2006-01-01

    Implementing lean manufacturing is a complex and everlasting task. The workers involving in production processes are the pivot of the lean manufacturing implementation. Training is known as a vehicle to assist the implementation process. Despite awareness of the training importance, so far, a little is available to assist to organise an efficient training. This paper summarises the overview of lean manufacturing and discuss the importance of human resource within lean implementation process. ...

  11. How to Train Safe Drivers: Setting Up and Evaluating a Fatigue Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamos Giannis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is considered as a serious risk driving behavior, causing road accidents, which in many cases involve fatalities and severe injuries. According to CARE database statistics, professional drivers are indicated as a high-risk group to be involved in a fatigue-related accident. Acknowledging these statistics, a training program on driving fatigue was organized, aiming at raising awareness of professional drivers of a leading company in building materials, in Greece. Selected experimental methods were used for collecting data before and after the training program, which allowed monitoring and assessing the potential behavioural changes. A questionnaire survey was conducted before the program implementation to 162 drivers of the company, while two months after the program, the same drivers replied to a second questionnaire. Impact assessment of the program relied on statistical analysis of the responses. Results showed the degree of penetration of the training program in the professional drivers' behavior towards safe driving.

  12. Leadership training design, delivery, and implementation: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerenza, Christina N; Reyes, Denise L; Marlow, Shannon L; Joseph, Dana L; Salas, Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    Recent estimates suggest that although a majority of funds in organizational training budgets tend to be allocated to leadership training (Ho, 2016; O'Leonard, 2014), only a small minority of organizations believe their leadership training programs are highly effective (Schwartz, Bersin, & Pelster, 2014), calling into question the effectiveness of current leadership development initiatives. To help address this issue, this meta-analysis estimates the extent to which leadership training is effective and identifies the conditions under which these programs are most effective. In doing so, we estimate the effectiveness of leadership training across four criteria (reactions, learning, transfer, and results; Kirkpatrick, 1959) using only employee data and we examine 15 moderators of training design and delivery to determine which elements are associated with the most effective leadership training interventions. Data from 335 independent samples suggest that leadership training is substantially more effective than previously thought, leading to improvements in reactions (δ = .63), learning (δ = .73), transfer (δ = .82), and results (δ = .72), the strength of these effects differs based on various design, delivery, and implementation characteristics. Moderator analyses support the use of needs analysis, feedback, multiple delivery methods (especially practice), spaced training sessions, a location that is on-site, and face-to-face delivery that is not self-administered. Results also suggest that the content of training, attendance policy, and duration influence the effectiveness of the training program. Practical implications for training development and theoretical implications for leadership and training literatures are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Leadership Training in an MBA Program Using Peer-Led Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Gregory; Frye, Robin; Mantena, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Leadership training is an important part of any MBA program, but is often difficult to provide in an effective way. Over the last three years, we implemented a program of Peer-Led Team Learning in two core courses of our MBA curriculum, which we believe provides a good solution. The program combines leadership training with practical hands-on…

  14. Training program in radiation protection: implantation in a radiation oncology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chretien, Mario; Morrier, Janelle; Cote, Carl; Lavallee, Marie C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To introduce the radiation protection training program implemented in the radiation oncology department of the Hotel-Dieu de Quebec. This program seeks to provide an adequate training for all the clinic workers and to fulfill Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) legislations. Materials and Methods: The radiation protection training program implemented is based on the use of five different education modalities: 1) Oral presentations, when the objective of the formation is to inform a large number of persons about general topics; 2) Periodic journals are published bimonthly and distributed to members of the department. They aim to answer frequently asked questions on the radiation safety domain. Each journal contains one main subject which is vulgarized and short notices, these later added to inform the readers about the departmental news and developments in radiation safety; 3) Electronic self-training presentations are divided into several units. Topics, durations, complexity and evaluations are adapted for different worker groups; 4) Posters are strategically displayed in the department in order to be read by all the radiation oncology employees, even those who are not specialized in the radiation protection area; 5) Simulations are organized for specialised workers to practice and to develop their skills in radiation protection situations as emergencies. A registration method was developed to record all training performed by each member of the department. Results: The training program implemented follows the CNSC recommendations. It allows about 150 members of the department to receive proper radiation safety training. The oral presentations allow an interaction between the trainer and the workers. The periodic journals are simple to write while ensuring continuous training. They are also easy to read and to understand. The e-learning units and their associated evaluations can be done at any time and everywhere in the department. The

  15. Institutional training programs for research personnel conducted by laboratory-animal veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Melissa C; Rush, Howard G

    2012-01-01

    Research institutions are required by federal law and national standards to ensure that individuals involved in animal research are appropriately trained in techniques and procedures used on animals. Meeting these requirements necessitates the support of institutional authorities; policies for the documentation and enforcement of training; resources to support and provide training programs; and high-quality, effective educational material. Because of their expertise, laboratory-animal veterinarians play an essential role in the design, implementation, and provision of educational programs for faculty, staff, and students in biomedical research. At large research institutions, provision of a training program for animal care and use personnel can be challenging because of the animal-research enterprise's size and scope. At the University of Michigan (UM), approximately 3,500 individuals have direct contact with animals used in research. We describe a comprehensive educational program for animal care and use personnel designed and provided by laboratory-animal veterinarians at UM and discuss the challenges associated with its implementation.

  16. A Meta-Analysis of Skills Training Programs for Rehabilitation Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Brian; Akridge, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Summarized the results of 15 experimental studies of 10 small-group skills training interventions developed for use with vocational rehabilitation clients. Concluded that the typical participant in skills training interventions received substantial benefit from the activity. Skills training programs should be implemented more widely with clients…

  17. Software engineering and Ada (Trademark) training: An implementation model for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Sue; Freedman, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The choice of Ada for software engineering for projects such as the Space Station has resulted in government and industrial groups considering training programs that help workers become familiar with both a software culture and the intricacies of a new computer language. The questions of how much time it takes to learn software engineering with Ada, how much an organization should invest in such training, and how the training should be structured are considered. Software engineering is an emerging, dynamic discipline. It is defined by the author as the establishment and application of sound engineering environments, tools, methods, models, principles, and concepts combined with appropriate standards, guidelines, and practices to support computing which is correct, modifiable, reliable and safe, efficient, and understandable throughout the life cycle of the application. Neither the training programs needed, nor the content of such programs, have been well established. This study addresses the requirements for training for NASA personnel and recommends an implementation plan. A curriculum and a means of delivery are recommended. It is further suggested that a knowledgeable programmer may be able to learn Ada in 5 days, but that it takes 6 to 9 months to evolve into a software engineer who uses the language correctly and effectively. The curriculum and implementation plan can be adapted for each NASA Center according to the needs dictated by each project.

  18. Dedicated training program for shoulder sonography: the results of a quality program reverberate with everyone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzell, Patricia B; Boyle, Alex; Schneider, Erika

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to define and report on the effect of a comprehensive musculoskeletal sonography training program to improve accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears in relatively inexperienced operators. Before the training program was implemented, radiologists (n = 12) had a mean of 2 years (range, training shoulder sonographic results were compared to surgical reports or, in their absence, to shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic arthrographic results if within 2 months of the sonographic examination. A total of 82 patients were included in the pre-training group (January 2010-December 2011), and 50 patients were included in the post-training group (January 2012-June 2013). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were determined for the presence or absence of supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon tears. After implementation of the training program, the sensitivity of sonography for detecting full-thickness rotator cuff tears increased by 14%, and the sensitivity for detecting partial-thickness rotator cuff tears increased by 3%. Quality improvement programs and acquisition standardization along with ongoing, focused case conferences for the entire care team increased the sensitivity of shoulder sonography for diagnosing both full- and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, independent of the years of operator experience. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Workplace Mental Health Training in Health Care: Key Ingredients of Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Sandra E; VandenBussche, Jessica; Brooks, Katelyn; Kirsh, Bonnie; Stuart, Heather; Patten, Scott; MacDermid, Joy C

    2018-01-01

    Despite growing awareness of the importance of workplace mental health training and an increasing number of educational resources, there is a gap in knowledge regarding what shapes training effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to compare and describe the active ingredients of 2 workplace mental health education programs for health care workers. Within the context of a randomized clinical trial, a multimethod process evaluation was conducted to explore key process elements shaping implementation outcomes: the innovation, service recipients, service providers, and the organizational context. Data collection included descriptive statistics regarding program participation, postprogram interviews with a purposive sample of 18 service recipients, 182 responses to open-ended questions on postgroup and follow-up surveys, and field journal reflections on the process of implementation. Data analysis was informed by an interpretive description approach, using a process evaluation framework to categorize responses from all data sources, followed by within and cross-case comparison of data from both programs. Five key forces shaped the implementation and perceived outcomes of both programs: a contact-based education approach, information tailored to the workplace context, varied stakeholder perspectives, sufficient time to integrate and apply learning, and organizational support. The Beyond Silence program provided more opportunity for contact-based education, health care-specific content, and in-depth discussion of diverse perspectives. To increase mental health literacy and reduce stigma, workplace training should be based on best practice principles of contact-based education, with contextually relevant examples and support from all levels of the organization.

  20. The feasibility of implementing a communication skills training course in pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Lauren; Figueiredo, Lisa; Roth, Michael; Levy, Adam

    Communication skills are a competency highlighted by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education; yet, little is known about the frequency with which trainees receive formal training or what programs are willing to invest. We sought to answer this question and designed a program to address identified barriers. We surveyed pediatric fellowship program directors from all disciplines and, separately, pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship program directors to determine current use of formal communication skills training. At our institution, we piloted a standardized patient (SP)-based communication skills training program for pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Twenty-seven pediatric hematology/oncology program directors and 44 pediatric program directors participated in the survey, of which 56% and 48%, respectively, reported having an established, formal communication skills training course. Multiple barriers to implementation of a communication skills course were identified, most notably time and cost. In the pilot program, 13 pediatric hematology/oncology fellows have participated, and 9 have completed all 3 years of training. Precourse assessment demonstrated fellows had limited comfort in various areas of communication. Following course completion, there was a significant increase in self-reported comfort and/or skill level in such areas of communication, including discussing a new diagnosis (p =.0004), telling a patient they are going to die (p =.005), discussing recurrent disease (p communicating a poor prognosis (p =.002), or responding to anger (p ≤.001). We have designed a concise communication skills training program, which addresses identified barriers and can feasibly be implemented in pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship.

  1. Factors related to leader implementation of a nationally disseminated community-based exercise program: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Economos Christina D

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits of community-based health programs are widely recognized. However, research examining factors related to community leaders' characteristics and roles in implementation is limited. Methods The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to use a social ecological framework of variables to explore and describe the relationships between socioeconomic, personal/behavioral, programmatic, leadership, and community-level social and demographic characteristics as they relate to the implementation of an evidence-based strength training program by community leaders. Eight-hundred fifty-four trained program leaders in 43 states were invited to participate in either an online or mail survey. Corresponding community-level characteristics were also collected. Programmatic details were obtained from those who implemented. Four-hundred eighty-seven program leaders responded to the survey (response rate = 57%, 78% online and 22% by mail. Results Of the 487 respondents, 270 implemented the program (55%. One or more factors from each category – professional, socioeconomic, personal/behavioral, and leadership characteristics – were significantly different between implementers and non-implementers, determined by chi square or student's t-tests as appropriate. Implementers reported higher levels of strength training participation, current and lifetime physical activity, perceived support, and leadership competence (all p Conclusion Among this sample of trained leaders, several factors within the professional, socioeconomic, personal/behavioral, and leadership categories were related to whether they implemented a community-based exercise program. It may benefit future community-based physical activity program disseminations to consider these factors when selecting and training leaders.

  2. Hanford general employee training - A million dollar cost beneficial program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, P.R.

    1991-02-01

    In January 1990, Westinghouse Hanford Company implemented an interactive videodisc training program entitled Hanford General Employee Training. Covering all Institute of Nuclear Power Operations general employee training objectives, training mandated by US Department of Energy orders, and training prescribed by internal Westinghouse Hanford Company policies, Hanford General Employee Training presents and manages engaging training programs individually tailored to each of the 9,000 employees. Development costs for a sophisticated program such as Hanford General Employee Training were high compared to similar costs for developing ''equivalent'' traditional training. Hardware ($500,000) and labor costs ($400,000) totaled $900,000. Annual maintenance costs, equipment plus labor, are totalling about $200,000. On the benefit side, by consolidating some 17 previous Westinghouse Hanford Company courses and more effectively managing the instructional process, Hanford General Employee Training reduced the average student training time from over 11 hours to just under 4 hours. For 9,000 employees, the computed net annual savings exceeds $1.3 million. 2 refs

  3. Report: Environmental Job Training Program Implemented Well, But Focus Needed on Possible Duplication With Other EPA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0843, September 21, 2012. EPA effectively established and adhered to competitive criteria that resulted in the selection of job training proposals that addressed the broad goals of the Environmental Job Training program.

  4. Staff training program of CANDU projects in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the training process for a nuclear project on a new site. When AECL opened a project office Saskatoon, senior management recognized the need for large scale staff training and made the necessary commitments. Two types of training programs were initiated, general and technical. The general training plan included topics related to nuclear project life cycle. Technical training was discipline and task specific. Based on the job descriptions and staff qualifications, technical training requirements were documented for the entire staff. The training strategy was developed and implemented. Detailed records were maintained to monitor the progress, draw conclusions, and plan training for future nuclear facilities. (author)

  5. Workplace Training Programs: Instruments for Human Capital Improvements or Screening Devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Irene; Corsini, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of an Italian training program on the re-employment probability of young unemployed workers. The program consists exclusively of workplace training and is coordinated by employment centers, even if it is fully implemented by firms. Design/Methodology/Approach: The authors develop a…

  6. Radiation Oncology Training Program Curriculum developments in Australia and New Zealand: Design, implementation and evaluation--What next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sandra; Seel, Matthew; Berry, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The Australian and New Zealand Radiation Oncology Training Program has undergone major changes to align with pedagogical principles and best-evidence practice. The curriculum was designed around the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists framework and involved structural programme changes and new in-training assessment. This paper summarises the work of programme design and implementation and presents key findings from an evaluation of the revised programme. An independent team conducted the evaluation during the last year of the first 5-year curriculum cycle. Opinions were sought from trainees, supervisors and directors of training (DoTs) through online surveys, focused interviews and group consultations. One hundred nineteen participated in surveys; 211 participated in consultations. All training networks were represented. The new curriculum was viewed favourably by most participants with over 90% responding that it 'provided direction in attaining competencies'. Most (87/107; 81%) said it 'promotes regular, productive interaction between trainees and supervisors'. Adequacy of feedback to trainees was rated as only 'average' by trainees/trainers in one-third of cases. Consultations revealed this was more common where trainers were less familiar with curriculum tools. Half of DoTs/supervisors felt better supported. Nearly two-third of all responders (58/92; 63%) stated that clinical service requirements could be met during training; 17/92 (18.5%) felt otherwise. When asked about 'work-readiness', 59/90 (66%) respondents, including trainees, felt this was improved. Findings suggest that the 'new' curriculum has achieved many of its aims, and implementation has largely been successful. Outcomes focus future work on better supporting trainers in using curriculum tools and providing useful feedback to trainees. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. Radiation Oncology Training Program Curriculum developments in Australia and New Zealand: Design, implementation and evaluation - what next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Sandra; Seel, Matthew; Berry, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The Australian and New Zealand Radiation Oncology Training Program has undergone major changes to align with pedagogical principles and best-evidence practice. The curriculum was designed around the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists framework and involved structural programme changes and new in-training assessment. This paper summarises the work of programme design and implementation and presents key findings from an evaluation of the revised programme. An independent team conducted the evaluation during the last year of the first 5-year curriculum cycle. Opinions were sought from trainees, supervisors and directors of training (DoTs) through online surveys, focused interviews and group consultations. One hundred nineteen participated in surveys; 211 participated in consultations. All training networks were represented. The new curriculum was viewed favourably by most participants with over 90% responding that it ‘provided direction in attaining competencies’. Most (87/107; 81%) said it ‘promotes regular, productive interaction between trainees and supervisors’. Adequacy of feedback to trainees was rated as only ‘average’ by trainees/trainers in one-third of cases. Consultations revealed this was more common where trainers were less familiar with curriculum tools. Half of DoTs/supervisors felt better supported. Nearly two-third of all responders (58/92; 63%) stated that clinical service requirements could be met during training; 17/92 (18.5%) felt otherwise. When asked about ‘work-readiness’, 59/90 (66%) respondents, including trainees, felt this was improved. Findings suggest that the ‘new’ curriculum has achieved many of its aims, and implementation has largely been successful. Outcomes focus future work on better supporting trainers in using curriculum tools and providing useful feedback to trainees.

  8. GESAT: System for management and evaluation of training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona, O.; Venegas, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Lopez, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describe the criteria considered to design the GESAT system, the elements considered to select the relational model, selection of the database language and the main features and possibilities of this system. GESAT allow the management of training programs based on the Systematic Approach to Training. Include the information related with all SAT phases, the results of the job analysis, training plans design, development of materials, training implementation, and the subsequent evaluation

  9. Management assessments of Quality Assurance Program implementation effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a method currently being used by UNC Nuclear Industries, Richland, Washington, to help assure the effectiveness of Quality Assurance (QA) Program implementation. Assessments are conducted annually by management in each department, and the results summarized to the president and his staff. The purpose of these assessments is to review the adequacy of the department's implementing procedures, training/instruction on implementing procedures, and procedure implementation effectiveness. The primary purpose is to assess effectiveness and take improvement action where the need is indicated. The QA organization provides only general guidance in conducting the assessments

  10. Guidelines for development of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) computer security training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    The report presents guidance for the NASA Computer Security Program Manager and the NASA Center Computer Security Officials as they develop training requirements and implement computer security training programs. NASA audiences are categorized based on the computer security knowledge required to accomplish identified job functions. Training requirements, in terms of training subject areas, are presented for both computer security program management personnel and computer resource providers and users. Sources of computer security training are identified.

  11. Nurse-Driven Training Courses: Impact on Implementation of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félez-Carrobé, Estel; Sagarra-Tió, Maria; Romero, Araceli; Rubio, Montserrat; Planas, Lourdes; Pérez-Lucena, María José; Baiget, Montserrat; Cabistañ, Cristina; Félez, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) predicts cardiovascular risk and identifies white-coat and masked hypertension, efficacy of treatment and the circadian cycle of hypertensive patients. Objective: To analyze the effectiveness of ABPM implementation thoughtout a nurse-driven training program. Materials and Methodology: Twenty eight professionals were involved in the study carried out in the primary care center of the metropolitan area of Barcelona that serves 34,289 inhabitants. The ABPM implementation program was driven by two nurses that held four education sessions. After a 2-year follow-up period, we assessed the outcome of attendance at the educational sessions. First, we evaluated whether the program increased the number of orders of ABPM. Second, we used a survey to evaluate to what extent the input of our educational sessions was understood by attendants. Third, we analyzed the effect ABPM results had on the treatment of patients with a bad control of their hypertension. Results: After the training sessions we found a 6-fold increase in the number of patients undergoing ABPM. We analyzed 204 hypertensive individuals: 41% dippers, 34% were non-dippers, 20% were risers and 5% were extremely dippers. According to our survey, 100% of attendants had a good practice regarding ABPM management. However only 27% of riser patients were studied with a second ABPM. Conclusions: Specific training processes are needed for implementation of ABPM and an even more concentrated effort should be focused on training in the correct interpretation of ABPM results. PMID:23750185

  12. Facilitating the implementation of the American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery phase III skills curriculum: training faculty in the assessment of team skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Louise; Arora, Sonal; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-11-01

    Effective teamwork is critical to safety in the operating room; however, implementation of phase III of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) Curriculum that focuses on team-based skills remains worryingly low. Training and assessing the complexities of teamwork is challenging. The objective of this study was to establish guidelines and recommendations for training faculty in assessing/debriefing team skills. A multistage survey-based consensus study was completed by 108 experts responsible for training and assessing surgical residents from the ACS Accredited Educational Institutes. Experts agreed that a program to teach faculty to assess team-based skills should include training in the recognition of teamwork skills, practice rating these skills, and training in the provision of feedback/debriefing. Agreement was reached that faculty responsible for conducting team-based skills assessment should be revalidated every 2 years and stringent proficiency criteria should be met. Faculty development is critical to ensure high-quality, standardized training and assessment. Training faculty to assess team-based skills has the potential to facilitate the effective implementation of phase III of the ACS and APDS Curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Health workers' views of a program to facilitate physical health care in mental health settings: implications for implementation and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wendy; Harris, Melanie; Battersby, Malcolm

    2014-12-01

    Physical comorbidities shorten the lifespan of people with severe mental illness therefore mental health clinicians need to support service users in risk factor-related behaviour change. We investigated mental health care workers' views of a physical health self-management support program in order to identify implementation requirements. Qualitative interviews were conducted with workers who had differing levels of experience with a self-management support program. Themes were identified using interpretive descriptive analysis and then matched against domains used in implementation models to draw implications for successful practice change. Three main themes emerged related to: (1) understandings of disease management within job roles; (2) requirements for putting self-management support into practice; and (3) challenges of coordination in disease management. Priority domains from implementation models were inner and outer health service settings. While staff training is required, practice change for care which takes account of both mental and physical health also requires changes in organisational frameworks. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  14. Interprofessional SDM train-the-trainer program "Fit for SDM": provider satisfaction and impact on participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Mirjam; Ehrhardt, Heike; Steger, Anne-Kathrin; Bengel, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the interprofessional SDM training program "Fit for SDM" in medical rehabilitation, which was implemented in two steps: (1) university staff trained providers in executive positions as trainers and (2) the providers trained their staff. For the evaluation of the first step a questionnaire for shared decision-making (SDM) skills and satisfaction with the training was completed by the providers in executive positions. A staff survey was used in a cluster-randomized controlled study to determine the overall impact of the train-the-trainer program on internal and external participation in the team. The providers in the six clinics evaluated their SDM competences and satisfaction very positively after training (step 1). External participation was enhanced by application of the training content, with significant changes recorded for females and nurses in particular. However, it had no direct influence on internal participation. This is the first interprofessional SDM train-the-trainer program in Germany to bridge interprofessionalism (internal participation) and SDM (external participation); it was implemented successfully and evaluated positively. Establishing interprofessional SDM training programs should be encouraged for all health care professionals. Implementation in the interprofessional setting should consider interprofessional team factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Awareness Training Program on Responsible Gambling for Casino Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Isabelle; Boutin, Claude; Ladouceur, Robert; Lachance, Stella; Dufour, Magali

    2008-01-01

    Over the last years, several comprehensive training programs for problem gambling have been developed and implemented in various casinos around the world. However, the efficacy of these programs has rarely been assessed and evaluated scientifically. A workshop called "Des gens qui font la difference" (People Making a Difference) was…

  16. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia J; Cotrina, Armando; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Elsa; Buffardi, Anne L

    2010-09-28

    There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings.

  17. Implementation of the INEEL safety analyst training standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochhalter, E. E.

    2000-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) safety analysis units at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are in the process of implementing the recently issued INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107). Safety analyst training and qualifications are integral to the development and maintenance of core safety analysis capabilities. The INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107) was developed directly from EFCOG Training Subgroup draft safety analyst training plan template, but has been adapted to the needs and requirements of the INEEL safety analysis community. The implementation of this Safety Analyst Training Standard is part of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Implementation currently underway at the INEEL. The objective of this paper is to discuss (1) the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard, (2) the development of the safety analyst individual training plans, (3) the implementation issues encountered during this initial phase of implementation, (4) the solutions developed, and (5) the implementation activities remaining to be completed

  18. The implementation and evaluation of a mandatory multi-professional obstetric skills training program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Johansen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    , shoulder dystocia, basic neonatal resuscitation, and severe preeclampsia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Before, just after and 9-15 months following the training, data were collected on the confidence and stress levels relating to the carrying out of certain procedures. In addition, a written objective test...... of all respondents had a positive attitude toward the training program. They considered management of shoulder dystocia, preeclampsia, and neonatal resuscitation less stresful and less unpleasant to perform after training. Confidence scores for all the trained skills improved significantly. A significant...

  19. The Role of Practitioner Self-Efficacy, Training, Program and Workplace Factors on the Implementation of an Evidence-Based Parenting Intervention in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Karen M. T.; Nicholson, Jan M.; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting the implementation by primary care practitioners (nursing, education, allied health, and medical) of a brief parenting and family support intervention (the Primary Care Triple P--Positive Parenting Program) following professional training. It assesses the impact of prior experience, self-efficacy, program…

  20. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Training Accreditation Program establishes the objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine its readiness for accreditation. Training programs are evaluated against the accreditation objectives and criteria by facility personnel during the initial self-evaluation process. From this self-evaluation, action plans are made by the contractor to address the scope of work necessary in order to upgrade any deficiencies noted. This scope of work must be formally documented in the Training Program Accreditation Plan. When reviewed and approved by the responsible Head of the Field Organization and cognizant Program Secretarial Office, EH-1 concurrence is obtained. This plan then becomes the document which guides accreditation efforts for the contractor

  1. A Preliminary Evaluation of Instructional Effectiveness of Online Training Implemented at a Government Agency in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supanakorn-Davila, Supawan; Bolliger, Doris U.

    2012-01-01

    Online training has become popular in the professional development of government employees in Thailand. One large government agency developed an online program to provide training to its employees across the country using two systems: an Internet and Intranet-based system. With the new program implemented, the evaluation of the instructional…

  2. The impact of a faculty training program on inclusive education and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriña, Anabel; Carballo, Rafael

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the knowledge gained by 20 faculty members following their participation in a training program on inclusive education and disability. The study, which was conducted at an university in Spain, aimed to design, implement and evaluate a program for training faculty members to respond in an inclusive manner to the needs of students with disabilities. An initial, formative and summative qualitative evaluation was carried out and four instruments were used for collecting the data: group and individual interviews, written open-ended questionnaires and observations. The data were analyzed inductively, using a category and code system. The results reveal that, after the training program, faculty considered what they had learned to be useful for their professional practice and highlighted that they felt better-informed and better-trained in relation to disability and were more aware of the needs of students with disabilities. Finally, in the conclusions section, the paper discusses the results in relation to those reported by other studies, and offers some recommendations for universities planning to implement training policies designed to build more inclusive learning environments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings. PMID:20875140

  4. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Elsa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings.

  5. Development and Implementation of a Model Training Program to Assist Special Educators, Parks and Resource Management Personnel and Parents to Cooperatively Plan and Conduct Outdoor/Environmental Education Programs for Handicapped Children and Youth. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinton, Dennis A.; Zachmeyer, Richard F.

    This final report presents a description of a 3-year project to develop and implement a model training program (for special education personnel, park and resource management personnel, and parents of disabled children) designed to promote outdoor environmental education for disabled children. The project conducted 22 training workshops (2-5 days)…

  6. Drug use prevention: factors associated with program implementation in Brazilian urban schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Paula Dias; Sanchez, Zila M

    2018-03-07

    A school is a learning environment that contributes to the construction of personal values, beliefs, habits and lifestyles, provide convenient settings for the implementation of drug use prevention programs targeting adolescents, who are the population group at highest risk of initiating drug use. The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of factors associated with implementing drug use prevention programs in Brazilian public and private middle and high urban schools. The present population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted with a probability sample of 1151 school administrators stratified by the 5 Brazilian administrative divisions, in 2014. A close-ended, self-reported online questionnaire was used. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with implementing drug use prevention programs in schools. A total of 51.1% of the schools had adopted drug use prevention programs. The factors associated with program implementation were as follows: belonging to the public school network; having a library; development of activities targeting sexuality; development of "Health at School Program" activities; offering extracurricular activities; and having an administrator that participated in training courses on drugs. The adoption of drug use prevention practices in Brazilian schools may be expanded with greater orchestration of schools through specialized training of administrators and teachers, expansion of the School Health Program and concomitant development of the schools' structural and curricular attributes.

  7. 30 CFR 46.4 - Training plan implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training plan implementation. 46.4 Section 46.4..., SURFACE CLAY, COLLOIDAL PHOSPHATE, OR SURFACE LIMESTONE MINES. § 46.4 Training plan implementation. (a... accordance with the written training plan; (2) Presented by a competent person; and (3) Presented in language...

  8. Abstract: Implementing Sustainable International Accepted Trainings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The program was established through monthly staff trainings using three evidenced-based global maternal and neonatal health programs: Helping Babies Breath, Helping Mothers Survive, and Basic Life Support. Methods ... Trainings done in the local language elicited more participation compared to trainings in English.

  9. The Interaction Effects of Program Training, Dosage, and Implementation Quality on Targeted Student Outcomes for The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Maria Regina; Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; Elbertson, Nicole A.; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how training, dosage, and implementation quality of a social and emotional learning program, The RULER Approach, were related to students' social and emotional competencies. There were no main effects for any of the variables on student outcomes, but students had more positive outcomes when their teachers (a) attended more…

  10. Implementation of a Cross-specialty Training Program in Basic Laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Sorensen, Jette Led; Thinggaard, Jette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Several surgical specialties use laparoscopy and share many of the same techniques and challenges, such as entry approaches, equipment, and complications. However, most basic training programs focus on a single specialty. The objective of this study was to describe the ...... laparoscopy is feasible. There are several logistic benefits of using a cross-specialty approach; however, it is important that local departments include specialty-specific components, together with clinical departmental follow-up....

  11. Results of a psychosomatic training program in China, Vietnam and Laos: successful cross-cultural transfer of a postgraduate training program for medical doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Kurt; Scheib, Peter; Ko, Nayeong; Wirsching, Michael; Kuhnert, Andrea; Hick, Jie; Schüßler, Gerhard; Wu, Wenyuan; Yuan, Shen; Cat, Nguyen Huu; Vongphrachanh, Sisouk; Linh, Ngo Tich; Viet, Ngyuen Kim

    2012-08-29

    With the "ASIA-LINK" program, the European Community has supported the development and implementation of a curriculum of postgraduate psychosomatic training for medical doctors in China, Vietnam and Laos. Currently, these three countries are undergoing great social, economic and cultural changes. The associated psychosocial stress has led to increases in psychological and psychosomatic problems, as well as disorders for which no adequate medical or psychological care is available, even in cities. Health care in these three countries is characterized by the coexistence of Western medicine and traditional medicine. Psychological and psychosomatic disorders and problems are insufficiently recognized and treated, and there is a need for biopsychosocially orientated medical care. Little is known about the transferability of Western-oriented psychosomatic training programs in the Southeast Asian cultural context. The curriculum was developed and implemented in three steps: 1) an experimental phase to build a future teacher group; 2) a joint training program for future teachers and German teachers; and 3) training by Asian trainers that was supervised by German teachers. The didactic elements included live patient interviews, lectures, communication skills training and Balint groups. The training was evaluated using questionnaires for the participants and interviews of the German teachers and the future teachers. Regional training centers were formed in China (Shanghai), Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Hue) and Laos (Vientiane). A total of 200 physicians completed the training, and 30 physicians acquired the status of future teacher. The acceptance of the training was high, and feelings of competence increased during the courses. The interactive training methods were greatly appreciated, with the skills training and self-experience ranked as the most important topics. Adaptations to the cultural background of the participants were necessary for the topics of "breaking bad

  12. Results of a psychosomatic training program in China, Vietnam and Laos: successful cross-cultural transfer of a postgraduate training program for medical doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritzsche Kurt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the “ASIA-LINK” program, the European Community has supported the development and implementation of a curriculum of postgraduate psychosomatic training for medical doctors in China, Vietnam and Laos. Currently, these three countries are undergoing great social, economic and cultural changes. The associated psychosocial stress has led to increases in psychological and psychosomatic problems, as well as disorders for which no adequate medical or psychological care is available, even in cities. Health care in these three countries is characterized by the coexistence of Western medicine and traditional medicine. Psychological and psychosomatic disorders and problems are insufficiently recognized and treated, and there is a need for biopsychosocially orientated medical care. Little is known about the transferability of Western-oriented psychosomatic training programs in the Southeast Asian cultural context. Methods The curriculum was developed and implemented in three steps: 1 an experimental phase to build a future teacher group; 2 a joint training program for future teachers and German teachers; and 3 training by Asian trainers that was supervised by German teachers. The didactic elements included live patient interviews, lectures, communication skills training and Balint groups. The training was evaluated using questionnaires for the participants and interviews of the German teachers and the future teachers. Results Regional training centers were formed in China (Shanghai, Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Hue and Laos (Vientiane. A total of 200 physicians completed the training, and 30 physicians acquired the status of future teacher. The acceptance of the training was high, and feelings of competence increased during the courses. The interactive training methods were greatly appreciated, with the skills training and self-experience ranked as the most important topics. Adaptations to the cultural background of the

  13. Training Out-of-School Time Staff. Part 2 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Frontline Staff. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Burkhauser; Mary; Bowie, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    A skilled and sustainable workforce is one of the most important markers of high-quality out-of-school time programs. Given the links between skilled staff, high-quality programs, and better youth outcomes, staff training has become an essential part of program implementation. To expand what is known about staff training, Child Trends recently…

  14. Tobacco training in clinical social work graduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfelder, JoAnn; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A; Jordan, Timothy R; Price, Joy A

    2013-08-01

    The leading cause of preventable death, in the most vulnerable segments of society, whom social workers often counsel, is cigarette smoking. The purpose of this study was to assess tobacco smoking cessation training in clinical social work programs. A valid 21-item questionnaire was sent to the entire population of 189 clinical graduate social work programs identified by the Council on Social Work Education. A three-wave mailing process was used to maximize the return rate. Directors from 112 clinical social work programs returned completed questionnaires (61 percent). The majority (91 percent) of directors reported having never thought about offering formal smoking cessation training, and only nine of the programs (8 percent) currently provided formal smoking cessation education. The three leading barriers to offering smoking cessation education were as follows: not a priority (60 percent), not enough time (55 percent), and not required by the accrediting body (41 percent). These findings indicate that clinical social work students are not receiving standardized smoking cessation education to assist in improving the well-being of their clients. The national accrediting body for graduate clinical social work programs should consider implementing guidelines for smoking cessation training in the curriculums.

  15. Adaptation, Implementation Plan, and Evaluation of an Online Tobacco Cessation Training Program for Health Care Professionals in Three Spanish-Speaking Latin American Countries: Protocol of the Fruitful Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Cristina; Company, Assumpta; Guillen, Olga; Margalef, Mercè; Arrien, Martha Alicia; Sánchez, Claudia; Cáceres de León, Paula; Fernández, Esteve

    2017-01-27

    Tobacco cessation training programs to treat tobacco dependence have measureable effects on patients' smoking. Tobacco consumption in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is high and slowly decreasing, but these countries usually lack measures to face the epidemic, including tobacco cessation training programs for health professionals and organizations. Based on a previous online smoking cessation training program for hospital workers in Spain, the Fruitful Study aims to increase smoking cessation knowledge, attitudes, self-confidence, and performance interventions among health care professionals of three Spanish-speaking low- and middle-income Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology and evaluation strategy of the Fruitful Study intended to adapt, implement, and test the effectiveness of an online, evidence-based tobacco cessation training program addressed to health professionals from Bolivia, Guatemala, and Paraguay. This study will use a mixed-methods design with a pre-post evaluation (quantitative approach) and in-depth interviews and focus groups (qualitative approach). The main outcomes will be (1) participants' attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors before and after the training; and (2) the level of implementation of tobacco control policies within the hospitals before and after the training. To date, adaptation of the materials, study enrollment, and training activities have been completed. During the adaptation, the main mismatches were language background and content adaptation. Several aids were developed to enable students' training enrollment, including access to computers, support from technicians, and reminders to correctly complete the course. Follow-up data collection is in progress. We have enrolled 281 hospital workers. Results are expected at the beginning of 2017 and will be reported in two follow-up papers: one about the formative evaluation and the other about the summative

  16. Assessing and implementing training requirements for staff at plants to meet safety, environment and job needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, L. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    The rationale for and the process to establish a team to develop a framework for a training plan, determine the cost of such a program for all employees of the Power Supply Division of Manitoba Hydro, and to establish guidelines for implementation of the plan are described. The end result of the process is a job profile and skill and knowledge inventory for some 25 job families within the Power Supply Division; a form to establish training needs for all employees for a three year period which will provide the basis for a three-year training plan and budget; an implementation guide and training plan spreadsheet to facilitate the implementation process; and a series of performance indicators. 4 figs.

  17. Implementing the AECL decommissioning quality assurance program at the Chalk River and Whiteshell Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colotelo, C.A.; Attas, E.M.; Stephens, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the approach and progress in developing, implementing and maintaining a quality assurance (QA) program for decommissioning at the nuclear facilities managed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Decommissioning activities conducted by AECL are varied in nature, so the QA program must provide adequate flexibility, while maintaining consistency with accepted quality standards. Well-written documentation adhering to the applicable decommissioning standards is a key factor. Manager commitment and input during the writing of the documentation are also important to ensure relevance of the QA program and effectiveness of implementation. Training in the use of the quality assurance plan and procedures is vital to the understanding of the QA program. Beyond the training aspect there is a need for the quality assurance program to be supported by a QA subject expert who is able to advise the group in implementing the Quality Program with consistency over the range of decommissioning work activities and to provide continual assessment of the quality assurance program for efficiency and effectiveness, with a concomitant continuous improvement process. (author)

  18. A Strategic Approach to Implementation of Medical Mentorship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Thomas J; Steinberg, Diane H; Piro, Nancy; Walker, Kimberly; Blankenburg, Rebecca; Rassbach, Caroline; Marquez, Juan L; Katznelson, Laurence; Dohn, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Mentors influence medical trainees' experiences through career enhancement and psychosocial support, yet some trainees never receive benefits from involved mentors. Our goals were to examine the effectiveness of 2 interventions aimed at increasing the number of mentors in training programs, and to assess group differences in mentor effectiveness, the relationship between trainees' satisfaction with their programs given the presence of mentors, and the relationship between the number of trainees with mentors and postgraduate year (PGY). In group 1, a physician adviser funded by the graduate medical education department implemented mentorships in 6 residency programs, while group 2 involved a training program with funded physician mentoring time. The remaining 89 training programs served as controls. Chi-square tests were used to determine differences. Survey responses from group 1, group 2, and controls were 47 of 84 (56%), 34 of 78 (44%), and 471 of 981 (48%, P = .38), respectively. The percentages of trainees reporting a mentor in group 1, group 2, and the control group were 89%, 97%, and 79%, respectively (P = .01). There were no differences in mentor effectiveness between groups. Mentored trainees were more likely to be satisfied with their programs (P = .01) and to report that faculty supported their professional aspirations (P = .001). Across all programs, fewer first-year trainees (59%) identified a mentor compared to PGY-2 through PGY-8 trainees (84%, P program is an effective way to create an educational environment that maximizes trainees' perceptions of mentorship and satisfaction with their training programs.

  19. SO2 NAAQS Implementation Training and Assistance for State and Local Air Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentations and training help air agencies understand the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for sulfur dioxide, how to engage the public in local emissions reduction programs, successful state implementation plan (SIP) development, and more.

  20. Plant services (maintenance) foreman training. Inception to implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Training content and time allocated for training have become essential and auditable commodities. This additional awareness, by upper management, has increased the pressure on training organizations to demonstrate effective and efficient programs. Structured program design and administration can assist training organizations in meeting these requirements and assuring a quality program. Sequential development of the job analysis, qualification standard, associated lesson plans, and a methodology for tracking program changes which affect the system, are all required components in a systematic approach to training. This paper addresses these facets in establishing a training program. It describes the methods utilized, problems identified and resolved as they occurred in the development of the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) Plant Services (Maintenance) Foreman Training Program

  1. Implementation of evidence-based home visiting programs aimed at reducing child maltreatment: A meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Katherine L; Fauchier, Angèle; Derkash, Bridget T; Garrido, Edward F

    2016-03-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the popularity of home visitation programs as a means of addressing risk factors for child maltreatment. The evidence supporting the effectiveness of these programs from several meta-analyses, however, is mixed. One potential explanation for this inconsistency explored in the current study involves the manner in which these programs were implemented. In the current study we reviewed 156 studies associated with 9 different home visitation program models targeted to caregivers of children between the ages of 0 and 5. Meta-analytic techniques were used to determine the impact of 18 implementation factors (e.g., staff selection, training, supervision, fidelity monitoring, etc.) and four study characteristics (publication type, target population, study design, comparison group) in predicting program outcomes. Results from analyses revealed that several implementation factors, including training, supervision, and fidelity monitoring, had a significant effect on program outcomes, particularly child maltreatment outcomes. Study characteristics, including the program's target population and the comparison group employed, also had a significant effect on program outcomes. Implications of the study's results for those interested in implementing home visitation programs are discussed. A careful consideration and monitoring of program implementation is advised as a means of achieving optimal study results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementing CDIO project-based learning in training of Heat and Power engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, E. A.; Shishmarev, P. V.; Karabarin, D. I.; Yanov, S. R.; Pikalova, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the experience and current results of CDIO standards implementation in training of bachelors in Heat and Power Engineering at Thermal Power Stations academic department in Siberian Federal University. It provides information on methodology of modernization of educational programs, curricula and programs of disciplines in transition to CDIO project-based learning technology. Preliminary assessment and analysis of lessons learned and scaling perspectives are given.

  3. Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. The program is compliant with requirements and provides evidence that a systematic approach has been taken to indoctrinate new technical staff. Development involved task analysis to determine activities where training was necessary and the standard which must be attained to qualify. Structured mentoring is used where experienced personnel interact with candidates using checksheets to guide candidates through various steps and to provide evidence that steps have been accomplished. Credit can be taken for the previous experience of personnel by means of evaluation boards which can credit or modify checksheet steps. Considering just the wealth of business practice and site specific information a new person at a facility needs to assimilate, the program has been effective in indoctrinating new technical staff personnel and integrating them into a productive role. The program includes continuing training

  4. Evaluation of Pre-Departure English Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saukah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The program evaluation reported in this article covers three batches of participants, from 1996 through 1997, sponsored by the Directorate General of Higher Education projects to prepare faculty members of teacher training institutions for overseas studies. The result outcomes could be achieved when the initial English competence requirred for participating in the program was at least at the Pre-Advanced level. The criterion validity of the TOEFL-Equivalent test developed by the program was assured, and the test could, therefore, be used as a good predictor of the International TOEFL. Other recommendations are also given for the improvement of the planning and implementation of the program in the future

  5. Design, implementation and results of a social and emotional learning program for teacher training at undergraduate and postgraduate level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Palomera

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, educational research has increased its interest on affects, not just in its relation to teacher´s health but in its relation to his/her implication to the professional performance and efficiency. At the same time, there is an increasing evidence on the role of the emotional and social skills regarding welfare and development of the children and youngsters. In this way, there are a great variety of educational programs that address the emotional education of school children. However, there are just a few initiatives on teacher training, and less on formal training. In this article, two pioneer proposals, that address the emotional education for pre-service and professional teachers, are presented. Several years after its implementation, and evaluation, important information on the most appropriate methodologies to reach these results has been gathered. It seems necessary to expand this training to other higher education institutions, because of the benefits for teachers and the potential positive consequences on the student’s development. So, the aim of this work is to inspire and guide future initiatives addressed to the emotional training of teachers.

  6. Athletic Training Student Core Competency Implementation During Patient Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallario, Julie M; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Hoch, Johanna M; Hoch, Matthew; Manspeaker, Sarah A; Pribesh, Shana L

    2018-03-01

      Health care research evidence suggests that early patient encounters (PEs), as well as the purposeful implementation of professional core competencies (CCs), for athletic training students (ATSs) may be beneficial to their ability to provide care. However, no investigators have related facets of the clinical education experience with CC implementation as a form of summative assessment of the clinical experience.   To determine the relationship between the frequency and length of PEs, as well as the student's role and clinical site during PEs, and the students' perceived CC implementation during these encounters.   Cross-sectional study.   Professional athletic training program, National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I institution.   We purposefully recruited 1 athletic training program that used E*Value software; 40 participants (31 females, 9 males) enrolled in the professional phase (12 first year, 14 second year, 14 third year) participated.   Participants viewed a 20-minute recorded CC educational module followed by educational handouts, which were also posted online for reference throughout the semester. The E*Value software was used to track PEs, including the type of encounter (ie, actual patient, practice encounter, didactic practice scenario), the type of site where the encounter occurred (university, high school), and the participant's role (observed, assisted, performed), as well as responses to an added block of questions indicating which, if any, of the CCs were implemented during the PE.   Variables per patient were PE length (minutes), participant role, site at which the encounter occurred, and whether any of the 6 CCs were implemented ( yes/ no). Variables per participant were average encounter length (minutes), encounter frequency, modal role, clinical site assignment, and the number of times each CC was implemented. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were used to examine the relationships between role or clinical site

  7. Introduction of the SAT based training programs at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, I.

    1998-01-01

    An introduction of the SAT based training programs at Paks nuclear power plant is described in detail, including framework of project operation; project implementation; process of SAT applied at Paks NPP and the needs of its introduction

  8. Kyiv institutional buildings sector energy efficiency program: Lending and implementation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secrest, T.J.; Freeman, S.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Popelka, A. [Tysak Engineering, Acton, MA (United States); Shestopal, P.A.; Gagurin, E.V. [Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    1997-08-01

    The government of Ukraine, through the State Committee of Energy Conservation (State Committee), is considering the implementation of energy efficiency measures in state and municipal institutional buildings in the city of Kyiv. The State Committee entered into a Memorandum of Cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct an assessment of the institutional buildings sector efficiency potential. This assessment will be used to support a potential loan by the World Bank for implementing a buildings efficiency improvement program in Kyiv. This report provides an assessment of the options for structuring the lending scenarios and the implementation of the program. Components to the lending structure are options for the disbursement of funds, options for the loan service, and other financial options and considerations. Program implementation includes management structures, reporting, installation activities, and post-installation activities such as training and verification.

  9. fastPACE Train-the-Trainer: A scalable new educational program to accelerate training in biomedical innovation, entrepreneurship, and commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servoss, Jonathan; Chang, Connie; Fay, Jonathan; Lota, Kanchan Sehgal; Mashour, George A; Ward, Kevin R

    2017-10-01

    The Institute of Medicine recommended the advance of innovation and entrepreneurship training programs within the Clinical & Translational Science Award (CTSA) program; however, there remains a gap in adoption by CTSA institutes. The University of Michigan's Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research and Fast Forward Medical Innovation (FFMI) partnered to develop a pilot program designed to teach CTSA hubs how to implement innovation and entrepreneurship programs at their home institutions. The program provided a 2-day onsite training experience combined with observation of an ongoing course focused on providing biomedical innovation, commercialization and entrepreneurial training to a medical academician audience (FFMI fast PACE). All 9 participating CTSA institutes reported a greater connection to biomedical research commercialization resources. Six launched their own version of the FFMI fast PACE course or modified existing programs. Two reported greater collaboration with their technology transfer offices. The FFMI fast PACE course and training program may be suitable for CTSA hubs looking to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship within their institutions and across their innovation ecosystems.

  10. The Benefits of High-Intensity Functional Training Fitness Programs for Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Christopher K; Poston, Walker S C; Heinrich, Katie M; Jahnke, Sara A; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2016-11-01

    metabolic conditioning and muscular strength, less systemic inflammation or oxidative damage compared to sustained aerobic activity, and promoting general physical preparedness (GPP) for the unpredictable physical demands of combat. Given the unique benefits of HIFT, we recommend that these programs become the standard for military physical training. Despite the promise of HIFT fitness programs, questions remain about implementing these programs in the military context. For instance, no large scale randomized trials comparing traditional military physical training with HIFT programs on both health and injury outcomes have been conducted. Such a trial could identify key elements from both types of programs which should be incorporated in future approaches to military fitness training. Also, research regarding the optimal ways of implementing HIFT to maximize both GPP and combat oriented physical skills is lacking. It is likely that an approach to HIFT training which promotes GPP for all personnel along with specialized elements selected on the basis of individual occupation demands would be maximally disseminable in the military. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Training scholars in dissemination and implementation research for cancer prevention and control: a mentored approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padek, Margaret; Mir, Nageen; Jacob, Rebekah R; Chambers, David A; Dobbins, Maureen; Emmons, Karen M; Kerner, Jon; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Pfund, Christine; Proctor, Enola K; Stange, Kurt C; Brownson, Ross C

    2018-01-22

    As the field of D&I (dissemination and implementation) science grows to meet the need for more effective and timely applications of research findings in routine practice, the demand for formalized training programs has increased concurrently. The Mentored Training for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Cancer (MT-DIRC) Program aims to build capacity in the cancer control D&I research workforce, especially among early career researchers. This paper outlines the various components of the program and reports results of systematic evaluations to ascertain its effectiveness. Essential features of the program include selection of early career fellows or more experienced investigators with a focus relevant to cancer control transitioning to a D&I research focus, a 5-day intensive training institute, ongoing peer and senior mentoring, mentored planning and work on a D&I research proposal or project, limited pilot funding, and training and ongoing improvement activities for mentors. The core faculty and staff members of the MT-DIRC program gathered baseline and ongoing evaluation data regarding D&I skill acquisition and mentoring competency through participant surveys and analyzed it by iterative collective reflection. A majority (79%) of fellows are female, assistant professors (55%); 59% are in allied health disciplines, and 48% focus on cancer prevention research. Forty-three D&I research competencies were assessed; all improved from baseline to 6 and 18 months. These effects were apparent across beginner, intermediate, and advanced initial D&I competency levels and across the competency domains. Mentoring competency was rated very highly by the fellows--higher than rated by the mentors themselves. The importance of different mentoring activities, as rated by the fellows, was generally congruent with their satisfaction with the activities, with the exception of relatively greater satisfaction with the degree of emotional support and relatively lower

  12. Impact of the draft DOE Training and Qualification Standard on an established training and qualification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    One of the provisions of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2 was that the US Department of Energy (DOE) hor e llipsis Develop and institute ahor e llipsiscourse in criticality and criticality safety hor e llipsis to serve as the foundation for a program of formal qualification of criticality engineers. In response, a draft DOE standard establishing requirements for a formal qualification program for nuclear criticality safety (NCS) engineers has been prepared and is currently in review. The Oak Ridge Y-12 plant implemented a formal training and qualification program for NCS engineers in 1995. The program complies with existing DOE requirements. The program was developed using a performance-based systematic approach to training and is accomplished through structured mentoring where experienced personnel interact with candidates through various learning exercises. Self-study, exercises, and work under instruction are all utilized. The candidate's performance is evaluated by mentors and oral boards. Competency gained through experience at other sites can also be credited. Technical portions of the program are primarily contained in an initial Engineer-in-Training segment and in subsequent task-specific qualifications. The Engineer-in-Training segment exposes the candidate to fundamental NCS concepts through example problems; ensures the initial compliance training requirements are met; and includes readings from applicable procedures, technical documents, and standards. Upon completion of this initial training, candidates proceed to task qualifications. Tasks are defined NCS activities such as operational reviews, criticality safety evaluations, criticality safety computations, criticality accident alarm system (CAAS) evaluations, support for emergency management, etc. Qualification on a task basis serves to break up training into manageable pieces and expedites qualification of candidates to perform specific production activities. The

  13. Planning and Implementing a Public Health Professional Distance Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Leppke, Allison M.; Robinson, Kara B.; Mettler, Erik P.; Miner, Kathleen R.; Smith, Iris

    2005-01-01

    Training of public health professionals through web-based technology is rapidly increasing. This article describes one school of public health's effort to establish an online Master's program that serves students nationally and internationally. It examines the critical components in the design and implementation of distance education, including…

  14. A Guide for Planning and Implementing Successful Mental Health Educational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Vieira, Thiago; Ramos, Fernando Augusto da Cunha; Lauridsen-Ribeiro, Edith; Ribeiro, Marcos Vinícius Vieira; Meireles, Elisa Andrade; Nóbrega, Brunno Araújo; Motta Palma, Sonia Maria; Ratto, Maria de Fátima; Caetano, Sheila Cavalcante; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva; Rosário, Maria Conceição do

    2018-01-01

    Considering the global burden of mental disorders, there is a worldwide need to improve the quality of mental health care. In order to address this issue, a change in how health care professionals are trained may be essential. However, the majority of the few reports published on this field's training programs do not discuss the characteristics associated with the success or failure of these strategies. The purpose of this review was to systematically examine the literature about mental health training programs designed for health care professionals in order to identify the relevant factors associated with their effective implementation. The MEDLINE/PubMed, SciELO, and Virtual Health Library databases were used to search for articles published before February 2017 and reviewed by two double-blind reviewers. We found 77 original papers about mental health educational programs. Many of these studies were conducted in the USA (39%), addressed depression as the main subject (34%), and applied a quasi-experimental design (52%). Effective interventions were associated with the following characteristics: the use of learner-centered and interactive methodological approaches; a curriculum based on challenges in the trainees' daily routines; the involvement of experts in the program's development; the enrollment of experienced participants; interdisciplinary group work; flexible timing; the use of e-learning resources; and optimizing the implementation of knowledge into the participants' routine work practices. These results will be helpful for planning and improving the quality of future educational programs in mental health.

  15. Peer education programs in corrections: curriculum, implementation, and nursing interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubik-Unruh, S

    1999-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of HIV and other infectious diseases in U.S. prisons, and the mix of infected and high-risk prisoners in crowded and volatile living conditions, federal and state prisons have reduced or eliminated prevention education programs addressing HIV and other infectious diseases for incarcerated populations. Nurses' knowledge, education, and licensure place them in a position to influence prison policy in developing and implementing educational programs for inmates and staff. Their role as advocates for patients in prison and their separation from the more punitive aspects of corrections also enable nurses to earn the trust of inmate populations. These factors identify nurses as the staff best suited within corrections to implement inmate prevention education. Training inmate educators to provide peer prevention and strategies for risk reduction have potential to modify inmate behaviors both within the facility and following release. Selection criteria for peer educator recruitment, prison-sensitive issues, and suggested training activities are discussed.

  16. Building Capacity for Workplace Health Promotion: Findings From the Work@Health® Train-the-Trainer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason; Cluff, Laurie; Rineer, Jennifer; Brown, Darigg; Jones-Jack, Nkenge

    2017-01-01

    Small- and mid-sized employers are less likely to have expertise, capacity, or resources to implement workplace health promotion programs, compared with large employers. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the Work@Health® employer training program to determine the best way to deliver skill-based training to employers of all sizes. The core curriculum was designed to increase employers’ knowledge of the design, implementation, and evaluation of workplace health strategies. The first arm of the program was direct employer training. In this article, we describe the results of the second arm—the program’s train-the-trainer (T3) component, which was designed to prepare new certified trainers to provide core workplace health training to other employers. Of the 103 participants who began the T3 program, 87 fully completed it and delivered the Work@Health core training to 233 other employers. Key indicators of T3 participants’ knowledge and attitudes significantly improved after training. The curriculum delivered through the T3 model has the potential to increase the health promotion capacity of employers across the nation, as well as organizations that work with employers, such as health departments and business coalitions. PMID:28829622

  17. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  18. Methodology to develop a training program as a tool for energy management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Rosario Berenguer-Ungaro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paperaims to present the methodology to develop a training program improve labor skills that enhance the efficient use of energy resources, which aims to make training a timely and meet the training needs as they arise and that the protagonist of it is he who receives training. It is based on the training-action and action research method and model for evaluating training Krikpatrick, it evaluates four levels, reaction, learning, behavior and results. The methodology is structured in three stages: 1 diagnosis of knowledge, 2 intervention based on the results and 3 evaluation and feedback for continuous improvement. Each stage has identified the objectives and implementation tools. Evaluation is transverse to the entire program and it is through it that decisions for feedback loops are taken.

  19. Privacy Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recognizing that training and awareness are critical to protecting agency Personally Identifiable Information (PII), the EPA is developing online training for privacy contacts in its programs and regions.

  20. Implementation and Sustainability of the Russian Federation Ministry of Defense Nuclear Personnel Reliability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lata, Vasiliy; Coates, Cameron W.

    2010-01-01

    Through a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy and the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) a Personnel Reliability Program (PRP) for the nuclear handlers within the RF MOD is at the stage of implementation. Sustaining the program is of major significance for long term success. This paper will discuss the elements of the RF PRP and the equipment needs for implementation. Program requirements, documentation needs, training, and assurances of appropriate equipment use will be addressed.

  1. "Business Continuity and Information Security Maintenance" Masters’ Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    Miloslavskaya , Natalia; Senatorov , Mikhail; Tolstoy , Alexandr; Zapechnikov , Sergei

    2013-01-01

    Part 1: WISE 8; International audience; The experience of preparing for the "Business Continuity and Information Security Maintenance" (BC&ISM) Masters’ program implementation and realization at the "Information Security of Banking Systems" Department of the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia) is presented. Justification of the educational direction choice for BC&ISM professionals is given. The model of IS Master being trained on this program is described. ...

  2. Effectiveness of yoga training program on the severity of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodeh, Mohammad Saber; Arabameri, Elahe; Panahibakhsh, Maryam; Kheiroddin, Fatemeh; Mirdoozandeh, Hatef; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the effect of yoga training program (YTP) on the severity of autism in children with High Function Autism (HFA). Twenty-nine children aged 7 to 15 (mean = 11.22, SD = 2.91) years were randomly allocated to either yoga or control group. The participants in the yoga group received an 8-week (24-session) Yoga Training Program (YTP). Parents or caregivers of participants completed autism treatment evaluation checklist (ATEC) at baseline and the end of the intervention. The results of the analysis showed that there were significant differences between the two groups with regards to all ATEC sub-scores except ATEC I (speech/language/communication). This study provides support for the implementation of a yoga training program and identifies specific procedural enhancements to reduce the severity of symptoms in children with autism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Implementation of the thinking skills for work program in a psychosocial clubhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Susan R; Schiano, Diane; Mueser, Kim T; Wolfe, Rosemarie

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive remediation programs aimed at improving role functioning have been implemented in a variety of different mental health treatment settings, but not in psychosocial clubhouses. This study sought to determine the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of providing a cognitive remediation program (the Thinking Skills for Work program), developed and previously implemented in supported employment programs at mental health agencies, in a psychosocial club-house. Twenty-three members with a history of difficulties getting or keeping jobs, who were participating in a supported employment program at a psychosocial clubhouse, were enrolled in the Thinking Skills for Work program. A neurocognitive battery was administered at baseline and 3 months later after completion of the computer cognitive training component of the program. Hours of competitive work were tracked for the 2 years before enrollment and 2 years following enrollment. Other work-related activities (school, volunteer) were also tracked for 2 years following enrollment. Twenty-one members (91%) completed 6 or more computer cognitive training sessions. Participants demonstrated significant improvements on neurocognitive measures of processing speed, verbal learning and memory, and executive functions. Sixty percent of the members obtained a competitive job during the 2-year follow-up, and 74% were involved in some type of work-related activity. Participants worked significantly more competitive hours over the 2 years after joining the Thinking Skills for Work program than before. The findings support the feasibility and promise of implementing the Thinking Skills for Work program in the context of supported employment provided at psychosocial clubhouses.

  4. NTC operator training program viewed from SAT-based training process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshio

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Training Center Ltd. (NTC) was established in June 1972 to train PWR plant operators. Operator training was started in Apr. 1974. Presently we have three full-scope, control-room simulators. Recently IAEA recommended that its Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) be used for the training of NPP personnel. We thoroughly examined the SAT-based process and compared it against the NTC training program. As a result, we have recognized that the NTC training program satisfies the SAT-based training process. We now intend to improve the feedback step of the NTC training system. Our efforts continue to produce a relevant program at the forefront of our profession. (author)

  5. The efficacy of stuttering measurement training: evaluating two training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Lauren A; Stavros, Candace; Ebrahimian, Mineh; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Roger J

    2015-04-01

    Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting. Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest-posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of stuttering events on eight 3-min audiovisual speech samples from adults and children who stutter. Stuttering judgment training involved use of either the Stuttering Measurement System (SMS), Stuttering Measurement Assessment and Training (SMAAT) programs, or no training. To test for the reliability of any training effect, SMS training was repeated with the 4th group. Both SMS-trained groups produced approximately 34% improvement, significantly better than no training or the SMAAT program. The SMAAT program produced a mixed result. The SMS program was shown to produce a "medium" effect size improvement in the accuracy of stuttering event counts, and this improvement was almost perfectly replicated in a 2nd group. Half of the SMAAT judges produced a 36% improvement in accuracy, but the other half showed no improvement. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate the durability of the reported improvements, but these positive effects justify the importance of stuttering measurement training.

  6. Preliminary design for an institutional needs assessment process to guide the development of training programs at the Department of Energy Central Training Academy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golder, T.; Laktasic, S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to provide and maintain a high level of nuclear security at DOE installations, the Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) is charged with the deployment of highly trained security staff at each DOE site. Faced with this mission, OSS must ensure that both Safeguards and Security personnel are adequately trained to meet present as well as potential future insider and outside threats. A major step toward meeting this goal was to begin to standardize training, establish an elite training cadre, and create a central training facility to implement training for safeguards and security personnel. These requirements were actualized by the creation of the Central Training Academy. After a 9 month start-up and 2 years of initial operation, the CTA can now provide a historical perspective on its evolution, early program development, and future plans and challenges. Central to future program planning at the Academy is the development and implementation of an internal DOE needs assessment process which is the focus of this study. Once institutionalized, the system would allow for the Academy to accurately assess and translate OSS needs into requirements for both OSS Safeguards and Security personnel and place the Academy in position to develop and tailor Tactical and Specialized programs that reflect and respond to changing threats and technological advances

  7. Effectiveness of a training package for implementing a community-based occupational therapy program in dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, Carola M E; Graff, Maud J L; Teerenstra, Steven; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of a training package to implement a community occupational therapy program for people with dementia and their caregiver (COTiD). Cluster randomized controlled trial. A total of 45 service units including 94 occupational therapists, 48 managers, 80 physicians, treating 71 client-caregiver couples. Control intervention: A postgraduate course for occupational therapists only. A training package including the usual postgraduate course, additional training days, outreach visits, regional meetings, and access to a reporting system for occupational therapists. Physicians and managers received newsletters, had access to a website, and were approached by telephone. The intended adherence of therapists to the COTiD program. This was assessed using vignettes. clients' daily functioning, caregivers' sense of competence, quality of life, and self-perceived performance of daily activities of both clients and caregivers. Between-group differences were assessed using multilevel analyses with therapist and intervention factors as covariates. No significant between-group differences between baseline and 12 months were found for adherence (1.58, 95% CI -0.10 to 3.25), nor for any client or caregiver outcome. A higher number of coaching sessions and higher self-perceived knowledge of dementia at baseline positively correlated with adherence scores. In contrast, experiencing more support from occupational therapy colleagues or having conducted more COTiD treatments at baseline negatively affected adherence scores. The training package was not effective in increasing therapist adherence and client-caregiver outcomes. This study suggests that coaching sessions and increasing therapist knowledge on dementia positively affect adherence. NCT01117285. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Implementing a Coach-Delivered Dating Violence Prevention Program with High School Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Maria Catrina D; McCauley, Heather L; Tancredi, Daniel J; Decker, Michele R; Silverman, Jay G; O'Connor, Brian; Miller, Elizabeth

    2018-05-10

    Teen dating violence and sexual violence are severe public health problems. Abusive behaviors within the context of dating or romantic relationships are associated with adverse health outcomes. Promoting positive bystander intervention and increasing knowledge of abusive behaviors are promising strategies for preventing dating and sexual violence. Coaching Boys Into Men (CBIM) is an evidence-based, athletic coach-delivered dating violence prevention program that has been shown to increase positive bystander behaviors and reduce abuse perpetration among high school male athletes. Identifying specific barriers and facilitators based on the coaches' experiences with program delivery combined with the coaches' and athletes' program perceptions may help optimize future CBIM implementation and sustainability. Semi-structured interviews with coaches (n = 36) explored the implementers' perspectives on strategies that worked well and potential barriers to program implementation. Ten focus groups with male athletes (n = 39) assessed their experiences with CBIM and the suitability of having their coaches deliver this program. Coaches described using the CBIM training cards and integrating program delivery during practice. Athletes reported coaches routinely delivering the CBIM program and adding their own personal stories or examples to the discussions. Key facilitators to program implementation include support from the violence prevention advocate, the ease of integrating CBIM into the sports season, and using the program materials. Barriers to implementation included finding sufficient time for the program, dynamics of delivering sensitive program content, and participant constraints. Coaches and athletes alike found the program feasible and acceptable to implement within the sports setting. Both coaches and athletes offered insights on the implementation and the feasibility and acceptability of CBIM within school-based athletic programs. These experiences by

  9. Designing and Implementing INTREPID, an Intensive Program in Translational Research Methodologies for New Investigators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphinyanaphongs, Yindalon; Shao, Yongzhao; Micoli, Keith J.; Fang, Yixin; Goldberg, Judith D.; Galeano, Claudia R.; Stangel, Jessica H.; Chavis‐Keeling, Deborah; Hochman, Judith S.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Pillinger, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Senior housestaff and junior faculty are often expected to perform clinical research, yet may not always have the requisite knowledge and skills to do so successfully. Formal degree programs provide such knowledge, but require a significant commitment of time and money. Short‐term training programs (days to weeks) provide alternative ways to accrue essential information and acquire fundamental methodological skills. Unfortunately, published information about short‐term programs is sparse. To encourage discussion and exchange of ideas regarding such programs, we here share our experience developing and implementing INtensive Training in Research Statistics, Ethics, and Protocol Informatics and Design (INTREPID), a 24‐day immersion training program in clinical research methodologies. Designing, planning, and offering INTREPID was feasible, and required significant faculty commitment, support personnel and infrastructure, as well as committed trainees. PMID:25066862

  10. Development and Evaluation of the Efficiency of In-Service Training Program with the Theme of Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Semra Demir; Karakurt, Sevgi Özden

    2017-01-01

    In this article, an in-service training program was developed and evaluated to improve the peace education competencies of primary school teachers. This program, named as In-Service Training Program with the Theme of Peace Education for Primary Teachers (BEHEP), was based on the system approach. The implementation was completed in 28 hours with…

  11. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, N.; Braspenning, J.C.; Roosmalen, S. van; Dijk, N. van; Visser, Machteld

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training

  12. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, Nienke; Braspenning, Jozé; van Roosmalen, Sanne; van Dijk, Nynke; Visser, Mechteld

    2017-01-01

    Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training institutes used

  13. Opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for the obstetric physician: a survey of neonatal and obstetric training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, C J; Johnston, L; Lee, C; Bernstein, P S; Goffman, D

    2018-04-01

    Our goal was to garner opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians. We sought to evaluate obstacles to neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians and possible solutions for implementation challenges. We distributed a national survey via email to all neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship directors and obstetrics & gynecology residency program directors in the United States. This survey was designed by a consensus method. Ninety-eight (53%) obstetric and fifty-seven (51%) neonatal program directors responded to our surveys. Eighty-eight percent of neonatologists surveyed believe that obstetricians should be neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) certified. The majority of surveyed obstetricians (>89%) believe that obstetricians should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Eighty-six percent of obstetric residents have completed training in NRP, but only 19% of obstetric attendings are NRP certified. Major barriers to NRP training that were identified include time, lack of national requirement, lack of belief it is helpful, and cost. Most obstetric attendings are not NRP certified, but the majority of respondents believe that obstetric providers should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Our study demonstrates that most respondents support a modified neonatal resuscitation course for obstetric physicians.

  14. Pilot Study of a School-Based Parent Training Program for Preschoolers with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Brooke R; Wainer, Allison L

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a parenting training program designed for early intervention and early childhood special education (EI/ESCE) programs serving students with autistic spectrum disorders. Thirteen teachers representing three intermediate school districts implemented the intervention with 27…

  15. Commitment to Change and Challenges to Implementing Changes After Workplace-Based Assessment Rater Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Jennifer R; Conforti, Lisa N; Yamazaki, Kenji; Iobst, William; Holmboe, Eric S

    2017-03-01

    Faculty development for clinical faculty who assess trainees is necessary to improve assessment quality and impor tant for competency-based education. Little is known about what faculty plan to do differently after training. This study explored the changes faculty intended to make after workplace-based assessment rater training, their ability to implement change, predictors of change, and barriers encountered. In 2012, 45 outpatient internal medicine faculty preceptors (who supervised residents) from 26 institutions participated in rater training. They completed a commitment to change form listing up to five commitments and ranked (on a 1-5 scale) their motivation for and anticipated difficulty implementing each change. Three months later, participants were interviewed about their ability to implement change and barriers encountered. The authors used logistic regression to examine predictors of change. Of 191 total commitments, the most common commitments focused on what faculty would change about their own teaching (57%) and increasing direct observation (31%). Of the 183 commitments for which follow-up data were available, 39% were fully implemented, 40% were partially implemented, and 20% were not implemented. Lack of time/competing priorities was the most commonly cited barrier. Higher initial motivation (odds ratio [OR] 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14, 3.57) predicted change. As anticipated difficulty increased, implementation became less likely (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.49, 0.93). While higher baseline motivation predicted change, multiple system-level barriers undermined ability to implement change. Rater-training faculty development programs should address how faculty motivation and organizational barriers interact and influence ability to change.

  16. The cardiovascular in-training examination: development, implementation, results, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvin, Jeffrey T; Soto, Amanda; Foster, Lauren; Dent, John; Kates, Andrew M; Polk, Donna M; Rosenzweig, Barry; Indik, Julia

    2015-03-31

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC), in collaboration with the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), developed the first standardized in-training examination (ITE) for cardiovascular disease fellows-in-training (FITs). In addition to testing knowledge, this examination uses the newly developed ACC Curricular Milestones to provide specific, competency-based feedback to program directors and FITs. The ACC ITE has been administered more than 5,000 times since 2011. This analysis sought to report the initial experience with the ITE, including feasibility and reliability of test development and implementation, as well as the ability of this process to provide useful feedback in key content areas. The annual ACC ITE has been available to cardiovascular disease fellowship programs in the United States since 2011. Questions for this Web-based, secure, multiple-choice examination were developed by a group of cardiovascular disease specialists and each question was analyzed by the NBME to ensure quality. Scores were equated and standardized to allow for comparability. Trainees and program directors were provided detailed feedback, including a list of the curricular competencies tested by those questions answered incorrectly. The ITE was administered 5,118 times. In 2013, the examination was taken by 1,969 fellows, representing 194 training programs. Among the 3 training years, there was consistency in the examination scores. Total test scores and scores within each of the content areas increased with each FIT year (there was a statistically significant difference in each cohort's average scale score across administration years). There was also significant improvement in examination scores across the fellowship years. The ACC ITE is a powerful tool available to all training programs to assess medical knowledge. This examination also delivers robust and timely feedback addressing individual knowledge gaps, and thus, may serve as a basis for improving training

  17. Strength training in community settings: impact of lay leaders on program access and sustainability for rural older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Lisa T; Cornell, Carol E; Phillips, Martha; Felix, Holly; Traywick, LaVona

    2014-09-01

    The effect of volunteer lay leaders on availability and sustainability of strength-training programs for older adults has not been well explored. We describe implementation of the StrongWomen strength training program by the Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service, and report on the relationship between delivery approach (agent-led, lay-led, or combination of agent- and lay-led) and program access and sustainability. All state Extension agents (n = 66) were surveyed on program implementation, continuance, and use of lay leaders. Program records were used to identify the number of trained lay leaders. Regression models were used to examine the relationship between delivery approach and group availability. Counties using lay leaders had twice as many groups as counties using only agents. There was a significant, positive relationship between the number of lay leaders and the number of groups. Counties using lay leaders were 8.3 times more likely to have continuing groups compared with counties not using lay leaders. Program continuance was significantly and positively associated with lay leader use. Lay delivery expanded access to strength training programs and increased the likelihood that programs would continue. This approach can be used to increase access to and sustainability of strength training programs, particularly in resource-constrained areas.

  18. Description of the Design and Implementation of a School-Based Obesity Prevention Program Addressing Needs of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Begnoche, Wendy L.; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Harris, Margaret M.; Dean, Janice

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of a school-based obesity prevention program, the successes associated with its implementation, and challenges with development and application of the program's curriculum base. The program is described, including purpose and goals, content and structure of the curriculum, type and training of…

  19. Implementing an overdose education and naloxone distribution program in a health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Jennifer; Rafie, Sally; Polston, Gregory

    To design and implement a health system-wide program increasing provision of take-home naloxone in patients at risk for opioid overdose, with the downstream aim of reducing fatalities. The program includes health care professional education and guidelines, development, and dissemination of patient education materials, electronic health record changes to promote naloxone prescriptions, and availability of naloxone in pharmacies. Academic health system, San Diego, California. University of California, San Diego Health (UCSDH), offers both inpatient and outpatient primary care and specialty services with 563 beds spanning 2 hospitals and 6 pharmacies. UCSDH is part of the University of California health system, and it serves as the county's safety net hospital. In January 2016, a multisite academic health system initiated a system-wide overdose education and naloxone distribution program to prevent opioid overdose and opioid overdose-related deaths. An interdisciplinary, interdepartmental team came together to develop and implement the program. To strengthen institutional support, naloxone prescribing guidelines were developed and approved for the health system. Education on naloxone for physicians, pharmacists, and nurses was provided through departmental trainings, bulletins, and e-mail notifications. Alerts in the electronic health record and preset naloxone orders facilitated co-prescribing of naloxone with opioid prescriptions. Electronic health record reports captured naloxone prescriptions ordered. Summary reports on the electronic health record measured naloxone reminder alerts and response rates. Since the start of the program, the health system has trained 252 physicians, pharmacists, and nurses in overdose education and take-home naloxone. There has been an increase in the number of prescriptions for naloxone from a baseline of 4.5 per month to an average of 46 per month during the 3 months following full implementation of the program including

  20. Costs to implement an effective transition-to-parenthood program for couples: Analysis of the Family Foundations program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Damon E.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Hostetler, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The transition to parenthood involves many stressors that can have implications for the couple relationship as well as the developmental environment of the child. Scholars and policymakers have recognized the potential for interventions that can help couples navigate these stressors to improve parenting and coparenting strategies. Such evidence-based programs are scarcely available, however, and little is known about the resources necessary to carry out these programs. This study examines the costs and resources necessary to implement Family Foundations, a program that addresses the multifaceted issues facing first-time parents through a series of pre- and post-natal classes. Costs were determined using a 6-step analytic process and are based on the first implementation of the program carried out through a five-year demonstration project. This assessment demonstrates how overall costs change across years as new cohorts of families are introduced, and how cost breakdowns differ by category as needs shift from training group leaders to sustaining program services. Information from this cost analysis helps clarify how the program could be made more efficient in subsequent implementations. We also consider how results may be used in future research examining economic benefits of participation in the program. PMID:24603052

  1. A Step Toward Timely Referral and Early Diagnosis of Cancer: Implementation and Impact on Knowledge of a Primary Care-Based Training Program in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neo M. Tapela

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHealth system delays in diagnosis of cancer contribute to the glaring disparities in cancer mortality between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries. In Botswana, approximately 70% of cancers are diagnosed at late stage and median time from first health facility visit for cancer-related symptoms to specialty cancer care was 160 days (IQR 59–653. We describe the implementation and early outcomes of training targeting primary care providers, which is a part of a multi-component implementation study in Kweneng-East district aiming to enhance timely diagnosis of cancers.MethodsHealth-care providers from all public facilities within the district were invited to participate in an 8-h intensive short-course program developed by a multidisciplinary team and adapted to the Botswana health system context. Participants’ performance was assessed using a 25-multiple choice question tool, with pre- and post-assessments paired by anonymous identifier. Statistical analysis with Wilcoxon signed-rank test to compare performance at the two time points across eight sub-domains (pathophysiology, epidemiology, social context, symptoms, evaluation, treatment, documentation, follow-up. Linear regression and negative binomial modeling were used to determine change in performance. Participants’ satisfaction with the program was measured on a separate survey using a 5-point Likert scale.Results176 participants attended the training over 5 days in April 2016. Pooled linear regression controlling for test version showed an overall performance increase of 16.8% after participation (95% CI 15.2–18.4. Statistically significant improvement was observed for seven out of eight subdomains on test A and all eight subdomains on test B. Overall, 71 (40.3% trainees achieved a score greater than 70% on the pretest, and 161 (91.5% did so on the posttest. Participants reported a high degree of satisfaction with the training program’s content

  2. A community-based program evaluation of community competency trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssmann, Christoph; Morrison, Darius; Russian, Ellery; Shiu-Thornton, Sharyne; Bowen, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Transgender and gender-nonconforming individuals encounter a multitude of barriers to accessing clinically and culturally competent health care. One strategy to increase the quality and competence of care delivery is workplace trainings. This study describes a community-based program for the evaluation of this type of training. Using a mixed-methods approach, the research team assessed the effectiveness of three competency trainings administered by a local nonprofit organization in the Northwest United States. Quantitative data indicated a significant shift in self-assessed knowledge associated with completion of the training. Qualitative data confirmed this result and revealed a number of important themes about the effect of the trainings on providers and their ability to implement knowledge and skills in practice. Clinical considerations are proposed for providers who seek similar trainings and who aim to increase clinical and cultural competency in delivering care to transgender and gender-nonconforming patients and clients.

  3. [Training program on cardiopulmonary resuscitation with the use of automated external defibrillator in a university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Ana Paula; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2012-03-01

    Early defibrillation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) receives increasing emphasis on its priority and rapidity. This is an experience report about the implementation of a training program in CPR using a defibrillator in a private university. The training program in basic CPR maneuvers was based on global guidelines, including a theorical course with practical demonstration of CPR maneuvers with the defibrillator, individual practical training and theoretical and practical assessments. About the performance of students in the practical assessment the mean scores obtained by students in the first stage of the course was 26.4 points, while in the second stage the mean was 252.8 points, in the theoretical assessment the mean in the first stage was 3.06 points and in the second 9.0 points. The implementation of programs like this contribute to the effective acquisition of knowledge (theory) and skill (pratice) for the care of CPR victims.

  4. Consensus on Training and Implementation of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Nader K; Walker, Thomas; Carter, Fiona

    2018-01-01

    ERAS programmes. Teaching modalities exist, but there remains no agreement regarding the optimal training curriculum or how its effectiveness is assessed. We aimed to draw consensus from an expert panel regarding the successful training and implementation of ERAS. METHODS: A modified Delphi technique...... and the structure of training courses; (2) the optimal framework for successful implementation and audit of ERAS including a guide for data collection; (3) a framework to assess the effectiveness of training; (4) criteria to define ERAS training centres of excellence. RESULTS: An ERAS training course must cover...... the evidence-based principles of ERAS with team-oriented training. Successful implementation requires strong leadership, an ERAS facilitator and an effective MDT. Effectiveness of training can be measured by improved compliance. A training centre of excellence should show a willingness to teach...

  5. Training Package Implementation: Innovative and Flexible Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Dave; Blom, Kaaren

    The implementation of training packages (TPs) in Australian workplaces was examined through case studies of the use of TPs in nontraditional trade areas by six innovative registered training organizations (RTOs) across Australia. The study focused on the extent to which new and flexible approaches to learning, training delivery, and assessment…

  6. Increasing Access to an ASD Imitation Intervention via a Telehealth Parent Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Allison L.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic research focused on developing and improving strategies for the dissemination and implementation of effective ASD services is essential. An innovative and promising area of research is the use of telehealth programs to train parents of children with ASD in intervention techniques. A hybrid telehealth program, combining self-directed…

  7. Assessment of current NRC/IE professional training program and recommendations for improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartley, H.J.; Hagerup, J.E.; Harrison, O.J.; Heyer, F.H.K.; Kaas, I.W.; Schwartz, E.G.

    1978-05-01

    This document is the General Research Corporation (GRC) report on Task III: to assess the current NRC/IE professional training program and to provide recommendations for improvement. The major objectives of this task were to determine the overall effectiveness of the NRC/IE training program and to provide recommendations for improvements where appropriate. The research involved a review of course manuals and of student critiques, observation in the classroom and person to person interviews; it also included an evaluation of the assignment of instructors to the Career Management Branch. Findings addressed refresher training, retread training and initial training--with emphasis on the last of these. Conclusions are that: (1) The curriculum provides, in general, types and levels of training needed; (2) the mix of training methods used is correct; and (3) the training management is effective. However, the training facilities do not reflect a commitment to quality instruction nor is assignment as instructor to the Career Management Branch attractive to inspectors. Recommendations presented in the report are based upon the findings; all lie within the implementing authority of Headquarters NRC/IE

  8. Implementation of Best Practices in Obesity Prevention in Child Care Facilities: The Arizona Empower Program, 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Jillian; Agostinelli, Joan; Rodriguez, Gertrudes; Robinson, Deborah

    2017-09-07

    Obesity is a major health concern in every US age group. Approximately one in 4 children in Arizona's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children is overweight or obese. The Arizona Department of Health Services developed the Empower program to promote healthy environments in licensed child care facilities. The program consists of 10 standards, including one standard for each of these 5 areas: physical activity and screen time, breastfeeding, fruit juice and water, family-style meals, and staff training. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the level of implementation of these 5 Empower standards. A self-assessment survey was completed from July 2013 through June 2015 by 1,850 facilities to evaluate the level of implementation of 5 Empower standards. We calculated the percentage of facilities that reported the degree to which they implemented each standard and identified common themes in comments recorded in the survey. All facilities reported either full or partial implementation of the 5 standards. Of 1,678 facilities, 21.7% (n = 364) reported full implementation of all standards, and 78.3% (n = 1,314) reported at least partial implementation. Staff training, which has only one component, had the highest level of implementation: 77.4% (n = 1,299) reported full implementation. Only 44.0% (n = 738) reported full implementation of the standard on a breastfeeding-friendly environment. Arizona child care facilities have begun to implement the Empower program, but facilities will need more education, technical assistance, and support in some areas to fully implement the program.

  9. Cernavoda NPP operations training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the philosophy, content and minimum requirements for the Cernavoda Training Programs for all Station staff and to identify the training department organization and respective responsibilities necessary to provide the required training. The hierarchical documentation and requirements related to these programs is shown in figure Rd-TR1-1

  10. Training the Workforce: Description of a Longitudinal Interdisciplinary Education and Mentoring Program in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stacie; O'Mahony, Sean; Baron, Aliza; Ansari, Aziz; Deamant, Catherine; Frader, Joel; Leyva, Ileana; Marschke, Michael; Preodor, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The rapid increase in demand for palliative care (PC) services has led to concerns regarding workforce shortages and threats to the resiliency of PC teams. To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a regional interdisciplinary training program in PC. Thirty nurse and physician fellows representing 22 health systems across the Chicago region participated in a two-year PC training program. The curriculum was delivered through multiple conferences, self-directed e-learning, and individualized mentoring by expert local faculty (mentors). Fellows shadowed mentors' clinical practices and received guidance on designing, implementing, and evaluating a practice improvement project to address gaps in PC at their institutions. Enduring, interdisciplinary relationships were built at all levels across health care organizations. Fellows made significant increases in knowledge and self-reported confidence in adult and pediatric PC and program development skills and frequency performing these skills. Fellows and mentors reported high satisfaction with the educational program. This interdisciplinary PC training model addressed local workforce issues by increasing the number of clinicians capable of providing PC. Unique features include individualized longitudinal mentoring, interdisciplinary education, on-site project implementation, and local network building. Future research will address the impact of the addition of social work and chaplain trainees to the program. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pressure Safety Program Implementation at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lower, Mark [ORNL; Etheridge, Tom [ORNL; Oland, C. Barry [XCEL Engineering, Inc.

    2013-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC. In February 2006, DOE promulgated worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. These regulations, which are provided in 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, establish requirements for worker safety and health program that reduce or prevent occupational injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE contractors and their workers with safe and healthful workplaces at DOE sites. The regulations state that contractors must achieve compliance no later than May 25, 2007. According to 10 CFR 851, Subpart C, Specific Program Requirements, contractors must have a structured approach to their worker safety and health programs that at a minimum includes provisions for pressure safety. In implementing the structured approach for pressure safety, contractors must establish safety policies and procedures to ensure that pressure systems are designed, fabricated, tested, inspected, maintained, repaired, and operated by trained, qualified personnel in accordance with applicable sound engineering principles. In addition, contractors must ensure that all pressure vessels, boilers, air receivers, and supporting piping systems conform to (1) applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (2004) Sections I through XII, including applicable code cases; (2) applicable ASME B31 piping codes; and (3) the strictest applicable state and local codes. When national consensus codes are not applicable because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc., contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local codes. This report documents the work performed to address legacy pressure vessel deficiencies and comply

  12. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwalda, Nienke; Braspenning, Jozé; van Roosmalen, Sanne; van Dijk, Nynke; Visser, Mechteld

    2017-07-21

    Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training institutes used an implementation strategy to implement a quality system (QS), and we aimed to study the success of this strategy and to learn about additional facilitators and barriers. Seventeen structured interviews were conducted with the directors and quality coordinators (QCs) of the eight Dutch GP training institutes. A five-stage process model of implementation was used to structure these interviews and analyze the data. Two researchers analyzed the data with a framework approach. The strategy supported the institutes in implementing the QS. However, after the introduction of the QS, staff experienced the QS as demanding, although they noticed almost no concrete short-term results. Moreover, they experienced difficulties in integrating the QS into their local situation. Collectively working with the QS and following common deadlines did create a sense of commitment towards each other that appeared to be a true stimulus to the introduction of the QS. The implementation strategy focused mainly on the introduction of the QS in the GP specialty training, and it was, as such, rather successful. An important barrier concerned the acceptance of the QS and the integration of the QS into local structures, which suggests that there is a need for guidance on the translation of the QS to local contexts. All in all, we recommend more focus on the benefits of a QS.

  13. Pollution prevention program implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Pollution Prevention Program Implementation Plan (the Plan) describes the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Pollution Prevention (P2) Program. The Plan also shows how the P2 Program at PNNL will be in support of and in compliance with the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) Awareness Program Plan and the Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation. In addition, this plan describes how PNNL will demonstrate compliance with various legal and policy requirements for P2. This plan documents the strategy for implementing the PNNL P2 Program. The scope of the P2 Program includes implementing and helping to implement P2 activities at PNNL. These activities will be implemented according to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) hierarchy of source reduction, recycling, treatment, and disposal. The PNNL P2 Program covers all wastes generated at the Laboratory. These include hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, radioactive mixed waste, radioactive liquid waste system waste, polychlorinated biphenyl waste, transuranic waste, and sanitary waste generated by activities at PNNL. Materials, resource, and energy conservation are also within the scope of the PNNL P2 Program

  14. Overdose prevention for injection drug users: lessons learned from naloxone training and distribution programs in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Tinka Markham; Rudenstine, Sasha; Stancliff, Sharon; Sherman, Susan; Nandi, Vijay; Clear, Allan; Galea, Sandro

    2007-01-25

    Fatal heroin overdose is a significant cause of mortality for injection drug users (IDUs). Many of these deaths are preventable because opiate overdoses can be quickly and safely reversed through the injection of Naloxone [brand name Narcan], a prescription drug used to revive persons who have overdosed on heroin or other opioids. Currently, in several cities in the United States, drug users are being trained in naloxone administration and given naloxone for immediate and successful reversals of opiate overdoses. There has been very little formal description of the challenges faced in the development and implementation of large-scale IDU naloxone administration training and distribution programs and the lessons learned during this process. During a one year period, over 1,000 participants were trained in SKOOP (Skills and Knowledge on Opiate Prevention) and received a prescription for naloxone by a medical doctor on site at a syringe exchange program (SEP) in New York City. Participants in SKOOP were over the age of 18, current participants of SEPs, and current or former drug users. We present details about program design and lessons learned during the development and implementation of SKOOP. Lessons learned described in the manuscript are collectively articulated by the evaluators and implementers of the project. There were six primary challenges and lessons learned in developing, implementing, and evaluating SKOOP. These include a) political climate surrounding naloxone distribution; b) extant prescription drug laws; c) initial low levels of recruitment into the program; d) development of participant appropriate training methodology; e) challenges in the design of a suitable formal evaluation; and f) evolution of program response to naloxone. Other naloxone distribution programs may anticipate similar challenges to SKOOP and we identify mechanisms to address them. Strategies include being flexible in program planning and implementation, developing evaluation

  15. Implementation of a new social skills training program for adults with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Sequera Fernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has the purpose to develop and apply a new training program in order to promote the use of social skills in a group of adults with intellectual disabilities. It contains a quasi-experimental methodological design to prove the program effectiveness. The sample used consists of 21 adults with intellectual disabilities, users of an occupational therapy day entity (10 persons participated in the program and 11 did not. The social skills were evaluated using an adjusted version of the Social Skills Scale Model of Gismero (2010. The outcomes of this study show a significant improvement in the overall score of the group included in the program in comparison with the rest of the group. Likewise, the group under the program obtained an increase in the scores within 5 out of 6 subscales evaluated. The identified improvements are key elements for the individual development of this group. The implications of the results are discussed.

  16. Preparing pharmacists to deliver a targeted service in hypertension management: evaluation of an interprofessional training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorek, Beata V; Lemay, Kate S; Magin, Parker J; Roberts, Christopher; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L

    2015-09-28

    Non-adherence to medicines by patients and suboptimal prescribing by clinicians underpin poor blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension. In this study, a training program was designed to enable community pharmacists to deliver a service in hypertension management targeting therapeutic adjustments and medication adherence. A comprehensive evaluation of the training program was undertaken. Tailored training comprising a self-directed pre-work manual, practical workshop (using real patients), and practice scenarios, was developed and delivered by an inter-professional team (pharmacists, GPs). Supported by practical and written assessment, the training focused on the principles of BP management, BP measurement skills, and adherence strategies. Pharmacists' experience of the training (expectations, content, format, relevance) was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Immediate feedback was obtained via a questionnaire comprising Likert scales (1 = "very well" to 7 = "poor") and open-ended questions. Further in-depth qualitative evaluation was undertaken via semi-structured interviews several months post-training (and post service implementation). Seventeen pharmacists were recruited, trained and assessed as competent. All were highly satisfied with the training; other than the 'amount of information provided' (median score = 5, "just right"), all aspects of training attained the most positive score of '1'. Pharmacists most valued the integrated team-based approach, GP involvement, and inclusion of real patients, as well as the pre-reading manual, BP measurement workshop, and case studies (simulation). Post-implementation the interviews highlighted that comprehensive training increased pharmacists' confidence in providing the service, however, training of other pharmacy staff and patient recruitment strategies were highlighted as a need in future. Structured, multi-modal training involving simulated and inter-professional learning is effective in preparing

  17. Academic training: Advanced lectures on multiprocessor programming

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme 31 October 1, 2 November 2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  IT Auditorium, Bldg. 31   Three classes (60 mins) on Multiprocessor Programming Prof. Dr. Christoph von Praun Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany This is an advanced class on multiprocessor programming. The class gives an introduction to principles of concurrent objects and the notion of different progress guarantees that concurrent computations can have. The focus of this class is on non-blocking computations, i.e. concurrent programs that do not make use of locks. We discuss the implementation of practical non-blocking data structures in detail. 1st class: Introduction to concurrent objects 2nd class: Principles of non-blocking synchronization 3rd class: Concurrent queues Brief Bio of Christoph von Praun Christoph worked on a variety of analysis techniques and runtime platforms for parallel programs. Hist most recent research studies programming models an...

  18. FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS: PRACTICE OF IMPLEMENTATION IN THE REGION AND POSSIBILITIES OF ITS STUDY IN THE PROCESS OF PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kozachek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim is to consider the structure and practice of funding environmental projects, its implementation in the region as well as the prospects for studying the characteristics of financial support for environmental programs in the course of vocational environmental training in regional universities.Methodology. We propose the method of quantitative research for statistical documents and the method of qualitative analysis that can be used to clarify the structure of environmental financing in the regions.Results. We identified the basic quantitative parameters and made a structure of financing the regional environmental programs. The analysis showed that this structure includes the federal budget, the budget of the Russian Federation, local budgets, extra-budgetary sources. Thus, the example of the Tambov region illustrates that the main financial burden is on the enterprises, and local governments involved in such financing make up the minority. It is proved that the study of the peculiarities of financing the regional environmental programs is important for students of different specialties. We propose a list of didactic units and issues to be included in the content of professional environmental training.Main conclusions. We recommend using the structure of funding the regional ecological projects analyzed on the example of the Tambov region for other regions of Russia as well. At the same time, putting into practice the basic principles of sustainable development, it is necessary to ensure the inclusion of the study of the characteristics and structure of the financing regional environmental programs as didactic units in the process of professional environmental training.

  19. Implementing portfolio in postgraduate general practice training. Benefits and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a review to explore the literature focusing on portfolio in postgraduate general practice (GP) training, and to examine the impact of implementation of portfolio on learning process, as well as proposing recommendations for its implementation in postgraduate GP training. An electronic search was carried out on several databases for studies addressing portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Six articles were included to address specifically the effectiveness of portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Five of them described successful experiences of portfolio-based learning implementation. Only one article addressed portfolio-based assessment in postgraduate GP training. The existing evidence provides various benefits of professional portfolio-based learning. It does appear to have advantages of stimulating reflective learning, promoting proactive learning, and bridging the hospital experiences of the learners to GP. Moreover, the challenges to implementation of portfolio-based learning are often based on orientation and training of stakeholders.

  20. Guidance for training program evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    An increased concern about the training of nuclear reactor operators resulted from the incident at TMI-2 in 1979. Purpose of this guide is to provide a general framework for the systematic evaluation of training programs for DOE Category-A reactors. The primary goal of such evaluations is to promote continuing quality improvements in the selection, training and qualification programs

  1. School Integration Program in Chile: gaps and challenges for the implementation of an inclusive education program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tamayo Rozas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Constructing inclusive societies, leaving no one behind, it is an ethical obligation. Developing inclusive educational programs allows ensuring equal opportunities in one of the most critical stages of development. The aim of this study is to describe the implementation of the School Integration Program (SIP in its different dimensions and in different zones of Chile. A descriptive and cross-sectional study of the perception of SIP Coordinators was performed in public and subsidized schools at the country through a web-based survey. A simple random convenience sampling of schools was performed, obtaining 1742 answers from educational establishments with SIP. Higher level of implementation of the program was identified in areas related to interdisciplinary work and comprehensive training, curricular and institutional aspects. On the other hand, deficiencies were identified in the implementation of accessibility, development of reasonable adjustments and participation of the educational community. Likewise, there are differences between the zones of Chile, with the North zone having the least progress. Although there are results in the work team and institutional development, the development of objective conditions and participation is still a pending task in the implementation of the SIP.

  2. Training for disaster recovery: a review of training programs for social workers after the tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Allison

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a range of training programs for social workers and other recovery workers following the Indian Ocean Tsunami of December 2004. These programs were developed and implemented by the author in Singapore, and with collaboration from Indonesian colleagues, in Indonesia. The content is outlined and the rationale behind the development of the programs is presented. The theoretical bases for the diversity of interventions are argued. A course module for both undergraduate and postgraduate social work education is also described, as inclusion of crisis and disaster recovery management in professional courses is necessary to prepare practitioners for their inevitable involvement in responding to emergencies.

  3. A software toolkit for implementing low-cost virtual reality training systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louka, Michael N.

    1999-04-01

    VR is a powerful technology for implementing training systems but better tools are needed to achieve wider usage and acceptance for desktop computer-based training applications. A need has been identified for a software tool kit to support the efficient implementation of well-structured desktop VR training systems. A powerful toolkit for implementing scalable low-cost VR training applications is described in this report (author) (ml)

  4. Evaluation of a model training program for respiratory-protection preparedness at local health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano-Sobsey, Edie; Kennedy, Bobby; Beck, Frank; Combs, Brian; Kady, Wendy; Ramsey, Steven; Stockweather, Allison; Service, Will

    2006-04-01

    Respiratory-protection programs have had limited application in local health departments and have mostly focused on protecting employees against exposure to tuberculosis (TB). The need to provide the public health workforce with effective respiratory protection has, however, been underscored by recent concerns about emerging infectious diseases, bioterrorism attacks, drug-resistant microbes, and environmental exposures to microbial allergens (as in recent hurricane flood waters). Furthermore, OSHA has revoked the TB standard traditionally followed by local health departments, replacing it with a more stringent regulation. The additional OSHA requirements may place increased burdens on health departments with limited resources and time. For these reasons, the North Carolina Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response and industrial hygienists of the Public Health Regional Surveillance Teams have developed a training program to facilitate implementation of respiratory protection programs at local health departments. To date, more than 1,400 North Carolina health department employees have been properly fit-tested for respirator use and have received training in all aspects of respiratory protection. This article gives an overview of the development and evaluation of the program. The training approach presented here can serve as a model that other health departments and organizations can use in implementing similar respiratory-protection programs.

  5. Impact of a provider training program on the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder at psychosocial care units in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luciana C; Teixeira, Maria C T V; Ribeiro, Edith L; Paula, Cristiane S

    2017-12-18

    To develop, implement, and verify the impact of a training program for health care providers working with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in psychosocial care centers for children and adolescents (Centro de Atenção Psicossocial à Infância e à Adolescência - CAPSi) in São Paulo, Brazil. This quasi-experimental study was conducted with 14 professionals from four CAPSi units. The training program consisted of six phases: 1) pre-intervention observation; 2) meeting with staff to assess the main needs of the training program; 3) developing materials for training and evaluation; 4) meetings to discuss program implementation; 5) a final meeting for case discussion and evaluation; and 6) distance supervision. Three measures were used to evaluate the training program: i) the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) questionnaire; ii) videos containing questions designed to assess program comprehension; and iii) a satisfaction survey. Thirteen videos were produced to as visual aids for use during the training program, and a further 26 videos were developed to evaluate it. The program was well evaluated by the participants. The video responses and KAP questionnaire scores suggest that staff knowledge and attitudes improved after training. The positive findings of this study suggest that the tested training program is feasible for use with multidisciplinary teams working in the CAPSi environment.

  6. Impact of a provider training program on the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder at psychosocial care units in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana C. Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop, implement, and verify the impact of a training program for health care providers working with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD in psychosocial care centers for children and adolescents (Centro de Atenção Psicossocial à Infância e à Adolescência – CAPSi in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted with 14 professionals from four CAPSi units. The training program consisted of six phases: 1 pre-intervention observation; 2 meeting with staff to assess the main needs of the training program; 3 developing materials for training and evaluation; 4 meetings to discuss program implementation; 5 a final meeting for case discussion and evaluation; and 6 distance supervision. Three measures were used to evaluate the training program: i the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP questionnaire; ii videos containing questions designed to assess program comprehension; and iii a satisfaction survey. Results: Thirteen videos were produced to as visual aids for use during the training program, and a further 26 videos were developed to evaluate it. The program was well evaluated by the participants. The video responses and KAP questionnaire scores suggest that staff knowledge and attitudes improved after training. Conclusion: The positive findings of this study suggest that the tested training program is feasible for use with multidisciplinary teams working in the CAPSi environment.

  7. Costs to implement an effective transition-to-parenthood program for couples: analysis of the Family Foundations program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Damon E; Feinberg, Mark E; Hostetler, Michelle L

    2014-06-01

    The transition to parenthood involves many stressors that can have implications for the couple relationship as well as the developmental environment of the child. Scholars and policymakers have recognized the potential for interventions that can help couples navigate these stressors to improve parenting and coparenting strategies. Such evidence-based programs are scarcely available, however, and little is known about the resources necessary to carry out these programs. This study examines the costs and resources necessary to implement Family Foundations, a program that addresses the multifaceted issues facing first-time parents through a series of pre- and post-natal classes. Costs were determined using a 6-step analytic process and are based on the first implementation of the program carried out through a five-year demonstration project. This assessment demonstrates how overall costs change across years as new cohorts of families are introduced, and how cost breakdowns differ by category as needs shift from training group leaders to sustaining program services. Information from this cost analysis helps clarify how the program could be made more efficient in subsequent implementations. We also consider how results may be used in future research examining economic benefits of participation in the program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Training review criteria and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    The industry, through commitment to the INPO-managed Training Accreditation Program, is implementing what is referred to as performance-based training, or the Systems Approach to Training (SAT). The NRC considers the following five elements as essential to these training programs: Systematic analysis of the jobs to be performed; learning objectives that are derived from the analysis and that describe desired performance after training; Training design and implementation based on the learning objectives; Evaluation of trainee mastery of the objectives during training; and evaluation and revision of the training based on the performance of trained personnel in the job setting. As indicated in the ''Commission Policy Statement on Training and Qualifications of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel'' of March 20, 1985,''the NRC will continue to closely monitor the process [INPO Accreditation] and its results, and ''It remains the continuing responsibility of the NRC to independently evaluate applicants' and licensees' implementation of improvement programs....'' These procedures provide a systematic means for implementing two of the NRC monitoring functions identified in the Commission Policy Statement: ''Continuing evaluation of industry training and qualification program effectiveness,''; and ''Monitoring plant and industry trends and events involving personnel errors.''

  9. A 3-month jump-landing training program: a feasibility study using the RE-AIM framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Inne; Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Mathieu, Niels; Van Schuerbeeck, Sander; Meeusen, Romain

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the translatability and feasibility of an intervention program has become as important as determining the effectiveness of the intervention. To evaluate the applicability of a 3-month jump-landing training program in basketball players, using the RE-AIM (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) framework. Randomized controlled trial. National and regional basketball teams. Twenty-four teams of the second highest national division and regional basketball divisions in Flanders, Belgium, were randomly assigned (1:1) to a control group and intervention group. A total of 243 athletes (control group = 129, intervention group = 114), ages 15 to 41 years, volunteered. All exercises in the intervention program followed a progressive development, emphasizing lower extremity alignment during jump-landing activities. The results of the process evaluation of the intervention program were based on the 5 dimensions of the RE-AIM framework. The injury incidence density, hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals were determined. The participation rate of the total sample was 100% (reach). The hazard ratio was different between the intervention group and the control group (0.40 [95% confidence interval = 0.16, 0.99]; effectiveness). Of the 12 teams in the intervention group, 8 teams (66.7%) agreed to participate in the study (adoption). Eight of the participating coaches (66.7%) felt positively about the intervention program and stated that they had implemented the training sessions of the program as intended (implementation). All coaches except 1 (87.5%) intended to continue the intervention program the next season (maintenance). Compliance of the coaches in this coach-supervised jump-landing training program was high. In addition, the program was effective in preventing lower extremity injuries.

  10. Developing a self-learning training program for RIS computer skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stike, R; Olivi, P

    2000-01-01

    The demonstration of competency by healthcare professionals remains a priority for hospital administrators, as well as for the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). Unfortunately, staff members who have to complete competency exercises often describe the process as a burden. Ineffective training processes may be the culprit. Our teaching hospital developed a training program for the radiology information system (RIS) computer system used by an imaging department of more than 200 staff members. The emphasis of our training program was on the design phase and the contribution of subject-matter experts (SMEs) to the content and testing of training materials, which included a computer-assisted, self-learning manual (SLM) and a pocket guide. The first step in the design process was to identify subject matter experts (SMEs) within the imaging department. Seven SMEs were shadowed by the IT educator. The role of the SME was to demonstrate current practices with RIS, to state principles involved and to serve as a reference for questions during training development. The steps that followed planning and design were: training delivery, evaluation and ongoing training. These steps were implemented in a series of workshops, which included soliciting feedback about the training program. Feedback was used to revise the SLM. The RIS SLM training project was a huge success for everyone involved. The average score for the core-skills test was higher than 90 percent. Seventy-five percent of the current staff was trained in the first phase, including radiology students. Our yearly cost savings using SLM workshops instead of on-the-job training will be about $35,000. We attribute the success of this project to a detailed timeline, SME contributions, the pilot testing phase, and the positive attitude of the imaging staff.

  11. Assessment of training and technical assistance needs of Colorectal Cancer Control Program Grantees in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Hannon, Peggy; Maxwell, Annette E; Vu, Thuy; Leeman, Jennifer; Dwyer, Andrea; Mason, Caitlin; Sowles, Shaina; Rice, Ketra; Gressard, Lindsay

    2015-01-31

    Practitioners often require training and technical assistance to build their capacity to select, adapt, and implement evidence-based interventions (EBIs). The CDC Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) aims to promote CRC screening to increase population-level screening. This study identified the training and technical assistance (TA) needs and preferences for training related to the implementation of EBIs among CRCCP grantees. Twenty-nine CRCCP grantees completed an online survey about their screening activities, training and technical assistance in 2012. They rated desire for training on various evidence-based strategies to increase cancer screening, evidence-based competencies, and program management topics. They also reported preferences for training formats and facilitators and barriers to trainings. Many CRCCP grantees expressed the need for training with regards to specific EBIs, especially system-level and provider-directed EBIs to promote CRC screening. Grantees rated these EBIs as more difficult to implement than client-oriented EBIs. Grantees also reported a moderate need for training regarding finding EBIs, assessing organizational capacity, implementing selected EBIs, and conducting process and outcome evaluations. Other desired training topics reported with higher frequency were partnership development and data collection/evaluation. Grantees preferred training formats that were interactive such as on-site trainings, webinars or expert consultants. Public health organizations need greater supports for adopting evidence-based interventions, working with organizational-level change, partnership development and data management. Future capacity building efforts for the adoption of EBIs should focus on systems or provider level interventions and key processes for health promotion and should be delivered in a variety of ways to assist local organizations in cancer prevention and control.

  12. Identifying gaps, barriers, and solutions in implementing pressure ulcer prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Irene M; Nadzam, Deborah Morris

    2011-06-01

    Patients continue to suffer from pressure ulcers (PUs), despite implementation of evidence-based pressure ulcer (PU) prevention protocols. In 2009, Joint Commission Resources (JCR) and Hill-Rom created the Nurse Safety Scholar-in-Residence (nurse scholar) program to foster the professional development of expert nurse clinicians to become translators of evidence into practice. The first nurse scholar activity has focused on PU prevention. Four hospitals with established PU programs participated in the PU prevention implementation project. Each hospital's team completed an inventory of PU prevention program components and provided copies of accompanying documentation, along with prevalence and incidence data. Site visits to the four participating hospitals were arranged to provide opportunities for more in-depth analysis and support. Following the initial site visit, the project team at each hospital developed action plans for the top three barriers to PU program implementation. A series of conference calls was held between the site visits. Pressure Ulcer Program Gaps and Recommendations. The four hospitals shared common gaps in terms of limitations in staff education and training; lack of physician involvement; limited involvement of unlicensed nursing staff; lack of plan for communicating at-risk status; and limited quality improvement evaluations of bedside practices. Detailed recommendations were identified for addressing each of these gaps. these Recommendations for eliminating gaps have been implemented by the participating teams to drive improvement and to reduce hospital-acquired PU rates. The nurse scholars will continue to study implementation of best practices for PU prevention.

  13. Strategies for developing and implementing specialized training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous strategies can be used to develop and implement specialized training. In order to achieve effective specialized training, however, two items are especially critical: use of a systematic approach and sensitiwity towards a good needs analysis. Sensitivity towards these items includes involving representatives of the target population in all phases of training, identifying student characteristics and their impact on training setting and delivery, preparing a scope document that addresses the terminal and enabling objectives of training in terms understandable to the customer, and emphasizing flexibility in the use of alternative training delivery methods and training resources. Increasing sensitivity towards these factors will increase participant satisfaction and the ultimate use of the training provided

  14. Creation and implementation of an emergency medicine education and training program in Turkey: an effective educational intervention to address the practitioner gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Jennifer Whitfield; Douglass, Katherine; Atilla, Ridvan; Smith, Jeffrey; Kapur, G Bobby

    2013-07-22

    The specialty of Emergency Medicine has enjoyed recognition for nearly 20 years in Turkey. However, the majority of underserved and rural Turkish emergency departments are staffed by general practitioners who lack formal training in the specialty and have few opportunities to increase emergency medicine-specific knowledge and skills. To address this "practitioner gap," the authors developed a four-phase comprehensive emergency medicine education and training program for general practitioners practicing in government hospitals in Turkey. From April 2006 until June 2009, 42 courses were taught by 62 trainers across seven regions in Turkey. A total of 2,262 physicians were trained. The mean course pre-test score for all regions was 42.3 (95% CI 39.8 to 44.7). The mean course post-test score was 70.1 (95% CI 67.2 to 72.9). The difference between the mean scores was 27.8 (95% CI 25.3 to 30.4, P emergency medicine department and an emergency medicine society to implement country-wide training of physicians practicing in public emergency departments can serve as a successful model for capacity-building global emergency medicine endeavors.

  15. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N I; Glebov, V B

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network. (paper)

  16. A Study on Evaluation of Training Program for MCR Operators of SMART Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Joon Ku; Jeong, Kwang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    It is important to develop a training program by simulators in main control room of nuclear power plants because there is no an operation expert and no operating experience in the pre-construction phase of nuclear power plants. It is also necessary to develop a training program and its evaluation method taking human error into account. The purpose of this study is developing evaluation model of simulators. In a training program, once training requirements are selected, evaluation of training is as important as its implementation. Training effectiveness is available value in a simulator-based environment. The main control room of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is consist of workstation, visual display units such as LDP and FPD based on digital systems. Cognitive behaviors of a high level are required to operators in these man-machine interface system (MMIS). Therefore, it is essential to identify training requirements and to develop its evaluation model. Virtual Environments such as a simulator have utilized by a lot of industries and companies for training and accident prevention. Simulators have three primary benefits. The first is that training by simulators is less expensive than those in real environment. The second is that simulators enable safety enhancement using systematic training program. The third is that simulators provide a preliminary to prevent human error. It is significant to apply TER, TCR, TCE in evaluation of training effect. It is expected that these could be applied to revise training criteria and enable to consider efficiency in terms of cost and benefit.

  17. A Study on Evaluation of Training Program for MCR Operators of SMART Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Joon Ku; Jeong, Kwang Il

    2015-01-01

    It is important to develop a training program by simulators in main control room of nuclear power plants because there is no an operation expert and no operating experience in the pre-construction phase of nuclear power plants. It is also necessary to develop a training program and its evaluation method taking human error into account. The purpose of this study is developing evaluation model of simulators. In a training program, once training requirements are selected, evaluation of training is as important as its implementation. Training effectiveness is available value in a simulator-based environment. The main control room of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is consist of workstation, visual display units such as LDP and FPD based on digital systems. Cognitive behaviors of a high level are required to operators in these man-machine interface system (MMIS). Therefore, it is essential to identify training requirements and to develop its evaluation model. Virtual Environments such as a simulator have utilized by a lot of industries and companies for training and accident prevention. Simulators have three primary benefits. The first is that training by simulators is less expensive than those in real environment. The second is that simulators enable safety enhancement using systematic training program. The third is that simulators provide a preliminary to prevent human error. It is significant to apply TER, TCR, TCE in evaluation of training effect. It is expected that these could be applied to revise training criteria and enable to consider efficiency in terms of cost and benefit

  18. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Approach for Seniors (MBCAS): Program Development and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner Keller, Brigitte; Singh, Nirbhay N; Winton, Alan S W

    2014-01-01

    A number of cognitive interventions have been developed to enhance cognitive functioning in the growing population of the elderly. We describe the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Approach for Seniors (MBCAS), a new training program designed especially for seniors. It was conceived in the context of self-development for seniors who wish to enhance their relationship with their inner and outer selves in order to navigate their aging process more easily and fluently. Physical and psychosocial problems related to aging, as well as some temporal issues, were taken into account in developing this program. Unlike clinically oriented mindfulness-based programs, which are generally delivered during an 8-week period, the MBCAS training program is presented over a period of 8 months. The main objectives of this program are to teach seniors to observe current experiences with nonjudgmental awareness, to identify automatic behaviors or reactions to current experiences that are potentially nonadaptive, and to enhance and reinforce positive coping with typical difficulties that they face in their daily lives. Details of the program development and initial implementation are presented, with suggestions for evaluating the program's effectiveness.

  19. The implementing of the training, examination and qualification for QA auditor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaozheng; Han Peicong; Zhang Zhongyuan; Zhu Guoliang

    2007-01-01

    China Power Investment Corporation has implemented the training, examination and qualification for QA auditor based on the related requirements of the nuclear safety documents. The bases, planning of the procedure, implementing procedure and suggestions for implementing the training, examination and qualification are described in this article. That can be used as the reference for implementing the training, examination and qualification for QA auditor, as well as for establishment of the related guide. (authors)

  20. Nurse-Driven Training Courses: Impact on Implementation of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    F?lez-Carrob?, Estel; Sagarra-Ti?, Maria; Romero, Araceli; Rubio, Montserrat; Planas, Lourdes; P?rez-Lucena, Mar?a Jos?; Baiget, Montserrat; Cabista?, Cristina; F?lez, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) predicts cardiovascular risk and identifies white-coat and masked hypertension, efficacy of treatment and the circadian cycle of hypertensive patients. Objective: To analyze the effectiveness of ABPM implementation thoughtout a nurse-driven training program. Materials and Methodology: Twenty eight professionals were involved in the study carried out in the primary care center of the metropolitan area of Barcelona that serves 34,289 inhab...

  1. Opinions of Primary Care Family Physicians About Family Medicine Speciality Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Sirri Keten

    2014-04-01

    Material and Method: A total of 170 family physicians working in Kahramanmaras were included in the study. After obtaining informed consent a questionnaire comprising questions regarding socio-demographic properties, conveying contracted family physicians as family medicine specialists and organization of the training program was applied to participants. Results: Among physicians participating in the study 130 (76.5% were male and 40 (23.5% were female, with a mean age of 40.7±7.1 (min = 26 years, max = 64 years. The mean duration of professional experience of physicians was 15.3±7.0 (min = 2 years, max = 40 years years. Of all, 91 (53.5% participants had already read the decree on family medicine specialist training program for contracted family physicians. A hundred and fifteen (67.6% family physicians supported that Family Medicine Specialty program should be taken part-time without interrupting routine medical tasks. Only 51 (30.0% participants stated the requirement of an entrance examination (TUS for family medicine specialty training. Conclusion: Family medicine specialty training program towards family physicians should be considered in the light of scientific criteria. In family medicine, an area exhibited a holistic approach to the patient; specialty training should be through residency training instead of an education program. For this purpose, family medicine departments in medical faculties should play an active role in this process. Additionally further rotations in needed branches should be implemented with a revision of area should be performed. In medicine practical training is of high importance and distant or part-time education is not appropriate, and specialist training shall be planned in accordance with the medical specialty training regulations. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 298-304

  2. SOFTWARE TRAINING AIDS DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION IN PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION PRACTICE OF TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION TEACHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy G. Gritchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the theoretical and practical aspects of software training aids development and implementation in professional preparation practice of technological education teacher. The myriad opportunities of new information technologies are described; the characteristic features of modern software training tool (STT are revealed; the main algorithmic structure circuits of training programs construction (linear, cyclic, with hyperlinks, to the labels, which enable the development of STT variety and functionality are given; the methodology of STT creating is described based on the analysis of the technology teacher preparation in HEE content, MITE didactic functions and selection criteria of educational software for this area of specialist’s preparation.

  3. Implementing Suicide Prevention Programs: Costs and Potential Life Years Saved in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Lesage, Alain; Latimer, Eric; Seguin, Monique

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the costs and effects of suicide prevention programs at the population level. We aimed to determine (i) the costs associated with a suicide death and using prospective values (ii) the costs and effects of transferring, into a Canadian context, the results of the European Nuremberg Alliance against Depression (NAD) trial with the addition of 4 community-based suicide prevention strategies. These included the training of family physicians in the detection and treatment of depression, population campaigns aimed at increasing awareness about depression, the training of community leaders among first responders and follow-up of individuals who attempted suicide. This study includes a prospective value implementation study design. Using published data and information from interviews with Canadian decision makers, we assessed the costs of a suicide death in the province of Quebec and the costs of potentially implementing the NAD multi-modal suicide prevention programs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), from a health care system and societal perspective, associated with the NAD program while considering the friction cost method (FCM) and human capital approach (HCA) (discounted at 3%.) The costs considered included those incurred for the suicide prevention program and direct medical and non-medical costs as well as those related to a police investigation and funeral costs. Indirect costs associated with loss of productivity and short term disability were also considered. Sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Costs presented were in 2010 dollars. The annual total cost of implementing the suicide prevention programs in Quebec reached CAD23,982,293. The most expensive components of the program included the follow-up of individuals who had attempted suicide and psychotherapy for bereaved individuals. These accounted for 39% and 34% of total costs. The ICER associated with the implementation of the programs reached on average CAD3

  4. Implementing an anti-smoking program in rural-remote communities: challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tall, Julie A; Brew, Bronwyn K; Saurman, Emily; Jones, Therese C

    2015-01-01

    Rural-remote communities report higher smoking rates and poorer health outcomes than that of metropolitan areas. While anti-smoking programs are an important measure for addressing smoking and improving health, little is known of the challenges faced by primary healthcare staff implementing those programs in the rural-remote setting. The aim of this study was to explore the challenges and strategies of implementing an anti-smoking program by primary healthcare staff in rural-remote Australia. Guided by a phenomenological approach, semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with health service managers, case managers and general practitioners involved in program implementation in Australian rural-remote communities between 2008 and 2010. Program implementation was reported to be challenged by limited primary and mental healthcare resources and client access to services; limited collaboration between health services; the difficulty of accessing staff training; high levels of community distress and disadvantage; the normalisation of smoking and its deleterious impact on smoking abstinence among program clients; and low morale among health staff. Strategies identified to overcome challenges included appointing tobacco-dedicated staff; improving health service collaboration, access and flexibility; providing subsidised pharmacotherapies and boosting staff morale. Findings may assist health services to better tailor anti-smoking programs for the rural-remote setting, where smoking rates are particularly high. Catering for the unique challenges of the rural-remote setting is necessary if anti-smoking programs are to be efficacious, cost-effective and capable of improving rural-remote health outcomes.

  5. The impact of health-management training programs in Latin America on job performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz-Monsalve Sonia Janeth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken in Mexico, Colombia, and El Salvador to determine the impact of a management training program on health managers' job performance. A quasi-experimental design was used where in the baseline study an intervention group of 85 district health managers in the three countries was compared with a control group of 71 managers who did not receive the training program. After the implementation of an 18-month training program (which included 5-day training workshops and a series of tasks to be carried out between the workshops, the outcome in terms of improved job performance (i.e. use of predefined management techniques was measured through twelve management performance indicators. The data collection tools were two questionnaires, participant observation in managers' workplaces, focus group discussions, staff interviews, and document analysis. In Mexico, the control group showed 8.3 times weaker management performance compared to the intervention group; in Colombia the value was 3.6 and in El Salvador 2.4. Factors associated with a successful training outcome were: (a training techniques, (b strengthening of enabling factors, and (c reinforcement mechanisms.

  6. Overdose prevention for injection drug users: Lessons learned from naloxone training and distribution programs in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandi Vijay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatal heroin overdose is a significant cause of mortality for injection drug users (IDUs. Many of these deaths are preventable because opiate overdoses can be quickly and safely reversed through the injection of Naloxone [brand name Narcan], a prescription drug used to revive persons who have overdosed on heroin or other opioids. Currently, in several cities in the United States, drug users are being trained in naloxone administration and given naloxone for immediate and successful reversals of opiate overdoses. There has been very little formal description of the challenges faced in the development and implementation of large-scale IDU naloxone administration training and distribution programs and the lessons learned during this process. Methods During a one year period, over 1,000 participants were trained in SKOOP (Skills and Knowledge on Opiate Prevention and received a prescription for naloxone by a medical doctor on site at a syringe exchange program (SEP in New York City. Participants in SKOOP were over the age of 18, current participants of SEPs, and current or former drug users. We present details about program design and lessons learned during the development and implementation of SKOOP. Lessons learned described in the manuscript are collectively articulated by the evaluators and implementers of the project. Results There were six primary challenges and lessons learned in developing, implementing, and evaluating SKOOP. These include a political climate surrounding naloxone distribution; b extant prescription drug laws; c initial low levels of recruitment into the program; d development of participant appropriate training methodology; e challenges in the design of a suitable formal evaluation; and f evolution of program response to naloxone. Conclusion Other naloxone distribution programs may anticipate similar challenges to SKOOP and we identify mechanisms to address them. Strategies include being flexible in

  7. Evaluation of interactive computerized training to teach parents to implement photographic activity schedules with children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerencser, Kristina R; Higbee, Thomas S; Akers, Jessica S; Contreras, Bethany P

    2017-07-01

    Training parents of children with autism spectrum disorder can be a challenge due to limited resources, time, and money. Interactive computerized training (ICT)-a self-paced program that incorporates instructions, videos, and interactive questions-is one method professionals can use to disseminate trainings to broader populations. This study extends previous research on ICT by assessing the effect of ICT to teach three parents how to implement a photographic activity schedule using a systematic prompting procedure with their child. Following ICT, all parents increased their fidelity to implementation of an activity schedule during role-play sessions with an adult. Fidelity remained high during implementation with their child and maintained during a 2-week follow-up. © 2017 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  8. Training Staff to Implement Brief Stimulus Preference Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldy, Christina R.; Rapp, John T.; Capocasa, Kelli

    2014-01-01

    We trained 9 behavioral staff members to conduct 2 brief preference assessments using 30-min video presentations that contained instructions and modeling. After training, we evaluated each staff member's implementation of the assessments in situ. Results indicated that 1 or 2 training sessions for each method were sufficient for teaching each…

  9. Customer Satisfaction with Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model for evaluating customer satisfaction with training programs was tested with training purchasers. The model confirmed two types of projects: training aimed at achieving learning results and at changing job performance. The model did not fit for training intended to support organizational change. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  10. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Seymour

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. Design: In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined ‘vertical’ direct patient care training with ‘horizontal’ interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. Results: The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Conclusions: Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come.

  11. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Muhumuza, Ibra; Mumena, Chris; Isyagi, Moses; Barrow, Jane; Meeks, Valli

    2013-01-01

    Objective Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. Design In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined ‘vertical’ direct patient care training with ‘horizontal’ interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. Results The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Conclusions Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come. PMID:23473054

  12. Supervisor's role in training programs as a manager of learning program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the training literature, a supervisor's role in training programs has two major elements: supervisor support and supervisor communication. The ability of supervisors to play effective roles in training programs may increase employees' motivation to learn. The nature of this relationship is interesting, but the role of supervisor's role as a predicting variable is less emphasized in a training program models. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the effect of supervisor's role in training programs on motivation to learn using 152 usable questionnaires gathered from non-academic employees who have worked in a technological based public university, Malaysia. The outcomes of stepwise regression analysis showed that the supervisor support and supervisor communication significantly associated with motivation to learn. Statistically, this result demonstrates that supervisor's role in training programs does act as an important predictor of motivation to learn in the organizational sample. In addition, discussion, implication and conclusion are elaborated.

  13. 14 CFR 1214.505 - Program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrators) before implementation. 5 See footnote 1 to § 1214.502(e). (2) A management review process to... Critical Space System Personnel Reliability Program § 1214.505 Program implementation. (a) The Director of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program implementation. 1214.505 Section...

  14. A generic hazardous waste management training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Karnofsky, B.

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of this training program element is to familiarize personnel involved in hazardous waste management with the goals of RCRA and how they are to be achieved. These goals include: to protect health and the environment; to conserve valuable material and energy resources; to prohibit future open dumping on the land; to assure that hazardous waste management practices are conducted in a manner which protects human health and the environment; to insure that hazardous waste is properly managed thereby reducing the need for corrective actions in the future; to establish a national policy to reduce or eliminate the generation of hazardous waste, wherever feasible. Another objective of this progam element is to present a brief overview of the RCRA regulations and how they are implemented/enforced by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and each of the fifty states. This element also discusses where the RCRA regulations are published and how they are updated. In addition it details who is responsible for compliance with the regulations. Finally, this part of the training program provides an overview of the activities and materials that are regulated. 1 ref

  15. 25 CFR 26.30 - Does the Job Training Program provide part-time training or short-term training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does the Job Training Program provide part-time training or short-term training? 26.30 Section 26.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.30 Does the Job Training...

  16. Implementing Health-Promoting Leadership in Municipal Organizations: Managers’ Experiences with a Leadership Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Larsson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze how line and middle managers experience and describe barriers and enablers in the implementation of a health-promoting leadership program in municipal organizations. A qualitative case study design was applied to examine the leadership program in a case involving implementation of an organizational health intervention. Data were mainly collected using semi-structured interviews with line and middle managers participating in the leadership program. Interviews with senior managers, notes from meetings/workshops, and written action plans were used as complementary data. The interview data were analyzed using a thematic analysis, and the complementary data using a summative content analysis. The findings show that the interviewed line and middle managers experienced this leadership program as a new approach in leadership training because it is based primarily on employee participation. Involvement and commitment of the employees was considered a crucial enabler in the implementation of the leadership program. Other enablers identified include action plans with specific goals, earlier experiences of organizational change, and integration of the program content into regular routines and structures. The line and middle managers described several barriers in the implementation process, and they described various organizational conditions, such as high workload, lack of senior management support, politically initiated projects, and organizational change, as challenges that limited the opportunities to be drivers of change. Taken together, these barriers interfered with the leadership program and its implementation. The study contributes to the understanding of how organizational-level health interventions are implemented in public sector workplaces.

  17. Core competencies for shared decision making training programs: insights from an international, interdisciplinary working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals' continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training. Copyright © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  18. 14 CFR 121.407 - Training program: Approval of airplane simulators and other training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Approval of airplane... Program § 121.407 Training program: Approval of airplane simulators and other training devices. (a) Each airplane simulator and other training device that is used in a training course permitted under § 121.409...

  19. Evaluation of the Tier 1 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S.: Secondary Data Analyses of Conclusions Drawn by the Program Implementers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes is a curricula-based positive youth development program. In the experimental implementation phase, 52 schools participated in the program. Based on subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (Form A and program implementers (Form B in each school, the program implementers were invited to write down five conclusions based on an integration of the evaluation findings (N = 52. The conclusions stated in the 52 evaluation reports were further analyzed via secondary data analyses in this paper. Results showed that most of the conclusions concerning perceptions of the Tier 1 Program, instructors, and effectiveness of the programs were positive in nature. There were also conclusions reflecting the respondents’ appreciation of the program. Finally, responses on the difficulties encountered and suggestions for improvements were observed. In conjunction with the previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 1 Program was well received by the stakeholders and the program was beneficial to the development of the program participants.

  20. Development and implementation of plant diagnostic skills training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatare, K.; Noji, K.

    2010-01-01

    It was learned from the July 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake that a need exists for simulator training methods to be revised to include the assumption of multiple failures such as those which may occur during a large earthquake. At BWR Operator Training Center Corp., multiple failure team training which focuses on plant diagnostic skills (Plant Diagnostic Skills Training) has been developed and implemented since September 2008. The contents of this training along with the results are presented and considered in this paper. (author)

  1. The Irie Classroom Toolbox: developing a violence prevention, preschool teacher training program using evidence, theory, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Henningham, Helen

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, I describe the development of the Irie Classroom Toolbox, a school-based violence prevention, teacher training program for use with children aged 3-6 years. In-depth interviews were conducted with Jamaican preschool teachers, who had participated in a trial of a classroom behavior management program, at posttest (n = 35) and 5 years later (n = 20). An on-going process evaluation was also conducted. Teachers' preferred behavior management strategies and training methods were documented, and enablers and barriers to implementation were identified. Teachers were most likely to adopt strategies that they liked, found easy to use, and were effective. These included paying attention to positive behavior and explicitly teaching children the expected behavior. Teachers preferred active, hands-on training strategies based on social-cognitive theories. Enablers to intervention implementation included positive teacher-facilitator relationships, choice, collaborative problem solving, teachers recognizing benefits of the intervention, group support, and provision of materials. Barriers to intervention implementation were also identified. These data were integrated with behavior change theory (i.e., the behavior change wheel and theoretical domains framework) to develop an intervention grounded in common core elements of evidence-based programs while also utilizing teachers' perspectives. The resulting program is a low cost, adaptable intervention that should be suitable for training preschool teachers in other low-resource settings. © 2018 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Developing a health and human rights training program for french speaking Africa: lessons learned, from needs assessment to a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastonay, Philippe; Klohn, Axel Max; Zesiger, Véronique; Freigburghaus, Franziska; Mpinga, Emmanuel Kabengele

    2009-08-24

    The importance of human rights education has widely been recognized as one of the strategies for their protection and promotion of health. Yet training programs have not always taken into account neither local needs, nor public health relevance, nor pedagogical efficacy.The objectives of our study were to assess, in a participative way, educational needs in the field of health and human rights among potential trainees in six French-speaking African countries and to test the feasibility of a training program through a pilot test. Ultimately the project aims to implement a health and human rights training program most appropriate to the African context. Needs assessment was done according to four approaches: Revue of available data on health and human rights in the targeted countries; Country visits by one of the authors meeting key institutions; Focus group discussions with key-informants in each country; A questionnaire-based study targeting health professionals and human rights activists.Pilot training program: an interactive e-learning pilot program was developed integrating training needs expressed by partner institutions and potential trainees. Needs assessment showed high public health and human rights challenges that the target countries have to face. It also showed precise demands of partner institutions in regard to a health and human rights training program. It further allowed defining training objectives and core competencies useful to potential employers and future students as well as specific training contents.A pilot program allowed testing the motivation of students, the feasibility of an interactive educational approach and identifying potential difficulties. In combining various approaches our study was able to show that training needs concentrate around tools allowing the identification of basic human rights violations in the health system, the analysis of their causes and coordinated responses through specific intervention projects.

  3. Developing a health and human rights training program for french speaking Africa: lessons learned, from needs assessment to a pilot program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freigburghaus Franziska

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of human rights education has widely been recognized as one of the strategies for their protection and promotion of health. Yet training programs have not always taken into account neither local needs, nor public health relevance, nor pedagogical efficacy. The objectives of our study were to assess, in a participative way, educational needs in the field of health and human rights among potential trainees in six French-speaking African countries and to test the feasibility of a training program through a pilot test. Ultimately the project aims to implement a health and human rights training program most appropriate to the African context. Methods Needs assessment was done according to four approaches: Revue of available data on health and human rights in the targeted countries; Country visits by one of the authors meeting key institutions; Focus group discussions with key-informants in each country; A questionnaire-based study targeting health professionals and human rights activists. Pilot training program: an interactive e-learning pilot program was developed integrating training needs expressed by partner institutions and potential trainees. Results Needs assessment showed high public health and human rights challenges that the target countries have to face. It also showed precise demands of partner institutions in regard to a health and human rights training program. It further allowed defining training objectives and core competencies useful to potential employers and future students as well as specific training contents. A pilot program allowed testing the motivation of students, the feasibility of an interactive educational approach and identifying potential difficulties. Conclusion In combining various approaches our study was able to show that training needs concentrate around tools allowing the identification of basic human rights violations in the health system, the analysis of their causes and

  4. Reasoning and Action: Implementation of a Decision-Making Program in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Arias, Alexander; Moreno, M Perla; García-Mas, Alex; Moreno, Alberto; García-González, Luíz; Del Villar, Fernando

    2016-09-20

    The objective of this study was to apply a decision training programme, based on the use of video-feedback and questioning, in real game time, in order to improve decision-making in volleyball attack actions. A three-phase quasi-experimental design was implemented: Phase A (pre-test), Phase B (Intervention) and Phase C (Retention). The sample was made up of 8 female Under-16 volleyball players, who were divided into two groups: experimental group (n = 4) and control group (n = 4). The independent variable was the decision training program, which was applied for 11 weeks in a training context, more specifically in a 6x6 game situation. The player had to analyze the reasons and causes of the decision taken. The dependent variable was decision-making, which was assessed based on systematic observation, using the "Game Performance Assessment Instrument" (GPAI) (Oslin, Mitchell, & Griffin, 1998). Results showed that, after applying the decision training program, the experimental group showed a significantly higher average percentage of successful decisions than the control group F(1, 6) = 11.26; p = .015; η2 p = .652; 95% CI [056, 360]. These results highlight the need to complement the training process with cognitive tools such as video-feedback and questioning in order to improve athletes' decision-making.

  5. Overcoming barriers to implementation of evidence-based practice concepts in athletic training education: perceptions of select educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manspeaker, Sarah; Van Lunen, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    The need to include evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts in entry-level athletic training education is evident as the profession transitions toward using evidence to inform clinical decision making. To evaluate athletic training educators' experience with implementation of EBP concepts in Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)-accredited entry-level athletic training education programs in reference to educational barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers. Qualitative interviews of emergent design with grounded theory. Undergraduate CAATE-accredited athletic training education programs. Eleven educators (3 men, 8 women). The average number of years teaching was 14.73 ± 7.06. Interviews were conducted to evaluate perceived barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers to implementation of evidence-based concepts in the curriculum. Interviews were explored qualitatively through open and axial coding. Established themes and categories were triangulated and member checked to determine trustworthiness. Educators identified 3 categories of need for EBP instruction: respect for the athletic training profession, use of EBP as part of the decision-making toolbox, and third-party reimbursement. Barriers to incorporating EBP concepts included time, role strain, knowledge, and the gap between clinical and educational practices. Suggested strategies for surmounting barriers included identifying a starting point for inclusion and approaching inclusion from a faculty perspective. Educators must transition toward instruction of EBP, regardless of barriers present in their academic programs, in order to maintain progress with other health professions' clinical practices and educational standards. Because today's students are tomorrow's clinicians, we need to include EBP concepts in entry-level education to promote critical thinking, inspire potential research interest, and further develop the available body of knowledge in our

  6. Radiological contamination control training for laboratory research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. The guide is to assist those individuals, both within the Department of Energy (DOE) and Managing and Operating (M and O) contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual. The management guide is divided into the following sections: introduction; instructional materials development; training program standards and policies; and course-specific information. The goal of the core training program is to provide a standardized, baseline knowledge for those individuals completing the core training. Standardization of the knowledge provides personnel with the information necessary to perform their assigned duties at a predetermined level of expertise. Implementing a core training program ensures consistent and appropriate training of personnel

  7. Program Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Program Implementation Plan (PIP) describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) current approaches for managing the permanent disposal of defense high-level waste (HLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, and low-level waste (LLW) from atomic energy defense activities. It documents the implementation of the HLW and TRU waste policies as stated in the Defense Waste Management Plan (DWMP) (DOE/DP-0015), dated June 1983, and also addresses the management of LLW. The narrative reflects both accomplishments and changes in the scope of activities. All cost tables and milestone schedules are current as of January 1987. The goals of the program, to provide safe processing and utilization, storage, and disposal of DOE radioactive waste and byproducts to support defense nuclear materials production activities, and to implement cost-effective improvements in all of its ongoing and planned activities, have not changed

  8. Tactical Vulnerability Assessment Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.; Paulus, W.K.; Winblad, A.G.; Graves, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy sponsors a 9-day training program for individuals who are responsible for evaluating and planning safeguards systems and for preparing DOE Master and Security Agreements (MSSAs). These agreements between DOE headquarters and operations offices establish required levels of protection. The curriculum includes: (1) the nature of potential insider and outsider threats involving theft or diversion of special nuclear material, (2) use of computerized tools for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection and material control and accountability systems, and (3) methods for analyzing the benefits and costs of safeguards improvements and for setting priorities among proposed upgrades. The training program is varied and high interactive. Presentations are intermixed with class discussions and ''hands-on'' analysis using computer tools. At the end of the program, participants demonstrate what they have learned in a two-and-one-half day ''field exercise,'' which is conducted on a facility scale-model. The training program has been conducted six times and has been attended by representatives of all DOE facilities. Additional sessions are planned at four-month intervals. This paper describes the training program, use of the tools in preparing MSSAs for various DOE sites, and recent extensions and refinements of the evaluation tools

  9. Tactical Vulnerability Assessment Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.; Paulus, W.K.; Winblad, A.E.; Graves, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy sponsors a 9-day training program for individual who are responsible for evaluating and planning safeguards systems and for preparing DOE Master and Security Agreements (MSSAs). These agreements between DOE headquarters and operations offices establish required levels of protection. The curriculum includes: (1) the nature of potential insider and outsider threats involving theft or diversion of special nuclear material, (2) use of computerized tools for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection and material control and acoountability systems, and (3) methods for analyzing the benefits and costs of safeguards improvements and for setting priorities among proposed upgrades. The training program is varied and highly interactive. Presentations are intermixed with class discussions and ''hands-on'' analysis using computer tools. At the end of the program, participants demonstrate what they have learned in a two-and-one-half day ''field excercise,'' which is conducted on a facility scale-model. The training programs has been conducted six times and has been attended by representatives of all DOE facilities. Additional sessions are planned at four-month intervals. This paper describes the training program, use of the tools in preparing MSSAs for various DOE sites, and recent extensions and refinements of the evaluation tools

  10. Determining Successful Approaches for a Total Quality Management Training Program for Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    job in the private sector ."’ 23) WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED FROM THE TQM IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS? (LESSONS LEARNED?) 1) Top management support. 2) JIT...wanted ’blanket training’ for TQM familiarization. 10) HOW WAS YOUR TQM TRAINING PROGRAM FORMULATED (INTERNAL ASSESSMENT)? "We used a quality of worklife

  11. Reinforcing Productivity in a Job-Skills Training Program for Unemployed Substance-Abusing Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Shrinidhi; Everly, Jeffrey J; Silverman, Kenneth

    2017-05-01

    Chronically unemployed adults may benefit from intensive job-skills training; however, training programs do not always reliably engage participants in mastering skills. This study examined effects of voucher reinforcement for performance on a job-skills training program in the therapeutic workplace. Participants were four unemployed, substance abusing adults who earned monetary vouchers for working on programs targeting typing skills. Participants were exposed to two payment conditions that differed in whether or not pay was dependent on performance in a within-subject reversal design. In the productivity-pay condition, participants earned $8.00 per hour for attending the workplace plus a bonus for performance. In the base-pay condition, participants were paid an hourly wage that was equivalent to the total hourly earnings from the previous productivity-pay condition. Participants completed less work on the typing programs in the base- than the productivity-pay condition, but the amount of time spent in the workroom and the accuracy and rate of typing were not affected by the pay manipulation. All participants reported preferring base pay over productivity pay. Explicit reinforcement of productivity maintains consistent work in training programs, but more aspects of productivity pay need to be refined for effective, efficient, and socially valid implementation with unemployed, substance-abusing adults.

  12. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  13. A Study on Teacher Training to Incorporate Gamification in Class Design--Program Development and Implementation in a Teacher Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Shingo; Abe, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Having classes with "fun" incorporated into their design is crucial for learners. Students can learn from classes that combine learning with fun. In this study, we developed a program for university students in a teacher training course that aimed to teach ways of incorporating gamification into class design. [For the complete…

  14. A randomized controlled trial of an online, modular, active learning training program for behavioral activation for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, Ajeng J; Kanter, Jonathan W; Busch, Andrew M; Leonard, Rachel; Dunsiger, Shira; Cahill, Shawn; Martell, Christopher; Koerner, Kelly

    2017-08-01

    This randomized-controlled trial assessed the efficacy of a trainer-led, active-learning, modular, online behavioral activation (BA) training program compared with a self-paced online BA training with the same modular content. Seventy-seven graduate students (M = 30.3 years, SD = 6.09; 76.6% female) in mental health training programs were randomly assigned to receive either the trainer-led or self-paced BA training. Both trainings consisted of 4 weekly sessions covering 4 core BA strategies. Primary outcomes were changes in BA skills as measured by an objective role-play assessment and self-reported use of BA strategies. Assessments were conducted at pre-, post-, and 6-weeks after training. A series of longitudinal mixed effect models assessed changes in BA skills and a longitudinal model implemented with generalized estimating equations assessed BA use over time. Significantly greater increases in total BA skills were found in the trainer-led training condition. The trainer-led training condition also showed greater increases in all core BA skills either at posttraining, follow-up, or both. Reported use of BA strategies with actual clients increased significantly from pre- to posttraining and maintained at follow-up in both training conditions. This trial adds to the literature on the efficacy of online training as a method to disseminate BA. Online training with an active learning, modular approach may be a promising and accessible implementation strategy. Additional strategies may need to be paired with the online BA training to assure the long-term implementation and sustainability of BA in clinical practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. A Community-Based Sensory Training Program Leads to Improved Experience at a Local Zoo for Children with Sensory Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Kong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensory processing difficulties are common among many special needs children, especially those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The sensory sensitivities often result in interference of daily functioning and can lead to social isolation for both the individual and family unit. A quality improvement (QI project was undertaken within a local zoo to systematically implement a sensory training program targeted at helping special needs individuals with sensory challenges, including those with ASD, Down’s syndrome, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and speech delay. We piloted the program over a 2-year period. The program consisted of staff training, provision of sensory bags and specific social stories, as well as creation of quiet zones. Two hundred family units were surveyed before and after implementation of the sensory training program. In this pilot QI study, families reported increased visitation to the zoo, improved interactions with staff members, and the overall quality of their experience. In conclusion, we are able to demonstrate that a sensory training program within the community zoo is feasible, impactful, and has the potential to decrease social isolation for special needs individuals and their families.

  16. Organizational Wellness Program Implementation and Evaluation: A Holistic Approach to Improve the Wellbeing of Middle Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Maria Del Consuelo; Calderon, Angelica; Blunk, Dan I; Mills, Brandy W; Leiner, Marie

    2018-06-01

    : Employee wellness programs can provide benefits to institutions as well as employees and their families. Despite the attempts of some organizations to implement programs that take a holistic approach to improve physical, mental, and social wellness, the most common programs are exclusively comprised of physical and nutritional components. In this study, we implemented a wellness program intervention, including training using a holistic approach to improve the wellbeing of middle managers in several multinational organizations. We included control and experimental groups to measure wellness and teamwork with two repeated measures. Our results indicated that employees receiving the intervention had improved measures of wellness and teamwork. A positive relationship was found between wellness and teamwork in the experimental group when compared with the control group. Taken together, the data suggest that implementation of these programs would provide valuable outcomes for both employees and organizations.

  17. Hanford general employee training: A million dollar cost-beneficial program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    In January, 1990, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) implemented an interactive videodisc training program entitled Hanford General Employee Training (HGET). Following an introduction by the course instructor, students begin the interactive video segment of the course by taking a tour of an office building. In fact, this tour is simply a setting in which to give the student a checkout on safety, security, and quality issues. For example, at one point the guide leaves the room and the phone suddenly begins a steady ring. This is a particular alarm at WHC, and the student is challenged to respond correctly. Missed questions flag corresponding tutorials to be delivered either immediately or on completion of the tour. Instructors receive notification of weakoesses left unremedied. Development costs for a sophisticated program such as HGET were high compared to similar costs for developing equivalent traditional training. Hardware and labor totaled $900K. Annual maintenance costs, equipment plus labor, appear to be running about $200K. On the benefit side, by consolidating some seventeen previous WHC courses and more effectively managing the instructional process, HGET reduced the average student training time from over eleven hours to just under four hours. In the development and implementation of HGET a number of issues were resolved, some more successfully than others: (1) what about job security for former instructors? (2) how should the course be run on a daily basis? (we envisioned a combination of instructor and videodisc); (3) how high will the maintenance costs be? (higher than projected); etc. Many obstacles arise, most in connection with the large number of groups and personnel whose efforts had to be coordinated

  18. Play Therapy Training among School Psychology, Social Work, and School Counseling Graduate Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Christina Bechle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined play therapy training across the nation among school psychology, social work, and school counseling graduate training programs. It also compared current training to previous training among school psychology and school counseling programs. A random sample of trainers was selected from lists of graduate programs provided by…

  19. Secondary Data Analyses of Conclusions Drawn by the Program Implementers of a Positive Youth Development Program in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. H. Siu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes is designed for adolescents with significant psychosocial needs, and its various programs are designed and implemented by social workers (program implementers for specific student groups in different schools. Using subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (Form C at 207 schools, the program implementers were asked to aggregate data and write down five conclusions (n = 1,035 in their evaluation reports. The conclusions stated in the evaluation reports were further analyzed via secondary data analyses in this study. Results showed that the participants regarded the Tier 2 Program as a success, and was effective in enhancing self-understanding, interpersonal skills, and self-management. They liked the experiential learning approach and activities that are novel, interesting, diversified, adventure-based, and outdoor in nature. They also liked instructors who were friendly, supportive, well-prepared, and able to bring challenges and give positive recognition. Most of the difficulties encountered in running the programs were related to time constraints, clashes with other activities, and motivation of participants. Consistent with the previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received by the participants and that it was beneficial to the development of the program participants.

  20. Translating an early childhood obesity prevention program for local community implementation: a case study of the Melbourne InFANT Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Laws

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is a growing interest in the field of research translation, there are few published examples of public health interventions that have been effectively scaled up and implemented in the community. This paper provides a case study of the community-wide implementation of the Melbourne Infant, Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT, an obesity prevention program for parents with infants aged 3–18 months. The study explored key factors influencing the translation of the Program into routine practice and the respective role of policy makers, researchers and implementers. Methods Case studies were conducted of five of the eight prevention areas in Victoria, Australia who implemented the Program. Cases were selected on the basis of having implemented the Program for 6 months or more. Data were collected from January to June 2015 and included 18 individual interviews, one focus group and observation of two meetings. A total of 28 individuals, including research staff (n = 4, policy makers (n = 2 and implementers (n = 22, contributed to the data collected. Thematic analysis was conducted using cross case comparisons and key themes were verified through member checking. Results Key facilitators of implementation included availability of a pre-packaged evidence based program addressing a community need, along with support and training provided by research staff to local implementers. Partnerships between researchers and policy makers facilitated initial program adoption, while local partnerships supported community implementation. Community partnerships were facilitated by local coordinators through alignment of program goals with existing policies and services. Workforce capacity for program delivery and administration was a challenge, largely overcome by embedding the Program into existing roles. Adapting the Program to fit local circumstance was critical for feasible and sustainable delivery, however

  1. A novel Python program for implementation of quality control in the ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Hanna N; Cohen, Cinder; Norman, Andrew B; Webster, Rose P

    2017-09-01

    The use of semi-quantitative assays such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) requires stringent quality control of the data. However, such quality control is often lacking in academic settings due to unavailability of software and knowledge. Therefore, our aim was to develop methods to easily implement Levey-Jennings quality control methods. For this purpose, we created a program written in Python (a programming language with an open-source license) and tested it using a training set of ELISA standard curves quantifying the Fab fragment of an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody in mouse blood. A colorimetric ELISA was developed using a goat anti-human anti-Fab capture method. Mouse blood samples spiked with the Fab fragment were tested against a standard curve of known concentrations of Fab fragment in buffer over a period of 133days stored at 4°C to assess stability of the Fab fragment and to generate a test dataset to assess the program. All standard curves were analyzed using our program to batch process the data and to generate Levey-Jennings control charts and statistics regarding the datasets. The program was able to identify values outside of two standard deviations, and this identification of outliers was consistent with the results of a two-way ANOVA. This program is freely available, which will help laboratories implement quality control methods, thus improving reproducibility within and between labs. We report here successful testing of the program with our training set and development of a method for quantification of the Fab fragment in mouse blood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Studying creativity training programs: A methodological analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder

    2017-01-01

    Throughout decades of creativity research, a range of creativity training programs have been developed, tested, and analyzed. In 2004 Scott and colleagues published a meta‐analysis of all creativity training programs to date, and the review presented here sat out to identify and analyze studies...... published since the seminal 2004 review. Focusing on quantitative studies of creativity training programs for adults, our systematic review resulted in 22 publications. All studies were analyzed, but comparing the reported effectiveness of training across studies proved difficult due to methodological...... inconsistencies, variations in reporting of results as well as types of measures used. Thus a consensus for future studies is called for to answer the question: Which elements make one creativity training program more effective than another? This is a question of equal relevance to academia and industry...

  3. How to Buy Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how to select the best training program for your needs. Includes information on deciding whether to develop your own program or buy one; identifying the kind of program you need; examining what is available; networking; choosing a supplier; and evaluating programs. (JOW)

  4. Final report on implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report on the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments represents an initiative of the Research and Education Division, Office of Minority Economic Impact, US Department of Energy. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was created by Congress in 1979, within the US Department of Energy, to afford the Secretary advice on the effect policies, regulations and other actions of DOE respecting minority participation in energy programs. The Director of MI is responsible for the conduct of ongoing research into the effects, including socio-economic and environmental, of national energy programs, policies, and regulations of the Department of minorities. Public housing in the United States is dominated by minorities, public housing is a large consumer of residential energy. Consequently, this project is a logical merging of these two factors and an attempt to somehow influence energy savings through improving public housing residents` energy-consumption practices. This final report attempts to capture the results of this current demonstration, and incorporate the historical basis for today`s results by renewing the efforts that preceded the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments.

  5. Final report on implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report on the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments represents an initiative of the Research and Education Division, Office of Minority Economic Impact, US Department of Energy. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was created by Congress in 1979, within the US Department of Energy, to afford the Secretary advice on the effect policies, regulations and other actions of DOE respecting minority participation in energy programs. The Director of MI is responsible for the conduct of ongoing research into the effects, including socio-economic and environmental, of national energy programs, policies, and regulations of the Department of minorities. Public housing in the United States is dominated by minorities, public housing is a large consumer of residential energy. Consequently, this project is a logical merging of these two factors and an attempt to somehow influence energy savings through improving public housing residents' energy-consumption practices. This final report attempts to capture the results of this current demonstration, and incorporate the historical basis for today's results by renewing the efforts that preceded the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments.

  6. Psychological Assessment Training in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihura, Joni L; Roy, Manali; Graceffo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed American Psychological Association-accredited clinical psychology doctoral programs' (n = 83) training in psychological assessment-specifically, their coverage of various assessment topics and tests in courses and practica, and whether the training was optional or required. We report results overall and separately per training model (clinical science, scientist-practitioner, and practitioner-focused). Overall, our results suggest that psychological assessment training is as active, or even more active, than in previous years. Areas of increased emphasis include clinical interviewing and psychometrics; multimethod, outcomes, health, and collaborative or therapeutic assessment; and different types of cognitive and self-report personality tests. All or almost all practice-focused programs offered training with the Thematic Apperception Test and Rorschach compared to about half of the scientist-practitioner programs and a third of the clinical science programs. Although almost all programs reported teaching multimethod assessment, what constitutes different methods of assessing psychopathology should be clarified in future studies because many programs appear to rely on one method-self-report (especially clinical science programs). Although doctoral programs covered many assessment topics and tests in didactic courses, there appears to be a shortage of program-run opportunities for students to obtain applied assessment training. Finally, we encourage doctoral programs to be familiar with (a) internships' assessment expectations and opportunities, (b) the professional guidelines for assessment training, and (c) the American Psychological Association's requirements for preinternship assessment competencies.

  7. Pilot Implementation of two evidence based programs (SafeCare and IncredibleYears in Child Protection Services in Gipuzkoa (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín de Paul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation process of two evidence-based programs in Gipuzko as Child Protection System (Spain: SafeCare and Incredible Years. SafeCare is a home visiting program for high-riskand neglectful families with children under 5 years. Incredible Years is a parenting skills training program for families with children between 4 to 8 years with behavior problems whose parents have significantdifficulties to manage. The paper describes the process by which public institutions responsible for child protection in Gipuzkoa decided to shift from current intervention programs towards more structured, focused, and short-term programs that have shown positive results in previous applications in other countries. Issues related to programs adaptation, selection, and training of professionals and pre- and postresults obtained in the preliminary application of SafeCare and Incredible Years to a limited set of families are presented. Finally, the next step of the implementation process (pilot implementation with a randomized control trial design is described. The paper discusses a significant number of issues that have been important throughout this process and that may be useful for administrations and institutions that wish to undertake a similar process.

  8. The Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division Management and Supervisor Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbreath, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) is the management and operating contractor (MOC) for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Isolation Plant (WIPP). Managers and supervisors at DOE facilities such as the WIPP are required to complete extensive training. To meet this requirement, WID created a self-paced, self-study program known as Management and Supervisor Training (MAST). All WID managers and supervisors are required to earn certification through the MAST program. Selected employees are permitted to participate in MAST with prior approval from their manager and the Human Resources Manager. Initial MAST certification requires the completion of 31 modules. MAST participants check out modules and read them when convenient. When they are prepared, participants take module examinations. To receive credit for a given module, participants must score at least 80 percent on the examination. Lessons learned from the development, implementation, and administration are presented in this paper

  9. [History of training and certification programs of medical specialists in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein Alva, Zuño

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, historical reference is made about legal provisions for recognition of the training and certification of medical specialists in Peru through university programs provided since 1928 and culminating in 1973 with the legal authorization by the relevant state authority to implement the Second Specialization Program in Human Medicine and to grant the Certification of Specialist in the Name of the Nation upon completion of a university residency program and specialized training by the “regular modality”, and the recognition by the university with the “non-regular modality”. In Peru it has been established to the present that the Professional Certifications of Specialists in Human Medicine “in the Name of the Nation”, both in “regular modality” as well as in “non-regular modality”, can only be granted by public or private universities authorized for this mission and, besides, no other public or private institution can claim this role that corresponds exclusively for the Peruvian University.

  10. Qualitative Assessment of the Impact of Implementing Reiki Training in a Supported Residence for People Older Than 50 Years with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Renfrew, Nita M; Mainguy, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Reiki is a Japanese form of energy healing that has become popular in the US. Reiki training involves three stages—levels I, II, and III—to a master practitioner level and requires both giving and receiving Reiki. We set out to implement a program to train clients of a supported residence in Brooklyn, NY. They were all older than age 50 years and had HIV/AIDS and substance-abuse and/or mental-health disorders. Methods: A qualitative, narrative-inquiry study was conducted. The Reiki master kept a journal of her 3 years of providing 90 minutes of Reiki treatment and/or training once weekly at the residence. Forty-five of 50 potential participants attended these sessions with various frequencies. Stories were collected from 35 participants regarding their experience of Reiki training. We posited success as continued involvement in the program. Results: All 35 participants reported receiving benefit from participation in Reiki. Participants first took part in training because of the offered subway tokens; however, 40 continued their involvement despite a lack of compensation. When asked why they continued, participants reported life-changing experiences, including a greater ability to cope with addictions, a greater ability to manage counseling, healing of wounds, improvement of T-cell counts, and improved skills of daily living. Conclusion: Reiki training can be successfully implemented in a supported housing facility with people with HIV/AIDS and comorbid disorders. Some people in our study population reported areas of improvement and life-changing experiences. Our study did not establish the efficacy of Reiki, but our findings support the effect of the entire gestalt of implementing a program related to spirituality and healing and supports the goal of implementing a larger randomized, controlled trial in this setting to establish the efficacy of Reiki. PMID:22058669

  11. Factors influencing the quality of implementation of a positive youth development program in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Law, Moon Y M

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how social workers collaborate with school teachers in implementing a school-based positive youth development program in Hong Kong. Individual and focus group interviews are conducted with social workers cooperating with school teachers in implementing the Project P.A.T.H.S. in a school context. Through the interviews, strategies for establishing inter-disciplinary collaboration and factors that hinder or facilitate program implementation are identified. This case study highlights factors that facilitate the collaboration between social workers and school teachers, including the following: 1) sufficient training for instructors, 2) sharing of the practice wisdom and teaching experiences, 3) building up mutual support among different parties, 4) use of proactive communication, and 5) demonstration of self-disclosure.

  12. Student retention in athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Thomas M; Mitchell, Murray F; Mensch, James M

    2009-01-01

    The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. The nature of persistent students versus students who prematurely leave the athletic training major is not known. Understanding the profiles of athletic training students who persist or leave is important. To (1) explore the relationships among the following variables: anticipatory factors, academic integration, clinical integration, social integration, and motivation; (2) determine which of the aforementioned variables discriminate between senior athletic training students and major changers; and (3) identify which variable is the strongest predictor of persistence in athletic training education programs. Descriptive study using a qualitative and quantitative mixed-methods approach. Thirteen athletic training education programs located in District 3 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Ninety-four senior-level athletic training students and 31 college students who changed majors from athletic training to another degree option. Data were collected with the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire (ATEPSRQ). Data from the ATEPSRQ were analyzed via Pearson correlations, multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis of variance, and a stepwise discriminant analysis. Open-ended questions were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer debriefing techniques ensured trustworthiness of the study. Pearson correlations identified moderate relationships among motivation and clinical integration (r = 0.515, P accounting for 37.2% of the variance between groups. The theoretic model accurately classified 95.7% of the seniors and 53.8% of the major changers. A common theme emerging from the qualitative data was the presence of a strong peer-support group that surrounded many of the senior-level students. Understanding student retention in athletic training is

  13. An evaluation of the American Indian Air Quality Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartaroli, Marylynn

    During centuries of geographic, economic, and cultural domination, the federal government held the responsibility for the management of environmental issues on tribal lands. Today, tribes are reasserting their sovereignty in many ways, including the development of their own environmental programs. Tribal agencies desperately search for tribal members who are qualified to make decisions for the benefit of the tribes from both Western scientific and traditional cultural viewpoints. To meet this need, the American Indian Air Quality Training Program (AIAQTP) offers technical and regulatory training courses that are both scientifically up-to-date and culturally responsive to this community. This study is an evaluation of these courses. To supplement data from existing program documents and databases, I also observed five courses, sent follow-up questionnaires, and interviewed lead instructors and course participants to develop an understanding of their perceptions of the training received. Computer analysis of this quantitative and qualitative data revealed patterns and themes; an external reviewer also independently analyzed the data set. The training courses offered by AIAQTP were judged to have merit and value by the course instructors, the participants, the external evaluator, and me. Designed to be both culturally responsive and technically rigorous, these courses provided relevant and useful information and skills to the tribal environmental professionals in attendance, meeting the demands of their jobs. Although not all training needs or expectations were met, the study participants indicated their intentions to continue their education and training in air quality and other environmental media. A significant benefit of attendance at AIAQTP training courses was the development of a network of tribal professionals across the nation that acts as a support system for the implementation and continuation of changes in the professional practice for the trainees and

  14. An empirical identification and categorisation of training best practices for ERP implementation projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Although training is one of the most cited critical success factors in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems implementations, few empirical studies have attempted to examine the characteristics of management of the training process within ERP implementation projects. Based on the data gathered from a sample of 158 respondents across four stakeholder groups involved in ERP implementation projects, and using a mixed method design, we have assembled a derived set of training best practices. Results suggest that the categorised list of ERP training best practices can be used to better understand training activities in ERP implementation projects. Furthermore, the results reveal that the company size and location have an impact on the relevance of training best practices. This empirical study also highlights the need to investigate the role of informal workplace trainers in ERP training activities.

  15. Barkley's Parent Training Program, Working Memory Training and their Combination for Children with ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hosainzadeh Maleki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of Barkley's parent training program, working memory training and the combination of these two interventions for children with Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD.In this study, 36 participants with ADHD (aged 6 to 12 years were selected by convenience sampling. Revision of the Swanson, Nolan and Pelham (SNAP questionnaire (SNAP-IV, Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL and clinical interviews were employed to diagnose ADHD. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition was also implemented. The participants were randomly assigned to the three intervention groups of Barkley's parent training program, working memory training and the combined group. SNAP-IV and CBCL were used as pre-tests and post-tests across all three groups. Data were analyzed using MANCOVA (SPSS version18.There was a significant difference (p< 0.05 in the decline of attention deficit and hyperactivity /impulsivity symptoms between the combined treatment group and working memory training group and also between the combined treatment group and the parent training group in SNAP. In terms of attention problems (experience-based subscales of CBCL, there was a significant difference (p< 0.001 between the combined treatment group and working memory training group. Furthermore, compared to the working memory training and parent training groups, the combined group demonstrated a significant decline (p< 0.01 in clinical symptoms of ADHD (based on DSM.It was revealed that combined treatment in comparison with the other two methods suppressed the clinical symptoms of ADHD more significantly.

  16. 76 FR 2147 - UAW-Chrysler National Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ...-Chrysler National Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Warren, MI; Notice of Revised... investigation, the Department confirmed that the proportion of Technology Training Joint Programs Staff...

  17. Implementing corporate wellness programs: a business approach to program planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, D C; Dunn, L M; Eaton, K; Macedonio, C; Lubritz, L

    1995-11-01

    1. Support of key decision makers is critical to the successful implementation of a corporate wellness program. Therefore, the program implementation plan must be communicated in a format and language readily understood by business people. 2. A business approach to corporate wellness program planning provides a standardized way to communicate the implementation plan. 3. A business approach incorporates the program planning components in a format that ranges from general to specific. This approach allows for flexibility and responsiveness to changes in program planning. 4. Components of the business approach are the executive summary, purpose, background, ground rules, approach, requirements, scope of work, schedule, and financials.

  18. Collaborative training program in coastal management in the Philippines: a local initiative with a global perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Balgos, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    A collaborative project in developing a broad-based coastal management training program in the Philippines is being undertaken by a group of government and nongovernment agencies. It addresses the lack of expertise in planning an implementation for coastal management in the country. The process will be documented to serve as a guide in starting and maintaining the process of collaborative training in coastal management in the region. Other training initiatives are outlined including regional ...

  19. Nuclear safety training program (NSTP) for dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cretskens, Pieter; Lenie, Koen; Mulier, Guido

    2014-01-01

    European Control Services (GDF Suez) has developed and is still developing specific training programs for the dismantling and decontamination of nuclear installations. The main topic in these programs is nuclear safety culture. We therefore do not focus on technical training but on developing the right human behavior to work in a 'safety culture' environment. The vision and techniques behind these programs have already been tested in different environments: for example the dismantling of the BN MOX Plant in Dessel (Belgium), Nuclear Safety Culture Training for Electrabel NPP Doel..., but also in the non-nuclear industry. The expertise to do so was found in combining the know-how of the Training and the Nuclear Department of ECS. In training, ECS is one of the main providers of education in risky tasks, like elevation and manipulation of charges, working in confined spaces... but it does also develop training on demand to improve safety in a certain topic. Radiation Protection is the core business in the Nuclear Department with a presence on most of the nuclear sites in Belgium. Combining these two domains in a nuclear safety training program, NSTP, is an important stage in a dismantling project due to specific contamination, technical and other risks. It increases the level of safety and leads to a harmonization of different working cultures. The modular training program makes it possible to evaluate constantly as well as in group or individually. (authors)

  20. Reading assessment and training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to ensure ourselves and the general public that the workers in the Nuclear Materials Processing Department (NMPD) could read, follow, and understand procedures. Procedures were randomly selected and analyzed for reading levels. A tenth grade reading level was established as the standard for all NMPD employees. Employees were tested to determine reading levels and approximately 12% could not read at the target level. A Procedure Walk-Through Evaluation was administered to each person not reaching tenth grade reading level. This was a job performance measure given to ensure that the worker was competent in his/her present job, and should remain there while completing reading training. A mandatory Reading Training Program utilizing Computer Based Training was established. This program is self-paced, individualized instruction and provided to the worker on Company time. Results of the CBT Program have been very good. Instruction is supplemented with test-taking skills seminars, practice exams, individual conferences with their own reading specialist, and some self-directed study books. This paper describes the program at Savannah River Site

  1. Training and certification program of the operating staff for a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Prior to beginning a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system, a need was identified for a training and certification program to qualify an operating staff for conducting the test. The staff was responsible for operating and maintaining the test facility, monitoring and ensuring crew safety, and implementing procedures to ensure effective mission performance with good data collection and analysis. The training program was designed to ensure that each operating staff member was capable of performing his assigned function and was sufficiently cross-trained to serve at certain other positions on a contingency basis. Complicating the training program were budget and schedule limitations, and the high level of sophistication of test systems.

  2. Factors influencing the implementation of a lifestyle counseling program in patients with venous leg ulcers: a multiple case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Glind Irene M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation of lifestyle interventions in patient care is a major challenge. Understanding factors that influence implementation is a first step in programs to enhance uptake of these interventions. A lifestyle-counseling intervention, Lively Legs, delivered by trained nurses, can effectively improve the lifestyle in patients with venous leg ulcers. The aim of this study was to identify factors that hindered or facilitated implementation of this intervention in outpatient dermatology clinics and in home care. Methods A mixed-methods multiple case study in five purposefully selected healthcare settings in the Netherlands was conducted. Measurements to identify influencing factors before and after implementation of Lively Legs included interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, and nurses’ registration. Analyses focused on qualitative data as the main data source. All data were compared across multiple cases to draw conclusions from the study as a whole. Results A total of 53 patients enrolled in the Lively Legs program, which was delivered by 12 trained nurses. Barriers for implementation were mainly organizational. It was difficult to effectively organize reaching and recruiting patients for the program, especially in home care. Main barriers were a lack of a standardized healthcare delivery process, insufficient nursing time, and a lack of motivated nurses to deliver the program. Facilitating factors were nurse-driven coordination of care and a standardized care process to tie Lively Legs into, as this resulted in better patient recruitment and better program implementation. Conclusions This study identified a range of factors influencing the implementation of a lifestyle-counseling program, mainly related to the organization of healthcare. Using a case study method proved valuable in obtaining insight into influencing factors for implementation. This study also shed light on a more general issue, which is that leg ulcer

  3. Cockpit resource management training at People Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Keith D.; Jensen, Doug

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986 in a continuing effort to maintain and improve flight safety and solve some Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) problems, People Express implemented a new CRM training program. It is a continuously running program, scheduled over the next three years and includes state-of-the-art full-mission simulation (LOFT), semi-annual seminar workshops and a comprehensive academic program authored by Robert W. Mudge of Cockpit Management Resources Inc. That program is outlined and to maximize its contribution to the workshop's goals, is organized into four topic areas: (1) Program content: the essential elements of resource management training; (2) Training methods: the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches; (3) Implementation: the implementation of CRM training; and (4) Effectiveness: the effectiveness of training. It is confined as much as possible to concise descriptions of the program's basic components. Brief discussions of rationale are included, however no attempt is made to discuss or review popular CRM tenets or the supporting research.

  4. 42 CFR 432.30 - Training programs: General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION Training Programs... of the program; (2) Be related to job duties performed or to be performed by the persons trained; and (3) Be consistent with the program objectives of the agency. ...

  5. Nationally Certified School Psychologists' use and reported barriers to using evidence-based interventions in schools: the influence of graduate program training and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Taylor B; Shahidullah, Jeffrey D; Carlson, John S; Palejwala, Mohammed H

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically investigate Nationally Certified School Psychologists' (NCSP) training in and use of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) for child behavior concerns as well as their reported implementation barriers. A modified Tailored Design Method (TDM; Dillman, Smyth, & Christian, 2009) using up to four mail-based participant contacts was used to obtain survey data (72% usable response rate; n = 392) from a randomly selected national sample of 548 currently practicing NCSPs. Lack of time was rated as the most serious barrier to behavioral EBI implementation, followed by a lack of necessary resources, and financial constraints. Nearly three-quarters (71%) of respondents reported a perceived inadequacy of graduate program training in behavioral EBIs, with a statistically significant difference found between respondents who attended American Psychological Association (APA)-accredited/National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)-approved programs and those who did not. These findings highlight the significant barriers school psychologists encounter when attempting to implement behavioral EBIs within applied practice, as well as the importance of graduate program training in implementation science. Implications for training, practice, and research are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Workplace Violence Training Programs for Health Care Workers: An Analysis of Program Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbury, Sheila; Hodgson, Michael; Zankowski, Donna; Lipscomb, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Commercial workplace violence (WPV) prevention training programs differ in their approach to violence prevention and the content they present. This study reviews 12 such programs using criteria developed from training topics in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers and a review of the WPV literature. None of the training programs addressed all the review criteria. The most significant gap in content was the lack of attention to facility-specific risk assessment and policies. To fill this gap, health care facilities should supplement purchased training programs with specific training in organizational policies and procedures, emergency action plans, communication, facility risk assessment, and employee post-incident debriefing and monitoring. Critical to success is a dedicated program manager who understands risk assessment, facility clinical operations, and program management and evaluation.

  7. Healthcare team training programs aimed at improving depression management in primary care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöhringer, Paul A; Castro, Ariel; Martínez, Pablo; Tala, Álvaro; Medina, Simón; Rojas, Graciela

    2016-08-01

    Although evidence from Latin America and the Caribbean suggests that depression can be effectively treated in primary care settings, depression management remains unevenly performed. This systematic review evaluates all the international evidence on healthcare team training programs aimed at improving the outcomes of patients with depression. Three databases were searched for articles in English or Spanish indexed up to November 20, 2014. Studies were included if they fulfilled the following conditions: clinical trials, meta-analyses, or systematic reviews; and if they evaluated a training or educational program intended to improve the management of depression by primary healthcare teams, and assessed change in depressive symptoms, diagnosis or response rates, referral rates, patients' satisfaction and/or quality of life, and the effectiveness of treatments. Nine studies were included in this systematic review. Five trials tested the effectiveness of multi-component interventions (training included), and the remaining studies evaluated the effectiveness of specific training programs for depression management. All the studies that implemented multi-component interventions were efficacious, and half of the training trials were shown to be effective. Contribution of training programs alone to the effectiveness of multi-component interventions is yet to be established. The lack of specificity regarding health providers' characteristics might be a confounding factor. The review conducted suggests that stand-alone training programs are less effective than multi-component interventions. In applying the evidence gathered from developed countries to Latin America and the Caribbean, these training programs must consider and address local conditions of mental health systems, and therefore multi-component interventions may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Eight critical factors in creating and implementing a successful simulation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Benishek, Lauren E; Dietz, Aaron S; Salas, Eduardo; Adriansen, David J

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the need to minimize human error and adverse events, clinicians, researchers, administrators, and educators have strived to enhance clinicians' knowledge, skills, and attitudes through training. Given the risks inherent in learning new skills or advancing underdeveloped skills on actual patients, simulation-based training (SBT) has become an invaluable tool across the medical education spectrum. The large simulation, training, and learning literature was used to provide a synthesized yet innovative and "memorable" heuristic of the important facets of simulation program creation and implementation, as represented by eight critical "S" factors-science, staff, supplies, space, support, systems, success, and sustainability. These critical factors advance earlier work that primarily focused on the science of SBT success, to also include more practical, perhaps even seemingly obvious but significantly challenging components of SBT, such as resources, space, and supplies. SYSTEMS: One of the eight critical factors-systems-refers to the need to match fidelity requirements to training needs and ensure that technological infrastructure is in place. The type of learning objectives that the training is intended to address should determine these requirements. For example, some simulators emphasize physical fidelity to enable clinicians to practice technical and nontechnical skills in a safe environment that mirrors real-world conditions. Such simulators are most appropriate when trainees are learning how to use specific equipment or conduct specific procedures. The eight factors-science, staff, supplies, space, support, systems, success, and sustainability-represent a synthesis of the most critical elements necessary for successful simulation programs. The order of the factors does not represent a deliberate prioritization or sequence, and the factors' relative importance may change as the program evolves.

  9. Training programs for the systems approach to nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In support of United States Government (USG) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear security programs, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has advocated and practiced a risk-based, systematic approach to nuclear security. The risk equation has been developed and implemented as the basis for a performance-based methodology for the design and evaluation of physical protection systems against a design basis threat (DBT) for theft and sabotage of nuclear and/or radiological materials. Integrated systems must include technology, people, and the man-machine interface. A critical aspect of the human element is training on the systems-approach for all the stakeholders in nuclear security. Current training courses and workshops have been very beneficial but are still rather limited in scope. SNL has developed two primary international classes - the international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials, and the design basis threat methodology workshop. SNL is also completing the development of three new courses that will be offered and presented in the near term. They are vital area identification methodology focused on nuclear power plants to aid in their protection against radiological sabotage, insider threat analysis methodology and protection schemes, and security foundations for competent authority and facility operator stakeholders who are not security professionals. In the long term, we envision a comprehensive nuclear security curriculum that spans policy and technology, regulators and operators, introductory and expert levels, classroom and laboratory/field, and local and offsite training options. This training curriculum will be developed in concert with a nuclear security series of guidance documents that is expected to be forthcoming from the IAEA. It is important to note that while appropriate implementation of systems based on such training and documentation can improve the risk reduction, such a

  10. Improving Insider Threat Training Awareness and Mitigation Programs at Nuclear Facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Shannon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, insider threat programs have become an important aspect of nuclear security, and nuclear security training courses. However, many nuclear security insider threat programs fail to address the insider threat attack and monitoring potential that exists on information technology (IT) systems. This failure is critical because of the importance of information technology and networks in today’s world. IT systems offer an opportunity to perpetrate dangerous insider attacks, but they also present an opportunity to monitor for them and prevent them. This paper suggests a number of best practices for monitoring and preventing insider attacks on IT systems, and proposes the development of a new IT insider threat tabletop that can be used to help train nuclear security practitioners on how best to implement IT insider threat prevention best practices. The development of IT insider threat best practices and a practical tabletop exercise will allow nuclear security practitioners to improve nuclear security trainings as it integrates a critical part of insider threat prevention into the broader nuclear security system.

  11. Clinical training: a simulation program for phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Toshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basic clinical skills training in the Japanese medical education system has traditionally incorporated on-the-job training with patients. Recently, the complementary use of simulation techniques as part of this training has gained popularity. It is not known, however, whether the participants view this new type of education program favorably; nor is the impact of this program known. In this study we developed a new simulation-based training program in phlebotomy for new medical residents and assessed their satisfaction with the program Methods The education program comprised two main components: simulator exercise sessions and the actual drawing of blood from other trainees. At the end of the session, we surveyed participant sentiment regarding the program. Results There were 43 participants in total. In general, they were highly satisfied with the education program, with all survey questions receiving scores of 3 or more on a scale of 1–5 (mean range: 4.3 – 4.8, with 5 indicating the highest level of satisfaction. Additionally, their participation as a 'patient' for their co-trainees was undertaken willingly and was deemed to be a valuable experience. Conclusion We developed and tested an education program using a simulator for blood collection. We demonstrated a high satisfaction level among the participants for this unique educational program and expect that it will improve medical training, patient safety, and quality of care. The development and dissemination of similar educational programs involving simulation for other basic clinical skills will be undertaken in the future.

  12. The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Lauren A.; Stavros, Candace; Ebrahimian, Mineh; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting. Method: Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest-posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of…

  13. A Systematic Review of Biopsychosocial Training Programs for the Self-Management of Emotional Stress: Potential Applications for the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Shawn S.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Walter, Joan A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed. PMID:24174982

  14. A Systematic Review of Biopsychosocial Training Programs for the Self-Management of Emotional Stress: Potential Applications for the Military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Crawford

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed.

  15. A systematic review of biopsychosocial training programs for the self-management of emotional stress: potential applications for the military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Cindy; Wallerstedt, Dawn B; Khorsan, Raheleh; Clausen, Shawn S; Jonas, Wayne B; Walter, Joan A G

    2013-01-01

    Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed.

  16. Good Cop, Better Cop: Evaluation of a Geriatrics Training Program for Police.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rebecca T; Ahalt, Cyrus; Rivera, Josette; Stijacic Cenzer, Irena; Wilhelm, Angela; Williams, Brie A

    2017-08-01

    To develop, implement, and evaluate a training program in aging-related health for police officers. Cross-sectional. Crisis intervention training program for police officers in San Francisco. Police officers attending one of five 2-hour trainings (N = 143). A lecture on aging-related health conditions pertinent to police work followed by three experiential trainings on how it feels to be "old." Participants evaluated the quality of the training and the likelihood that they would apply new knowledge to their work and rated their knowledge using a retrospective pre-post evaluation. In open-ended responses, participants reported work-related changes they anticipated making in response to the training. All 143 participants completed the evaluation. Eighty-four percent reported interacting with older adults at least monthly; 45% reported daily interactions. Participants rated the training quality at 4.6/5 and the likelihood they would apply new knowledge to their work at 4.4/5. Retrospective pre-post knowledge scores increased for all domains, including how to identify aging-related health conditions that can affect safety during police interactions (2.9/5 to 4.2/5; P police officers' self-reported knowledge and skills. Clinicians have an important opportunity to help enhance safe and effective community policing for older adults. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. The Human Rights and Social Justice Scholars Program: a collaborative model for preclinical training in social medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Salina; James, Aisha; Hennelly, Marie Oliva; Karani, Reena; Palermo, Ann-Gel; Jakubowski, Andrea; Ciccariello, Chloe; Atkinson, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of the role social justice takes in medical professionalism, the need to train health professionals to address social determinants of health, and medical trainees' desire to eliminate health disparities, undergraduate medical education offers few opportunities for comprehensive training in social justice. The Human Rights and Social Justice (HRSJ) Scholars Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is a preclinical training program in social medicine consisting of 5 components: a didactic course, faculty and student mentorship, research projects in social justice, longitudinal policy and advocacy service projects, and a career seminar series. The aim of this article is to describe the design and implementation of the HRSJ curriculum with a focus on the cornerstone of the HRSJ Scholars Program: longitudinal policy and advocacy service projects implemented in collaboration with partner organizations in East Harlem. Furthermore, we describe the results of a qualitative survey of inaugural participants, now third-year medical students, to understand how their participation in this service-learning component affected their clinical experiences and professional self-perceptions. Ultimately, through the implementation and evaluation of the HRSJ Scholars Program, we demonstrate an innovative model for social justice education; the enduring effect of service-learning experiences on participants' knowledge, skills, and attitudes; and the potential to increase community capacity for improved health through a collaborative educational model. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HEALS Hypertension Control Program: Training Church Members as Program Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodani, Sunita; Beayler, Irmatine; Lewis, Jennifer; Sowders, Lindsey A

    2014-01-01

    Health disparities related to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including stroke have remained higher in the African-Americans (AAs) than in other populations. HEALS is a faith-based hypertension (HTN) control program modified according to AA community needs, and delivered by the church-lay members called church health advisors (CHAs). This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of training CHAs as HEALS program leaders. Four CHAs completed a 10-hour HEALS program training workshop at the Church, conducted by the nutrition experts. Workshop was evaluated by CHAs on their level of satisfaction, clarity of contents covered and comfort in delivery the program to the church congregation. The overall six main HEALS curriculum components were completed. Workshop was highly evaluated by CHAs on length of training, balance between content and skills development, and level of satisfaction with program delivery. Church-based culturally modified health promotion interventions conducted by the community lay members may be a way to reduce health disparities in ethnic minorities.

  19. Effective safety training program design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilton, D.A.; Lombardo, G.J.; Pater, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the oil industry require new strategies to reduce costs and retain valuable employees. Training is a potentially powerful tool for changing the culture of an organization, resulting in improved safety awareness, lower-risk behaviors and ultimately, statistical improvements. Too often, safety training falters, especially when applied to pervasive, long-standing problems. Stepping, Handling and Lifting injuries (SHL) more commonly known as back injuries and slips, trips and falls have plagued mankind throughout the ages. They are also a major problem throughout the petroleum industry. Although not as widely publicized as other immediately-fatal accidents, injuries from stepping, materials handling, and lifting are among the leading causes of employee suffering, lost time and diminished productivity throughout the industry. Traditional approaches have not turned the tide of these widespread injuries. a systematic safety training program, developed by Anadrill Schlumberger with the input of new training technology, has the potential to simultaneously reduce costs, preserve employee safety, and increase morale. This paper: reviews the components of an example safety training program, and illustrates how a systematic approach to safety training can make a positive impact on Stepping, Handling and Lifting injuries

  20. Development and implementation of a radiological worker training program for an architect/engineer contractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemuth, W.

    1993-01-01

    Prior to the implementation of the DOE Rad Con Manual, Kaiser Engineers Hanford offered a four hour radiation worker class, which met all DOE 5480.11 requirements. This class included a dress/undress exercise. The content of the class was focused on the construction worker who is our typical radiation worker. We did not go into depth on the theory material, having a general feeling that this would not be essential information to the typical construction worker. We tried to gear the class to the level of understanding of the average craft worker. We provide training to 500 employees in the average year

  1. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Objectives, regulations and requirements, training methods, certification and recertification, progression and incentives, and coverage of the ICPP operator training program are discussed in detail. (LK)

  2. 76 FR 35474 - UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ...-Chrysler Technical Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Cranks, O/E Learning, DBSI, IDEA, and Tonic/MVP, Detroit, MI; UAW-Chrysler Technical Training... workers and former workers of UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs...

  3. Implantation and Evaluation of a Training Program in Radiation Protection of the Exposed Workers in our Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Agudo, A.; Ruiz Rodriguez, J. C.; Zapata Jimenez, J. C.; Munoz Cuevas, R.; Gil Tomas, S.

    2004-01-01

    The object of this work is to introduce the training program in Radiation Protection implemented in our Hospital, and its evaluation and follow-up. Material AND Methods: The training program in Radiation Protection implanted by the Department of Radiation Protection in the Hospital de la Ribera consists of three types of training modalities: Annual Seminars: applicable to all the exposed workers and divided in a general part and a specific one for each area; Informative lectures: applicable to a specific department, deal with specific issues of interest without predetermined frequency; Individualised training: applicable to pregnant, new workers, job moves and duties change. The follow-up of the program is carried out by mean of inquiries about general and site-specific knowledge on radiation protection. Results The results of the inquiries are analysed and related with the continuous training program. Conclusion: It is remarkable that departments with workers without academic training in radiation protection (Intensive Care Unit, Surgery, Endoscopy,) need a more dedicated training. The results confirm the validity of the three training modalities: The annual seminar provides a continuous training to all exposed workers; the informative lecture is useful to handle immediately issues of current interest in a specific department and the individual training are useful to acquire specific knowledge about radiation risks and radiation protection rules in new working situations. (Author)

  4. NET-ZERO ENERGY BUILDING OPERATOR TRAINING PROGRAM (NZEBOT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brizendine, Anthony; Byars, Nan; Sleiti, Ahmad; Gehrig, Bruce; Lu, Na

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Net-Zero Energy Building Operator Training Program (NZEBOT) was to develop certificate level training programs for commercial building owners, managers and operators, principally in the areas of energy / sustainability management. The expected outcome of the project was a multi-faceted mechanism for developing the skill-based competency of building operators, owners, architects/engineers, construction professionals, tenants, brokers and other interested groups in energy efficient building technologies and best practices. The training program draws heavily on DOE supported and developed materials available in the existing literature, as well as existing, modified, and newly developed curricula from the Department of Engineering Technology & Construction Management (ETCM) at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNC-Charlotte). The project goal is to develop a certificate level training curriculum for commercial energy and sustainability managers and building operators that: 1) Increases the skill-based competency of building professionals in energy efficient building technologies and best practices, and 2) Increases the workforce pool of expertise in energy management and conservation techniques. The curriculum developed in this project can subsequently be used to establish a sustainable energy training program that can contribute to the creation of new “green” job opportunities in North Carolina and throughout the Southeast region, and workforce training that leads to overall reductions in commercial building energy consumption. Three energy training / education programs were developed to achieve the stated goal, namely: 1. Building Energy/Sustainability Management (BESM) Certificate Program for Building Managers and Operators (40 hours); 2. Energy Efficient Building Technologies (EEBT) Certificate Program (16 hours); and 3. Energy Efficent Buildings (EEB) Seminar (4 hours). Training Program 1 incorporates the following

  5. An e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer program to implement a suicide practice guideline. Rationale, content and dissemination in Dutch mental health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke de Groot

    2015-09-01

    These results suggest that an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer program is an efficient way to uptake new interventions by professionals. The face-to-face training was easily replicable so it was easy to adhere to the training protocol. E-learning made the distribution of the training material more viable, although the distribution was limited by problems with ICT facilities. Overall, the intervention was well received by both trainers and trainees. By thoroughly describing the material and by offering all training materials online, we aim at further dissemination of the program.

  6. A Cooperative Training Program for Students with Severe Behavior Problems: Description and Comparative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reganick, Karol A.

    The Cooperative Training Program was implemented with 20 students having severe behavior problems, to augment a classroom employability curriculum. Educators and business managers at a local Perkins restaurant worked cooperatively to design a new curriculum and recruitment procedure to benefit both students and the business. A continuous and…

  7. A radiation protection training program with a focus on communicating risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.H.; Zelmer, R.L.; Tourneur, F.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation protection training is generally provided to promote a radiologically safe work environment, and to help ensure that doses are kept as low as reasonably achievable. In many cases, this reason makes good sense. Radiological risk can often be a significant concern when working with radioactive materials or radiation-emitting devices. However, in conducting the work of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, it is often the case that the perception of radiological risk is of greater concern that the radiological risk itself. In this case, radiation protection training can serve another equally important purpose. It can be used to convey, in a balanced manner, the actual radiological risks associated with the work, and to put those risks in perspective. For individuals who are not familiar with radiation safety, effective radiation protection training that focuses on risk communication can reduce the level of concern surrounding work to be performed. This, in turn, can have an overall positive impact on the efficiency of the work, on goodwill within the community where the work is taking place, and even on the overall safety of those conducting the work. The radiation protection training program developed and implemented by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office is described in the context of other, more traditional radiation protection training programs. (author)

  8. Implementing an Employee Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gam, John; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes in detail the implementation of an employee assistance program in a textile plant. Reviews the historical development, referral process, and termination guidelines of the program and contains descriptive statistics for six periods of the program's operation. (Author/JAC)

  9. Implementation of customized health information technology in diabetes self management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Susan; Frith, Karen H; O'Keefe, Louise; Hennigan, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The project was a nurse-led implementation of a software application, designed to combine clinical and demographic records for a diabetes education program, which would result in secure, long-term record storage. Clinical information systems may be prohibitively expensive for small practices and require extensive training for implementation. A review of the literature suggests that the use of simple, practice-based registries offer an economical method of monitoring the outcomes of diabetic patients. The database was designed using a common software application, Microsoft Access. The theory used to guide implementation and staff training was Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations theory (1995). Outcomes after a 3-month period included incorporation of 100% of new clinical and demographic patient records into the database and positive changes in staff attitudes regarding software applications used in diabetes self-management training. These objectives were met while keeping project costs under budgeted amounts. As a function of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) researcher role, there is a need for CNSs to identify innovative and economical methods of data collection. The success of this nurse-led project reinforces suggestions in the literature for less costly methods of data maintenance in small practice settings. Ongoing utilization and enhancement have resulted in the creation of a robust database that could aid in the research of multiple clinical issues. Clinical nurse specialists can use existing evidence to guide and improve both their own practice and outcomes for patients and organizations. Further research regarding specific factors that predict efficient transition of informatics applications, how these factors vary according to practice settings, and the role of the CNS in implementation of such applications is needed.

  10. Challenges in Measuring Benefit of Clinical Research Training Programs--the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Lillian; Crowther, Mark; Byrd, John; Gitlin, Scott D; Basso, Joe; Burns, Linda

    2015-12-01

    The American Society of Hematology developed the Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI) to address the lack of training in patient-oriented research among hematologists. As the program continues, we need to consider metrics for measuring the benefits of such a training program. This article addresses the benefits of clinical research training programs. The fundamental and key components are education and mentorship. However, there are several other benefits including promotion of collaboration, job and advancement opportunities, and promotion of work-life balance. The benefits of clinical research training programs need to be measured so that funders and society can judge if they are worth the investment in time and resources. Identification of elements that are important to program benefit is essential to measuring the benefit of the program as well as program planning. Future work should focus on the constructs which contribute to benefits of clinical research training programs such as CRTI.

  11. 23 CFR 260.407 - Implementation and reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) exclusive of travel, subsistence, or salary of trainees. (c) As provided in 23 U.S.C. 321(c), education and... EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAMS State Education and Training Programs § 260.407 Implementation and...-related training and education. The principal recipients of this training shall be employees who are...

  12. The Rwanda Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rwanda Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (RFELTP) is a 2-year public health leadership development training program that provides applied epidemiology and public health laboratory training while the trainees provide public health service to the Ministry of Health. RFELTP is hosted at the National ...

  13. [Resident evaluation of general surgery training programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza G, Ricardo; Danilla E, Stefan; Valdés G, Fabio; San Francisco R, Ignacio; Llanos L, Osvaldo

    2009-07-01

    The profile of the general surgeon has changed, aiming to incorporate new skills and to develop new specialties. To assess the quality of postgraduate General Surgery training programs given by Chilean universities, the satisfaction of students and their preferences after finishing the training period. A survey with multiple choice and Likert type questions was designed and applied to 77 surgery residents, corresponding to 59% of all residents of general surgery specialization programs of Chilean universities. Fifty five per cent of residents financed with their own resources the specialization program. Thirty nine percent disagreed partially or totally with the objectives and rotations of programs. The opportunity to perform surgical interventions and the support by teachers was well evaluated. However, 23% revealed teacher maltreatment. Fifty six percent performed research activities, 73% expected to continue training in a derived specialty and 69% was satisfied with the training program. Residents considered that the quality and dedication of professors and financing of programs are issues that must be improved. The opportunity to perform surgical interventions, obtaining a salary for their work and teacher support is considered of utmost importance.

  14. Food Safety Programs Based on HACCP Principles in School Nutrition Programs: Implementation Status and Factors Related to Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Wendy Bounds; Carr, Deborah; Nettles, Mary Frances; Johnson, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess the extent to which school nutrition (SN) programs have implemented food safety programs based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles, as well as factors, barriers, and practices related to implementation of these programs. Methods: An online survey was…

  15. Perspectives in medical education 7. Observations on clinical training at a "US-style" residency program at Teine Keijinkai Hospital in Sapporo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Harsha

    2009-06-01

    The residency program at Teine Keijinkai Hospital in Sapporo has successfully implemented a training philosophy that is focused on the development of clinical skills and critical thinking in Japanese residents. Several elements contribute to its success. The first and foremost is visionary physician leadership, beginning with the pioneers who implemented the philosophy, and continuing through the current leadership, which has sustained the original vision. A close second is the administrative and financial commitment to invest in producing more clinically accomplished Japanese physicians, long before that need was officially recognized. Third is the program's explicit aim of adhering to international norms by requiring three years of training, promulgating a benevolent, not paternalistic teaching philosophy and encouraging an interactive and interrogatory learning ethic. Fourth is the year-round presence of a US-trained Physician-in-Residence, to sustain the focus on clinical skills and international norms. Fifth is a long-term relationship with the Internal Medicine Training Program at the University of Pittsburgh, providing a conduit for ongoing academic exchange and programmatic advice. Last, but not least, is its avowed intention of being viewed as an "American-style program" with a preference for English fluent applicants, which acts as a magnet for trainees motivated to acquire clinical skills and competencies, with an eye to future training in the US. All these elements contribute to the program's unique focus on teaching clinical skills and critical thinking. Others who are striving with varying degrees of success to implement a similar philosophy in Japan may benefit from studying its example.

  16. Implementation of systematic training approach in Kozloduy Training Centre - Current situation. Presentation of Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosturkov, L.

    1993-01-01

    To identify the needs in implementation of the systematic training approach, a relation between the number of trainees, duration of the training and the type of training should be made. In other hand, as it was stated in the TWG-T(93) Status Report, in order to be better identified outstanding training needs, the existing capabilities and other related projects should be taken into account. This report is pointed to give more details for the current situation in Bulgaria and to clarify the needs of international assistance. 3 refs, 3 tabs

  17. Evaluating an australian emergency nurse practitioner candidate training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Sharyn J; Wright, Mary; Hocking, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Nurse Practitioners (NPs) receive core clinical training at master's level, with their employer providing the opportunity to upskill in clinical and procedural competencies. It is increasingly recognised that this generic education requires supplementary training for operating effectively within a specific clinical environment. In this paper we describe a pilot program designed to train Australian NP Candidates to work effectively within the Emergency Department Fast Track model of care. The training program consisted of a 12-month period: four hours in-house training per week over two semesters, running concurrently with the NP candidate's University semesters, and 3 months' clinical practice to consolidate. The training team defined milestones for Semesters one and two, and developed a case review form to assess application of the candidate's knowledge in new clinical situations, as well as check for gaps in understanding. A clinical skills guide was developed for the candidate to work toward, and a comprehensive assessment was carried out at two time points in the training program. Feedback was obtained from the mentors and the candidate at the end point of the training program, and has been used to refine the program for 2017. This in-house training program provided specialised, evidence-based training for the emergency department environment, resulting in development of the nurse practitioner candidate as a high functioning team member. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear criticality safety training: guidelines for DOE contractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, M.R.

    1983-09-01

    The DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter V, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, establishes safety procedures and requirements for DOE nuclear facilities. This guide has been developed as an aid to implementing the Chapter V requirements pertaining to nuclear criticality safety training. The guide outlines relevant conceptual knowledge and demonstrated good practices in job performance. It addresses training program operations requirements in the areas of employee evaluations, employee training records, training program evaluations, and training program records. It also suggests appropriate feedback mechanisms for criticality safety training program improvement. The emphasis is on academic rather than hands-on training. This allows a decoupling of these guidelines from specific facilities. It would be unrealistic to dictate a universal program of training because of the wide variation of operations, levels of experience, and work environments among DOE contractors and facilities. Hence, these guidelines do not address the actual implementation of a nuclear criticality safety training program, but rather they outline the general characteristics that should be included

  19. Data Programming: Creating Large Training Sets, Quickly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Alexander; De Sa, Christopher; Wu, Sen; Selsam, Daniel; Ré, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Large labeled training sets are the critical building blocks of supervised learning methods and are key enablers of deep learning techniques. For some applications, creating labeled training sets is the most time-consuming and expensive part of applying machine learning. We therefore propose a paradigm for the programmatic creation of training sets called data programming in which users express weak supervision strategies or domain heuristics as labeling functions, which are programs that label subsets of the data, but that are noisy and may conflict. We show that by explicitly representing this training set labeling process as a generative model, we can “denoise” the generated training set, and establish theoretically that we can recover the parameters of these generative models in a handful of settings. We then show how to modify a discriminative loss function to make it noise-aware, and demonstrate our method over a range of discriminative models including logistic regression and LSTMs. Experimentally, on the 2014 TAC-KBP Slot Filling challenge, we show that data programming would have led to a new winning score, and also show that applying data programming to an LSTM model leads to a TAC-KBP score almost 6 F1 points over a state-of-the-art LSTM baseline (and into second place in the competition). Additionally, in initial user studies we observed that data programming may be an easier way for non-experts to create machine learning models when training data is limited or unavailable. PMID:29872252

  20. On the implementation of the Biological Threat Reduction Program in the Republic of Uzbekistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuychiev, Laziz; Madaminov, Marifjon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the implementation of the Biological Threat Reduction Program (BTRP) of the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency in the Republic of Uzbekistan since 2004. Introduction The Biological Threat Reduction Program (BTRP) has been being implemented in the Republic of Uzbekistan since 2004 within the framework of the Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Uzbekistan and the Government of the United States of America Concerning Cooperation in the Area of the Promotion of Defense Relations and the Prevention of Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction of 06.05.2001. Threat agent detection and response activities that target a list of especially dangerous pathogens are being carried out under the BTRP within the health care system of Uzbekistan. This presentation reviews some of the achievements of the program to date. Results BTRP, in partnership with the Government of Uzbekistan, has funded the establishment of five Regional Diagnostic Laboratories (RDL) and ten Epidemiological Support Units (ESU), operated by the Ministry of Health of Uzbekistan, which are intended to improve the diagnosis of quarantine and especially dangerous infections, and to ensure timely preventive and anti-epidemic measures. RDLs provide a high level of biosafety and biosecurity to conduct rapid laboratory diagnostics (PCR, ELISA) of especially dangerous infections. RDLs are equipped with up-to-date diagnostic laboratory equipment that conforms to internationals standards, as well as with all necessary consumables. Personnel of RDLs have been appropriately trained in epidemiology, clinical and diagnostic techniques for especially dangerous infections, including such state-of-the-art techniques as rapid PCR and ELISA diagnostics, as well as in work and equipment operation safety regulations. Epidemiological Support Units (ESU) have been established on the basis of the Especially Dangerous Infections Divisions of Oblast, city and Rayon Centers for State Sanitary

  1. Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Seavey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Journal of Sports Medicine & Allied Health Sciences, 2016;2(1 ISSN: 2376-9289 Seavey, Beatty, Lenhoff, & Krause. Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs Douglas M. Seavey, AT, Christopher T. Beatty, Tyler L. Lenhoff, & Bentley A. Krause, PhD, AT Ohio University, College of Health Sciences & Professions, Division of Athletic Training. ____________________________________________________________________ Context: Athletic trainers (ATs, more than any other healthcare professional, has expertise in areas of on-field assessment and management of sport related concussion and spinal cord injury. A search of the key words “brain” (n=>100 or “spinal cord/spine” (n=~50 were identified in National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statements on Concussion and Spinal Cord Injury. However, a significant gap exists in the basic science knowledge of neuroscience and neuroanatomy. Objective: The goal of this study is to identify the basic science coursework in professional and post-professional athletic training curricula. Design and Setting: This is a descriptive, curricula analysis of CAATE Professional and Post-Professional Athletic Training Programs using web-based search and review. Participants: Curricula for accredited Professional (n=336 and Post-Professional (n=15 Athletic Training Programs were reviewed and analyzed to characteristics basic science content. Interventions: This web-based program review of CAATE standard course content and elective options occurred. Main Outcome Measures: Course titles, numbers and descriptions were accessed at CAATE.net and offerings of anatomy, gross anatomy, neuroanatomy and neuroscience, human physiology, exercise physiology, psychology, chemistry and physics content were quantified. Main outcome measures include frequencies and distributions of courses in each subject area. Results: We reviewed 309

  2. In-vivo job development training among peer providers of homeless veterans supported employment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ni; Dolce, Joni; Rio, John; Heitzmann, Carma; Loving, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    This column describes a goal-oriented, time-limited in vivo coaching/training approach for skills building among peer veterans vocational rehabilitation specialists of the Homeless Veteran Supported Employment Program (HVSEP). Planning, implementing, and evaluating the training approach for peer providers was intended, ultimately, to support veterans in their goal of returning to community competitive employment. The description draws from the training experience that aimed to improve the ability of peer providers to increase both rates of employment and wages of the homeless veterans using their services. Training peers using an in vivo training approach provided a unique opportunity for the veterans to improve their job development skills with a focus to support employment outcomes for the service users. Peers who received training also expressed that learning skills through an in vivo training approach was more engaging than typical classroom trainings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Nucleoelectric energy training programs in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanarro, A.; Izquierdo, L.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of nucleoelectric energy in Spain is developing very rapidly. The nuclear power installed in Spain at the present time is 1,1 GWe and it is expected to increase to 8 GWe in 1980 and to 28 GWe in 1990. Spanish industry and technology are also rapidly increasing their participation in building nuclear stations, in manufacturing the necessary components and in the activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle. All of this requires properly trained personnel which is estimated at approximately 1200 high-level technicians, 1100 medium-level technicians and 1500 technical assistants by 1980. This personnel is trained: a) In engineering schools; b) In the Nuclear Studies Institute; and c) In the electric companies with nuclear programs. The majority of the high-level engineering schools in the Country include physics and basic nuclear technology courses in their programs. Some of them have an experimental low-power nuclear reactor. The Nuclear Studies Institute is an official organism depending on the Nuclear Energy Commission responsible, among other subjects, of training personnel for the peaceful use and development of nuclear energy in the Country. The electric companies also participate in training personnel for future nuclear stations and they plan to have advanced simulators of the PWR and BWR type stations for operator training. The report deals with the personnel requirement forecasts and describes the personnel training programs [es

  4. Predicting Attrition in a Military Special Program Training Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    made by assessing additional psychological factors. Specifically, motivation (s) to enter the training program (e.g., intrinsic versus extrinsic ...this and other training programs. Motivations to enter the training program could be assessed using a measure such as the Work Extrinsic and...MEDICINE GRADUATE PROGRAMS Graduate Education Office (A 1045), 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 APPROVAL OF THE DOCTORAL DISSERTATION IN THE

  5. Using a Moodle-Based Professional Development Program to Train Science Teachers to Teach for Creativity and its Effectiveness on their Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Al-Abdali, Nasser S.

    2015-08-01

    This study describes a distance learning professional development program that we designed for the purpose of training science teachers to teach for creativity. The Moodle platform was used to host the training. To ensure that trainees would benefit from this distance learning program, we designed the instructional activities according to the Community of Inquiry framework, which consists of three main elements: cognitive presence, teaching presence and social presence. Nineteen science teachers in Oman engaged in the training, which lasted for 36 working days. To measure the effectiveness of the training program on science teachers' instructional practices related to teaching for creativity, we used a pre-post one-group quasi-experimental design. An observation form was used to assess and document participants' practices. Paired t test results showed that there was a statistically significant improvement in science teachers' practices related to teaching for creativity. During the implementation of the training program, we observed that cognitive presence and teaching presence were the two most successful elements of the program. The training program involved participants in different instructional activities which were designed to help them understand the role of creativity in science; a wide range of instructional techniques designed to nurture students' creativity was discussed. The program also provided participants with opportunities to relate their practices to teaching for creativity and to design and implement lesson plans geared toward teaching for creativity. However, the social presence element was not satisfying. Participants' virtual interactions with each other and their engagement in online discussion forums were limited. This paper provides some recommendations to overcome such pitfalls.

  6. 30 CFR 77.107-1 - Plans for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for training programs. 77.107-1 Section... COAL MINES Qualified and Certified Persons § 77.107-1 Plans for training programs. Each operator must..., a program or plan setting forth what, when, how, and where the operator will train and retrain...

  7. Training within the French nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jusselin, F.

    1987-01-01

    Training dispensed by the EDF Nuclear and Fossil Generation Division has contributed significantly toward successful startup and operation of French nuclear power plants. In 1986, the time-based availability of 900 MW PWRs totaled 85 %. This is just one example of how EDF training programs have benefited from 150 reactor-years of operating experience and the ensuing opportunities for perfecting and testing of training tool effectiveness. These programs have been adopted by utilities in other countries where suitable local facilities are making advantageous use of EDF training experience and methods. EDF expertise is also transferred to these countries indirectly through the simulator manufacturer

  8. Improving the Teaching Skills of Residents in a Surgical Training Program: Results of the Pilot Year of a Curricular Initiative in an Ophthalmology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yewlin E; Newman, Lori R; Loewenstein, John I; Kloek, Carolyn E

    2015-01-01

    To design and implement a teaching skills curriculum that addressed the needs of an ophthalmology residency training program, to assess the effect of the curriculum, and to present important lessons learned. A teaching skills curriculum was designed for the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology. Results of a needs assessment survey were used to guide curriculum objectives. Overall, 3 teaching workshops were conducted between October 2012 and March 2013 that addressed areas of need, including procedural teaching. A postcurriculum survey was used to assess the effect of the curriculum. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, a tertiary care institution in Boston, MA. Overall, 24 residents in the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology were included. The needs assessment survey demonstrated that although most residents anticipated that teaching would be important in their future career, only one-third had prior formal training in teaching. All residents reported they found the teaching workshops to be either very or extremely useful. All residents reported they would like further training in teaching, with most residents requesting additional training in best procedural teaching practices for future sessions. The pilot year of the resident-as-teacher curriculum for the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology demonstrated a need for this curriculum and was perceived as beneficial by the residents, who reported increased comfort in their teaching skills after attending the workshops. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. OSHA Training Programs. Module SH-48. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act) training programs is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module provides a list of OSHA training requirements and describes OSHA training programs and other safety organizations' programs. Following the introduction, 11 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  10. Application to graduate psychology programs by undergraduate students of color: the impact of a research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Gordon C Nagayama; Allard, Carolyn B

    2009-07-01

    The top 86 students were selected from a pool of approximately 400 applicants to a summer clinical psychology research training program for undergraduate students of color. Forty-three of the students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 clinical psychology research training programs, and 43 were randomly assigned to a control condition without training. The multicultural version of the training program emphasized the cultural context of psychology in all areas of training, whereas cultural context was de-emphasized in the monocultural version of the program. Although the cultural content of the 2 training programs was effectively manipulated as indicated by a fidelity check by an outside expert, there were no significant differences between the effects of the 2 programs on the outcomes measured in this study. The primary differences in this study were between students who did versus those who did not participate in a training program. Sixty-five percent of the students who completed the multicultural training program applied to graduate schools in psychology, compared with 47% of those who completed the monocultural training program, and 31% of those in the control group. Participation in summer research training programs also increased self-perceptions of multicultural competence.

  11. Quality assurance in postgraduate pathology training the Dutch way: regular assessment, monitoring of training programs but no end of training examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It might seem self-evident that in the transition from a supervised trainee to an independent professional who is no longer supervised, formal assessment of whether the trainee knows his/her trade well enough to function independently is necessary. This would then constitute an end of training examination. Such examinations are practiced in several countries but a rather heterogeneous situation exists in the EU countries. In the Netherlands, the training program is not concluded by a summative examination and reasons behind this situation are discussed. Quality assurance of postgraduate medical training in the Netherlands has been developed along two tracks: (1) not a single testing moment but continuous evaluation of the performance of the trainee in 'real time' situations and (2) monitoring of the quality of the offered training program through regular site-visits. Regular (monthly and/or yearly) evaluations should be part of every self-respecting training program. In the Netherlands, these evaluations are formative only: their intention is to provide the trainee a tool by which he or she can see whether they are on track with their training schedule. In the system in the Netherlands, regular site-visits to training programs constitute a crucial element of quality assurance of postgraduate training. During the site-visit, the position and perceptions of the trainee are key elements. The perception by the trainee of the training program, the institution (or department) offering the training program, and the professionals involved in the training program is explicitly solicited and systematically assessed. With this two-tiered approach high-quality postgraduate training is assured without the need for an end of training examination.

  12. Training Program in Biostatistics for Breast Cancer Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Little, Roderick

    1998-01-01

    The current training program terminates in the summer of 1998. We had originally planned to develop a training program in biostatistics for cancer research for submission to the National Cancer Institute (Task 9...

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of the Community Research Fellows Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy eD'Agostino McGowan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Community Research Fellows Training (CRFT program is a community-based participatory research (CBPR initiative for the St. Louis area. This fifteen week program, based on a Master in Public Health curriculum, was implemented by the Division of Public Health Sciences at Washington University School of Medicine in partnership with the Siteman Cancer Center. Objectives: We measure the knowledge gained by participants and evaluate participant and faculty satisfaction of the CRFT program both in terms of meeting learning objectives and actively engaging the community in the research process.Participants: We conducted analyses on 44 community members who participated in the CRFT program and completed the baseline and follow-up knowledge assessments.Main Outcome Measures: Knowledge gain is measured by a baseline and follow-up assessment given at the first and final session. Additionally, pre- and post-tests are given after the first 12 sessions. To measure satisfaction, program evaluations are completed by both the participants and faculty after each topic. Mid-way through the program, a mid-term assessment was administered to assess the program’s community engagement. We analyzed the results from the assessments, pre- and post-tests, and evaluations.Results: The CRFT participants’ knowledge increased at follow-up as compared with baseline on average by a 16.5 point difference (p<0.0001. Post-test scores were higher than pre-test scores for 11 of the 12 sessions. Both participants and faculty enjoyed the training and rated all session well.Conclusions: The CRFT program was successful in increasing community knowledge, in participant satisfaction, and in faculty satisfaction. This success has enhanced the infrastructure for CBPR as well as led to CBPR pilot projects that address health disparities in the St. Louis Greater Metropolitan Area.

  14. A structured, extended training program to facilitate adoption of new techniques for practicing surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jacob A; Jolles, Sally; Sullivan, Sarah; Quamme, Sudha Pavuluri; Funk, Luke M; Lidor, Anne O; Greenberg, Caprice; Pugh, Carla M

    2018-01-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has been shown to have significant benefits when compared to open inguinal hernia repair, yet remains underutilized in the United States. The traditional model of short, hands-on, cognitive courses to enhance the adoption of new techniques fails to lead to significant levels of practice implementation for most surgeons. We hypothesized that a comprehensive program would facilitate the adoption of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (TEP) for practicing surgeons. A team of experts in simulation, coaching, and hernia care created a comprehensive training program to facilitate the adoption of TEP. Three surgeons who routinely performed open inguinal hernia repair with greater than 50 cases annually were recruited to participate in the program. Coaches were selected based on their procedural expertise and underwent formal training in surgical coaching. Participants were required to evaluate all aspects of the educational program and were surveyed out to one year following completion of the program to assess for sustained adoption of TEP. All three participants successfully completed the first three steps of the seven-step program. Two participants completed the full course, while the third dropped out of the program due to time constraints and low case volume. Participant surgeons rated Orientation (4.7/5), GlovesOn training (5/5), and Preceptored Cases (5/5) as highly important training activities that contributed to advancing their knowledge and technical performance of the TEP procedure. At one year, both participants were performing TEPs for "most of their cases" and were confident in their ability to perform the procedure. The total cost of the program including all travel, personal coaching, and simulation was $8638.60 per participant. Our comprehensive educational program led to full and sustained adoption of TEP for those who completed the course. Time constraints, travel costs, and case volume are major considerations for

  15. A Simulation-Based Program to Train Medical Residents to Lead and Perform Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Mihaela S.; Belforti, Raquel K.; Langlois, Gerard; Rothberg, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical residents are often responsible for leading and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation; however, their levels of expertise and comfort as leaders of advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) teams vary widely. While the current American Heart Association ACLS course provides education in recommended resuscitative protocols, training in leadership skills is insufficient. In this article, we describe the design and implementation in our institution of a formative curriculum aimed at improving residents’ readiness for being leaders of ACLS teams using human patient simulation. Human patient simulation refers to a variety of technologies using mannequins with realistic features, which allows learners to practice through scenarios without putting patients at risk. We discuss the limitations of the program and the challenges encountered in implementation. We also provide a description of the initiation and organization of the program. Case scenarios and assessment tools are provided. Description of the Institutional Training Program Our simulation-based training curriculum consists of 8 simulated patient scenarios during four 1-hour sessions. Postgraduate year–2 and 3 internal medicine residents participate in this program in teams of 4. Assessment tools are utilized only for formative evaluation. Debriefing is used as a teaching strategy for the individual resident leader of the ACLS team to facilitate learning and improve performance. To evaluate the impact of the curriculum, we administered a survey before and after the intervention. The survey consisted of 10 questions answered on a 5-point Likert scale, which addressed residents’ confidence in leading ACLS teams, management of the equipment, and management of cardiac rhythms. Respondents’ mean presimulation (ie, baseline) and postsimulation (outcome) scores were compared using a 2-sample t test. Residents’ overall confidence score improved from 2.8 to 3.9 (P simulation-based training

  16. ARL/OMS Consultant Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euster, Joanne R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Academic Library Consultant Training Program begun in 1979, sponsored by Office of Management Studies (OMS) and designed to provide 80 consultants to aid academic libraries in improving performance. Viewpoints are included from OMS Director and participants concerning program objectives, trainee selection, workshops, internships, and the…

  17. Forging a partnership between operations and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Following the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979, the world of training changed radically, and the field became very specialized and technical. In some cases, this led to a marked separation between Operations and Training and a decrease in the effectiveness of the training program due to divergent objectives and needs. By recognizing the mutual needs between Operations and Training, defining each group's role and developing mutual objectives, an effective program can be implemented and a true partnership formed. Following the implementation of the mutually agreed upon program, an ongoing measurement of the effectiveness of the program can help to strengthen the partnership and to assure that corrective action is taken in a timely manner, when required

  18. Implementation of full patient simulation training in surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Gladys L; Lee, Patrick C; Page, David W; D'Amour, Elizabeth M; Wait, Richard B; Seymour, Neal E

    2010-01-01

    -measures analysis of variance and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Residents participated in 4.5 ± 1.4 sessions per academic year. Compliance with scheduled training was 88%, 90%, and 99% over successive years. Performance data were available for 39 PGY1, 2, and 3 residents. Ten individual residents could be followed between PGY1 and PGY2. For these individuals, improvement in mean performance was detected for the PGY2 (81% ± 5% vs 86% ± 4%; p 2 standard deviations below mean for the PGY level and 5 of these had deficiencies in clinical performance noted by other evaluation methods. Patient simulation training was implemented successfully with good compliance in this medium-sized surgical residency training program, but clear challenges were encountered with issues related to the number and range of experiences available per resident, competition with other educational activities, and fidelity and realism. Initial experience suggests that the associated assessment methods can detect predictable improvements in patient management skills across successive residency years, as well as potentially deficient management. Additional work is required to determine the educational effect of this training on resident clinical competency. Copyright © 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Integrated initial training program for a CEGB operations engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompsett, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the overall training programs undertaken by a newly appointed Operations Engineer at one of the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB) Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) nuclear power stations. The training program is designed to equip him with the skills and knowledge necessary for him to discharge his duties safely and effectively. In order to assist the learning process and achieve and integrated program, aspects of reactor technology and operation, initially the subject of theoretical presentations at the CEGB's Nuclear Power Training Center (NPTC) are reinforced by either simulation and/or practical experience on site. In the later stages plant-specific simulators, operated by trained tutors, are incorporated into the training program to provide the trainee with practical experience of plant operation. The trainee's performance is assessed throughout the program to provide feedback to the trainee, the trainers and station management

  20. Cost effective material control and accountability training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robichaux, J.J.; Shull, L.M.; Salizzoni, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    DOE Order 5630.15, ''Safeguards and Security Training Program'' is being implemented at the Savannah River Site within the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's material control and accountability program. This paper reviews the development of a material control and accountability task analysis, the development of specific material control and accountability courses, and the cost effective and innovative strategies employed to implement the training program. The paper also discusses how the site material control and accountability policies and procedures are incorporated into the Westinghouse Savannah River Company training program to ensure that personnel receive the most current information

  1. Mozambique field epidemiology and laboratory training program: a pathway for strengthening human resources in applied epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, Cynthia Semá; Taibo, Cátia; Sacarlal, Jahit; Gujral, Lorna; Salomão, Cristolde; Doyle, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, Mozambique has been undergoing demographic, epidemiological, economic and social transitions, which have all had a notable impact on the National Health System. New challenges have emerged, causing a need to expand the preparation and response to emerging disease threats and public health emergencies. We describe the structure and function of the Mozambique Field Epidemiology Training Program (MZ-FELTP) and the main outputs achieved during the first 6 years of program implementation (consisting of 3 cohorts). We also outline the contribution of the program to the National Health System and assess the retention of the graduates. The MZ-FELTP is a post-graduate in-service training program, based on the acquisition of skills, within two tracks: applied epidemiology and laboratory management. The program was established in 2010, with the objective of strengthening capacity in applied epidemiology and laboratory management, so that events of public health importance can be detected and investigated in a timely and effective manner. The program is in its seventh year, having successfully trained 36 health professionals in the advanced course. During the first six years of the program, more than 40 outbreaks were investigated, 37 surveillance system evaluations were conducted and 39 descriptive data analyses were performed. Surveillance activities were implemented for mass events and emergency situations. In addition, more than 100 oral and poster presentations were given by trainees at national and international conferences. The MZ-FELTP has helped provide the Ministry of Health with the human and technical resources and operational capacity, to rapidly and effectively respond to major public health challenges in the country. The continuous involvement of key stakeholders is necessary for the continuation, expansion and ongoing sustainability of the program.

  2. Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. All personnel who are to perform nuclear criticality safety technical work are required to participate in the program. The program includes both general nuclear criticality safety and plant specific knowledge components. Advantage can be taken of previous experience for that knowledge which is portable such as performance of computer calculations. Candidates step through a structured process which exposes them to basic background information, general plant information, and plant specific information which they need to safely and competently perform their jobs. Extensive documentation is generated to demonstrate that candidates have met the standards established for qualification

  3. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program: implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security

  4. Pilot implementation of training modules of the EMERALD program in Brazil; Implementacao piloto de modulos de treinamento do programa EMERALD no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo R.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Okuno, Emico; Nersissian, Denise Y. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Intituto de Fisica. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Tabakov, Slavik [Dept. Medical Engineering and Physics, King' s College, London (United Kingdom); Terini, Ricardo A., E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUCSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2014-04-15

    A research cooperation program was established between the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo and the King's College of London to conduct the translation to Portuguese language, adaptation and update of the X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology training module of the Emerald Program (www.emerald2.eu/cd/Emerald2/). The Emerald Program teaching material in X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology is divided in ten topics covering the basics of Diagnostic Radiology, Quality Control and Radiation Protection. The referred work, besides the translation of the texts into Portuguese, comprised the review of the previously produced material. During the review process, it was decided to update some of the training tasks and add more information related to current topics, such as digital X-ray imaging modalities, multislice computed tomography and tomosynthesis. These new additions will also be available in English. The translated or written texts have been submitted to a cross-reviewing process by the co-authors in order to standardize the language. Moreover, national radiological protection recommendations were included to assist the users of the teaching material with the Brazilian rules of radiation safety and quality control in X-ray medical applications. Part of the material was submitted to a validation and also to a practical assessment process by means of a critical analysis by experts in Medical Physics education during a workshop held in Sao Paulo in March 2014. Finally, a pilot implementation has been organized in order to do the last adjustments before making the material available to other users in Portuguese language. Further assessment and feedback procedures were planned in both London and Sao Paulo, aiming to evaluate and disseminate the final product. (author)

  5. The SBIRT program matrix: a conceptual framework for program implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Boca, Frances K; McRee, Bonnie; Vendetti, Janice; Damon, Donna

    2017-02-01

    Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is a comprehensive, integrated, public health approach to the delivery of services to those at risk for the adverse consequences of alcohol and other drug use, and for those with probable substance use disorders. Research on successful SBIRT implementation has lagged behind studies of efficacy and effectiveness. This paper (1) outlines a conceptual framework, the SBIRT Program Matrix, to guide implementation research and program evaluation and (2) specifies potential implementation outcomes. Overview and narrative description of the SBIRT Program Matrix. The SBIRT Program Matrix has five components, each of which includes multiple elements: SBIRT services; performance sites; provider attributes; patient/client populations; and management structure and activities. Implementation outcomes include program adoption, acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility, fidelity, costs, penetration, sustainability, service provision and grant compliance. The Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment Program Matrix provides a template for identifying, classifying and organizing the naturally occurring commonalities and variations within and across SBIRT programs, and for investigating which variables are associated with implementation success and, ultimately, with treatment outcomes and other impacts. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Effectiveness of Mental Immunization Program Training on Social Competency and Personality Traits of Individuals With Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashoori

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion The results of the present research indicated a significant increase in social competency in adolescents with cerebral palsy. Also, desirable changes were found to be developed in the personality traits of these adolescents. In other words, there was a decreased level of neuroticism and significant increase in positive traits such as extroversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness. The overall results of the present research indicated that mental immunization program training led to improvement in social competency and personality traits of individuals with cerebral palsy. Therefore, paying attention to the mental immunization program training is essential, and planning for providing of psychological immunization program training is of particular importance. Cerebral palsy affects all aspect of an individual’s life and implementing the mental immunization program training has been associated with effective outcomes. Therefore, instructional interventions such as mental immunization program training are required . While a lot of research works have been conducted with regard to the effectiveness of mental immunization program training on social competency and personality traits of normal students, only a few investigations have been carried out for the same in relation to individuals with cerebral palsy. As far as present study used experimental method, could be cautioned in generalization of results . Another limitation of this study is the use of self-reporting questionnaires, wherein individuals do not feel the responsibility to answer correctly and honestly in order to avoid stigma or rejection by the community. It is recommended that the psychological immunization program training, which is very helpful in the instruction  of teenagers with cerebral palsy, be used in primary schools and among various categories of exceptional students.

  7. Implementing a new model for on-the-job training: critical success factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zolingen, S.J.; Streumer, Jan; van der Klink, Marcel; de Jong, Rolinda

    2000-01-01

    Post Offices Inc. in The Netherlands has developed and implemented a new instruction model for the training of desk employees. The quality of the new instruction model was assessed by means of the evaluation model of Jacobs and Jones for on-the-job training. It is concluded that the implementation

  8. Successful Bullying Prevention Programs: Influence of Research Design, Implementation Features, and Program Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryanna Hahn Fox

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bullying prevention programs have been shown to be generally effective in reducing bullying and victimization. However, the effects are relatively small in randomized experiments and greater in quasi-experimental and age-cohort designs. Programs that are more intensive and of longer duration (for both children and teachers are more effective, as are programs containing more components. Several program components are associated with large effect sizes, including parent training or meetings and teacher training. These results should inform the design and evaluation of anti-bullying programs in the future, and a system ofaccreditation of effective programs.

  9. Implementation fidelity of a nurse-led falls prevention program in acute hospitals during the 6-PACK trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Renata T; Barker, Anna L; Ayton, Darshini R; Landgren, Fiona; Kamar, Jeannette; Hill, Keith D; Brand, Caroline A; Sherrington, Catherine; Wolfe, Rory; Rifat, Sheral; Stoelwinder, Johannes

    2017-06-02

    When tested in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of 31,411 patients, the nurse-led 6-PACK falls prevention program did not reduce falls. Poor implementation fidelity (i.e., program not implemented as intended) may explain this result. Despite repeated calls for the examination of implementation fidelity as an essential component of evaluating interventions designed to improve the delivery of care, it has been neglected in prior falls prevention studies. This study examined implementation fidelity of the 6-PACK program during a large multi-site RCT. Based on the 6-PACK implementation framework and intervention description, implementation fidelity was examined by quantifying adherence to program components and organizational support. Adherence indicators were: 1) falls-risk tool completion; and for patients classified as high-risk, provision of 2) a 'Falls alert' sign; and 3) at least one additional 6-PACK intervention. Organizational support indicators were: 1) provision of resources (executive sponsorship, site clinical leaders and equipment); 2) implementation activities (modification of patient care plans; training; implementation tailoring; audits, reminders and feedback; and provision of data); and 3) program acceptability. Data were collected from daily bedside observation, medical records, resource utilization diaries and nurse surveys. All seven intervention components were delivered on the 12 intervention wards. Program adherence data were collected from 103,398 observations and medical record audits. The falls-risk tool was completed each day for 75% of patients. Of the 38% of patients classified as high-risk, 79% had a 'Falls alert' sign and 63% were provided with at least one additional 6-PACK intervention, as recommended. All hospitals provided the recommended resources and undertook the nine outlined program implementation activities. Most of the nurses surveyed considered program components important for falls prevention. While implementation

  10. Responsive Feeding: Implications for Policy and Program Implementation12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Patrice L.; Pelto, Gretel H.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine responsive feeding as a nutrition intervention, with an emphasis on the development and incorporation of responsive feeding into policies and programs over the last 2 decades and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of responsive feeding interventions. A review of policy documents from international agencies and high-income countries reveals that responsive feeding has been incorporated into nutrition policies. Official guidelines from international agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and professional organizations often include best practice recommendations for responsive feeding. Four potential explanations are offered for the rapid development of policies related to responsive feeding that have occurred despite the relatively recent recognition that responsive feeding plays a critical role in child nutrition and growth and the paucity of effectiveness trials to determine strategies to promote responsive feeding. Looking to the future, 3 issues related to program implementation are highlighted: 1) improving intervention specificity relative to responsive feeding; 2) developing protocols that facilitate efficient adaptation of generic guidelines to national contexts and local conditions; and 3) development of program support materials, including training, monitoring, and operational evaluation. PMID:21270361

  11. 30 CFR 75.161 - Plans for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for training programs. 75.161 Section 75... Provision] § 75.161 Plans for training programs. Each operator must submit to the district manager, of the Coal Mine Safety and Health District in which the mine is located, a program or plan setting forth what...

  12. 45 CFR 235.62 - State plan requirements for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State plan requirements for training programs. 235... ADMINISTRATION OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 235.62 State plan requirements for training programs. A State plan under title I, IV-A, X, XIV, or XVI (AABD) of the Act must provide for a training program for...

  13. Robotics Programs: Automation Training in Disguise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehg, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Questions and answers from the book "Guidelines for Robotics Program Development" are presented, addressing some of the major issues confronted by the person setting the direction for a robotics training program. (CT)

  14. Training of Evaluators in the Third World: Implementation of the Action Training Model (ATM) in Kenya and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, H. S.

    The Action Training Model (ATM) was developed for the delivery of evaluation training to development workers in Kenya and Botswana and implemented under the aegis of the German Foundation for International Development. Training of evaluators is a challenge in any context, but in the Third World environment, evaluation training offers special…

  15. Implementation of a Training Course Increased the Diagnosis of Histoplasmosis in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Diego H.; Zuluaga, Alejandra; Arango-Bustamante, Karen; de Bedout, Catalina; Tobón, Ángela Maria; Restrepo, Ángela; Gómez, Beatriz L.; Cano, Luz Elena; González, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Histoplasmosis causes a significant mortality, especially persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) from developing countries where access to both appropriate diagnostic methods and antiretroviral therapy are limited. A total of 81 physicians assigned to 17 Colombian departments (states) received training in the clinical, epidemiological, and diagnostic aspects of histoplasmosis. Once this training was received and during the period of October 2009–November 2012, these physicians sent biological samples for immunodiagnostic, mycological, and molecular tests from their patients with suspicion of histoplasmosis. A total of 1,536 samples from 768 patients were evaluated. Of the 768 patients studied, 463 (60%) were HIV positive, 214 (28%) HIV negative, and in 91 (12%) this diagnosis was unknown, and 538 (70%) were males. The 1,536 specimens studied comprised 722 sera, 439 blood samples, and 241 urines, which were tested by immunodiffusion (ID), culture, and antigenuria, respectively; in addition, 134 specimens were tested by performing a molecular assay. Histoplasmosis was diagnosed in 133 patients (17%). After the training, we observed more diagnoses from 27 to 44 cases per year. In this study, a significantly increased number of histoplasmosis cases reported by year were observed after implementing an educational training program. PMID:26123961

  16. Developing communication skills training in 5 educational programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Ringby, Betina

    Understanding the ability to communicate with patients as a central clinical skill, the importance of developing communication teaching in healthcare educations is obvious. Following the establishment of a room specially equipped for training communication skills in 2010, implementation of commun......Understanding the ability to communicate with patients as a central clinical skill, the importance of developing communication teaching in healthcare educations is obvious. Following the establishment of a room specially equipped for training communication skills in 2010, implementation....... As a result of the combination of easy access to technical resources in the dedicated room and the opportunity to continuously develop the facilitation skills needed to train students, communication skills training has been integrated in the curriculum of all five healthcare educational programmes....

  17. 77 FR 76861 - Removal of Job Training Partnership Act Implementing Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ..., 633, 634, 636, 637, and 638 RIN 1205-AB68 Removal of Job Training Partnership Act Implementing...=FR . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Direct Final Rule Procedure Since removal of the Job Training... barriers to employment for participation in the labor force by providing job training and other services...

  18. New Clinical Faculty Training Program: Transforming Practicing Dentists into Part-Time Dental Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brooke N; Kirkup, Michele L; Willis, Lisa H; Reifeis, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    At Indiana University School of Dentistry, a New Clinical Faculty Training (NCFT) program was created with the primary goals of informing new part-time faculty members of clinical policies and assessment guidelines and thus developing qualified and satisfied faculty members. The aim of this study was to determine if participation in the training program improved the participants' satisfaction and competence in comparison to their colleagues who did not participate in the program. Two cohorts were compared: a control group of part-time faculty members who did not receive formal training when they were hired (n=21; response rate 58.3%); and the intervention group, who had participated in the NCFT program (n=12; response rate 80%). A survey of faculty members in the control group gathered information on their experiences when initially hired, and a pretest was administered to measure their knowledge of clinical policies. After the control group was given an overview of the program, their feedback was collected through post surveys, and a posttest identical to the pretest was given that found statistically significant increases on questions one (p=0.003) and four (p=0.025). In February 2014, 15 new faculty members participated in the pilot implementation of the NCFT program. Of those 15, 12 (the intervention group) completed follow-up surveys identical to the pre survey used with the control group. Statistically significant differences were found for the factors clinical teaching (p=0.005) and assessment training (p=0.008) with better responses for the NCFT group. These results suggest that participation in the program was associated with improved clinical teaching knowledge and job satisfaction.

  19. Health physics training of plant staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heublein, R.M. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The scope of this document entitled Health Physics Training of Plant Staff addresses those critical elements common to all health physics training programs. The incorporation of these elements in a health physics training program will provide some assurances that the trainees are competent to work in the radiological environment of a nuclear plant. This paper provides sufficient detail for the health physicist to make managerial decisions concerning the planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of health physics training programs. Two models are provided in the appendices as examples of performance based health physics training programs

  20. Implementation of physical coordination training and cognitive behavioural training interventions at cleaning workplaces - secondary analyses of a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie B; Faber, Anne; Jespersen, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    intervention effects, more research on implementation is needed. Trial registration: ISRCTN96241850. Practitioner summary: Both physical coordination training and cognitive behavioural training are potential effective workplace interventions among low educated job groups with high physical work demands......This study evaluates the implementation of physical coordination training (PCT) and cognitive behavioural training (CBTr) interventions in a randomised controlled trial at nine cleaners' workplaces. Female cleaners (n = 294) were randomised into a PCT, a CBTr or a reference (REF) group. Both 12...

  1. Seriously Implementing Health Capacity Strengthening Programs in Africa; Comment on “Implementation of a Health Management Mentoring Program: Year-1 Evaluation of Its Impact on Health System Strengthening in Zambézia Province, Mozambique”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Velez Lapão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Faced with the challenges of healthcare reform, skills and new capabilities are needed to support the reform and it is of crucial importance in Africa where shortages affects the health system resilience. Edwards et al provides a good example of the challenge of implementing a mentoring program in one province in a sub-Saharan country. From this example, various aspects of strengthening the capacity of managers in healthcare are examined based on our experience in action-training in Africa, as mentoring shares many characteristics with action-training. What practical lessons can be drawn to promote the strengthening so that managers can better intervene in complex contexts? Deeper involvement of health authorities and more rigorous approaches are seriously desirable for the proper development of health capacity strengthening programs in Africa.

  2. Radiation monitor training program at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, L.C.; Kittinger, W.D.; Vogel, R.M.

    The Rocky Flats Radiation Monitor Training Program is tailored to train new health physics personnel in the field of radiation monitoring. The purpose of the prescribed materials and media is to be consistent in training in all areas of Rocky Flats radiation monitoring job involvement

  3. The Alcohol Intervention Training Program (AITP: A response to alcohol misuse in the farming community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricciardelli Lina A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farm men and women in Australia have higher levels of problematic alcohol use than their urban counterparts and experience elevated health risks associated with excessive alcohol consumption. The Sustainable Farm Families (SFF program has worked successfully with farm men and women to address health, well- being and safety and has identified that further research and training is required to understand and address alcohol misuse behaviours. This project will add an innovative component to the program by training health professionals working with farm men and women to discuss and respond to alcohol-related physical and mental health problems. Methods/Design A mixed method design with multi-level evaluation will be implemented following the development and delivery of a training program (The Alcohol Intervention Training Program {AITP} for Sustainable Farm Families health professionals. Pre-, post- and follow-up surveys will be used to assess both the impact of the training on the knowledge, confidence and skills of the health professionals to work with alcohol misuse and associated problems, and the impact of the training on the attitudes, behaviour and mental health of farm men and women who participate in the SFF project. Evaluations will take a range of forms including self-rated outcome measures and interviews. Discussion The success of this project will enhance the health and well-being of a critical population, the farm men and women of Australia, by producing an evidence-based strategy to assist them to adopt more positive alcohol-related behaviours that will lead to better physical and mental health.

  4. Development and Implementation of a Training-of-Trainers Program for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Neonatal and Pediatric Patients in Five Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick T; Benckert, Megan M; Moresky, Rachel T; Morris, Marilyn C

    2017-10-01

    We describe a pragmatic training-of-trainers program for the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for neonatal and pediatric patients. The program is designed for medical professionals working in low- and middle-income countries and involves 2 days of in-class training followed by 1 day of in-service training. The program was created after training in Cambodia, Ghana, Honduras, Kenya and Rwanda and addresses the issues of resource availability, cultural context and local buy-in and partnership in low- and middle-income countries. We hope others will use the training program to increase knowledge and use of CPAP with the ultimate goal of improving neonatal and pediatric survival globally. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 30 CFR 77.1706 - First aid training program; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First aid training program; minimum... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 77.1706 First aid training program; minimum requirements. (a) All first aid training programs required under the provisions of §§ 77.1703 and 77.1704 shall...

  6. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835

  7. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  8. Implementation evaluation of a culturally competent eye injury prevention program for citrus workers in a Florida migrant community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, John S; Monaghan, Paul; Contreras, Ricardo B; August, Euna; Baldwin, Julie A; Bryant, Carol A; McDermott, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    The Partnership for Citrus Worker Health (PCWH) is a coalition that connects academic institutions, public health agencies, industry and community-based organizations for implementation of an eye safety pilot project with citrus workers using the Camp Health Aide (CHA) model. This project was an implementation evaluation of an eye safety curriculum using modeling and peer-to-peer education among Mexican migrant citrus workers in a southwest Florida community to increase positive perceptions toward the use of safety eyewear and reduce occupational eye injuries. CHAs have been employed and trained in eye safety and health during harvesting seasons since 2004. Field observations, focus group interviews, and written questionnaires assessed program implementation and initial outcomes. There was an increase in positive perceptions toward use of safety eyewear between 2004 and 2005. Evaluation of training suggested ways to improve the curriculum. The modest literacy level of the CHAs necessitated some redesign of the curriculum and its implementation (e.g., introduction of and more reliance on use of training posters). PCWH benefited by extensive documentation of the training and supervision, a pilot project that demonstrated the potential effectiveness of CHAs, and having a well-defined target population of citrus workers (n = 427). Future research can rigorously test the effectiveness of CHAs in reducing eye injuries among citrus workers.

  9. How can clinician-educator training programs be optimized to match clinician motivations and concerns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Brendan; Marton, Gregory E; Ramnanan, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Several medical schools have implemented programs aimed at supporting clinician-educators with formal mentoring, training, and experience in undergraduate medical teaching. However, consensus program design has yet to be established, and the effectiveness of these programs in terms of producing quality clinician-educator teaching remains unclear. The goal of this study was to review the literature to identify motivations and perceived barriers to clinician-educators, which in turn will improve clinician-educator training programs to better align with clinician-educator needs and concerns. Review of medical education literature using the terms "attitudes", "motivations", "physicians", "teaching", and "undergraduate medical education" resulted in identification of key themes revealing the primary motivations and barriers involved in physicians teaching undergraduate medical students. A synthesis of articles revealed that physicians are primarily motivated to teach undergraduate students for intrinsic reasons. To a lesser extent, physicians are motivated to teach for extrinsic reasons, such as rewards or recognition. The key barriers deterring physicians from teaching medical students included: decreased productivity, lack of compensation, increased length of the working day, patient concerns/ethical issues, and lack of confidence in their own ability. Our findings suggest that optimization of clinician-educator training programs should address, amongst other factors, time management concerns, appropriate academic recognition for teaching service, and confidence in teaching ability. Addressing these issues may increase the retention of clinicians who are active and proficient in medical education.

  10. Voices of Informal Caregivers and Community Stakeholders: Whether and How to Develop an Informal Caregiver Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sara S; Ragas, Daiva M; Tom, Laura S; Hajjar, Nadia; Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Our primary objective was to gather pilot data from caregivers and stakeholders to guide the development of a training program to assist informal caregivers in re-entering the job market. The goal of the program would be to help caregivers rebound from their incurred economic burden by transitioning into a paid caregiving or other health-service role. The economic burden they bear often necessitates a return to the workforce following caregiving; yet the act of returning is complicated by an extended absence from the workforce and a lack of experience in other verifiably skilled and paid roles. We interviewed 37 stakeholders and 25 caregivers of a chronically or terminally ill family member or friend in a suburban collar county close to Chicago. The interview questions considered the economic impact of illness, as well as the feasibility, logistics, and options of a training program for caregivers. Our data gathered from caregivers and leaders within this community support the acceptability of such a training program for informal caregivers, and also provide practical advice for development and implementation related to training cost, length, content, and instructional practices.

  11. Current status of endoscopic simulation in gastroenterology fellowship training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Thompson, Christopher C

    2015-07-01

    Recent guidelines have encouraged gastroenterology and surgical training programs to integrate simulation into their core endoscopic curricula. However, the role that simulation currently has within training programs is unknown. This study aims to assess the current status of simulation among gastroenterology fellowship programs. This questionnaire study consisted of 38 fields divided into two sections. The first section queried program directors' experience on simulation and assessed the current status of simulation at their institution. The second portion surveyed their opinion on the potential role of simulation on the training curriculum. The study was conducted at the 2013 American Gastroenterological Association Training Directors' Workshop in Phoenix, Arizona. The participants were program directors from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited gastroenterology training programs, who attended the workshop. The questionnaire was returned by 69 of 97 program directors (response rate of 71%). 42% of programs had an endoscopic simulator. Computerized simulators (61.5%) were the most common, followed by mechanical (30.8%) and animal tissue (7.7%) simulators, respectively. Eleven programs (15%) required fellows to use simulation prior to clinical cases. Only one program has a minimum number of hours fellows have to participate in simulation training. Current simulators are deemed as easy to use (76%) and good educational tools (65%). Problems are cost (72%) and accessibility (69%). The majority of program directors believe that there is a need for endoscopic simulator training, with only 8% disagreeing. Additionally, a majority believe there is a role for simulation prior to initiation of clinical cases with 15% disagreeing. Gastroenterology fellowship program directors widely recognize the importance of simulation. Nevertheless, simulation is used by only 42% of programs and only 15% of programs require that trainees use simulation prior to

  12. Implementation of the Louisiana ADD Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounders, Mickey

    Louisiana's state education agency (SEA) was mandated to provide appropriate services for children with attention deficit disorders, by developing statewide training for representatives from public school districts and by selecting and implementing four pilot programs. The SEA implemented the pilot programs, provided an informational training…

  13. A training program for anthropometric measurements by a dedicated nutrition support team improves nutritional status assessment of the critically ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Frederic V; Ford-Chessel, Carole; Meyer, Rosan; Berthiller, Julien; Dupenloup, Christine; Follin-Arbelet, Nathalie; Hubert, Anna; Javouhey, Etienne; Peretti, Noel

    2015-03-01

    The cornerstone of an optimal nutrition approach in PICUs is to evaluate the nutritional status of any patient. Anthropometric measurements and nutritional indices calculation allow for nutritional status assessment, which is not often part of routine management, as it is considered difficult to perform in this setting. We designed a study to evaluate the impact of a training program by the PICU nutritional support team on the implementation of routine anthropometric measurements on our PICU. A prospective study was performed over a 2-year period, which included: a baseline evaluation of nutritional assessment, knowledge, anthropometric measurements (weight, height, and head and mid upper arm circumferences), and nutritional indices calculation in patient files. This was followed by a training program to implement the newly developed nutrition assessment guidelines, which included anthropometrical measurements and also the interpretation of these. The impact of this nutritional assessment program was reviewed annually for 2 years after the implementation. PICU--Lyon, France. PICU nursing and medical staff, and patients admitted in February 2011, 2012, and 2013. Training program. Ninety-nine percent of staff (n = 145) attended the individual teaching. We found significant progress in nutritional awareness and confidence about nutritional assessment following the teaching program. In addition, an improvement in staff knowledge about undernutrition and its consequences were found. We enrolled 41, 55, and 91 patients in 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. There was a significant increase in anthropometric measurements during this time: 32%, 65% (p = 0.002), and 96% in 2013 (p Nutritional indices were calculated in 20%, 74% (p nutritional assessment teaching program that highlights both the importance and techniques of anthropometrical measurements has successfully been implemented in a PICU. It managed to improve staff knowledge and nutritional practice.

  14. Radiation protection technologist training and certification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to establish training requirements and methods for certifying the technical competence of Radiation Protection Technologists. This manual delineates general requirements as well as academic training, on-the-job training, area of facility training, and examination or evaluation requirements for Radiation Protection Trainees (Trainees), Junior Radiation Protection Technologists (JRPT), Radiation Protection Technologists (RPT), and Senior Radiation Protection Technologists (SRPT). This document also includes recertification requirements for SRPTs. The appendices include training course outlines, on-the-job training outlines, and training certification record forms

  15. Establishing High-Quality Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Phantom Simulator Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaker, Nikhil G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Albert, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Banner Health, Loveland/Greeley, Colorado (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Pugh, Thomas J.; Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bruno, Teresa L. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Prestidge, Bradley R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bon Secours Health System, Norfolk, Virginia (United States); Crook, Juanita M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Cox, Brett W.; Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore-LIJ Health System, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, Illinois (United States); Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Center, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To design and implement a unique training program that uses a phantom-based simulator to teach the process of prostate brachytherapy (PB) quality assurance and improve the quality of education. Methods and Materials: Trainees in our simulator program were practicing radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents, and fellows of the American Brachytherapy Society. The program emphasized 6 core areas of quality assurance: patient selection, simulation, treatment planning, implant technique, treatment evaluation, and outcome assessment. Using the Iodine 125 ({sup 125}I) preoperative treatment planning technique, trainees implanted their ultrasound phantoms with dummy seeds (ie, seeds with no activity). Pre- and postimplant dosimetric parameters were compared and correlated using regression analysis. Results: Thirty-one trainees successfully completed the simulator program during the period under study. The mean phantom prostate size, number of seeds used, and total activity were generally consistent between trainees. All trainees met the V100 >95% objective both before and after implantation. Regardless of the initial volume of the prostate phantom, trainees' ability to cover the target volume with at least 100% of the dose (V100) was not compromised (R=0.99 pre- and postimplant). However, the V150 had lower concordance (R=0.37) and may better reflect heterogeneity control of the implant process. Conclusions: Analysis of implants from this phantom-based simulator shows a high degree of consistency between trainees and uniformly high-quality implants with respect to parameters used in clinical practice. This training program provides a valuable educational opportunity that improves the quality of PB training and likely accelerates the learning curve inherent in PB. Prostate phantom implantation can be a valuable first step in the acquisition of the required skills to safely perform PB.

  16. Establishing High-Quality Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Phantom Simulator Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaker, Nikhil G.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Swanson, David A.; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Mahmood, Usama; Pugh, Thomas J.; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Prestidge, Bradley R.; Crook, Juanita M.; Cox, Brett W.; Potters, Louis; Moran, Brian J.; Keyes, Mira; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To design and implement a unique training program that uses a phantom-based simulator to teach the process of prostate brachytherapy (PB) quality assurance and improve the quality of education. Methods and Materials: Trainees in our simulator program were practicing radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents, and fellows of the American Brachytherapy Society. The program emphasized 6 core areas of quality assurance: patient selection, simulation, treatment planning, implant technique, treatment evaluation, and outcome assessment. Using the Iodine 125 ( 125 I) preoperative treatment planning technique, trainees implanted their ultrasound phantoms with dummy seeds (ie, seeds with no activity). Pre- and postimplant dosimetric parameters were compared and correlated using regression analysis. Results: Thirty-one trainees successfully completed the simulator program during the period under study. The mean phantom prostate size, number of seeds used, and total activity were generally consistent between trainees. All trainees met the V100 >95% objective both before and after implantation. Regardless of the initial volume of the prostate phantom, trainees' ability to cover the target volume with at least 100% of the dose (V100) was not compromised (R=0.99 pre- and postimplant). However, the V150 had lower concordance (R=0.37) and may better reflect heterogeneity control of the implant process. Conclusions: Analysis of implants from this phantom-based simulator shows a high degree of consistency between trainees and uniformly high-quality implants with respect to parameters used in clinical practice. This training program provides a valuable educational opportunity that improves the quality of PB training and likely accelerates the learning curve inherent in PB. Prostate phantom implantation can be a valuable first step in the acquisition of the required skills to safely perform PB

  17. Enrollment of SME Managers to Growth-oriented Training Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Torben; Jensen, Kent Wickstrøm; Schou Nielsen, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth-intention......Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth...... has from 2012 to 2015 trained about 700 SME managers. Data are currently available for 366 of these participants. This evidence is compared with survey results from a randomly selected control group of 292 growth oriented SME managers in the same firm-size group. The data were analyzed through...... of the program. Originality/value The paper is the first systematic study of the importance of who enrolls in training programs for SME managers....

  18. Nuclear manpower planning and personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company has established a nuclear manpower program to identify human resources, selection and recruitment of entry level engineers and technicians of Nuclear Energy Group. The methodology to estimate the future nuclear manpower demand of Taipower has been clearly described in this article. Also, the manpower program is being used as the bases for nuclear training program development. For safe, reliable and efficient operation of nuclear power plants, Taipower has established a systematic training program for nuclear power stations and headquarter personnel. The training program has been implemented in three stages with different patterns of training program. The first stage of nuclear training before 1975 was completed successfully. The second stage of nuclear training currently conducted since 1975 enlarges domestic training capability. The third stage of nuclear training with a long term training program is now under a systematic and compositive development effort

  19. Directory of Instructional Programs in Supervision and Management Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Training Assistance Div.

    This directory, which is designed for the use of training officers in the Washington, D.C. area in prescribing learning programs to meet employee training needs, describes available group and self instructional programs used for the training of supervisors and managers. Each of the 21 courses listed contains the pertinent information necessary to…

  20. Why do seniors leave resistance training programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton E

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Elissa Burton,1 Anne-Marie Hill,1 Simone Pettigrew,2 Gill Lewin,3 Liz Bainbridge,1 Kaela Farrier,1 Phil Airey,4 Keith D Hill1 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, 2School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, 3School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, 4Council on the Ageing, Perth, WA, Australia Purpose: The proportion of the population, that is older, is growing at a faster rate than other age groups. Physical activity is important for older people because it assists in living independently. Participating in resistance training on a regular basis (twice weekly is recommended for older people; yet, fewer than 15% of people over 60 years achieve this level. The aim of this article was to investigate the factors contributing to older people’s decisions to stop participation in a resistance training program.Participants and methods: Participants were older people who had chosen to participate in a structured resistance training program specifically designed for seniors and then after a period of time discontinued. This population received a questionnaire in the mail focused on factors contributing to their cessation of resistance training exercise. Qualitative results were analyzed using inductive content analysis.Results: Fifty-six survey responses were received (average age 71.5 years, SD =9.0; 79% females. Injury, illness, and holidaying were the main reasons for ceasing participation. A small but important number of responses (11% reported that they considered they were not provided with sufficient support during the resistance training programs.Conclusions: To attract and retain their senior clients, the results indicate that program organizers need to provide tailored support to return to resistance training after injury and offer flexible and individualized services that accommodate older people’s life choices in retirement. Keywords: older people, strength training, gymnasium, retention, aging

  1. Development of exercise design, development and implementation protocol in the utilization of simulators for response management training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesen, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    Development and operation of a marine oil spill management simulator system at Texas A and M University's Galveston Center for Marine Training and Safety was described. The Spill Management Simulator is a multi-year joint program between the U. S. Coast Guard and the Center. Essentially, it is a a computer-based modelling and scenario generator for conducting and evaluating incident management training. An independent evaluation group has been set up by the U.S.Coast Guard to evaluate the Galveston and similar programs established under the same legislation throughout the United States. This paper discusses the creation of a development and implementation protocol for Spill Management Team simulation as a foundation upon which to integrate available and future technology and for making it available to the response community as a whole. 12 refs.,1 tab., 4 figs

  2. Frustrations among graduates of athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Dodge, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Although previous researchers have begun to identify sources of athletic training student stress, the specific reasons for student frustrations are not yet fully understood. It is important for athletic training administrators to understand sources of student frustration to provide a supportive learning environment. To determine the factors that lead to feelings of frustration while completing a professional athletic training education program (ATEP). Qualitative study. National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) accredited postprofessional education program. Fourteen successful graduates (12 women, 2 men) of accredited professional undergraduate ATEPs enrolled in an NATA-accredited postprofessional education program. We conducted semistructured interviews and analyzed data with a grounded theory approach using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. We negotiated over the coding scheme and performed peer debriefings and member checks to ensure trustworthiness of the results. Four themes emerged from the data: (1) Athletic training student frustrations appear to stem from the amount of stress involved in completing an ATEP, leading to anxiety and feelings of being overwhelmed. (2) The interactions students have with classmates, faculty, and preceptors can also be a source of frustration for athletic training students. (3) Monotonous clinical experiences often left students feeling disengaged. (4) Students questioned entering the athletic training profession because of the fear of work-life balance problems and low compensation. In order to reduce frustration, athletic training education programs should validate students' decisions to pursue athletic training and validate their contributions to the ATEP; provide clinical education experiences with graded autonomy; encourage positive personal interactions between students, faculty, and preceptors; and successfully model the benefits of a career in athletic training.

  3. Empowering nurses to handle the guideline implementation process: identification of implementation competencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleman, G.J.M.; Tol, M. van; Schoonhoven, L.; Groot, J. de; Achterberg, T. van

    2014-01-01

    Employing nurses as opinion leaders to implement guidelines may be a promising implementation activity. Until now, insight into necessary competencies of nurse opinion leaders is lacking. We studied and supported aspiring nurse opinion leaders, using a training program based on social influence and

  4. Use of Simulation in Canadian Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jonathan; Finan, Emer; Campbell, Douglas

    2017-07-08

    Introduction Simulation is used for the delivery of education and on occasion assessment. Before such a tool is used routinely in neonatal training programs across Canada, a need assessment is required to determine its current usage by accredited training programs. Our aim was to characterize the type of simulation modalities used and the perceived simulation-based training needs in Canadian neonatal-perinatal medicine (NPM) training programs. Methods A 22-item and 13-item online descriptive survey was sent to all NPM program directors and fellows in Canada, respectively. The survey was modeled on a previously validated tool by Johnston, et al. and responses were collected over 30 days. Results In total, eight (63%) program directors and 24 (28%) fellows completed the survey, with all respondents indicating that simulation is being used. Both lab-based and in situ simulations are occurring, with a range of simulation modalities employed to primarily teach resuscitation, procedural and communication skills. Fellows indicated that simulation should also be used to also teach other important topics, including disease-specific management, crisis resource management, and prevention of medical error. Five (63%) programs have faculty with formal simulation training and four (50%) programs have at least one faculty involved in simulation research. Conclusion Simulation is widely used in Canadian NPM training programs, with program directors and fellows identifying this as an important tool. Simulation can be used to teach a range of skills, but programs need to align their curriculum with both training objectives and learner needs. There is an opportunity for faculty development and increased simulation research.

  5. Putting the MeaT into TeaM Training: Development, Delivery, and Evaluation of a Surgical Team-Training Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Neal E; Paige, John T; Arora, Sonal; Fernandez, Gladys L; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Tsuda, Shawn T; Powers, Kinga A; Langlois, Gerard; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Despite importance to patient care, team training is infrequently used in surgical education. To address this, a workshop was developed by the Association for Surgical Education Simulation Committee to teach team training using high-fidelity patient simulators and the American College of Surgeons-Association of Program Directors in Surgery team-training curriculum. Workshops were conducted at 3 national meetings. Participants completed preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires to define experience, confidence in using simulation, intention to implement, as well as workshop content quality. The course consisted of (A) a didactic review of Preparation, Implementation, and Debriefing and (B) facilitated small group simulation sessions followed by debriefings. Of 78 participants, 51 completed the workshops. Overall, 65% indicated that residents at their institutions used patient simulation, but only 33% used the American College of Surgeons-the Association of Program Directors in Surgery team-training modules. The workshop increased confidence to implement simulation team training (3.4 ± 1.3 vs 4.5 ± 0.9). Quality and importance were rated highly (5.4 ± 00.6, highest score = 6). Preparation for simulation-based team training is possible in this workshop setting, although the effect on actual implementation remains to be determined. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An Evaluation of a Decade of a Rural Field-Based Special and Elementary Teacher Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Catherine; Redsteer, Denise; Prater, Greg; Minner, Sam

    To address the need for special education teachers trained in rural and culturally diverse settings, a field-based special education program was implemented in Kayenta Unified School District (KUSD), Arizona, on the Navajo Nation. KUSD provided teacher housing, classroom space, sites for practicum coursework, and some student teaching placements.…

  7. 10 CFR 850.37 - Training and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training and counseling. 850.37 Section 850.37 Energy... Training and counseling. (a) The responsible employer must develop and implement a beryllium training... implement a counseling program to assist beryllium-associated workers who are diagnosed by the SOMD to be...

  8. Introduction of a quality improvement program in a children's hospital in Tehran: design, implementation, evaluation and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S Mehrdad; Mohammadi, S Farzad; Hedges, Jerris R; Zohrabi, Morteza; Ameli, Omid

    2007-08-01

    Reports addressing continuous quality improvement (CQI) methods in developing countries are scant and there are questions about the applicability of quality improvement methods in such settings. The structure and output of a formal quality improvement program implemented in a teaching hospital affiliated with the Tehran University of Medical Sciences is presented. OBJECTIVE METHOD: During a nine-month period, a multi-stage quality improvement program was implemented. It comprised: (i) training workshops; (ii) a steering committee; (iii) weekly consultation and facilitation of improvement projects; and (iv) a day-long demonstration and recognition meeting. Four cycles of workshops were held in which 132 employees were trained in the basics of CQI. Thirty improvement projects were initiated. Twenty-five of the projects were completed. In an evaluation survey more than 70% of respondents assessed a 'positive impact' on organizational culture, work efficiency and quality of services. More than 90% believed that the changes were sustained, and more than 60% reported that they have implemented additional improvement projects. Our quality improvement package supported rapid implementation of multiple projects. The underlying 'change structure' comprised the improvement teams, top management and the university's quality improvement office; it integrated project management, support and facilitation functions by the respective participant. Organization-wide change was more limited than anticipated. To institutionalize the program and ensure sustainability, a local structure for change should be organized, management coaching should be sustained, local facilitators should be developed, incentives should be established and physician involvement should be emphasized.

  9. Implementing a centralized institutional peer tutoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughf, Natalie White; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-01-01

    Peer tutoring has been found to be beneficial to both students and peer tutors in health sciences education programs. This article describes the implementation of a centralized, institutional peer tutoring program at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, an academic health science center in the U.S. The Program: This multispecialty peer tutoring program paired students experiencing academic difficulties with peer tutors who showed prior academic success, professionalism and effective communication skills. The program allowed students and peer tutors to coordinate their own tutoring services. Evaluations by both students and peer tutors showed satisfaction with the program. Recommendations for developing and implementing an effective peer tutoring program are presented, including utilization of an online system, consistent program policy with high professionalism expectations, funding, program evaluation and data tracking.

  10. Ethical Issues in Parent Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapon-Shevin, Mara

    1982-01-01

    Four areas of ethical concern are voiced in the training of parents of handicapped children: (1) selection of program goals, (2) problems involved with both positive reinforcement and punishment, (3) conflicts between experimentation and therapeutic intervention, and (4) level of parent training. Consideration of ethical issues at each step of…

  11. Health literacy training for public health nurses in fukushima: a case-study of program adaptation, implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Aya; Rudd, Rima E; Lai, Alden Yuanhong; Yoshida-Komiya, Hiromi

    2014-05-01

    Health literacy comprises not only an individual's ability to gain access to, understand and use health information, but also health care providers' ability to make health information accessible and usable. The Fukushima nuclear accident has posed challenges related to the communication of radiation-related health information. Public health nurses are gatekeepers of community health in Japan, and have primary responsibility for communicating this complex information about science and risk to lay members of the community. A health literacy training program was designed to augment communication skills of participating nurses with two primary goals: changing communication practices and norms among public health nurses, and improving access to information for community residents. Training content incorporated an overview of health literacy skills (including numeracy), processes for assessing written materials and visual displays, as well as guidelines for text improvement. The workshop was spread across two days with two-hour sessions each day. A proximal post-training evaluation survey was conducted, followed by a more distal one-month follow-up evaluation to assess the application of learned skills in practice. Twenty-six nurses in Fukushima City attended the first trial. Post-training evaluations were highly positive, with agreement from 85-100% of participants on the appropriateness and usefulness of the workshop. During a one-month follow-up, the nurses reported applying new knowledge and skills to develop written materials. However, they faced difficulties sharing their new skills with colleagues and challenges changing work norms. Participants also encountered difficulties using graphics and explaining risks in practice. This paper highlights the importance of providing health literacy training opportunities for professionals to strengthen health system's ability to accessible information and services. This program also serves as important reference for future

  12. Project Management Plan/Progress Report UT/GTKS Training Program Development for Commercial Building Operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-03-31

    Universidad del Turabo (UT), in a collaborative effort with Global Turn Key Services, Inc. (GTKS), proposed to develop a training program and a commercialization plan for the development of Commercial Building Operators (CBOs). The CBOs will operate energy efficient buildings to help maintain existing buildings up to their optimal energy performance level, and ensure that net-zero-energy buildings continuously operate at design specifications, thus helping achieve progress towards meeting BTP Strategic Goals of creating technologies and design approaches that enable net-zero-energy buildings at low incremental costs by 2025. The proposed objectives were then: (1) Develop a Commercial Building Operator (CBO) training program and accreditation that will in turn provide a certification to participants recognized by Accreditation Boards such as the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) and Leadership in Energy & Environmental Designs (LEED). (2) Develop and implement a commercialization and sustainability plan that details marketing, deployment, financial characterization, job placement, and other goals required for long-term sustainability of the project after the funding period. (3) After program development and deployment, provide potential candidates with the knowledge and skill sets to obtain employment in the commercial building green energy (net-zero-energy building) job market. The developed CBO training program will focus on providing skills for participants, such as displaced and unemployed workers, to enter the commercial building green energy (net-zeroenergy building) job market. This course was designed to allow a participant with minimal to no experience in commercial building green technology to obtain the required skill sets to enter the job market in as little as 12 weeks of intensive multi-faceted learning. After completion of the course, the CBO staff concluded the participant will meet minimum established accreditation

  13. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  14. 32 CFR 634.10 - Remedial driver training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Remedial driver training programs. 634.10 Section 634.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.10 Remedial driver training programs. (a) Navy...

  15. E-Basics: Online Basic Training in Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, Ben

    2016-01-01

    E-Basics is an online training in program evaluation concepts and skills designed for youth development professionals, especially those working in nonformal science education. Ten hours of online training in seven modules is designed to prepare participants for mentoring and applied practice, mastery, and/or team leadership in program evaluation.…

  16. Proposed performance standards for the Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Order certification training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, B F; Field, W E; Tormoehlen, R

    2007-07-01

    The performance standards that accompany Gearing Up for Safety, the agricultural production safety training curriculum for youth, were designed to meet the certification testing requirements of the Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Order (AgHOs) certification training program. The AgHOs requires that certain youth who are older than 13 and younger than 16 years of age complete a prescribed training program before being eligible for employment on farms to perform certain tasks considered hazardous. These training resources will be available for implementation and can be accessed by contacting the second author. To our knowledge, up until this time, few, if any, standardized testing procedures or instruments have had the necessary psychometric evidence to support use of the resulting scores to assess the readiness of youth to meet the basic certification requirements contained in the AgHOs. This article describes the rationale, methods, and key findings from a standard-setting session held to establish minimum passing scores for a proposed testing process. The test will be used as a component of the Gearing Up for Safety certification process for youth workers seeking employment to perform job functions as specified under the AgHOs. Readers may be able to apply this standardized testing process, or similarly accepted processes, to other or future testing and certification projects involving agricultural safety and health.

  17. Do volunteers reduce the costs of parent training programs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scavenius Sonne-Schmidt, Christoffer; Amilon, Anna; Schultz, Esben Anton

    ADHD in children has considerable negative consequences for both affected individuals and their families. One way to milden these negative consequences is by offering parents training in how to handle the child’s difficulties. However, running parent training programs is associated with substanti...... programs. Although direct comparison is difficult due to different outcome measures being used in comparable studies, our findings suggest that Caring in Chaos constitutes a commendable alternative to validated parent training programs such as Triple P and The Incredible Years...

  18. Westinghouse Hanford Company Pollution Prevention Program Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, B.C.

    1994-10-01

    This plan documents Westinghouse Hanford Company's (WHC) Pollution Prevention (P2) (formerly Waste Minimization) program. The program includes WHC; BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR); and ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH). The plan specifies P2 program activities and schedules for implementing the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness (WMin/P2) Program Plan requirements (DOE 1994a). It is intended to satisfy the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other legal requirements that are discussed in both the Hanford Site WMin/P2 plan and paragraph C of this plan. As such, the Pollution Prevention Awareness Program required by DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988) is included in the WHC P2 program. WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH are committed to implementing an effective P2 program as identified in the Hanford Site WMin/P2 Plan. This plan provides specific information on how the WHC P2 program will develop and implement the goals, activities, and budget needed to accomplish this. The emphasis has been to provide detailed planning of the WHC P2 program activities over the next 3 years. The plan will guide the development and implementation of the program. The plan also provides background information on past program activities. Because the plan contains greater detail than in the past, activity scope and implementation schedules may change as new priorities are identified and new approaches are developed and realized. Some activities will be accelerated, others may be delayed; however, all of the general program elements identified in this plan and contractor requirements identified in the Site WMin/P2 plan will be developed and implemented during the next 3 years. This plan applies to all WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH organizations and subcontractors. It will be distributed to those with defined responsibilities in this plan; and the policy, goals, objectives, and strategy of the program will be communicated to all WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH employees

  19. The Design of Model-Based Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, Peter; Sherry, Lance; Feary, Michael; Palmer, Everett; Alkin, Marty; McCrobie, Dan; Kelley, Jerry; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based training program for the skills necessary to operate advance avionics systems that incorporate advanced autopilots and fight management systems. The training model is based on a formalism, the operational procedure model, that represents the mission model, the rules, and the functions of a modem avionics system. This formalism has been defined such that it can be understood and shared by pilots, the avionics software, and design engineers. Each element of the software is defined in terms of its intent (What?), the rationale (Why?), and the resulting behavior (How?). The Advanced Computer Tutoring project at Carnegie Mellon University has developed a type of model-based, computer aided instructional technology called cognitive tutors. They summarize numerous studies showing that training times to a specified level of competence can be achieved in one third the time of conventional class room instruction. We are developing a similar model-based training program for the skills necessary to operation the avionics. The model underlying the instructional program and that simulates the effects of pilots entries and the behavior of the avionics is based on the operational procedure model. Pilots are given a series of vertical flightpath management problems. Entries that result in violations, such as failure to make a crossing restriction or violating the speed limits, result in error messages with instruction. At any time, the flightcrew can request suggestions on the appropriate set of actions. A similar and successful training program for basic skills for the FMS on the Boeing 737-300 was developed and evaluated. The results strongly support the claim that the training methodology can be adapted to the cockpit.

  20. Training of engineering personnel - Ad-hoc or science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, J.; MacIsaac, M.

    2005-01-01

    The training programs at AECL, with emphasis on training of technical employees is described and discussed. Implementation of Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) principles, establishments of individual and organizational unit career development and training plans, commitment for training budget, and assessment on training effectiveness are presented. There is also recognition of the importance of informal training for on-going continued development of staff, around key specialists/subject-matter experts, through mentoring and establishment of small centers of excellence, as part of the technical succession planning program. There is a discussion on what works well and what needs improvements. These approaches to training promise improvements in training and career development of individual employees and implementation of the Corporate training objectives. (author)

  1. Evaluating the effectiveness of operator education/training program of Fugen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Kouichi; Sakruai, Naoto; Nakamura, Shinji

    2003-01-01

    The ATR Fugen determines 'the Operator Education/Training Program' for plant operators to acquire knowledge, technique and skill from the reactor facility, operation and the other nuclear plant technology. This program consists of the On-the-Job Training (OJT), desk education, ETC training, compact simulator FATRAS training, and lectures in external organization. So it provides education/training according to operators' technical level, knowledge, and experience. Fugen is investigating the most suitable training/education based on past training/education experience. (author)

  2. Ethics and Accreditation in Addictions Counselor Training: Possible Field Placement Issues for CACREP-Accredited Addictions Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Professional counselors have long been practicing in alcohol and drug treatment settings. However, only recently has the counseling field offered formal recognition of addictions counseling as a specialization through the implementation of accreditation standards for addiction counseling training programs. With the passage of the 2009 standards,…

  3. Cost basis for implementing ALARA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    A method of implementing effective ALARA programs is discussed. A basic element of the cost benefit methodology is the valuation of a man-rem. In the program, this is derived from an assessment of radiation exposure risk and societal valuation of harmful effects. The man-rem value is used as an element in the cost benefit analysis. The analysis includes an assessment of the differential man-rem resulting from the action, implementation cost, and operational savings

  4. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Julia E.; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D.; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. F...

  5. IMPLEMENTATION OF AN EVIDENCED-BASED PARENTING PROGRAM IN A COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SETTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosa Ordway, Monica; McMahon, Thomas J; De Las Heras Kuhn, Lourdes; Suchman, Nancy E

    2018-01-01

    The process of mental health intervention implementation with vulnerable populations is not well-described in the literature. The authors worked as a community-partnered team to adapt and pilot an empirically supported intervention program for mothers of infants and toddlers in an outpatient mental health clinic that primarily serves a low-income community. We used qualitative ethnographic methods to document the adaption of an evidence-based intervention, Mothering from the Inside Out, and the pilot implementation in a community mental health clinic. Seventeen mothers and their identified 0- to 84-month-old children were enrolled in the study. Key lessons from this implementation include (a) the importance of formative work to build community relationships and effectively adapt the intervention to meet the needs of the therapists and their clients, (b) the importance of designing plans for training and reflective supervision that fit within the flow of the clinic and can tolerate disruptions, and (c) that use of an interdisciplinary approach is feasible with the development of a plan for communication and the support of a trained reflective clinical supervisor. These key lessons advance the scientific knowledge available to healthcare managers and researchers who are looking to adapt mental health clinical interventions previously tested in clinical trials to implementation in community settings. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  6. Palliative care education in Latin America: A systematic review of training programs for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindrola-Padros, Cecilia; Mertnoff, Rosa; Lasmarias, Cristina; Gómez-Batiste, Xavier

    2018-02-01

    The integration of palliative care (PC) education into medical and nursing curricula has been identified as an international priority. PC education has undergone significant development in Latin America, but gaps in the integration of PC courses into undergraduate and postgraduate curricula remain. The aim of our review was to systematically examine the delivery of PC education in Latin America in order to explore the content and method of delivery of current PC programs, identify gaps in the availability of education opportunities, and document common barriers encountered in the course of their implementation. We carried out a systematic review of peer-reviewed academic articles and grey literature. Peer-reviewed articles were obtained from the following databases: CINAHL Plus, Embase, the Web of Science, and Medline. Grey literature was obtained from the following directories: the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care's Global Directory of Education in Palliative Care, the Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance's lists of palliative care resources, the Latin American Association for Palliative Care's training resources, and the Latin American Atlas of Palliative Care. The inclusion criteria were that the work: (1) focused on describing PC courses; (2) was aimed at healthcare professionals; and (3) was implemented in Latin America. The PRISMA checklist was employed to guide the reporting of methods and findings. We found 36 programs that were delivered in 8 countries. Most of the programs were composed of interdisciplinary teams, taught at a postgraduate level, focused on pain and symptom management, and utilized classroom-based methods. The tools for evaluating the courses were rarely reported. The main barriers during implementation included: a lack of recognition of the importance of PC education, a lack of funding, and the unavailability of trained teaching staff. Considerable work needs to be done to improve the delivery of PC

  7. A Flipped Classroom Approach to Improving the Quality of Delirium Care Using an Interprofessional Train-the-Trainer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; James, Sandra-Li; Sinyi, Rebecca; Carroll, Aideen; Laidlaw, Jennifer; Yanofsky, Richard; Sheehan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Given the prevalence and morbidity associated with delirium, there is a need for effective and efficient institutional approaches to delirium training in health care settings. Novel education methods, specifically the "flipped classroom" (FC) and "train-the-trainer" (TTT), have the potential to address these delirium training gaps. This study evaluates the effect of a TTT FC interprofessional delirium training program on participants' perceived ability to manage delirium, delirium knowledge, and clinicians' delirium assessment behaviors. FC Delirium TTT sessions were implemented in a large four-hospital network and consisted of presession online work and a 3-hour in-session component. The 156 TTT interprofessional participants who attended the sessions (ie, trainers) were expected to then deliver delirium training to their patient care units. Delirium care self-efficacy and knowledge test scores were measured before, after, and 6 months after the training session. Clinician delirium assessment rates were measured by chart audits before and 3 months after trainer's implementation of delirium training sessions. Delirium knowledge test scores (7.8 ± 1.6 versus 9.7 ± 1.2, P approach can improve participants' perceived delirium care skills and confidence, and delirium knowledge up to 6 months after the session. This approach provides a model for implementing hospitalwide delirium education that can change delirium assessment behavior while minimizing time and personnel requirements.

  8. 25 CFR 26.32 - What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Training Program... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.32 What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application? A request for training includes: (a) Intake and application data; (b) Feasible...

  9. 25 CFR 26.4 - Who administers the Job Placement and Training Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who administers the Job Placement and Training Program... PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM General Applicability § 26.4 Who administers the Job Placement and Training Program? The Job Placement and Training Program is administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs or a...

  10. Creating Communication Training Programs for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, M.; Lewenstein, B.; Weiss, M.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and engineers in all disciplines are required to communicate with colleagues, the media, policy-makers, and/or the general public. However, most STEM graduate programs do not equip students with the skills needed to communicate effectively to these diverse audiences. In this presentation, we describe a science communication course developed by and for graduate students at Cornell University. This training, which has been implemented as a semester-long seminar and a weekend-long workshop, covers popular science writing, science policy, print and web media, radio and television. Here we present a comparison of learning outcomes for the semester and weekend formats, a summary of lessons learned, and tools for developing similar science communication programs for graduate students at other institutions.

  11. Improving the management of diabetes in hospitalized patients: the results of a computer-based house staff training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand; Hurwitz, Shelley; Yialamas, Maria; Min, Le; Garg, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes in hospitalized patients is associated with poor clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that computer-based diabetes training could improve house staff knowledge and comfort for the management of diabetes in a large tertiary-care hospital. We implemented a computer-based training program on inpatient diabetes for internal medicine house staff at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA) in September 2009. House staff were required to complete the program and answer a set of questions, before and after the program, to evaluate their level of comfort and knowledge of inpatient diabetes. Chart reviews of all non-critically ill patients with diabetes managed by house staff in August 2009 (before the program) and December 2009 (after the program) were performed. Chart reviews were also performed for August 2008 and December 2008 to compare house staff management practices when the computer-based educational program was not available. A significant increase in comfort levels and knowledge in the management of inpatient diabetes was seen among house staff at all levels of training (Pstaff compared with junior house staff. Nonsignificant trends suggesting increased use of basal-bolus insulin (P=0.06) and decreased use of sliding-scale insulin (P=0.10) were seen following the educational intervention in 2009, whereas no such change was seen in 2008 (P>0.90). Overall, house staff evaluated the training program as "very relevant" and the technology interface as "good." A computer-based diabetes training program can improve the comfort and knowledge of house staff and potentially improve their insulin administration practices at large academic centers.

  12. The development and implementation of environmental training for management and employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, R.O.; Whelan, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an environmental training strategy in a major North Sea operating company. The training events were designed using in-house environmental and training advisers to include all levels of management, operational employees and contractors. As well as designing new courses, material was produced to introduce an environmental awareness component into some existing courses

  13. Building capacity for water, sanitation, and hygiene programming: Training evaluation theory applied to CLTS management training in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Jonny; Shields, Katherine F; Venkataramanan, Vidya; Saywell, Darren; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Training and capacity building are long established critical components of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) policies, strategies, and programs. Expanding capacity building support for WaSH in developing countries is one of the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. There are many training evaluation methods and tools available. However, training evaluations in WaSH have been infrequent, have often not utilized these methods and tools, and have lacked rigor. We developed a conceptual framework for evaluating training in WaSH by reviewing and adapting concepts from literature. Our framework includes three target outcomes: learning, individual performance, and improved programming; and two sets of influences: trainee and context factors. We applied the framework to evaluate a seven-month community-led total sanitation (CLTS) management training program delivered to 42 government officials in Kenya from September 2013 to May 2014. Trainees were given a pre-training questionnaire and were interviewed at two weeks and seven months after initial training. We qualitatively analyzed the data using our conceptual framework. The training program resulted in trainees learning the CLTS process and new skills, and improving their individual performance through application of advocacy, partnership, and supervision soft skills. The link from trainees' performance to improved programming was constrained by resource limitations and pre-existing rigidity of trainees' organizations. Training-over-time enhanced outcomes and enabled trainees to overcome constraints in their work. Training in soft skills is relevant to managing public health programs beyond WaSH. We make recommendations on how training programs can be targeted and adapted to improve outcomes. Our conceptual framework can be used as a tool both for planning and evaluating training programs in WaSH. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Outcomes from a postgraduate biomedical technology innovation training program: the first 12 years of Stanford Biodesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Todd J; Kurihara, Christine Q; Camarillo, David B; Pietzsch, Jan B; Gorodsky, Julian; Zenios, Stefanos A; Doshi, Rajiv; Shen, Christopher; Kumar, Uday N; Mairal, Anurag; Watkins, Jay; Popp, Richard L; Wang, Paul J; Makower, Josh; Krummel, Thomas M; Yock, Paul G

    2013-09-01

    The Stanford Biodesign Program began in 2001 with a mission of helping to train leaders in biomedical technology innovation. A key feature of the program is a full-time postgraduate fellowship where multidisciplinary teams undergo a process of sourcing clinical needs, inventing solutions and planning for implementation of a business strategy. The program places a priority on needs identification, a formal process of selecting, researching and characterizing needs before beginning the process of inventing. Fellows and students from the program have gone on to careers that emphasize technology innovation across industry and academia. Biodesign trainees have started 26 companies within the program that have raised over $200 million and led to the creation of over 500 new jobs. More importantly, although most of these technologies are still at a very early stage, several projects have received regulatory approval and so far more than 150,000 patients have been treated by technologies invented by our trainees. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions in terms of training priorities.

  15. Designing and implementing a resiliency program for family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Julie; McGrady, Angele

    2015-01-01

    Family medicine residents are at risk for burnout due to extended work hours, lack of control over their work schedule, and challenging work situations and environments. Building resiliency can prevent burnout and may improve a resident's quality of life and health behavior. This report describes a program designed to build resiliency, the ability to bounce back from stress, in family medicine residents in a medium sized U.S. residency training program. Interactive sessions emphasized building self-awareness, coping skills, strengths and meaning in work, time management, self-care, and connections in and outside of medicine to support resident well-being. System changes which fostered wellness were also implemented. These changes included increasing the availability of fresh fruits in the conference and call room, purchasing an elliptical exercise machine for the on call room, and offering a few minutes of mindfulness meditation daily to the inpatient residents. Results to date show excellent acceptance of the program by trainees, increased consumption of nutritious foods, more personal exercise, and self-reported decreased overreactions to stress. Resiliency programs can effectively serve to meet accreditation requirements while fostering residents' abilities to balance personal and professional demands. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. The training of coaching skills: An implementation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenman, S.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the implementation effects of a programme for the training of coaching skills with Dutch school counsellors are described. These school counsellors are expected to provide help and support to primary school teachers. Coaching is a form of in-class support intended to provide teachers

  17. Teacher Training and Professional Development Needs in the Literacy Field: Implications of the New Spanish Programs for Elementary Education in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Hernández-Segura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the training and professional development of teachers in the literacy field, in order to analyze the implications of implementing the new Spanish program for Elementary Education in Costa Rica. For this purpose, the results obtained from questionnaires completed by current elementary teachers are shared, in order to get firsthand knowledge of their professional training and experience, as well as their training and pedagogical needs in the literacy field. Among the main findings of the research, it is considered as critical that the teachers’ own training and professional development regarding the initial processes of reading and writing allow them to fully comprehend the theoretical background of the Elementary Level Spanish Program; otherwise, there is a risk of misinterpretations and incorrect practices that might jeopardize the Program´s approach.

  18. Management training in global health education: a Health Innovation Fellowship training program to bring healthcare to low-income communities in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Andrea M; Pearson, Andy A; Bertelsen, Nathan S

    2018-01-01

    Interprofessional education is increasingly recognized as essential for health education worldwide. Although effective management, innovation, and entrepreneurship are necessary to improve health systems, business schools have been underrepresented in global health education. Central America needs more health professionals trained in health management and innovation to respond to health disparities, especially in rural communities. This paper explores the impact of the Health Innovation Fellowship (HIF), a new training program for practicing health professionals offered jointly by the Central American Healthcare Initiative and INCAE Business School, Costa Rica. Launched in 2014, HIF's goal is to create a network of highly trained interdisciplinary health professionals in competencies to improve health of Central American communities through better health management. The program's fellows carried out innovative healthcare projects in their local regions. The first three annual cohorts (total of 43 fellows) represented all health-related professions and sectors (private, public, and civil society) from six Central American countries. All fellows attended four 1-week, on-site modular training sessions, received ongoing mentorship, and stayed connected through formal and informal networks and webinars through which they exchange knowledge and support each other. CAHI stakeholders supported HIF financially. Impact evaluation of the three-year pilot training program is positive: fellows improved their health management skills and more than 50% of the projects found either financial or political support for their implementation. HIF's strengths include that both program leaders and trainees come from the Global South, and that HIF offers a platform to collaborate with partners in the Global North. By focusing on promoting innovation and management at a top business school in the region, HIF constitutes a novel capacity-building effort within global health education. HIF

  19. Implementation of transdiagnostic treatment for emotional disorders in residential eating disorder programs: A preliminary pre-post evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Boswell, James F; Espel-Huynh, Hallie; Brooks, Gayle; Lowe, Michael R

    2018-03-19

    Data are lacking from empirically supported therapies implemented in residential programs for eating disorders (EDs). Common elements treatments may be well-suited to address the complex implementation and treatment challenges that characterize these settings. This study assessed the preliminary effect of implementing a common elements therapy on clinician treatment delivery and patient (N = 616) symptom outcomes in two residential ED programs. The Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders was adapted to address ED and co-occurring psychopathology and implemented across sites. Therapists' treatment fidelity was rated independently to assess implementation success. Additionally, longitudinal (pre-post) design compared treatment outcomes among patients treated before and after implementation. Patient outcomes included ED and depressive symptoms, experiential avoidance, anxiety sensitivity, and mindfulness. Following training and implementation, clinicians demonstrated adequate to good fidelity. Relative to pre-implementation, post-implementation patients showed significantly greater improvements in experiential avoidance, anxiety sensitivity, and mindfulness at discharge (ps ≤ .04) and more favorable outcomes on ED symptom severity, depression, and experiential avoidance at 6-month follow up (ps ≤ .0001). Preliminary pilot data support the feasibility of implementing transdiagnostic common elements therapy in residential ED treatment, and suggest that implementation may benefit transdiagnostic outcomes for patients.

  20. Exploring multi-level system factors facilitating educator training and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBP): a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmer, Aubyn C; Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Schetter, Patricia L; McGee Hassrick, Elizabeth

    2018-01-08

    This study examines how system-wide (i.e., region, district, and school) mechanisms such as leadership support, training requirements, structure, collaboration, and education affect the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in schools and how this affects the outcomes for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Despite growing evidence for the positive effects of EBPs for ASD, these practices are not consistently or effectively used in schools. Although special education programs are mandated to use EBPs, there are very few evidence-based methods for selecting, implementing, and sustaining EBPs. Research focuses primarily on teacher training, without attention to contextual factors (e.g., implementation climate, attitudes toward EBPs, resource allocation, and social networks) that may impact outcomes. Using an implementation science framework, this project will prospectively examine relations between system-wide factors and teachers' use of EBPs and student education outcomes. Survey data will be collected from approximately 85 regional special education directors, 170 regional program specialists, 265 district special education directors, 265 behavior specialists, 925 school principals, 3538 special education teachers, and 2700 paraprofessionals. Administrative data for the students with ASD served by participating teachers will be examined. A total of 79 regional-, district-, and school-level personnel will also participate in social network interviews. Mixed methods, including surveys, administrative data, and observational checklists, will be used to gather in-depth information about system-wide malleable factors that relate to positive teacher implementation of EBPs and student outcomes. Multi-level modeling will be used to assess system-wide malleable factors related to EBP implementation which will be linked to the trainer, teacher, and student outcomes and examined based on moderators (e.g., district size, Special Education Local Plan Area structure

  1. Development of Capacity Building Training Programs for Nuclear R and D Personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eui Jin; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Hyeseon; Jang, Eunsook; Song, Eun Ju

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Training and Education Center of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been operating technical training courses on nuclear engineering, engineering mathematics, management leadership training, out sourced practical training, legal education, etc. Strengthening nuclear R and D capacity is essential for the long-term mission and goals of the institute. Therefore, it requires a comprehensive training program to strengthen the unique capability of the institute that reflects diversity and differentiation. In this regard, the capacity building training program has developed on a modular basis, and the developed training program should be tailored to operate according to the institute needs. The capacity building training program for nuclear R and D personnel was developed to reflect the technology strengths of the institute. The developed training program will be developed into a leading branded education of the institute in the future

  2. Development of Capacity Building Training Programs for Nuclear R and D Personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eui Jin; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Hyeseon; Jang, Eunsook; Song, Eun Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The Nuclear Training and Education Center of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been operating technical training courses on nuclear engineering, engineering mathematics, management leadership training, out sourced practical training, legal education, etc. Strengthening nuclear R and D capacity is essential for the long-term mission and goals of the institute. Therefore, it requires a comprehensive training program to strengthen the unique capability of the institute that reflects diversity and differentiation. In this regard, the capacity building training program has developed on a modular basis, and the developed training program should be tailored to operate according to the institute needs. The capacity building training program for nuclear R and D personnel was developed to reflect the technology strengths of the institute. The developed training program will be developed into a leading branded education of the institute in the future.

  3. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Pound, Catherine M; Peddle, Beth; Tokarewicz, Jaclyn; Eady, Kaylee

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians' research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1) critically evaluating research literature, 2) writing a research proposal, 3) submitting an application for research funding, and 4) writing a manuscript. This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents' scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway.

  4. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Moreau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians’ research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. Purpose: To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Results: Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1 critically evaluating research literature, 2 writing a research proposal, 3 submitting an application for research funding, and 4 writing a manuscript. Discussion: This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents’ scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway.

  5. Alpine skiing: Effects of mental training program of junior representatives of the Czech republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Hřebíčková

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Qualitative evaluation case study deals with the implementation of mental skills training program conducted with the Czech national junior alpine skiing team over a period of an annual training cycle and evaluation of its effects by one of the members of the team. The concept of the study is based on current findings of sport psychology in the field of mental training in alpine skiing and other sports. The theoretical framework of the study is the socio-cognitive psychological paradigm (Bandura, 1986, 1997 and cognitive-behavioral approach. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the work is a qualitative evaluation of a program involving relaxation, concentration and imaginative techniques and goal setting by one of its participants. METHODS: Evaluation is carried out through semi-structured interview with the participant. The interview was analyzed in a scientific software Atlas.ti 6.2. The method of creating clusters were used for analysis. RESULTS: From the participants answers we understand the subjectively perceived benefit of the program based on understanding of the possibility of influencing the mental part of his performance. The racer presents that he learned the practical application of certain techniques of the mental preparation, particularly imagery and the mental plan of the race, which contributed to better coping with the race situation. The racer achieved the improvement in his FIS ranking standings in all the disciplines over the monitored season. Research findings are used in the proposal of practical recommendations for mental preparation in the training of top and performing skiers. CONCLUSION: An important factor in the success of the mental skills training program is cooperation of all interested participants, that are athlete, coach and psychologist. With applying the psychological techniques the key factors are mental support, encouragement, and development of confidence of the athlete in his own abilities. A well

  6. INPO JTA application: developing a competency-based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Developing a competency-based training program requires the support of a strong curriculum development program. The major thrust of Arkansas Power and Light Company's competency-based curriculum development program is the identification of competencies using position task analysis data, panels, and INPO JTA data. Eight steps in the curriculum development approach provide the logic and rationale of the process: (1) establish competencies, (2) conduct competency verification, (3) develop competency tests, (4) develop curriculum, (5) develop instructional media, (6) validate curriculum and conduct field testing, (7) perform training effectiveness evaluation, and (8) revise the curriculum as needed. The processes describe how INPO JTA's and NRC procedures are cross-referenced to show that standards and requirements imposed or sanctioned by NRC and INPO are met. The competency-based approach to curriculum and training development eliminates the traditional scatterload approach to training and focuses on training to the competency. The primary benefits of competency-based training include accountability, minimal job training to meet job or position requirements, and a process to document an individual's job proficiency

  7. Experiences on implementation of on-the-job training programmes for maintenance personnel in Asco and Vandellos II NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Anez, F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a process and methodology for definition and implementation of On-Job-Training Programmes (OJTP) for new maintenance personnel in Asco and Vandellos II. The content of these OJTP has been defined for each maintenance job position. A simplified task analysis was carried out to specify common and specific training. Generally, the specific maintenance training programs includes training modules in classroom and workshop environment on (1) maintenance of components and (2) maintenance fundamentals of mechanical, electrical and instrumentation. This specific training has been finally completed with a OJT programme based on the execution, observation or/and discussion about the main maintenance activities under entitled worker supervision. Each lesson, task or activity is defined in a format where the training objective, milestones and deliverables are specified. The list of activities makes up the OJTP. It is based on applicable plant procedures and maintenance instruction to each job position. Several participants or actors have been defined to implement the OJTP: co-ordinator of the process, tutors for each OJT task, line maintenance manager and trainee. Co-ordinator is the link among all actors. He knows the OJTP scope and plans the training activities according to the line maintenance manager. Co-ordinator carries out a tracking process, informs to training and maintenance managers about the progress in the programme, elaborates the progress and final reports and keeps training records. Tutors, usually entitled workers in the job position, transfer the knowledge to the trainee and discuss, review and assess the trainee's performance. Trainee carries out the scheduled tasks, keeps records of work done, prepares deliverables and informs about his activities to the Co-ordinator. The OJT programme for each new maintenance worker starts with a launching meeting with all involved actors. The goals of this meeting are to explain the OJTP scope and

  8. A Training Intervention for Supervisors to Support a Work-Life Policy Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laharnar, Naima; Glass, Nancy; Perrin, Nancy; Hanson, Ginger; Kent Anger, W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective policy implementation is essential for a healthy workplace. The Ryan-Kossek 2008 model for work-life policy adoption suggests that supervisors as gatekeepers between employer and employee need to know how to support and communicate benefit regulations. This article describes a workplace intervention on a national employee benefit, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and evaluates the effectiveness of the intervention on supervisor knowledge, awareness, and experience with FMLA. Methods The intervention consisted of computer-based training (CBT) and a survey measuring awareness and experience with FMLA. The training was administered to 793 county government supervisors in the state of Oregon, USA. Results More than 35% of supervisors reported no previous training on FMLA and the training pre-test revealed a lack of knowledge regarding benefit coverage and employer responsibilities. The CBT achieved: (1) a significant learning effect and large effect size of d = 2.0, (2) a positive reaction to the training and its design, and (3) evidence of increased knowledge and awareness regarding FMLA. Conclusion CBT is an effective strategy to increase supervisors' knowledge and awareness to support policy implementation. The lack of supervisor training and knowledge of an important but complex employee benefit exposes a serious impediment to effective policy implementation and may lead to negative outcomes for the organization and the employee, supporting the Ryan-Kossek model. The results further demonstrate that long-time employees need supplementary training on complex workplace policies such as FMLA. PMID:24106648

  9. Implementation of laparoscopic virtual-reality simulation training in gynaecology: a mixed-methods design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christy; Appleyard, Tracy-Louise; Angouri, Jo; Draycott, Timothy J; McDermott, Leanne; Fox, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Virtual-reality (VR) training has been demonstrated to improve laparoscopic surgical skills in the operating theatre. The incorporation of laparoscopic VR simulation into surgical training in gynaecology remains a significant educational challenge. We undertook a pilot study to assess the feasibility of the implementation of a laparoscopic VR simulation programme into a single unit. An observational study with qualitative analysis of semi-structured group interviews. Trainees in gynaecology (n=9) were scheduled to undertake a pre-validated structured training programme on a laparoscopic VR simulator (LapSim(®)) over six months. The main outcome measure was the trainees' progress through the training modules in six months. Trainees' perceptions of the feasibility and barriers to the implementation of laparoscopic VR training were assessed in focus groups after training. Sixty-six percent of participants completed six of ten modules. Overall, feedback from the focus groups was positive; trainees felt training improved their dexterity, hand-eye co-ordination and confidence in theatre. Negative aspects included lack of haptic feedback, and facility for laparoscopic port placement training. Time restriction emerged as the main barrier to training. Despite positive perceptions of training, no trainee completed more than two-thirds of the modules of a self-directed laparoscopic VR training programme. Suggested improvements to the integration of future laparoscopic VR training include an additional theoretical component with a fuller understanding of benefits of VR training, and scheduled supervision. Ultimately, the success of a laparoscopic VR simulation training programme might only be improved if it is a mandatory component of the curriculum, together with dedicated time for training. Future multi-centred implementation studies of validated laparoscopic VR curricula are required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 75 FR 13521 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Centers for Independent Living Program--Training and Technical Assistance... for Independent Living Program--Training and Technical Assistance (CIL-TA program). The Assistant... appropriated for the CIL program to provide training and technical assistance to CILs, agencies eligible to...

  11. NRC methods for evaluation of industry training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisseau, D.S.; Koontz, J.L.; Persensky, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    On March 20, 1985, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission published the Policy Statement on Training and Qualification. The Policy Statement endorsed the INPO-managed Training Accreditation Program because it encompasses the five elements of performance-based training. This paper described the multiple methods that the NRC is using to monitor industry efforts to improve training and implement the NRC Policy Statement on Training and Qualification. The results of the evaluation of industry training improvement programs will be reviewed by the Commissioners in April 1987 to determine the nature of continuing NRC policy and programs for ensuring effective training for the US nuclear industry

  12. Initiatives in training program evaluation outside the nuclear utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Training literature is reviewed, and program evaluative practices outside the nuclear utility industry are reported. The findings indicate some innovations in philosophy and practice and program evaluation, although not necessarily in the context of evaluation as a route to assessing the impact of training. Program evaluation is described in the context of the impact of training, suggesting continued efforts to accept a multivariate concept of individual and organizational performance

  13. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  14. A web-based training program using cognitive behavioral therapy to alleviate psychological distress among employees: randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Makiko; Tajima, Miyuki; Kimura, Risa; Sasaki, Norio; Somemura, Hironori; Ito, Yukio; Okanoya, June; Yamamoto, Megumi; Nakamura, Saki; Tanaka, Katsutoshi

    2014-12-02

    A number of psychoeducational programs based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to alleviate psychological distress have been developed for implementation in clinical settings. However, while these programs are considered critical components of stress management education in a workplace setting, they are required to be brief and simple to implement, which can hinder development. The intent of the study was to examine the effects of a brief training program based on CBT in alleviating psychological distress among employees and facilitating self-evaluation of stress management skills, including improving the ability to recognize dysfunctional thinking patterns, transform dysfunctional thoughts to functional ones, cope with stress, and solve problems. Of the 187 employees at an information technology company in Tokyo, Japan, 168 consented to participate in our non-blinded randomized controlled study. The training group received CBT group education by a qualified CBT expert and 1 month of follow-up Web-based CBT homework. The effects of this educational program on the psychological distress and stress management skills of employees were examined immediately after completion of training and then again after 6 months. Although the training group did exhibit lower mean scores on the Kessler-6 (K6) scale for psychological distress after 6 months, the difference from the control group was not significant. However, the ability of training group participants to recognize dysfunctional thinking was significantly improved both immediately after training completion and after 6 months. While the ability of participants to cope with stress was not significantly improved immediately after training, improvement was noted after 6 months in the training group. No notable improvements were observed in the ability of participants to transform thoughts from dysfunctional to functional or in problem-solving skills. A sub-analysis of participants who initially exhibited clinically

  15. Slaughterhouse Inspection (Egypt). Training Manual : Guidelines for the Planning and Organisation of Training Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomne Sopov, M.; Ghouti, C.A.; Benlafquih, R.; Vugt, van F.; Latief, A.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The training manual was prepared for the inspectors of slaughterhouses in Egypt to support the training activities of the General Organization for Veterinary Services (GOVS). The manual has two main parts: 1. Overview on how to design, organize, implement and evaluate training programs in general 2.

  16. A Training Intervention for Supervisors to Support a Work-Life Policy Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Laharnar

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: CBT is an effective strategy to increase supervisors' knowledge and awareness to support policy implementation. The lack of supervisor training and knowledge of an important but complex employee benefit exposes a serious impediment to effective policy implementation and may lead to negative outcomes for the organization and the employee, supporting the Ryan-Kossek model. The results further demonstrate that long-time employees need supplementary training on complex workplace policies such as FMLA.

  17. Improving Training in Enterprise Resource Planning Systems Implementation through Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Don; Burgess, Kevin J.; Houghton, Luke; Murray, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) literature suggests that effective training is one of the key reasons for success in ERP implementations. However, limited research has been conducted on what constitutes effective training in an ERP environment. A case study approach was used to explore the effectiveness of traditional training and to…

  18. From job training to green jobs: a case study for a young adult employment program centered on environmental restoration in New York City, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy Falxa-Raymond; Erika Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    The demand for a well-trained green-collar labor force will increase as many cities implement sustainability and green infrastructure plans. Additionally, many green jobs training programs are intended to provide pathways out of poverty for low-skilled workers. In this case study, we analyze the experiences of graduates from a New York City, USA green jobs training...

  19. HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Program Implementation Using Intervention Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flash, Charlene A; Frost, Elizabeth L T; Giordano, Thomas P; Amico, K Rivet; Cully, Jeffrey A; Markham, Christine M

    2018-04-01

    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis has been proven to be an effective tool in HIV prevention. However, numerous barriers still exist in pre-exposure prophylaxis implementation. The framework of Intervention Mapping was used from August 2016 to October 2017 to describe the process of adoption, implementation, and maintenance of an HIV prevention program from 2012 through 2017 in Houston, Texas, that is nested within a county health system HIV clinic. Using the tasks outlined in the Intervention Mapping framework, potential program implementers were identified, outcomes and performance objectives established, matrices of change objectives created, and methods and practical applications formed. Results include the formation of three matrices that document program outcomes, change agents involved in the process, and the determinants needed to facilitate program adoption, implementation, and maintenance. Key features that facilitated successful program adoption and implementation were obtaining leadership buy-in, leveraging existing resources, systematic evaluation of operations, ongoing education for both clinical and nonclinical staff, and attention to emergent issues during launch. The utilization of Intervention Mapping to delineate the program planning steps can provide a model for pre-exposure prophylaxis implementation in other settings. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. IMPROVING LECTURERS’ PAEDAGOGIC COMPETENCE THROUGH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF LESSON STUDY IN FACULTY OF TEACHER TRAINING AND EDUCATION OF PAKUAN UNIVERSITY, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Sarimanah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at improving the lecturers of Faculty of Teacher Training and Education of Pakuan University paedagogic competence through the implementation of lesson study which covers learning management competence including developing chapter design and lesson design, media making, teaching and learning, evaluation, post evaluation follow-up and learning supervision. This research involves four study program. The method used in this research is qualitative descriptive. The data are collected through documentation, observation, interview and questionnaire. The data are analyzed descriptively to investigate the improvement of the lecturers’ paedagogic competence in teaching through the implementation of lesson study. Lesson study has been implemented for two years in Indonesian and Literature Education Study Program, English Education Study Program, Biology Education Study Program, and Primary Education Study Program. The findings show that there is an improvement of the lecturers paedagogic competence in developing chapter design and lesson design, developing material and designing media for learning (plan stage; running the lesson (do stage; and observing the lesson as well as evaluating and reflecting it (see stage. Besides, it is found the lecturers develop learning innovation to create students’ active learning. The colleagality among the lecturers is also develop well through the implementation of lesson study. The questionnaire result also shows that the implementation of lesson study can make the student become autonomous learners.

  1. International Training Program on Nuclear Engineering at Kinki University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohara, Sin-ya; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Itoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Outline of the Training Program: • This training program is a 3-years program since 2013. • This program is conducted with 5 universities’ cooperation: Kyushu Univ., Nagoya Univ., Kyung Hee Univ., Kyoto Univ. and Kinki Univ.; • Education is provided in 3 experimental fields: Kinki Univ. Reactor: UTR-KINKI, Kyung Hee Univ. Reactor: AGN-201K, Reconstruction Support Test Field in Fukushima: RSTF; • The language used in the program is English which is not mother tongue for neither Japanese nor Korean students

  2. Demographic Changes in School Psychology Training Programs between 1997 and 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study seeks to add to the body of knowledge regarding school psychology training programs by analyzing the data of the 2005 National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Graduate Training in School Psychology Database, a national survey of psychology training programs. Program directors of all known existing school…

  3. 30 CFR 75.1713-6 - First-aid training program; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First-aid training program; minimum... § 75.1713-6 First-aid training program; minimum requirements. (a) All first-aid training programs... course of instruction similar to that outlined in “First Aid, A Bureau of Mines Instruction Manual.” (b...

  4. Airline Crew Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The discovery that human error has caused many more airline crashes than mechanical malfunctions led to an increased emphasis on teamwork and coordination in airline flight training programs. Human factors research at Ames Research Center has produced two crew training programs directed toward more effective operations. Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) defines areas like decision making, workload distribution, communication skills, etc. as essential in addressing human error problems. In 1979, a workshop led to the implementation of the CRM program by United Airlines, and later other airlines. In Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT), crews fly missions in realistic simulators while instructors induce emergency situations requiring crew coordination. This is followed by a self critique. Ames Research Center continues its involvement with these programs.

  5. European advanced driver training programs: Reasons for optimism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Washington

    2011-03-01

    This paper reviews the predominant features and empirical evidence surrounding post licensing advanced driver training programs focused on novice drivers. A clear articulation of differences between the renewed and current US advanced driver training programs is provided. While the individual quantitative evaluations range from marginally to significantly effective in reducing novice driver crash risk, they have been criticized for evaluation deficiencies ranging from small sample sizes to confounding variables to lack of exposure metrics. Collectively, however, the programs sited in the paper suggest at least a marginally positive effect that needs to be validated with further studies. If additional well controlled studies can validate these programs, a pilot program in the US should be considered.

  6. The Metaphorical Perceptions of Students on a Teacher-Training Course towards the Concepts of "Teacher" and "Teacher Training"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Zehra Taspinar; Bulut, Ahsen Seda; Ünal, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Problem Statement: Two different teacher training programs have been implemented in Turkey over recent years. In addition to attending faculties of teacher training (on traditional educational degree programs), graduates from different faculties have the right to become teachers by way of the "pedagogical formation certification…

  7. Implementation of training programs in self-regulated learning strategies in Moodle format: results of a experience in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José Carlos; Cerezo, Rebeca; Bernardo, Ana; Rosário, Pedro; Valle, Antonio; Fernández, Estrella; Suárez, Natalia

    2011-04-01

    This paper tests the efficacy of an intervention program in virtual format intended to train studying and self-regulation strategies in university students. The aim of this intervention is to promote a series of strategies which allow students to manage their learning processes in a more proficient and autonomous way. The program has been developed in Moodle format and hosted by the Virtual Campus of the University of Oviedo. The present study had a semi-experimental design, included an experimental group (n=167) and a control one (n=206), and used pretest and posttest measures (self-regulated learning strategies' declarative knowledge, self-regulated learning macro-strategy planning-execution-assessment, self-regulated learning strategies on text, surface and deep learning approaches, and academic achievement). Data suggest that the students enrolled in the training program, comparing with students in the control group, showed a significant improvement in their declarative knowledge, general and on text use of learning strategies, increased their deep approach to learning, decreased their use of a surface approach and, in what concerns to academic achievement, statistically significant differences have been found in favour of the experimental group.

  8. Effect of the full implementation of the European Working Time Directive on operative training in adult cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Sharples, Linda; Codispoti, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Surgical specialties rely on practice and apprenticeship to acquire technical skills. In 2009, the final reduction in working hours to 48 per week, in accordance with the European Working Time Directive (EWTD), has also led to an expansion in the number of trainees. We examined the effect of these changes on operative training in a single high-volume [>1500 procedures/year] adult cardiac surgical center. Setting: A single high-volume [>1500 procedures/year] adult cardiac surgical center. Design: Consecutive data were prospectively collected into a database and retrospectively analyzed. Procedures and Main Outcome Measures: Between January 2006 and August 2010, 6688 consecutive adult cardiac surgical procedures were analyzed. The proportion of cases offered for surgical training were compared for 2 non-overlapping consecutive time periods: 4504 procedures were performed before the final implementation of the EWTD (Phase 1: January 2006-December 2008) and 2184 procedures after the final implementation of the EWTD (Phase 2: January 2009-August 2010). Other predictors of training considered in the analysis were grade of trainee, logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE), type of surgical procedure, weekend or late procedure, and consultant. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of training cases (procedure performed by trainee) and to evaluate the effect of the EWTD on operative surgical training after correcting for confounding factors. Proportion of training cases rose from 34.6% (1558/4504) during Phase 1 to 43.6% (953/2184) in Phase 2 (p hours [153 (3.4) during Phase 1 vs 116 (5.3) during Phase 2, p hours' procedures, and surgery other than coronary artery bypass grafts. Implementation of the final phase of EWTD has not decreased training in a high-volume center. The positive adjustment of trainers' attitudes and efforts to match trainees' needs allow maintenance of adequate training, despite reduction in

  9. Health and safety training for hazardous waste site activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Implementation of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120(e)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Among the requirements set forth by the interim final rule, 29 CFR Part 1910.120, promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in response to the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), are specific provisions for health and safety training of employees involved in hazardous waste operations. These training provisions require a minimum of 40 hours of initial instruction off the site for employees involved in corrective operations and cleanup activities at hazardous waste sites. A less detailed training requirement of 24 hours is specified for employees working in more routine treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Managers and supervisors who are directly responsible for or who supervise employees engaged in hazardous waste operations must complete 8 additional hours of training related to management of hazardous waste site activities. Consistent with the intent of 29 CFR 1910.120, a training program has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to comply with the need to protect the safety and health of hazardous waste workers. All hourly requirements specified in the interim final rule are met by a comprehensive program structure involving three stages of training. This paper will outline and discuss the content of each of these stages of the program. The involvement of various ORNL organizations in facilitating the training will be highlighted. Implementation strategies will be discussed as well as progress made to date

  10. Regulatory activities in gaining assurance of training program effectiveness in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legare, Michele

    2003-01-01

    This presentation shows the regulator's point of view on evaluating a training program effectiveness. The mission of the Training Program Evaluation Section of the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board is to obtain and document assurance that the training of NPP operators is effective in providing them with the knowledge and skills needed to become and remain competent. Proposals are made to be considered when drafting the IAEA guideline on evaluation of training program effectiveness

  11. A Rural Special Education Teacher Training Program: Successful Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Greg; And Others

    The Rural Special Education Program (RSEP), a partnership between Northern Arizona University (NAU) and Kayenta Unified School District (KUSD), provides training for preservice special education teachers to work with Native American students and their families. To date, the program has provided training for 63 preservice special education…

  12. Interim Evaluation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: First Year of the Full Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes in the full implementation phase, 100 schools were randomly selected to participate in personal and/or telephone interviews regarding the quality of the implementation process of the Tier 1 Program. In the interviews, the participants described the responses of the students to the program, the perceived benefits of the program, the perceived good aspects of the program, and the areas requiring improvement, difficulties encountered in the implementation process, and perceived attributes of the worker-support scheme (“Co-Walker Scheme”. Results showed that most workers perceived that the students had positive responses to the program and the program was beneficial to the students. They also identified several good aspects in the program, although negative comments on the program design and difficulties in the implementation process were also recorded. Roughly half of the respondents had positive comments on the “Co-Walker Scheme”. In sum, the respondents generally regarded the program as beneficial to the students and they were satisfied with the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum in the full implementation phase, although some implementation difficulties were also expressed.

  13. Child Protection Program Implementations in Sport Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgün PARASIZ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The protection and provision of the welfare of children who are in a vulnerable condition to all kinds of risk in the modern world in every field they actively take part in is acknowledged as one of the most important social responsibilites of states in this day and age. In the fight against this problem, especially developed countries promote chi ld protection policies and implement them in every sport field children take active part in. The aim of this study is to examine in which dimensions child protection system, defined as the provision of the child’s safety in all aspects including physical, social, emotional, economic, cultural, ethnic, moral, religious and political on a legal basis and in practice, is implemented within the sport systems of England and to identify the policies of sports organizations. In the study, scanning method based o n the literature was used. Research data was obtained by examining the related sources on the subject in various international libraries, journals, books and sports organizations. According to the information obtained in the study, child protection progra ms were identified to be a legal obligation for independent sports organizations responsible for the management of the sport (such as Federations, Olympic committees, sport clubs. The fundamental purpose of child protection programs is to diminish the ris k of all kinds of (sexual, physical and emotional child abuse. Sports organization establish child protection systems within their governing structure and work in coordination with the related units of clubs, federations and central administrations. Moreo ver, by providing special trainings to administrators and coaches, the stipulation of obtaining a special document for coaches who shall work with sportsmen under the age of 18 has been laid down. Special regulations and educational programs for sport fede rations have been prepared intended for the functioning of child protection system in

  14. A Strength Training Program for Primary Care Patients, Central Pennsylvania, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vijay A.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Messina, Dino A.; Stuckey, Heather L.; Curry, William J.; Chuang, Cynthia H.; Sherwood, Lisa L.; Hess, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Primary care providers can recommend strength training programs to use “Exercise as Medicine,” yet few studies have examined the interest of primary care patients in these programs. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of primary care patients in central Pennsylvania. Interest in participating in free group-based strength training and weight control programs was assessed, in addition to patient demographics, medical history, and quality of life. Results Among 414 patients, most (61.0%) were aged 54 or older, and 64.0% were female. More patients were interested in a strength training program (55.3%) than in a weight control program (45.4%). Nearly three-quarters (72.8%) of those reporting 10 or more days of poor physical health were interested in a strength training program compared with 49.5% of those reporting no days of poor physical health. After adjusting for potential confounders, those reporting poorer physical health had 2.7 greater odds (95% confidence interval, 1.4–5.1) of being interested in a strength training program compared with those reporting better physical health. Patients with hypertension, diabetes, or high cholesterol were not more interested in a strength training program than those without these conditions. Conclusion Primary care practices may consider offering or referring patients to community-based strength training programs. This study observed high levels of interest in these widely available programs. Practices may also consider screening and referring those with poorer physical health, as they may be the most interested and have the most to gain from participating. PMID:24967829

  15. Evaluation of an Efficient Method for Training Staff to Implement Stimulus Preference Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Eileen M.; Fisher, Wayne W.

    2008-01-01

    We used a brief training procedure that incorporated feedback and role-play practice to train staff members to conduct stimulus preference assessments, and we used group-comparison methods to evaluate the effects of training. Staff members were trained to implement the multiple-stimulus-without-replacement assessment in a single session and the…

  16. Effective e-Training: Using a Course Management System and e-Learning Tools to Train Library Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Andrew; Teetor, Travis Stephen

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the University of Arizona Libraries implemented an online training program to effectively train Access Services staff and student employees at a large academic research library. This article discusses the program, which was built using a course management system (D2L) and various e-Learning software applications (Articulate…

  17. Train Repathing in Emergencies Based on Fuzzy Linear Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelei Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Train pathing is a typical problem which is to assign the train trips on the sets of rail segments, such as rail tracks and links. This paper focuses on the train pathing problem, determining the paths of the train trips in emergencies. We analyze the influencing factors of train pathing, such as transferring cost, running cost, and social adverse effect cost. With the overall consideration of the segment and station capability constraints, we build the fuzzy linear programming model to solve the train pathing problem. We design the fuzzy membership function to describe the fuzzy coefficients. Furthermore, the contraction-expansion factors are introduced to contract or expand the value ranges of the fuzzy coefficients, coping with the uncertainty of the value range of the fuzzy coefficients. We propose a method based on triangular fuzzy coefficient and transfer the train pathing (fuzzy linear programming model to a determinate linear model to solve the fuzzy linear programming problem. An emergency is supposed based on the real data of the Beijing-Shanghai Railway. The model in this paper was solved and the computation results prove the availability of the model and efficiency of the algorithm.

  18. Train repathing in emergencies based on fuzzy linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xuelei; Cui, Bingmou

    2014-01-01

    Train pathing is a typical problem which is to assign the train trips on the sets of rail segments, such as rail tracks and links. This paper focuses on the train pathing problem, determining the paths of the train trips in emergencies. We analyze the influencing factors of train pathing, such as transferring cost, running cost, and social adverse effect cost. With the overall consideration of the segment and station capability constraints, we build the fuzzy linear programming model to solve the train pathing problem. We design the fuzzy membership function to describe the fuzzy coefficients. Furthermore, the contraction-expansion factors are introduced to contract or expand the value ranges of the fuzzy coefficients, coping with the uncertainty of the value range of the fuzzy coefficients. We propose a method based on triangular fuzzy coefficient and transfer the train pathing (fuzzy linear programming model) to a determinate linear model to solve the fuzzy linear programming problem. An emergency is supposed based on the real data of the Beijing-Shanghai Railway. The model in this paper was solved and the computation results prove the availability of the model and efficiency of the algorithm.

  19. Evaluation of a train-the-trainer program for stable coronary artery disease management in community settings: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiyun; Jiang, Changying; Chen, Liqun

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of conducting a train-the-trainer (TTT) program for stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) management in community settings. The study involved two steps: (1) tutors trained community nurses as trainers and (2) the community nurses trained patients. 51 community nurses attended a 2-day TTT program and completed questionnaires assessing knowledge, self-efficacy, and satisfaction. By a feasibility and non-randomized control study, 120 SCAD patients were assigned either to intervention group (which received interventions from trained nurses) or control group (which received routine management). Pre- and post-intervention, patients' self-management behaviors and satisfaction were assessed to determine the program's overall impact. Community nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy improved (Pmanagement behaviors (Pmanagement in community settings in China was generally feasible and effective, but many obstacles remain including patients' noncompliance, nurses' busy work schedules, and lack of policy supports. Finding ways to enhance the motivation of community nurses and patients with SCAD are important in implementing community-based TTT programs for SCAD management; further multicenter and randomized control trials are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear Training Excellence Project in Slovenské elektrárne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvočková, Alena; Tonkovičová, Martina; Baláž, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Goals 2013-2015: • Set and implement nuclear training in accordance with the best nuclear practice: → Change understanding of nuclear training by line management – nuclear training is part of core business; → Apply Systematic Approach to Training methodology thoroughly; → Develop and start implementing new training programs. • Prepare practical training centers in EBO and EMO for real operation

  1. Outcome Evaluation of a Policy-Mandated Lifestyle and Environmental Modification Program in a National Job Training Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Elizabeth Yakes; Harris, Amanda; Luna, Donald; Velasquez, Daniel; Slovik, Jonathan; Kong, Alberta

    2017-06-01

    Excess weight gain is common when adolescents become young adults, but there are no obesity prevention or weight management interventions that have been tested for emerging adults who follow non-traditional post-secondary paths, such as enrolling in job training programs. We evaluated Healthy Eating & Active Lifestyles (HEALs), a policy-mandated lifestyle education/environmental modification program, at a job training center for low-income 16-24 year olds. We examined average change in body mass index (BMI) z-score from baseline to 6 months for emerging adults (aged 16-24 years) in pre-HEALs implementation (n = 125) and post-HEALs implementation (n = 126) cohorts living at the job training center, by baseline weight status. In both cohorts, average BMI z-score significantly increased from baseline to 6 months for students with BMI < 25. Average BMI z-score significantly decreased for the overweight (BMI 25 to <30; -0.11, p = .03) and obese (BMI ≥ 30; -0.11, p = .001) students only within the post-HEALs cohort; changes within the pre-HEALs cohort and between cohorts were not significant. HEALs may promote positive weight-related trends for overweight/obese students, but prevention efforts for non-overweight/obese students need to be improved.

  2. Nuclear criticality safety specialist training and qualification programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) in 1967, the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) community has sought to provide an exchange of information at a national level to facilitate the education and development of NCS specialists. In addition, individual criticality safety organizations within government contractor and licensed commercial nonreactor facilities have developed training and qualification programs for their NCS specialists. However, there has been substantial variability in the content and quality of these program requirements and personnel qualifications, at least as measured within the government contractor community. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief, general history of staff training and to describe the current direction and focus of US DOE guidance for the content of training and qualification programs designed to develop NCS specialists

  3. 75 FR 48934 - Coral Reef Conservation Program Implementation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ...-01] RIN 0648-ZC19 Coral Reef Conservation Program Implementation Guidelines AGENCY: National Oceanic... Guidelines (Guidelines) for the Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP or Program) under the Coral Reef... assistance for coral reef conservation projects under the Act. NOAA revised the Implementation Guidelines for...

  4. Alternative systematic approaches to training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    This handbook is approved for use by all DOE Components and contractors. The handbook was prepared primarily for DOE nuclear facilities, but the information can be effectively used by any other type of facility. DOE nuclear, DOE non-nuclear, commercial nuclear reactor, fuel fabrication, chemical processing, or other types of facilities may also apply the principles of this approach and find it useful and applicable to local needs. The handbook provides DOE and contractor operating organizations with concepts and guidance regarding the use of alternative techniques to implement a systematic approach to training (SAT). The techniques described in this handbook are endorsed by DOE and use of the guidance in this handbook is appropriate for establishment of technical training programs at DOE nuclear facilities. The use of guidance on selection and implementation of appropriate training approaches after consideration of job complexity, the consequences of error based on risk/hazard potential, and available training media should result in effective and efficient training programs. The information presented in this handbook can be used to grade the level of effort and formality used in developing training programs.

  5. 34 CFR 395.11 - Training program for blind individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training program for blind individuals. 395.11 Section... BLIND ON FEDERAL AND OTHER PROPERTY The State Licensing Agency § 395.11 Training program for blind... be provided to blind individuals as vocational rehabilitation services under the Rehabilitation Act...

  6. Model for behavior observation training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghausen, P.E. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Continued behavior observation is mandated by ANSI/ANS 3.3. This paper presents a model for behavior observation training that is in accordance with this standard and the recommendations contained in US NRC publications. The model includes seventeen major topics or activities. Ten of these are discussed: Pretesting of supervisor's knowledge of behavior observation requirements, explanation of the goals of behavior observation programs, why behavior observation training programs are needed (legal and psychological issues), early indicators of emotional instability, use of videotaped interviews to demonstrate significant psychopathology, practice recording behaviors, what to do when unusual behaviors are observed, supervisor rationalizations for noncompliance, when to be especially vigilant, and prevention of emotional instability

  7. Characteristics and Outcomes of an Innovative Train-in-Place Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-McKenzie, Judith; Emmett, Edward A

    2017-10-01

    Physicians who make a midcareer specialty change may find their options for formal training are limited. Here, we describe a train-in-place program, with measureable outcomes, created to train midcareer physicians who desire formal training in occupational medicine. We evaluated educational outcomes from a novel residency program for midcareer physicians seeking formal training and board certification in occupational medicine. Physicians train in place at selected clinical training sites where they practice, and participate in 18 visits to the primary training site over a 2-year period. Program components include competency-based training structured around rotations, mentored projects, and periodic auditing visits to train-in-site locations by program faculty. Main outcome measures are achievement of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Occupational Medicine Milestones, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine competencies, performance on the American College of Preventive Medicine examinations, diversity in selection, placement of graduates, and the number of graduates who remain in the field. Since inception of this program in 1997, there have been 109 graduates who comprise 7.2% of new American Board of Preventive Medicine diplomates over the past decade. Graduates scored competitively on the certifying examination, achieved all milestones, expressed satisfaction with training, and are geographically dispersed, representing every US region. Most practice outside the 25 largest standard metropolitan statistical areas. More than 95% have remained in the field. Training in place is an effective approach to provide midcareer physicians seeking comprehensive skills and board certification in occupational medicine formal training, and may be adaptable to other specialties.

  8. Designing, Developing, and Implementing Diversity Training: Guidelines for Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Tanna M.; Horner, Erin R.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses diversity in the workplace and offers guidelines for practitioners in designing, developing, and implementing diversity training. Highlights include linking the diversity initiative to the organization's mission, cultural climate assessments, reviewing policies and procedures, needs assessment, learner analysis, establishing objectives,…

  9. Breaking bad news: A communication competency for ophthalmology training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkert, Sarah M; Cebulla, Colleen M; Jain, Shelly Gupta; Pfeil, Sheryl A; Benes, Susan C; Robbins, Shira L

    As the ophthalmology accreditation system undergoes major changes, training programs must evaluate residents in the 6 core competencies, including appropriately communicating bad news. Although the literature is replete with recommendations for breaking bad news across various non-ophthalmology specialties, no formal training programs exist for ophthalmology. There are many valuable lessons to be learned from our colleagues regarding this important skill. We examine the historic basis for breaking bad news, explore current recommendations among other specialties, and then evaluate a pilot study in breaking bad news for ophthalmology residents. The results of this study are limited by a small number of residents at a single academic center. Future studies from multiple training programs should be conducted to further evaluate the need and efficacy of formal communication skills training in this area, as well as the generalizability of our pilot training program. If validated, this work could serve as a template for future ophthalmology resident training and evaluation in this core competency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biosafety Education and Training Programs for Ukrainian Microbiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushkina, V.; Volyansky, A.; Popova, N.

    2007-01-01

    In the period of the Soviet Union Ukrainian Mechnikov Anti-Plaque Research Institute was one of the main bases of centralized training for laboratory diagnosis of especially dangerous infections. Not only specialists, but medical technicians were obligatory trained. In training programs special attention was paid to the safety regime in accurate work out of practical manipulations in investigational classical methods (cultivating technique, pipeting, animals' infection and dissection, etc.), protective clothes usage, anti-epidemic measures use at different accidents. This approach gave effective results not only in laboratories but also during field work (natural plaque foci investigations, etc.) and at emergencies. Recently in world practice to increase the level of biosafety technical equipment and devices are developed and used very intensively. During training maximal time is paid to their mastering. At such training biosafety practically depends on safe and reliable work of engineer-technical systems. At present in Ukrainian Anti-Plaque Institute with the support of Canadian Government Training Centre on biosafety and biodefense for specialists of Ukraine and FSU countries is being organized. Teaching programs will include complex study of hand manipulations and modern technical means knowledge. To our mind such initial training had to be available for all specialists of BSL 1-2 microbiological laboratories of any subordination. For this goal all kinds of programs will be developed. Such complex approach will promote to decrease biological risks in microbiological laboratories and prevent infectious agents import from working territories.(author)

  11. Improved education after implementation of the Danish postgraduate medical training reform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kodal, Troels; Kjær, Niels Kristian; Qvesel, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    A reform of educational postgraduate medical training was launched in Denmark in 2004. The reform was based on a report by the Danish Medical Specialist Commission and consisted of a number of initiatives that were all aimed at improving the quality of medical training. Since 1998, all junior...... doctors in Denmark have been requested to rate the quality of their training on a Danish standardized questionnaire (DSQ) comprising 24 questions. In this study, we examined how junior doctors in hospitals rated their postgraduate medical training before and six years after the reform was implemented....

  12. Evaluating the effectiveness of a logger safety training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jennifer L; Grushecky, Shawn T

    2006-01-01

    Logger safety training programs are rarely, if ever, evaluated as to their effectiveness in reducing injuries. Workers' compensation claim rates were used to evaluate the effectiveness of a logger safety training program, the West Virginia Loggers' Safety Initiative (LSI). There was no claim rate decline detected in the majority (67%) of companies that participated in all 4 years of the LSI. Furthermore, their rate did not differ from the rest of the WV logging industry that did not participate in the LSI. Worker turnover was significantly related to claim rates; companies with higher turnover of employees had higher claim rates. Companies using feller bunchers to harvest trees at least part of the time had a significantly lower claim rate than companies not using them. Companies that had more inspections per year had lower claim rates. High injury rates persist even in companies that receive safety training; high employee turnover may affect the efficacy of training programs. The logging industry should be encouraged to facilitate the mechanization of logging tasks, to address barriers to employee retention, and to increase the number of in-the-field performance monitoring inspections. Impact on industry There are many states whose logger safety programs include only about 4-8 hours of safe work practices training. These states may look to West Virginia's expanded training program (the LSI) as a model for their own programs. However, the LSI training may not be reaching loggers due to the delay in administering training to new employees and high levels of employee turnover. Regardless of training status, loggers' claim rates decline significantly the longer they work for a company. It may be that high injury rates in the state of West Virginia would be best addressed by finding ways to encourage and facilitate companies to become more mechanized in their harvesting practices, and to increase employee tenure. Increasing the number of yearly performance inspections

  13. Allied-General operator training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, A.L.; Ebel, P.E.

    1975-01-01

    All operators at Allied-General Nuclear Services are initially trained in the basic concepts of radiation and radiation protection, they are drilled in the basic technical tools needed for further training, they are instructed in the design and operation of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, and they are introduced to the actual operations via operating procedures. This all occurs during the Before-the-Baseline training phase and then the operators move on Beyond-the-Baseline. There they physically learn how to do their job at their own pace using checklists as a guide. All operators are then internally certified. Progression is based on demonstrated ability and those that qualify go on to jobs requiring NRC licenses. Upon internal certification, retraining commences immediately and will continue in its four month, one year, and two year cycles. Current feedback from the various classes that have completed the courses and are now in the retraining program indicates that this combination of initial technical training, on-the-job training, and retraining will produce and maintain effective, safe, and efficient operators

  14. Implementation of a novel portfolio of structured, curriculum-aligned, simulation-based, cardiothoracic surgery training courses: Evolving the delivery of surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorjani, Narain; Lewis, Michael; Shah, Rajesh; Barnard, Sion; Graham, Tim; Rathinam, Sridhar

    2017-12-01

    The provision of high-quality cardiothoracic surgical training faces many challenges. This has generated an increased interest in simulation-based learning, which can provide a less stressful environment for deliberate practice. We developed a comprehensive, structured program of knowledge and simulation-based learning aligned to the official cardiothoracic surgery curriculum. A portfolio of 10 curriculum-aligned training courses was designed for cardiothoracic surgical trainees during their 6-year training program. The courses were delivered through a multitude of education methods, including live porcine operating simulation models, and were evaluated through a series of quantitative (5-point Likert-scale) and qualitative assessments. The trainees (n = 15-21 per course) also completed pre- and postsession self-confidence and competency levels for each training episode of knowledge and skill, respectively. In addition, board examination pass rates were assessed in the 3-year periods before and after implementation of the courses. Quantitative analysis of the trainees' feedback demonstrated an extremely positive view of the portfolio of the simulation-based training courses with excellent satisfaction scores (out of 5) for teaching sessions (4.44 ± 0.07), faculty (4.64 ± 0.07), content and materials (4.63 ± 0.07), and facilities (4.73 ± 0.05). The courses have shown a significant improvement in the post-self-confidence (7.98 ± 0.13 vs 5.62 ± 0.20, P < .01) and perceived self-competency (8.10 ± 0.10 vs 5.67 ± 0.11, P < .01) scores for all courses. Examination pass rates significantly improved in the 3-year period after attendance at the courses (94.82% ± 2.34% vs 76.26% ± 3.23%, P < .005). This study has described the implementation of the only extensive program of structured simulation-based courses that has been developed to complement clinical training in cardiothoracic surgery. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  15. Examining the utility of a train-the-trainer model for dissemination of sexual violence prevention in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Christine; Rabago, Jina; Reynolds, Jasmine; Gates, Kalani; Yanagida, Evie; Baker, Charlene

    2018-06-01

    Rates of childhood sexual abuse are unacceptably high, with potentially long-lasting consequences for those who have been victimized. Currently, there are a number of sexual violence prevention programs that have been developed to lower rates of victimization, increase awareness, and connect victims with resources. Within this area of research, there has been less focus on effective methods of program dissemination. For example, school-based sexual violence prevention programs have had positive outcomes; however, little is known about how these programs are disseminated. The train-the-trainer model of dissemination utilizes master trainers to equip others to implement programs, thereby allowing more adults to teach and subsequently more children to receive the program. This study used survey data from teachers and other school personnel (n = 127) to analyze the utility of a train-the-trainer model of dissemination for a sexual violence prevention program in the state of Hawai'i. Through responses of people who were trained to implement the program (59.8% of whom did implement), aspects of the training, the program itself, and factors affecting whether a person implemented the program were explored. Results suggest that time spent in training, job position, and time in that position predicted whether a person trained to implement the sexual violence prevention program followed through with teaching the program to students. Additionally, 54.7% of people who did implement the program had at least one student disclose sexual violence to them, indicating the importance of sexual violence prevention programming and dissemination of these programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating an HIV and AIDS Community Training Partnership Program in Five Diamond Mining Communities in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispel, L. C.; Peltzer, K.; Nkomo, N.; Molomo, B.

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, De Beers Consolidated Diamond Mines in South Africa entered into a partnership, with the Soul City Institute for Health and Development Communications to implement an HIV and AIDS Community Training Partnership Program (CTPP), initially in five diamond mining areas in three provinces of South Africa. The aim of CTPP was to improve HIV…

  17. The GLOBE Program in Alabama: A Mentoring Approach to State-wide Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.

    2003-12-01

    Established in 1997, the GLOBE in Alabama (GIA) partnership has trained more than 1,000 teachers in almost 500 schools - over 25% of the total number of K-12 schools in Alabama. Over those five years, GIA has strived to achieve recognition of GLOBE as the "glue" to Alabama's new education program, the Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). In 2003, GIA trained over 370 AMSTI K-8 teachers at two AMSTI hub sites in north Alabama. As the AMSTI program grows with the addition of future hub sites (eleven are planned), GIA must ready itself to train thousands of AMSTI teachers during the two-week summer professional development institutes that are part of AMSTI. A key component of AMSTI is a mentoring program conducted by math and science specialists - classroom educators loaned to the AMSTI hub sites by the school systems each hub site serves. The AMSTI mentoring program mirrors the GIA mentoring model begun in 1999 that originally funded regional GLOBE master teachers to provide technical assistance, feedback, and coaching for other GLOBE teachers. In schools where GIA mentor teachers were working, nearly a 100% increase in GLOBE student data reporting was noted. The GIA mentors now work within the hub site framework to ensure implementation of GLOBE as an integrated part of AMSTI. With the continued support of the State of Alabama, GIA will establish a network of mentors who work with the AMSTI hub site specialists in providing support for all AMSTI teachers. GIA is administered by the National Space Science and Technology Center, a partnership between NASA and the State of Alabama's seven research universities. Operational funding for GIA has been provided by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Earth System Science Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, the Alabama State Department of Education, and Legacy. GIA has been able to build on these

  18. Injuries in women associated with a periodized strength training and running program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, K L; Harman, E A; Worsham, R E; Sykes, M B; Frykman, P N; Backus, V L

    2001-02-01

    Forty-five women participated in a 24-week physical training program designed to improve lifting, load carriage, and running performance. Activities included weightlifting, running, backpacking, lift and carry drills, and sprint running. Physicians documented by passive surveillance all training-related injuries. Thirty-two women successfully completed training program. Twenty-two women (48.9%) suffered least 1 injury during training, but only 2 women had to drop out of the study because of injuries. The rate of injury associated with lost training time was 2.8 injuries per 1,000 training hours of exposure. Total clinic visits and days lost from training were 89 and 69, respectively. Most injuries were the overuse type involving the lower back, knees, and feet. Weightlifting accounted for a majority of the lost training days. A combined strength training and running program resulted in significant performance gains in women. Only 2 out of 45 participants left the training program cause of injuries.

  19. Can training improve human performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waylett, W.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear industry has made a significant commitment to improve training through the implementation of performance-based training programs. Senior management expects that human performance improvement will result from this significant resource allocation. The author examines this hypothesis and discusses other issues that may interfere with enhancing human performance through training. The integration of quality improvement concepts to support training is also discussed by the author, who was a pioneer facilitator during the development of Florida Power and Light Company's Quality Improvement Program. Critical success factors are proposed based on the author's experience as a plant manager, training manager and quality facilitator

  20. Physical Training for Long-Duration Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, James A; Guilliams, Mark E; Petersen, Nora; Hirsch, Natalie; Kawashima, Shino; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Physical training has been conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) for the past 10 yr as a countermeasure to physiological deconditioning during spaceflight. Each member space agency has developed its own approach to creating and implementing physical training protocols for their astronauts. We have divided physical training into three distinct phases (preflight, in-flight, and postflight) and provided a description of each phase with its constraints and limitations. We also discuss how each member agency (NASA, ESA, CSA, and JAXA) prescribed physical training for their crewmembers during the first 10 yr of ISS operations. It is important to understand the operational environment, the agency responsible for the physical training program, and the constraints and limitations associated with spaceflight to accurately design and implement exercise training or interpret the exercise data collected on ISS. As exploration missions move forward, resolving agency differences in physical training programs will become important to maximizing the effectiveness of exercise as a countermeasure and minimizing any mission impacts.

  1. 14 CFR 91.1097 - Pilot and flight attendant crewmember training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot and flight attendant crewmember... RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1097 Pilot and flight attendant crewmember training programs. (a) Each program manager must establish and maintain an approved pilot training program...

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE TRAINING PROGRAM (DIKLATPIM TO INCREASE THE QUALITY OF LEADERSHIP (LEADERSHIP OF CIVIL SERVANTS IN THE OFFICE OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT DISTRICT OF AGAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Amaluis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The principal functions of human resources management, there is a function evaluation. Program training as one strategy for human resource development that requires function evaluation to determine the effectiveness of a training Program. On the Organization of the public sector, the implementation of a training Program is set based on the Government Regulation No. 101 in 2000. Training programs for civil servants aims to improve the ability of lead as well as performance improvements. In this study, the intended training program is a level III leadership Training. This research aims to quantify relationships training programme to improve the quality of leadership. Respondents consisted of 96 people level III Leadership Training Program evaluation method using the method of Kirkpatrick & Kirkpatrick. Analysis of the correlation used is simple by looking at the significance of the values between variables. Based on the research results obtained that the only training Program correlates on taraf was strong but not significantly to improve the quality of leadership. From this research can be disimpulan that the organizers of the training program is considered necessary to conduct a training needs Analysis in depth, so knowable Competency Gapsetiap potential participants and prepare a suitable training method to improve the Gap.

  3. Evaluation of a teacher training program to enhance executive functions in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Laura M; Evers, Wiebke F; Quante, Sonja; Hille, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) play a critical role in cognitive and social development. During preschool years, children show not only rapid improvement in their EFs, but also appear sensitive to developmentally appropriate interventions. EMIL is a training program for German preschool teachers that was developed and implemented to improve the EFs of preschoolers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate its effects on the EFs of children between three and six years old. The teacher training (eight sessions, 28.5 hours) was implemented in four preschools. The EFs of children of the intervention group (n = 72, 32 girls, Mage = 48 months) and the control group of four other matched preschools (n = 61, 27 girls, Mage = 48 months) were tested before, during, and after the intervention using different measures assessing working memory, inhibitory control, and cognitive flexibility. The intervention group showed significant gains on three out of seven EF tests (behavioral inhibition, visual-spatial working memory, and combined EFs) compared to the control group. Post hoc analyses for children with low initial EFs scores revealed that participation in the intervention led to significant gains in inhibitory control, visual-spatial working memory, and phonological working memory as well as a marginally significant difference for combined EFs. However, effect sizes were rather small. The results suggest that teacher training can lead to significant improvements in preschooler's EFs. Although preliminary, the results could contribute to the discussion on how teacher training can facilitate the improvement of EFs in preschool children.

  4. Forty years of training program in the JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    This report is to compile the past training program of researchers, engineers and regulatory members at the NuTEC (Nuclear Technology and Education Center) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the past basic seminars for the public, in addition to advice and perspective on the future program from relevant experts, in commemoration of the forty years of the NuTEC. It covers the past five years of educational courses and seminars in utilization of radioisotopes and nuclear energy for domestic and for international training provided at Tokyo and Tokai Education Centers and covers the activity of the Asia-Pacific nuclear technology transfer, including the activity of various committees and meetings. Especially, fifty six experts and authorities have contributed to the report with positive advice and perspective on the training program in the 21st century based on their reminiscences. (author)

  5. Pharmacists' views on implementing a disease state management program for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Shaheed, Christina; Maher, Christopher G; Williams, Kylie A; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacists have the potential to take a lead role in the primary care management of people with acute low back pain. The aim of this study was to investigate pharmacists' views on implementing a care program for people with acute low back pain in the community pharmacy. Recruitment of pharmacists for this study took place between July 2012 and March 2013. A convenience sample of 30 pharmacists who collaborated in recruiting participants for a low back pain clinical trial in Sydney (n=15 pharmacist recruiters and n=15 non-recruiters) completed an open-ended questionnaire. There was no marked variation in responses between the two groups. Participating pharmacists were receptive to the idea of implementing a care program for people with low back pain, highlighting the need for adequate reimbursement and adequate training of staff to ensure it is successful. Pharmacists identified that the follow up of people receiving such a service is dependent on several factors such as effective reminder systems and the proximity of patients to the pharmacy.

  6. Application of Higher Diploma Program training skills

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RPO

    This article examines the application Higher Diploma training skills in classroom instruction as .... the intention of articulating the extent to which the ... graduates are applying HDP training skills ... HDP) to revisit their procedure, which result ..... not believe in the usefulness of the ... of this study perceived CPD as a program.

  7. Development of a national sport event risk management training program for college command groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Homeland Security identified college sport venues as terrorist targets due to the potential for mass casualties and catastrophic social and economic impact. Therefore, it is critical for college sport safety and security personnel to implement effective risk management practices. However, deficiencies have been identified in the level of preparedness of college sport event security personnel related to risk management training and effective emergency response capabilities. To address the industry need, the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security designed, developed, and evaluated a national sport event risk management training program for National Collegiate Athletic Association command groups. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the design, development, and evaluation process.

  8. Postdeployment military mental health training: cross-national evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Heather M; Garber, Bryan G; Zamorski, Mark A; Wray, Mariane; Mulligan, Kathleen; Greenberg, Neil; Castro, Carl Andrew; Adler, Amy B

    2013-05-01

    Deployments increase risk for adjustment problems in service members. To mitigate this increased risk, mental health training programs have been developed and implemented in several nations. As part of a coordinated effort, three nations adapted a U.S. mental health training program that had been validated by a series of group randomized trials demonstrating improvement in postdeployment adjustment. Implementation of evidence-based programs in a new context is challenging: How much of the original program needs to remain intact in order to retain its utility? User satisfaction rates can provide essential data to assess how well a program is accepted. This article summarizes service member ratings of postdeployment mental health training and compares ratings from service members across four nations. The participating nations (Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and the United States) administered mental health training to active duty military personnel in their respective nations. Following the training, military personnel completed an evaluation of the training. Overall, across the four nations, more than 70% of military personnel agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied with the mental health training. Although some differences in evaluations were observed across nations, components of training that were most important to overall satisfaction with the training were strikingly similar across nations. Fundamentally, it appears feasible that despite cultural and organizational differences, a mental health training program developed in one nation can be successfully adapted for use in other nations. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. COMPLEX TRAINING: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Ebben

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of plyometric training is well supported by research. Complex training has gained popularity as a training strategy combining weight training and plyometric training. Anecdotal reports recommend training in this fashion in order to improve muscular power and athletic performance. Recently, several studies have examined complex training. Despite the fact that questions remain about the potential effectiveness and implementation of this type of training, results of recent studies are useful in guiding practitioners in the development and implementation of complex training programs. In some cases, research suggests that complex training has an acute ergogenic effect on upper body power and the results of acute and chronic complex training include improved jumping performance. Improved performance may require three to four minutes rest between the weight training and plyometrics sets and the use of heavy weight training loads

  10. Nuclear Power Reactor simulator - based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear power stations will continue playing a major role as an energy source for electric generation and heat production in the world. in this paper, a nuclear power reactor simulator- based training program will be presented . this program is designed to aid in training of the reactor operators about the principles of operation of the plant. also it could help the researchers and the designers to analyze and to estimate the performance of the nuclear reactors and facilitate further studies for selection of the proper controller and its optimization process as it is difficult and time consuming to do all experiments in the real nuclear environment.this program is written in MATLAB code as MATLAB software provides sophisticated tools comparable to those in other software such as visual basic for the creation of graphical user interface (GUI). moreover MATLAB is available for all major operating systems. the used SIMULINK reactor model for the nuclear reactor can be used to model different types by adopting appropriate parameters. the model of each component of the reactor is based on physical laws rather than the use of look up tables or curve fitting.this simulation based training program will improve acquisition and retention knowledge also trainee will learn faster and will have better attitude

  11. Instituting Learning-By-Doing Practices in Training Programs for Technical Writers, Usability Testers, and Translators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Isohella, Suvi; Mara, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract - This workshop focuses on how to implement and grow highly successful and realistic learning-by-doing approaches to teaching and training professional communicators by connecting students from across the globe and across academic language programs. Workshop participants learn the method...... that instructors from the Trans-Atlantic & Pacific Project use when they form students enrolled in technical writing, usability testing, and translation courses into multilingual cross-cultural virtual teams....

  12. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  13. Training program for students and young engineers in JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Suzuki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The JMTR is expected to be a key infrastructure to contribute the nuclear Human Resource Development (HRD) by a research and On-Job-Training (OJT) in order to support global expansion of nuclear power industry. The training program for Asian young researchers and engineers were started from JFY 2011 in JAEA, and ten trainees from Kazakhstan and Thailand had attended in this program in JFY 2011. In addition, in the nuclear HRD initiative program sponsored by the MEXT, the training course was newly established for domestic students and young engineers from JFY 2010 to JFY 2012. In this course, basic understanding on irradiation test and post irradiation examination is aimed to achieve by overall and practical training such as the neutronic/thermal designs of irradiation capsule, post irradiation examination, measurement and evaluation of neutron fluence, etc. using the JMTR and the related facilities. The 1st training course was held with 10 trainees in JFY 2010. The 2nd and 3rd training courses were also held with 19 trainees and 16 trainees in JFY 2011. From JFY 2012, two courses will be held in every year, and 20 trainees will be accepted in each course. (author)

  14. Training program for students and young engineers in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The JMTR is expected to be a key infrastructure to contribute the nuclear Human Resource Development (HRD) by a research and On-Job-Training (OJT) in order to support global expansion of nuclear power industry. The training program for Asian young researchers and engineers were started from JFY 2011 in JAEA, and ten trainees from Kazakhstan and Thailand had attended in this program in JFY 2011. In addition, in the nuclear HRD initiative program sponsored by the MEXT, the training course was newly established for domestic students and young engineers from JFY 2010 to JFY 2012. In this course, basic understanding on irradiation test and post irradiation examination is aimed to achieve by overall and practical training such as the neutronic/thermal designs of irradiation capsule, post irradiation examination, measurement and evaluation of neutron fluence, etc. using the JMTR and the related facilities. The 1st training course was held with 10 trainees in JFY 2010. The 2nd and 3rd training courses were also held with 19 trainees and 16 trainees in JFY 2011. From JFY 2012, two courses will be held in every year, and 20 trainees will be accepted in each course. (author)

  15. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, John; Boninger, Michael; Helkowski, Wendy; Braddom-Ritzler, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Physician scientists are seen as important in healthcare research. However, the number of physician scientists and their success in obtaining NIH funding have been declining for many years. The shortage of physician scientists in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is particularly severe, and can be attributed to many of the same factors that affect physician scientists in general, as well as to the lack of well developed models for research training. In 1995, the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program (RMSTP) was funded by a K12 grant from the National Center of Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR), as one strategy for increasing the number of research-productive physiatrists. The RMSTP's structure was revised in 2001 to improve the level of preparation of incoming trainees, and to provide a stronger central mentorship support network. Here we describe the original and revised structure of the RMSTP and review subjective and objective data on the productivity of the trainees who have completed the program. These data suggest that RMSTP trainees are, in general, successful in obtaining and maintaining academic faculty positions and that the productivity of the cohort trained after the revision, in particular, shows impressive growth after about 3 years of training. PMID:19847126

  16. Overview of implementation of DARPA GPU program in SAIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunreiter, Dennis; Furtek, Jeremy; Chen, Hai-Wen; Healy, Dennis

    2008-04-01

    This paper reviews the implementation of DARPA MTO STAP-BOY program for both Phase I and II conducted at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The STAP-BOY program conducts fast covariance factorization and tuning techniques for space-time adaptive process (STAP) Algorithm Implementation on Graphics Processor unit (GPU) Architectures for Embedded Systems. The first part of our presentation on the DARPA STAP-BOY program will focus on GPU implementation and algorithm innovations for a prototype radar STAP algorithm. The STAP algorithm will be implemented on the GPU, using stream programming (from companies such as PeakStream, ATI Technologies' CTM, and NVIDIA) and traditional graphics APIs. This algorithm will include fast range adaptive STAP weight updates and beamforming applications, each of which has been modified to exploit the parallel nature of graphics architectures.

  17. Establishment of Oversea HRD Network and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.

    2008-02-01

    The project deals with establishment of international network for human resources and the development of international nuclear education and training programs. The primary result is the establishment of KAERI International Nuclear R and D Academy as a new activity on cooperation for human resource development and building network. For this purpose, KAERI concluded the MOU with Vietnamese Universities and selected 3 students to provide Master and Ph. D. Courses in 2008. KAERI also held the 3rd World Nuclear University Summer Institute, in which some 150 international nuclear professionals attended for 6 weeks. Also, as part of regional networking, the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) was promoted through development of a cyber platform and accomplishment the first IAEA e-training course. There were 3 kind of development activities for the international cooperation of human resources development. Firstly, the project provided training courses on nuclear energ