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Sample records for implanted silicon oxide

  1. Segregation of boron implanted into silicon on angular configurations of silicon/silicon dioxide oxidation interface

    CERN Document Server

    Tarnavskij, G A; Obrekht, M S

    2001-01-01

    One studies segregation of boron implanted into silicon when a wave (interface) of oxidation moves within it. There are four types of angular configurations of SiO sub 2 /Si oxidation interface, that is: direct and reverse shoulders, trench type cavities and a square. By means of computer-aided simulation one obtained and analyzed complex patterns of B concentration distribution within Si, SiO sub 2 domains and at SiO sub 2 /Si interface for all types of angular configurations of the oxidation interface

  2. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  3. Effects of Cl+ and F+ implantation of oxidation-induced stacking faults in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.Y.; Bronsveld, P.M.; Boom, G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1984-01-01

    Three implantation effects were investigated in floating-zone-grown silicon: (a) the effect of Cl+ implantation resulting in the shrinkage of oxidation-induced stacking faults; (b) the effect of F+ implantation giving rise to defaulting of the 1/3 [111] Frank dislocations into 1/2[110] perfect

  4. Waveguiding properties of Er-implanted silicon-rich oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliman, R.G.; Forcales, M.; Wilkinson, A.R.; Smith, N.J.

    2007-01-01

    The optical properties of erbium-doped silicon-rich silicon-oxide waveguides containing amorphous silicon nanoclusters and/or silicon nanocrystals are reported. Both amorphous nanoclusters and nanocrystals are shown to act as effective sensitizers for Er, with nanocrystals being more effective at low pump powers and nanoclusters being more effective at higher pump powers. All samples are shown to exhibit photo-induced absorption, as measured for a guided 1.5 μm probe beam while the waveguide was illuminated from above with a 477 nm pump beam. At a given pump power samples containing silicon nanocrystals exhibited greater attenuation than samples containing amorphous nanoclusters. The absorption is shown to be consistent with confined-carrier absorption due to photoexcited carriers in the nanocrystals and/or nanoclusters

  5. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  6. Oxidation-enhanced diffusion of boron in very low-energy N2+-implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarlatos, D.; Tsamis, C.; Perego, M.; Fanciulli, M.

    2005-06-01

    In this article we study the interstitial injection during oxidation of very low-energy nitrogen-implanted silicon. Buried boron δ layers are used to monitor the interstitial supersaturation during the oxidation of nitrogen-implanted silicon. No difference in boron diffusivity enhancement was observed compared to dry oxidation of nonimplanted samples. This result is different from our experience from N2O oxynitridation study, during which a boron diffusivity enhancement of the order of 20% was observed, revealing the influence of interfacial nitrogen on interstitial kinetics. A possible explanation may be that implanted nitrogen acts as an excess interstitial sink in order to diffuse towards the surface via a non-Fickian mechanism. This work completes a wide study of oxidation of very low-energy nitrogen-implanted silicon related phenomena we performed within the last two years [D. Skarlatos, C. Tsamis, and D. Tsoukalas, J. Appl. Phys. 93, 1832 (2003); D. Skarlatos, E. Kapetanakis, P. Normand, C. Tsamis, M. Perego, S. Ferrari, M. Fanciulli, and D. Tsoukalas, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 300 (2004)].

  7. Microstructure and magnetooptics of silicon oxide with implanted nickel nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edel’man, I. S.; Petrov, D. A.; Ivantsov, R. D.; Zharkov, S. M.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Metallic nickel nanoparticles of various sizes are formed in a thin near-surface layer in an amorphous SiO 2 matrix during 40-keV Ni + ion implantation at a dose of (0.25−1.0) × 10 17 ions/cm 2 . The micro-structure of the irradiated layer and the crystal structure, morphology, and sizes of nickel particles formed at various irradiation doses are studied by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The magnetooptical Faraday effect and the magnetic circular dichroism in an ensemble of nickel nanoparticles are studied in the optical range. The permittivity ε tensor components are calculated for the implanted samples using an effective medium model with allowance for the results of magnetooptical measurements. The spectral dependences of the tensor ε components are found to be strongly different from those of a continuous metallic nickel film. These differences are related to a disperse structure of the magnetic nickel phase and to a surface plasma resonance in the metal nanoparticles.

  8. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichel, Christian; Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.; Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiO x /c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF 2 ), the ion implantation dose (5 × 10 14  cm −2 to 1 × 10 16  cm −2 ), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iV oc ) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF 2 implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iV oc of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iV oc of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved V oc of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF 2 implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with V oc of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts

  9. The effects of trichloroethane HCl and ion-implantation on the oxidation rate of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, W.; Ahmed, E.

    1994-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of silicon was studied using a large-scale industrial oxidation system. The characteristics of the oxides resulting from pure hydrogen/oxygen (Hsub(2)/Osub(2)), trichloroethane/oxygen (TCA/Osub(2) and hydrogen chloride/oxygen (HCI/Osub(2)) mixtures are compared. Both HCI and TCA addition to oxygen produced an enhanced oxidation rate. The oxidation rate for TCA/Osub(2) was approximately 30-40% higher than for HCI/Osub(2) mixtures. A molar ratio of TCA/Osub(2) of 1% gives an optimum process for very-large-scale industrial (VLSI) applications. However, 3% HCI/Osub(2) gives comparable results to 1% TCA. In addition, boron and phosphorus implantation are observed to increase the oxidation rate. Phosphorus doping of the silicon yields a higher rate than boron-doped wafers. This behaviour is explained in terms of surface damage and chemistry. It appears that the overall mechanisms governing all these processes are similar. (8 figures, 22 references) (Author)

  10. Experimental studies of thorium ion implantation from pulse laser plasma into thin silicon oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyuk, P. V.; Chubunova, E. V.; Lebedinskii, Yu Yu; Tkalya, E. V.; Vasilyev, O. S.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Strugovshchikov, E.; Mamedov, D.; Pishtshev, A.; Karazhanov, S. Zh

    2018-05-01

    We report the results of experimental studies related to implantation of thorium ions into thin silicon dioxide by pulsed plasma flux expansion. Thorium ions were generated by laser ablation from a metal target, and the ionic component of the laser plasma was accelerated in an electric field created by the potential difference (5, 10 and 15 kV) between the ablated target and a SiO2/Si (0 0 1) sample. The laser ablation system installed inside the vacuum chamber of the electron spectrometer was equipped with a YAG:Nd3  +  laser having a pulse energy of 100 mJ and time duration of 15 ns in the Q-switched regime. The depth profile of thorium atoms implanted into the 10 nm thick subsurface areas together with their chemical state as well as the band gap of the modified silicon oxide at different conditions of implantation processes were studied by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and reflected electron energy loss spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the chemical composition showed that the modified silicon oxide film contains complex thorium silicates. Depending on the local concentration of thorium atoms, the experimentally established band gaps were located in the range 6.0–9.0 eV. Theoretical studies of the optical properties of the SiO2 and ThO2 crystalline systems were performed by ab initio calculations within hybrid functional. The optical properties of the SiO2/ThO2 composite were interpreted on the basis of the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. A quantitative assessment of the yield of isomeric nuclei in ‘hot’ laser plasma at the early stages of expansion was performed. The estimates made with experimental results demonstrated that the laser implantation of thorium ions into the SiO2 matrix can be useful for further research of low-lying isomeric transitions in a 229Th isotope with energy of 7.8 +/- 0.5 eV.

  11. Silicon technologies ion implantation and thermal treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrant, Annie

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to remind new engineers in silicon foundry, the fundamental physical and chemical rules in major Front end treatments: oxidation, epitaxy, ion implantation and impurities diffusion.

  12. Effect of annealing and oxide layer thickness on doping profiles shape of ''through-oxide'' implanted P+ ions in textured silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dessouki, M.S.; Galloni, R.

    1987-10-01

    Phosphorous ions at energies of 60+100 KeV, and doses (4+5)x10 15 atom/cm 2 have been implanted randomly through SiO 2 layers into textured silicon crystals. The penetration profiles of the P + ions have been determined by means of differential sheet resistivity and Hall-effect, together with the anodic oxidation stripping technique. The effect of the oxide layer thickness, annealing temperature on the junction properties has been studied. The damage produced by implantation, has also been investigated using transmission electron microscope (TEM). From the mobility measurements of the free carriers as a function of depth through the junction, two minima have been observed in through oxide implanted samples. The one nearer to the Si-SiO 2 interface (at about 200A from the interface) was related to the damage produced by the recoil oxygen atoms from the oxide layer into silicon. The deeper minimum is lying at ∼ 0.2μm from the interface and was attributed to the damage produced by the implanted P + ions, which caused clusters and defect loops after annealing. This damage was observed through TEM photographs. The optimum conditions for producing shallow junction without losing much of the implanted P + ions through the oxide layer were estimated. (author). 22 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  13. Arsenic implantation into polycrystalline silicon and diffusion to silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, K.; Akasaka, Y.; Horie, K.

    1977-01-01

    Arsenic implantation into polycrystalline silicon and drive-in diffusion to silicon substrate have been investigated by MeV He + backscattering analysis and also by electrical measurements. The range distributions of arsenic implanted into polycrystalline silicon are well fitted to Gaussian distributions over the energy range 60--350 keV. The measured values of R/sub P/ and ΔR/sub P/ are about 10 and 20% larger than the theoretical predictions, respectively. The effective diffusion coefficient of arsenic implanted into polycrystalline silicon is expressed as D=0.63 exp[(-3.22 eV/kT)] and is independent of the arsenic concentration. The drive-in diffusion of arsenic from the implanted polycrystalline silicon layer into the silicon substrate is significantly affected by the diffusion atmosphere. In the N 2 atmosphere, a considerable amount of arsenic atoms diffuses outward to the ambient. The outdiffusion can be suppressed by encapsulation with Si 3 N 4 . In the oxidizing atmosphere, arsenic atoms are driven inward by growing SiO 2 due to the segregation between SiO 2 and polycrystalline silicon, and consequently the drive-in diffusion of arsenic is enhanced. At the interface between the polycrystalline silicon layer and the silicon substrate, arsenic atoms are likely to segregate at the polycrystalline silicon side

  14. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  15. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse M; Conrad, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Implant rupture is a well-known complication of breast implant surgery that can pass unnoticed by both patient and physician. To date, no prospective study has addressed the possible health implications of silicone breast implant rupture. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether untre...

  16. Implantation damage in silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation, is an attractive technique for producing doped layers in silicon devices but the implantation process involves disruption of the lattice and defects are formed, which can degrade device properties. Methods of minimizing such damage are discussed and direct comparisons made between implantation and diffusion techniques in terms of defects in the final devices and the electrical performance of the devices. Defects are produced in the silicon lattice during implantation but they are annealed to form secondary defects even at room temperature. The annealing can be at a low temperature ( 0 C) when migration of defects in silicon in generally small, or at high temperature when they can grow well beyond the implanted region. The defect structures can be complicated by impurity atoms knocked into the silicon from surface layers by the implantation. Defects can also be produced within layers on top of the silicon and these can be very important in device fabrication. In addition to affecting the electrical properties of the final device, defects produced during fabrication may influence the chemical properties of the materials. The use of these properties to improve devices are discussed as well as the degradation they can cause. (author)

  17. Implantation of boron in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofker, W.K.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution versus depth of boron implanted in silicon and the corresponding electrical activity obtained after annealing are studied. The boron distributions are measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Boron distributions implanted at energies in the range from 30 keV to 800 keV in amorphous and polycrystalline silicon are analysed. Moments of these distributions are determined by a curve-fitting programme and compared with moments calculated by Winterbon. Boron distributions obtained by implantations along a dense crystallographic direction in monocrystalline silicon are found to have penetrating tails. After investigation of some possible mechanisms of tail formation it is concluded that the tails are due to channelling. It was found that the behaviour of boron during annealing is determined by the properties of three boron fractions consisting of precipitated boron, interstitial boron and substitutional boron. The electrical activity of the boron versus depth is found to be consistent with the three boron fractions. A peculiar redistribution of boron is found which is induced by the implantation of a high dose of heavy ions and subsequent annealing. Different mechanisms which may cause the observed effects, such as thermal diffusion which is influenced by lattice strain and damage, are discussed. (Auth.)

  18. Electrochemical properties of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham minh Tan.

    1979-11-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of ion implanted silicon in contact with hydrofluoric acid solution was investigated. It was shown that the implanted layer on silicon changes profoundly its electrochemical properties (photopotential, interface impedance, rest potential, corrosion, current-potential behaviour, anodic dissolution of silicon, redox reaction). These changes depend strongly on the implantation parameters such as ion dose, ion energy, thermal treatment and ion mass and are weakly dependent on the chemical nature of the implantation ion. The experimental results were evaluated and interpreted in terms of the semiconductor electrochemical concepts taking into account the interaction of energetic ions with the solid surface. The observed effects are thus attributed to the implantation induced damage of silicon lattice and can be used for profiling of the implanted layer and the electrochemical treatment of the silicon surface. (author)

  19. Effects of ion implantation on charges in the silicon--silicon dioxide system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learn, A.J.; Hess, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Structures consisting of thermally grown oxide on silicon were implanted with boron, arsenic, or argon ions. For argon implantation through oxides, an increased fixed oxide charge (Q/sub ss/) was observed with the increase being greater for than for silicon. This effect is attributed to oxygen recoil which produces additional excess ionized silicon in the oxide of a type similar to that arising in thermal oxidation. Fast surface state (N/sub st/) generation was also noted which in most cases obscured the Q/sub ss/ increase. Of various heat treatments tested, only a 900 degreeC anneal in hydrogen annihilated N/sub st/ and allowed Q/sub ss/ measurement. Such N/sub st/ apparently arises as a consequence of implantation damage at the silicon--silicon dioxide interface. With the exception of boron implantations into thick oxides or through aluminum electrodes, reduction of the mobile ionic charge (Q/sub o/) was achieved by implantation. The reduction again is presumably damage related and is not negated by high-temperature annealing but may be counterbalanced by aluminum incorporation in the oxide

  20. Fracture dynamics in implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massy, D.; Tardif, S.; Penot, J. D.; Ragani, J.; Rieutord, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Mazen, F.; Madeira, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Landru, D.; Kononchuk, O. [SOITEC, Parc Technologique des Fontaines, 38190 Bernin (France)

    2015-08-31

    Crack propagation in implanted silicon for thin layer transfer is experimentally studied. The crack propagation velocity as a function of split temperature is measured using a designed optical setup. Interferometric measurement of the gap opening is performed dynamically and shows an oscillatory crack “wake” with a typical wavelength in the centimetre range. The dynamics of this motion is modelled using beam elasticity and thermodynamics. The modelling demonstrates the key role of external atmospheric pressure during crack propagation. A quantification of the amount of gas trapped inside pre-existing microcracks and released during the fracture is made possible, with results consistent with previous studies.

  1. Characterization of silicon oxynitride films prepared by the simultaneous implantation of oxygen and nitrogen ions into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hezel, R.; Streb, W.

    1985-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride films about 5 nm in thickness were prepared by simultaneously implanting 5 keV oxygen and nitrogen ions into silicon at room temperature up to saturation. These films with concentrations ranging from pure silicon oxide to silicon nitride were characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and depth-concentration profiling. The different behaviour of the silicon oxynitride films compared with those of silicon oxide and silicon nitride with regard to thermal stability and hardness against electron and argon ion irradiation is pointed out. (Auth.)

  2. Silver nanoparticle formation in thin oxide layer on silicon by silver-negative-ion implantation for Coulomb blockade at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Arai, Nobutoshi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Ueno, Kazuya; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Adachi, Kouichiro; Kotaki, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2004-01-01

    Formation of silver nanoparticles formed by silver negative-ion implantation in a thin SiO 2 layer and its I-V characteristics were investigated for development single electron devices. In order to obtain effective Coulomb blockade phenomenon at room temperature, the isolated metal nanoparticles should be in very small size and be formed in a thin insulator layer such as gate oxide on the silicon substrate. Therefore, conditions of a fine particles size, high particle density and narrow distribution should be controlled at their formation without any electrical breakdown of the thin insulator layer. We have used a negative-ion implantation technique with an advantage of 'charge-up free' for insulators, with which no breakdown of thin oxide layer on Si was obtained. In the I-V characteristics with Au electrode, the current steps were observed with a voltage interval of about 0.12 V. From the step voltage the corresponded capacitance was calculated to be 0.7 aF. In one nanoparticle system, this value of capacitance could be given by a nanoparticle of about 3 nm in diameter. This consideration is consistent to the measured particle size in the cross-sectional TEM observation. Therefore, the observed I-V characteristics with steps are considered to be Coulomb staircase by the Ag nanoparticles

  3. Laser annealing of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.; Narayan, J.; Young, R.T.

    1978-11-01

    The physical and electrical properties of ion implanted silicon annealed with high powered ruby laser radiation are summarized. Results show that pulsed laser annealing can lead to a complete removal of extended defects in the implanted region accompanied by incorporation of dopants into lattice sites even when their concentration far exceeds the solid solubility limit

  4. Study of high energy ion implantation of boron and oxygen in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thevenin, P.

    1991-06-01

    Three aspects of high energy (0.5-3 MeV) light ions ( 11 B + and 16 O + ) implantation in silicon are examined: (1)Spatial repartition; (2) Target damage and (3) Synthesis by oxygen implantation of a buried silicon oxide layer

  5. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimbert, J.

    1999-01-01

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  6. Implant damage and redistribution of indium in indium-implanted thin silicon-on-insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peng; An Zhenghua; Zhu Ming; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Montgomery, Neil; Biswas, Sukanta

    2004-01-01

    The indium implant damage and diffusion behavior in thin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) with a 200 nm top silicon layer were studied for different implantation energies and doses. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in the channeling mode (RBS/C) was used to characterize the implant damage before and after annealing. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to study the indium transient enhanced diffusion (TED) behavior in the top Si layer of the SOI structure. An anomalous redistribution of indium after relatively high energy (200 keV) and dose (1 x 10 14 cm -2 ) implantation was observed in both bulk Si and SOI substrates. However, there exist differences in these two substrates that are attributable to the more predominant out-diffusion of indium as well as the influence of the buried oxide layer in the SOI structure

  7. Rapid thermal annealing of phosphorus implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.H.; Pogany, A.; Harrison, H.B.; Williams, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of phosphorus-implanted silicon has been investigated by four point probe, Van der Pauw methods and transmission electron microscopy. The results have been compared to furnace annealing. Experiments show that RTA, even at temperatures as low as 605 deg C, results in good electrical properties with little remnant damage and compares favourably with furnace annealing

  8. Depth resolved investigations of boron implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztucki, M.; Metzger, T. H.; Milita, S.; Berberich, F.; Schell, N.; Rouvière, J. L.; Patel, J.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the depth distribution and structure of defects in boron implanted silicon (0 0 1). Silicon wafers were implanted with a boron dose of 6×10 15 ions/cm -2 at 32 keV and went through different annealing treatments. Using diffuse X-ray scattering at grazing incidence and exit angles we are able to distinguish between different kinds of defects (point defect clusters and extrinsic stacking faults on {1 1 1} planes) and to determine their depth distribution as a function of the thermal budget. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to gain complementary information. In addition we have determined the strain distribution caused by the boron implantation as a function of depth from rocking curve measurements.

  9. PENIS ENLARGEMENT USING SILICONE SHELL IMPLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Adamyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. To date, the vast majority of penis thickening techniques based on the patient's own tissue. Methods with synthetic autotransplants are often inefficient, or accompanied by a large number of complications. In the article the technique of thickening the penis using specially designed enveloped silicone implants is described. During the procedure, silicone shell implants are inserted under the Buck’s fascia in the previously prepared tunnels. This placement of implants prevents their offset. At the moment, 15 operations is made successfully. The absolute majority of the patients are satisfied with the result. The uniqueness of the presented method is ease of performance, high efficiency with minimal rehabilitation period. The technique can be recommended for plastic surgeons and urologists. 

  10. Simulations of Proton Implantation in Silicon Carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Simulations of Proton Implantation in Silicon Carbide (SiC) Jonathan P. McCandless, Hailong Chen, Philip X.-L. Feng Electrical Engineering, Case...of implanting protons (hydrogen ions, H+) into SiC thin layers on silicon (Si) substrate, and explore the ion implantation conditions that are...relevant to experimental radiation of SiC layers. Keywords: silicon carbide (SiC); radiation effects; ion implantation ; proton; stopping and range of

  11. Annealing of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivers, D.; Smith, B.J.; Stephen, J.; Fisher, M.

    1980-09-01

    The newer uses of ion implantation require a higher dose rate. This has led to the introduction of high beam current implanters; the wafers move in front of a stationary beam to give a scanning effect. This can lead to non-uniform heating of the wafer. Variations in the sheet resistance of the layers can be very non-uniform following thermal annealing. Non-uniformity in the effective doping both over a single wafer and from one wafer to another, can affect the usefulness of ion implantation in high dose rate applications. Experiments to determine the extent of non-uniformity in sheet resistance, and to see if it is correlated to the annealing scheme have been carried out. Details of the implantation parameters are given. It was found that best results were obtained when layers were annealed at the maximum possible temperature. For arsenic, phosphorus and antimony layers, improvements were observed up to 1200 0 C and boron up to 950 0 C. Usually, it is best to heat the layer directly to the maximum temperature to produce the most uniform layer; with phosphorus layers however it is better to pre-heat to 1050 0 C. (U.K.)

  12. Behavior of ion-implanted cesium in silicon dioxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbein, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Charged impurities in silicon dioxide can be used to controllably shift the flatband voltage of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices independently of the substrate doping, the gate oxide thickness and the gate-electrode work function. Cesium is particularly well suited for this purpose because it is immobile in SiO 2 at normal device operating temperatures, and because it can be controllably introduced into oxide films by ion implantation. Cesium is positively charged in silicon dioxide, resulting in a negative flatband voltage shift. Possible applications for cesium technology include solar cells, devices operated at liquid nitrogen temperature, and power devices. The goal of this work has been to characterize as many aspects of cesium behavior in silicon dioxide as are required for practical applications. Accordingly, cesium-ion implantation, cesium diffusion, and cesium electrical activation in SiO 2 were studied over a broad range of processing conditions. The electrical properties of cesium-containing oxides, including current-voltage characteristics, interface trap density, and inversion-layer carrier mobility were examined, and several potential applications for cesium technology have been experimentally demonstrated

  13. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A

    2015-08-01

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition.

  14. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E.; Walker, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition. (orig.)

  15. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E. [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Pathology, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Walker, Eric A. [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bethesda, MD, 20814 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition. (orig.)

  16. Cutaneous Silicone Granuloma Mimicking Breast Cancer after Ruptured Breast Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations due to migration of silicone from ruptured implants are rare. Migrated silicone with cutaneous involvement has been found in the chest wall, abdominal wall, and lower extremities. We describe a case of cutaneous silicone granuloma in the breast exhibiting unusual growth mimicking breast cancer after a ruptured implant.

  17. Laser annealing of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.; Appleton, B.R.; Wilson, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    Pulsed laser annealing of ion implanted silicon leads to the formation of supersaturated alloys by nonequilibrium crystal growth processes at the interface occurring during liquid phase epitaxial regrowth. The interfacial distribution coefficients from the melt (k') and the maximum substitutional solubilities (C/sub s//sup max/) are far greater than equilibrium values. Both K' and C/sub s//sup max/ are functions of growth velocity. Mechanisms limiting substitutional solubilities are discussed. 5 figures, 2 tables

  18. Silicone breast implants and connective tissue disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipworth, Loren; Holmich, Lisbet R; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2011-01-01

    The association of silicone breast implants with connective tissue diseases (CTDs), including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia, as well as a hypothesized new "atypical" disease, which does not meet established diagnostic criteria for any known...... CTD, has been extensively studied. We have reviewed the epidemiologic literature regarding an association between cosmetic breast implants and CTDs, with particular emphasis on results drawn from the most recent investigations, many of which are large cohort studies with long-term follow-up, as well...... as on those studies that address some of the misinformation and historically widespread claims regarding an association between breast implants and CTDs. These claims have been unequivocally refuted by the remarkably consistent evidence from published studies, as well as numerous independent meta...

  19. Ion-implantation and analysis for doped silicon slot waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum J. C.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have utilised ion implantation to fabricate silicon nanocrystal sensitised erbium-doped slot waveguide structures in a Si/SiO2/Si layered configuration and photoluminescence (PL and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS to analyse these structures. Slot waveguide structures in which light is confined to a nanometre-scale low-index region between two high-index regions potentially offer significant advantages for realisation of electrically-pumped Si devices with optical gain and possibly quantum optical devices. We are currently investigating an alternative pathway in which high quality thermal oxides are grown on silicon and ion implantation is used to introduce the Er and Si-ncs into the SiO2 layer. This approach provides considerable control over the Er and Si-nc concentrations and depth profiles which is important for exploring the available parameter space and developing optimised structures. RBS is well-suited to compositional analysis of these layered structures. To improve the depth sensitivity we have used a 1 MeV α beam and results indicate that a layered silicon-Er:SiO2/silicon structure has been fabricated as desired. In this paper structural results will be compared to Er photoluminescence profiles for samples processed under a range of conditions.

  20. Silicone implant incompatibility syndrome (SIIS) in a 57-year-old woman with unilateral silicone breast implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, Juliane; Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Grindsted Nielsen, Sanne

    2017-01-01

    implants can lead to different interstitial lung manifestations predominantly with granuloma evolvement, leading to the so-called silicone implant incompatibility syndrome (SIIS). This case describes a 57-year-old woman with multiple lung infiltrations and a left-sided breast implant. The implant had been...

  1. Implantation of Neural Probes in the Brain Elicits Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evon S. Ereifej

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical implantation of intracortical microelectrodes has been hindered, at least in part, by the perpetual inflammatory response occurring after device implantation. The neuroinflammatory response observed after device implantation has been correlated to oxidative stress that occurs due to neurological injury and disease. However, there has yet to be a definitive link of oxidative stress to intracortical microelectrode implantation. Thus, the objective of this study is to give direct evidence of oxidative stress following intracortical microelectrode implantation. This study also aims to identify potential molecular targets to attenuate oxidative stress observed postimplantation. Here, we implanted adult rats with silicon non-functional microelectrode probes for 4 weeks and compared the oxidative stress response to no surgery controls through postmortem gene expression analysis and qualitative histological observation of oxidative stress markers. Gene expression analysis results at 4 weeks postimplantation indicated that EH domain-containing 2, prion protein gene (Prnp, and Stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1 were all significantly higher for animals implanted with intracortical microelectrode probes compared to no surgery control animals. To the contrary, NADPH oxidase activator 1 (Noxa1 relative gene expression was significantly lower for implanted animals compared to no surgery control animals. Histological observation of oxidative stress showed an increased expression of oxidized proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids concentrated around the implant site. Collectively, our results reveal there is a presence of oxidative stress following intracortical microelectrode implantation compared to no surgery controls. Further investigation targeting these specific oxidative stress linked genes could be beneficial to understanding potential mechanisms and downstream therapeutics that can be utilized to reduce oxidative stress-mediated damage

  2. Silicon on insulator by ion implantation: A dream or a reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinizzotto, R F [Ultrastructure, Inc., Richardson, TX (USA)

    1985-03-01

    One method of producing a silicon-on-oxide structure is to implant a sufficient dose of oxygen into a conventional silicon substrate to synthesize a layer of SiO/sub 2/ just below the surface. If the proper implant conditions are maintained, the top silicon layer will be a single crystal. The required doses are large, but the use of commercially available medium current implanters can reduce the time to 25 minutes per wafer. This adds about $ 10 per chip in process related costs. A very large implanter (100 mA analyzed beam) may not be the best approach for scaling up the process. The power in the beam and the power required for operation of the machine are both enormous. A more conservative approach of using multiple medium current implanters may prove to be more economical in the long run.

  3. Silicone implant correction of pectus excavatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechselberger, G; Ohlbauer, M; Haslinger, J; Schoeller, T; Bauer, T; Piza-Katzer, H

    2001-11-01

    Between May 1989 and December 2000 in 24 adult patients with pectus excavatum, a subcutaneous implantation of silicone prostheses was performed. Of the 24 patients, 20 were followed. During follow-up the authors encountered seroma complications in 13 patients and postoperative hematoma in 4 patients. The patients stayed in the hospital 5 days on average, and showed excellent aesthetic results in 80% (N = 16), good results in 10% (N = 2), and fair results in 10% (N = 2). Patient satisfaction was also taken into consideration. A follow-up survey questioned whether patients were satisfied with the cosmetic outcome. On a scale of 1 to 5 points, with 1 point being the highest level of satisfaction, 85% of patients used ratings of 1 and 2 to express satisfaction levels. Silicone implant correction of pectus excavatum in adult patients without any impairment of cardiopulmonary function has value. The major advantages are the minimally invasive operation, the short hospital stay, good aesthetic results, and high patient satisfaction

  4. Experimental identification of nitrogen-vacancy complexes in nitrogen implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Lahir Shaik; Law, Mark E.; Szpala, Stanislaw; Simpson, P. J.; Lawther, Derek; Dokumaci, Omer; Hegde, Suri

    2001-07-01

    Nitrogen implantation is commonly used in multigate oxide thickness processing for mixed signal complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor and System on a Chip technologies. Current experiments and diffusion models indicate that upon annealing, implanted nitrogen diffuses towards the surface. The mechanism proposed for nitrogen diffusion is the formation of nitrogen-vacancy complexes in silicon, as indicated by ab initio studies by J. S. Nelson, P. A. Schultz, and A. F. Wright [Appl. Phys. Lett. 73, 247 (1998)]. However, to date, there does not exist any experimental evidence of nitrogen-vacancy formation in silicon. This letter provides experimental evidence through positron annihilation spectroscopy that nitrogen-vacancy complexes indeed form in nitrogen implanted silicon, and compares the experimental results to the ab initio studies, providing qualitative support for the same.

  5. Simulation of atomistic processes during silicon oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Bongiorno, Angelo

    2003-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) films grown on silicon monocrystal (Si) substrates form the gate oxides in current Si-based microelectronics devices. The understanding at the atomic scale of both the silicon oxidation process and the properties of the Si(100)-SiO2 interface is of significant importance in state-of-the-art silicon microelectronics manufacturing. These two topics are intimately coupled and are both addressed in this theoretical investigation mainly through first-principles calculations....

  6. Electron microscopy studies of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshan, K.

    1975-11-01

    The nature of defects resulting from the implantation of phosphorous ions into doped silicon and a model of how they form are reported. This involved an electron microscope study of the crystallographic defects (in the 300A size range in concentration of 10 15 /cm 3 ) that form upon annealing. Images formed by these crystallographic defects are complex and that nonconventional imaging techniques are required for their characterization. The images of these small defects (about 300A) are sensitive to various parameters, such as foil thickness, their position in the foil, and diffracting conditions. The defects were found to be mostly interstitial hexagonal Frank loops lying on the four [111] planes and a few perfect interstitial loops; these loops occurred in concentrations of about 10 16 /cm 3 . In addition, ''rod like'' linear defects that are shown to be interstitial are also found in concentrations of 10 13 /cm 3 . It was found that the linear defects require boron for their formation. A model is proposed to account for the interstitial defects. The number of point defects that make up the defects is of the same order as the number of implanted ions. The model predicts that only interstitial loops ought to be observed in agreement with several recent investigations. Dislocation models of the loops are examined and it is shown that phosphorous ions could segregate to the Frank loops, changing their displacement vectors to a/x[111]. (x greater than 3) thus explaining the contrast effects observed. It would also explain the relative electrical inactivity of P + ion implants

  7. Micro-cutting of silicon implanted with hydrogen and post-implantation thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenković, Emil V.; To, Suet; Sundaravel, B.; Xiao, Gaobo; Huang, Hu

    2016-07-01

    It was reported that non-amorphizing implantation by hydrogen has a potential in improving silicon machining. Post-implantation high-temperature treatment will affect implantation-induced damage, which can have impact on silicon machining. In this article, a relation of a thermal annealing of hydrogen implanted in silicon to micro-cutting experiment is investigated. Hydrogen ions were implanted into 4″ silicon wafers with 175 keV, 150 keV, 125 keV and doses of 2 × 1016 cm-2, 2 × 1016 cm-2 and 3 × 1016 cm-2, respectively. In this way, low hydrogen atom-low defect concentration was created in the region less than ~0.8 μm deep and high hydrogen atom-high defect concentration was obtained at silicon depth of ~0.8-1.5 μm. The post-implantation annealing was carried out at 300 and 400 °C in nitrogen for 1 h. Physical and electrical properties of implanted and annealed samples were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nanoindentation. Plunge cutting experiment was carried out in and silicon crystal direction. The critical depth of cut and cutting force were monitored and found to be influenced by the annealing. The limits of hydrogen implantation annealing contribution to the cutting characteristics of silicon are discussed in light of implantation process and redistribution of hydrogen and defects generation during annealing process.

  8. Selective CVD tungsten on silicon implanted SiO/sub 2/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennessy, W.A.; Ghezzo, M.; Wilson, R.H.; Bakhru, H.

    1988-01-01

    The application range of selective CVD tungsten is extended by its coupling to the ion implantation of insulating materials. This article documents the results of selective CVD tungsten using silicon implanted into SiO/sub 2/ to nucleate the tungsten growth. The role of implant does, energy, and surface preparation in achieving nucleation are described. SEM micrographs are presented to demonstrate the selectivity of this process. Measurements of the tungsten film thickness and sheet resistance are provided for each of the experimental variants corresponding to successful deposition. RBS and XPS analysis are discussed in terms of characterizing the tungsten/oxide interface and to evaluate the role of the silicon implant in the CVD tungsten mechanism. Utilizing this method a desired metallization pattern can be readily defined with lithography and ion implantation, and accurately replicated with a layer of CVD tungsten. This approach avoids problems usually associated with blanket deposition and pattern transfer, which are particularly troublesome for submicron VLSI technology

  9. Depth profiling of boron implanted silicon by positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oevuenc, S.

    2004-01-01

    Positron depth profiling analyses of low energy implants of silicon aim to observe tbe structure and density of the vacancies generating by implantation and the effect of annealing. This work present the results to several set of data starting S and W parameters. Boron implanted Silicon samples with different implantation energies,20,22,24,and 26 keV are analyzed by Slow positron beam (0-40 keV and 10 5 e + /s )(Variable Energy Positron) at the Positron Centre Delf-HOLLAND

  10. Dose measurement of ion implanted silicon by RBS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamawanna, Teerasak; Intarasiri, Saweat; Prapunsri, Chowunchun; Thongleurm, Chome; Maleepatra, Saenee; Singkarat, Somsorn

    2003-10-01

    Surface modification can be achieved by ion implantation. This study used a 1 mm thick silicon wafer as a target which was implanted with Ar+ at 80 keV. The degree of the modification depends on both the ion energy and the implanted dose. The distribution of argon in the silicon substrate and the absolute implanted dose can be measured by using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). These investigations utilized a 1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator system at Chiang Mai University. The dose determination by a direct calculation is in agreement with the simulation by the SIMNRA code

  11. IBC c-Si solar cells based on ion-implanted poly-silicon passivating contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, G.; Ingenito, A.; Isabella, O.; Zeman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-implanted poly-crystalline silicon (poly-Si), in combination with a tunnel oxide layer, is investigated as a carrier-selective passivating contact in c-Si solar cells based on an interdigitated back contact (IBC) architecture. The optimized poly-Si passivating contacts enable low interface

  12. Release of low molecular weight silicones and platinum from silicone breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykissa, E D; Kala, S V; Hurley, J B; Lebovitz, R M

    1997-12-01

    We have conducted a series of studies addressing the chemical composition of silicone gels from breast implants as well as the diffusion of low molecular weight silicones (LM-silicones) and heavy metals from intact implants into various surrounding media, namely, lipid-rich medium (soy oil), aqueous tissue culture medium (modified Dulbecco's medium, DMEM), or an emulsion consisting of DMEM plus 10% soy oil. LM-silicones in both implants and surrounding media were detected and quantitated using gas chromatography (GC) coupled with atomic emission (GC-AED) as well as mass spectrometric (GC/MS) detectors, which can detect silicones in the nanogram range. Platinum, a catalyst used in the preparation of silicone gels, was detected and quantitated using inductive argon-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which can detect platinum in the parts per trillion range. Our results indicate that GC-detectable low molecular weight silicones contribute approximately 1-2% to the total gel mass and consist predominantly of cyclic and linear poly-(dimethylsiloxanes) ranging from 3 to 20 siloxane [(CH3)2-Si-O] units (molecular weight 200-1500). Platinum can be detected in implant gels at levels of approximately 700 micrograms/kg by ICP-MS. The major component of implant gels appears to be high molecular weight silicone polymers (HM-silicones) too large to be detected by GC. However, these HM-silicones can be converted almost quantitatively (80% by mass) to LM-silicones by heating implant gels at 150-180 degrees C for several hours. We also studied the rates at which LM-silicones and platinum leak through the intact implant outer shell into the surrounding media under a variety of conditions. Leakage of silicones was greatest when the surrounding medium was lipid-rich, and up to 10 mg/day LM-silicones was observed to diffuse into a lipid-rich medium per 250 g of implant at 37 degrees C. This rate of leakage was maintained over a 7-day experimental period. Similarly, platinum was

  13. Photoluminescence and electrical properties of silicon oxide and silicon nitride superlattices containing silicon nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuleiko, D V; Ilin, A S

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence and electrical properties of superlattices with thin (1 to 5 nm) alternating silicon-rich silicon oxide or silicon-rich silicon nitride, and silicon oxide or silicon nitride layers containing silicon nanocrystals prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with subsequent annealing were investigated. The entirely silicon oxide based superlattices demonstrated photoluminescence peak shift due to quantum confinement effect. Electrical measurements showed the hysteresis effect in the vicinity of zero voltage due to structural features of the superlattices from SiOa 93 /Si 3 N 4 and SiN 0 . 8 /Si 3 N 4 layers. The entirely silicon nitride based samples demonstrated resistive switching effect, comprising an abrupt conductivity change at about 5 to 6 V with current-voltage characteristic hysteresis. The samples also demonstrated efficient photoluminescence with maximum at ∼1.4 eV, due to exiton recombination in silicon nanocrystals. (paper)

  14. Comparative silicone breast implant evaluation using mammography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging: experience with 59 implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, C Y; DeBruhl, N D; Gorczyca, D P; Shaw, W W; Bassett, L W

    1994-10-01

    With the current controversy regarding the safety of silicone implants, the detection and evaluation of implant rupture are causing concern for both plastic surgeons and patients. Our study obtained comparative value analysis of mammography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of silicone implant rupture. Twenty-nine symptomatic patients (total of 59 silicone implants) were entered into the study. Intraoperative findings revealed 21 ruptured implants (36 percent). During physical examination, a positive "squeeze test" was highly suggestive of implant rupture. Mammograms were obtained of 51 implants (sensitivity 11 percent, specificity 89 percent). Sonography was performed on 57 implants (sensitivity 70 percent, specificity 92 percent). MRI was performed on 55 implants (sensitivity 81 percent, specificity 92 percent). Sonographically, implant rupture is demonstrated by the "stepladder sign." Double-lumen implants may appear as false-positive results for rupture on sonography. On MRI, the "linguine sign" represents disrupted fragments of a ruptured implant. The most reliable imaging modality for implant rupture detection is MRI, followed by sonogram. Mammogram is the least reliable. Our study supports the clinical indication and diagnostic value of sonogram and MRI in the evaluation of symptomatic breast implant patients.

  15. Characteristics of MOSFETs fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material formed by high-dose oxygen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, H.W.; Pinizzotto, R.F.; Yuan, H.T.; Bellavance, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    By implanting a dose of 6 x 10 17 cm -2 of 32 O 2 + at 300 keV into a silicon wafer, a buried oxide layer is formed. Crystallinity of the silicon layer above the buried oxide layer is maintained by applying a high (>200 0 C) substrate temperature during the ion implantation process. A two-step anneal cycle is found to be adequate to form the insulating buried oxide layer and to repair the implantation damage in the silicon layer on top of the buried oxide. A surface electron mobility as high as 710 cm 2 /Vs has been measured in n-channel MOSFETs fabricated in a 0.5 μm-thick epitaxial layer grown on the buried oxide wafer. A minimum subthreshold current of about 10 pA per micron of channel width at Vsub(DS)=2 V has been measured. (author)

  16. Characterization of ion implanted silicon by the electrolytic reverse current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueller, J.; Pham, M.T.

    1977-01-01

    The current voltage behaviour of ion implanted silicon electrodes in HF electrolyte is investigated. The electrolytic reverse current, i.e. the reaction rate of the minority carrier limited reactions is found to increase. The current increase depends on the implanted dose and layer stripping. Reason for the increased reverse current can be referred to radiation damage acting as generation centres for minority carriers. Measurement of the electrolytic reverse current can be used for determining damage profiles. Layer stripping is carried out by anodic dissolution in the same electrolyte. The sensitivity of this new method for characterizing ion implanted silicon layers lies at 10 11 to 10 12 atoms/cm 2 . (author)

  17. Total dose hardening of buried insulator in implanted silicon-on-insulator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, B.Y.; Chen, C.E.; Pollack, G.; Hughes, H.L.; Davis, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Total dose characteristics of the buried insulator in implanted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates have been studied using MOS transistors. The threshold voltage shift of the parasitic back channel transistor, which is controlled by charge trapping in the buried insulator, is reduced by lowering the oxygen dose as well as by an additional nitrogen implant, without degrading the front channel transistor characteristics. The improvements in the radiation characteristics of the buried insulator are attributed to the decrease in the buried oxide thickness or to the presence of the interfacial oxynitride layer formed by the oxygen and nitrogen implants

  18. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence in silicon oxide films rich in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman M, D.; Piters, T. M.; Aceves M, M.; Berriel V, L. R.; Luna L, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we determined the fluorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) creation spectra of silicon rich oxide films (SRO) with three different silicon excesses. To study the TL of SRO, 550 nm of SRO film were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition technique on N-type silicon substrates with resistivity in the order of 3 to 5 Ω-cm with silicon excess controlled by the ratio of the gases used in the process, SRO films with Ro= 10, 20 and 30 (12-6% silicon excess) were obtained. Then, they were thermally treated in N 2 at high temperatures to diffuse and homogenize the silicon excess. In the fluorescence spectra two main emission regions are observed, one around 400 nm and one around 800 nm. TL creation spectra were determined by plotting the integrated TL intensity as function of the excitation wavelength. (Author)

  19. 3D silicone rubber interfaces for individually tailored implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieghorst, Jan; Bondarenkova, Alexandra; Burblies, Niklas; Behrens, Peter; Doll, Theodor

    2015-01-01

    For the fabrication of customized silicone rubber based implants, e.g. cochlear implants or electrocortical grid arrays, it is required to develop high speed curing systems, which vulcanize the silicone rubber before it runs due to a heating related viscosity drop. Therefore, we present an infrared radiation based cross-linking approach for the 3D-printing of silicone rubber bulk and carbon nanotube based silicone rubber electrode materials. Composite materials were cured in less than 120 s and material interfaces were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, curing related changes in the mechanical and cell-biological behaviour were investigated with tensile and WST-1 cell biocompatibility tests. The infrared absorption properties of the silicone rubber materials were analysed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in transmission and attenuated total reflection mode. The heat flux was calculated by using the FTIR data, emissivity data from the infrared source manufacturer and the geometrical view factor of the system.

  20. Suppression of nanoindentation-induced phase transformation in crystalline silicon implanted with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenković, Emil V.; To, Suet

    2017-09-01

    In this paper the effect of hydrogen implantation in silicon on nanoindentation-induced phase transformation is investigated. Hydrogen ions were implanted in silicon through 300 nm thick oxide with double energy implantation (75 and 40 keV). For both energies implantation dose was 4 × 1016 cm-2. Some samples were thermally annealed at 400 °C. The micro-Raman spectroscopy was applied on nanoindentation imprints and the obtained results were related to the pop out/elbow appearances in nanoindentatioin unloading-displacement curves. The Raman spectroscopy revealed a suppression of Si-XII and Si-III phases and formation of a-Si in the indents of hydrogen implanted Si. The high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements were taken to support the analysis of silicon phase formation during nanoindentation. Implantation induced strain, high hydrogen concentration, and platelets generation were found to be the factors that control suppression of c-Si phases Si-XII and Si-III, as well as a-Si phase enhancement during nanoindentation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Microstructure and nanomechanical properties of Fe+ implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, B.; Magalhães, S.; Franco, N.; Alves, E.; Colaço, R.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon wafers were implanted with iron ions at different fluences (from 5 × 10 15 up to 2 × 10 17 cm −2 ), followed by annealing treatments at temperatures from 550 °C to 1000 °C, aiming at evaluating the nanomechanical response of the samples and its relation with the microstructural features and characteristics of the modified layer. After implantation, a homogeneous amorphous layer with a thickness between 200 nm and 270 nm is formed, without damaging the surface smoothness neither introducing surface defects. After annealing, recrystallization and formation of nanometric precipitates of iron silicides is observed, with the corresponding changes in the hardness and stiffness of the modified layer. These results indicate that ion implantation of silicon followed by annealing at proper temperatures, can be an alternative route to be deeper explored in what concerns the precise control of the microstructure and, thus, the improvement of nanomechanical properties of silicon.

  2. Formation of porous silicon oxide from substrate-bound silicon rich silicon oxide layers by continuous-wave laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Fricke-Begemann, Th.; Peretzki, P.; Ihlemann, J.; Seibt, M.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide that show room temperature photoluminescence (PL) have great potential in silicon light emission applications. Nanocrystalline silicon particle formation by laser irradiation has the unique advantage of spatially controlled heating, which is compatible with modern silicon micro-fabrication technology. In this paper, we employ continuous wave laser irradiation to decompose substrate-bound silicon-rich silicon oxide films into crystalline silicon particles and silicon dioxide. The resulting microstructure is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques with considerable emphasis on the formation and properties of laser damaged regions which typically quench room temperature PL from the nanoparticles. It is shown that such regions consist of an amorphous matrix with a composition similar to silicon dioxide which contains some nanometric silicon particles in addition to pores. A mechanism referred to as "selective silicon ablation" is proposed which consistently explains the experimental observations. Implications for the damage-free laser decomposition of silicon-rich silicon oxides and also for controlled production of porous silicon dioxide films are discussed.

  3. Silicon carbide layer structure recovery after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Demakov, K.D.; Kal'nin, A.A.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.; Tairov, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    The process of recovery of polytype structure of SiC surface layers in the course of thermal annealing (TA) and laser annealing (LA) upon boron and aluminium implantation is studied. The 6H polytype silicon carbide C face (0001) has been exposed to ion radiation. The ion energies ranged from 80 to 100 keV, doses varied from 5x10 14 to 5x10 16 cm -2 . TA was performed in the 800-2000 K temperature range. It is shown that the recovery of the structure of silicon carbide layers after ion implantation takes place in several stages. Considerable effect on the structure of the annealed layers is exerted by the implantation dose and the type of implanted impurity. The recovery of polytype structure is possible only under the effect of laser pulses with duration not less than the time for the ordering of the polytype in question

  4. High-resolution ion-implanted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Borany, J.; Schmidt, B.

    1985-01-01

    An account is given of the properties of silicon detectors developed at the Central Institute of Nuclear Research of the Academy of Sciences of the German Democratic Republic (Rossendorf) and made by a special planar technology using ion implantation, anodic oxidation, thermal oxidation in an oxygen atmosphere containing HCl, and annealing by pulses of 10--20 msec duration. The resolution for α particles of 5.5 MeV energy was 11.2 keV (active area A 2 ). The detectors were characterized by a low intrinsic noise (< or =5 keV), so that they could be used for spectrometry of low-energy electrons (E/sub e/< or =250 keV). In a certain range of energies (E/sub x/ = 15--60 keV) it was possible to use these detectors for spectrometry of x rays at room temperature. Examples and results of applications of detectors in radiation chemistry (investigations of backscattering of particles and nuclear reaction spectroscopy) are given. The feasibility of annealing of radiation defects in such detectors after irradiation with a large dose of charged particles is considered

  5. High energy P implants in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raineri, V.; Cacciato, A.; Benyaich, F.; Priolo, F.; Rimini, E.; Galvagno, G.; Capizzi, S.

    1992-01-01

    Phosphorus ions in the energy range 0.25-1 MeV and in the dose range 2x10 13 -1x10 15 P/cm 2 were implanted into (100) Si single crystal at different tilt angles. In particular channeling and random conditions were investigated. For comparison some implants were performed on samples with a 2 μm thick surface amorphous layer. Chemical concentration P profiles were obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Carrier concentration and mobility profile measurements were carried out by sheet resistance and Hall measurements on implanted van der Pauw patterns. Carrier concentration profiles were also obtained by spreading resistance (SR) measurements. The damage in the as-implanted samples was determined by backscattering and channeling spectrometry (RBS) as a function of the dose and implantation energy. Comparison of random implants in crystal with implants in amorphous layers shows that in the first case it is impossible to completely avoid the channeling tail. In the implants performed under channeling conditions at low doses the P profiles are flat over more than 2 μm thick layers. Furthermore, by increasing the implanted dose, the shape of the profiles dramatically changes due to the dechanneling caused by the crystal disorder. The data are discussed and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using the MARLOWE code. A simple description of the electronic energy loss provides an excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental profiles. (orig.)

  6. Oxygen recoil implant from SiO2 layers into single-crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.; Chen, Y.; Li, D.; Oak, S.; Srivastav, G.; Banerjee, S.; Tasch, A.; Merrill, P.; Bleiler, R.

    2001-01-01

    It is important to understand the distribution of recoil-implanted atoms and the impact on device performance when ion implantation is performed at a high dose through surface materials into single crystalline silicon. For example, in ultralarge scale integration impurity ions are often implanted through a thin layer of screen oxide and some of the oxygen atoms are inevitably recoil implanted into single-crystalline silicon. Theoretical and experimental studies have been performed to investigate this phenomenon. We have modified the Monte Carlo ion implant simulator, UT-Marlowe (B. Obradovic, G. Wang, Y. Chen, D. Li, C. Snell, and A. F. Tasch, UT-MARLOWE Manual, 1999), which is based on the binary collision approximation, to follow the full cascade and to dynamically modify the stoichiometry of the Si layer as oxygen atoms are knocked into it. CPU reduction techniques are used to relieve the demand on computational power when such a full cascade simulation is involved. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiles of oxygen have been carefully obtained for high dose As and BF 2 implants at different energies through oxide layers of various thicknesses, and the simulated oxygen profiles are found to agree very well with the SIMS data. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  7. Influence of implantation energy on the electrical properties of ultrathin gate oxides grown on nitrogen implanted Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, E.; Skarlatos, D.; Tsamis, C.; Normand, P.; Tsoukalas, D.

    2003-01-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor tunnel diodes with gate oxides, in the range of 2.5-3.5 nm, grown either on 25 or 3 keV nitrogen-implanted Si substrates at (0.3 or 1) x10 15 cm -2 dose, respectively, are investigated. The dependence of N 2 + ion implant energy on the electrical quality of the growing oxide layers is studied through capacitance, equivalent parallel conductance, and gate current measurements. Superior electrical characteristics in terms of interface state trap density, leakage current, and breakdown fields are found for oxides obtained through 3 keV nitrogen implants. These findings together with the full absence of any extended defect in the silicon substrate make the low-energy nitrogen implantation technique an attractive option for reproducible low-cost growth of nanometer-thick gate oxides

  8. Subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Sautter, Ken; Davis, Robert C; Linford, Matthew R

    2009-02-03

    Here we present a straightforward patterning technique for silicon: subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS). In this method, a stencil mask is placed above a silicon surface. Radio-frequency plasma oxidation of the substrate creates a pattern of thicker oxide in the exposed regions. Etching with HF or KOH produces very shallow or much higher aspect ratio features on silicon, respectively, where patterning is confirmed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The oxidation process itself is studied under a variety of reaction conditions, including higher and lower oxygen pressures (2 and 0.5 Torr), a variety of powers (50-400 W), different times and as a function of reagent purity (99.5 or 99.994% oxygen). SOMS can be easily executed in any normal chemistry laboratory with a plasma generator. Because of its simplicity, it may have industrial viability.

  9. Physical Properties of Silicone Gel Breast Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Mark L; Bengtson, Bradley P; Smither, Kate; Nuti, Gina; Perry, TracyAnn

    2018-04-28

    Surgical applications using breast implants are individualized operations to fill and shape the breast. Physical properties beyond shape, size, and surface texture are important considerations during implant selection. Compare form stability, gel material properties, and shell thickness of textured shaped, textured round, and smooth round breast implants from 4 manufacturers: Allergan, Mentor, Sientra, and Establishment Labs through bench testing. Using a mandrel height gauge, form stability was measured by retention of dimensions on device movement from a horizontal to vertical supported orientation. Dynamic response of gel material (gel cohesivity, resistance to gel deformation, energy absorption) was measured using a synchronized target laser following application of graded negative pressure. Shell thickness was measured using digital thickness gauge calipers. Form stability, gel material properties, and shell thickness differed across breast implants. Of textured shaped devices, Allergan Natrelle 410 exhibited greater form stability than Mentor MemoryShape and Sientra Shaped implants. Allergan Inspira round implants containing TruForm 3 gel had greater form stability, higher gel cohesivity, greater resistance to gel deformation, and lower energy absorption than those containing TruForm 2 gel and in turn, implants containing TruForm 1 gel. Shell thickness was greater for textured versus smooth devices, and differed across styles. Gel cohesivity, resistance to gel deformation, and energy absorption are directly related to form stability, which in turn determines shape retention. These characteristics provide information to aid surgeons choosing an implant based on surgical application, patient tissue characteristics, and desired outcome.

  10. Recrystallization of implanted amorphous silicon layers. I. Electrical properties of silicon implanted with BF+2 or Si++B+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, M.Y.; Streetman, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical properties of recrystallized amorphous silicon layers, formed by BF + 2 implants or Si + +B + implants, have been studied by differential resistivity and Hall-effect measurements. Electrical carrier distribution profiles show that boron atoms inside the amorphized Si layers can be fully activated during recrystallization at 550 0 C. The mobility is also recovered. However, the tail of the B distribution, located inside a damaged region near the original amorphous-crystalline interface, remains inactive. This inactive tail has been observed for all samples implanted with BF + 2 . Only in a thicker amorphous layer, formed for example by Si + predamage implants, can the entire B profile be activated. The etch rate of amorphous silicon in HF and the effect of fluorine on the recrystallization rate are also reported

  11. Plasma immersion ion implantation of boron for ribbon silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derbouz K.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report for the first time on the solar cell fabrication on n-type silicon RST (for Ribbon on Sacrificial Template using plasma immersion ion implantation. The experiments were also carried out on FZ silicon as a reference. Boron was implanted at energies from 10 to 15 kV and doses from 1015 to 1016 cm-2, then activated by a thermal annealing in a conventional furnace at 900 and 950 °C for 30 min. The n+ region acting as a back surface field was achieved by phosphorus spin-coating. The frontside boron emitter was passivated either by applying a 10 nm deposited SiOX plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD or with a 10 nm grown thermal oxide. The anti-reflection coating layer formed a 60 nm thick SiNX layer. We show that energies less than 15 kV and doses around 5 × 1015 cm-2 are appropriate to achieve open circuit voltage higher than 590 mV and efficiency around 16.7% on FZ-Si. The photovoltaic performances on ribbon silicon are so far limited by the bulk quality of the material and by the quality of the junction through the presence of silicon carbide precipitates at the surface. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that plasma immersion ion implantation is very promising for solar cell fabrication on ultrathin silicon wafers such as ribbons.

  12. Effect of microstructure on the arsenic profile in implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Rhee, M.H.; Williams, J.M.; Streit, L.A.; Williams, P.

    1985-10-01

    According to an irradiation damage model, the profile of an implanted ion at temperature great enough for diffusion to occur will depend on the sink density in the material. To test this model, pure silicon wafers were prepared with high and low dislocation densities. These wafers were implanted with about 5 x 10 19 As +2 /m 2 at 77 0 K, 300 0 C, and 600 0 C. After implanting the profiles were measured using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The observed spreading of the As-profile contradicts initial theoretical predictions. Further speculation is presented to explain the differences

  13. Ellipsometric and channeling studies on ion-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohner, T.; Mezey, G.; Kotai, E.; Paszti, F.; Kiralyhidi, L.; Valyi, G.; Gyulai, J.

    1980-09-01

    RBS and ellipsometric investigations were combined to separate the contribution of radiation damage and overlayer contamination. It is pointed out that disorder effects which were produced by silicon self-implantation are shielded without proper surface cleaning. For cleaning, plasma stripping proved to be an effective method. The change in psi parameter could be correlated with the degree of amorphousness. It seems that Δ parameter ''feels'' crystalline-amorphous phase transition on low dose 31 P + and 27 Al + implants. No clear evidence was found for impurity effects on high-dose 75 As + and 31 P + implants. (author)

  14. Formation of 2-D arrays of semiconductor nanocrystals or semiconductor-rich nanolayers by very low-energy Si or Ge ion implantation in silicon oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, P. E-mail: p.normand@imel.demokritos.gr; Beltsios, K.; Kapetanakis, E.; Tsoukalas, D.; Travlos, T.; Stoemenos, J.; Berg, J. van den; Zhang, S.; Vieu, C.; Launois, H.; Gautier, J.; Jourdan, F.; Palun, L

    2001-05-01

    The structure evolution of annealed low-energy Si- or Ge-implanted thin and thick SiO{sub 2} layers is studied. The majority of Si (or Ge) species is restricted within a 3-4 nm thick layer. Si is able to separate and crystallize more easily than Ge. The glass transition temperature of the as-implanted structure has a significant effect on the progress of phase transformations accompanying annealing.

  15. Formation of 2-D arrays of semiconductor nanocrystals or semiconductor-rich nanolayers by very low-energy Si or Ge ion implantation in silicon oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, P.; Beltsios, K.; Kapetanakis, E.; Tsoukalas, D.; Travlos, T.; Stoemenos, J.; Berg, J. van den; Zhang, S.; Vieu, C.; Launois, H.; Gautier, J.; Jourdan, F.; Palun, L.

    2001-01-01

    The structure evolution of annealed low-energy Si- or Ge-implanted thin and thick SiO 2 layers is studied. The majority of Si (or Ge) species is restricted within a 3-4 nm thick layer. Si is able to separate and crystallize more easily than Ge. The glass transition temperature of the as-implanted structure has a significant effect on the progress of phase transformations accompanying annealing

  16. The influence of excess vacancy generation on the diffusion of ion implanted phosphorus into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakowski, A.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion of ion implanted phosphorus in silicon has been studied. It was found that the diffusion coefficient is not only dependent on the phosphorus surface concentration (the concentration effect) but also on the conditions at the silicon surface (the surface effect). The phosphorus diffusion coefficient is considerably lower when the silicon surface during annealing is covered with a CVD oxide layer. It is suggested that excess vacancies generated at the surface are reponsible for both the concentration and surface effects. Enhanced phosphorus diffusion is attributed to the disturbance of thermodynamic equilibrium in the crystal through phosphorus-vacancy part formation by vacancies introduced into silicon at the surface. On the basis of the data presented, it can be concluded that two mechanisms for excess vacancy generation are involved. Assuming that phosphorus diffuses via E-centers, calculations of the concentration profiles and the diffusion coefficient were performed for different concentrations and surface conditions. (orig.)

  17. Plasma effects for heavy ions in implanted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Campisi, M.G.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, Sl.; Filippo, E. De; Geraci, E.; Geraci, M.; Guazzoni, P.; Manno, M.C. Iacono; Lanzalone, G.; Lanzano, G.; Nigro, S. Lo; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Sambataro, S.; Sperduto, M.L.; Sutera, C.; Zetta, L.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma effects for heavy ions in implanted silicon detectors have been investigated for different detector characteristics as a function of type and energy of the detected particles. A new approach is presented and used to reproduce the effect of the plasma delay in the timing performances. The results are in good agreement with the present data and with previous measurements found in the literature

  18. Silicon solar cells made by ion implantation and glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponpon, J.P.; Siffert, P.

    1975-01-01

    Three different methods of silicon solar cell preparation are considered and investigated: low energy implantation, glow discharge and prebombarded Schottky barriers. The properties of the contact layers realized by these processes are compared in terms of junction depth and sheet resistance. Preliminary results show the usefulness of these techniques for terrestrial solar cell realization [fr

  19. High-density oxidized porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharbi, Ahmed; Souifi, Abdelkader; Remaki, Boudjemaa; Halimaoui, Aomar; Bensahel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have studied oxidized porous silicon (OPS) properties using Fourier transform infraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy and capacitance–voltage C–V measurements. We report the first experimental determination of the optimum porosity allowing the elaboration of high-density OPS insulators. This is an important contribution to the research of thick integrated electrical insulators on porous silicon based on an optimized process ensuring dielectric quality (complete oxidation) and mechanical and chemical reliability (no residual pores or silicon crystallites). Through the measurement of the refractive indexes of the porous silicon (PS) layer before and after oxidation, one can determine the structural composition of the OPS material in silicon, air and silica. We have experimentally demonstrated that a porosity approaching 56% of the as-prepared PS layer is required to ensure a complete oxidation of PS without residual silicon crystallites and with minimum porosity. The effective dielectric constant values of OPS materials determined from capacitance–voltage C–V measurements are discussed and compared to FTIR results predictions. (paper)

  20. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelrod, Ekaterina; Urbach, Benayahu; Sa'ar, Amir; Feldman, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Dielectric measurements accompanied by infrared absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to investigate the electrical and optical properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). As opposed to non-oxidized PS, only high temperature relaxation processes could be resolved for oxidized PS. Two relaxation processes have been observed. The first process is related to dc-conductivity that dominates at high temperatures and low frequencies. After subtraction of dc-conductivity we could analyse a second high-temperature relaxation process that is related to interface polarization induced by charge carriers trapped at the host matrix-pore interfaces. We found that, while the main effect of the oxidation on the PL appears to be a size reduction in the silicon nanocrystals that gives rise to a blue shift of the PL spectrum, its main contribution to the dielectric properties turns out to be blocking of transport channels in the host tissue and activation of hopping conductivity between silicon nanocrystals

  1. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelrod, Ekaterina [Department of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Urbach, Benayahu [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Sa' ar, Amir [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feldman, Yuri [Department of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

    2006-04-07

    Dielectric measurements accompanied by infrared absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to investigate the electrical and optical properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). As opposed to non-oxidized PS, only high temperature relaxation processes could be resolved for oxidized PS. Two relaxation processes have been observed. The first process is related to dc-conductivity that dominates at high temperatures and low frequencies. After subtraction of dc-conductivity we could analyse a second high-temperature relaxation process that is related to interface polarization induced by charge carriers trapped at the host matrix-pore interfaces. We found that, while the main effect of the oxidation on the PL appears to be a size reduction in the silicon nanocrystals that gives rise to a blue shift of the PL spectrum, its main contribution to the dielectric properties turns out to be blocking of transport channels in the host tissue and activation of hopping conductivity between silicon nanocrystals.

  2. Thermal Oxidation of Structured Silicon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    The topography of thermally oxidized, structured silicon dioxide is investigated through simulations, atomic force microscopy, and a proposed analytical model. A 357 nm thick oxide is structured by removing regions of the oxide in a masked etch with either reactive ion etching or hydrofluoric acid....... Subsequent thermal oxidation is performed in both dry and wet ambients in the temperature range 950◦C to 1100◦C growing a 205 ± 12 nm thick oxide in the etched mask windows. Lifting of the original oxide near the edge of the mask in the range 6 nm to 37 nm is seen with increased lifting for increasing...

  3. Effect of post-deposition implantation and annealing on the properties of PECVD deposited silicon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shams, Q.A.

    1988-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that memory-quality silicon nitride can be deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Nitrogen implantation and post-deposition annealing resulted in improved memory properties of MNOS devices. The primary objective of the work described here is the continuation of the above work. Silicon nitride films were deposited using argon as the carrier gas and evaluated in terms of memory performance as the charge-trapping layer in the metal-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) capacitor structure. The bonding structure of PECVD silicon nitride was modified by annealing in different ambients at temperatures higher than the deposition temperature. Post-deposition ion implantation was used to introduce argon into the films in an attempt to influence the transfer, trapping, and emission of charge during write/erase exercising of the MNOS devices. Results show that the memory performance of PECVD silicon nitride is sensitive to the deposition parameters and post-deposition processing

  4. A comparison of buried oxide characteristics of single and multiple implant SIMOX and bond and etch back wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annamalai, N.K.; Bockman, J.F.; McGruer, N.E.; Chapski, J.

    1990-01-01

    The current through the buried oxides of single and multiple implant SIMOX and bond and etch back silicon-on-insulator (BESOI) wafers were measured as a function of radiation dose. From these measurements, conductivity and static capacitances were derived. High frequency capacitances were also measured. Leakage current through the buried oxide of multiple implant SIMOX is considerably less than that of single implant SIMOX (more than an order of magnitude). High frequency and static capacitances, as a function of total dose, were used to study the buried oxide---top silicon interface and the buried oxide---bottom silicon interface. Multiple implant had fewer interface traps than single implant at pre-rad and after irradiation

  5. Increased carrier lifetimes in epitaxial silicon layers on buried silicon nitride produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorupa, W.; Kreissig, U.; Hensel, E.; Bartsch, H.

    1984-01-01

    Carrier lifetimes were measured in epitaxial silicon layers deposited on buried silicon nitride produced by high-dose nitrogen implantation at 330 keV. The values were in the range 20-200 μs. The results are remarkable taking into account the high density of crystal defects in the epitaxial layers. Comparing with other SOI technologies the measured lifetimes are higher by 1-2 orders of magnitude. (author)

  6. Material synthesis for silicon integrated-circuit applications using ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang

    As devices scale down into deep sub-microns, the investment cost and complexity to develop more sophisticated device technologies have increased substantially. There are some alternative potential technologies, such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and SiGe alloys, that can help sustain this staggering IC technology growth at a lower cost. Surface SiGe and SiGeC alloys with germanium peak composition up to 16 atomic percent are formed using high-dose ion implantation and subsequent solid phase epitaxial growth. RBS channeling spectra and cross-sectional TEM studies show that high quality SiGe and SiGeC crystals with 8 atomic percent germanium concentration are formed at the silicon surface. Extended defects are formed in SiGe and SiGeC with 16 atomic percent germanium concentration. X-ray diffraction experiments confirm that carbon reduces the lattice strain in SiGe alloys but without significant crystal quality improvement as detected by RBS channeling spectra and XTEM observations. Separation by plasma implantation of oxygen (SPIMOX) is an economical method for SOI wafer fabrication. This process employs plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) for the implantation of oxygen ions. The implantation rate for Pm is considerably higher than that of conventional implantation. The feasibility of SPIMOX has been demonstrated with successful fabrication of SOI structures implementing this process. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) micrographs of the SPIMOX sample show continuous buried oxide under single crystal overlayer with sharp silicon/oxide interfaces. The operational phase space of implantation condition, oxygen dose and annealing requirement has been identified. Physical mechanisms of hydrogen induced silicon surface layer cleavage have been investigated using a combination of microscopy and hydrogen profiling techniques. The evolution of the silicon cleavage phenomenon is recorded by a series

  7. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation; Dopage du carbure de silicium par implantation ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimbert, J

    1999-03-04

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  8. Electrical activation of solid-phase epitaxially regrown ultra-low energy boron implants in Ge preamorphised silicon and SOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.J.; Collart, E.J.H.; Colombeau, B.; Jeynes, C.; Bersani, M.; Giubertoni, D.; Sharp, J.A.; Cowern, N.E.B.; Kirkby, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of highly activated ultra-shallow junctions (USJ) is one of the key requirements for the next generation of CMOS devices. One promising method for achieving this is the use of Ge preamorphising implants (PAI) prior to ultra-low energy B implantation. In future technology nodes, bulk silicon wafers may be supplanted by Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI), and an understanding of the Solid Phase Epitaxial (SPE) regrowth process and its correlation to dopant electrical activation in both bulk silicon and SOI is essential in order to understand the impact of this potential technology change. This kind of understanding will also enable tests of fundamental models for defect evolution and point-defect reactions at silicon/oxide interfaces. In the present work, B is implanted into Ge PAI silicon and SOI wafers with different PAI conditions and B doses, and resulting samples are annealed at various temperatures and times. Glancing-exit Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is used to monitor the regrowth of the amorphous silicon, and the resulting redistribution and electrical activity of B are monitored by SIMS and Hall measurements. The results confirm the expected enhancement of regrowth velocity by B doping, and show that this velocity is otherwise independent of the substrate type and the Ge implant distribution within the amorphised layer. Hall measurements on isochronally annealed samples show that B deactivates less in SOI material than in bulk silicon, in cases where the Ge PAI end-of-range defects are close to the SOI back interface

  9. Depth distribution of nitrogen in silicon from plasma ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajo, J.J.; Williams, J.D.; Wei, R.; Wilson, R.G.; Matossian, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma Ion Implantation (PII) is an ion implantation technique that eliminates the line-of-sight restriction of conventional ion-beam implantation and therefore allows for cost effective surface modification of large-scale objects or large-number of small-scale objects. In PII, a part to be implanted is immersed in a low-pressure (10 -4 --10 -5 Torr), partially-ionized plasma that surrounds the part with a plasma sheath. The part is negatively pulse biased up to 100 keV using a repetitive train (100--1,000 Hz) of short-duration (10--40 μsec) voltage pulses. The applied voltage develops across the sheath and accelerates plasma ions into the surface, implanting them omnidirectionally and simultaneously over the entire surface of the part. The depth distribution of the implanted ions influences the extent and type of surface modification achieved and depends upon many factors. These include three rise and fall time of the voltage-pulse waveform, the voltage-pulse amplitude, the ion specie, the ion density, and the temperature of the target. Understanding the contributions to the depth distribution from each of these factors will enable prediction of conditions that will be useful for implantation of large complex parts. To investigate the contributions to the measured depth distributions from these factors nitrogen, predominantly as N + 2 , has been implanted into silicon using PII at 50 and 100 keV (25 and 50 keV per N atom). The implanted depth distributions have been determined using secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. The distributions differ from the typical, approximately Gaussian, profiles that result from conventional mass selected monoenergetic ion beam implantation. In comparison with ion beam implants and numerical simulations the profiles appear ''filled-in'' with an approximately constant nitrogen concentration for depths less than the expected average ion range

  10. Distribution and characterization of iron in implanted silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, J.; Romana, L.J.; Horton, L.L.; McHargue, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy-ion channeling (RBS-C) have been used to characterize single crystal α-silicon carbide implanted at room temperature with 160 keV 57 Fe ions to fluences of 1, 3, and 6 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Best correlations among AEM, RBS, and TRIM calculations were obtained assuming a density of the amorphized implanted regions equal to that of crystalline SiC. No iron-rich precipitates or clusters were detected by AEM. Inspection of the electron energy loss fine structure for iron in the implanted specimens suggests that the iron is not metallically-bonded, supporting conclusions from earlier conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) studies. In-situ annealing surprisingly resulted in crystallization at 600 degrees C with some redistribution of the implanted iron

  11. Effect of thermal annealing on the optical and structural properties of silicon implanted with a high hydrogen fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, A.; Soares, J.C.; Rodriguez, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Avella, M.; Jimenez, J.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon capped by thermal oxide has been implanted with 1 x 10 17 H/cm 2 and the implant profile peaking at the interface. Samples were subjected to thermal annealing and characterized by ERD, FTIR, RBS/channeling, UV/VIS reflectance and cathodoluminescence regarding H-content, crystalline quality and light emission. The results show that the luminescent properties are independent of the hydrogen content but are strongly related with the present damage

  12. Investigation of Ion-Implanted Photosensitive Silicon Structures by Electrochemical Capacitance–Voltage Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovlev, G. E., E-mail: geyakovlev@etu.ru; Frolov, D. S.; Zubkova, A. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation); Levina, E. E. [JSC National Research Institute “Electron” (Russian Federation); Zubkov, V. I.; Solomonov, A. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation); Sterlyadkin, O. K.; Sorokin, S. A. [JSC National Research Institute “Electron” (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    The method of electrochemical capacitance–voltage profiling is used to study boron-implanted silicon structures for CCD matrices with backside illumination. A series of specially prepared structures with different energies and doses of ion implantation and also with various materials used for the coating layers (aluminum, silicon oxide, and their combinations) is studied. The profiles of the depth distribution of majority charge carriers of the studied structures are obtained experimentally. Also, using the Poisson equation and the Fredholm equation of the first kind, the distributions of the charge-carrier concentration and of the electric field in the structures are calculated. On the basis of the analysis and comparison of theoretical and experimental concentration profiles, recommendations concerning optimization of the structures’ parameters in order to increase the value of the pulling field and decrease the effect of the surface potential on the transport of charge carriers are suggested.

  13. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  14. Silicon exfoliation by hydrogen implantation: Actual nature of precursor defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuisseu, Pauline Sylvia Pokam, E-mail: pauline-sylvia.pokam-kuisseu@cnrs-orleans.fr [CEMHTI-CNRS, 3A, rue de la férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France); Pingault, Timothée; Ntsoenzok, Esidor [CEMHTI-CNRS, 3A, rue de la férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France); Regula, Gabrielle [IM2NP-CNRS-Université d’Aix-Marseille, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille (France); Mazen, Frédéric [CEA-Leti, MINATEC campus, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Sauldubois, Audrey [Université d’Orléans, rue de Chartres – Collegium ST, 45067 Orléans (France); Andreazza, Caroline [ICMN-CNRS-Université d’Orléans, 1b rue de la férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France)

    2017-06-15

    MeV energy hydrogen implantation in silicon followed by a thermal annealing is a very smart way to produce high crystalline quality silicon substrates, much thinner than what can be obtained by diamond disk or wire sawing. Using this kerf-less approach, ultra-thin substrates with thicknesses between 15 µm and 100 µm, compatible with microelectronic and photovoltaic applications are reported. But, despite the benefits of this approach, there is still a lack of fundamental studies at this implantation energy range. However, if very few papers have addressed the MeV energy range, a lot of works have been carried out in the keV implantation energy range, which is the one used in the smart-cut® technology. In order to check if the nature and the growth mechanism of extended defects reported in the widely studied keV implantation energy range could be extrapolated in the MeV range, the thermal evolution of extended defects formed after MeV hydrogen implantation in (100) Si was investigated in this study. Samples were implanted at 1 MeV with different fluences ranging from 6 × 10{sup 16} H/cm{sup 2} to 2 × 10{sup 17} H/cm{sup 2} and annealed at temperatures up to 873 K. By cross-section transmission electron microscopy, we found that the nature of extended defects in the MeV range is quite different of what is observed in the keV range. In fact, in our implantation conditions, the generated extended defects are some kinds of planar clusters of gas-filled lenses, instead of platelets as commonly reported in the keV energy range. This result underlines that hydrogen behaves differently when it is introduced in silicon at high or low implantation energy. The activation energy of the growth of these extended defects is independent of the chosen fluence and is between (0.5–0.6) eV, which is very close to the activation energy reported for atomic hydrogen diffusion in a perfect silicon crystal.

  15. Surface layers in the 4A group metals with implanted silicon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovneristyj, Yu.K.; Vavilova, V.V.; Krasnopevtsev, V.V.; Galkin, L.N.; Kudyshev, A.N.; Klechkovskaya, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made on the change of structure and phase composition of fine near the surface layers of 4A group metals (Hf, Zr, Ti) during ion Si implantation and successive thermal annealing at elevated temperatures. Implantation of Si + ions with 30 or 16 keV energy in Ti, Zr and Hf at room temperature results to amorphization of metal surface layer. The surface hafnium and titanium layer with implanted Si atoms due to interaction with residual atmosphere of oxygen turns during annealing at 870 K to amorphous solid solution of HfO 2m or TiO 2 with Si, preventing further metal oxidation; layers of amorphous alloy are characterized by thermal stability up to 1270 K. Oxidation of the surface amorphous layer in residual oxygen atmosphere and its crystallization in ZrO 2 take place in result of Zr annealing with implanted Si ions at temperature not exceeding 870 K. Similar phenomena are observed in the case of hafnium with implanted oxygen ions or small dose of silicon ions. Thermal stability of amorphous layers produced during ion implantation of Si in Ti, Zr and Hf corresponds to scale resistance of monolithic alloys in Ti-Si, Zr-Si and Hf-Si systems

  16. Impact of implanted phosphorus on the diffusivity of boron and its applicability to silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrof, Julian; Müller, Ralph; Benick, Jan; Hermle, Martin; Reedy, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Boron diffusivity reduction in extrinsically doped silicon was investigated in the context of a process combination consisting of BBr 3 furnace diffusion and preceding Phosphorus ion implantation. The implantation of Phosphorus leads to a substantial blocking of Boron during the subsequent Boron diffusion. First, the influences of ion implantation induced point defects as well as the initial P doping on B diffusivity were studied independently. Here, it was found that not the defects created during ion implantation but the P doping itself results in the observed B diffusion retardation. The influence of the initial P concentration was investigated in more detail by varying the P implantation dose. A secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of the BSG layer after the B diffusion revealed that the B diffusion retardation is not due to potential P content in the BSG layer but rather caused by the n-type doping of the crystalline silicon itself. Based on the observations the B diffusion retardation was classified into three groups: (i) no reduction of B diffusivity, (ii) reduced B diffusivity, and (iii) blocking of the B diffusion. The retardation of B diffusion can well be explained by the phosphorus doping level resulting in a Fermi level shift and pairing of B and P ions, both reducing the B diffusivity. Besides these main influences, there are probably additional transient phenomena responsible for the blocking of boron. Those might be an interstitial transport mechanism caused by P diffusion that reduces interstitial concentration at the surface or the silicon/BSG interface shift due to oxidation during the BBr 3 diffusion process. Lifetime measurements revealed that the residual (non-blocked) B leads to an increased dark saturation current density in the P doped region. Nevertheless, electrical quality is on a high level and was further increased by reducing the B dose as well as by removing the first few nanometers of the silicon surface after the BBr 3

  17. Role of masking oxide on silicon in processes of defect generation at formation of SIMOX structures

    CERN Document Server

    Askinazi, A Y; Miloglyadova, L V

    2002-01-01

    One investigated into Si-SiO sub 2 structures formed by implantation of oxygen ions into silicon (SIMOX-technology) by means of techniques based on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics and by means of electroluminescence. One determined existence of electrically active centres and of luminescence centres in the formed oxide layer near boundary with silicon. One clarified the role SiO sub 2 masking layer in silicon in defect generation under formation of the masked oxide layer. One established dependence of concentration of electrically active and luminescence centres on thickness of masking layer

  18. Elastic properties of sub-stoichiometric nitrogen ion implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmanova, M.F., E-mail: marina.sarmanova@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Karl, H. [University Augsburg, Institute of Physics, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Mändl, S.; Hirsch, D. [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Mayr, S.G.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); University Leipzig, Institute for Experimental Physics II, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Elastic properties of sub-stoichiometric nitrogen implanted silicon were measured with nanometer-resolution using contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) as function of ion fluence and post-annealing conditions. The determined range of indentation moduli was between 100 and 180 GPa depending on the annealing duration and nitrogen content. The high indentation moduli can be explained by formation of Si–N bonds, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Thermal oxidation of silicon with two oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vild-Maior, A.A.; Filimon, S.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model for the thermal oxidation of silicon in wet oxygen is presented. It is shown that the presence of oxygen in the oxidation furnace has an important effect when the water temperature is not too high (less than about 65 deg C). The model is in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  20. Nickel silicide formation in silicon implanted nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Z.; Williams, J. S.; Pogany, A. P.; Sood, D. K.; Collins, G. A.

    1995-04-01

    Nickel silicide formation during the annealing of very high dose (≥4.5×1017 ions/cm2) Si implanted Ni has been investigated, using ion beam analytical techniques, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. An initial amorphous Si-Ni alloy, formed as a result of high dose ion implantation, first crystallized to Ni2Si upon annealing in the temperature region of 200-300 °C. This was followed by the formation of Ni5Si2 in the temperature region of 300-400 °C and then by Ni3Si at 400-600 °C. The Ni3Si layer was found to have an epitaxial relationship with the substrate Ni, which was determined as Ni3Si∥Ni and Ni3Si∥Ni for Ni(100) samples. The minimum channeling yield in the 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectra of this epitaxial layer improved with higher annealing temperatures up to 600 °C, and reached a best value measured at about 8%. However, the epitaxial Ni3Si dissolved after long time annealing at 600 °C or annealing at higher temperatures to liberate soluble Si into the Ni substrate. The epitaxy is attributed to the excellent lattice match between the Ni3Si and the Ni. The annealing behavior follows the predictions of the Ni-Si phase diagram for this nickel-rich binary system.

  1. Nano-structure and tribological properties of B+ and Ti+ co-implanted silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Noda, Katsutoshi; Yamauchi, Yukihiko

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics have been co-implanted with boron and titanium ions at a fluence of 2 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 and an energy of 200 keV. TEM results indicated that the boron and titanium-implanted layers were amorphized separately and titanium nitride nano-crystallites were formed in the titanium-implanted layer. XPS results indicated that the implantation profile varied a little depending on the ion implantation sequence of boron and titanium ions, with the boron implantation peak shifting to a shallower position when implanted after Ti + -implantation. Wear tests of these ion-implanted materials were carried out using a block-on-ring wear tester under non-lubricated conditions against commercially available silicon nitride materials. The specific wear rate was reduced by ion implantation and showed that the specific wear rate of Ti + -implanted sample was the lowest, followed by B + , Ti + co-implanted and B + -implanted samples

  2. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon: Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwanath, V. [Applied Materials, 3225 Oakmead Village Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95052 (United States); Demenev, E. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Department of Molecular Science and Nanosystems, Ca’Foscari University, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Giubertoni, D., E-mail: giuberto@fbk.eu [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Vanzetti, L. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Koh, A.L. [Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Stanford University, 476 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Steinhauser, G. [Colorado State University, Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Radioökologie und Strahlenschutz, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Meirer, F., E-mail: f.meirer@uu.nl [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Utrecht University, Utrecht 3584 CG (Netherlands); Foad, M.A. [Applied Materials, 3225 Oakmead Village Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95052 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Samples prepared by high fluence, low-energy PIII of AsH{sub 3}{sup +} on Si(1 0 0) were studied. • PIII is of high technological interest for ultra-shallow doping and activation. • We used a multi-technique approach to study the As-implanted surface. • We show that PIII presents a new set of problems that needs to be tackled. • The presented study goes toward understanding the root mechanisms involved. - Abstract: High fluence (>10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) low-energy (<2 keV) plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of AsH{sub 3}{sup +} on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon indicates that the layer is not only a result of deposition, but predominantly ion mixing. High fluence PIII introduces high concentration of arsenic, modifying the stopping power for incoming ions resulting in an increased deposition. When exposed to atmosphere, the arsenic rich layer spontaneously evolves forming arsenolite As{sub 2}O{sub 3} micro-crystals at the surface. The micro-crystal formation was monitored over several months and exhibits typical crystal growth kinetics. At the same time, a continuous growth of native silicon oxide rich in arsenic was observed on the exposed surface, suggesting the presence of oxidation enhancing factors linked to the high arsenic concentration at the surface.

  3. Extended defects and hydrogen interactions in ion implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sanjay

    The structural and electrical properties of extended defects generated because of ion implantation and the interaction of hydrogen with these defects have been studied in this work. Two distinct themes have been studied, the first where defects are a detrimental and the second where they are useful. In the first scenario, transient enhanced diffusion of boron has been studied and correlated with defect evolution studies due to silicon and argon ion implants. Spreading resistance profiles (SRP) correlated with deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements, reveal that a low anneal temperatures (TED at low anneal temperatures (550°C, the effect of hydrogen is lost, due to its out-diffusion. Moreover, due to catastrophic out-diffusion of hydrogen, additional damage is created resulting in deeper junctions in hydrogenated samples, compared to the non-hydrogenated ones. Comparing defect evolution due to Si and Ar ion implants at different anneal temperatures, while the type of defects is the same in the two cases, their (defect) dissolution occurs at lower anneal temperatures (˜850°C) for Si implants. Dissolution for Ar implants seems to occur at higher anneal temperatures. The difference has been attributed to the increased number of vacancies created by Ar to that of silicon implant. In second aspect, nano-cavity formation due to vacancy agglomeration has been studied by helium ion implantation and furnace anneal, where the effect of He dose, implant energy and anneal time have been processing parameters that have been varied. Cavities are formed only when the localized concentration of He is greater than 3 x 1020 cm-3. While at high implant doses, a continuous cavity layer is formed, at low implant doses a discontinuous layer is observed. The formation of cavities at low doses has been observed for the first time. Variation of anneal times reveal that cavities are initially facetted (for short anneal times) and tend to become spherical when annealed for

  4. Simulation of the proton implantation process in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccinelli, Martin; Hadley, Peter [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Solid State Physics (Austria); Jelinek, Moriz; Wuebben, Thomas [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Laven, Johannes G.; Schulze, Hans-Joachim [Infineon Technologies AG, Neubiberg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Proton implantation is one of many processes used to ad-just the electronic and mechanical properties of silicon. Though the process has been extensively studied, it is still not clear which exact defects are formed and what their concentration profiles are. In this article, a simulation method is presented, which provides a better understanding of the implantation process. The simulation takes into account the diffusion of mobile point defects and their reactions to defect complexes, as well as the dissociation of defect complexes. Concentration profiles for a set of defect complexes after an implantation at 400 keV and a dose of 5 x 10{sup 14} H{sup +}cm{sup -2} are presented. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. What's really behind the attack on silicone breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, M

    1996-09-09

    Millions of dollars are being awarded by injuries and a major company has been forced into bankruptcy because of litigation over silicone breast implants. Yet scientific research hasn't established a link between the implants and disease, notes Marcia Angell, executive editor of the New England Journal of Medicine. When she began studying the issue, this self-described feminist and liberal Democrat expected to uncover iniquities of big business and the implant manufacturers. Instead, she's written an indictment of the tort system, junk science, and the gullibility of the news media. Attorneys have twisted facts and played on the emotions of juries, with the consent of judges and often to the cheers of the press. Angell worries that it's now become politically correct to bash the scientific method in the name of diversity, multiculturalism, and feminism.

  6. Operation of low-energy ion implanters for Si, N, C ion implantation into silicon and glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carder, D.A.; Markwitz, A.

    2009-01-01

    This report details the operation of the low-energy ion implanters at GNS Science for C, N and Si implantations. Two implanters are presented, from a description of the components through to instructions for operation. Historically the implanters have been identified with the labels 'industrial' and 'experimental'. However, the machines only differ significantly in the species of ions available for implantation and sample temperature during implantation. Both machines have been custom designed for research purposes, with a wide range of ion species available for ion implantation and the ability to implant two ions into the same sample at the same time from two different ion sources. A fast sample transfer capability and homogenous scanning profiles are featured in both cases. Samples up to 13 mm 2 can be implanted, with the ability to implant at temperatures down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The implanters have been used to implant 28 Si + , 14 N + and 12 C + into silicon and glassy carbon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy has been used to analyse the implanted material. From the data a Si 30 C 61 N 9 layer was measured extending from the surface to a depth of about 77 ± 2 nm for (100) silicon implanted with 12 C + and 14 N + at multiple energies. Silicon and nitrogen ion implantation into glassy carbon produced a Si (40.5 %), C (38 %), N (19.5 %) and O (2%) layer centred around a depth of 50 ± 2 nm from the surface. (author). 8 refs., 20 figs

  7. Defects in boron ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, W.K.

    1975-05-01

    The crystal defects formed after post-implantation annealing of B-ion-implanted Si irradiated at 100 keV to a moderate dose (2 x 10 14 /cm 2 ) were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Contrast analysis and annealing kinetics show at least two different kinds of linear rod-like defects along broken bracket 110 broken bracket directions. One kind either shrinks steadily remaining on broken bracket 110 broken bracket at high temperatures (greater than 850 0 C), or transforms into a perfect dislocation loop which rotates toward broken bracket 112 broken bracket perpendicular to its Burgers vector. The other kind shrinks steadily at moderate temperatures (approximately 800 0 C). The activation energy for shrinkage of the latter (3.5 +- 0.1 eV) is the same as that for B diffusion in Si, suggesting that this linear defect is a boron precipitate. There also exist a large number of perfect dislocation loops with Burgers vector a/2broken bracket 110 broken bracket. The depth distribution of all these defects was determined by stereomicroscopy. The B precipitates lying parallel to the foil surfaces are shown to be at a depth of about 3500 +- 600 A. The loops are also at the same depth, but with a broader spread, +-1100 A. Si samples containing B and samples containing no B (P-doped) were irradiated in the 650-kV electron microscope. Irradiation at 620 0 C resulted in the growth of very long linear defects in the B-doped samples but not in the others, suggesting that at 620 0 C Si interstitials produced by the electron beam replace substitutional B some of which precipitates in the form of long rods along broken bracket 110 broken bracket. (DLC)

  8. XPS studies of SiO2 surface layers formed by oxygen ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, D.; Finster, J.

    1983-01-01

    SiO 2 surface layers of 160 nm thickness formed by 16 O + ion implantation into silicon are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements into the depth after a step-by-step chemical etching. The chemical nature and the thickness of the transition layer were determined. The results of the XPS measurements show that the outer surface and the bulk of the layers formed by oxygen implantation and subsequent high temperature annealing consist of SiO 2 . There is no evidence for Si or SiO/sub x/ (0 2 and Si is similar to that of thin grown oxide layers. Only its thickness is somewhat larger than in thermal oxide

  9. RBS/channeling analysis of hydrogen-implanted single crystals of FZ silicon and 6H silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Single crystals of FZ silicon and 6H silicon carbide were implanted with hydrogen ions (50 and 80 keV, respectively) to fluences from 2 x 10 16 H + /cm 2 to 2 x 10 18 H+/cm 2 . The implantations were carried out at three temperatures: approx.95K, 300 K, and approx.800 K. Swelling of the samples was measured by surface profilometry. RBS/channeling was used to obtain the damage profiles and to determine the amount of hydrogen retained in the lattice. The damage profiles are centered around X/sub m/ for the implants into silicon and around R/sub p/ for silicon carbide. For silicon carbide implanted at 95 K and 300 K and for silicon implanted at 95 K, the peak damage region is amorphous for fluences above 8 x 10 16 H + /cm 2 , 4 x 10 17 H + /cm 2 , and 2 x 10 17 H + /cm 2 , respectively. Silicon implanted at 300 and 800 K and silicon carbide implanted at 800 K remain crystalline up to fluences of 1 x 10 18 H + /cm 2 . The channeling damage results agree with previously reported TEM and electron diffraction data. The predictions of a simple disorder-accumulation model with a linear annealing term explains qualitatively the observed damage profiles in silicon carbide. Quantitatively, however, the model predicts faster development of the damage profiles than is observed at low fluences in both silicon and silicon carbide. For samples implanted at 300 and 800 K, the model also predicts substantially less peak disorder than is observed. The effect of the surface, the retained hydrogen, the shape of S/sub D/(X), and the need for a nonlinear annealing term may be responsible for the discrepancy

  10. Linguine sign at MR imaging: does it represent the collapsed silicone implant shell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, D P; DeBruhl, N D; Mund, D F; Bassett, L W

    1994-05-01

    One intact and one ruptured single-lumen implant were surgically placed in a rabbit. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed before and after surgical removal, and the ruptured implant was imaged after removal of the implant shell. Multiple curvilinear hypointense lines (linguine sign) were present in the MR images of the ruptured implant and of the implant shell alone immersed in saline solution but not in the image of the free silicone. The collapsed implant shell in a ruptured silicone implant does cause the linguine sign.

  11. The Clinical and Diagnostic Consequences of Poly Implant Prothese Silicone Breast Implants, Recalled from the European Market in 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijers, M.C.; Niessen, F.B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Recently, Poly Implant Prothèse silicone breast implants were recalled from the European market. The authors studied 112 women and previously published data on rupture prevalence. Women are presenting with symptoms they feel may be a result of ruptured implants. The authors' aim was to

  12. Triangulating the Position of Antimony Donors Implanted in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau-Oxton, Chloe; Nielsen, Erik; Luhman, Dwight; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    A potential candidate for a quantum bit is a single Sb atom implanted in silicon. A single-electron-transistor (SET) situated close to an Sb donor can be used to measure the occupancy and spin of the electron on the donor while the lithographically patterned poly-silicon gates defining the SET can be used to control donor occupancy. In our samples two clusters of Sb donors have been implanted adjacent to opposite sides of the SET through a self-aligned process. In this talk, we will present experimental results that allow us to determine the approximate position of different donors by determining their relative capacitance to pairs of the SET's poly-silicon gates. We will present the results of capacitive-based modeling calculations that allow us to further locate the position of the donors. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Osseointegrated silicone finger prosthesis using dental implants: a renovated technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Sankar, V Vijay; Chirumamilla, Naveen; Reddy, V Vamsikrishna

    2014-11-01

    In clinical practice, we come across patients with traumatically amputated or congenitally missing partial or complete fingers that can be restored using microsurgical replantation or transplantation procedures. However, in some cases this might not be possible due to systemic or local factors and the lost or missing part has to be replaced prosthetically to offer psychological and functional wellbeing. These prostheses can be constructed with various materials like acrylics or silicone retained with the help of auxiliary aids. However, these prostheses cause some hindrance in performing functions like writing, typing, etc. The aim of the present trial was to ameliorate the existing design of implant supported finger prosthesis. Distal phalange of middle finger replaced with implant supported silicone finger prosthesis is modified by utilizing a metal framework to support silicone material to improve rigidity while working. We could achieve a good function, esthetics and tactile sensibility with this modified design. Whenever, feasible this design can improve the performance and patients feel a deep sense of satisfaction and improved self-esteem with this modified prosthesis.

  14. Effect of dose and size on defect engineering in carbon cluster implanted silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Ryosuke; Masada, Ayumi; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Kadono, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryo; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko; Kurita, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-cluster-ion-implanted defects were investigated by high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy toward achieving high-performance CMOS image sensors. We revealed that implantation damage formation in the silicon wafer bulk significantly differs between carbon-cluster and monomer ions after implantation. After epitaxial growth, small and large defects were observed in the implanted region of carbon clusters. The electron diffraction pattern of both small and large defects exhibits that from bulk crystalline silicon in the implanted region. On the one hand, we assumed that the silicon carbide structure was not formed in the implanted region, and small defects formed because of the complex of carbon and interstitial silicon. On the other hand, large defects were hypothesized to originate from the recrystallization of the amorphous layer formed by high-dose carbon-cluster implantation. These defects are considered to contribute to the powerful gettering capability required for high-performance CMOS image sensors.

  15. Rapid Thermal annealing of silicon layers amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenack, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    The recrystallization behavior and the supression mechanisms of the residual defects of silicon layers amorphized by ion implantation, were investigated. The samples were annealed with the aid of a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system at temperature range from 850 to 1200 0 C, and annealing time up to 120 s. Random and aligned Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy were used to analyse the samples. Similarities in the recrystallization behavior for layers implanted with ions of the same chemical groups such as As or Sb; Ge, Sn or Pb, In or Ga, are observed. The results show that the effective supression of resisual defects of the recrystallired layers is vinculated to the redistribution of impurities via thermal diffusion. (author) [pt

  16. Molecular dynamics characterization of as-implanted damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Ivan; Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Lopez, Pedro; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the as-implanted damage produced in silicon by B, Si and Ge ions using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Implantations were carried out at 50 K to avoid damage migration and annealing. In order to make a statistical study of the damage features, we have simulated hundreds of independent cascades for each ion for the same nuclear deposited energy. We have obtained that the average number of displaced atoms (DA) from perfect lattice positions and the size of defect clusters formed increases with ion mass. This dependence has not been obtained from equivalent binary collisions simulations. This indicates that multiple interactions play an important role in the generation of damage. Amorphous regions are directly formed during the collisional phase of the cascade of Ge and Si ions

  17. Molecular dynamics characterization of as-implanted damage in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ivan [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: ivasan@ele.uva.es; Marques, Luis A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pelaz, Lourdes [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Lopez, Pedro [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Aboy, Maria [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Barbolla, Juan [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2005-12-05

    We have analyzed the as-implanted damage produced in silicon by B, Si and Ge ions using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Implantations were carried out at 50 K to avoid damage migration and annealing. In order to make a statistical study of the damage features, we have simulated hundreds of independent cascades for each ion for the same nuclear deposited energy. We have obtained that the average number of displaced atoms (DA) from perfect lattice positions and the size of defect clusters formed increases with ion mass. This dependence has not been obtained from equivalent binary collisions simulations. This indicates that multiple interactions play an important role in the generation of damage. Amorphous regions are directly formed during the collisional phase of the cascade of Ge and Si ions.

  18. Contribution to implanted silicon layers and their annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combasson, J.-L.

    1976-01-01

    Defects created by boron implantation in silicon have been characterized by measuring the diffusion coefficient during annealing. Implanted impurity distributions were calculated after analyzing the hypotheses relating to charged particle slowing down through matter. Profiles are predicted with a good accuracy, by replacing occasionally the electronic stopping law by an empirical law. The asymmetries predicted are generally observed but deviations may occur for crystalline targets, or when the ion is heavy with regard to the substrate (in the event the Thomas-Fermi potential is not yet valid due to the high impact parameters). When deviations are neglected, the displacement cascade from implantation is represented by a damage profile proportional to the distribution of the Frenkel pairs. The annealing of the implanted layers is characterized by three annealing stages. The first one (400 deg C-600 deg C) is imputed to divacancy annealing associated to the formation and migration of boron-vacancy complexes. The second one (500 deg C-650 deg C) is characterized by the Watkins replacement mechanism. At high temperatures, when the annealing duration is longer than that of precipitation, interstitial loops are dissolved, and the thermal diffusion of boron atoms involves the vacancy mechanism of thermal diffusion [fr

  19. Photoconduction in silicon rich oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Lopez, J A; Carrillo-Lopez, J; Flores-Gracia, F J; Garcia-Salgado, G [CIDS-ICUAP, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. Ed. 103 D and C, col. San Manuel, Puebla, Pue. Mexico 72570 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, M; Morales-Sanchez, A, E-mail: jluna@buap.siu.m, E-mail: jluna@inaoep.m [INAOE, Luis Enrique Erro No. 1, Apdo. 51, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico 72000 (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Photoconduction of silicon rich oxide (SRO) thin films were studied by current-voltage (I-V) measurements, where ultraviolet (UV) and white (Vis) light illumination were applied. SRO thin films were deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) technique, using SiH{sub 4} (silane) and N{sub 2}O (nitrous oxide) as reactive gases at 700 {sup 0}. The gas flow ratio, Ro = [N{sub 2}O]/[SiH{sub 4}] was used to control the silicon excess. The thickness and refractive index of the SRO films were 72.0 nm, 75.5 nm, 59.1 nm, 73.4 nm and 1.7, 1.5, 1.46, 1.45, corresponding to R{sub o} = 10, 20, 30 and 50, respectively. These results were obtained by null ellipsometry. Si nanoparticles (Si-nps) and defects within SRO films permit to obtain interesting photoelectric properties as a high photocurrent and photoconduction. These effects strongly depend on the silicon excess, thickness and structure type. Two different structures (Al/SRO/Si and Al/SRO/SRO/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS)-like structures) were fabricated and used as devices. The photocurrent in these structures is dominated by the generation of carriers due to the incident photon energies ({approx}3.0-1.6 eV and 5 eV). These structures showed large photoconductive response at room temperature. Therefore, these structures have potential applications in optoelectronics devices.

  20. Mammary prostheses may hide breast cancer. Silicon implants and cancer diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heywang, S H

    1987-10-30

    Mammoplasty with silicon implants is risky: In women wearing protheses of this type, carcinomas of the breast may be diagnosed in a more advanced stage than in women without silicon implants. This is the result of a study by US oncologists and was proved by observation in Grosshadern hospital, Munich. (orig.)

  1. Long-term health status of Danish women with silicone breast implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Vibeke B; Hölmich, Lisbet R; Brandt, Bodil

    2004-01-01

    Long-term safety data are important in the evaluation of possible adverse health outcomes related to silicone breast implants. The authors evaluated long-term symptoms and conditions and medication use among 190 Danish women with cosmetic silicone breast implants compared with 186 women who had u...

  2. Si-O compound formation by oxygen ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensel, E.; Wollschlaeger, K.; Kreissig, U.; Skorupa, W.; Schulze, D.; Finster, J.

    1985-01-01

    High dose oxygen ion implantation into silicon at 30 keV was performed to produce understoichiometric and stoichiometric surface oxide layers of approx. 160 nm thickness. The oxygen depth profile and oxide stoichiometry was determined by RBS and XPS. Si-O compound formation was found by IR spectroscopy and XPS in the unannealed samples as well as after target heating, furnace or flash lamp annealing. As implanted understoichiometric layers consist of random bonding like SiOsub(x) (O 2 after annealing. Unannealed stoichiometric layers are bond strained SiO 2 . The activation energies of demixing and of the annealing of bond strains are determined to 0.19 and 0.13 eV, respectively. The removing of bond strains occurs at temperatures >= 800 C in a time shorter than 1 s. The SiO 2 /Si transition region of unannealed stoichiometric layers consists of SiOsub(x) with an extent of about 10 nm. After annealing this extent diminishes to 0.8 to 1 nm in consequence of oxidation by excess oxygen from the overstoichiometric oxide region. This thickness is comparable with that of thermal oxide. (author)

  3. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mula, Guido, E-mail: guido.mula@unica.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Tiddia, Maria V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Falqui, Andrea [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Palmas, Simonetta; Mascia, Michele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica Chimica e dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Piazza d' Armi, 09126 Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    We present a study of the electrochemical oxidation process of porous silicon. We analyze the effect of the layer thickness (1.25–22 μm) and of the applied current density (1.1–11.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, values calculated with reference to the external samples surface) on the oxidation process by comparing the galvanostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and the optical specular reflectivity of the samples. The results of EIS were interpreted using an equivalent circuit to separate the contribution of different sample parts. A different behavior of the electrochemical oxidation process has been found for thin and thick samples: whereas for thin samples the oxidation process is univocally related to current density and thickness, for thicker samples this is no more true. Measurements by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy using a Scanning Electron Microscopy confirmed that the inhomogeneity of the electrochemical oxidation process is increased by higher thicknesses and higher currents. A possible explanation is proposed to justify the different behavior of thin and thick samples during the electrochemical process. - Highlights: • A multidisciplinary approach on porous Si electrochemical oxidation is proposed. • Electrochemical, optical, and structural characterizations are used. • Layer thickness and oxidation current effects are shown. • An explanation of the observed behavior is proposed.

  4. Homojunction silicon solar cells doping by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milési, Frédéric; Coig, Marianne; Lerat, Jean-François; Desrues, Thibaut; Le Perchec, Jérôme; Lanterne, Adeline; Lachal, Laurent; Mazen, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    Production costs and energy efficiency are the main priorities for the photovoltaic (PV) industry (COP21 conclusions). To lower costs and increase efficiency, we are proposing to reduce the number of processing steps involved in the manufacture of N-type Passivated Rear Totally Diffused (PERT) silicon solar cells. Replacing the conventional thermal diffusion doping steps by ion implantation followed by thermal annealing allows reducing the number of steps from 7 to 3 while maintaining similar efficiency. This alternative approach was investigated in the present work. Beamline and plasma immersion ion implantation (BLII and PIII) methods were used to insert n-(phosphorus) and p-type (boron) dopants into the Si substrate. With higher throughput and lower costs, PIII is a better candidate for the photovoltaic industry, compared to BL. However, the optimization of the plasma conditions is demanding and more complex than the beamline approach. Subsequent annealing was performed on selected samples to activate the dopants on both sides of the solar cell. Two annealing methods were investigated: soak and spike thermal annealing. Best performing solar cells, showing a PV efficiency of about 20%, was obtained using spike annealing with adapted ion implantation conditions.

  5. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilteanu, L.

    2010-12-01

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCut TM technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  6. Multimodality Imaging-based Evaluation of Single-Lumen Silicone Breast Implants for Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Stephen J; Sharma, Pooja B; Hayes, Jody C; Ganti, Ramapriya; Mootz, Ann R; Eads, Emily D; Teotia, Sumeet S; Evans, W Phil

    2017-01-01

    Breast implants are frequently encountered on breast imaging studies, and it is essential for any radiologist interpreting these studies to be able to correctly assess implant integrity. Ruptures of silicone gel-filled implants often occur without becoming clinically obvious and are incidentally detected at imaging. Early diagnosis of implant rupture is important because surgical removal of extracapsular silicone in the breast parenchyma and lymphatics is difficult. Conversely, misdiagnosis of rupture may prompt a patient to undergo unnecessary additional surgery to remove the implant. Mammography is the most common breast imaging examination performed and can readily depict extracapsular free silicone, although it is insensitive for detection of intracapsular implant rupture. Ultrasonography (US) can be used to assess the internal structure of the implant and may provide an economical method for initial implant assessment. Common US signs of intracapsular rupture include the "keyhole" or "noose" sign, subcapsular line sign, and "stepladder" sign; extracapsular silicone has a distinctive "snowstorm" or echogenic noise appearance. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most accurate and reliable means for assessment of implant rupture and is highly sensitive for detection of both intracapsular and extracapsular rupture. MR imaging findings of intracapsular rupture include the keyhole or noose sign, subcapsular line sign, and "linguine" sign, and silicone-selective MR imaging sequences are highly sensitive to small amounts of extracapsular silicone. © RSNA, 2017.

  7. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  8. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin, Chin-Che; Mendis, Suwan; Chew, Kerlit; Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin; Atabaev, Bakhtiyar; Adedeji, Victor; Rusli

    2010-01-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  9. Single- and double- lumen silicone breast implant integrity: prospective evaluation of MR and US criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, W A; Caskey, C I; Hamper, U M; Kuhlman, J E; Anderson, N D; Chang, B W; Sheth, S; Zerhouni, E A

    1995-10-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) criteria for breast implant integrity. One hundred twenty-two single-lumen silicone breast implants and 22 bilumen implants were evaluated with surface coil MR imaging and US and surgically removed. MR criteria for implant failure were a collapsed implant shell ("linguine sign"), foci of silicone outside the shell ("noose sign"), and extracapsular gel, US criteria were collapsed shell, low-level echoes within the gel, and "snowstorm" echoes of extracapsular silicone. Among single-lumen implants, MR imaging depicted 39 of 40 ruptures, 14 of 28 with minimal leakage; 49 of 54 intact implants were correctly interpreted. US depicted 26 of 40 ruptured implants, four of 28 with minimal leakage, and 30 of 54 intact implants. Among bilumen implants, MR imaging depicted four of five implants with rupture of both lumina and nine of 10 as intact; US depicted one rupture and helped identify two of 10 as intact. Mammography accurately depicted the status of 29 of 30 bilumen implants with MR imaging correlation. MR imaging depicts implant integrity more accurately than US; neither method reliably depicts minimal leakage with shell collapse. Mammography is useful in screening bilumen implant integrity.

  10. Nano-ridge fabrication by local oxidation of silicon edges with silicon nitride as a mask

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneveld, J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Maury, P.A.; Jansen, Henricus V.

    2005-01-01

    A method to fabricate nano-ridges over a full wafer is presented. The fabrication method uses local oxidation of silicon, with silicon nitride as a mask, and wet anisotropic etching of silicon. The realized structures are 7-20 nm wide, 40-100 nm high and centimeters long. All dimensions are easily

  11. Implanted Silicon Resistor Layers for Efficient Terahertz Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Abrahams, J.; Allen, C. A.; Benford, D. J.; Henry, R.; Stevenson, T.; Wollack, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2005-01-01

    Broadband absorption structures are an essential component of large format bolometer arrays for imaging GHz and THz radiation. We have measured electrical and optical properties of implanted silicon resistor layers designed to be suitable for these absorbers. Implanted resistors offer a low-film-stress, buried absorber that is robust to longterm aging, temperature, and subsequent metals processing. Such an absorber layer is readily integrated with superconducting integrated circuits and standard micromachining as demonstrated by the SCUBA II array built by ROE/NIST (1). We present a complete characterization of these layers, demonstrating frequency regimes in which different recipes will be suitable for absorbers. Single layer thin film coatings have been demonstrated as effective absorbers at certain wavelengths including semimetal (2,3), thin metal (4), and patterned metal films (5,6). Astronomical instrument examples include the SHARC II instrument is imaging the submillimeter band using passivated Bi semimetal films and the HAWC instrument for SOFIA, which employs ultrathin metal films to span 1-3 THz. Patterned metal films on spiderweb bolometers have also been proposed for broadband detection. In each case, the absorber structure matches the impedance of free space for optimal absorption in the detector configuration (typically 157 Ohms per square for high absorption with a single or 377 Ohms per square in a resonant cavity or quarter wave backshort). Resonant structures with -20% bandwidth coupled to bolometers are also under development; stacks of such structures may take advantage of instruments imaging over a wide band. Each technique may enable effective absorbers in imagers. However, thin films tend to age, degrade or change during further processing, can be difficult to reproduce, and often exhibit an intrinsic granularity that creates complicated frequency dependence at THz frequencies. Thick metal films are more robust but the requirement for

  12. A prospective study on silicone breast implants and the silicone-related symptom complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contant, C M E; Swaak, A J G; Obdeijn, A I M; van der Holt, B; Tjong Joe Wai, R; van Geel, A N; Eggermont, A M M

    2002-06-01

    This cohort study prospectively evaluated the prevalence of the silicone-related symptom complex (SRSC) in relation to antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of silicone breast implants (SBI) 1 year after implantation. A total of 57 women undergoing mastectomy followed by immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and SBI between March 1995 and March 1997 at the University Hospital Rotterdam/Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, were prospectively evaluated. Just before and 1 year after IBR the sera of these women were tested for the presence of ANA and they were screened for the prevalence of SRSC-related symptoms by questionnaire. All prostheses were evaluated by MRI 1 month and 1 year after IBR. Just before operation 11% of the women had a Sjögren score of more than 2, whereas 30% had such a score 1 year after IBR ( P = 0.01). One year postoperatively women had significantly more RA/Raynaud-related complaints: 21% preoperatively versus 40% 1 year after IBR ( P = 0.03). Within the undefined complaints-related group 19% had a score of 2 or more preoperatively and 33% 1 year after IBR ( P = 0.09). There were no new cases of ANA positivity 1 year after IBR. The linguine sign was seen by MRI in three implants: one 1 month after IBR and two 1 year after IBR. There was no relation to changes in SRSC expression and these MRI findings. In conclusion, 1 year after SBI implantation women had more SRSC-related complaints, especially Sjögren's and RA/Raynaud's. Moreover there was no correlation between elevated SRSC expression and changes in the presence of ANA or changes in MRI of the SBI 1 year after IBR.

  13. Blocking germanium diffusion inside silicon dioxide using a co-implanted silicon barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, D.; Wang, C.; Nélis, A.; Terwagne, G.; Rosei, F.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the effect of co-implanting a silicon sublayer on the thermal diffusion of germanium ions implanted into SiO2 and the growth of Ge nanocrystals (Ge-ncs). High-resolution imaging obtained by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements supported by Monte-Carlo calculations shows that the Si-enriched region acts as a diffusion barrier for Ge atoms. This barrier prevents Ge outgassing during thermal annealing at 1100 °C. Both the localization and the reduced size of Ge-ncs formed within the sample region co-implanted with Si are observed, as well as the nucleation of mixed Ge/Si nanocrystals containing structural point defects and stacking faults. Although it was found that the Si co-implantation affects the crystallinity of the formed Ge-ncs, this technique can be implemented to produce size-selective and depth-ordered nanostructured systems by controlling the spatial distribution of diffusing Ge. We illustrate this feature for Ge-ncs embedded within a single SiO2 monolayer, whose diameters were gradually increased from 1 nm to 5 nm over a depth of 100 nm.

  14. Silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Pacheco, Jose; Perry, Daniel; Wendt, Joel; Manginell, Ronald; Dominguez, Jason; Pluym, Tammy; Luhman, Dwight; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    Antimony donor implants next to silicon quantum dots have been detected with integrated solid-state diode detectors with single ion precision. Devices with counted number of donors have been fabricated and low temperature transport measurements have been performed. Charge offsets, indicative of donor ionization and coupling to the quantum dot, have been detected in these devices. The number of offsets corresponds to 10-50% of the number of donors counted. We will report on tunneling time measurements and spin readout measurements on the donor offsets. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Hydrothermal deposition and characterization of silicon oxide nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon oxide nanospheres with the average diameter of about 100 nm have been synthesized by hydrothermal deposition process using silicon and silica as the starting materials. The silicon oxide nanospheres were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, respectively. The results show that large scale silicon oxide nanospheres with the uniform size are composed of Si and O showing the amorphous structure. Strong PL peak at 435 nm is observed demonstrating the good blue light emission property

  16. Activation of boron and phosphorus atoms implanted in polycrystalline silicon films at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoh, Nobuyuki; Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Andoh, Yasunori

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus atoms implanted in laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon films were activated by a heat treatment in air at 260 deg. C for 1, 3 and 24 h. Analysis of ultraviolet reflectivity of phosphorus-doped silicon films implanted by ion doping method at 4 keV revealed that the thickness of the top disordered layer formed by ion bombardment was 6 nm. It is reduced to 4 nm by a 3 h heat treatment at 260 deg. C by recrystallization of disordered region. The electrical conductance of silicon films implanted increased to 1.7x10 5 S/sq after 3 h heat treatment

  17. Nitrogen implantation into silicon at 700-1100 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, G.A.; Tyschenko, I.E.; Popov, V.P.; Tijs, S.A.; Plotnikov, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogen ions 130-140 kW potential accelerated were implanted in silicon heated up to Ti=700-1100 deg C. Densities of ion current were 1-5 mcA/cm 2 , doses did not exceed 5x10 17 cm -2 . Initial stages of nitride formation in buried layers are investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering, layer-by-layer Augerspctroscopy and electron microscopy. It is determind, that Ti growth from 700 up to 900 deg C is accompanied by essential reduction of defectiveness of silicon near-the-surface layer at nitrogen retention within the limits of the calculation profile of ion ranges. At Ti=900 deg C nitrogen is rather mobile and at ∼5x10 16 cm -2 dose it is drown to α-Si 3 N 4 crystalling extraction in R p range. Beginning from Ti ≅1000 deg C nitrogen is not retained in the furied layer and diffuses to the surface. No essenstial losses of nitrogen due to evaporation or inside diffusion are observed. It is noted, that critical Ti, when nitrogen is accumulated in the buried layer, correspond to critical temperatures, when light ions introduce essential structure distortions. Conclusion is made, that irradition-introduced distortions of structure represent centres of initiation and growth of nitride phase. At 1150 deg C additional annaling during 3 hs nitrogen, occurring outside the stable extraction, is redistributed between th surface and furied layers, sintering in narrow concentration peaks

  18. Implantation of oxygen ions for the realization of SOS (silicon on insulator) structures: SIMOX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margail, J.

    1987-03-01

    Highdose oxygen implantation is becoming a serious candidate for SOI (silicon on insulator) structure realization. The fabrication condition study of these substrates allowed to show up the implantation and annealing parameter importance for microstructure, and particularly for crystal quality of silicon films. It has been shown that the use of high temperature annealings leads to high quality substrates: monocrystal silicon film without any precipitate, at the card scale; Si/Si O 2 interface formation. After annealing at 1340 O C, Hall mobilities have been measured in silicon film, and its residual doping is very low. First characteristics and performance of submicron CMOS circuits prooves the electric quality of these substrates [fr

  19. Correlation between MRI results and intraoperative findings in patients with silicone breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenblatt, Nicole; El-Rabadi, Karem; Helbich, Thomas H; Czembirek, Heinrich; Deutinger, Maria; Benditte-Klepetko, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Silicone gel breast implants may silently rupture without detection. This has been the main reason for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the augmented or reconstructed breast. The aim of the present study was to investigate the accuracy of MRI for implant rupture. Fifty consecutive patients with 85 silicone gel implants were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 51 (range 21-72) years, with a mean duration of implantation of 3.8 (range 1-28) years. All patients underwent clinical examination and breast MRI. Intraoperative implant rupture was diagnosed by the operating surgeon. Nineteen of the 50 patients suffered from clinical symptoms. An implant rupture was diagnosed by MRI in 22 of 85 implants (26%). In seven of 17 removed implants (41%), the intraoperative diagnosis corresponded with the positive MRI result. However, only 57% of these patients were symptomatic. Ultrasound imaging of the harvested implants showed signs of interrupted inner layers of the implant despite integrity of the outer shell. By microsurgical separation of the different layers of the implant shell, we were able to reproduce this phenomenon and to produce signs of implant rupture on MRI. Our results show that rupture of only the inner layers of the implant shell with integrity of the outer shell leads to a misdiagnosis on MRI. Correlation with clinical symptoms and the specific wishes of the patient should guide the indication for implant removal.

  20. Paramagnetism in ion-implanted oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, Torben Esmann; Gíslason, Hafliði Pétur; Ólafsson, Sveinn

    This thesis describes the investigation on para-magnetism in dilute ion-implanted single-crystal oxide samples studied by on- and off-line $^{57}$Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ion-implantation of the radioactive isotopes ( $^{57}$Mn and $^{57}$Co) was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The off-line measurements were performed at Aarhus University, Denmark. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a unique method, giving simultaneously local information on valence/spin state of the $^{57}$Fe probe atoms, site symmetry and magnetic properties on an atomic scale. The utilisation of emission Mössbauer spectroscopy opens up many new possibilities compared with traditional transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with a low concentration below 10$^{-4}$ –10$^{-3}$ at.%, where the implanted Mössbauer $^{57}$Fe probes are truly dilute impurities exclusively interacting with their nearest neighbours and therefore the possibility of crea...

  1. Use of silicone implants in reconstructive plastic surgery for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers procedures for reconstructive plastic operations, by using silicone implants, in patients with breast cancer. It analyzes 592 primary breast repairs and evaluates their aesthetic effects and complications. The surgical procedures are described.

  2. Investigation into the surface of implanted monocrystalline silicon with the aid of wetting angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, N.N.; Bakovets, V.V.; Sedymova, E.A.; Pridachin, N.B.

    1986-01-01

    The dependence of silicon wetting margical angle on its irradiation dose by ions of electrically active and neutral materials is studied. It has been found that the system of immiscible liquids - ether and water can be successfully used for studying the silicon ion implantation effect on its water wetting. Changing of implanted silicon wetting is bound up with the increase of the defects presence level of surface layers. The specimens annealing reestablishes silicon wetting up to parameters characteristic of non irradiated specimens. The most effective annealing region is within the 550-700 deg C range. The implanted silicon wetting by melts at increased temperatures can be employed for studying kinetics and defect annealing mechanism

  3. Simulation of the diffusion of implanted impurities in silicon structures at the rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, F.F.; Komarov, A.F.; Mironov, A.M.; Makarevich, Yu.V.; Miskevich, S.A.; Zayats, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Physical and mathematical models and numerical simulation of the diffusion of implanted impurities during rapid thermal treatment of silicon structures are discussed. The calculation results correspond to the experimental results with a sufficient accuracy. A simulation software system has been developed that is integrated into ATHENA simulation system developed by Silvaco Inc. This program can simulate processes of the low-energy implantation of B, BF 2 , P, As, Sb, C ions into the silicon structures and subsequent rapid thermal annealing. (authors)

  4. The oxidized porous silicon field emission array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Demroff, H.P.; Elliott, T.S.; Kasprowicz, T.B.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.K.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Trost, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of developing a highly efficient microwave power source has led the authors to investigate new methods of electron field emission. One method presently under consideration involves the use of oxidized porous silicon thin films. The authors have used this technology to fabricate the first working field emission arrays from this substance. This approach reduces the diameter of an individual emitter to the nanometer scale. Tests of the first samples are encouraging, with extracted electron currents to nearly 1 mA resulting from less than 20 V of pulsed DC gate voltage. Modulated emission at 5 MHz was also observed. Developments of a full-scale emission array capable of delivering an electron beam at 18 GHz of minimum density 100 A/cm 2 is in progress

  5. Safely re-integrating silicone breast implants into the plastic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladfelter, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    In the early 1990s, it was reported that silicone breast implants were possibly responsible for serious damage to women's health. In January 1992, the Food and Drug Administration issued a voluntary breast implant moratorium and, in April, issued a ban on the use of silicone gel-filled implants for cosmetic breast augmentation. Since that time, silicone gel-filled breast implants have been available to women only for select cases: women seeking breast reconstruction or revision of an existing breast implant, women who have had breast cancer surgery, a severe injury to the breast, a birth defect that affects the breast, or a medical condition causing a severe breast deformity. Since the ban on the use of silicone gel-filled breast implants for cosmetic breast augmentation, numerous scientific studies have been conducted. To ensure patient safety, the American Board of Plastic Surgery believes that these scientific studies and the Food and Drug Administration's scrutiny of silicone gel-filled breast implants have been appropriate and necessary.

  6. Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells Using AlOx and Plasma-Immersion Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsien Lin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum oxide (AlOx and plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII were studied in relation to passivated silicon heterojunction solar cells. When aluminum oxide (AlOx was deposited on the surface of a wafer; the electric field near the surface of wafer was enhanced; and the mobility of the carrier was improved; thus reducing carrier traps associated with dangling bonds. Using PIII enabled implanting nitrogen into the device to reduce dangling bonds and achieve the desired passivation effect. Depositing AlOx on the surface of a solar cell increased the short-circuit current density (Jsc; open-circuit voltage (Voc; and conversion efficiency from 27.84 mA/cm2; 0.52 V; and 8.97% to 29.34 mA/cm2; 0.54 V; and 9.68%; respectively. After controlling the depth and concentration of nitrogen by modulating the PIII energy; the ideal PIII condition was determined to be 2 keV and 10 min. As a result; a 15.42% conversion efficiency was thus achieved; and the Jsc; Voc; and fill factor were 37.78 mA/cm2; 0.55 V; and 0.742; respectively.

  7. Double-step annealing and ambient effects on phosphorus implanted emitters in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koji, T.; Tseng, W.F.; Mayer, J.W.; Suganuma, T.

    1979-01-01

    Emitters of npn silicon bipolar transistors have been made by a phosphorus implantation at 50 keV P + to a dose of 1 x 10 16 cm -2 . This was followed by high temperature processes to reduce lattice disorder, to drive-in the phosphorus atoms, and to form oxide layers. The first process step was carried out by using single- and double-step anneals in various ambients (dry N 2 , dry 0 2 and steam) while the drive-in and oxidation steps were common for all structures. Electrical measurements on emitter/base leakage current, low frequency (popcorn) noise and current gain showed that the annealing ambient had a major influence. The transistors with implanted emitters annealed in a dry N 2 ambient are comparable to commercial ones with thermally-diffused emitters. Transmission electron microscopy observations on samples annealed in steam ambients revealed dislocations extending into the sidewall of the emitter/base junction. This sidewell penetration of dislocations is the main origin of the degradation of the emitter/base junction characteristics. (author)

  8. Correlation between MRI results and intraoperative findings in patients with silicone breast implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Lindenblatt (Nicole); K. El-Rabadi (Karem); T. Helbich (Thomas); H. Czembirek (Heinrich); M. Deutinger (Maria); H. Benditte-Klepetko (Heike)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Silicone gel breast implants may silently rupture without detection. This has been the main reason for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the augmented or reconstructed breast. The aim of the present study was to investigate the accuracy of MRI for implant rupture.

  9. MR imaging of silicone breast implants: evaluation of prospective and retrospective interpretations and interobserver agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, S F; Neubauer, N M; Sheley, R C; Demlow, T A; Szumowski, J

    1996-01-01

    MR imaging was used to evaluate the integrity of silicone breast implants in 54 women with 108 implants. MR images were interpreted by relatively inexperienced readers who tried to reproduce the experiences reported in the literature. The study examines the interobserver agreement using different diagnostic signs and the influence of experience on interpretation errors. Prospective and retrospective interpretations were compared with surgical findings at the time of explanation. Diagnostic indicators, including the linguine sign, the inverted tear drop sign, the C sign, water droplets mixed with silicone, and extracapsular globules of silicone, were evaluated for diagnostic efficacy and interobserver agreement. The prospective sensitivity and specificity were 87% and 78%, respectively. With the retrospective interpretations, the sensitivity and specificity increased to 93% and 92%, respectively. Most of the prospective false-positive interpretations were due to misinterpreting radial folds as signs of implant rupture. Six implants interpreted retrospectively as false positives had gross amounts of silicone around the implants at surgery but there were no obvious rents in the implant shells. There was fair to excellent interobserver agreement with the individual diagnostic signs except for extracapsular globules of silicone. All of the signs had specificities of greater than 90%. The sensitivities of the individual signs were less than the overall retrospective sensitivity. With experience, the sensitivity improved from 87% to 93% and the specificity improved from 78% to 92%. This study helps substantiate the use of diagnostic signs used by other authors to detect silicone loss from breast implants by MR imaging; however, questions remain as to the clinical role of MR imaging in evaluating implants for silicone loss.

  10. Complete suppression of boron transient-enhanced diffusion and oxidation-enhanced diffusion in silicon using localized substitutional carbon incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, M. S.; Chang, C.-L.; Sturm, J. C.; Büyüklimanli, T.

    1998-12-01

    In this letter, we show the ability, through introduction of a thin Si1-x-yGexCy layer, to eliminate the enhancement of enhanced boron diffusion in silicon due to an oxidizing surface or ion implant damage. This reduction of diffusion is accomplished through a low-temperature-grown thin epitaxial Si1-x-yGexCy layer which completely filters out excess interstitials introduced by oxidation or ion implant damage. We also quantify the oxidation-enhanced diffusion (OED) and transient-enhanced diffusion (TED) dependence on substitutional carbon level, and further report both the observation of carbon TED and OED, and its dependence on carbon levels.

  11. Spectroellipsometric detection of silicon substrate damage caused by radiofrequency sputtering of niobium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Tivadar; Serényi, Miklós; Szilágyi, Edit; Zolnai, Zsolt; Czigány, Zsolt; Khánh, Nguyen Quoc; Petrik, Péter; Fried, Miklós

    2017-11-01

    Substrate surface damage induced by deposition of metal atoms by radiofrequency (rf) sputtering or ion beam sputtering onto single-crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface has been characterized earlier by electrical measurements. The question arises whether it is possible to characterize surface damage using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). In our experiments niobium oxide layers were deposited by rf sputtering on c-Si substrates in gas mixture of oxygen and argon. Multiple angle of incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were performed, a four-layer optical model (surface roughness layer, niobium oxide layer, native silicon oxide layer and ion implantation-amorphized silicon [i-a-Si] layer on a c-Si substrate) was created in order to evaluate the spectra. The evaluations yielded thicknesses of several nm for the i-a-Si layer. Better agreement could be achieved between the measured and the generated spectra by inserting a mixed layer (with components of c-Si and i-a-Si applying the effective medium approximation) between the silicon oxide layer and the c-Si substrate. High depth resolution Rutherford backscattering (RBS) measurements were performed to investigate the interface disorder between the deposited niobium oxide layer and the c-Si substrate. Atomic resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy investigation was applied to visualize the details of the damaged subsurface region of the substrate.

  12. Investigation of MeV-Cu implantation and channeling effects into porous silicon formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Naddaf, M.

    2011-01-01

    P-type (1 1 1) silicon wafers were implanted by copper ions (2.5 MeV) in channeling and random directions using ion beam accelerator of the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS). The effect of implantation direction on formation process of porous silicon (PS) using electrochemical etching method has been investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. SEM observations revealed that the size, shape and density of the formed pores are highly affected by the direction of beam implantation. This in turn is seen to influence the PL behavior of the PS.

  13. Investigation of MeV-Cu implantation and channeling effects into porous silicon formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Naddaf, M.

    2012-01-01

    P-type (1 1 1) silicon wafers were implanted by copper ions (2.5 MeV) in channeling and random directions using ion beam accelerator of the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS). The effect of implantation direction on formation process of porous silicon (PS) using electrochemical etching method has been investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. SEM observations revealed that the size, shape and density of the formed pores are highly affected by the direction of beam implantation. This in turn is seen to influence the PL behavior of the PS.(author)

  14. Investigation of MeV-Cu implantation and channeling effects into porous silicon formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M.; Naddaf, M.

    2011-11-01

    P-type (1 1 1) silicon wafers were implanted by copper ions (2.5 MeV) in channeling and random directions using ion beam accelerator of the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS). The effect of implantation direction on formation process of porous silicon (PS) using electrochemical etching method has been investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. SEM observations revealed that the size, shape and density of the formed pores are highly affected by the direction of beam implantation. This in turn is seen to influence the PL behavior of the PS.

  15. The annealing of phosphorus-implanted silicon investigated at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, C.; Burkhardt, F.

    1978-01-01

    Phosphorus ions are implanted at 50 keV into misaligned silicon crystals at 20 and 300 0 C, respectively. The ion doses used are 8 x 10 13 and 8 x 10 14 cm -2 , respectively. After annealing treatments the electrical properties of the samples are investigated by measuring Hall effect and sheet resistivity in the range from 300 to 4.2 K. The experimental results indicate some problems which must be taken into account for interpreting Hall effect measurements made at room temperature only. Furthermore the results give some new information on the annealing process in phosphorus implanted silicon and the influence of the implantation parameters. (author)

  16. Effects of silicone expanders and implants on echocardiographic image quality after breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatti, Marco; Mantovani, Francesca; Bertelli, Luca; Barbieri, Andrea; Pacchioni, Lucrezia; Loschi, Pietro; De Santis, Giorgio

    2013-08-01

    Use of silicone expanders and implants is the most common breast reconstruction technique after mastectomy. Postmastectomy patients often need echocardiographic monitoring of potential cardiotoxicity induced by cancer chemotherapy. The impairment of the echocardiographic acoustic window caused by silicone implants for breast augmentation has been reported. This study investigates whether the echocardiographic image quality was impaired in women reconstructed with silicone expanders and implants. The records of 44 consecutive women who underwent echocardiographic follow-up after breast reconstruction with expanders and implants at the authors' institution from January of 2000 to August of 2012 were reviewed. The population was divided into a study group (left or bilateral breast expanders/implants, n=30) and a control group (right breast expanders/implants, n=14). The impact of breast expanders/implants on echocardiographic image quality was tested (analysis of covariance model). Patients with a breast expander/implant (left or bilateral and right breast expanders/implants) were included. The mean volume of the breast devices was 353.2±125.5 cc. The quality of the echocardiographic images was good or sufficient in the control group; in the study group, it was judged as adequate in only 50 percent of cases (15 patients) and inadequate in the remaining 15 patients (pimplants in postmastectomy left breast reconstruction considerably reduce the image quality of echocardiography. This may have important clinical implications, given the need for periodic echocardiographic surveillance before and during chemotherapy. Therapeutic, III.

  17. Passivating electron contact based on highly crystalline nanostructured silicon oxide layers for silicon solar cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stuckelberger, J.; Nogay, G.; Wyss, P.; Jeangros, Q.; Allebe, Ch.; Debrot, F.; Niquille, X.; Ledinský, Martin; Fejfar, Antonín; Despeisse, M.; Haug, F.J.; Löper, P.; Ballif, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 158, Dec (2016), s. 2-10 ISSN 0927-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : surface passivation * passivating contact * nanostructure * silicon oxide * nanocrystalline * microcrystalline * poly-silicon * crystallization * Raman * transmission line measurement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.784, year: 2016

  18. Silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp fabrication by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2007-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp employing edge lithography in combination with silicon nitride deposition is presented. The fabrication process is based on conventional photolithography an weg etching methods. Nanoridges with width dimension of sub-20 nm were fabricated by edge

  19. Development of Doped Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide and its Application to Thin‑Film Silicon Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertz, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the development of doped microcrystalline silicon oxide (µc‑SiOx:H) alloys and its application in thin‑film silicon solar cells. The doped µc‑SiOx:H material was prepared from carbon dioxide (CO2), silane (SiH4), hydrogen (H2) gas mixtures using plasma enhanced

  20. XPS studies of SiO/sub 2/ surface layers formed by oxygen ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, D.; Finster, J. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Chemie); Hensel, E.; Skorupa, W.; Kreissig, U. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic))

    1983-03-16

    SiO/sub 2/ surface layers of 160 nm thickness formed by /sup 16/O/sup +/ ion implantation into silicon are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements into the depth after a step-by-step chemical etching. The chemical nature and the thickness of the transition layer were determined. The results of the XPS measurements show that the outer surface and the bulk of the layers formed by oxygen implantation and subsequent high temperature annealing consist of SiO/sub 2/. There is no evidence for Si or SiO/sub x/ (0oxide layers. Only its thickness is somewhat larger than in thermal oxide.

  1. The influence of ion implantation on the oxidation of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goode, P.D.

    1975-11-01

    The effects of ion implantation on the oxidation of polycrystalline nickel have been studied for a range of implanted species: viz. He, Li, Ne, Ca, Ti, Ni, Co, Xe, Ce and Bi. The oxides were grown in dry oxygen at 630 0 C and the 16 O(d,p) 17 O nuclear reaction technique used to determine the amount of oxygen taken up. The influence of atomic and ionic size, valency and electronegativity of the implanted impurities was studied as also were the effects of ion bombardment damage and the influence of sputtering during implantation. Atomic size and the annealing of disorder were found to have a marked influence on oxide growth rate. The dependence of oxidation on annealing was further studied by implanting polycrystalline specimens with self ions and observing the oxide growth rate as a function of annealing temperature. A peak in the curve was found at 400 0 C and a similar peak observed at a somewhat higher temperature for oxidised single crystals. It is concluded that the oxidation rate will be influenced by those factors which alter the epitaxial relationship between metal and growing oxide. Such factors include atomic size of the implanted species, surface strain induced by implantation and changes in surface topography as a result of sputtering. In addition a model based on vacancy assisted cation migration is proposed to explain enhanced oxidation observed over a limited temperature range. (author)

  2. Electrochemical investigations of ion-implanted oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.W.; Danzfuss, B.; Meyer, O.; Stimming, U.

    1985-01-01

    Oxide films (passive films) of 40-50 nm thickness were prepared by anodic polarization of hafnium and titanium electrodes up to 20 V. Multiple-energy ion implantation of palladium, iron and xenon was used in order to obtain modified films with constant concentration profiles of the implanted ions. Rutherford backscattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and electrochemical charging curves prove the presence of implanted ions, but electrochemical and photoelectrochemical measurements indicate that the dominating effect of ion implantation is the disordering of the oxide film. The capacity of hafnium electrodes increases as a result of an increase in the dielectric constant D. For titanium the Schottky-Mott analysis shows that ion implantation causes an increase in D and the donor concentration N. Additional electronic states in the band gap which are created by the implantation improve the conductivity of the semiconducting or insulating films. This is seen in the enhancement of electron transfer reactions and its disappearance during repassivation and annealing. Energy changes in the band gap are derived from photoelectrochemical measurements; the absorption edge of hafnium oxide films decreases by approximately 2 eV because of ion implantation, but it stays almost constant for titanium oxide films. All changes in electrochemical behavior caused by ion implantation show little variation with the nature of the implanted ion. Hence the dominating effect seems to be a disordering of the oxide. (Auth.)

  3. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  4. Density of oxidation-induced stacking faults in damaged silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, F.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Verwey, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    A model for the relation between density and length of oxidation-induced stacking faults on damaged silicon surfaces is proposed, based on interactions of stacking faults with dislocations and neighboring stacking faults. The model agrees with experiments.

  5. Analysis of buried etch-stop layers in silicon by nitrogen-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, M.C.; Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Garrido, B.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of the etch-stop properties of layers obtained by substoichiometric nitrogen-ion implantation and annealing in silicon has been performed as a function of the implantation conditions. The analysis of the etching efficiency has been tested in TMAH-IPA systems. The results obtained show the need to implant at doses higher than 2 x 10 17 cm -2 to obtain etch-stop layers stable under high-temperature annealing. So, for implantation doses of 5 x 10 17 cm -2 , layers stand unetched for times longer than 2 h. The preliminary structural analysis of the samples suggests the presence of an amorphous silicon nitride layer for higher implantation doses. (author)

  6. Analysis of buried etch-stop layers in silicon by nitrogen-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acero, M.C.; Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J. (Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (CNM-CSIC), Bellaterra (Spain)); Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Garrido, B.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R. (Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Electronica)

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of the etch-stop properties of layers obtained by substoichiometric nitrogen-ion implantation and annealing in silicon has been performed as a function of the implantation conditions. The analysis of the etching efficiency has been tested in TMAH-IPA systems. The results obtained show the need to implant at doses higher than 2 x 10[sup 17] cm[sup -2] to obtain etch-stop layers stable under high-temperature annealing. So, for implantation doses of 5 x 10[sup 17] cm[sup -2], layers stand unetched for times longer than 2 h. The preliminary structural analysis of the samples suggests the presence of an amorphous silicon nitride layer for higher implantation doses. (author).

  7. The influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulinich O. A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface silicon layers in silicon – dioxide silicon systems with modern methods of research are investigated. It is shown that these layers have compound structure and their parameters depend on oxidation and initial silicon parameters. It is shown the influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon.

  8. Patient satisfaction with postmastectomy breast reconstruction: a comparison of saline and silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Colleen M; Klassen, Anne F; Cano, Stefan J; Scott, Amie; Vanlaeken, Nancy; Lennox, Peter A; Alderman, Amy K; Mehrara, Babak J; Disa, Joseph J; Cordeiro, Peter G; Pusic, Andrea L

    2010-12-15

    At a time when the safety and effectiveness of breast implants remains under close scrutiny, it is important to provide reliable and valid evidence regarding patient outcomes. In the setting of postmastectomy reconstruction, patient satisfaction and quality of life may be the most significant outcome variables when evaluating surgical success. The objective of the current study was to identify predictors of patient satisfaction with breast appearance, including implant type, in a large sample of women who underwent breast reconstruction surgery using implants. A multicenter, cross-sectional study design was used. A total of 672 women who had completed postmastectomy, implant-based reconstruction at 1 of 3 centers in North America were asked to complete the BREAST-Q (Reconstruction Module). Multivariate linear regression modeling was performed. Completed questionnaire data were available for 482 of the 672 patients. In 176 women, silicone implants were placed and in 306, saline implants were used. The multivariate model confirmed that patients' satisfaction with their breasts was significantly higher in patients with silicone implants (P = .016). The receipt of postmastectomy radiotherapy was found to have a significant, negative effect on breast satisfaction (Pimplant recipients. In addition, for women who received either silicone or saline implants, satisfaction diminished over time (P = .017). In the setting of postmastectomy reconstruction, patients who received silicone breast implants reported significantly higher satisfaction with the results of reconstruction than those who received saline implants. This information can be used to optimize shared medical decision-making by providing patients with realistic postoperative expectations. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  9. Oxidation of ultra low carbon and silicon bearing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Lucia [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: lucia.suarez@ctm.com.es; Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es; Houbaert, Yvan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be; Colas, Rafael [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)], E-mail: rcolas@mail.uanl.mx

    2010-06-15

    Oxidation tests were carried out in samples from an ultra low carbon and two silicon bearing steels to determine the distribution and morphology of the oxide species present. The ultra low carbon steel was oxidized for short periods of time within a chamber designed to obtain thin oxide layers by controlling the atmosphere, and for longer times in an electric furnace; the silicon steels were reheated only in the electric furnace. The chamber was constructed to study the behaviour encountered during the short period of time between descaling and rolling in modern continuous mills. It was found that the oxide layers formed on the samples reheated in the electric furnace were made of different oxide species. The specimens treated in the chamber had layers made almost exclusively of wustite. Selected oxide samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy to obtain electron backscattered diffraction patterns, which were used to identify the oxide species in the layer.

  10. Oxide layers for silicon detector protection against enviroment effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'tsazh, E.; Brylovska, I.; Valerian, M.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that for protection of silicon detectors of nuclear radiations oxide layers could be used. The layers are produced by electrochemical oxidation of silicon surface with the following low-temperature annealing. These layers have characteristics similar to those for oxide layers produced by treatment of silicon samples at elevated temperature in oxygen flow. To determine properties of oxide layers produced by electrochemical oxidation the α-particle back-scattering method and the method of volt-farad characteristics were used. Protection properties of such layers were checked on the surface-barrier detectors. It was shown that protection properties of such detectors were conserved during long storage at room temperature and during their storage under wet-bulb temperature. Detectors without protection layer have worsened their characteristics

  11. Catalytic oxidation of silicon by cesium ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souzis, A.E.; Huang, H.; Carr, W.E.; Seidl, M.

    1991-01-01

    Results for room-temperature oxidation of silicon using cesium ion bombardment and low oxygen exposure are presented. Bombardment with cesium ions is shown to allow oxidation at O 2 pressures orders of magnitude smaller than with noble gas ion bombardment. Oxide layers of up to 30 A in thickness are grown with beam energies ranging from 20--2000 eV, O 2 pressures from 10 -9 to 10 -6 Torr, and total O 2 exposures of 10 0 to 10 4 L. Results are shown to be consistent with models indicating that initial oxidation of silicon is via dissociative chemisorption of O 2 , and that the low work function of the cesium- and oxygen-coated silicon plays the primary role in promoting the oxidation process

  12. Effect of recoiled O on damage regrowth and electrical properties of through-oxide implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.; Wu, N.R.; Washburn, J.; Current, M.; Morgan, A.; Reed, D.; Maenpaa, M.

    1982-10-01

    High dose (4 to 7.5 x 10 15 cm -2 ) As implantations into p-type (100) Si have been carried out through a screen-oxide of thicknesses less than or equal to 775A and without screen oxide. The effect of recoiled O on damage annealing and electrical properties of the implanted layers has been investigated using a combination of the following techniques: TEM, RBS/MeV He + channeling, SIMS and Hall measurements in conjunction with chemical stripping and sheet resistivity measurements. The TEM results show that there is a dramatically different annealing behavior of the implantation damage for the through oxide implants (Case I) as compared to implants into bare silicon (Case II). Comparison of the structural defect profiles with O distributions obtained by SIMS demonstrated that retardation in the secondary damage growth in Case I can be directly related with the presence of O. Weak-beam TEM showed that a high density of fine defect clusters (less than or equal to 50A) were present both in Case I and Case II. The electrical profiles showed only 30% of the total As to be electrically active. The structural and electrical results have been explained by a model that entails As-O, Si-O and As-As complex formation and their interaction with the dislocations

  13. Al and Cu Implantation into Silicon Substrate for Ohmic Contact in Solar Cell Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Sulamdari; Sudjatmoko; Wirjoadi; Yunanto; Bambang Siswanto

    2002-01-01

    Research on the implantation of Al and Cu ions into silicon substrate for ohmic contact in solar cell fabrication has been carried using ion accelerator machine. Al and Cu ions are from 98% Al and 99.9% Cu powder ionized in ion source system. provided in ion implantor machine. Before implantation process, (0.5 x 1) cm 2 N type and P type silicon were washed in water and then etched in Cp-4A solution. After that, P type silicon were implanted with Al ions and N type silicon were implanted with Cu ions with the ions dose from 10 13 ion/cm 2 - 10 16 ion/cm 2 and energy 20 keV - 80 keV. Implanted samples were then annealed at temperature 400 o C - 850 o C. Implanted and annealed samples were characterized their resistivities using four point probe FPP-5000. It was found that at full electrically active conditions the ρ s for N type was 1.30 x 10 8 Ω/sq, this was achieved at ion dose 10 13 ion/cm 2 and annealing temperature 500 o C. While for P type, the ρ s was 1.13 x 10 2 Ω/sq, this was achieved at ion dose 10 13 ion/cm 2 and energy 40 keV, and annealing temperature 500 o C. (author)

  14. Mechanical grooving of oxidized porous silicon to reduce the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarroug, A.; Dimassi, W.; Ouertani, R.; Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre des Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, we are interested to use oxidized porous silicon (ox-PS) as a mask. So, we display the creating of a rough surface which enhances the absorption of incident light by solar cells and reduces the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si). It clearly can be seen that the mechanical grooving enables us to elaborate the texturing of monocrystalline silicon wafer. Results demonstrated that the application of a PS layer followed by a thermal treatment under O2 ambient easily gives us an oxide layer of uniform size which can vary from a nanometer to about ten microns. In addition, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy investigations of the PS layer illustrates the possibility to realize oxide layer as a mask for porous silicon. We found also that this simple and low cost method decreases the total reflectivity (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Long-Term Health Outcomes in Women With Silicone Gel Breast Implants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Ethan M; Earley, Amy; Avendano, Esther A; Raman, Gowri

    2016-02-02

    Silicone gel breast implants were removed from the U.S. market for cosmetic use in 1992 owing to safety concerns. They were reintroduced in 2006, with a call for improved surveillance of clinical outcomes. To systematically review the literature regarding specific long-term health outcomes in women with silicone gel breast implants, including cancer; connective tissue, rheumatologic, and autoimmune diseases; neurologic diseases; reproductive issues, including lactation; offspring issues; and mental health issues (depression and suicide). MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ovid Healthstar (inception through 30 June 2015), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (through the first quarter of 2015). 4 researchers double-screened articles for longitudinal studies that compared women with and without breast implants and reported long-term health outcomes of interest. 4 researchers extracted data on participant and implant characteristics, analytic methods, and results. 32 studies (in 58 publications) met eligibility criteria. Random-effects model meta-analyses of effect sizes were conducted when feasible. For most outcomes, there was at most only a single adequately adjusted study, which usually found no significant associations. There were possible associations with decreased risk for primary breast and endometrial cancers and increased risks for lung cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, and Raynaud syndrome. Evidence on breast implants and other outcomes either was limited or did not exist. The evidence was most frequently not specific to silicone gel implants, and studies were rarely adequately adjusted for potential confounders. The evidence remains inconclusive about any association between silicone gel implants and long-term health outcomes. Better evidence is needed from existing large studies, which can be reanalyzed to clarify the strength of associations between silicone gel implants and health outcomes

  16. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  17. Integration of functional complex oxide nanomaterials on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel eVila-Fungueiriño

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of standard wafer-scale semiconductor processing with the properties of functional oxides opens up to innovative and more efficient devices with high value applications that can be produced at large scale. This review uncovers the main strategies that are successfully used to monolithically integrate functional complex oxide thin films and nanostructures on silicon: the chemical solution deposition approach (CSD and the advanced physical vapor deposition techniques such as oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Special emphasis will be placed on complex oxide nanostructures epitaxially grown on silicon using the combination of CSD and MBE. Several examples will be exposed, with a particular stress on the control of interfaces and crystallization mechanisms on epitaxial perovskite oxide thin films, nanostructured quartz thin films, and octahedral molecular sieve nanowires. This review enlightens on the potential of complex oxide nanostructures and the combination of both chemical and physical elaboration techniques for novel oxide-based integrated devices.

  18. Histological study on acute inflammatory reaction to polyurethane-coated silicone implants in rats Estudo histológico da reação inflamatória aguda ao implante de silicone revestido com poliuretano em ratos

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Roberto da Silva Mendes; Jorge Bins-Ely; Eduardo Arnaut dos Santos Lima; Zulmar Antonio Accioli de Vasconcellos; Armando José d'Acampora; Rodrigo d' Eça Neves

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evaluating histologically the silicone peri-implant coated by polyurethane inflammation associated to the use of anti-microbial and bacterial contamination. METHODS: It was used 35 Wistar rats. The animals were divided in seven groups: I - Control; II - implant cavity contamination with10 bacteria/ml; III - implant cavity contamination with 10 bacteria/ml; IV - implant cavity contamination with 10 bacteria/ml; V - identical contamination to group II and implant immersions in anti-mic...

  19. Annealing effect of H+ -implanted single crystal silicon on strain and crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duo Xinzhong; Liu Weili; Zhang Miao; Gao Jianxia; Fu Xiaorong; Lin Chenglu

    2000-01-01

    The work focuses on the rocking curves of H + -implanted single silicon crystal detected by Four-Crystal X-ray diffractometer. The samples were annealed under different temperatures. Lattice defect in H + -implanted silicon crystals was detected by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. It appeared that H-related complex did not crush until annealing temperature reached about 400 degree C. At that temperature H 2 was formed, deflated in silicon lattice and strained the lattice. But defects did not come into being in large quantity. The lattice was undamaged. When annealing temperature reached 500 degree C, strain induced by H 2 deflation crashed the silicon lattice. A large number of defects were formed. At the same time bubbles in the crystal and blister/flaking on the surface could be observed

  20. Controlled localised melting in silicon by high dose germanium implantation and flash lamp annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelskow, Matthias; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Pezoldt, Joerg; Kups, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    High intensity light pulse irradiation of monocrystalline silicon wafers is usually accompanied by inhomogeneous surface melting. The aim of the present work is to induce homogeneous buried melting in silicon by germanium implantation and subsequent flash lamp annealing. For this purpose high dose, high energy germanium implantation has been employed to lower the melting temperature of silicon in a predetermined depth region. Subsequent flash lamp irradiation at high energy densities leads to local melting of the germanium rich buried layer, whereby the thickness of the molten layer depends on the irradiation energy density. During the cooling down epitaxial crystallization takes place resulting in a largely defect-free layer. The combination of buried melting and dopant segregation has the potential to produce unusually buried doping profiles or to create strained silicon structures.

  1. Modification of the refractive index and the dielectric constant of silicon dioxide by means of ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, J.W.; Diniz, J.A.; Doi, I.; Moraes, M.A.B. de

    2000-01-01

    The modification of silicon dioxide films by means of ion implantation of fluorine and carbon was studied. 19 F + and 12 C + ions were separately and sequentially implanted in 250 nm thick thermal SiO 2 films with energies ranging from 10 to 50 keV and fluences in the interval 5x10 15 to 5x10 16 cm -2 . Metal/oxide/semiconductor (MOS) capacitors were fabricated on half side of the wafers. The implanted SiO 2 /Si samples were characterized by means of ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The MOS capacitors were used to determine the relative dielectric constant. Our results indicate a considerable reduction of the dielectric constant and refractive index. The refractive index was reduced from 1.46 to 1.29 when only fluorine was implanted or when fluorine with a higher dose was implanted in combination with carbon. For the same conditions, a relative dielectric constant of 3.4 was obtained and a shift in the Si-O bond stretching mode from 1085 to 1075 cm -1 was observed by FTIR spectroscopy

  2. Use of porous silicon to minimize oxidation induced stacking fault defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, S.Y.; Evans, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents methods for minimizing stacking fault defects, generated during oxidation of silicon, include damaging the back of the wafer or depositing poly-silicon on the back. In either case a highly defective structure is created and this is capable of gettering either self-interstitials or impurities which promote nucleation of stacking fault defects. A novel method of minimizing these defects is to form a patch of porous silicon on the back of the wafer by electrochemical etching. Annealing under inert gas prior to oxidation may then result in the necessary gettering. Experiments were carried out in which wafers were subjected to this treatment. Subsequent to oxidation, the wafers were etched to remove oxide and reveal defects. The regions of the wafer adjacent to the porous silicon patch were defect-free, whereas remote regions had defects. Deep level transient spectroscopy has been used to examine the gettering capability of porous silicon, and the paper discusses the mechanism by which the porous silicon getters

  3. Radiological and echographic aspects of breasts with silicone implants; Aspectos radiologicos e ecograficos das mamas com protese de silicone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace Bauab, S de [Instituto de Radiodiagnostico Rio Preto, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil)

    1994-10-01

    The silicone prosthesis, its application in breast augmentation mammoplasty and the studies about its association with auto-immune diseases and cancer, are commented. The normal and the pathologic radiologic and echographic aspects of breasts with implants are discussed, concerning to the prosthesis itself and to the adjacent parenchyma. The validity of mammographic and ultrasound mammography in the detection of cancer and of alterations of the implants are emphasized and also the importance of exams of high technical quality.(author). 16 refs, 13 figs.

  4. The fabrication of silicon nanostructures by focused-ion-beam implantation and TMAH wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievilae, Paeivi; Chekurov, Nikolai; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2010-01-01

    Local gallium implantation of silicon by a focused ion beam (FIB) has been used to create a mask for anisotropic tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) wet etching. The dependence of the etch stop properties of gallium-doped silicon on the implanted dose has been investigated and a dose of 4 x 10 13 ions cm -2 has been determined to be the threshold value for achieving observable etching resistance. Only a thin, approx. 50 nm, surface layer is found to be durable enough to serve as a mask with a high selectivity of at least 2000:1 between implanted and non-implanted areas. The combined FIB-TMAH process has been used to generate various types of 3D nanostructures including nanochannels separated by thin vertical sidewalls with aspect ratios up to 1:30, ultra-narrow (approx. 25 nm) freestanding bridges and cantilevers, and gratings with a resolution of 20 lines μm -1 .

  5. Measurement of mobility profile in ion-implanted silicon layers using electroreflection spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiev, G.B.; Kapaev, V.V.; Mokerov, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility is shown of the application of the low field linearized electroreflection spectroscopy for the measurement of profiles of carriers mobilities μ(x) simultaneously with the concentration profiles N(x) in thin ion-implanted silicon layers. The μ(χ) value is determined from the calibration curve of the dependence of the phenomenological broadening parameter γ on the mobility for uniformly doped samples. The results are presented for the measurements of the profiles μ(x) for boron- and arsenic-implanted silicon

  6. Defect generation/passivation by low energy hydrogen implant for silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopori, B.L.; Zhou, T.Q.; Rozgonyi, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Low energy ion implant is shown to produce defects in silicon. These defects include surface damage, hydrogen agglomeration, formation of platelets with (111) habit plane and decoration of dislocations. Hydrogen also produces an inversion type of surface on boron doped silicon. These effects indicate that a preferred approach for passivation is to incorporate hydrogen from the back side of the cell. A backside H + implant technique is described. The results show that degree of passivation differs for various devices. A comparison of the defect structures of hydrogenated devices indicates that the structure and the distribution of defects in the bulk of the material plays a significant role in determining the degree of passivation

  7. Immunophenotypic characterization of human T cells after in vitro exposure to different silicone breast implant surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cappellano

    Full Text Available The most common complication of silicone breast implants is capsular contracture (massive scar formation around the implant. We postulate that capsular contracture is always a sequel to inflammatory processes, with both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms participating. In general, fibroblasts and macrophages have been used as cell types to evaluate in vitro the biocompatibility of breast implant surfaces. Moreover, also T cells have been found at the implant site at the initial stage of fibrous capsule formation. However, only few studies have addressed the influence of surfaces with different textures on T-cell responses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the immune response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC to commercially available silicone breast implants in vitro. PBMC from healthy female blood donors were cultured on each silicone surface for 4 days. Proliferation and phenotype of cultured cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Cytokine levels were determined by multiplex and real-time assay. We found that silicone surfaces do not induce T-cell proliferation, nor do they extensively alter the proportion of T cell subsets (CD4, CD8, naïve, effector memory. Interestingly, cytokine profiling identified matrix specific differences, especially for IL-6 and TNF-α on certain surface topographies that could lead to increased fibrosis.

  8. Silicon Quantum Dots with Counted Antimony Donor Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Meenakshi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Pacheco, Jose L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Perry, Daniel Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Garratt, E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Ten Eyck, Gregory A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Wendt, Joel R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Manginell, Ronald P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Luhman, Dwight [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Bielejec, Edward S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Lilly, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Carroll, Malcolm S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies

    2015-10-01

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. A focused ion beam is used to implant close to quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of ions implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. Regular coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization, are observed in devices with counted implants.

  9. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M., E-mail: msingh@sandia.gov; Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87175 (United States); Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  10. Systematic review of the effectiveness of polyurethane-coated compared with textured silicone implants in breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Paula J; Harvey, James R

    2016-04-01

    Silicone gel implants are used worldwide for breast augmentation and breast reconstruction. Textured silicone implants are the most commonly placed implant, but polyurethane-coated implants are increasingly being used in an attempt to ameliorate the long-term complications associated with implant insertion. This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and www.ClinicalTrials.gov were undertaken in March 2014 using keywords. Following data extraction, 18 studies were included in the review, including four core studies of textured silicone implants and five studies reporting outcomes for polyurethane-coated silicone implants. There are no clear data reporting revision rates in patients treated with polyurethane implants. In the primary reconstructive setting, capsular contracture rates with silicone implants are 10-15% at 6 years, whilst studies of polyurethane implants report rates of 1.8-3.4%. In the primary augmentation setting, core studies show a capsular contracture rate of 2-15% at 6 years compared with 0.4-1% in polyurethane-coated implants; however, the polyurethane studies are limited by their design and poor follow-up. The use of polyurethane implants should be considered a safe alternative to textured silicone implants. It is likely that an implant surface does influence short- and long-term outcomes; however, the extent of any benefit cannot be determined from the available evidence base. Future implant studies should target the short- and long-term benefits of implant surfacing by procedure with defined outcome measures; a head-to-head comparison would help clarify outcomes. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon nanotube network-silicon oxide non-volatile switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Albert D; Araujo, Paulo T; Xu, Runjie; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2014-12-08

    The integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon is important for their incorporation into next-generation nano-electronics. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile switch that utilizes carbon nanotube networks to electrically contact a conductive nanocrystal silicon filament in silicon dioxide. We form this device by biasing a nanotube network until it physically breaks in vacuum, creating the conductive silicon filament connected across a small nano-gap. From Raman spectroscopy, we observe coalescence of nanotubes during breakdown, which stabilizes the system to form very small gaps in the network~15 nm. We report that carbon nanotubes themselves are involved in switching the device to a high resistive state. Calculations reveal that this switching event occurs at ~600 °C, the temperature associated with the oxidation of nanotubes. Therefore, we propose that, in switching to a resistive state, the nanotube oxidizes by extracting oxygen from the substrate.

  12. The relationship of silicone breast implants and cancer at other sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Louise A

    2007-12-01

    Although most attention regarding the effects of silicone breast implants on cancer risk has focused on breast cancer, there have also been concerns regarding effects on other cancers. This includes malignancies that could occur as a result of foreign-body carcinogenesis (sarcomas) or immune alterations (hematopoietic malignancies), or cancers suggested as possibly elevated on the basis of previous epidemiologic studies (cancers of the cervix, vulva, lung, and brain). Searches of the English language literature on the topic of silicone breast implants and cancer risk were conducted and reviewed to determine relationships that might have etiologic relevance. Epidemiologic studies provide no support for an increased risk of either sarcoma or multiple myeloma among breast implant recipients, disputing clinical and laboratory findings suggesting such a link. Although a number of epidemiologic studies have demonstrated elevated risks of cervical, vulvar, and lung cancers among breast implant patients, it is likely that these excesses relate more to lifestyle characteristics (e.g., cigarette smoking, sexual behavior) than to the effects of the implants. Brain cancer excesses, suggested in one study, have not been confirmed in either an update of the mortality experience in this study or on the basis of other investigations. At present, there is no convincing evidence that breast implants alter the risk of nonbreast malignancies. Breast implant patients should continue to be monitored for longer term risks and to assess whether cancer risk is influenced by various patient and implant characteristics.

  13. Adhesive, abrasive and oxidative wear in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-01-01

    Ion implantation is increasingly being used to provide wear resistance in metals and cemented tungsten carbides. Field trials and laboratory tests indicate that the best performance is achieved in mild abrasive wear. This can be understood in terms of the classification of wear modes (adhesive, abrasive, oxidative etc.) introduced by Burwell. Surface hardening and work hardenability are the major properties to be enhanced by ion implantation. The implantation of nitrogen or dual implants of metallic and interstitial species are effective. Recently developed techniques of ion-beam-enhanced deposition of coatings can further improve wear resistance by lessening adhesion and oxidation. In order to support such hard coatings, ion implantation of nitrogen can be used as a preliminary treatment. There is thus emerging a versatile group of related hard vacuum treatments involving intense beams of nitrogen ions for the purpose of tailoring metal surfaces to resist wear. (Auth.)

  14. Oxidation under electron bombardment. A tool for studying the initial states of silicon oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriere, B.; Deville, J.P.; El Maachi, A.

    1987-06-01

    The exciting beam of an Auger electron spectrometer has been used to monitor the oxidation of silicon single crystals at room temperature and very low pressures of oxygen (approx. 10/sup -7/ Torr). This process allows us to build ultra-thin layers of silica on silicon (down to 30 A) but it is mostly used to investigate the mechanisms of the initial stages of oxidation. Auger spectra recorded continuously during the oxidation process provide information on (1) the nature of the silicon-oxygen chemical bonds which are interpreted through fine structure in the Auger peak, and (2) the kinetics of oxide formation which are deduced from curves of Auger signal versus time. An account is given of the contribution of these Auger studies to the description of the intermediate oxide layer during the reaction between silicon and oxygen and the influence of surface structural disorder, induced mainly by argon-ion bombardment, is discussed in terms of reactivity and oxide coverage.

  15. Oxidation of mullite-zirconia-alumina-silicon carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, C.; Moya, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the isothermal oxidation of mullite-alumina-zirconia-silicon carbide composites obtained by reaction sintering studied in the temperature interval 800 degrees to 1400 degrees C. The kinetics of the oxidation process was related to the viscosity of the surface glassy layer as well as to the crystallization of the surface film. The oxidation kinetics was halted to T ≤ 1300 degrees C, presumably because of crystallization

  16. Correlation between MRI results and intraoperative findings in patients with silicone breast implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindenblatt N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicole Lindenblatt,1 Karem El-Rabadi,2 Thomas H Helbich,2 Heinrich Czembirek,3 Maria Deutinger,4 Heike Benditte-Klepetko5 1Division of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Department of Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Medical University of Vienna - General Hospital Vienna, 3Department of Radiology, Hospital Wiener Privatklinik, 4Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Hospital Rudolfstiftung, Vienna, Austria; 5Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Background: Silicone gel breast implants may silently rupture without detection. This has been the main reason for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the augmented or reconstructed breast. The aim of the present study was to investigate the accuracy of MRI for implant rupture. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with 85 silicone gel implants were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 51 (range 21–72 years, with a mean duration of implantation of 3.8 (range 1–28 years. All patients underwent clinical examination and breast MRI. Intraoperative implant rupture was diagnosed by the operating surgeon. Results: Nineteen of the 50 patients suffered from clinical symptoms. An implant rupture was diagnosed by MRI in 22 of 85 implants (26%. In seven of 17 removed implants (41%, the intraoperative diagnosis corresponded with the positive MRI result. However, only 57% of these patients were symptomatic. Ultrasound imaging of the harvested implants showed signs of interrupted inner layers of the implant despite integrity of the outer shell. By microsurgical separation of the different layers of the implant shell, we were able to reproduce this phenomenon and to produce signs of implant rupture on MRI. Conclusion: Our results show that rupture of only the inner layers of the implant shell with integrity of

  17. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  18. Annealing of Al implanted 4H silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallen, A; Suchodolskis, A; Oesterman, J; Abtin, L; Linnarsson, M

    2006-01-01

    Al ions were implanted with multiple energies up to 250 keV at elevated temperatures in n-type 4H SiC epitaxial layers to reach a surface concentration of 1x10 20 cm -3 . These samples were then annealed at temperatures between 1500 and 1950 deg. C. A similar 4H SiC epitaxial sample was implanted by MeV Al ions to lower doses and annealed only at 200 and 400 deg. C. After annealing, cross-sections of the samples were characterized by scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM). The results show that the resistivity of high-dose Al implanted samples has not reached a saturated value, even after annealing at the highest temperature. For the MeV Al implanted sample, the activation of Al has not yet started, but a substantial annealing of the implantation induced damage can be seen from the SSRM depth profiles

  19. Oxidation kinetics of CVD silicon carbide and silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term oxidation behavior of pure, monolithic CVD SiC and Si3N4 is studied, and the isothermal oxidation kinetics of these two materials are obtained for the case of 100 hrs at 1200-1500 C in flowing oxygen. Estimates are made of lifetimes at the various temperatures investigated. Parabolic rate constants for SiC are within an order of magnitude of shorter exposure time values reported in the literature. The resulting silica scales are in the form of cristobalite, with cracks visible after exposure. The oxidation protection afforded by silica for these materials is adequate for long service times under isothermal conditions in 1-atm dry oxygen.

  20. Study of Silicon/silicon, Silicon/silicon Dioxide, and Metal-Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, To Chi

    A variable-energy positron beam is used to study Si/Si, Si/SiO_2, and metal-oxide -semiconductor (MOS) structures. The capability of depth resolution and the remarkable sensitivity to defects have made the positron annihilation technique a unique tool in detecting open-volume defects in the newly innovated low temperature (300^circC) molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) Si/Si. These two features of the positron beam have further shown its potential role in the study of the Si/SiO_2. Distinct annihilation characteristics has been observed at the interface and has been studied as a function of the sample growth conditions, annealing (in vacuum), and hydrogen exposure. The MOS structure provides an effective way to study the electrical properties of the Si/SiO_2 interface as a function of applied bias voltage. The annihilation characteristics show a large change as the device condition is changed from accumulation to inversion. The effect of forming gas (FG) anneal is studied using positron annihilation and the result is compared with capacitance-voltage (C -V) measurements. The reduction in the number of interface states is found correlated with the changes in the positron spectra. The present study shows the importance of the positron annihilation technique as a non-contact, non-destructive, and depth-sensitive characterization tool to study the Si-related systems, in particular, the Si/SiO_2 interface which is of crucial importance in semiconductor technology, and fundamental understanding of the defects responsible for degradation of the electrical properties.

  1. Destiny rides again: the reappearance of silicone gel-filled breast implant toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawer, A E

    2017-09-01

    Background Twenty-five years ago attorneys representing ailing women in class action litigation against silicone breast implant manufacturers made the procedural error of defining silicone-induced toxicity in the courtroom before it was properly studied in the exam room. This aberrant methodology perverted the proper research process, rendered verification of any real disease elusive, and cemented the groundwork for a repeat public health crisis potentially affecting two million women in the USA who possess new silicone gel devices inserted over the past 10 years. Patients and methods Six women, previously well, aged 27 to 53 (mean 42), were recipients of the new generations of cohesive silicone gel-filled breast implants approved for general use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since December of 2006. They averaged seven years of total implantation time, and none experienced implant rupture. Results All six became ill on average 3.5 years from the time of implantation. By seven years the women manifested multiple types of skin rashes, polyarthritis, fatigue, protracted AM stiffness, myalgias, headaches, photosensitivity, hair loss, paresthesias, tinnitus, lymphadenopathy, chest pain, cognitive dysfunction, dry eyes, skin pigment changes, itching, muscle twitching, dizziness, nausea, easy bruising, and odor and smell sensitivity. Three of the four who were explanted noted improvement and/or resolution of at least 50% of their total disease manifestations. Conclusions These six women are representative of over 70,000 other breast implant recipients who, over the past three years, have had their new silicone devices permanently removed because of alleged gel-induced toxicity. The recurrence of this public health crisis has been fueled by manufacturers' research fraud, FDA ineptness, faulty informed consent, patient abandonment, proprietary manufacturing secrecy, misleading advertising, physician indifference, aberrant research methodology, and lax

  2. In-Situ Photoexcitation-Induced Suppression of Point Defect Generation in Ion Implanted Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.R.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Yarykin, N.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of vacancy-related defects in n-type silicon has been studied immediately after implantation of He, Si, or Ge ions at 85 K using in-situ DLTS. A-center concentrations in He-implanted samples reach a maximum immediately after implantation, whereas, with Si or Ge ion implanted samples they continuously increase during subsequent anneals. It is proposed that defect clusters, which emit vacancies during anneals, are generated in the collision cascades of Si or Ge ions. An illumination-induced suppression of A-center formation is seen immediately after implantation of He ions at 85 K. This effect is also observed with Si or Ge ions, but only after annealing. The suppression of vacancy complex formation via photoexcitation is believed to occur due to an enhanced recombination of defects during ion implantation, and results in reduced number of vacancies remaining in the defect clusters. In p-type silicon, a reduction in K-center formation and an enhanced migration of defects are concurrently observed in the illuminated sample implanted with Si ions. These observations are consistent with a model where the injection of excess carriers modifies the defect charge state and impacts their diffusion

  3. Model of the recrystallization mechanism of amorphous silicon layers created by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosd, R.M.

    1979-11-01

    The recrystallization behavior during annealing of thin films of amorphous (α) silicon, in contact with a single crystal silicon substrate (referred to as C), has been studied in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The amorphous film is created during high dose phosphorus ion implantation at 100 keV. It was found that the crystal substrate orientation and the implantation temperature have dramatic effects on the recrystallizaton rate, and the defect microstructure produced during annealing. Specifically, (100) wafers implanted at 77 0 K contain only a low density of dislocation loops, but when the same wafer is implanted at room temperature the dislocation density is increased drastically. (111) wafers, when implanted at 77 0 K show a high density of microtwins, but as the implantation temperature is increased a gradual increase in the density of dislocation loops is observed along with a reduction of the microtwins. At an implantation temperature of about 100 0 C both orientations give an identical defect microstructure when annealed, which is a dense tangle of dislocations

  4. Can interposition of a silicone implant after sapheno-femoral ligation prevent recurrent varicose veins?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Maeseneer, M. G.; Giuliani, D. R.; van Schil, P. E.; de Hert, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether a silicone implant at the sapheno-femoral ligation site could prevent recurrent varicosities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two non-randomised groups of patients were studied prospectively. In group A 173 patients and 212 limbs had sapheno-femoral ligation, while 172

  5. Mixing of phosphorus and antimony ions in silicon by recoil implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, H.L.; Lam, Y.W.; Wong, S.P.; Poon, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of mixing phosphorus and antimony ions in silicon by recoil implantation were examined. The electrical properties after ion mixing were investigated, and the results were compared with those obtained using other techniques. Different degrees of activation were also studied, by investigating the annealing behaviour. (U.K.)

  6. The oxidation behaviour of lanthanum implanted stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, F.J.; Respaldiza, M.A.; Luna, C.; Botella, J.; Soares, C.G.; da Silva, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    Rare earth oxide deposition onto stainless steel surfaces has been attempted as a way of improving corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. The improvement in the corrosion behaviour has been related to the modification of the diffusion mechanisms through the chromia protective layer. In a previous work we have postulated the formation of a LaCrO 3 as responsible for such a behaviour. Among the alternatives to deposit reactive elements, ion implantation has been chosen as a way of obtaining surface and/or subsurface alloys with the desired composition. During ion implantation, a modification of the alloy structure may also occur, resulting in a way of testing the influence of the alloy structure on the oxidation behaviour. In the present work we propose two procedures for obtaining the refractory behaviour implantation in the bulk alloy and in controlled preoxidized layers. Ion fluency has been chosen in such a way that final rare earth element concentration falls within the limits experimentally observed as adequate using wet chemistry methods. Excellent parabolic oxidation is observed in every case showing the efficiency of the implantation method both in the implanted bulk alloy as well as in the preoxidized specimens. The differences in the oxidation kinetics are related to the surface composition and to the structure of the implanted materials. (author)

  7. Critical microstructure for ion-implantation gettering effects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geipel, H.J.; Tice, W.K.

    1977-01-01

    The nature of residual ion-implantation damage responsible for gettering deleterious impurities from active semiconductor device regions in Si has been studied. A propensity for dislocations of the type b=1/2 to gather metallic contaminant (e.g., Cu), as compared to Frank partials b=1/3 , is established. Transmission electron microscopy and pulsed leakage measurements are used to demonstrate that the density of 1/2 dislocations introduced by Xe implantation greatly influences gettering efficiency

  8. Structural and photoluminescent properties of a composite tantalum oxide and silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Becerril, T.; Herrera, V.; Morales, C.; García-Salgado, G.; Rosendo, E.; Coyopol, A.; Galeazzi, R.; Romano, R.; Nieto-Caballero, F.G.; Sarmiento, J.

    2017-01-01

    Tantalum oxide crystals encrusted in a silicon oxide matrix were synthesized by using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition system (HFCVD). A solid source composed by a mixture in different percentages of Ta 2 O 5 and silicon (Si) powders were used as reactants. The films were grown at 800 °C and 1000 °C under hydrogen ambient. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. From the XPS results it was confirmed the formation of a mixture of Tantalum oxide, silicon oxide and Si nanoparticles (Ta 2 O 5- SiO 2 -Si(nc)) as seen from the Si (2p) and Ta (4f) lines corresponding to Si + and Ta + states respectively. Ta 2 O 5 and Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in the silicon oxide films were observed on HRTEM images which corroborate the XPS results. Finally the emission properties of the films exhibited a broad band from 400 to 850 nm caused by the independent PL properties of tantalum oxide and Si-NCs that compose the film. The intensity of the emissions was observed to be dependent on both temperature of deposition and the ratio Ta 2 O 5 /Si, used as initial reactants. Results from this work might supply useful data for the development of future light emitter devices.

  9. Etch-stop behavior of buried layers formed by substoichiometric nitrogen ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R.; Acero, M.C. Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J.; El-Hassani, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this work the etch-stop behavior of buried layers formed by substoichiometric nitrogen ion implantation into silicon is studied as a function of the processing parameters, the implantation dose and temperature, and the presence of capping layers during implantation. Etching characteristics have been probed using tetramethylammonium hydroxide or KOH solutions for different times up to 6 h. Results show that, after annealing, the minimum dose required for the formation of an efficient etch-stop layer is about 4 x 10 17 cm -2 , for an implantation energy of 75 keV. This is defined as a layer with an efficient etch selectivity in relation to Si of s ≥ 100. For larger implantation doses efficient etch selectivities larger than 100 are obtained. However, for these doses a considerable density of pits is observed in the etch-stop layer. These are related to the presence of nitrogen poor Si regions in the buried layer after annealing, due to a partial separation of silicon and silicon nitride phases during the annealing process. The influence of this separation of phases as well as nitrogen gettering in the buried layer on the etch-stop behavior is discussed as a function of the processing parameters

  10. The silicon-silicon oxide multilayers utilization as intrinsic layer on pin solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colder, H.; Marie, P.; Gourbilleau, F.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nanostructures are promising candidate for the intrinsic layer on pin solar cells. In this work we report on new material: silicon-rich silicon oxide (SRSO) deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering of a pure silica target and an interesting structure: multilayers consisting of a stack of SRSO and pure silicon oxide layers. Two thicknesses of the SRSO sublayer, t SRSO , are studied 3 nm and 5 nm whereas the thickness of silica sublayer is maintaining at 3 nm. The presence of nanocrystallites of silicon, evidenced by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), leads to photoluminescence (PL) emission at room temperature due to the quantum confinement of the carriers. The PL peak shifts from 1.3 eV to 1.5 eV is correlated to the decreasing of t SRSO from 5 nm down to 3 nm. In the purpose of their potential utilization for i-layer, the optical properties are studied by absorption spectroscopy. The achievement a such structures at promising absorption properties. Moreover by favouring the carriers injection by the tunnel effect between silicon nanograins and silica sublayers, the multilayers seem to be interesting for solar cells

  11. Electron beam irradiation after reconstruction with silicone gel implant in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, L.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation for breast cancer in the presence of a silicone gel breast prosthesis is sometimes necessary. There is a concern among radiation and other oncologists as to whether the presence of the prosthetic implant would interfere with delivery of the needed irradiation doses. Electron beams, with their finite penetration and rapid fall-off, offer a mode of adequately treating the recurrence and minimizing the radiation to the underlying normal structures, such as the lung and the heart. The dose distribution using 9-20 MeV electrons in the presence of a breast prosthesis is compared to the dose distribution without the implant in a tissue equivalent water phantom. The results reveal no significant difference in the dose delivered due to the presence of the prosthesis. Clinical verification of the dosimetry in the presence of the prosthesis confirmed that the presence of the silicone gel implant does not compromise treatment by irradiation in the management of breast cancer

  12. Formation of SiC using low energy CO2 ion implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, A.H.; Ghorbani, S.; Dorranian, D.; Azadfar, P.; Hojabri, A.R.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ions with 29 keV energy were implanted into (4 0 0) high-purity p-type silicon wafers at nearly room temperature and doses in the range between 1 x 10 16 and 3 x 10 18 ions/cm 2 . X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to characterize the formation of SiC in implanted Si substrate. The formation of SiC and its crystalline structure obtained from above mentioned technique. Topographical changes induced on silicon surface, grains and evaluation of them at different doses observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Infrared reflectance (IR) and Raman scattering measurements were used to reconfirm the formation of SiC in implanted Si substrate. The electrical properties of implanted samples measured by four point probe technique. The results show that implantation of carbon dioxide ions directly leads to formation of 15R-SiC. By increasing the implantation dose a significant changes were also observed on roughness and sheet resistivity properties.

  13. Effect of low-energy hydrogen ion implantation on dendritic web silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a low-energy (0.4 keV), short-time (2-min), heavy-dose (10 to the 18th/sq cm) hydrogen ion implant on dendritic web silicon solar cells and material was investigated. Such an implant was observed to improve the cell open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current appreciably for a number of cells. In spite of the low implant energy, measurements of internal quantum efficiency indicate that it is the base of the cell, rather than the emitter, which benefits from the hydrogen implant. This is supported by the observation that the measured minority-carrier diffusion length in the base did not change when the emitter was removed. In some cases, a threefold increase of the base diffusion length was observed after implantation. The effects of the hydrogen implantation were not changed by a thermal stress test at 250 C for 111 h in nitrogen. It is speculated that hydrogen enters the bulk by traveling along dislocations, as proposed recently for edge-defined film-fed growth silicon ribbon.

  14. In vivo characterization of the electrophysiological and astrocytic responses to a silicon neuroprobe implanted in the mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mols, Katrien; Musa, Silke; Nuttin, Bart; Lagae, Liesbet; Bonin, Vincent

    2017-11-15

    Silicon neuroprobes hold great potential for studies of large-scale neural activity and brain computer interfaces, but data on brain response in chronic implants is limited. Here we explored with in vivo cellular imaging the response to multisite silicon probes for neural recordings. We tested a chronic implant for mice consisting of a CMOS-compatible silicon probe rigidly implanted in the cortex under a cranial imaging window. Multiunit recordings of cortical neurons with the implant showed no degradation of electrophysiological signals weeks after implantation (mean spike and noise amplitudes of 186 ± 42 µV pp and 16 ± 3.2 µV rms , respectively, n = 5 mice). Two-photon imaging through the cranial window allowed longitudinal monitoring of fluorescently-labeled astrocytes from the second week post implantation for 8 weeks (n = 3 mice). The imaging showed a local increase in astrocyte-related fluorescence that remained stable from the second to the tenth week post implantation. These results demonstrate that, in a standard electrophysiology protocol in mice, rigidly implanted silicon probes can provide good short to medium term chronic recording performance with a limited astrocyte inflammatory response. The precise factors influencing the response to silicon probe implants remain to be elucidated.

  15. Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting film on oxidized silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.P.; Khokle, W.S.; Dubey, R.C.; Singhal, S.; Nagpal, K.C.; Rao, G.S.T.; Jain, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    We report thick superconducting films of Y-Ba-Cu-O on oxidized silicon substrates. The critical temperatures for onset and zero resistance are 96 and 77 K, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis predicts 1, 2, 3 composition and orthorhombic phase of the film

  16. Transparent conductive oxides for thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes research on thin-film silicon solar cells with focus on the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) for such devices. In addition to the formation of a transparent and electrically conductive front electrode for the solar cell allowing photocurrent collection with low ohmic losses,

  17. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hattum, E.D. van

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology,

  18. Study of oxide facing at silicone detectors of ionization detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopestansky, J.; Tykva, R.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of oxide facing on silicone in discrete phases of technological preparation of detectors and interaction of gold (aluminium) steamed with SiO x layer were studied. The homogeneity of Au and Si) x layers and interface Au-SiO x and SiO x -Si were examined. The methods SIMS, and partially XPS, AES and RBS were used

  19. Fluorescence studies of Rhodamine 6G functionalized silicon oxide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertel, Thomas; Borczyskowski, Christian von; Graaf, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Selective anchoring of optically active molecules on nanostructured surfaces is a promising step towards the creation of nanoscale devices with new functionalities. Recently we have demonstrated the electrostatic attachment of charged fluorescent molecules on silicon oxide nanostructures prepared by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanolithography via local anodic oxidation (LAO) of dodecyl-terminated silicon. In this paper we report on our findings from a more detailed optical investigation of the bound dye Rhodamine 6G. High sensitivity optical wide field microscopy as well as confocal laser microscopy have been used to characterize the Rhodamine fluorescence emission. A highly interesting question concerns the interaction between an emitter close to a silicon surface because mechanisms such as energy transfer and fluorescence quenching will occur which are still not fully understood. Since the oxide thickness can be varied during preparation continuously from 1 to ∼ 5 nm, it is possible to investigate the fluorescence of the bound dye in close proximity to the underlying silicon. Using confocal laser microscopy we were also able to obtain optical spectra from the bound molecules. Together with the results from an analysis of their photochemical bleaching behaviour, we conjecture that some of the Rhodamine 6G molecules on the structure are interacting with the oxide, causing a spectral shift and differences in their photochemical properties.

  20. Chemical behavior of energetic deuterium implanted into silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Kazunari; Morimoto, Yasutomi; Shimada, Asako; Inuduka, Nobuo; Okuno, Kenji; Nakamura, Hirohumi; Nishi, Masataka

    2000-01-01

    Studies on chemical behavior of energetic deuterium (D) ions implanted into SiC were carried out by means of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS). From XPS results, it was suggested that the implanted D was attracted strongly to Si and/or C. From TDS results, two peaks corresponding to D 2 release appeared near 470 K (1st peak) and 1080 K (2nd peak). The activation energies for the two D 2 release processes were also determined. It was found from these experimental results that the 1st peak seemed to be attributed to deuterium that existed in interstitial. The 2nd peak was considered to be caused by deuterium trapped in lattice defects produced through deuterium ion implantation. (author)

  1. Lattice damage in ion-implanted silicon-germanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, T.E.; Holland, O.W.

    1992-08-01

    The damage produced in Si 1-x Ge x alloys (0≤x≤1) by implantation of 70--100 keV 30 Si + has been measured as a function of temperature and fluence by ion channeling. For all compositions, the damage efficiency decreased sharply as the implant temperature was increased between room temperature and 150 degrees C. Furthermore, the damage efficiency in alloys of intermediate compositions (0.34≤x≤0.5) exceeds that in Ge, especially at elevated temperatures, despite the larger cascade energy density in Ge. It is shown that this behavior can be described based on a model in which the point-defect mobility is the dominant factor controlling damage retention, rather than the cascade energy density. This approach provides a framework for understanding other temperature-dependent phenomena related to damage growth in Si-Ge alloys including dose-rate effects and damage saturation in MeV implantation

  2. Effect of backbond oxidation on silicon nanocrystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L.E.; Furthmueller, J.; Bechstedt, F.

    2004-01-01

    We employ density functional calculations to study properties of Si nanocrystals after backbond oxidation in comparison to the ones passivated with hydrogen or hydroxyl. Structural parameters, pair excitation energies, quasiparticle gaps, and electrostatic potentials vary significantly in dependence on degree of oxidation and surface passivation. The variations are discussed within a quantum confinement picture. Blueshifts and redshifts observed in photoluminescence are related to the size of the Si nanocrystallite cores and the oxygen incorporation via passivation with group OH or oxidation

  3. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  4. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccari-Mazzetti, Marcelo Paulo; Kobata, Celio Toshiro; Fabiani, Paulo; Martins, Dulce Maria Fonseca Soares; Gomes, Paulo de Oliveira; Martins, Jose Luiz

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC) and silicon (S) implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. Methods: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20) PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O) and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. Results: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo capsule), that do not appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (p≤0,05), in all implants. Conclusion: In CT evaluation the implants of CPV have greater deformation that the S, which makes them not suitable for replacement of membranous bone in the rat skull. (author)

  5. Reflectance spectroscopy of PMMA implanted with 50 keV silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florian, Bojana [Bulgarian Institute of Metrology, 2 Prof. P. Mutafchiev Str., 1797 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stefanov, Ivan [Department of Quantum Electronics, Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Hadjichristov, Georgi [Institute of Solid State Physics, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2009-07-01

    Recently, the modification of the specular reflectivity of PMMA implanted with low-energy (50 keV) silicon ions was studied and nano-clusters formed in PMMA by Si{sup +} implantation were evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements. Further, the optical loss due to off-specular (diffuse) reflectivity of this ion-implanted polymer is also of practical interest for applications such as micro-optical lenses, diffraction gratings, Fresnel lenses, waveguides, etc. We examined both specular and diffuse reflectivity of Si{sup +} implanted PMMA in the UV-Vis-NIR. The effect from Si{sup +} implantation in the dose range 10{sup 14}-10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} is linked to the structure formed in PMMA where the buried ion-implanted layer has a thickness up to 100 nm. As compared to the pristine PMMA, an enhancement of the reflectivity of Si{sup +} implanted PMMA is observed, that is attributed to the modification of the subsurface region of PMMA upon the ion implantation.

  6. Development of a radiochemical procedure for certification of phosphorus implantation dose in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, R.L.; Simons, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. semiconductor industry relies heavily on secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for characterization of the depth distribution of dopants such as boron, arsenic, and phosphorus in silicon. To assist the industry in achieving high accuracy measurements, two Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) have been developed by NIST as SIMS calibration standards: SRM 2137 (Boron Implant in Silicon), certified by neutron depth profiling, and SRM 2134 (Arsenic Implant in Silicon), certified by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The industry is still in need of a phosphorus standard. Plans are currently underway to develop a phosphorus implant in silicon SRM, to be certified by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA). RNAA was chosen because other techniques lack the necessary sensitivity, chemical specificity and matrix independence to measure phosphorus at implantation levels. In order to assess the sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of RNAA for this work, preliminary measurements were carried out on six pieces of a phosphorus-implanted silicon wafer that was previously used in a round-robin study of SIMS measurement repeatability. Standards were prepared by depositing micro litre amounts of a standardized phosphorus solution on aluminum foil. A non-implanted silicon wafer was analysed as a blank. Samples were irradiated at a neutron fluency rate of 1 x 10 14 cm -2 s -1 to convert 31 P to 32 P, then mixed with milligram amounts of phosphorus carrier and dissolved in a mixture of nitric and hydrofluoric acids. Phosphorus was separated from the matrix by precipitation first as ammonium phosphomolybdate then as magnesium ammonium phosphate. The yield (fraction of recovered carrier) was determined gravimetrically as Mg(NH 4 )PO 4 .6H 2 O. 32 P was measured using a beta proportional counter. The measurements yielded a mean and standard deviation of (8.35 ± 0.20) x 10 14 atoms.cm -2 (relative standard deviation = 2.35 %), in agreement with both the nominal

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Screening Results Compared with Explantation Results in Poly Implant Prothese Silicone Breast Implants, Recalled from the European Market in 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijers, M.C.; Niessen, F.B.; Veldhuizen, J.F.H.; Ritt, M.J.P.F.; Manoliu, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a prospective cohort study, the authors followed 112 women whose Poly Implant Prothèse silicone breast implants were recalled. Magnetic resonance imaging results and clinical consequences were previously published. The authors compared magnetic resonance imaging screening with

  8. Positron annihilation studies of high dose Sb implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schut, H.; Eijt, S.W.H.; Beling, C.D.; Ho, K.; Takamura, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The formation and evolution of vacancies and precipitates created by implantation of 60 keV, 2 x 10 16 cm -2 Sb + in pre-amorphized (0 0 1) Cz-Si is studied using the Doppler broadening (DB) and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) positron beam techniques. After implantation, samples were laser annealed (LTA) and subsequently thermal annealed at temperatures ranging from 400 to 1000 deg. C. Implantation-induced vacancy-type defects were detected up to a depth of 280 nm. After LTA, positron annihilation related to both Sb and remaining defects is observed in the first 100 nm below the surface. The deeper region only shows positron trapping at vacancy-type defects with strong reduced concentration. Complete removal is obtained after 600 deg. C anneal. At this temperature, the positron data for the upper region reveals trapping at Sb and Si sites only. With increasing annealing time (at 600 deg. C) or increasing temperature (up to 1000 deg. C) positron annihilation at Sb-sites associated with neighboring vacancies becomes apparent. Results are correlated with the observed Sb electrical deactivation above 600 deg. C, the shift from small Sb aggregates to precipitates and out-diffusion of Sb from the implantation region at higher temperatures

  9. Value of contrast-enhanced MRI of breast after silicone implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinig, A.; Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Viehweg, P.; Spielmann, R.P.; Lampe, D.; Buchmann, J.

    1997-01-01

    Early recognition of recurrence and work-up of clinically indeterminate lesions may be impaired after reconstruction with silicone implants due to superimposition of the implant or to scarring. This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with silicone implant after breast cancer. Contrast-enhanded MRI was offered to 169 patients. Comparative two- to three-view mammography was also performed in 169 patients, as well as comparative sonography in 144 patients. Conventional imaging and clinical examination detected only 8/13 recurrences, whereas 12/13 were detected by MRI. One recurrence had been visible as a strongly enhancing 2-mm dot in a previous examination (2 years before), but was not called. It was therefore counted as false negative. In addition, multicentricity was detected by MRI alone in two of three cases. MRI correctly diagnosed scar tissue in all cases with indeterminate findings. However, due to false-positive calls caused by enhancing granulomas specificity could not be improved. Contrast-enhanded MRI allowed decisive additional information in our study group and improved the sensitivity significantly (concerning all diagnoses). Contrast-enhanded MRI allowed decisive additional information in our study group and improved the sensitivity significantly (concerning all diagnoses). Contrast-enhanded MRI is recommended in patients with diagnostic problems or high risk of recurrence after silicone implants. (orig.) [de

  10. Development of an oxidized porous silicon vacuum microtriode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, II, Don Deewayne [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In order to realize a high-power microwave amplifier design known as a gigatron, a gated field emission array must be developed that can deliver a high-intensity electron beam at gigahertz frequencies. No existing field emission device meets the requirements for a gigatron cathode. In the present work, a porous silicon-based approach is evaluated. The use of porous silicon reduces the size of a single emitter to the nanometer scale, and a true two-dimensional array geometry can be approached. A wide number of applications for such a device exist in various disciplines. Oxidized porous silicon vacuum diodes were first developed in 1990. No systematic study had been done to characterize the performance of these devices as a function of the process parameters. The author has done the first such study, fabricating diodes from p<100>, p<111>, and n<100> silicon substrates. Anodization current densities from 11 mA/cm2 to 151 mA/cm2 were used, and Fowler-Nordheim behavior was observed in over 80% of the samples. In order to effectively adapt this technology to mainstream vacuum microelectronic applications, a means of creating a gated triodic structure must be found. No previous attempts had successfully yielded such a device. The author has succeeded in utilizing a novel metallization method to fabricate the first operational oxidized porous silicon vacuum microtriodes, and results are encouraging.

  11. An automated ion implant/pulse anneal machine for low cost silicon cell production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armini, A.J.; Bunker, S.N.; Spitzer, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The continuing development of a high throughput ion implanter and a pulsed electron beam annealer designed for dedicated silicon solar cell manufacture is reviewed. This equipment is intended for production of junctions in 10 cm wide wafers at a throughput up to 10 MWsub(p) per year. The principal features of the implanter are the lack of mass analysis and defocusing utilizing electrostatic deflection. The implanted surface is annealed by liquid phase epitaxy resulting from a single burst of a large area electron beam. Cells with non-mass analyzed ion implantation have yielded AM1 cell efficiencies in excess of 15%. Pulse annealed Czochralski cells have been made with AM1 efficiencies of 13% vs. 15% for a furnace annealed group. Results of pulse annealing of polycrystalline materials indicate that cell performance comparable to diffusion can be obtained. (Auth.)

  12. Electronic structure of xenon implanted with low energy in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, P.F.; Landers, R.; Oliveira, M.H. de; Alvarez, F.; Marques, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure of Xe implanted in amorphous silicon (a-Si) films are investigated. Xe atoms were implanted with low energy by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) technique during growth of the a-Si films. The Xe implantation energy varied in the 0-300 eV energy range. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Auger excited spectroscopy (XAES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used for investigating the Xe electronic structure. The Xe M 4 N 45 N 45 transitions were measured to extract the Auger parameter and to analyze the initial state and relaxation contributions. It was found that the binding energy variation is mainly due to initial state contribution. The relaxation energy variation also shows that the Xe trapped environment depends on the implantation energy. XAS measurements reveals that Xe atoms are dispersed in the a-Si matrix

  13. TEM study of the ion beam induced damage during 14 kev P+ implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Tamanyan, G.; Hudson, F.; Jamieson, D.N.; McCallum, J.C.; Prawer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed silicon-based quantum computer architecture comprises an array of phosphorus donor atoms (qubits) positioned with nanometre accuracy beneath the surface of a semiconductor host, using a single ion implantation technique. The average depth of the implanted ions (the projected range R p ), lateral range R p 1, and the distribution of ions about that depth can be approximated as two-dimensional Gaussian with standard deviation ΔR p and ΔR p 1 (lateral straggle). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we studied ion beam induced damage after 14 keV P + implantation in Si. The TEM images allowed us to compare the depth of the amorphous cluster formation to R p , R p 1, ΔR p 1 calculated from SRIM and hence determine evidence for the limitation on the accuracy of the position of the implanted ions imposed by straggling. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  14. High-temperature oxidation of ion-implanted tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, E.N.; Musket, R.G.; Truhan, J.J.; Grabowski, K.S.; Singer, I.L.; Gossett, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation of ion-implanted Ta in two different high temperature regimes has been studied. Oxidations were carried out at 500 0 C in Ar/O 2 mixtures, where oxide growth is known to follow a parabolic rate law in initial stages, and at 1000 0 C in pure O 2 , where a linear-rate behavior obtains. Implanted species include Al, Ce, Cr, Li, Si and Zr at fluences of the order of 10 17 /cm 2 . Oxidized samples were studied using Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis, Auger spectroscopy, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. Significant differences among the specimens were noted after the milder 500 0 C treatment, specifically, in the amount of oxide formed, the degree of oxygen dissolution in the metal beneath the oxide, and in the redistribution behavior of the implanted solutes. Under the severe 1000 0 C treatment, indications of different solute distributions and of different optical features were found, whereas overall oxidation rate appeared to be unaffected by the presence of the solute. 7 figures

  15. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  16. Delayed-Onset Edematous Foreign Body Granulomas 40 Years After Augmentation Rhinoplasty by Silicone Implant Combined with Liquid Silicone Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao-Chun; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Chiu, Yu-Hsun

    2017-06-01

    Despite the widespread application of augmentation rhinoplasty in Asia, reports on the interaction between alloplastic implants and injectable filler are scarce. This paper reports on a patient with delayed-onset edematous foreign body granuloma that had been caused by augmentation rhinoplasty performed using a silicone implant in conjunction with a liquid silicone injection 40 years earlier. This is the longest reported duration between initial rhinoplasty and the exacerbation of foreign body granuloma. This case report also presents intraoperative findings pertaining to the interlocking structures between silicone implants and injected liquid silicone. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  17. Systemic Sclerosis and Silicone Breast Implant: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Psarras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally induced systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized condition, which is correlated with exposure to various chemical compounds or drugs. However, development of scleroderma-like disease after exposure to silicone has always been a controversial issue and, over time, it has triggered spirited debate whether there is a certain association or not. Herein, we report the case of a 35-year-old female who developed Raynaud’s phenomenon and, finally, systemic sclerosis shortly after silicone breast implantation surgery.

  18. Buried melting in germanium implanted silicon by millisecond flash lamp annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelskow, Matthias; Yankov, Rossen; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Pezoldt, Joerg; Kups, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Flash lamp annealing in the millisecond range has been used to induce buried melting in silicon. For this purpose high dose high-energy germanium implantation has been employed to lower the melting temperature of silicon in a predetermined depth region. Subsequent flash lamp treatment at high energy densities leads to local melting of the germanium rich layer. The thickness of the molten layer has been found to depend on the irradiation energy density. During the cool-down period, epitaxial crystallization takes place resulting in a largely defect-free layer

  19. Demonstration of slot-waveguide structures on silicon nitride / silicon oxide platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, C A; Sánchez, B; Gylfason, K B; Griol, A; Sohlström, H; Holgado, M; Casquel, R

    2007-05-28

    We report on the first demonstration of guiding light in vertical slot-waveguides on silicon nitride/silicon oxide material system. Integrated ring resonators and Fabry-Perot cavities have been fabricated and characterized in order to determine optical features of the slot-waveguides. Group index behavior evidences guiding and confinement in the low-index slot region at O-band (1260-1370nm) telecommunication wavelengths. Propagation losses of <20 dB/cm have been measured for the transverse-electric mode of the slot-waveguides.

  20. A detailed physical model for ion implant induced damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, S.; Morris, M.F.; Morris, S.J.; Obradovic, B.; Wang, G.; Tasch, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    A unified physically based ion implantation damage model has been developed which successfully predicts both the impurity profiles and the damage profiles for a wide range of implant conditions for arsenic, phosphorus, BF 2 , and boron implants into single-crystal silicon. In addition, the amorphous layer thicknesses predicted by this new damage model are also in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. This damage model is based on the physics of point defects in silicon, and explicitly simulates the defect production, diffusion, and their interactions which include interstitial-vacancy recombination, clustering of same type of defects, defect-impurity complex formation, emission of mobile defects from clusters, and surface effects for the first time. New computationally efficient algorithms have been developed to overcome the barrier of the excessive computational requirements. In addition, the new model has been incorporated in the UT-MARLOWE ion implantation simulator, and has been developed primarily for use in engineering workstations. This damage model is the most physical model in the literature to date within the framework of the binary collision approximation (BCA), and provides the required, accurate as-implanted impurity profiles and damage profiles for transient enhanced diffusion (TED) simulation

  1. Origin of reverse annealing effect in hydrogen-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, Zengfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In contradiction to conventional damage annealing, thermally annealed H-implanted Si exhibits an increase in damage or reverse annealing behavior, whose mechanism has remained elusive. On the basis of quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with channeling Rutherford backscattering analysis, we conclusively elucidate that the reverse annealing effect is due to the nucleation and growth of hydrogen-induce platelets. Platelets are responsible for an increase in the height and width the channeling damage peak following increased isochronal anneals.

  2. Accelerating action of stresses on crystallization kinetics in silicon ion-implanted layers during pulsed heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the effect of stressed in ion-implanted layers on kinetics of amorphous phase transformations is performed. The suggested model of accounting stresses including concentration ones is based on the locality of action of interstitial addition atoms and on general structural inhomogeneity of amorphous semiconductor leading to the formation of areas of the facilitated phase transition. Accounting of effect of energy variation of silicon atoms interaction on probability of displacement events and atoms building in lattice points or atomic bonds disintegration allows one to trace the accelerating action of introduced by ion implantation stresses on the kinetics of layer crystallization during pulsed heating

  3. Defects characterization of arsenic implanted silicon by AC Hall effect measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, H.; Ghibaudo, G.; Christofides, C.

    1986-01-01

    AC and DC Hall effects measurements as a function of temperature (77 - 300K) and frequency (1Hz - 100KHz) have been performed to characterize implanted Silicon films. This technique enables the determination of the annihilation processes of defects in such layers as a function of temperature of isochronal annealings (300/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C during 1 hour). The experimental results are discussed with respect to proper transport models based on short and long range disorder considerations in order to find out the features of defects and inhomogeneities arising from implantation and their thermal annihilation after isochronal annealing

  4. Field oxide radiation damage measurements in silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakso, M [Particle Detector Group, Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Research Inst. for High Energy Physics (SEFT), Helsinki (Finland); Singh, P; Shepard, P F [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Surface radiation damage in planar processed silicon detectors is caused by radiation generated holes being trapped in the silicon dioxide layers on the detector wafer. We have studied charge trapping in thick (field) oxide layers on detector wafers by irradiating FOXFET biased strip detectors and MOS test capacitors. Special emphasis was put on studying how a negative bias voltage across the oxide during irradiation affects hole trapping. In addition to FOXFET biased detectors, negatively biased field oxide layers may exist on the n-side of double-sided strip detectors with field plate based n-strip separation. The results indicate that charge trapping occurred both close to the Si-SiO[sub 2] interface and in the bulk of the oxide. The charge trapped in the bulk was found to modify the electric field in the oxide in a way that leads to saturation in the amount of charge trapped in the bulk when the flatband/threshold voltage shift equals the voltage applied over the oxide during irradiation. After irradiation only charge trapped close to the interface is annealed by electrons tunneling to the oxide from the n-type bulk. (orig.).

  5. Oxidation and corrosion of silicon-based ceramics and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, N.S.; Fox, D.S.; Smialek, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Silica scales exhibit slow growth rates and a low activation energy. Thus silica-protected materials are attractive high temperature structural materials for their potentially excellent oxidation resistance and well-documented high temperature strength. This review focuses on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and composites of these materials. It is divided into four parts: (i) Fundamental oxidation mechanisms, (ii) Special properties of silica scales, (iii) Protective coatings, and (iv) Internal oxidation behavior of composites. While the fundamental oxidation mechanism of SiC is understood, there are still many questions regarding the oxidation mechanism of Si 3 N 4 . Silica scales exhibit many unique properties as compared to chromia and alumina. These include slower growth rates, SiO(g) formation, sensitivity to water vapor and impurities, and dissolution by basic molten salts. Protective coatings can limit the deleterious effects. The fourth area-internal oxidation of fibers and fiber coatings in composites-has limited the application of these novel materials. Strategies for understanding and limiting this internal oxidation are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Influence of sample oxidation on the nature of optical luminescence from porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulthard, I.; Antel, W. J. Jr.; Freeland, J. W.; Sham, T. K.; Naftel, S. J.; Zhang, P.

    2000-01-01

    Site-selective luminescence experiments were performed upon porous-silicon samples exposed to varying degrees of oxidation. The source of different luminescence bands was determined to be due to either quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon or defective silicon oxide. Of particular interest is the defective silicon-oxide luminescence band found at 2.1 eV, which was found to frequently overlap with a luminescence band from nanocrystalline silicon. Some of the historical confusion and debate with regards to the source of luminescence from porous silicon can be attributed to this overlap. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  7. Ultrathin Oxide Passivation Layer by Rapid Thermal Oxidation for the Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngseok Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to deposit extremely thin a-Si:H layer in heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT solar cell due to thermal damage and tough process control. This study aims to understand oxide passivation mechanism of silicon surface using rapid thermal oxidation (RTO process by examining surface effective lifetime and surface recombination velocity. The presence of thin insulating a-Si:H layer is the key to get high Voc by lowering the leakage current (I0 which improves the efficiency of HIT solar cell. The ultrathin thermal passivation silicon oxide (SiO2 layer was deposited by RTO system in the temperature range 500–950°C for 2 to 6 minutes. The thickness of the silicon oxide layer was affected by RTO annealing temperature and treatment time. The best value of surface recombination velocity was recorded for the sample treated at a temperature of 850°C for 6 minutes at O2 flow rate of 3 Lpm. A surface recombination velocity below 25 cm/s was obtained for the silicon oxide layer of 4 nm thickness. This ultrathin SiO2 layer was employed for the fabrication of HIT solar cell structure instead of a-Si:H, (i layer and the passivation and tunneling effects of the silicon oxide layer were exploited. The photocurrent was decreased with the increase of illumination intensity and SiO2 thickness.

  8. Isothermal annealing of silicon implanted with 50 keV 10B ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, B.; Zaschke, G.

    1974-01-01

    Isothermal annealing characteristics of silicon implanted with boron were measured and compared with calculated results. Implantation was performed with 50 keV 10 B ions in the dose range of 7.5 x 10 12 cm -2 to 2.0 x 10 15 cm -2 . Annealing temperatures ranged from 700 to 900 0 C. Maximum annealing time was 10 4 minutes. Annealing time strongly increases with increasing dose and decreasing temperature. Assuming that there is only one activation energy the isothermal annealing curves of constant dose and different temperatures were combined to a reduced annealing curve and the reduced isothermal annealing curve calculated. Starting from first order kinetics, considering the doping profile of boron in silicon and assuming a depth-dependent decay constant the experimentally determined annealing curves could be easily described over the total dose and time range

  9. Study of the bistable hydrogen donors properties in silicon implanted by the protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullin, Kh.A.; Gorelkinskij, Yu.V.; Serikkanov, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    The proton implantation in silicon with doses 10 16 -10 17 cm -2 leads to formation of the hydrogen supersaturated solid solution in the Si. At the room temperature the hydrogen mobility on radiation defects limited by the H atom capture is inappreciably low. Thermal annealing at 400-500 Deg. C results in the decay and rebuilding of hydrogen-containing radiation defects and precipitants, that leads to reduction of the free energy of the system. Precipitation occurring in the form of nano-cluster defects formation, containing the hydrogen atoms. Thermal annealing of the silicon implanted by hydrogen at ∼450 Deg. C during 20 min. causing the hydrogen precipitation process and defects agglomeration leads to donor centers formation registering by the Hall effect

  10. Electrical properties and annealing kinetics study of laser-annealed ion-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K.L.; Liu, Y.S.; Kirkpatrick, C.G.; Possin, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of electrical properties and the regrowth behavior of ion-implanted silicon annealed with an 80-ns (FWHM) laser pulse at 1.06 μm. The experimental results include: (1) a determination of threshold energy density required for melting using a transient optical reflectivity technique, (2) measurements of dopant distribution using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, (3) characterization of electrical properties by measuring reverse leakage current densities of laser-annealed and thermal-annealed mesa diodes, (4) determination of annealed junction depth using an electron-beam-induced-current technique, and (5) a deep-level-transient spectroscopic study of residual defects. In particular, by measuring these properties of a diode annealed at a condition near the threshold energy density for liquid phase epitaxial regrowth, we have found certain correlations among these various annealing behaviors and electrical properties of laser-annealed ion-implanted silicon diodes

  11. The fraction of substitutional boron in silicon during ion implantation and thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caturla, M.J.; Johnson, M.D.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1998-01-01

    We present results from a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of boron transient enhanced diffusion (TED) in silicon. Our approach avoids the use of phenomenological fits to experimental data by using a complete and self-consistent set of values for defect and dopant energetics derived mostly from ab initio calculations. The results predict that, during annealing of 40 keV B-implanted Si at 800 degree C, there exists a time window during which all the implanted boron atoms are substitutional. At earlier or later times, the interactions between free silicon self-interstitials and boron atoms drive the growth of boron clusters and result in an inactive boron fraction. The results show that the majority of boron TED takes place during the growth period of interstitial clusters and not during their dissolution. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  12. Breast cancer in a patient with silicone breast implants after 13 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, H G; Copeland, E M; Hackett, R; Caffee, H H

    1988-03-01

    The patient described in this article is a 45-year-old woman who developed an infiltrating ductal carcinoma in her left breast next to a Silastic mammary implant that had been used for augmentation some 13 years previously. She underwent a modified radical mastectomy and removal of the silicone prosthesis with an axillary lymph node dissection. Twenty-six axillary lymph nodes were negative for metastatic disease. The 165-gram silicone gel prosthesis was surrounded by a thin fibrous capsule with an attached 1-cm carcinoma that did not invade the fibrous capsule. It appeared that the capsule presented a barrier to the invading ductal carcinoma. The fibrous capsule surrounding the Silastic implant may have altered the spread of the breast cancer without being related to its genesis.

  13. Structural and photoluminescent properties of a composite tantalum oxide and silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon oxide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-Becerril, T., E-mail: tomas.diaz.be@gmail.com; Herrera, V.; Morales, C.; García-Salgado, G.; Rosendo, E.; Coyopol, A., E-mail: acoyopol@gmail.com; Galeazzi, R.; Romano, R.; Nieto-Caballero, F.G.; Sarmiento, J.

    2017-04-15

    Tantalum oxide crystals encrusted in a silicon oxide matrix were synthesized by using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition system (HFCVD). A solid source composed by a mixture in different percentages of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and silicon (Si) powders were used as reactants. The films were grown at 800 °C and 1000 °C under hydrogen ambient. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. From the XPS results it was confirmed the formation of a mixture of Tantalum oxide, silicon oxide and Si nanoparticles (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5-}SiO{sub 2}-Si(nc)) as seen from the Si (2p) and Ta (4f) lines corresponding to Si{sup +} and Ta{sup +} states respectively. Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in the silicon oxide films were observed on HRTEM images which corroborate the XPS results. Finally the emission properties of the films exhibited a broad band from 400 to 850 nm caused by the independent PL properties of tantalum oxide and Si-NCs that compose the film. The intensity of the emissions was observed to be dependent on both temperature of deposition and the ratio Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si, used as initial reactants. Results from this work might supply useful data for the development of future light emitter devices.

  14. Five-Year Safety Data for More than 55,000 Subjects following Breast Implantation: Comparison of Rare Adverse Event Rates with Silicone Implants versus National Norms and Saline Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navin; Picha, George J; Hardas, Bhushan; Schumacher, Andrew; Murphy, Diane K

    2017-10-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has required postapproval studies of silicone breast implants to evaluate the incidence of rare adverse events over 10 years after implantation. The Breast Implant Follow-Up Study is a large 10-year study (>1000 U.S. sites) evaluating long-term safety following primary augmentation, revision-augmentation, primary reconstruction, or revision-reconstruction with Natrelle round silicone breast implants compared with national norms and outcomes with saline implants. Targeted adverse events in subjects followed for 5 to 8 years included connective tissue diseases, neurologic diseases, cancer, and suicide. The safety population comprised 55,279 women (primary augmentation, n = 42,873; revision-augmentation, n = 6837; primary reconstruction, n = 4828; and revision-reconstruction, n = 741). No targeted adverse events occurred at significantly greater rates in silicone implant groups versus national norms across all indications. The standardized incidence rate (observed/national norm) for all indications combined was 1.4 for cervical/vulvar cancer, 0.8 for brain cancer, 0.3 for multiple sclerosis, and 0.1 for lupus/lupus-like syndrome. Silicone implants did not significantly increase the risk for any targeted adverse events compared with saline implants. The risk of death was similar with silicone versus saline implants across all indications. The suicide rate (10.6 events per 100,000 person-years) was not significantly higher than the national norm. No implant-related deaths occurred. Results from 5 to 8 years of follow-up for a large number of subjects confirmed the safety of Natrelle round silicone implants, with no increased risk of systemic disease or suicide versus national norms or saline implants. Therapeutic, II.

  15. Electrical and electron microscopy observations on defects in ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, H.

    1978-01-01

    Silicon single crystals were implanted with 100 keV phosphorus ions to a dose of 2 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 at both room-temperature and 600 0 C. They were isochronally annealed at temperatures ranging from 400 0 C to 900 0 C. Sheet resistivity measurements of the specimens were taken after each anneal, together with corresponding transmission electron micrographs

  16. Comparison of silicon pin diode detector fabrication processes using ion implantation and thermal doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, C.Z.; Warburton, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    Two processes for the fabrication of silicon p-i-n diode radiation detectors are described and compared. Both processes are compatible with conventional integrated-circuit fabrication techniques and yield very low leakage currents. Devices made from the process using boron thermal doping have about a factor of 2 lower leakage current than those using boron ion implantation. However, the boron thermal doping process requires additional process steps to remove boron skins. (orig.)

  17. Optical absorption in silicon layers in the presence of charge inversion/accumulation or ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloatti, L.; Lauermann, M.; Koos, C.; Freude, W.; Sürgers, C.; Leuthold, J.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the optical losses in gate-induced charge accumulation/inversion layers at a Si/SiO 2 interface. Comparison between gate-induced charge layers and ion-implanted thin silicon films having an identical sheet resistance shows that optical losses can be significantly lower for gate-induced layers. For a given sheet resistance, holes produce higher optical loss than electrons. Measurements have been performed at λ = 1550 nm

  18. Occurrence of the macropore nucleation centers in silicon as result of ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Astrova, E V

    2002-01-01

    Instead of commonly used V-shaped pits the possibility of application of ion implantation for formation of the regular pattern of macropore nucleation centers has been studied. It is shown that selective radiative damage or local conductivity type conversion are sufficient for generation of macropore nucleation in certain regions and passivation in other ones. Results obtained can be of interest both for practical application and for explanation of pore origin in silicon

  19. Seeding of silicon by copper ion implantation for selective electroless copper plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhansali, S; Sood, D K; Zmood, R B [Microelectronic and Materials Technology Centre, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technolgy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    We report on the successful use of copper(self) ion implantation into silicon to seed the electroless plating of copper on silicon (100) surfaces. Copper ions have been implanted to doses of 5E14-6.4E16 ions/cm{sup 2} using a MEEVA ion implanter at extraction voltage of 40kV. Dose was varied in fine steps to determine the threshold dose of 2E15 Cu ions/cm{sup 2} for `seed` formation of copper films on silicon using a commercial electroless plating solution. Plated films were studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, EDX and profilometry . The adhesion of films was measured by `scotch tape test`. The adhesion was found to improve with increasing dose. However thicker films exhibited rather poor adhesion and high internal stress. SEM results show that the films grow first as isolated islands which become larger and eventually impinge into a continuous film as the plating time is increased. (authors). 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  20. X-ray analysis of temperature induced defect structures in boron implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztucki, M.; Metzger, T. H.; Kegel, I.; Tilke, A.; Rouvière, J. L.; Lübbert, D.; Arthur, J.; Patel, J. R.

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate the application of surface sensitive diffuse x-ray scattering under the condition of grazing incidence and exit angles to investigate growth and dissolution of near-surface defects after boron implantation in silicon(001) and annealing. Silicon wafers were implanted with a boron dose of 6×1015 ions/cm2 at 32 keV and went through different annealing treatments. From the diffuse intensity close to the (220) surface Bragg peak we reveal the nature and kinetic behavior of the implantation induced defects. Analyzing the q dependence of the diffuse scattering, we are able to distinguish between point defect clusters and extrinsic stacking faults on {111} planes. Characteristic for stacking faults are diffuse x-ray intensity streaks along directions, which allow for the determination of their growth and dissolution kinetics. For the annealing conditions of our crystals, we conclude that the kinetics of growth can be described by an Ostwald ripening model in which smaller faults shrink at the expense of the larger stacking faults. The growth is found to be limited by the self-diffusion of silicon interstitials. After longer rapid thermal annealing the stacking faults disappear almost completely without shrinking, most likely by transformation into perfect loops via a dislocation reaction. This model is confirmed by complementary cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy.

  1. Seeding of silicon by copper ion implantation for selective electroless copper plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhansali, S.; Sood, D.K.; Zmood, R.B. [Microelectronic and Materials Technology Centre, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technolgy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    We report on the successful use of copper(self) ion implantation into silicon to seed the electroless plating of copper on silicon (100) surfaces. Copper ions have been implanted to doses of 5E14-6.4E16 ions/cm{sup 2} using a MEEVA ion implanter at extraction voltage of 40kV. Dose was varied in fine steps to determine the threshold dose of 2E15 Cu ions/cm{sup 2} for `seed` formation of copper films on silicon using a commercial electroless plating solution. Plated films were studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, EDX and profilometry . The adhesion of films was measured by `scotch tape test`. The adhesion was found to improve with increasing dose. However thicker films exhibited rather poor adhesion and high internal stress. SEM results show that the films grow first as isolated islands which become larger and eventually impinge into a continuous film as the plating time is increased. (authors). 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  2. Seeding of silicon by copper ion implantation for selective electroless copper plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhansali, S.; Sood, D.K.; Zmood, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    We report on the successful use of copper(self) ion implantation into silicon to seed the electroless plating of copper on silicon (100) surfaces. Copper ions have been implanted to doses of 5E14-6.4E16 ions/cm 2 using a MEEVA ion implanter at extraction voltage of 40kV. Dose was varied in fine steps to determine the threshold dose of 2E15 Cu ions/cm 2 for 'seed' formation of copper films on silicon using a commercial electroless plating solution. Plated films were studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, EDX and profilometry . The adhesion of films was measured by 'scotch tape test'. The adhesion was found to improve with increasing dose. However thicker films exhibited rather poor adhesion and high internal stress. SEM results show that the films grow first as isolated islands which become larger and eventually impinge into a continuous film as the plating time is increased. (authors). 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  3. Optimization of a plasma immersion ion implantation process for shallow junctions in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Ashok; Nori, Rajashree; Bhatt, Piyush; Lodha, Saurabh; Pinto, Richard, E-mail: rpinto@ee.iitb.ac.in; Rao, Valipe Ramgopal [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Jomard, François; Neumann-Spallart, Michael [Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée, C.N.R.S./Université de Versailles-St.Quentin, 45, Avenue des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01

    A plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process has been developed for realizing shallow doping profiles of phosphorus and boron in silicon using an in-house built dual chamber cluster tool. High Si etch rates observed in a 5% PH{sub 3} in H{sub 2} plasma have been ascribed to high concentration of H(α) radicals. Therefore, subsequent work was carried out with 5% PH{sub 3} in He, leading to much smaller etch rates. By optical emission spectroscopy, the radical species H(α), PH*{sub 2}, and PH* have been identified. The concentration of all three species increased with pressure. Also, ion concentrations increased with pressure as evidenced by Langmuir data, with a maximum occurring at 0.12 mbar. The duty cycle of pulsed DC bias has a significant bearing on both the implantation and the etching process as it controls the leakage of positive charge collected at the surface of the silicon wafer during pulse on-time generated primarily due to secondary electron emission. The P implant process was optimized for a duty cycle of 10% or less at a pressure of 0.12 mbar with implant times as low as 30 s. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed a P dopant depth of 145 nm after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 950 °C for 5 s, resulting in a sheet resistance of 77 Ω/◻. Si n{sup +}/p diodes fabricated with phosphorus implantation using optimized PIII and RTA conditions exhibit J{sub on}/J{sub off} > 10{sup 6} with an ideality factor of nearly 1.2. Using similar conditions, shallow doping profiles of B in silicon have also been realized.

  4. The Reduction of TED in Ion Implanted Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Amitabh

    2008-01-01

    The leading challenge in the continued scaling of junctions made by ion implantation and annealing is the control of the undesired transient enhanced diffusion (TED) effect. Spike annealing has been used as a means to reduce this effect and has proven successful in previous nodes. The peak temperature in this process is typically 1050 deg. C and the time spent within 50 deg. C of the peak is of the order of 1.5 seconds. As technology advances along the future scaling roadmap, further reduction or elimination of the enhanced diffusion effect is necessary. We have shown that raising the peak temperature to 1175 deg. C or more and reduction of the anneal time at peak temperature to less than a millisecond is effective in eliminating enhanced diffusion. We show that it is possible to employ a sequence of millisecond anneal followed by spike anneal to obtain profiles that do not exhibit gradient degradation at the junction and have junction depth and sheet resistance appropriate to the needs of future technology nodes. We have implemented millisecond annealing using a carbon dioxide laser to support high-volume manufacturing of 65 nm microprocessors and system-on-chip products. We further show how the use of molecular ion implantation to produce amorphousness followed by laser annealing to produce solid phase epitaxial regrowth results in junctions that meet the shallow depth and abruptness requirements of the 32 nm node.

  5. The Reduction of TED in Ion Implanted Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amitabh

    2008-11-01

    The leading challenge in the continued scaling of junctions made by ion implantation and annealing is the control of the undesired transient enhanced diffusion (TED) effect. Spike annealing has been used as a means to reduce this effect and has proven successful in previous nodes. The peak temperature in this process is typically 1050 °C and the time spent within 50 °C of the peak is of the order of 1.5 seconds. As technology advances along the future scaling roadmap, further reduction or elimination of the enhanced diffusion effect is necessary. We have shown that raising the peak temperature to 1175 °C or more and reduction of the anneal time at peak temperature to less than a millisecond is effective in eliminating enhanced diffusion. We show that it is possible to employ a sequence of millisecond anneal followed by spike anneal to obtain profiles that do not exhibit gradient degradation at the junction and have junction depth and sheet resistance appropriate to the needs of future technology nodes. We have implemented millisecond annealing using a carbon dioxide laser to support high-volume manufacturing of 65 nm microprocessors and system-on-chip products. We further show how the use of molecular ion implantation to produce amorphousness followed by laser annealing to produce solid phase epitaxial regrowth results in junctions that meet the shallow depth and abruptness requirements of the 32 nm node.

  6. On magnetic ordering in silicon made amorphous by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, A.F.; Mashin, A.N.; Polyakov, S.M.

    1978-01-01

    Temperature dependences of the EPR intensity for silicon irradiated with the neon and argon ions at (2-4)x10 17 cm -2 doses have been studied. Paramagnetic defects with 2.0055 g-factor were recorded. Intensity jump associated with the transformation of the irradiated layer part to ferromagnetic state is observed at approximately 140 K. Paramagnetic centre distributions at temperatures above and lower the magnetic ordering temperature have heen investigated. It has been found, that ferromagnetic ordering is observed in a layer with the defect concentrations (3-7)x10 20 cm -3 , located at a depth > 100 A. Magnetic-ordered layer thickness is proportional to the incident ion energy

  7. An extended five-stream model for diffusion of ion-implanted dopants in monocrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khina, B.B.

    2007-01-01

    Low-energy high-dose ion implantation of different dopants (P, Sb, As, B and others) into monocrystalline silicon with subsequent thermal annealing is used for the formation of ultra-shallow p-n junctions in modern VLSI circuit technology. During annealing, dopant activation and diffusion in silicon takes place. The experimentally observed phenomenon of transient enhanced diffusion (TED), which is typically ascribed to the interaction of diffusing species with non-equilibrium point defects accumulated in silicon due to ion damage, and formation of small clusters and extended defects, hinders further down scaling of p-n junctions in VLSI circuits. TED is currently a subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigation in many binary and multicomponent systems. However, the state-of-the-art mathematical models of dopant diffusion, which are based on the so-called 'five-stream' approach, and modern TCAD software packages such as SUPREM-4 (by Silvaco Data Systems, Ltd.) that implement these models encounter severe difficulties in describing TED. Solving the intricate problem of TED suppression and development of novel regimes of ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing is impossible without elaboration of new mathematical models and computer simulation of this complex phenomenon. In this work, an extended five-stream model for diffusion in silicon is developed which takes into account all possible charge states of point defects (vacancies and silicon self-interstitials) and diffusing pairs 'dopant atom-vacancy' and 'dopant atom-silicon self-interstitial'. The model includes the drift terms for differently charged point defects and pairs in the internal electric field and the kinetics of interaction between unlike 'species' (generation and annihilation of pairs and annihilation of point defects). Expressions for diffusion coefficients and numerous sink/source terms that appear in the non-linear, non-steady-state reaction-diffusion equations are derived

  8. Influence of Hot Implantation on Residual Radiation Damage in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawski, M.; Zuk, J.; Kulik, M.; Drozdziel, A.; Pyszniak, K.; Turek, M.; Lin, L.; Prucnal, S.

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable thermomechanical and electrical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this material very attractive for high-temperature, high-power, and high-frequency applications. Because of very low values of diffusion coefficient of most impurities in SiC, ion implantation is the best method to selectively introduce dopants over well-defined depths in SiC. Aluminium is commonly used for creating p-type regions in SiC. However, post-implantation radiation damage, which strongly deteriorates required electric properties of the implanted layers, is difficult to anneal even at high temperatures because of remaining residual damage. Therefore implantation at elevated target temperatures (hot implantation) is nowadays an accepted method to decrease the level of the residual radiation damage by avoiding ion beam-induced amorphization. The main objective of this study is to compare the results of the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy with channeling and micro-Raman spectroscopy investigations of room temperature and 500 o C Al + ion implantation-induced damage in 6H-SiC and its removal by high temperature (up to 1600 o C) thermal annealing. (author)

  9. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-02-26

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants.

  10. Recoil implantation of boron into silicon by high energy silicon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, L.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, X. M.; Rusakova, I.; Mount, G.; Zhang, L. H.; Liu, J. R.; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2001-07-01

    A recoil implantation technique for shallow junction formation was investigated. After e-gun deposition of a B layer onto Si, 10, 50, or 500 keV Si ion beams were used to introduce surface deposited B atoms into Si by knock-on. It has been shown that recoil implantation with high energy incident ions like 500 keV produces a shallower B profile than lower energy implantation such as 10 keV and 50 keV. This is due to the fact that recoil probability at a given angle is a strong function of the energy of the primary projectile. Boron diffusion was showed to be suppressed in high energy recoil implantation and such suppression became more obvious at higher Si doses. It was suggested that vacancy rich region due to defect imbalance plays the role to suppress B diffusion. Sub-100 nm junction can be formed by this technique with the advantage of high throughput of high energy implanters.

  11. Resistivity and morphology of TiSi2 formed on Xe+-implanted polycrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwano, H.; Phillips, J.R.; Mayer, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Xe ion irradiation of polycrystalline silicon before Ti deposition is found to affect subsequent silicide formation. Silicide films were prepared by implanting 60, 100, or 240 keV Xe + ions into 500-nm-thick undoped polycrystalline silicon before depositing Ti and annealing in vacuum. Preimplantation altered the subsequent silicide resistivity, x-ray diffraction patterns, and morphology as compared to films prepared on unimplanted polycrystalline Si substrates. We found that minimal TiSi 2 resistivities were achieved at lower temperatures with preimplantation, indicating that the Xe-implanted substrate promotes a lower temperature transition from the metastable C49 phase to the low-resistivity equilibrium C54 phase of TiSi 2 . X-ray diffraction results confirmed the lower temperature formation of the C54 phase with preimplantation. Low-temperature annealing (650 degree C, 30 min) of 6x10 16 cm -2 , 240 keV Xe + -implanted samples yielded low-resistivity (∼22 μΩ cm) silicide films, while simultaneously annealed samples without preimplantation had resistivity five times higher. Lower doses were effective at lower implant energies, with low resistivity achieved after 725 degree C, 30 min annealing for 2x10 15 cm -2 , 60 keV Xe + preimplantation

  12. Annealing damage caused by implantation of group IB elements into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Svenningsen, B.; Chadderton, L.T.; Whitton, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the Rutherford backscattering method (RBS) have been used in an investigation of the annealing of radiation damage produced in silicon by 80 keV Cu + , Ag + and Au + ions up to doses of 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Whilst the damage caused by Cu + and Ag + implantation, measured by RBS, persists following annealing sequences up to temperatures of 800 0 C, Au + -implanted samples show recovery. Furthermore, RBS indicates quite clearly that, in the case of gold, atomic diffusion to the silicon surface takes place. TEM and electron diffraction both indicate that in all three implants the anomalous 'damage' remaining in RBS spectra is due to an amorphous-polycrystalline transition. In the case of Au + implants, however, there is less inhibition of the process of recovery, quite apart from the thermal history of the sample. The importance of using another technique, especially TEM, in conjunction with RBS investigations of radiation damage in the solid state is emphasized. (author)

  13. Memory characteristics of silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals as a charge trapping layer of nonvolatile memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Yang, Hyundeok; Chang, Man; Baek, Sungkweon; Hwang, Hyunsang; Jeon, Sanghun; Kim, Juhyung; Kim, Chungwoo

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals formed by low-energy silicon plasma immersion ion implantation has been investigated as a charge trapping layer of a polycrystalline silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon-type nonvolatile memory device. Compared with the control sample without silicon nanocrystals, silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals provides excellent memory characteristics, such as larger width of capacitance-voltage hysteresis, higher program/erase speed, and lower charge loss rate at elevated temperature. These improved memory characteristics are derived by incorporation of silicon nanocrystals into the charge trapping layer as additional accessible charge traps with a deeper effective trap energy level

  14. Interference effects in Bragg-case synchrotron section topography of elastically bent silicon implanted crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Graeff, W.

    1997-01-01

    White-beam synchrotron section topography was applied to a silicon crystal implanted with 4.8 MeV α-particles elastically bent with the radius of curvature close to 100 m. A number of section patterns corresponding to different reflections was analysed. It was found that the section pattern in the bent sample was drastically different from those observed in a flat sample. The difference consists in the occurrence of the sets of additional interference fringes covering a long distance up to several millimetres behind the main diffraction maximum. It was possible to reproduce some characteristic features of the fringes both in the implanted and non-implanted region by numerical integration of the Takagi-Taupin equation

  15. The transmission diffraction patterns of silicon implanted with high-energy α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Wierzchowski, W.

    1995-01-01

    2 mm thick silicon wafers, implanted with 4.8 MeV α-particles are studied by means of transmission section topography and additionally by Lang and double-crystal methods. It was found that all three methods produced a negligible contrast in the symmetric transmission reflection apart from some fragments of the implanted area's boundaries. The interference fringes were observed in the case of asymmetric reflections. The asymmetric section topographs revealed distinct interference fringes, which cannot be explained in terms of simple bicrystal models. In particular, the curvature of these fringes may be interpreted as being due to the change in the implanted ion dose along the beam intersecting the crystal. Some features of the fringe pattern were reproduced by numerical integration of Takagi-Taupin equations. (author)

  16. Channeled-ion implantation of group-III and group-V ions into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, T.; Nishi, H.; Inada, T.; Sakurai, T.

    1978-01-01

    Implantation of group-III and group-V ions along [111] and [110] axes of silicon have been performed using a backscattering technique, and the depth profiles of implanted ions have been measured by the C-V method. The range of channeled Ga ions is the largest among the present data, and a p-type layer of about 6 μm is obtained by implantation at only 150 keV. The carrier profiles of channeled Al and Ga ions with deep ranges do not show any distinguishable channeled peak contrasting with the B, P, and As channeling which gives a well-defined peak. The electronic stopping cross section (S/sub e/) of channeled P ions agree well with the results of Eisen and Reddi, but in B channeling, the discrepancies of 10--20% are observed among S/sub e/ values obtained experimentally by three different groups

  17. Visible light emission from silicon implanted and annealed SiO2layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghislotti, G.; Nielsen, B.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.; Di Mauro, L.F.; Bottani, C.E.; Corni, F.; Tonini, R.; Ottaviani, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon implanted and annealed SiO 2 layers are studied using photoluminescence (PL) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Two PL emission bands are observed. A band centered at 560 nm is present in as-implanted samples and it is still observed after 1,000 C annealing. The emission time is fast. A second band centered at 780 nm is detected after 1,000 C annealing. The intensity of the 780 nm band further increased when hydrogen annealing was performed. The emission time is long (1 micros to 0.2 ms). PAS results show that defects produced by implantation anneal at 600 C. Based on the annealing behavior and on the emission times, the origin of the two bands is discussed

  18. Production and beam annealing of damage in carbon implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kool, W.H.; Roosendaal, H.E.; Wiggers, L.W.; Saris, F.W.

    1978-01-01

    The annealing of damage introduced by 70 keV C implantation of Si is studied for impact of H + and He + beams in the energy interval 30 to 200 keV. For a good description of the annealing behaviour it is necessary to account for the damage introduction which occurs simultaneously. It turns out that the initial damage annealing rate is proportional to the amount of damage. The proportionality constant is related to a quantity introduced in an earlier paper in order to describe saturation effects in the damage production after H + or He + impact in unimplanted Si. This indicates that the same mechanism governs both processes: beam induced damage annealing and saturation of the damage introduction. (author)

  19. Effect of radiation induced defects and incompatibility elastic stresses on the diffusion of ion implantated boron in silicon at the pulse annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stel'makh, V.F.; Suprun-Belevich, Yu.R.; Chelyadinskij, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    For determination of radiation defects effect on diffusion of the implanted boron in silicon at the pulse annealing, silicon crystals, implanted with boron, preliminary irradiated by silicon ions of different flows for checked defects implantation, were investigated. Silicon crystals additionally implanted by Ge + ions were investigated to research the effect of the incompatibility elastic stresses, emerging in implanted structures due to lattice periods noncoincidence in matrix and alloyed layers, on implanted boron diffusion. It is shown, that abnormally high values of boron diffusion coefficients in silicon at the pulse annealing are explained by silicon interstitial atom participation in redistribution of diffusing boron atoms by two diffusion channels - interstitial and vacation - and by incompatibility elastic stresses effect on diffusion

  20. X-ray diffuse scattering study of the kinetics of stacking fault growth and annihilation in boron-implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbert, D.; Arthur, J.; Sztucki, M.; Metzger, T. H.; Griffin, P. B.; Patel, J. R.

    2002-10-01

    Stacking faults in boron-implanted silicon give rise to streaks or rods of scattered x-ray intensity normal to the stacking fault plane. We have used the diffuse scattering rods to follow the growth of faults as a function of time when boron-implanted silicon is annealed in the range of 925 to 1025 degC. From the growth kinetics we obtain an activation energy for interstitial migration in silicon: EI=1.98plus-or-minus0.06 eV. Fault intensity and size versus time results indicate that faults do not shrink and disappear, but rather are annihilated by a dislocation reaction mechanism.

  1. Study Trapped Charge Distribution in P-Channel Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Memory Device Using Dynamic Programming Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Hai; Chiu, Yung-Yueh; Lee, Yen-Hui; Chang, Ru-Wei; Yang, Bo-Jun; Sun, Wein-Town; Lee, Eric; Kuo, Chao-Wei; Shirota, Riichiro

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we precisely investigate the charge distribution in SiN layer by dynamic programming of channel hot hole induced hot electron injection (CHHIHE) in p-channel silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) memory device. In the dynamic programming scheme, gate voltage is increased as a staircase with fixed step amplitude, which can prohibits the injection of holes in SiN layer. Three-dimensional device simulation is calibrated and is compared with the measured programming characteristics. It is found, for the first time, that the hot electron injection point quickly traverses from drain to source side synchronizing to the expansion of charged area in SiN layer. As a result, the injected charges quickly spread over on the almost whole channel area uniformly during a short programming period, which will afford large tolerance against lateral trapped charge diffusion by baking.

  2. Optical characterization of nanocrystals in silicon rich oxide superlattices and porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agocs, E.; Petrik, P.; Milita, S.; Vanzetti, L.; Gardelis, S.; Nassiopoulou, A.G.; Pucker, G.; Balboni, R.; Fried, M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose to analyze ellipsometry data by using effective medium approximation (EMA) models. Thanks to EMA, having nanocrystalline reference dielectric functions and generalized critical point (GCP) model the physical parameters of two series of samples containing silicon nanocrystals, i.e. silicon rich oxide (SRO) superlattices and porous silicon layers (PSL), have been determined. The superlattices, consisting of ten SRO/SiO 2 layer pairs, have been prepared using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The porous silicon layers have been prepared using short monopulses of anodization current in the transition regime between porous silicon formation and electropolishing, in a mixture of hydrofluoric acid and ethanol. The optical modeling of both structures is similar. The effective dielectric function of the layer is calculated by EMA using nanocrystalline components (nc-Si and GCP) in a dielectric matrix (SRO) or voids (PSL). We discuss the two major problems occurring when modeling such structures: (1) the modeling of the vertically non-uniform layer structures (including the interface properties like nanoroughness at the layer boundaries) and (2) the parameterization of the dielectric function of nanocrystals. We used several techniques to reduce the large number of fit parameters of the GCP models. The obtained results are in good agreement with those obtained by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. We investigated the correlation of the broadening parameter and characteristic EMA components with the nanocrystal size and the sample preparation conditions, such as the annealing temperatures of the SRO superlattices and the anodization current density of the porous silicon samples. We found that the broadening parameter is a sensitive measure of the nanocrystallinity of the samples, even in cases, where the nanocrystals are too small to be visible for X-ray scattering. Major processes like sintering, phase separation, and intermixing have been

  3. Silicon heterojunction solar cells with novel fluorinated n-type nanocrystalline silicon oxide emitters on p-type crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Sukanta; Mandal, Sourav; Das, Gourab; Mukhopadhyay, Sumita; Pratim Ray, Partha; Banerjee, Chandan; Barua, Asok Kumar

    2015-08-01

    A novel fluorinated phosphorus doped silicon oxide based nanocrystalline material have been used to prepare heterojunction solar cells on flat p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) Czochralski (CZ) wafers. The n-type nc-SiO:F:H material were deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Deposited films were characterized in detail by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and optoelectronics properties have been studied using temperature dependent conductivity measurement, Ellipsometry, UV-vis spectrum analysis etc. It is observed that the cell fabricated with fluorinated silicon oxide emitter showing higher initial efficiency (η = 15.64%, Jsc = 32.10 mA/cm2, Voc = 0.630 V, FF = 0.77) for 1 cm2 cell area compare to conventional n-a-Si:H emitter (14.73%) on flat c-Si wafer. These results indicate that n type nc-SiO:F:H material is a promising candidate for heterojunction solar cell on p-type crystalline wafers. The high Jsc value is associated with excellent quantum efficiencies at short wavelengths (<500 nm).

  4. The clinical and diagnostic consequences of Poly Implant Prothèse silicone breast implants, recalled from the European market in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maijers, Maria C; Niessen, Francisus B

    2013-03-01

    Recently, Poly Implant Prothèse silicone breast implants were recalled from the European market. The authors studied 112 women and previously published data on rupture prevalence. Women are presenting with symptoms they feel may be a result of ruptured implants. The authors' aim was to study the clinical consequences of Poly Implant Prothèse implants. One hundred twelve women with 224 proven Poly Implant Prothèse implants after 10 years of implantation were enrolled in this study. All women underwent physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging and were interviewed regarding symptoms. Details of the explantations of 35 women with at least one ruptured implant were documented. Tissue from 10 women was sent for pathologic investigation. Of 112 women, 34 (30.4 percent) had symptoms attributable to their implants. Physical examination showed that 12 of the 121 women (10.7 percent) had findings suggestive of rupture, most commonly pain. Three had lymphadenopathy that seemed to correlate with implant rupture or excessive "gel bleed." Pathologic findings showed no malignancies. Eight women who underwent explantation had no implant rupture. Excessive gel bleed was documented in half of them. Clinical consequences of women with Poly Implant Prothèse implants are comparable to those reported in the literature of other manufacturers. Neither complaints nor findings at physical examination had a significant correlation with implant rupture at explantation. Magnetic resonance imaging is still the preferred method compared with physical examination for diagnosing rupture. The low specificity was probably caused by the difficulty in differentiating between rupture and excessive gel bleed in these implants.

  5. Spectroscopy of bound multi exciton complexes and deep centers in implanted and annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, V.M.; Valakh, M.Ya.; Kovalchuk, V.B.; Rudko, G.Yu.; Shakhrajchuk, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    The change of silicon properties relevant to device physics caused by ion implantation and thermal annealing is studied. It is shown that in boron-doped p-Si the increase of P + ions implantation doses from 10 12 to 10 14 ions/cm 2 lead to a decrease of the broadening of boron bound exciton bands. This behaviour is caused by implantation-induced disordering of the lattice. The subsequent thermal annealing restores the intensity and the halfwidth of the above-mentioned bands and initiates the increase of the bands which correspond to excitons bond on the implanted phosphorus ions. Measurements of phosphorus bound exciton band intensities are applicable to the characterization of the process of phosphorus activation. Analysis of low energy region of luminescence spectra of heat treated samples shows that there is a correlation between the process of implanted phosphorus activation and the one of radiation defects transformation. The influence of germanium doping on the generation of thermal donors by means of spectroscopy of deep centres luminescence has been investigated. It is shown that the introduction of germanium in concentrations of 10 19 -10 20 cm -3 effectively suppresses the generation of thermal donors and deep centres under investigation. (author)

  6. Oxidized zirconium: a potentially longer lasting hip implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, V.; Widding, K.; Hunter, G.; Heuer, D.

    2005-01-01

    Because younger, more active patients are receiving total hip replacements, it is necessary to develop materials, which would increase the life span of the implants and challenge their wear potential under adverse conditions. Oxidized zirconium (OxZr) is a metal with the surface transformed to ceramic by oxidation that offers low fracture risk and excellent abrasion resistance. This study compared wear of polyethylene (non-irradiated and highly crosslinked) with OxZr and CoCr heads under smooth and rough (clinically relevant) conditions. Wear was up to 15-fold less and up to 4-fold fewer particles were produced when coupled with OxZr than with CoCr, demonstrating that OxZr heads should increase clinical implant longevity

  7. The role of implantation damage in the production of silicon-on-insulator films by co-implantation of He+ and H+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venezia, V.C.; Agarwal, A.; Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ; Haynes, T.E.; Holland, O.W.; Eaglesham, D.J.; Weldon, M.K.; Chabal, Y.J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the process of silicon thin film separation by hydrogen implantation, as well as the more basic phenomenon of surface blistering, can occur at a much lower total dose when H and He are co-implanted than when H is implanted alone. Building on that work, this paper investigates the role of implantation damage in this process by separating the contributions of gas pressure from those of damage. Three different experiments using co-implantation were designed. In the first of these experiments, H and He implants were spatially separated thereby separating the damage from each implant. The second experiment involved co-implantation of H and He at a temperature of 77 K to retain a larger amount of damage for the same gas dose. In the third experiment, Li was co-implanted with H, to create additional damage without introducing additional gas. These experiments together show that increasing the implantation damage itself hampers the formation of surface blisters, and that the increased efficiency observed for He co-implantation with H is due to the supplementary source of gas provided by the He

  8. Direct comparison of the electrical properties in metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon and metal/aluminum oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon capacitors with equivalent oxide thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Ho-Myoung; Seo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Hee Dong; Kim, Kyoung Chan; Kim, Jong-Guk [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Won-Ju; Koh, Jung-Hyuk [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Yun Mo [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.k [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-31

    We examine the electrical properties of metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon (MONOS) capacitors with two different blocking oxides, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, under the influence of the same electric field. The thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer is set to 150 A, which is electrically equivalent to a thickness of the SiO{sub 2} layer of 65 A, in the MONOS structure for this purpose. The capacitor with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer shows a larger capacitance-voltage memory window of 8.6 V, lower program voltage of 7 V, faster program/erase speeds of 10 ms/1 {mu}s, lower leakage current of 100 pA and longer data retention than the one with the SiO{sub 2} blocking layer does. These improvements are attributed to the suppression of the carrier transport to the gate electrode afforded by the use of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer physically thicker than the SiO{sub 2} one, as well as the effective charge-trapping by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the deep energy levels in the nitride layer.

  9. Thermal processing and native oxidation of silicon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, Brandon J.; Holm, Jason; Roberts, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to investigate in-air oxidation of silicon nanoparticles ca. 11 nm in diameter. Particle samples were prepared first by extracting them from an RF plasma synthesis reactor, and then heating them in an inert carrier gas stream. The resulting particles had varying surface hydrogen coverages and relative amounts of SiH x (x = 1, 2, and 3), depending on the temperature to which they had been heated. The particles were allowed to oxidize in-air for several weeks. FTIR, XPS, and EELS analyses that were performed during this period clearly establish that adsorbed hydrogen retards oxidation, although in complex ways. In particular, particles that have been heated to intermediate hydrogen coverages oxidize more slowly in air than do freshly generated particles that have a much higher hydrogen content. In addition, the loss of surface hydride species at high processing temperatures results in fast initial oxidation and the formation of a self-limiting oxide layer. Analogous measurements made on deuterium-covered particles show broadly similar behavior; i.e., that oxidation is the slowest at some intermediate coverage of adsorbed deuterium.

  10. Nanosystems in Ceramic Oxides Created by Means of Ion Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Van Huis, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The material properties of nanometer-sized clusters are dependent on the cluster size. Changing the cluster dimensions induces structural phase transformations, metal-insulator transitions, non-linear optical properties and widening of the band gap of semiconductors. In this work, nanoclusters are created by ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. The ceramic oxides MgO and Al2O3 are used as embedding materials because of their stability and optical transparency. All clusters were cre...

  11. Distribution of species and Ga–N bonds in silicon co-implanted with gallium and nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surodin, S. I.; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Kryukov, R. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I.

    2016-01-01

    The concentration profiles of species in silicon subjected to gallium and nitrogen co-implantation and subsequent annealing have been investigated by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with the layer-by-layer ion etching of the implanted layer. It is shown that practically entire implanted gallium undergoes out-diffusion, but the preliminary implantation of nitrogen for the synthesis of a barrier SiN_x layer makes it possible to avoid the essential loss of gallium. In this case, about 14 % of implanted gallium bond to nitrogen. The obtained data are discussed from the viewpoint of the possibility of ion synthesis of GaN inclusions in silicon matrix.

  12. Distribution of species and Ga–N bonds in silicon co-implanted with gallium and nitrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surodin, S. I., E-mail: surodin.bsn@mail.ru; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Kryukov, R. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I., E-mail: tetelbaum@phys.unn.ru [Lobachevsky University, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The concentration profiles of species in silicon subjected to gallium and nitrogen co-implantation and subsequent annealing have been investigated by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with the layer-by-layer ion etching of the implanted layer. It is shown that practically entire implanted gallium undergoes out-diffusion, but the preliminary implantation of nitrogen for the synthesis of a barrier SiN{sub x} layer makes it possible to avoid the essential loss of gallium. In this case, about 14 % of implanted gallium bond to nitrogen. The obtained data are discussed from the viewpoint of the possibility of ion synthesis of GaN inclusions in silicon matrix.

  13. Self-cleaning glass coating containing titanium oxide and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.O. de; Alves, A.K.; Berutti, F.A.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    Using the electro spinning technique nano fibers of titanium oxide doped with silicon were synthesized. As precursor materials, titanium propoxide, silicon tetra propoxide and a solution of polyvinylpyrrolidone were used. The non-tissue material obtained was characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine the phase and crystallite size, BET method to determine the surface and SEM to analyze the microstructure of the fibers. After ultrasound dispersion of this material in ethanol, the glass coatings were made by dip-coating methodology. The influence of the removal velocity, the solution composition and the glass surface preparation were evaluated. The film was characterized by the contact angle of a water droplet in its surface. (author)

  14. Ion beam analysis of PECVD silicon oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Lima, F.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Pedrero, E.; Fonseca Filho, H.D.; Llovera, A.; Riera, M.; Dominguez, C.; Behar, M.; Zawislak, F.C.

    2006-01-01

    A study of ion beam analysis techniques of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon oxide thin films (1 μm thick) obtained from silane (SiH 4 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is reported. The film, elemental composition and surface morphology were determined as function of the reactant gas flow ratio, R = [N 2 O]/[SiH 4 ] in the 22-110 range using the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and atomic force microscopy techniques. The density of the films was determined by combining the RBS and thickness measurements. All the experiments were done at a deposition temperature of 300 deg. C. In all the cases almost stoichiometric oxides were obtained being the impurity content function of R. It was also observed that physical properties such as density, surface roughness and shape factor increase with R in the studied interval

  15. Implantation of xenon in amorphous carbon and silicon for brachytherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, F.C.; Barbieri, P.F.; Viana, G.A.; Silva, D.S. da

    2013-01-01

    We report a procedure to implant high dose of xenon atoms (Xe) in amorphous carbon, a-C, and amorphous silicon, a-Si, for application in brachytherapy seeds. An ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) system was used for the deposition of the films, where one ion gun was used for sputtering a carbon (or silicon) target, while the other ion gun was used to simultaneously bombard the growing film with a beam of xenon ion Xe + in the 0–300 eV range. Xe atoms were implanted into the film with concentration up to 5.5 at.%, obtained with Xe bombardment energy in the 50–150 eV range. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the local arrangement of the implanted Xe atoms through the Xe L III absorption edge (4.75 keV). It was observed that Xe atoms tend to agglomerate in nanoclusters in a-C and are dispersed in a-Si.

  16. Mn-implanted, polycrystalline indium tin oxide and indium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, Camelia; Vinnichenko, Mykola; Xu Qingyu; Buerger, Danilo; Zhou Shengqiang; Kolitsch, Andreas; Grenzer, Joerg; Helm, Manfred; Schmidt, Heidemarie

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline conducting, ca. 250 nm thick indium tin oxide (ITO) and indium oxide (IO) films grown on SiO 2 /Si substrates using reactive magnetron sputtering, have been implanted with 1 and 5 at.% of Mn, followed by annealing in nitrogen or in vacuum. The effect of the post-growth treatment on the structural, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties has been studied. The roughness of implanted films ranges between 3 and 15 nm and XRD measurements revealed a polycrystalline structure. A positive MR has been observed for Mn-implanted and post-annealed ITO and IO films. It has been interpreted by considering s-d exchange. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been used to prove the existence of midgap electronic states in the Mn-implanted ITO and IO films reducing the transmittance below 80%.

  17. Size modulation of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in amorphous silicon oxide by Cat-CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Godavarthi, S.; Ortega, M.; Sanchez, V.; Velumani, S.; Mallick, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Different issues related to controlling size of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO x :H) deposited by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) have been reported. Films were deposited using tantalum (Ta) and tungsten (W) filaments and it is observed that films deposited using tantalum filament resulted in good control on the properties. The parameters which can affect the size of nc-Si domains have been studied which include hydrogen flow rate, catalyst and substrate temperatures. The deposited samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, HRTEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy, for determining the size of the deposited nc-Si. The crystallite formation starts for Ta-catalyst around the temperature of 1700 o C.

  18. Passivation mechanism in silicon heterojunction solar cells with intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Dimitrios; van Vliet, Jeroen; Vasudevan, Ravi; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Zeman, Miro

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we use intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide layers (a-SiOx:H) with varying oxygen content (cO) but similar hydrogen content to passivate the crystalline silicon wafers. Using our deposition conditions, we obtain an effective lifetime (τeff) above 5 ms for cO ≤ 6 at. % for passivation layers with a thickness of 36 ± 2 nm. We subsequently reduce the thickness of the layers using an accurate wet etching method to ˜7 nm and deposit p- and n-type doped layers fabricating a device structure. After the deposition of the doped layers, τeff appears to be predominantly determined by the doped layers themselves and is less dependent on the cO of the a-SiOx:H layers. The results suggest that τeff is determined by the field-effect rather than by chemical passivation.

  19. Structural and optical properties of silicon rich oxide films in graded-stoichiometric multilayers for optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios-Huerta, L.; Aceves-Mijares, M. [Electronics Department, INAOE, Apdo. 51, Puebla, Pue. 72000, México (Mexico); Cabañas-Tay, S. A.; Cardona-Castro, M. A.; Morales-Sánchez, A., E-mail: alfredo.morales@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Unidad Monterrey-PIIT, Apodaca, NL 66628, México (Mexico); Domínguez-Horna, C. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-07-18

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si-ncs) are excellent candidates for the development of optoelectronic devices. Nevertheless, different strategies are still necessary to enhance their photo and electroluminescent properties by controlling their structural and compositional properties. In this work, the effect of the stoichiometry and structure on the optical properties of silicon rich oxide (SRO) films in a multilayered (ML) structure is studied. SRO MLs with silicon excess gradually increased towards the top and bottom and towards the center of the ML produced through the variation of the stoichiometry in each SRO layer were fabricated and confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Si-ncs with three main sizes were observed by a transmission electron microscope, in agreement with the stoichiometric profile of each SRO layer. The presence of the three sized Si-ncs and some oxygen related defects enhances intense violet/blue and red photoluminescence (PL) bands. The SRO MLs were super-enriched with additional excess silicon by Si{sup +} implantation, which enhanced the PL intensity. Oxygen-related defects and small Si-ncs (<2 nm) are mostly generated during ion implantation enhancing the violet/blue band to become comparable to the red band. The structural, compositional, and luminescent characteristics of the multilayers are the result of the contribution of the individual characteristics of each layer.

  20. Deep level transient spectroscopy studies of charge traps introduced into silicon by channeling ion implantation of phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallum, J.C.; Lay, M.; Deenapanray, P.N.K.; Jagadish, C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The operating conditions of a silicon-based quantum computer are expected to place stringent requirements on the quality of the material and the processes used to make it. In the Special Research Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, ion implantation is one of the principle processing techniques under investigation for forming an ordered array of phosphorus atoms. This technique introduces defect centres in silicon which act as charge traps. Charge traps are expected to be detrimental to operation of the device. These defect centres, their dependence on ion implantation and thermal annealing conditions are being quantified using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). Since the aspect ratio of the masks required for the top-down fabrication process restrict the incident ions to a range of angles in which they may undergo channeling implantation in the silicon substrate, we have examined the effect of channeling implantation on the nature and quantity of the charge traps produced. This is the first time that DLTS studies have been performed for channeling implantation of a dopant species in silicon. DLTS is well-suited to the dose regime of ∼10 11 P/cm 3 required for the quantum computer, however, a standard DLTS measurement is unable to probe the shallow depth range of ∼ 20 nm required for the P atoms (∼ 10-15 keV implantation energy). Our aim has therefore been to perform P implants in the appropriate dose regime but using higher implantation energies, ∼ 75-450 keV, where DLTS can directly identify and profile the charge traps induced by the implantation step and monitor their annealing characteristics during subsequent processing. To map the behaviour observed in this energy regime onto the low energy range required for the quantum computer we are comparing the DLTS results to damage profiles predicted by the Monte Carlo code Crystal Trim which is used in the semiconductor industry to simulate ion implantation processes in crystalline

  1. A new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, K.M.; Park, C.; Yang, S.; Morris, S.; Do, V.; Tasch, F.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon. This paper reports that this new model is based on the dual Pearson semi-empirical implant depth profile model and the UT-MARLOWE Monte Carlo boron ion implantation model. This new model can predict with very high computational efficiency two-dimensional as-implanted boron profiles as a function of energy, dose, tilt angle, rotation angle, masking edge orientation, and masking edge thickness

  2. Forming of nanocrystal silicon films by implantation of high dose of H+ in layers of silicon on isolator and following fast thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyschenko, I.E.; Popov, V.P.; Talochkin, A.B.; Gutakovskij, A.K.; Zhuravlev, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    Formation of nanocrystalline silicon films during rapid thermal annealing of the high-dose H + ion implanted silicon-on-insulator structures was studied. It was found, that Si nanocrystals had formed alter annealings at 300-400 deg C, their formation being strongly limited by the hydrogen content in silicon and also by the annealing time. It was supposed that the nucleation of crystalline phase occurred inside the silicon islands between micropores. It is conditioned by ordering Si-Si bonds as hydrogen atoms are leaving their sites in silicon network. No coalescence of micropores takes place during the rapid thermal annealing at the temperatures up to ∼ 900 deg C. Green-orange photoluminescence was observed on synthesized films at room temperature [ru

  3. Ultrathin Oxide Passivation Layer by Rapid Thermal Oxidation for the Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Youngseok; Oh, Woongkyo; Dao, Vinh Ai; Hussain, Shahzada Qamar; Yi, Junsin

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to deposit extremely thin a-Si:H layer in heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) solar cell due to thermal damage and tough process control. This study aims to understand oxide passivation mechanism of silicon surface using rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) process by examining surface effective lifetime and surface recombination velocity. The presence of thin insulating a-Si:H layer is the key to get high Voc by lowering the leakage current (I0) which improves the efficie...

  4. Appearance of low signal intensity lines in MRI of silicone breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroman, P W; Rolland, C; Dufour, M; Grondin, P; Guidoin, R G

    1996-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of five explanted mammary prostheses were obtained with a 1.5 T GE Signa system using a conventional spin-echo pulse sequence, in order to investigate the low-intensity curvilinear lines which may be observed in MR images of silicone gel-filled breast implants under pressure from fibrous capsules. MR images showed ellipsoid prostheses, often containing multiple low-intensity curvilinear lines which in some cases presented an appearance very similar to that of the linguine sign. Upon opening the fibrous capsules, however, all of the prostheses were found to be completely intact demonstrating that the appearance of multiple low signal intensity curvilinear lines in MR images of silicone gel-filled prostheses is not necessarily a sign of prosthesis rupture. The MR image features which are specific to the linguine sign must be more precisely defined.

  5. Wet-Chemical Preparation of Silicon Tunnel Oxides for Transparent Passivated Contacts in Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Malte; Pomaska, Manuel; Lentz, Florian; Finger, Friedhelm; Rau, Uwe; Ding, Kaining

    2018-05-02

    Transparent passivated contacts (TPCs) using a wide band gap microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H(n)), silicon tunnel oxide (SiO 2 ) stack are an alternative to amorphous silicon-based contacts for the front side of silicon heterojunction solar cells. In a systematic study of the μc-SiC:H(n)/SiO 2 /c-Si contact, we investigated selected wet-chemical oxidation methods for the formation of ultrathin SiO 2 , in order to passivate the silicon surface while ensuring a low contact resistivity. By tuning the SiO 2 properties, implied open-circuit voltages of 714 mV and contact resistivities of 32 mΩ cm 2 were achieved using μc-SiC:H(n)/SiO 2 /c-Si as transparent passivated contacts.

  6. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)]. E-mail: jesus.hernandez.mangas@tel.uva.es; Arias, J. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Marques, L.A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Ruiz-Bueno, A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Bailon, L. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results.

  7. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Arias, J.; Marques, L.A.; Ruiz-Bueno, A.; Bailon, L.

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results

  8. Heavy-ion irradiation effects on passivated implanted planar silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coster, W. de; Brijs, B.; Vandervorst, W.; Burger, P.

    1992-01-01

    Commercially available p + nn + passivated implanted planar silicon detectors have been shown to be very performing for standard RBS-analysis with 4 He beams. Lifetimes are found to range up till >10 9 particles. The end of lifetime occurs concurrent with internal breakdown of the detector. Inverted n + np + detectors where the junction is located well outside the damage region, are expected to be less sensitive to the radiation damage and to have a higher lifetime. In the present paper the characteristics for heavy-ion detection of both types of detector are investigated and discussed upon. (orig.)

  9. X-Ray diffraction studies of silicon implanted with high energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Wierzchowski, W.; Graeff, W.

    1998-01-01

    The character of lattice deformation in silicon implanted with high energy alpha-particles and protons was studied using a number of X-ray methods. The experiments included double-crystal spectrometer method as well as single crystal section and projection topography realised both with conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. All observed diffraction patterns were reasonably explainable assuming the lattice parameter distribution proportional to the vacancy-interstitial distribution coming from the Biersack-ziegler theory. The theoretical rocking curves and distribution in back-reflection double-crystal and section topographs well corresponding to the experimental results were calculated using numerical integration of the takagi-taupin equations

  10. Study of phosphorus implanted and annealed silicon by electrical measurements and ion channeling technique

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjersi, T; Zilabdi, M; Benazzouz, C

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of annealing temperature on the electrical activation of phosphorus implanted into silicon. The measurements performed using spreading resistance, four-point probe and ion channeling techniques have allowed us to establish the existence of two domains of variation of the electrical activation (350-700 deg. C) and (800-1100 deg. C). The presence of reverse annealing and the annihilation of defects have been put in a prominent position in the first temperature range. It has been shown that in order to achieve a complete electrical activation, the annealing temperature must belong to the second domain (800-1100 deg. C).

  11. Defect diffusion during annealing of low-energy ion-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedrossian, P.J.; Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a new approach for investigating the kinetics of defect migration during annealing of low-energy, ion-implanted silicon, employing a combination of computer simulations and atomic-resolution tunneling microscopy. Using atomically-clean Si(111)-7 x 7 as a sink for bulk point defects created by 5 keV Xe and Ar irradiation, they observe distinct, temperature-dependent surface arrival rates for vacancies and interstitials. A combination of simulation tools provides a detailed description of the processes that underlie the observed temperature-dependence of defect segregation, and the predictions of the simulations agree closely with the experimental observations

  12. Subthreshold currents in CMOS transistors made on oxygen-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Kinks have been observed in subthreshold current plots of mesa-shaped n-channel transistors made on oxygen-implanted silicon substrates. The kinks represent additional current flow and are due to overlapping fields from the gate electrode causing early corner inversion and to a Qsub(ss) side-wall effect. Subthreshold currents in n-channel transistors are dominated by the two effects which, as a consequence, reduce threshold voltages especially in narrow n-channel transistors. The subthreshold characteristics of p-channel transistors were not affected in the same way. (author)

  13. Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.

    1998-01-01

    The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 x 10 17 /cm 2 . The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency

  14. Double and triple crystal diffraction investigation on ion implanted and electron beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servidori, M.; Cembali, F.; Winter, U.; Zaumseil, P.; Richter, H.

    1985-01-01

    Double (DCD) and triple crystal (TCD) diffractometry was used to investigate radiation damage produced in silicon by silicon bombardment and its evolution after electron beam annealing. The implantation processes were carried out at 60 keV energy and at doses of 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 200 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . As to the annealing treatments, an electron gun was used, operating in the ranges 7.5 to 24 W/cm 2 and 2 to 20 seconds. DCD rocking curves were analyzed by means of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. The formalism introduced by Taupin was used to simulate the experimental intensity profiles. From the resulting best fits, the lattice strain vs. depth profiles were obtained, indicating an increase of the damage with dose for the as-implanted samples up to 1 x 10 14 cm -2 dose, whereas amorphous layers are produced for the higher doses. After annealing, lowering of the residual strain was observed to be directly proportional to the implanted dose. In particular, a complete recovery of the damage occurred for the 0.5 and 1 x 10 13 cm -2 samples. The results obtained by the fitting procedure were substantially independent from the power densities and times used during electron beam irradiation. TCD as a very sensitive method to investigate lattice defects after implantation was used to obtain information about the crystallographic perfection of the surface layer. The absence of diffuse scattering indicates that the annealed layers do not contain microdefects within the detection limits. (author)

  15. Characterization of junctions produced by medium-energy ion implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfret, A.

    1970-01-01

    Characteristics of diodes made by implanting 20 keV boron and phosphorus ions into silicon are reviewed. Special features of theses diodes are presented, and correlation with technology is studied. This paper includes three parts: - in the first part, the theory of range distribution is considered for both amorphous and single-crystal targets, - In the second part, a brief description of the experimental conditions is given. - In the third part, the experimental results are presented. The results lead to a schematic model of the component. They also show the influence of cleaning and annealing treatments from which optimized process of fabrication can be determined. In this study, the influence of a two stage annealing process is shown. For phosphorus and boron implants, the first stage is performed at 150 deg. C while the second stage is 450 deg. C for phosphorus and 550 deg. C for boron implants. The implanted diodes are found to exhibit good electrical characteristics. Comparisons with standard diffused diodes are quite favourable. (author) [fr

  16. Effect of laser pulsed radiation on the properties of implanted layers of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Voron'ko, O.N.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of investigation into pulsed laser radiation effects on the layers of GH polytype silicon carbide converted to amorphous state by implantation of boron and aluminium ions. The implantation doses were selected to be 5x10 16 for boron and 5x10 15 cm -2 for aluminium, with the ion energies being 60 and 80 keV, respectively. The samples annealed under nanosecond regime are stated to posseys neither photoluminescence (PL) nor cathodoluminescence (CL). At the same time the layers annealed in millisecond regime have a weak PL at 100 K and CL at 300 K. The PL and CL are observed in samples, laser-annealed at radiation energy density above 150-160 J/cm 2 in case of boron ion implantation and 100-120 J/cm 2 in case of aluminium ion implantation. Increasing the radiation energy density under the nanosecond regime of laser annealing results in the surface evaporation due to superheating of amorphous layers. Increasing the energy density above 220-240 J/cm 2 results in destruction of the samples

  17. Interference fringes in synchrotron section topography of implanted silicon with a very large ion range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Dluzewska, K.; Wierzchowski, W.; Graeff, W.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon crystals implanted with 9 MeV protons to the dose of 5x10 17 cm -2 were studied with X-ray topographic methods using both conventional and synchrotron radiation sources. After the implantation the crystals were thermally and electron annealed. The implantation produced large 600 μm thick shot-through layer while the total thickness of the samples was 1.6 mm. It was confirmed by means of double crystal topography that the whole crystal was elastically bent. The transmission section patterns revealed both parts of the implanted crystal separated by strong contrasts coming from the most damaged layer and distinct interference fringes which appeared on one side of the topograph only. The locations of the fringes changed when the beam entered the other side of the sample. The mechanism of fringe formation was studied with numerical integration of the Takagi-Taupin equations, especially studying the intensity distribution in the diffraction plane. The simulations reproduced the location of the fringes in different geometries and indicate that they can be caused both by variable crystal curvature and variable ion dose. (author)

  18. Local electronic and geometric structures of silicon atoms implanted in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao

    2002-01-01

    Low-energy Si + ions were implanted in highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) up to 1% of surface atomic concentration, and the local electronic and geometric structures around the silicon atoms were in situ investigated by means of the Si K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation. The resonance peak appeared at 1839.5 eV in the Si K-edge XANES spectra for Si + -implanted HOPG. This energy is lower than those of the Si 1s→σ * resonance peaks in any other Si-containing materials. The intensity of the resonance peak showed strong polarization dependence, which suggests that the final state orbitals around the implanted Si atoms have π * -like character. It is concluded that the σ-type Si-C bonds produced by the Si + -ion implantation are nearly parallel to the graphite plane, and Si x C phase forms two-dimensionally spread graphite-like layer with sp 2 bonds

  19. Effects of Zafirlukast on the Capsular Fibrosis of Silicone Breast Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Hocaoglu

    2014-06-01

    Methods: Forty-eight adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Smooth-surfaced, gel-filled prostheses were implanted in 36 rats. Group A: The day of the operation, 12 animals received Zafirlukast treatment for 14 weeks (oral gavage, once a day, 6 days a week, 4 mg/kg/day; Group B: 10 weeks after the operation, 12 animals received Zafirlukast treatment for 4 weeks; Group C: 12 animals were implanted but did not receive treatment; Group D: 12 animals did not have an operation, but for 14 weeks received oral gavage containing water instead of Zafirlukast. At the end of the 14 weeks, the implants with the surrounding capsules were extracted. Blind macroscopic inspectional evaluation of the capsules was performed, and microscopic capsular thickness measurements were made. Results: The mean capsular thickness was 0.033 mm (SD: 0.011 in Group A, and 0.089 mm (SD: 0.023 and 0.125 mm (SD: 0.025 in Groups B and C, respectively. Differences between Groups A and C and between Groups A and B were significant (p0.05. Similarly, Macroscopic Inspectional Fibrosis Scoring showed a significant difference between Groups A and C and a non-significant difference between Groups B and C. Conclusion: Daily prophylactic oral administration of Zafirlukast immediately after implantation significantly diminishes the development of fibrotic capsules around the silicone prostheses. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(3.000: 139-146

  20. Radiation damage in He implanted silicon at high temperature using multi-energies

    CERN Document Server

    David, M L; Oliviero, E; Denanot, M F; Beaufort, M F; Declemy, A; Blanchard, C; Gerasimenko, N N; Barbot, J F

    2002-01-01

    He sup + ions were implanted at 800 deg. C into (1 0 0) silicon with multiple energies and selected fluences to get a number of displacement per atom constant in a large plateau. The ion-related defects have been mainly studied by transmission electron microscopy. Both the amount and the microstructure of defects have been found to be strongly dependent on the order of implants. Faceted cavities are only observed where damage overlapping occurs. The first implant provides thus nucleation sites for cavities. The generation of these sites is less efficient when using increasing energies because of damage recovery; fewer cavities are observed. Concurrently interstitial-type defects, left brace 1 1 3 right brace agglomerates, are formed. The observed state of growth of these left brace 1 1 3 right brace defects (rod-like and ribbon-like defects) is dependent on the implantation energy order but in any cases, no dislocation loops are observed even in the deepest damage region.

  1. Incidence of Internal Mammary Lymph Nodes with Silicone Breast Implants at MR Imaging after Oncoplastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Elizabeth J; Watson, Elizabeth J; Gibbons, Girard; Goldman, Debra A; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Jochelson, Maxine S; Dershaw, D David; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    To assess the incidence of benign and malignant internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging among women with a history of treated breast cancer and silicone implant reconstruction. The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study and waived informed consent. Women were identified who (a) had breast cancer, (b) underwent silicone implant oncoplastic surgery, and (c) underwent postoperative implant-protocol MR imaging with or without positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) between 2000 and 2013. The largest IMLNs were measured. A benign IMLN was pathologically proven or defined as showing 1 year of imaging stability and/or no clinical evidence of disease. Malignant IMLNs were pathologically proven. Incidence of IMLN and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated on a per-patient level by using proportions and exact 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in axis size. In total, 923 women with breast cancer and silicone implants were included (median age, 46 years; range, 22-89 years). The median time between reconstructive surgery and first MR imaging examination was 49 months (range, 5-513 months). Of the 923 women, 347 (37.6%) had IMLNs at MR imaging. Median short- and long-axis measurements were 0.40 cm (range, 0.20-1.70 cm) and 0.70 cm (range, 0.30-1.90 cm), respectively. Two hundred seven of 923 patients (22.4%) had adequate follow-up; only one of the 207 IMLNs was malignant, with a PPV of 0.005 (95% CI: 0.000, 0.027). Fifty-eight of 923 patients (6.3%) had undergone PET/CT; of these, 39 (67.2%) had IMLN at MR imaging. Twelve of the 58 patients (20.7%) with adequate follow-up had fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid IMLN, with a median standardized uptake value of 2.30 (range, 1.20-6.10). Only one of the 12 of the fluorodeoxyglucose-avid IMLNs was malignant, with a PPV of 0.083 (95% CI: 0.002, 0.385). IMLNs identified at

  2. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chenlong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Wang, Guangfu, E-mail: 88088@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Beijing Radiation Center, 100875 Beijing (China); Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2016-03-01

    Highlights: • The radiation effect has a greater influence than doping effect on the hydrophilicity of RTV SR. • The implanted ions result in a new surface atomic bonding state and morphology. • Generating hydrophilic functional groups is a reason for the improved cell biocompatibility. • The micro roughness makes the hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect. • Cell culture demonstrates that negative-ion implantation can improve biocompatibility. - Abstract: A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C{sub 1}{sup −} implantation dose was increased to 1 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, and the effects of C{sub 1}{sup −}, C{sub 2}{sup −} and O{sub 1}{sup −} implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Si−CH{sub 3}, Si−O−Si, C−H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (−COOH, −OH, Si−(O){sub x} (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method

  3. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Chenlong; Wang, Guangfu; Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The radiation effect has a greater influence than doping effect on the hydrophilicity of RTV SR. • The implanted ions result in a new surface atomic bonding state and morphology. • Generating hydrophilic functional groups is a reason for the improved cell biocompatibility. • The micro roughness makes the hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect. • Cell culture demonstrates that negative-ion implantation can improve biocompatibility. - Abstract: A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C_1"− implantation dose was increased to 1 × 10"1"6 ions/cm"2, and the effects of C_1"−, C_2"− and O_1"− implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 10"1"5 ions/cm"2. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Si−CH_3, Si−O−Si, C−H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (−COOH, −OH, Si−(O)_x (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method to improve the cell biocompatibility of RTV SR.

  4. Research on total-dose hardening for H-gate PD NMOSFET/SIMOX by ion implanting into buried oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Cong; Zhang Zhengxuan; Zhang Feng; Lin Chenglu

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the back-gate I-V characteristics for two kinds of NMOSFET/SIMOX transistors with H gate structure fabricated on two different SOI wafers. A transistors are made on the wafer implanted with Si + and then annealed in N 2 , and B transistors are made on the wafer without implantation and annealing. It is demonstrated experimentally that A transistors have much less back-gate threshold voltage shift ΔV th than B transistors under X-ray total close irradiation. Subthreshold charge separation technique is employed to estimate the build-up of oxide charge and interface traps during irradiation, showing that the reduced ΔV th for A transistors is mainly due to its less build-up of oxide charge than B transistors. Photo-luminescence (PL) research indicates that Si implantation results in the formation of silicon nanocrystalline (nanocluster) whose size increases with the implant dose. This structure can trap electrons to compensate the positive charge build-up in the buried oxide during irradiation, and thus reduce the threshold voltage negative shift. (authors)

  5. Silicon integrated circuit process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Duck

    1985-12-01

    This book introduces the process of silicon integrated circuit. It is composed of seven parts, which are oxidation process, diffusion process, ion implantation process such as ion implantation equipment, damage, annealing and influence on manufacture of integrated circuit and device, chemical vapor deposition process like silicon Epitaxy LPCVD and PECVD, photolithography process, including a sensitizer, spin, harden bake, reflection of light and problems related process, infrared light bake, wet-etch, dry etch, special etch and problems of etching, metal process like metal process like metal-silicon connection, aluminum process, credibility of aluminum and test process.

  6. Silicon integrated circuit process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Duck

    1985-12-15

    This book introduces the process of silicon integrated circuit. It is composed of seven parts, which are oxidation process, diffusion process, ion implantation process such as ion implantation equipment, damage, annealing and influence on manufacture of integrated circuit and device, chemical vapor deposition process like silicon Epitaxy LPCVD and PECVD, photolithography process, including a sensitizer, spin, harden bake, reflection of light and problems related process, infrared light bake, wet-etch, dry etch, special etch and problems of etching, metal process like metal process like metal-silicon connection, aluminum process, credibility of aluminum and test process.

  7. Study of the processes of carbonization and oxidation of porous silicon by Raman and IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, A. V.; Okholin, P. N.; Verovsky, I. N.; Nazarov, A. N.; Lysenko, V. S.; Kholostov, K. I.; Bondarenko, V. P.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were produced by electrochemical etching of single-crystal silicon wafers with the resistivity 10 Ω cm in the aqueous-alcohol solution of hydrofluoric acid. Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy are used to study the processes of interaction of porous silicon with undiluted acetylene at low temperatures and the processes of oxidation of carbonized porous silicon by water vapors. It is established that, even at the temperature 550°C, the silicon-carbon bonds are formed at the pore surface and the graphite-like carbon condensate emerges. It is shown that the carbon condensate inhibits oxidation of porous silicon by water vapors and contributes to quenching of white photoluminescence in the oxidized carbonized porous silicon nanocomposite layer.

  8. Properties of ion implanted epitaxial CoSi2/Si(1 0 0) after rapid thermal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.T.; Kluth, P.; Xu, J.; Kappius, L.; Zastrow, U.; Wang, Z.L.; Mantl, S.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial CoSi 2 layers were grown on Si(1 0 0) using molecular beam allotaxy. Boron ion implantations and rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) were performed. During oxidation, SiO 2 formed on the surface of the CoSi 2 layers, and the silicides was pushed into the substrate. The diffusion of boron was slightly retarded during oxidation for the specimen with a 20 nm epitaxial CoSi 2 capping layer as compared to the specimen without CoSi 2 capping layer. The electrical measurements showed that the silicide has good Schottky contacts with the boron doped silicon layer after RTO. A nanometer silicide patterning process, based on local oxidation of silicide (LOCOSI) layer, was also investigated. It shows two back-to-back Schottky diodes between the two separated parts of the silicide

  9. A model for the formation of lattice defects at silicon oxide precipitates in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhellemont, J.; Gryse, O. de; Clauws, P.

    2003-01-01

    The critical size of silicon oxide precipitates and the formation of lattice defects by the precipitates are discussed. An expression is derived allowing estimation of self-interstitial emission by spherical precipitates as well as strain build-up during precipitate growth. The predictions are compared with published experimental data. A model for stacking fault nucleation at oxide precipitates is developed based on strain and self-interstitial accumulation during the thermal history of the wafer. During a low-temperature treatment high levels of strain develop. During subsequent high-temperature treatment, excess strain energy in the precipitate is released by self-interstitial emission leading to favourable conditions for stacking fault nucleation

  10. Toward Annealing-Stable Molybdenum-Oxide-Based Hole-Selective Contacts For Silicon Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Essig, Stephanie; Dré on, Julie; Rucavado, Esteban; Mews, Mathias; Koida, Takashi; Boccard, Mathieu; Werner, Jé ré mie; Geissbü hler, Jonas; Lö per, Philipp; Morales-Masis, Monica; Korte, Lars; De Wolf, Stefaan; Balllif, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOX) combines a high work function with broadband optical transparency. Sandwiched between a hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon passivation layer and a transparent conductive oxide, this material allows a highly efficient

  11. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissbühler, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.geissbuehler@epfl.ch; Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Barraud, Loris; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain [CSEM PV-Center, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Ballif, Christophe [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); CSEM PV-Center, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2015-08-24

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  12. A pile-up phenomenon during arsenic diffusion in silicon-on-insulator structures formed by oxygen implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, P.; Tsoukalas, D.; Guillemot, N.; Chenevier, P.

    1989-10-01

    Arsenic diffusion in silicon-on-insulator formed by deep oxygen implantation is studied by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and speading resistance measurements. An enhanced diffusivity as well as a pile-up phenomenon are observed in the thin silicon layer. The McNabb and Foster equations [Trans. TMS-AIME 22, 618 (1963)] for diffusion with trapping are solved in order to simulate this last effect.

  13. Enhancing Hydrogen Diffusion in Silica Matrix by Using Metal Ion Implantation to Improve the Emission Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bornacelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient silicon-based light emitters continue to be a challenge. A great effort has been made in photonics to modify silicon in order to enhance its light emission properties. In this aspect silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs have become the main building block of silicon photonic (modulators, waveguide, source, and detectors. In this work, we present an approach based on implantation of Ag (or Au ions and a proper thermal annealing in order to improve the photoluminescence (PL emission of Si-NCs embedded in SiO2. The Si-NCs are obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy and nucleated at high depth into the silica matrix (1-2 μm under surface. Once Si-NCs are formed inside the SiO2 we implant metal ions at energies that do not damage the Si-NCs. We have observed by, PL and time-resolved PL, that ion metal implantation and a subsequent thermal annealing in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere could significantly increase the emission properties of Si-NCs. Elastic Recoil Detection measurements show that the samples with an enhanced luminescence emission present a higher hydrogen concentration. This suggests that ion metal implantation enhances the hydrogen diffusion into silica matrix allowing a better passivation of surface defects on Si NCs.

  14. Low-temperature technique of thin silicon ion implanted epitaxial detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordyasz, A.J.; Bednarek, A. [Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Lopez, O.; Merrer, Y.; Vient, E. [Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN, Caen-Cedex (France); Parlog, M. [Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN, Caen-Cedex (France); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Casini, G.; Poggi, G.; Bini, M.; Valdre, S.; Scarlini, E.; Pasquali, G.; Pastore, G.; Piantelli, S.; Stefanini, A.; Olmi, A.; Barlini, S. [INFN Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Universita di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Kowalczyk, M. [Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Frankland, J.D.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Gruyer, D. [CEA et IN2P3-CNRS, GANIL, Caen-Cedex 05 (France); Borderie, B.; Ademard, G.; Edelbruck, P.; Rivet, M.F.; Salomon, F. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay-Cedex (France); Boiano, A.; Rosato, E.; Meoli, A.; Ordine, A.; Spadaccini, G.; Tortone, G.; Vigilante, M.; Vanzanella, E. [Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Bruno, M.; Serra, S.; Morelli, L.; Guerzoni, M. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alba, R.; Santonocito, D.; Maiolino, C. [INFN, Catania (Italy); Universita di Catania, LNS, Catania (Italy); Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T. [INFN LNL Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Kozik, T.; Kulig, P.; Twarog, T.; Sosin, Z. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Gasior, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Silesian University, Katowice (Poland); Sarnecki, J.; Lipinski, D.; Wodzinska, H.; Brzozowski, A.; Teodorczyk, M.; Gajewski, M.; Zagojski, A.; Krzyzak, K. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Tarasiuk, K.J. [University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Khabanowa, Z. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Kordyasz, L. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechatronics, Institute of Mikromechanics and Photonics, Department of Design of Precision Devices, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-02-01

    A new technique of large-area thin ion implanted silicon detectors has been developed within the R and D performed by the FAZIA Collaboration. The essence of the technique is the application of a low-temperature baking process instead of high-temperature annealing. This thermal treatment is performed after B{sup +} ion implantation and Al evaporation of detector contacts, made by using a single adjusted Al mask. Extremely thin silicon pads can be therefore obtained. The thickness distribution along the X and Y directions was measured for a prototype chip by the energy loss of α-particles from {sup 241}Am (left angle E{sub α} right angle = 5.5 MeV). Preliminary tests on the first thin detector (area ∼ 20 x 20 mm{sup 2}) were performed at the INFN-LNS cyclotron in Catania (Italy) using products emitted in the heavy-ion reaction {sup 84}Kr (E = 35 A MeV) + {sup 112}Sn. The ΔE - E ion identification plot was obtained using a telescope consisting of our thin ΔE detector (21 μm thick) followed by a typical FAZIA 510 μm E detector of the same active area. The charge distribution of measured ions is presented together with a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the Z resolution. The threshold is lower than 2 A MeV depending on the ion charge. (orig.)

  15. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    OpenAIRE

    Geissbühler Jonas; Werner Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas Silvia; Barraud Loris; Hessler-Wyser Aïcha; Despeisse Matthieu; Nicolay Sylvain; Tomasi Andrea; Niesen Bjoern; De Wolf Stefaan; Ballif Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article we evidence that annealing above 130?°C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited c...

  16. The role of oxide interlayers in back reflector configurations for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demontis, V.; Sanna, C.; Melskens, J.; Santbergen, R.; Smets, A.H.M.; Damiano, A.; Zeman, M.

    2013-01-01

    Thin oxide interlayers are commonly added to the back reflector of thin-film silicon solar cells to increase their current. To gain more insight in the enhancement mechanism, we tested different back reflector designs consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) and/or hydrogenated silicon

  17. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is

  18. Fluorodeoxyglucose--positive internal mammary lymph node in breast cancer patients with silicone implants: is it always metastatic cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudack, Michalle; Yelin, Alon; Simansky, David; Ben-Nun, Alon

    2013-07-01

    Patients with breast cancer following mastectomy and silicone implant reconstruction may have enlarged internal mammary lymph nodes with pathological uptake on positron emission tomography with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose. This lymphadenopathy is usually considered as metastatic in nature, but has also been reported to be related to other conditions, including silicon migration. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of metastatic disease in this unique group of patients. A retrospective comparative study of 12 female patients with breast cancer with silicone implants referred for biopsy due to isolated internal mammary lymph node fluorodeoxyglucose uptake on positron emission tomography. Five patients (41.6%) had histological findings related to silicone (n = 4) or non-specific inflammation (n = 1). The remaining 7 (58.3%) had histological evidence of cancer recurrence. There was no significant difference in the fluorodeoxyglucose-standardized uptake value between the two groups. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positive mammary lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer following silicone implant reconstruction may be due to metastatic deposits, non-specific inflammation or silicone migration. Clinical and imaging characteristics are insufficient in differentiating between these conditions. Biopsy is recommended prior to initiation of further treatment.

  19. Comparison of oxidation resistance of copper treated by beam-line ion implantation and plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Quanzhang; Li Liuhe; Hu Tao; Xin Yunchang; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Kwok, D.T.K.; Cai Xun; Chu, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    Copper which has many favorable properties such as low cost, high thermal and electrical conductivity, as well as easy fabrication and joining is one of the main materials in lead frames, interconnects, and foils in flexible circuits. Furthermore, copper is one of the best antibacterial materials. However, unlike aluminum oxide or chromium oxide, the surface copper oxide layer does not render sufficient protection against oxidation. In this work, in order to improve the surface oxidation resistance of Cu, Al and N were introduced into copper by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) and beam-line ion implantation (BII). The implantation fluences of Al and N were 2 x 10 17 ions cm -2 and 5 x 10 16 ions cm -2 , respectively. The implanted and untreated copper samples were oxidized in air at 260 deg. C for 1 h. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicate that both implantation methods can enhance the oxidation resistance of copper but to different extent. PIII is superior to BII in enhancing the oxidation resistance of copper. The effects and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  20. Synchrotron Topographic and Diffractometer Studies of Buried Layered Structures Obtained by Implantation with Swift Heavy Ions in Silicon Single Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Zymierska, D.; Graeff, W.; Czosnyka, T.; Choinski, J.

    2006-01-01

    A distribution of crystallographic defects and deformation in silicon crystals subjected to deep implantation (20-50 μm) with ions of the energy of a few MeV/amu is studied. Three different buried layered structures (single layer, binary buried structure and triple buried structure) were obtained by implantation of silicon single crystals with 184 MeV argon ions, 29.7 MeV boron ions, and 140 MeV argon ions, each implantation at a fluency of 1x10 14 ions cm -2 . The implanted samples were examined by means of white beam X-ray section and projection topography, monochromatic beam topography and by recording local rocking curves with the beam restricted to 50 x 50 μm 2 . The experiment pointed to a very low level of implantation-induced strain (below 10 -5 ). The white beam Bragg case section experiment revealed a layer producing district black contrast located at a depth of the expected mean ion range. The presence of these buried layered structures in studied silicon crystals strongly affected the fringe pattern caused by curvature of the samples. In case of white beam projection and monochromatic beam topographs the implanted areas were revealed as darker regions with a very tiny grain like structure. One may interpret these results as the effect of considerable heating causing annihilation of point defects and formation of dislocation loops connected with point defect clusters. (author)

  1. MRI screening for silicone breast implant rupture: accuracy, inter- and intraobserver variability using explantation results as reference standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maijers, M.C.; Ritt, M.J.P.F. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, F.B. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jan van Goyen Clinic, Department of Plastic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veldhuizen, J.F.H. [MRI Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Manoliu, R.A. [MRI Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    The recall of Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) silicone breast implants in 2010 resulted in large numbers of asymptomatic women with implants who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening. This study's aim was to assess the accuracy and interobserver variability of MRI screening in the detection of rupture and extracapsular silicone leakage. A prospective study included 107 women with 214 PIP implants who underwent explantation preceded by MRI. In 2013, two radiologists blinded for previous MRI findings or outcome at surgery, independently re-evaluated all MRI examinations. A structured protocol described the MRI findings. The ex vivo findings served as reference standard. In 208 of the 214 explanted prostheses, radiologists agreed independently about the condition of the implants. In five of the six cases they disagreed (2.6 %), but subsequently reached consensus. A sensitivity of 93 %, specificity of 93 %, positive predictive value of 77 % and negative predictive value of 98 % was found. The interobserver agreement was excellent (kappa value of 0.92). MRI has a high accuracy in diagnosing rupture in silicone breast implants. Considering the high kappa value of interobserver agreement, MRI appears to be a consistent diagnostic test. A simple, uniform classification, may improve communication between radiologist and plastic surgeon. (orig.)

  2. MRI screening for silicone breast implant rupture: accuracy, inter- and intraobserver variability using explantation results as reference standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maijers, M.C.; Ritt, M.J.P.F.; Niessen, F.B.; Veldhuizen, J.F.H.; Manoliu, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    The recall of Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) silicone breast implants in 2010 resulted in large numbers of asymptomatic women with implants who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening. This study's aim was to assess the accuracy and interobserver variability of MRI screening in the detection of rupture and extracapsular silicone leakage. A prospective study included 107 women with 214 PIP implants who underwent explantation preceded by MRI. In 2013, two radiologists blinded for previous MRI findings or outcome at surgery, independently re-evaluated all MRI examinations. A structured protocol described the MRI findings. The ex vivo findings served as reference standard. In 208 of the 214 explanted prostheses, radiologists agreed independently about the condition of the implants. In five of the six cases they disagreed (2.6 %), but subsequently reached consensus. A sensitivity of 93 %, specificity of 93 %, positive predictive value of 77 % and negative predictive value of 98 % was found. The interobserver agreement was excellent (kappa value of 0.92). MRI has a high accuracy in diagnosing rupture in silicone breast implants. Considering the high kappa value of interobserver agreement, MRI appears to be a consistent diagnostic test. A simple, uniform classification, may improve communication between radiologist and plastic surgeon. (orig.)

  3. Polycrystalline silicon ring resonator photodiodes in a bulk complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karan K; Orcutt, Jason S; Shainline, Jeffrey M; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Meade, Roy; Popović, Miloš A; Ram, Rajeev J

    2014-02-15

    We present measurements on resonant photodetectors utilizing sub-bandgap absorption in polycrystalline silicon ring resonators, in which light is localized in the intrinsic region of a p+/p/i/n/n+ diode. The devices, operating both at λ=1280 and λ=1550  nm and fabricated in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) dynamic random-access memory emulation process, exhibit detection quantum efficiencies around 20% and few-gigahertz response bandwidths. We observe this performance at low reverse biases in the range of a few volts and in devices with dark currents below 50 pA at 10 V. These results demonstrate that such photodetector behavior, previously reported by Preston et al. [Opt. Lett. 36, 52 (2011)], is achievable in bulk CMOS processes, with significant improvements with respect to the previous work in quantum efficiency, dark current, linearity, bandwidth, and operating bias due to additional midlevel doping implants and different material deposition. The present work thus offers a robust realization of a fully CMOS-fabricated all-silicon photodetector functional across a wide wavelength range.

  4. The influence of silicon as a possible reactive element in the protection against high temperature oxidation of AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, E.; Perez, F.J.; Hierro, M.P.; Gomez, C.; Pedraza, F.; Segovia, J. L. de; Roman, E.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of silicon incorporated into the alloy by means of ion implantation of 1 x 10''15 ions/cm''2 at 150 keV on the protective scale development based upon Cr 1 ,3 Fe 0 ,7O 3 and manganese-enriched spinels, Mn 1 ,5Cr 1 .5O 4 after oxidation of an austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel at 1.173 K and atmospheric pressure of air for 144 h has been studied. The presence of small quantities of silicon at the outermost layers of the alloy promotes transport of chromium during the early stages of oxidation. Further, ion implantation seems to play a beneficial role against decarburization of the alloy. (Author) 8 refs

  5. Design and evaluation of carbon nanofiber and silicon materials for neural implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Janice L.

    Reduction of glial scar tissue around central nervous system implants is necessary for improved efficacy in chronic applications. Design of materials that possess tunable properties inspired by native biological tissue and elucidation of pertinent cellular interactions with these materials was the motivation for this study. Since nanoscale carbon fibers possess the fundamental dimensional similarities to biological tissue and have attractive material properties needed for neural biomaterial implants, this present study explored cytocompatibility of these materials as well as modifications to traditionally used silicon. On silicon materials, results indicated that nanoscale surface features reduced astrocyte functions, and could be used to guide neurite extension from PC12 cells. Similarly, it was determined that astrocyte functions (key cells in glial scar tissue formation) were reduced on smaller diameter carbon fibers (125 nm or less) while PC12 neurite extension was enhanced on smaller diameter carbon fibers (100 nm or less). Further studies implicated laminin adsorption as a key mechanism in enhancing astrocyte adhesion to larger diameter fibers and at the same time encouraging neurite extension on smaller diameter fibers. Polycarbonate urethane (PCU) was then used as a matrix material for the smaller diameter carbon fibers (100 and 60 nm). These composites proved very versatile since electrical and mechanical properties as well as cell functions and directionality could be influenced by changing bulk and surface composition and features of these matrices. When these composites were modified to be smooth at the micronscale and only rough at the nanoscale, P19 cells actually submerged philopodia, extensions, or whole cells bodies beneath the PCU in order to interact with the carbon nanofibers. These carbon nanofiber composites that have been formulated are a promising material to coat neural probes and thereby enhance functionality at the tissue interface. This

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of boron-ion implantation into single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    A physically based Monte Carlo boron implantation model developed comprehends previously neglected but important implant parameters such as native oxide layers, wafer temperature, beam divergence, tilt angle, rotation (twist) angle, and dose, in addition to energy. This model uses as its foundation the MARLOWE Monte Carlo simulation code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the analysis of radiation effects in materials. This code was carefully adapted for the simulation of ion implantation, and a number of significant improvements have been made, including the addition of atomic pair specific interatomic potentials, the implementation of a newly developed local electron concentration dependent electronic stopping model, and the implementation of a newly developed cumulative damage model. This improved version of the code, known as UT-MARLOWE, allows boron implantation profiles to be accurately predicted as a function of energy, tilt angle, rotation angle, and dose. This code has also been used in the development and implementation of an accurate and efficient two-dimensional boron implantation model

  7. Microfabrication of an Implantable silicone Microelectrode array for an epiretinal prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam Nader [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2003-06-10

    Millions of people suffering from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration are legally blind due to the loss of photoreceptor function. Fortunately a large percentage of the neural cells connected to the photoreceptors remain viable, and electrical stimulation of these cells has been shown to result in visual perception. These findings have generated worldwide efforts to develop a retinal prosthesis device, with the hope of restoring vision. Advances in microfabrication, integrated circuits, and wireless technologies provide the means to reach this challenging goal. This dissertation describes the development of innovative silicone-based microfabrication techniques for producing an implantable microelectrode array. The microelectrode array is a component of an epiretinal prosthesis being developed by a multi-laboratory consortium. This array will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces. Because the array is intended as a long-term implant, vital biological and physical design requirements must be met. A retinal implant poses difficult engineering challenges due to the size of the intraocular cavity and the delicate retina. Not only does it have to be biocompatible in terms of cytotoxicity and degradation, but it also has to be structurally biocompatible, with regard to smooth edges and high conformability; basically mimicking the biological tissue. This is vital to minimize stress and prevent physical damage to the retina. Also, the device must be robust to withstand the forces imposed on it during fabrication and implantation. In order to meet these biocompatibility needs, the use of non-conventional microfabrication materials such as silicone is required. This mandates the enhancement of currently available polymer-based fabrication techniques and the development of new microfabrication methods. Through an iterative process, devices

  8. Phosphorus-defect interactions during thermal annealing of ion implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Patrick Henry

    Ion implantation of dopant atoms into silicon generates nonequilibrium levels of crystal defects that can lead to the detrimental effects of transient enhanced diffusion (TED), incomplete dopant activation, and p-n junction leakage. In order to control these effects, it is vital to have a clear understanding of dopant-defect interactions and develop models that account for these interactions. This research focuses on experimentally investigating and modeling the clustering of phosphorus dopant atoms with silicon interstitials. Damage recovery of 40keV Si+ implants in phosphorus doped wells is experimentally analyzed. The effects of background phosphorus concentration, self implant dose, and anneal temperature are investigated. Phosphorus concentrations ranging from 2.0 x 1017 to 4.0 x 1019 cm-3 and Si+ doses ranging from 5.0 x 1013 cm-2 to 2.0 x 1014 cm-2 are studied during 650-800°C anneals. A dramatic reduction in the number of interstitials bound in {311} defects with increasing phosphorus background concentration is observed. It is suggested that the reduction of interstitials in {311} defects at high phosphorus concentrations is due to the formation of phosphorus-interstitial clusters (PICs). The critical concentration for clustering (approximately 1.0 x 1019 cm-3 at 750°C) is strongly temperature dependent and in close agreement with the kink concentration of phosphorus diffusion. Information gained from these "well experiments" is applied to the study of direct phosphorus implantation. An experimental study is conducted on 40keV phosphorus implanted to a dose of 1.0 x 1014 cm-2 during 650-800°C anneals. Electrically inactive PICs are shown to form at concentrations below the solid solubility limit due to high interstitial supersaturations. Data useful for developing a model to accurately predict phosphorus diffusion under nonequilibrium conditions are extracted from the experimental results. A cluster-mediated diffusion model is developed using the

  9. Ion implantation artifacts observed in depth profiling boron in silicon by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, P.; Simons, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison study of depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) was recently conducted. The specimens were portions of 5 cm diameter single crystal silicon slices in which B-10 had been implanted at various fluences and energies. NDP measurements were made on a 13 mm diameter area at the center of the wafers. SIMS measurements were taken from a 60 μm diameter area approximately 16 mm from the center of the wafer. One observation that emerged from this work was an apparent discrepancy between the profiles of B-10 measured by DNP and SIMS. The peaks of the SIMS profiles were typically deeper than those of NDP by as much as 30 nm, which is 10% of the projected range for a 70 keV implant. Moreover, the profiles could not be made to coincide by either a constant shift or a proportional change of one depth scale with respect to the other. The lateral inhomogeneity of boron that these experiments have demonstrated arises from the variable contribution of ion channeling during implantation

  10. Local structure of the silicon implanted in a graphite single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Shimoyama, Iwao; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2002-01-01

    Solid carbon forms two kinds of local structures, i.e., diamond-like and two-dimensional graphite structures. In contrast, silicon carbide tends to prefer only diamond structure that is composed of sp 3 bonds. In order to clarify weather or not two-dimensional graphitic Si x C layer exists, we investigate the local structures of Si x C layer produced by Si + -ion implantation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by means of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The energy of the resonance peak in the Si K-edge NEXAFS spectra for Si + -implanted HOPG is lower than those for any other Si-containing materials. The intensity of the resonance peak showed a strong polarization dependence. These results suggests that the final state orbitals around Si atoms have π*-like character and the direction of this orbital is perpendicular to the graphite plane. It is elucidated that the Si-C bonds produced by the Si + -ion implantation are nearly parallel to the graphite plane, and Si x C phase forms a two-dimensionally spread graphite-like layer with sp 2 bonds. (author)

  11. Gallium and silicon synergistically promote osseointegration of dental implant in patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinsong; Wu, Zuosu; He, Hongli; Cai, Kaiyong; Zhang, Hualin; Xu, Lihua

    2017-06-01

    Over the last few decades, a wide variety of dental implants have been successfully placed in jaw bones to restore tooth function. But major challenges still remain in patients with osteoporosis involving compromised osseointegration, and the therapeutic methods is far from optimism. Gallium can directly inhibit bone osteolysis, prevent bone calcium release and augment bone mass, which makes Ga unique among the potential antiresorptive drugs. Silicon, as an indispensable modulator in bone formation, presents its bone anabolic effects, while reduces, at least doesn't increase, bone resorption. We hypothesize that the combination of bone anabolic effects of Si and antiresorptive effects of Ga will result in synergistic effects on the improvement of osteointegration under osteoporotic condition. In our strategy, in order to maximize the efficacy while minimize the side effects of ions, a novel titania mesoporous layer fabricated by electrochemical anodization on the surface of titanium implant will be employed as a promising local drug delivery system. The synergistic effects of Ga and Si on improving osseointegration will be verified by animal experiments, and be furthered by clinical trials. Our hypothesis could help to create an option to improve success rate of dental implants in osteoporotic patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Improved oxidation resistance of group VB refractory metals by Al+ ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampikian, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum ion implantation of vanadium, niobium, and tantalum improved the metals' oxidation resistances at 500 C and 735 C. Implanted vanadium oxidized only to one-third the extent of unimplanted vanadium when exposed at 500 C to air. The oxidative weight gains of implanted niobium and tantalum proved negligible when measured at 500 C and for times sufficient to fully convert the untreated metals to their pentoxides. At 735 C, implantation of vanadium only slightly retarded its oxidation, while oxidative weight gains of niobium and tantalum were reduced by factors of 3 or more. Implanted niobium exhibited weight gain in direct proportion to oxidation time squared at 735 C. Microstructural examination of the metals implanted with selected fluences of the 180 kV aluminum ions showed the following. The solubility limit of aluminum is extended by implantation, the body centered cubic (bcc) phases being retained to ∼60 at. pct Al in all three metals. The highest fluence investigated, 2.4 x 10 22 ions/m 2 , produced an ∼400-nm layer of VAl 3 beneath the surface of vanadium, and ∼300-nm layers of an amorphous phase containing ∼70 at. pct Al beneath the niobium and tantalum surfaces. All three metals, implanted to this fluence and annealed at 600 C, contained tri-aluminides, intermetallic compounds known for their oxidation resistances. Specimens implanted to this fluence were thus selected for the oxidation measurements

  13. Shrinking of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon oxide matrix during rapid thermal annealing in a forming gas atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sebille, M.; Fusi, A.; Xie, L.; Ali, H.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Leifer, K.; Zeman, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen on the crystallization process of silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon oxide matrix. We show that hydrogen gas during annealing leads to a lower sub-band gap absorption, indicating passivation of defects created during annealing. Samples annealed in pure nitrogen show expected trends according to crystallization theory. Samples annealed in forming gas, however, deviate from this trend. Their crystallinity decreases for increased annealing time. Furthermore, we observe a decrease in the mean nanocrystal size and the size distribution broadens, indicating that hydrogen causes a size reduction of the silicon nanocrystals.

  14. Strained silicon/silicon germanium heterojunction n-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Sarah H.

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into the performance of strained silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) have been carried out. Theoretical predictions suggest that use of a strained Si/SiGe material system with advanced material properties compared with conventional silicon allows enhanced MOSFET device performance. This study has therefore investigated the practical feasibility of obtaining superior electrical performance using a Si/SiGe material system. The MOSFET devices consisted of a strained Si surface channel and were fabricated on relaxed SiGe material using a reduced thermal budget process in order to preserve the strain. Two batches of strained Si/SiGe devices fabricated on material grown by differing methods have been analysed and both showed good transistor action. A correlation of electrical and physical device data established that the electrical device behaviour was closely related to the SiGe material quality, which differed depending on growth technique. The cross-wafer variation in the electrical performance of the strained Si/SiGe devices was found to be a function of material quality, thus the viability of Si/SiGe MOSFET technology for commercial applications has been addressed. Of particular importance was the finding that large-scale 'cross-hatching' roughness associated with relaxed SiGe alloys led to degradation in the small-scale roughness at the gate oxide interface, which affects electrical device performance. The fabrication of strained Si MOSFET devices on high quality SiGe material thus enabled significant performance gains to be realised compared with conventional Si control devices. In contrast, the performance of devices fabricated on material with severe cross-hatching roughness was found to be diminished by the nanoscale oxide interface roughness. The effect of device processing on SiGe material with differing as-grown roughness has been carried out and compared with the reactions

  15. Intra-prosthetic breast MR virtual navigation: a preliminary study for a new evaluation of silicone breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Capuano, Giulia; Rella, Leonarda; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio

    2013-10-01

    To assess the contribute of intra-prosthetic MRI virtual navigation for evaluating breast implants and detecting implant ruptures. Forty-five breast implants were evaluated by MR examination. Only patients with a clinical indication were assessed. A 1.5-T device equipped with a 4-channel breast coil was used by performing axial TSE-T2, axial silicone-only, axial silicone suppression and sagittal STIR images. The obtained dicom files were also analyzed by using virtual navigation software. Two blinded radiologists evaluated all MR and virtual images. Eight patients for a total of 13 implants underwent surgical replacement. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for both imaging strategies. Intra-capsular rupture was diagnosed in 13 out of 45 (29%) implants by using MRI. Basing on virtual navigation, 9 (20%) cases of intra-capsular rupture were diagnosed. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV values of 100%, 86%, 89%, 62% and 100%, respectively, were found for MRI. Virtual navigation increased the previous values up to 100%, 97%, 98%, 89% and 100%. Intra-prosthetic breast MR virtual navigation can represent an additional promising tool for the evaluation of breast implants being able to reduce false positives and to provide a more accurate detection of intra-capsular implant rupture signs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tunnel Oxides Formed by Field-Induced Anodisation for Passivated Contacts of Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingnan Tong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel silicon oxides form a critical component for passivated contacts for silicon solar cells. They need to be sufficiently thin to allow carriers to tunnel through and to be uniform both in thickness and stoichiometry across the silicon wafer surface, to ensure uniform and low recombination velocities if high conversion efficiencies are to be achieved. This paper reports on the formation of ultra-thin silicon oxide layers by field-induced anodisation (FIA, a process that ensures uniform oxide thickness by passing the anodisation current perpendicularly through the wafer to the silicon surface that is anodised. Spectroscopical analyses show that the FIA oxides contain a lower fraction of Si-rich sub-oxides compared to wet-chemical oxides, resulting in lower recombination velocities at the silicon and oxide interface. This property along with its low temperature formation highlights the potential for FIA to be used to form low-cost tunnel oxide layers for passivated contacts of silicon solar cells.

  17. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  18. Deep levels induced by low energy B+ implantation into Ge-preamorphised silicon in correlation with end of range formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzohra, Mohamed; Olivie, Francois; Idrissi-Benzohra, Malika; Ketata, Kaouther; Ketata, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that low energy B + ion implantation into Ge- (or Si) implantation pre-amorphised silicon allows ultra-shallow p + n junctions formation. However, this process is known to generate defects such as dislocation loops, vacancies and interstitials which can act as vehicles to different mechanisms inducing electrically active levels into the silicon bulk. The junctions studied have been obtained using 3 keV/10 15 cm -2 B + implantation into Ge-implantation pre-amorphised substrates and into a reference crystalline substrate. Accurate measurements using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and isothermal transient capacitance ΔC(t,T) were performed to characterise these levels. Such knowledge is crucial to improve the device characteristics. In order to sweep the silicon band gap, various experimental conditions were considered. The analysis of DLTS spectra have first showed three deep levels associated to secondary induced defects. Their concentration profiles were derived from isothermal transient capacitance at depths up to 3.5 μm into the silicon bulk and allowed us to detect a new deep level. The evolution of such defect distribution in correlation with the technological steps is discussed. The end of range (EOR) defect influence on electrical activity of secondary induced defects in ultra-shallow p + n diodes is clearly demonstrated

  19. Study to the presence of antipolymer antibodies in a group of Dutch women with a silicone breast implant. Part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong WH de; Kallewaard M; Verhoef CM; Bijlsma JWJ; Schouten JSAG; Loveren H van; Afdeling Reumatologie en; LPI; LGM

    2002-01-01

    The presence of antipolymer antibodies (APA) was reported in women with severe symptoms and a silicone breast implant (SBI). The aim of the present study was to determine whether there exists a population of symptomatic SBI recipients with a high prevalence of APA in the Netherlands. Participants

  20. Effect of titanium implantation on the mechanical properties of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihana, T.; Nishimura, O.; Yabe, K.; Hayashi, H.; Iwaki, M.

    1995-01-01

    A study has been made of the chemical composition and mechanical properties of Ti + -implanted Si 3 N 4 surface layers. Implantation of 48 Ti + was performed with doses ranging from 10 15 to 10 17 ions cm -2 at an energy of 150 keV, and at nearly room temperature. XPS was used to analyze the depth dependence of atomic fraction and chemical bonding states of Ti + -implanted layers. The near-surface hardness was measured by a Vickers hardness tester. The friction and wear properties were measured under unlubricated conditions at room temperature using a pin on disk-plane and a block on wheel-periphery configurations, in which the pin and wheel used were AISI 1045 and ASTM W1-9, respectively. Implanted Ti-atoms formed a gaussian distribution predicted by the range theory. At the average projected range, most of Ti-atoms existed as a metallic state and TiN bonding was also formed. Oxygen and carbon were found near the surface layers. In addition to the surface peak, O-atoms accumulated in front of the average projected range of Ti. Such O-atoms formed bonds of Si-oxides and Ti-oxides. Carbon existed as a graphitic state. With increasing a Ti dose, the near-surface hardness decreased, and the wear rate increased at the running-in stage having the high friction coefficient. The steady wear attributed to the stable friction coefficient appeared after the running-in stage, although such a stable stage was not observed for unimplanted Si 3 N 4 . The mechanism for the change in mechanical properties of Si 3 N 4 induced by Ti + -implantation will be discussed in relation to XPS characteristics

  1. "Ride-on" technique and other simple and logical solutions to counter most common complications of silicone implants in augmentation rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil S Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmentation rhinoplasty can be carried out using a wide range of materials including autologous bone and/or cartilage as well as alloplasts. Use of biologic bone and cartilage grafts results in lower infection rates, but they are associated with long-term resorption and donor-site morbidity. Alloplastic materials, in particular silicone, have been associated in literature with extrusion, necrosis of the tip, mobility and deviation or displacement of the implant, immobile nasal tip and infection. However, they have the advantages of being readily available and easy to reshape with no requirement for harvesting autografts. Aim: To overcome these problems associated with silicone implants for which the authors have devised a novel technique, the "rideon technique". Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out on 11 patients over a period of 4 years. The authors have devised a simple technique to fix the silicone implant and retain it in place. Restricting the implant to only dorsum avoided common complications related to the silicone implant. Results: The authors have used this technique in 11 patients with encouraging results. Follow-up ranged from 12 months to 36 months during which patients were assessed for implant mobility, implant extrusion and tip necrosis. There was no incidence of above mentioned complications in these patients. Conclusion: The "rideon technique" provides excellent stability to silicone implants and restricting the implant only to dorsum not only eliminates chances of tip necrosis and thus implant extrusion but also maintains natural shape, feel and mobility of the tip.

  2. Suppression of interfacial voids formation during silane (SiH4)-based silicon oxide bonding with a thin silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Yue; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Seng Tan, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The material properties and bonding behavior of silane-based silicon oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to determine the chemical composition of the silicon oxide films. The incorporation of hydroxyl (-OH) groups and moisture absorption demonstrates a strong correlation with the storage duration for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. It is observed that moisture absorption is prevalent in the silane-based silicon oxide film due to its porous nature. The incorporation of -OH groups and moisture absorption in the silicon oxide films increase with the storage time (even in clean-room environments) for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. Due to silanol condensation and silicon oxidation reactions that take place at the bonding interface and in the bulk silicon, hydrogen (a byproduct of these reactions) is released and diffused towards the bonding interface. The trapped hydrogen forms voids over time. Additionally, the absorbed moisture could evaporate during the post-bond annealing of the bonded wafer pair. As a consequence, defects, such as voids, form at the bonding interface. To address the problem, a thin silicon nitride capping film was deposited on the silicon oxide layer before bonding to serve as a diffusion barrier to prevent moisture absorption and incorporation of -OH groups from the ambient. This process results in defect-free bonded wafers.

  3. Histological study on acute inflammatory reaction to polyurethane-coated silicone implants in rats Estudo histológico da reação inflamatória aguda ao implante de silicone revestido com poliuretano em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto da Silva Mendes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluating histologically the silicone peri-implant coated by polyurethane inflammation associated to the use of anti-microbial and bacterial contamination. METHODS: It was used 35 Wistar rats. The animals were divided in seven groups: I - Control; II - implant cavity contamination with10 bacteria/ml; III - implant cavity contamination with 10 bacteria/ml; IV - implant cavity contamination with 10 bacteria/ml; V - identical contamination to group II and implant immersions in anti-microbial solution; VI - identical contamination in group III and implant immersions in the anti-microbial solution; VII - identical contamination of group IV and implant immersions in anti-microbial solution. It was evaluated morphometrically the peri-implant capsules after 30 days of introduction. RESULTS: The factors with more discriminating power were the giants cells of a strange body and the mononuclear. There was no correlation between the bacterial concentrations and the histological alterations. CONCLUSION: 1 The histological standard of the inflammatory reaction around the silicone implant coated with polyurethan is chronic granulomatosis type of a strange body; 2 There isn´t correlation between concentration of Staphylococcus epidermidis and histological changes; 3 The use of anti-microbial solution decreased the mononuclear cell reactions, with the increase of giant cells in a strange body.OBJETIVO: Avaliar, histologicamente, a reação inflamatória aos implantes de silicone revestidos por poliuretano, com contaminação bacteriana, associada ou não ao uso de antimicrobianos. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se 35 ratos Wistar. Os animais foram divididos em 7 grupos: I- Controle, II- contaminação da cavidade do implante com 10¹ bactérias/ml, III- contaminação da cavidade do implante com 10³ bactérias/ml, IV- contaminação da cavidade do implante com 10(5 bactérias/ml, V- contaminação idêntica ao grupo II e imersão dos implantes em solu

  4. Effect of argon implantation on solid-state dewetting: control of size and surface density of silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadori, Y; Borowik, Ł; Chevalier, N; Barbé, J-C

    2017-01-27

    Thermally induced solid-state dewetting of ultra-thin films on insulators is a process of prime interest, since it is capable of easily forming nanocrystals. If no particular treatment is performed to the film prior to the solid-state dewetting, it is already known that the size, the shape and the density of nanocrystals is governed by the initial film thickness. In this paper, we report a novel approach to control the size and the surface density of silicon nanocrystals based on an argon-implantation preliminary surface treatment. Using 7.5 nm thin layers of silicon, we show that increasing the implantation dose tends to form smaller silicon nanocrystals with diameter and height lower than 50 nm and 30 nm, respectively. Concomitantly, the surface density is increased by a factor greater than 20, going from 5 μm -2 to values over 100 μm -2 .

  5. Viscous properties of aluminum oxide nanotubes and aluminium oxide nanoparticles - silicone oil suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Ram; French, Steven; Delgado, Adrian; Ramos, Carlos; Gutierrez, Jose; Chipara, Mircea; Lozano, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids consisting of γ-aluminum oxide nanotubes and γ-aluminum oxide nanoparticles dispersed within silicone oil were prepared. The relationship between shear stress and shear rate was measured and theoretically simulated by using an extended Bingham model for both the rheological and electrorheological features of these systems. Shear stress and viscosity showed a sharp increase for the aluminum oxide nanotubes suspensions subjected to applied electric fields whereas aluminum oxide nanoparticles suspensions showed a moderate change. It was found that the transition from liquid to solid state (mediated by the applied electric field) can be described by a power law and that for low applied voltages the relationship is almost linear.

  6. Acute Immunologic Reaction to Silicone Breast Implant after Mastectomy and Immediate Reconstruction: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoome Najafi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the introduction of silicone based medical devices in to clinical practice, several reports appeared in the medical literature regarding their adverse effects. However, there are few reports of immunologic reactions to these implants.Case presentation: A case of systemic reaction to a breast implant inserted for immediate breast reconstruction in a breast cancer patient is presented. The patient developed fever and skin rash two months after the surgery. Investigations disclosed no infectious origin for the fever and a dramatic response to steroid therapy was observed.Conclusion: Immunologic reaction should be considered in case of systemic signs and symptoms after silicone breast implant placement as a rare complication. 

  7. Study of an Amorphous Silicon Oxide Buffer Layer for p-Type Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide/n-Type Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells and Their Temperature Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweewat Krajangsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (i-a-SiO:H films were used as front and rear buffer layers in crystalline silicon heterojunction (c-Si-HJ solar cells. The surface passivity and effective lifetime of these i-a-SiO:H films on an n-type silicon wafer were improved by increasing the CO2/SiH4 ratios in the films. Using i-a-SiO:H as the front and rear buffer layers in c-Si-HJ solar cells was investigated. The front i-a-SiO:H buffer layer thickness and the CO2/SiH4 ratio influenced the open-circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and temperature coefficient (TC of the c-Si-HJ solar cells. The highest total area efficiency obtained was 18.5% (Voc=700 mV, Jsc=33.5 mA/cm2, and FF=0.79. The TC normalized for this c-Si-HJ solar cell efficiency was −0.301%/°C.

  8. Computer simulation for the formation of the insulator layer of silicon-on-insulator devices by N sup + and O sup + Co-implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Lin Qing; Xie Xin Yun; Lin Chenglu; Liu Xiang Hua

    2002-01-01

    A buried sandwiched layer consisting of silicon dioxide (upper part), silicon oxynitride (medium part) and silicon nitride (lower part) is formed by N sup + and O sup + co-implantation in silicon wafers at a constant temperature of 550 degree C. The microstructure is performed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. To predict the quality of the buried sandwiched layer, the authors study the computer simulation for the formation of the SIMON (separated by implantation of oxygen and nitrogen) structure. The simulation program for SIMOX (separated by implantation of oxygen) is improved in order to be applied in O sup + and N sup + co-implantation on the basis of different formation mechanism between SIMOX and SIMNI (separated by implantation of nitrogen) structures. There is a good agreement between experiment and simulation results verifying the theoretical model and presumption in the program

  9. On formation of silicon nanocrystals under annealing SiO2 layers implanted with Si ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, G.A.; Yanovskaya, S.G.; Volodin, V.A.; Kesler, V.G.; Lejer, A.F.; Ruault, M.-O.

    2002-01-01

    Raman scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoluminescence have been used to study the formation of silicon nanocrystals in SiO 2 implanted with Si ions. Si clusters have been formed at once in the postimplanted layers, providing the excessive Si concentration more ∼ 3 at. %. Si segregation with Si-Si 4 bonds formation is enhanced as following annealing temperature increase, however, the Raman scattering by Si clusters diminishes. The effect is explained by a transformation of the chain-like Si clusters into compact phase nondimensional structures. Segregation of Si nanoprecipitates had ended about 1000 deg C, but the strong photoluminescence typical for Si nanocrystals manifested itself only after 1100 deg C [ru

  10. X-ray diffraction studies of silicon implanted with high energy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieteska, K [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk, (Poland); Wierzchowski, W [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw, (Poland); Graeff, W [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg, (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The character of lattice deformation in silicon in implanted with high energy {alpha} particles and protons was studied with a number of X-ray methods. The experiments included double crystal spectrometer method as well as single crystal section and projection topography realised both with conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. All observed diffraction patterns were reasonably explainable assuming the lattice parameter depth distribution proportional to the vacancy-interstitial distribution coming from the Biersack-Ziegler theory. The theoretical rocking curves and density distribution in back-reflection double-crystal and section topography well corresponding to experimental results were calculated using numerical integration of the Takagi-Taupin equations. 9 figs.

  11. Direct observation of the lattice sites of implanted manganese in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Amorim, Lígia; Decoster, Stefan; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel; Esteves De Araujo, Araujo Joao Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Mn-doped Si has attracted significant interest in the context of dilute magnetic semiconductors. We investigated the lattice location of implanted Mn in silicon of different doping types (n, n+ and p+) in the highly dilute regime. Three different lattice sites were identified by means of emission channeling experiments: ideal substitutional sites; sites displaced from bond-centered towards substitutional sites and sites displaced from anti-bonding towards tetrahedral interstitial sites. For all doping types investigated, the substitutional fraction remained below ∼ 30%. We discuss the origin of the observed lattice sites as well as the implications of such structures on the understanding of Mn-doped Si systems.

  12. Radiation damage and defect behavior in ion-implanted, lithium counterdoped silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Mehta, S.; Swartz, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    Boron doped silicon n+p solar cells were counterdoped with lithium by ion implantation and the resuitant n+p cells irradiated by 1 MeV electrons. The function of fluence and a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) was studied to correlate defect behavior with cell performance. It was found that the lithium counterdoped cells exhibited significantly increased radiation resistance when compared to boron doped control cells. It is concluded that the annealing behavior is controlled by dissociation and recombination of defects. The DLTS studies show that counterdoping with lithium eliminates at least three deep level defects and results in three new defects. It is speculated that the increased radiation resistance of the counterdoped cells is due primarily to the interaction of lithium with oxygen, single vacanies and divacancies and that the lithium-oxygen interaction is the most effective in contributing to the increased radiation resistance.

  13. Atomic scale simulations of arsenic ion implantation and annealing in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Jaraiz, M.

    1995-01-01

    We present results of multiple-time-scale simulations of 5, 10 and 15 keV low temperature ion implantation of arsenic on silicon (100), followed by high temperature anneals. The simulations start with a molecular dynamics (MD) calculation of the primary state of damage after 10ps. The results are then coupled to a kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of bulk defect diffusion and clustering. Dose accumulation is achieved considering that at low temperatures the damage produced in the lattice is stable. After the desired dose is accumulated, the system is annealed at 800 degrees C for several seconds. The results provide information on the evolution for the damage microstructure over macroscopic length and time scales and affords direct comparison to experimental results. We discuss the database of inputs to the MC model and how it affects the diffusion process

  14. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2012-01-01

    (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria......Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following...... intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  15. The fabrication of silicon nanostructures by local gallium implantation and cryogenic deep reactive ion etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekurov, N; Grigoras, K; Franssila, S; Tittonen, I; Peltonen, A

    2009-01-01

    We show that gallium-ion-implanted silicon serves as an etch mask for fabrication of high aspect ratio nanostructures by cryogenic plasma etching (deep reactive ion etching). The speed of focused ion beam (FIB) patterning is greatly enhanced by the fact that only a thin approx. 30 nm surface layer needs to be modified to create a mask for the etching step. Etch selectivity between gallium-doped and undoped material is at least 1000:1, greatly decreasing the mask erosion problems. The resolution of the combined FIB-DRIE process is 20 lines μm -1 with the smallest masked feature size of 40 nm. The maximum achieved aspect ratio is 15:1 (e.g. 600 nm high pillars 40 nm in diameter).

  16. Effect of porous silicon layer on the performance of Si/oxide photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, Waheed A.

    2008-01-01

    Photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical systems were prepared by the formation of a thin porous film on silicon. The porous silicon layer was formed on the top of a clean oxide free silicon wafer surface by anodic etching in HF/H 2 O/C 2 H 5 OH mixture (2:1:1). The silicon was then covered by an oxide film (tin oxide, ITO or titanium oxide). The oxide films were prepared by the spray/pyrolysis technique which enables doping of the oxide film by different atoms like In, Ru or Sb during the spray process. Doping of SnO 2 or TiO 2 films with Ru atoms improves the surface characteristics of the oxide film which improves the solar conversion efficiency. The prepared solar cells are stable against environmental attack due to the presence of the stable oxide film. It gives relatively high short circuit currents (I sc ), due to the presence of the porous silicon layer, which leads to the recorded high conversion efficiency. Although the open-circuit potential (V oc ) and fill factor (FF) were not affected by the thickness of the porous silicon film, the short circuit current was found to be sensitive to this thickness. An optimum thickness of the porous film and also the oxide layer is required to optimize the solar cell efficiency. The results represent a promising system for the application of porous silicon layers in solar energy converters. The use of porous silicon instead of silicon single crystals in solar cell fabrication and the optimization of the solar conversion efficiency will lead to the reduction of the cost as an important factor and also the increase of the solar cell efficiency making use of the large area of the porous structures

  17. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull; Avaliacao radiologica de implantes de carbono vitreo poroso ou silicone em cranio de ratos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari-Mazzetti, Marcelo Paulo; Kobata, Celio Toshiro [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Hospital Defeitos da Face. Dept. of Surgery]. E-mail: mmgvaccari@ig.com.br; Fabiani, Paulo [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Martins, Dulce Maria Fonseca Soares [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Plastic Surgery; Gomes, Paulo de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Operatory Technique and Experimental Surgery; Martins, Jose Luiz [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Pediatric Surgery

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC) and silicon (S) implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. Methods: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20) PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O) and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. Results: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo capsule), that do not appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (p{<=}0,05), in all implants. Conclusion: In CT evaluation the implants of CPV have greater deformation that the S, which makes them not suitable for replacement of membranous bone in the rat skull. (author)

  18. The alteration of oxidation and related properties of metals by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of the various ways in which ion implanted additives can affect the thermal oxidation of metals, for example by blocking diffusion paths for ions, by catalytic effects or by altering the plasticity of the oxide. The versatility of the process has already proved useful in the study of oxidation mechanisms. Ways of achieving a long-lasting protection are discussed in relation to the dominant mechanisms of oxidation inhibition. In many practical applications at elevated temperatures oxidation and mechanical stresses co-exist. In steels the process of oxidative wear is important under conditions of poor lubrication and implanted metallic ions have been shown to be effective. In titanium alloys fatigue cracks probably initiate at dislocation sites at which oxidation proceeds most rapidly, and hence the same implanted species can improve both types of behaviour. Successful implantation treatments for fretting fatigue in titanium and a corrosion-erosion problem in steel are described. (orig.)

  19. Formation of silicon carbide by laser ablation in graphene oxide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone suspension on silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleh, Babak; Ghasemi, Samaneh; Torkamany, Mohammad Javad; Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Maleki, Farahnaz

    2018-01-01

    Laser ablation of a silicon wafer in graphene oxide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (GO-NMP) suspension was carried out with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (pulse duration = 250 ns, wavelength = 1064 nm). The surface of silicon wafer before and after laser ablation was studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The results showed that the ablation of silicon surface in liquid by pulsed laser was done by the process of melt expulsion under the influence of the confined plasma-induced pressure or shock wave trapped between the silicon wafer and the liquid. The X-ray diffraction‌ (XRD) pattern of Si wafer after laser ablation showed that 4H-SiC layer is formed on its surface. The formation of the above layer was also confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy‌ (XPS), as well as EDX was utilized. The reflectance of samples decreased with increasing pulse energy. Therefore, the morphological alteration and the formation of SiC layer at high energy increase absorption intensity in the UV‌-vis regions. Theoretical calculations confirm that the formation of silicon carbide from graphene oxide and silicon wafer is considerably endothermic. Development of new methods for increasing the reflectance without causing harmful effects is still an important issue for crystalline Si solar cells. By using the method described in this paper, the optical properties of solar cells can be improved.

  20. Functionalization of 2D macroporous silicon under the high-pressure oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Kartel, M.; Kladko, V.; Gudymenko, O.; Bo, Wang; Bratus, V.; Lytvynenko, O.; Onyshchenko, V.; Stronska, O.

    2018-03-01

    Addition functionalization after high-pressure oxidation of 2D macroporous silicon structures is evaluated. X-ray diffractometry indicates formation of orthorhombic SiO2 phase on macroporous silicon at oxide thickness of 800-1200 nm due to cylindrical symmetry of macropores and high thermal expansion coefficient of SiO2. Pb center concentration grows with the splitting energy of LO- and TO-phonons and SiO2 thickness in oxidized macroporous silicon structures. This increase EPR signal amplitude and GHz radiation absorption and is promising for development of high-frequency devices and electronically controlled elements.

  1. A parametric study of laser induced ablation-oxidation on porous silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Stefano, Luca; Rea, Ilaria; Nigro, M Arcangela; Della Corte, Francesco G; Rendina, Ivo

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the laser induced ablation-oxidation process on porous silicon layers having different porosities and thicknesses by non-destructive optical techniques. In particular, the interaction between a low power blue light laser and the porous silicon surfaces has been characterized by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The oxidation profiles etched on the porous samples can be tuned as functions of the layer porosity and laser fluence. Oxide stripes of width less than 2 μm and with thicknesses between 100 nm and 5 μm have been produced, depending on the porosity of the porous silicon, by using a 40 x focusing objective

  2. Diffusion of ion-implanted B in high concentration P- and As-doped silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fair, R.B.; Pappas, P.N.

    1975-01-01

    The diffusion of ion-implanted B in Si in the presence of a uniform background of high concentration P or As was studied by correlating numerical profile calculations with profiles determined by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Retarded B diffusion is observed in both As- and P-doped Si, consistent with the effect of the local Fermi-level position in the Si band gap on B diffusivity, D/sub B/. It is shown that D/sub B/ is linearly dependent on the free hole concentration, p, over the range 0.1 less than p/n/sub ie/ less than 30, where n/sub ie/ is the effective intrinsic electron concentration. This result does not depend on the way in which the background dopant has been introduced (implantation predeposition or doped-oxide source), nor the type of dopant used (P or As). (U.S.)

  3. The effects of incomplete annealing on the temperature dependence of sheet resistance and gage factor in aluminum and phosphorus implanted silicon on sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, B. P.; Gross, C.

    1976-01-01

    Partial annealing of damage to the crystal lattice during ion implantation reduces the temperature coefficient of resistivity of ion-implanted silicon, while facilitating controlled doping. Reliance on this method for temperature compensation of the resistivity and strain-gage factor is discussed. Implantation conditions and annealing conditions are detailed. The gage factor and its temperature variation are not drastically affected by crystal damage for some crystal orientations. A model is proposed to account for the effects of electron damage on the temperature dependence of resistivity and on silicon piezoresistance. The results are applicable to the design of silicon-on-sapphire strain gages with high gage factors.

  4. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull Avaliação radiológica de implantes de carbono vítreo poroso ou silicone em crânio de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Paulo Vaccari-Mazzetti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC and silicon (S implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. METHODS: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20 PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. RESULTS: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo-capsule, that don't appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (pOBJETIVO: Realizar avaliação através de tomografia computadorizada (TC de implantes de carbono vítreo poroso (CVP e silicone (S para sua utilização na substituição óssea no esqueleto craniofacial de ratos. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 40 ratos Wistar divididos em: Grupo A (n=20, implantes subperiostais de CVP no crânio. Após o momento da eutanásia os animais foram divididos em dois subgrupos: A I: 10 animais, estudados no 7(0 dia pós-operatório (PO e AII: 10 animais, estudados no 28(0 PO. No grupo B (n=20, os ratos foram submetidos ao implante de silicone no crânio. Todas outras etapas foram idênticas ao grupo A, com a designação de subgrupos BI e BII. Foi realizada tomografia computadorizada com cortes axiais de 1 mm de espessura para obtenção de imagens tridimensionais. A escala de Hounsfield

  5. Osteopontin (OPN is an important protein to mediate improvements in the biocompatibility of C ion-implanted silicone rubber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-liang Wang

    Full Text Available Medical device implants are drawing increasing amounts of interest from modern medical practitioners. However, this attention is not evenly spread across all such devices; most of these implantable devices can cause adverse reactions such as inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis, and infection. In this work, the biocompatibility of silicone rubber (SR was improved through carbon (C ion implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD results confirmed that these newly generated carbon-implanted silicone rubbers (C-SRs had large, irregular peaks and deep valleys on their surfaces. The water contact angle of the SR surface decreased significantly after C ion implantation. C ion implantation also changed the surface charge distribution, silicone oxygen rate, and chemical-element distribution of SR to favor cell attachment. The dermal fibroblasts cultured on the surface C-SR grew faster and showed more typical fibroblastic shapes. The expression levels of major adhesion proteins, including talin-1, zyxin, and vinculin, were significantly higher in dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR coated plates than in dermal fibroblasts cultured on SR. Those same dermal fibroblasts on C-SRs showed more pronounced adhesion and migration abilities. Osteopontin (OPN, a critical extracellular matrix (ECM protein, was up-regulated and secreted from dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 activity was also increased. These cells were highly mobile and were able to adhere to surfaces, but these abilities were inhibited by the monoclonal antibody against OPN, or by shRNA-mediated MMP-9 knockdown. Together, these results suggest that C ion implantation significantly improves SR biocompatibility, and that OPN is important to promote cell adhesion to the C-SR surface.

  6. Silicon-ion-implanted PMMA with nanostructured ultrathin layers for plastic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjichristov, G. B.; Ivanov, Tz E.; Marinov, Y. G.

    2014-12-01

    Being of interest for plastic electronics, ion-beam produced nanostructure, namely silicon ion (Si+) implanted polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) with ultrathin nanostructured dielectric (NSD) top layer and nanocomposite (NC) buried layer, is examined by electric measurements. In the proposed field-effect organic nanomaterial structure produced within the PMMA network by ion implantation with low energy (50 keV) Si+ at the fluence of 3.2 × 1016 cm-2 the gate NSD is ion-nanotracks-modified low-conductive surface layer, and the channel NC consists of carbon nanoclusters. In the studied ion-modified PMMA field-effect configuration, the gate NSD and the buried NC are formed as planar layers both with a thickness of about 80 nm. The NC channel of nano-clustered amorphous carbon (that is an organic semiconductor) provides a huge increase in the electrical conduction of the material in the subsurface region, but also modulates the electric field distribution in the drift region. The field effect via the gate NSD is analyzed. The most important performance parameters, such as the charge carrier field-effect mobility and amplification of this particular type of PMMA- based transconductance device with NC n-type channel and gate NSD top layer, are determined.

  7. X-ray diffraction patterns in high-energy proton implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Dluzewska, K.D.; Wierzchowski, W.; Graeff, W.

    1998-01-01

    Silicon crystals implanted with 1 and 1.6 MeV protons were studied by means of conventional source double-crystal and synchrotron multi-crystal arrangements. Both the rocking curves and series of topographs were recorded in different parallel settings employing different reflections and wavelengths of radiation. A comparison of rocking curves in different regions of implanted areas was performed in synchrotron multi-crystal arrangement with a beam of a very small diameter. The rocking curves exhibited subsidiary interference maxima with increasing periodicity on the low angle side. The plane wave topographs taken at different angular setting revealed characteristic fringes whose number decreased with increasing distance from the main maximum. The fringe pattern did not depend on the direction of the diffraction vector. The number of fringes for equivalent angular distance from the maximum was larger for higher order of reflection. The shape of the rocking curve and other diffraction patterns were reasonably explained assuming the lattice parameter change depth distribution proportional to the profile obtained from the Biersack-Ziegler theory and lateral non-uniformity of ion dose. A good approximation of the experimental results was obtained using numerical integration of the Takagi-Taupin equations. (orig.)

  8. Recrystallization behaviour and electrical properties of germanium ion implanted polycrystalline silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeon-Koo; Matsui, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    The recrystallization behaviour of undoped and phosphorus-doped polycrystalline silicon films amorphized by germanium ion implantation at doses ranging from 1 x 10 15 to 1 x 10 16 cm -2 are investigated, and the electrical properties of phosphorus-doped films after recrystallization are studied. The phosphorus doping concentration ranges from 3 x 10 18 to 1 x 10 20 cm -3 . It is found that the nucleation rate decreases for undoped films and increases for phosphorus-doped films with increasing germanium dose; the growth rates decrease for both doped and undoped films. The decrease in nucleation rate is caused by the increase in implantation damage. The decrease in growth rate is considered to be due to the increase in lattice strain. The grain size increases with germanium dose for undoped films, but decreases for phosphorus-doped films. The dependence of the electrical properties of the recrystallized films as a function of phosphorus doping concentration with different germanium doses can be explained in terms of the grain size, crystallinity and grain boundary barrier height. (Author)

  9. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  10. Diffusion modelling of low-energy ion-implanted BF{sub 2} in crystalline silicon: Study of fluorine vacancy effect on boron diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcon, J. [Laboratoire Electronique Microtechnologie et Instrumentation (LEMI), University of Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France)], E-mail: Jerome.Marcon@univ-rouen.fr; Merabet, A. [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux Metalliques, Departement d' O.M.P., Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Universite de Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria)

    2008-12-05

    We have investigated and modelled the diffusion of boron implanted into crystalline silicon in the form of boron difluoride BF{sub 2}{sup +}. We have used published data for BF{sub 2}{sup +} implanted with an energy of 2.2 keV in crystalline silicon. Fluorine effects are considered by using vacancy-fluorine pairs which are responsible for the suppression of boron diffusion in crystalline silicon. Following Uematsu's works, the simulations satisfactory reproduce the SIMS experimental profiles in the 800-1000 deg. C temperature range. The boron diffusion model in silicon of Uematsu has been improved taking into account the last experimental data.

  11. The suitability of silicon carbide for photocatalytic water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M.; Qamar, M. T.; Ahmed, Ikram; Rehman, Ateeq Ur; Ali, Shahid; Ismail, I. M. I.; Hameed, Abdul

    2018-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), owing to its extraordinary chemical stability and refractory properties, is widely used in the manufacturing industry. Despite the semiconducting nature and morphology-tuned band gap, its efficacy as photocatalysts has not been thoroughly investigated. The current study reports the synthesis, characterization and the evaluation of the capability of silicon carbide for hydrogen generation from water splitting. The optical characterization of the as-synthesized powder exposed the formation of multi-wavelength absorbing entities in synthetic process. The structural analysis by XRD and the fine microstructure analysis by HRTEM revealed the cubic 3C-SiC (β-SiC) and hexagonal α-polymorphs (2H-SiC and 6H-SiC) as major and minor phases, respectively. The Mott-Schottky analysis verified the n-type nature of the material with the flat band potential of - 0.7 V. In the electrochemical evaluation, the sharp increase in the peak currents in various potential ranges, under illumination, revealed the plausible potential of the material for the oxidation of water and generation of hydrogen. The generation of hydrogen and oxygen, as a consequence of water splitting in the actual photocatalytic experiments, was observed and measured. A significant increase in the yield of hydrogen was noticed in the presence of methanol as h + scavenger, whereas a retarding effect was offered by the Fe3+ entities that served as e - scavengers. The combined effect of both methanol and Fe3+ ions in the photocatalytic process was also investigated. Besides hydrogen gas, the other evolved gasses such as methane and carbon monoxide were also measured to estimate the mechanism of the process.

  12. Quantifying shape changes of silicone breast implants in a murine model using in vivo micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily E; Perilli, Egon; Carati, Colin J; Reynolds, Karen J

    2017-08-01

    A major complication of silicone breast implants is the formation of a capsule around the implant known as capsular contracture which results in the distortion of the implant. Recently, a mouse model for studying capsular contracture was examined using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), however, only qualitative changes were reported. The aim of this study was to develop a quantitative method for comparing the shape changes of silicone implants using in vivo micro-CT. Mice were bilaterally implanted with silicone implants and underwent ionizing radiation to induce capsular contracture. On day 28 post-surgery mice were examined in vivo using micro-CT. The reconstructed cross-section images were visually inspected to identify distortion. Measurements were taken in 2D and 3D to quantify the shape of the implants in the normal (n = 11) and distorted (n = 5) groups. The degree of anisotropy was significantly higher in the distorted implants in the transaxial view (0.99 vs. 1.19, p = 0.002) and the y-axis lengths were significantly shorter in the sagittal (9.27 mm vs. 8.55 mm, p = 0.015) and coronal (9.24 mm vs. 8.76 mm, p = 0.031) views, indicating a deviation from the circular cross-section and shortening of the long axis. The 3D analysis revealed a significantly lower average thickness (sphere-fitting method) in distorted implants (6.86 mm vs. 5.49 mm, p = 0.002), whereas the volume and surface area did not show significant changes. Statistically significant differences between normal and distorted implants were found in 2D and 3D using distance measurements performed via micro-CT. This objective analysis method can be useful for a range of studies involving deformable implants using in vivo micro-CT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1447-1452, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. New transport phenomena probed by dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized and non-oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, B.; Axelrod, E.; Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2007-05-15

    Dielectric spectroscopy accompanied by infrared (IR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy have been utilized to reveal the correlation between transport, optical and structural properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). Three relaxation processes at low-, mid- and high-temperatures were observed, including dc-conductivity at high-temperatures. Both the low-T relaxation and the dc conductivity were found to be thermally activated processes that involve tunneling and hopping in between the nanocrystals in oxidized PS. We have found that the dc-conductivity is limited by geometrical constrictions along the transport channels, which are not effected by the oxidation process and are characterized by activation energies of about {proportional_to}0.85 eV. The low-T relaxation process involves thermal activation followed by tunneling in between neighbor nanocrystals, with somewhat lower activation energies. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Exploring the deposition of oxides on silicon for photovoltaic cells by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; de Moor, Hugo H.C.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, David H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Since most commercially available solar cells are still made from silicon, we are exploring the introduction of passivating qualities in oxides, with the potential to serve as an antireflection coating. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit TiO2 and SrTiO3 coatings on silicon substrates.

  15. Laser direct writing of oxide structures on hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Birkelund, Karen; Grey, Francois

    1996-01-01

    on amorphous and crystalline silicon surfaces in order to determine the depassivation mechanism. The minimum linewidth achieved is about 450 nm using writing speeds of up to 100 mm/s. The process is fully compatible with local oxidation of silicon by scanning probe lithography. Wafer-scale patterns can...

  16. Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1984-03-13

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  17. Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

    1999-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors

  18. Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

    1999-07-21

    Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors.

  19. Nitric oxide levels in the anterior chamber of vitrectomized eyes with silicon oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Escarião

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the nitric oxide levels in the anterior chamber of eyes who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV with silicone oil. METHODS: Patients who underwent PPV with silicon oil injection, from february 2005 to august 2007, were selected. Nine patients (nine eyes participated in the study (five women and four men. Nitric oxide concentration was quantified after the aspiration of aqueous humor samples during the procedure of silicon oil removal. Data such as: oil emulsification; presence of oil in the anterior chamber; intraocular pressure and time with silicone oil were evaluated. Values of p <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: A positive correlation between nitric oxide concentration and time with silicon oil in the vitreous cavity (r=0.799 was observed. The nitric oxide concentration was significantly higher (p=0.02 in patients with silicon oil more than 24 months (0.90µmol/ml ± 0.59, n=3 in the vitreous cavity comparing to patients with less than 24 months (0.19µmol/ml ± 0.10, n=6. CONCLUSION: A positive correlation linking silicone oil time in the vitreous cavity with the nitric oxide concentration in the anterior chamber was observed.

  20. Role of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as oxidation barrier for silicon based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.fiorentino@tudelft.nl; Morana, Bruno [Department of Microelectronic, Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628 CT Delft (Netherlands); Forte, Salvatore [Department of Electronic, University of Naples Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Sarro, Pasqualina Maria [Department of Microelectronic, Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628 CT, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, the authors study the protective effect against oxidation of a thin layer of atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Nitrogen doped silicon carbide (poly-SiC:N) based microheaters coated with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used as test structure to investigate the barrier effect of the alumina layers to oxygen and water vapor at very high temperature (up to 1000 °C). Different device sets have been fabricated changing the doping levels, to evaluate possible interaction between the dopants and the alumina layer. The as-deposited alumina layer morphology has been evaluated by means of AFM analysis and compared to an annealed sample (8 h at 1000 °C) to estimate the change in the grain structure and the film density. The coated microheaters are subjected to very long oxidation time in dry and wet environment (up to 8 h at 900 and 1000 °C). By evaluating the electrical resistance variation between uncoated reference devices and the ALD coated devices, the oxide growth on the SiC is estimated. The results show that the ALD alumina coating completely prevents the oxidation of the SiC up to 900 °C in wet environment, while an oxide thickness reduction of 50% is observed at 1000 °C compared to uncoated devices.

  1. Etched ion tracks in silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride as charge injection or extraction channels for novel electronic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Petrov, A.V.; Hoppe, K.; Fahrner, W.R.; Papaleo, R.M.; Berdinsky, A.S.; Chandra, A.; Chemseddine, A.; Zrineh, A.; Biswas, A.; Faupel, F.; Chadderton, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of swift heavy ions onto silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride on silicon creates etchable tracks in these insulators. After their etching and filling-up with highly resistive matter, these nanometric pores can be used as charge extraction or injection paths towards the conducting channel in the underlying silicon. In this way, a novel family of electronic structures has been realized. The basic characteristics of these 'TEMPOS' (=tunable electronic material with pores in oxide on silicon) structures are summarized. Their functionality is determined by the type of insulator, the etch track diameters and lengths, their areal densities, the type of conducting matter embedded therein, and of course by the underlying semiconductor and the contact geometry. Depending on the TEMPOS preparation recipe and working point, the structures may resemble gatable resistors, condensors, diodes, transistors, photocells, or sensors, and they are therefore rather universally applicable in electronics. TEMPOS structures are often sensitive to temperature, light, humidity and organic gases. Also light-emitting TEMPOS structures have been produced. About 37 TEMPOS-based circuits such as thermosensors, photosensors, humidity and alcohol sensors, amplifiers, frequency multipliers, amplitude modulators, oscillators, flip-flops and many others have already been designed and successfully tested. Sometimes TEMPOS-based circuits are more compact than conventional electronics

  2. Electrical properties improvement of multicrystalline silicon solar cells using a combination of porous silicon and vanadium oxide treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbali, L.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will report the enhancement of the conversion efficiency of multicrystalline silicon solar cells after coating the front surface with a porous silicon layer treated with vanadium oxide. The incorporation of vanadium oxide into the porous silicon (PS) structure, followed by a thermal treatment under oxygen ambient, leads to an important decrease of the surface reflectivity, a significant enhancement of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ) and a significant enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) of the PS structure. We Obtained a noticeable increase of (τ eff ) from 3.11 μs to 134.74 μs and the surface recombination velocity (S eff ) have decreased from 8441 cm s −1 to 195 cm s −1 . The reflectivity spectra of obtained films, performed in the 300–1200 nm wavelength range, show an important decrease of the average reflectivity from 40% to 5%. We notice a significant improvement of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) in the used multicrystalline silicon substrates. Results are analyzed and compared to those carried out on a reference (untreated) sample. The electrical properties of the treated silicon solar cells were improved noticeably as regard to the reference (untreated) sample.

  3. Location of a Dexamethasone Implant at the Macula after Intravitreal Injection in a Silicone Oil-Filled Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenap Mahmut Esenulku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a case with cystoid macular edema (CME due to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO presented with a dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex trapped at the macula in her silicone oil- (SO- filled eye after injection. No additional complications such as intraocular pressure (IOP rise or retinal damage were observed. The CME was resolved during the follow-up period. At the last visit, 3 months following the injection, Ozurdex implant was found to be mostly dissolved without any additional ocular complications.

  4. Positron annihilation studies of silicon-rich SiO2 produced by high dose ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghislotti, G.; Nielsen, B.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.; Di Mauro, L.F.; Corni, F.; Tonini, R.

    1997-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is used to study Si-rich SiO 2 samples prepared by implantation of Si (160 keV) ions at doses in the range 3x10 16 endash 3x10 17 cm -2 and subsequent thermal annealing at high temperature (up to 1100 degree C). Samples implanted at doses higher than 5x10 16 cm -2 and annealed above 1000 degree C showed a PAS spectrum with an annihilation peak broader than the unimplanted sample. We discuss how these results are related to the process of silicon precipitation inside SiO 2 . copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. Alternative method for steam generation for thermal oxidation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelman, Jeffrey J.

    2010-02-01

    Thermal oxidation of silicon is an important process step in MEMS device fabrication. Thicker oxide layers are often used as structural components and can take days or weeks to grow, causing high gas costs, maintenance issues, and a process bottleneck. Pyrolytic steam, which is generated from hydrogen and oxygen combustion, was the default process, but has serious drawbacks: cost, safety, particles, permitting, reduced growth rate, rapid hydrogen consumption, component breakdown and limited steam flow rates. Results from data collected over a 24 month period by a MEMS manufacturer supports replacement of pyrolytic torches with RASIRC Steamer technology to reduce process cycle time and enable expansion previously limited by local hydrogen permitting. Data was gathered to determine whether Steamers can meet or exceed pyrolytic torch performance. The RASIRC Steamer uses de-ionized water as its steam source, eliminating dependence on hydrogen and oxygen. A non-porous hydrophilic membrane selectively allows water vapor to pass. All other molecules are greatly restricted, so contaminants in water such as dissolved gases, ions, total organic compounds (TOC), particles, and metals can be removed in the steam phase. The MEMS manufacturer improved growth rate by 7% over the growth range from 1μm to 3.5μm. Over a four month period, wafer uniformity, refractive index, wafer stress, and etch rate were tracked with no significant difference found. The elimination of hydrogen generated a four-month return on investment (ROI). Mean time between failure (MTBF) was increased from 3 weeks to 32 weeks based on three Steamers operating over eight months.

  6. Nafion/Silicon Oxide Composite Membrane for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membranes were produced via in situ sol-gel reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) in Nafion membranes. The physicochemical properties of the membranes were studied by FT-IR, TG-DSC and tensile strength. The results show that the silicon oxide is compatible with the Nafion membrane and the thermo stability of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is higher than that of Nafion membrane. Furthermore, the tensile strength of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is similar to that of the Nafion membrane. The proton conductivity of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is higher than that of Nafion membrane. When the Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane was employed as an electrolyte in H2/O2 PEMFC, a higher current density value (1 000 mA/cm2 at 0.38 V) than that of the Nafion 1135 membrane (100 mA/cm2 at 0.04 V) was obtained at 110 ℃.

  7. About the optical properties of oxidized black silicon structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincik, E.; Brunner, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Mikula, M.; Kučera, M.; Švec, P.; Greguš, J.; Vojtek, P.; Zábudlá, Z.; Imamura, K.; Zahoran, M.

    2017-02-01

    The paper deals with the optical and morphological properties of thermally oxidized black silicon (OBSi) nano-crystalline specimens produced by the surface structure chemical transfer method (SSCT). This method can produce a nano-crystalline Si black color layer on c-Si with a range of thickness of ∼50 nm to ∼300 nm by the contact of c-Si immersed in chemical solutions HF + H2O2 with a catalytic mesh. We present and discuss mainly the photoluminescence properties of both polished c-Si and OBSi structures, respectively. The similar photoluminescence (PL) behaviors recorded at liquid helium (6 K) and room temperatures on both polished crystalline Si and OBSi samples, respectively, indicate the similar origin of recorded luminescence light. As the positions of PL maxima of OBSi structures are mainly related to the size of Si nanocrystallites and SiO(x), we therefore suppose that the size of the dominant parts of the luminated OBSi nanostructure is pre-determined by the used polishing Si procedure, and/or the distribution function of the number of formed crystallites on their size is very similar. The blue shift of both PL spectra reaching almost value of 0.40 eV observed after the decrease of the sample temperature to 6 K we relate also with the change of the semiconductor band gap width.

  8. Transverse mode control in proton-implanted and oxide-confined VCSELs via patterned dielectric anti-phase filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Benjamin; O'Brien, Thomas; Dallesasse, John M.

    2017-02-01

    A novel method for controlling the transverse lasing modes in both proton implanted and oxide-confined vertical- cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with a multi-layer, patterned, dielectric anti-phase (DAP) filter is pre- sented. Using a simple photolithographic liftoff process, dielectric layers are deposited and patterned on individual VCSELs to modify (increase or decrease) the mirror reflectivity across the emission aperture via anti-phase reflections, creating spatially-dependent threshold material gain. The shape of the dielectric pattern can be tailored to overlap with specific transverse VCSEL modes or subsets of transverse modes to either facilitate or inhibit lasing by decreasing or increasing, respectively, the threshold modal gain. A silicon dioxide (SiO2) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) anti-phase filter is used to achieve a single-fundamental-mode, continuous-wave output power greater than 4.0 mW in an oxide-confined VCSEL at a lasing wavelength of 850 nm. A filter consisting of SiO2 and TiO2 is used to facilitate injection-current-insensitive fundamental mode and lower order mode lasing in proton implanted VCSELs at a lasing wavelength of 850 nm. Higher refractive index dielectric materials such as amorphous silicon (a-Si) can be used to increase the effectiveness of the anti-phase filter on proton implanted devices by reducing the threshold modal gain of any spatially overlapping modes. This additive, non-destructive method allows for mode selection at any lasing wavelength and for any VCSEL layer structure without the need for semiconductor etching or epitaxial regrowth. It also offers the capability of designing a filter based upon available optical coating materials.

  9. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  10. Effect of additive gases and injection methods on chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F2 remote plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y. B.; Park, S. M.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, N.-E.; Kim, K. S.; Bae, G. H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of various additive gases and different injection methods on the chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F 2 remote plasmas. N 2 and N 2 +O 2 gases in the F 2 /Ar/N 2 and F 2 /Ar/N 2 /O 2 remote plasmas effectively increased the etch rate of the layers. The addition of direct-injected NO gas increased the etch rates most significantly. NO radicals generated by the addition of N 2 and N 2 +O 2 or direct-injected NO molecules contributed to the effective removal of nitrogen and oxygen in the silicon nitride and oxide layers, by forming N 2 O and NO 2 by-products, respectively, and thereby enhancing SiF 4 formation. As a result of the effective removal of the oxygen, nitrogen, and silicon atoms in the layers, the chemical dry etch rates were enhanced significantly. The process regime for the etch rate enhancement of the layers was extended at elevated temperature

  11. Defect and dopant depth profiles in boron-implanted silicon studied with channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.; Boerma, D.O.; Smulders, P.J.M.; Oosterhoff, S.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystals of silicon were implanted at RT with 1 MeV boron ions to a dose of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The depth profile of the boron was measured using the 2060-keV resonance of the 11B(α, n)14N nuclear reaction. The distribution of the lattice disorder as a function of depth was determined from

  12. Laser annealing of ion implanted silicon by the aid of a Q-switched neodymium glass laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exner, H.; Laemmel, B.; Zscherpe, G.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results of laser annealing of arsenic implanted silicon are presented. Different depths of melting are obtained by varying the energy flux density of the Q-switched neodymium glass laser. The annealed samples are studied by the aid of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) combined with ion channeling, and of resistance measurements. Not any defect could be found by RBS and no surface structure could be determined by microscopy

  13. Toward 3D Printing of Medical Implants: Reduced Lateral Droplet Spreading of Silicone Rubber under Intense IR Curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieghorst, Jan; Majaura, Daniel; Wevering, Hendrik; Doll, Theodor

    2016-03-01

    The direct fabrication of silicone-rubber-based individually shaped active neural implants requires high-speed-curing systems in order to prevent extensive spreading of the viscous silicone rubber materials during vulcanization. Therefore, an infrared-laser-based test setup was developed to cure the silicone rubber materials rapidly and to evaluate the resulting spreading in relation to its initial viscosity, the absorbed infrared radiation, and the surface tensions of the fabrication bed's material. Different low-adhesion materials (polyimide, Parylene-C, polytetrafluoroethylene, and fluorinated ethylenepropylene) were used as bed materials to reduce the spreading of the silicone rubber materials by means of their well-known weak surface tensions. Further, O2-plasma treatment was performed on the bed materials to reduce the surface tensions. To calculate the absorbed radiation, the emittance of the laser was measured, and the absorptances of the materials were investigated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode. A minimum silicone rubber spreading of 3.24% was achieved after 2 s curing time, indicating the potential usability of the presented high-speed-curing process for the direct fabrication of thermal-curing silicone rubbers.

  14. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of oxidation on the efficiency and spectrum of photoluminescence of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulakh, B. M.; Korsunska, N. E.; Khomenkova, L. Yu.; Staraya, T. R.; Sheinkman, M. K.

    2006-01-01

    The photoluminescence spectra of porous silicon and their temperature dependences and transformations on aging are studied. It is shown that the infrared band prevailing in the spectra of as-prepared samples is due to exciton recombination in silicon crystallites. On aging, a well-pronounced additional band is observed at shorter wavelengths of the spectra. It is assumed that this band is due to the recombination of carriers that are excited in silicon crystallites and recombine via some centers located in oxide. It is shown that the broad band commonly observable in oxidized porous silicon is a superposition of the above two bands. The dependences of the peak positions and integrated intensities of the bands on time and temperature are studied. The data on the distribution of oxide centers with depth in the porous layer are obtained

  16. 18O isotopic tracer studies of silicon oxidation in dry oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidation of silicon in dry oxygen has been an important process in the integrated circuit industry for making gate insulators on metal-oxide-semiconductory (MOS) devices. This work examines this process using isotopic tracers of oxygen to determine the transport mechanisms of oxygen through silicon dioxide. Oxides were grown sequentially using mass-16 and mass-18 oxygen gas sources to label the oxygen molecules from each step. The resulting oxides are analyzed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The results of these analyses suggest two oxidant species are present during the oxidation, each diffuses and oxidizes separately during the process. A model from this finding using a sum of two linear-parabolic growth rates, each representing the growth rate from one of the oxidants, describes the reported oxidation kinetics in the literature closely. A fit of this relationship reveals excellent fits to the data for oxide thicknesses ranging from 30 A to 1 μm and for temperatures ranging from 800 to 1200 0 C. The mass-18 oxygen tracers also enable a direct observation of the oxygen solubility in the silicon dioxide during a dry oxidation process. The SIMS profiles establish a maximum solubility for interstitial oxygen at 1000 0 C at 2 x 10 20 cm -3 . Furthermore, the mass-18 oxygen profiles show negligible network diffusion during an 1000 0 C oxidation

  17. Distribution of impurity elements in slag-silicon equilibria for oxidative refining of metallurgical silicon for solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, M.D.; Barati, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    The possibility of refining metallurgical grade silicon to a high-purity product for solar cell applications by the slagging of impurity elements was investigated. Distribution coefficients were determined for B, Ca, Mg, Fe, K and P between magnesia or alumina saturated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO-MgO-SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-BaO-SiO{sub 2} slags and silicon at 1500 C. The partitioning of the impurity elements between molten silicon and slag was examined in terms of basicity and oxygen potential of the slag, with particular focus on the behaviour of boron and phosphorus. The experimental results showed that both of these aspects of slag chemistry have a significant influence on the distribution coefficient of B and P. Increasing the oxygen potential by additions of silica was found to increase the distribution coefficients for both B and P. Increasing the basicity of the slag was not always effective in achieving high removal of these elements from silicon as excess amounts of basic oxides lower the activity of silica and consequently the oxygen potential. The extent of this effect is such that increasing basicity can lead to a decrease in distribution coefficient. Increasing lime in the slag increased distribution coefficients for B and P, but this counterbalancing effect was such that distributions were the lowest in barium-containing slags, despite barium oxide being the most basic of the fluxes used in this study. The highest removal efficiencies achieved were of the order of 80% and 90% for B and P, respectively. It was demonstrated that for the removal of B and P from metallurgical-grade silicon to solar-grade levels, a slag mass about 5 times the mass of silicon would be required. (author)

  18. Early stages of oxidation of ion-implanted nickel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peide, Z.; Grant, W.A.; Procter, R.P.M.

    1981-01-01

    The early stages of oxidation of nickel implanted with nickel, chromium, or lithium ions in oxygen at 1100 0 C have been studied using various electron-optical techniques. The unimplanted metal develops initially a fine-grained, convoluted scale having a ridged, cellular structure. Subsequently, the oxide grains increase in size significantly and oxidation becomes predominantly controlled by diffusion of Ni /sup 2+/ ions across a compact, columnar scale. Implantation of the surface with nickel ions has no significant effect on the initial oxidation behavior. However, after implantation with chromium or lithium ions, the development of the NiO scale is, in the early stages of oxidation, suppressed by formation of NiCr 2 O 4 or LiO 2 nodules, respectively. Subsequently, the implanted species are incorporated into the steady-state NiO scale where they dope the oxide and thus influence the diffusion rate of Ni /sup 2+/ ions through it. As would be predicted, the steady-state oxidation rate of chromium-implanted nickel is increased while that of lithium- implanted nickel is decreased compared with that of the unimplanted metal

  19. Fabrication of a silicon oxide stamp by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride for nanoimprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of a stamp reinforced with silicon nitride is presented for its use in nanoimprint lithography. The fabrication process is based on edge lithography using conventional optical lithography and wet anisotropic etching of 110 silicon wafers. SiO2 nano-ridges of 20 nm in width were

  20. Microstructure and oxidative degradation behavior of silicon carbide fiber Hi-Nicalon type S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, M.; Urano, A.; Sakamoto, J.; Imai, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Polycarbosilane-derived SiC fibers, Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon type S were exposed for 1 to 100 h at 1273-1773 K in air. Oxide layer growth and tensile strength change of these fibers were examined after the oxidation test. As a result, three types of SiC fibers decreased their strength as oxide layer thickness increased. Fracture origins were determined at near the oxide layer-fiber interface. Adhered fibers arised from softening of silicon oxide at high temperature were also observed. In this study, Hi-Nicalon type S showed better oxidation resistance than other polycarbosilane-derived SiC fibers after 1673 K or higher temperature exposure in air for 10 h. This result was explained by the poreless silicon oxide layer structure of Hi-Nicalon type S. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of pulsed electron beam-annealed and pulsed ruby laser-annealed ion-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, S.R.; Appleton, B.R.; White, C.W.; Narayan, J.; Greenwald, A.C.

    1978-11-01

    Recently two new techniques, pulsed electron beam annealing and pulsed laser annealing, have been developed for processing ion-implanted silicon. These two types of anneals have been compared using ion-channeling, ion back-scattering, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Single crystal samples were implanted with 100 keV As + ions to a dose of approx. 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 and subsequently annealed by either a pulsed Ruby laser or a pulsed electron beam. Our results show in both cases that the near-surface region has melted and regrown epitaxially with nearly all of the implanted As (97 to 99%) incroporated onto lattice sites. The analysis indicates that the samples are essentially defect free and have complete electrical recovery

  2. On the oxidation mechanism of microcrystalline silicon thin films studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronneberg, A. C.; Smets, A. H. M.; Creatore, M.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2011-01-01

    Insight into the oxidation mechanism of microcrystalline silicon thin films has been obtained by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The films were deposited by using the expanding thermal plasma and their oxidation upon air exposure was followed in time. Transmission spectra were

  3. Super-oxidation of silicon nanoclusters: magnetism and reactive oxygen species at the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepeshkin, Sergey; Baturin, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Evgeny; Matsko, Nikita; Uspenskii, Yurii; Naumova, Anastasia; Feya, Oleg; Schoonen, Martin A.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of silicon nanoclusters depending on the temperature and oxygen pressure is explored from first principles using the evolutionary algorithm, and structural and thermodynamic analysis. From our calculations of 90 SinOm clusters we found that under normal conditions oxidation does not stop at the stoichiometric SiO2 composition, as it does in bulk silicon, but goes further placing extra oxygen atoms on the cluster surface. These extra atoms are responsible for light emission, relevant to reactive oxygen species and many of them are magnetic. We argue that the super-oxidation effect is size-independent and discuss its relevance to nanotechnology and miscellaneous applications, including biomedical ones.

  4. Fabrication of amorphous silicon nanoribbons by atomic force microscope tip-induced local oxidation for thin film device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, L; Rogel, R; Demami, F

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of induced local oxidation of amorphous silicon by atomic force microscopy. The resulting local oxide is used as a mask for the elaboration of a thin film silicon resistor. A thin amorphous silicon layer deposited on a glass substrate is locally oxidized following narrow continuous lines. The corresponding oxide line is then used as a mask during plasma etching of the amorphous layer leading to the formation of a nanoribbon. Such an amorphous silicon nanoribbon is used for the fabrication of the resistor

  5. Effect of yttrium on the oxide scale adherence of pre-oxidized silicon-containing heat-resistant alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jingbo; Gao Yimin; Shen Yudi; Yang Fang; Yi Dawei; Ye Zhaozhong; Liang Long; Du Yingqian

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → AE experiment shows yttrium has a beneficial effect on the pre-oxidized HP40 alloy. → Yttrium facilitates the formation of internal oxide after 10 h of oxidation. → Internal oxide changes the rupture behaviour of the oxide scale. → Twins form in the internal oxide and improve the binding strength of the scale. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of the rare earth element yttrium on the rupture behaviour of the oxide scale on the silicon-containing heat-resistant alloy during cooling. After 10 h of oxidation, yttrium is found to facilitate the formation of internal oxides (silica) at the scale-matrix interface. Due to the twinning observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in silica, the critical strain value for the scale failure can be dramatically improved, and the formation of cracks at the scale-matrix interface is inhibited.

  6. The characteristics of surface oxidation and corrosion resistance of nitrogen implanted zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, G.; Choi, B.H.; Kim, W.; Jung, K.S.; Kwon, H.S.; Lee, S.J.; Lee, J.H.; Song, T.Y.; Shon, D.H.; Han, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    This work is concerned with the development and application of ion implantation techniques for improving the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-4. The corrosion resistance in nitrogen implanted zircaloy-4 under a 120 keV nitrogen ion beam at an ion dose of 3 x 10 17 cm -2 depends on the implantation temperature. The characteristics of surface oxidation and corrosion resistance were analyzed with the change of implantation temperature. It is shown that as implantation temperature rises from 100 to 724 C, the colour of specimen surface changes from its original colour to light yellow at 100 C, golden at 175 C, pink at 300 C, blue at 440 C and dark blue at 550 C. As the implantation temperature goes above 640 C, the colour of surface changes to light black, and the surface becomes a little rough. The corrosion resistance of zircaloy-4 implanted with nitrogen is sensitive to the implantation temperature. The pitting potential of specimens increases from 176 to 900 mV (SCE) as the implantation temperature increases from 100 to 300 C, and decreases from 900 to 90 mV(SCE) as the implantation temperature increases from 300 to 640 C. The microstructure, the distribution of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon elements, the oxide grain size and the feature of the precipitation in the implanted surface were investigated by optical microscope, TEM, EDS, XRD and AES. The experimental results reveal that the ZrO 2 is distributed mainly on the outer surface. The ZrN is distributed under the ZrO 2 layer. The characteristics of the distribution of ZrO 2 and ZrN in the nitrogen-implanted zircaloy-4 is influenced by the implantation temperature of the sample, and in turn the corrosion resistance is influenced. (orig.)

  7. Effect of trichloroethylene enhancement on deposition rate of low-temperature silicon oxide films by silicone oil and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Susumu; Jain, Puneet

    2017-08-01

    A low-temperature silcon oxide film was deposited at 160 to 220 °C using an atmospheric pressure CVD system with silicone oil vapor and ozone gases. It was found that the deposition rate is markedly increased by adding trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor, which is generated by bubbling TCE solution with N2 gas flow. The increase is more than 3 times that observed without TCE, and any contamination due to TCE is hardly observed in the deposited Si oxide films from Fourier transform infrared spectra.

  8. The oxidation of titanium nitride- and silicon nitride-coated stainless steel in carbon dioxide environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.; Stott, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    A study has been undertaken into the effects of thin titanium nitride and silicon nitride coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition and chemical vapour deposition processes, on the oxidation resistance of 321 stainless steel in a simulated advanced gas-cooled reactor carbon dioxide environment for long periods at 550 o C and 700 o C under thermal-cycling conditions. The uncoated steel contains sufficient chromium to develop a slow-growing chromium-rich oxide layer at these temperatures, particularly if the surfaces have been machine-abraded. Failure of this layer in service allows formation of less protective iron oxide-rich scales. The presence of a thin (3-4 μm) titanium nitride coating is not very effective in increasing the oxidation resistance since the ensuing titanium oxide scale is not a good barrier to diffusion. Even at 550 o C, iron oxide-rich nodules are able to develop following relatively rapid oxidation and breakdown of the coating. At 700 o C, the coated specimens oxidize at relatively similar rates to the uncoated steel. A thin silicon nitride coating gives improved oxidation resistance, with both the coating and its slow-growing oxide being relatively electrically insulating. The particular silicon nitride coating studied here was susceptible to spallation on thermal cycling, due to an inherently weak coating/substrate interface. (Author)

  9. Preparation of highly aligned silicon oxide nanowires with stable intensive photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M.; Mansurov, Z.A.; Tokmolden, S.; Beall, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report the successful formation of highly aligned vertical silicon oxide nanowires. The source of silicon was from the substrate itself without any additional source of silicon. X-ray measurement demonstrated that our nanowires are amorphous. Photoluminescence measurements were conducted through 18 months and indicated that there is a very good intensive emission peaks near the violet regions. The FTIR measurements indicated the existence of peaks at 463, 604, 795 and a wide peak at 1111 cm -1 and this can be attributed to Si-O-Si and Si-O stretching vibrations. We also report the formation of the octopus-like silicon oxide nanowires and the growth mechanism of these structures was discussed.

  10. Preparation of highly aligned silicon oxide nanowires with stable intensive photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M., E-mail: duraia_physics@yahoo.co [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mansurov, Z.A. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tokmolden, S. [Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Beall, Gary W. [Texas State University-San Marcos, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 601 University Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In this work we report the successful formation of highly aligned vertical silicon oxide nanowires. The source of silicon was from the substrate itself without any additional source of silicon. X-ray measurement demonstrated that our nanowires are amorphous. Photoluminescence measurements were conducted through 18 months and indicated that there is a very good intensive emission peaks near the violet regions. The FTIR measurements indicated the existence of peaks at 463, 604, 795 and a wide peak at 1111 cm{sup -1} and this can be attributed to Si-O-Si and Si-O stretching vibrations. We also report the formation of the octopus-like silicon oxide nanowires and the growth mechanism of these structures was discussed.

  11. Sponge-like reduced graphene oxide/silicon/carbon nanotube composites for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Menglu; Wang, Zhao; Chen, Xiaojun; Guan, Shiyou

    2018-04-01

    Three-dimensional sponge-like reduced graphene oxide/silicon/carbon nanotube composites were synthesized by one-step hydrothermal self-assembly using silicon nanoparticles, graphene oxide and amino modified carbon nanotubes to develop high-performance anode materials of lithium ion batteries. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images show the structure of composites that Silicon nanoparticles are coated with reduced graphene oxide while amino modified carbon nanotubes wrap around the reduced graphene oxide in the composites. When applied to lithium ion battery, these composites exhibit high initial specific capacity of 2552 mA h/g at a current density of 0.05 A/g. In addition, reduced graphene oxide/silicon/carbon nanotube composites also have better cycle stability than bare Silicon nanoparticles electrode with the specific capacity of 1215 mA h/g after 100 cycles. The three-dimension sponge-like structure not only ensures the electrical conductivity but also buffers the huge volume change, which has broad potential application in the field of battery.

  12. Covalent Surface Modification of Silicon Oxides with Alcohols in Polar Aprotic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2017-09-05

    Alcohol-based monolayers were successfully formed on the surfaces of silicon oxides through reactions performed in polar aprotic solvents. Monolayers prepared from alcohol-based reagents have been previously introduced as an alternative approach to covalently modify the surfaces of silicon oxides. These reagents are readily available, widely distributed, and are minimally susceptible to side reactions with ambient moisture. A limitation of using alcohol-based compounds is that previous reactions required relatively high temperatures in neat solutions, which can degrade some alcohol compounds or could lead to other unwanted side reactions during the formation of the monolayers. To overcome these challenges, we investigate the condensation reaction of alcohols on silicon oxides carried out in polar aprotic solvents. In particular, propylene carbonate has been identified as a polar aprotic solvent that is relatively nontoxic, readily accessible, and can facilitate the formation of alcohol-based monolayers. We have successfully demonstrated this approach for tuning the surface chemistry of silicon oxide surfaces with a variety of alcohol containing compounds. The strategy introduced in this research can be utilized to create silicon oxide surfaces with hydrophobic, oleophobic, or charged functionalities.

  13. Yttrium implantation and addition element effects on the oxidation behaviour of reference steels at 973 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudron, E.; Buscail, H.; Cueff, R.; Issartel, C.; El Messki, S.; Perrier, S.; Riffard, F. [Lab. Vellave d' Elaboration et d' Etude des Materiaux, Univ. Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd 2, Le Puy en Velay (France)

    2004-07-01

    Yttrium implantation effects on reference steels (extra low carbon and low manganese steel) were studied by rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). Thermogravimetry and in situ X-ray diffraction at 700 C and P{sub O2}=0.04 Pa for 24h were used to determine the yttrium implantation and addition element effects on sample oxidation resistance at high temperatures. This study clearly shows that yttrium implantation and subsequent high temperature oxidation induced the formation of several yttrium mixed oxides which closely depend on the reference steel addition elements. Moreover, these yttrium mixed oxides seem to be responsible for the improved reference steel oxidation resistance at high temperatures. (orig.)

  14. Tunnel oxide passivated rear contact for large area n-type front junction silicon solar cells providing excellent carrier selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguo Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrier-selective contact with low minority carrier recombination and efficient majority carrier transport is mandatory to eliminate metal-induced recombination for higher energy conversion efficiency for silicon (Si solar cells. In the present study, the carrier-selective contact consists of an ultra-thin tunnel oxide and a phosphorus-doped polycrystalline Si (poly-Si thin film formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD and subsequent thermal crystallization. It is shown that the poly-Si film properties (doping level, crystallization and dopant activation anneal temperature are crucial for achieving excellent contact passivation quality. It is also demonstrated quantitatively that the tunnel oxide plays a critical role in this tunnel oxide passivated contact (TOPCON scheme to realize desired carrier selectivity. Presence of tunnel oxide increases the implied Voc (iVoc by ~ 125 mV. The iVoc value as high as 728 mV is achieved on symmetric structure with TOPCON on both sides. Large area (239 cm2 n-type Czochralski (Cz Si solar cells are fabricated with homogeneous implanted boron emitter and screen-printed contact on the front and TOPCON on the back, achieving 21.2% cell efficiency. Detailed analysis shows that the performance of these cells is mainly limited by boron emitter recombination on the front side.

  15. Recovery of indium-tin-oxide/silicon heterojunction solar cells by thermal annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Morales Vilches, Ana Belén; Voz Sánchez, Cristóbal; Colina Brito, Mónica Alejandra; López Rodríguez, Gema; Martín García, Isidro; Ortega Villasclaras, Pablo Rafael; Orpella García, Alberto; Alcubilla González, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    The emitter of silicon heterojunction solar cells consists of very thin hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers deposited at low temperature. The high sheet resistance of this type of emitter requires a transparent conductive oxide layer, which also acts as an effective antireflection coating. The deposition of this front electrode, typically by Sputtering, involves a relatively high energy ion bombardment at the surface that could degrade the emitter quality. The work function of the tra...

  16. Stressing effects on the charge trapping of silicon oxynitride prepared by thermal oxidation of LPCVD Si-rich silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H.Y.; Wong, H.; Filip, V.; Sen, B.; Kok, C.W.; Chan, M.; Poon, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    It was recently found that the silicon oxynitride prepared by oxidation of silicon-rich silicon nitride (SRN) has several important features. The high nitrogen and extremely low hydrogen content of this material allows it to have a high dielectric constant and a low trap density. The present work investigates in further detail the electrical reliability of this kind of gate dielectric films by studying the charge trapping and interface state generation induced by constant current stressing. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements indicate that for oxidation temperatures of 850 and 950 deg. C, the interface trap generation is minimal because of the high nitrogen content at the interface. At a higher oxidation temperature of 1050 deg. C, a large flatband shift is found for constant current stressing. This observation can be explained by the significant reduction of the nitrogen content and the phase separation effect at this temperature as found by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study. In addition to the high nitrogen content, the Si atoms at the interface exist in the form of random bonding to oxygen and nitrogen atoms for samples oxidized at 850 and 950 deg. C. This structure reduces the interface bonding constraint and results in the low interface trap density. For heavily oxidized samples the trace amount of interface nitrogen atoms exist in the form of a highly constraint SiN 4 phase and the interface oxynitride layer is a random mixture of SiO 4 and SiN 4 phases, which consequently reduces the reliability against high energy electron stressing

  17. Metallic oxide nano-clusters synthesis by ion implantation in high purity Fe10Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ce

    2015-01-01

    ODS (Oxide Dispersed Strengthened) steels, which are reinforced with metal dispersions of nano-oxides (based on Y, Ti and O elements), are promising materials for future nuclear reactors. The detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved in the precipitation of these nano-oxides would improve manufacturing and mechanical properties of these ODS steels, with a strong economic impact for their industrialization. To experimentally study these mechanisms, an analytical approach by ion implantation is used, to control various parameters of synthesis of these precipitates as the temperature and concentration. This study demonstrated the feasibility of this method and concerned the behaviour of alloys models (based on aluminium oxide) under thermal annealing. High purity Fe-10Cr alloys were implanted with Al and O ions at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the nano-oxides appear in the Fe-10Cr matrix upon ion implantation at room temperature without subsequent annealing. The mobility of implanted elements is caused by the defects created during ion implantation, allowing the nucleation of these nanoparticles, of a few nm in diameter. These nanoparticles are composed of aluminium and oxygen, and also chromium. The high-resolution experiments show that their crystallographic structure is that of a non-equilibrium compound of aluminium oxide (cubic γ-Al 2 O 3 type). The heat treatment performed after implantation induces the growth of the nano-sized oxides, and a phase change that tends to balance to the equilibrium structure (hexagonal α-Al 2 O 3 type). These results on model alloys are fully applicable to industrial materials: indeed ion implantation reproduces the conditions of milling and heat treatments are at equivalent temperatures to those of thermo-mechanical treatments. A mechanism involving the precipitation of nano-oxide dispersed in ODS alloys is proposed in this manuscript based on the obtained experimental results

  18. Effect of MeV energy He and N pre-implantation on the formation of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuaba, A. E-mail: manu@rmki.kfki.hu; Paszti, F.; Ortega, C.; Grosman, A.; Horvath, Z.E.; Szilagyi, E.; Khanh, N.Q.; Vickridge, I

    2001-06-01

    The effects of MeV energy He and N pre-implantation of Si substrate on the structure of porous silicon formed by anodic etching were studied by measuring the depth profiles of {sup 15}N decorating the pores walls. Radiation damage was recovered by annealing after the implantation. It was found that the He implant accelerates the etching process, probably due to the bubbles or the remaining lattice damage. At a dose of 8x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} the He containing layer was formed with a significantly enhanced porosity due to the contribution of the large-sized bubbles. At the highest dose of 32.5x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} flaking took place during the anodic etching. In contrast to He, N stopped the anodic etching at a depth of critical N concentration of {approx}0.9 at.%. For the lowest implantation dose, where the peak concentration was below this limit, the pores propagate through the implanted layer with an enhanced speed.

  19. Effect of MeV energy He and N pre-implantation on the formation of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuaba, A.; Paszti, F.; Ortega, C.; Grosman, A.; Horvath, Z.E.; Szilagyi, E.; Khanh, N.Q.; Vickridge, I.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of MeV energy He and N pre-implantation of Si substrate on the structure of porous silicon formed by anodic etching were studied by measuring the depth profiles of 15 N decorating the pores walls. Radiation damage was recovered by annealing after the implantation. It was found that the He implant accelerates the etching process, probably due to the bubbles or the remaining lattice damage. At a dose of 8x10 16 ions/cm 2 the He containing layer was formed with a significantly enhanced porosity due to the contribution of the large-sized bubbles. At the highest dose of 32.5x10 16 ions/cm 2 flaking took place during the anodic etching. In contrast to He, N stopped the anodic etching at a depth of critical N concentration of ∼0.9 at.%. For the lowest implantation dose, where the peak concentration was below this limit, the pores propagate through the implanted layer with an enhanced speed

  20. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr, E-mail: gryshkov@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Klyui, Nickolai I., E-mail: klyuini@ukr.net [College of Physics, Jilin University, 130012 Changchun (China); V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Temchenko, Volodymyr P., E-mail: tvp@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kyselov, Vitalii S., E-mail: kyselov@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Chatterjee, Anamika, E-mail: chatterjee@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Belyaev, Alexander E., E-mail: belyaev@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Lauterboeck, Lothar, E-mail: lauterboeck@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Iarmolenko, Dmytro, E-mail: iarmolenko.dmytro@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Glasmacher, Birgit, E-mail: glasmacher@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO{sub 2}) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO{sub 2} using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO{sub 2} to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO{sub 2} coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO{sub 2} coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of porous biomorphic SiC ceramics derived from wood • Successful deposition of bioactive calcium phosphate coatings using gas detonation deposition • Porosity and pore size of Si

  1. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I.; Temchenko, Volodymyr P.; Kyselov, Vitalii S.; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E.; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO 2 ) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO 2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO 2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO 2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO 2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of porous biomorphic SiC ceramics derived from wood • Successful deposition of bioactive calcium phosphate coatings using gas detonation deposition • Porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on wood

  2. Interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium: radiation enhanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium is of significant interest in the application of first wall coatings and other components of fusion reactors. Electropolished polycrystalline beryllium was first implanted with an Xe backscatter marker at 1.98 MeV followed by either implantation with 5 keV diatomic deuterium or helium. A 2.0 MeV He beam was used to analyze for impurity buildup; namely oxygen. The oxide layer thickness was found to increase linearly with increasing implant fluence. A 2.5 MeV H/sup +/ beam was used to depth profile the D and He by ion backscattering. In addition the retention of the implant was measured as a function of the implant fluence. The mean depth of the implant was found to agree with theoretical range calculations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe blister formation. No blisters were observed for implanted D but for implanted He blisters occurred at approx. 1.75 x 10/sup 17/ He cm/sup -2/. The blister diameter increased with increasing implant fluence from about 0.8 ..mu..m at 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/ to 5.5 ..mu..m at 3 x 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/.

  3. Interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium: radiation enhanced oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium is of significant interest in the application of first wall coatings and other components of fusion reactors. Electropolished polycrystalline beryllium was first implanted with an Xe backscatter marker at 1.98 MeV followed by either implantation with 5 keV diatomic deuterium or helium. A 2.0 MeV He beam was used to analyze for impurity buildup; namely oxygen. The oxide layer thickness was found to increase linearly with increasing implant fluence. A 2.5 MeV H + beam was used to depth profile the D and He by ion backscattering. In addition the retention of the implant was measured as a function of the implant fluence. The mean depth of the implant was found to agree with theoretical range calculations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe blister formation. No blisters were observed for implanted D but for implanted He blisters occurred at approx. 1.75 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The blister diameter increased with increasing implant fluence from about 0.8 μm at 10 18 He cm -2 to 5.5 μm at 3 x 10 18 He cm -2

  4. High aspect ratio silicon nanomoulds for UV embossing fabricated by directional thermal oxidation using an oxidation mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L Q; Chan-Park, Mary B; Yan, Y H; Zhang Qing; Li, C M; Zhang Jun

    2007-01-01

    Nanomoulding is simple and economical but moulds with nanoscale features are usually prohibitively expensive to fabricate because nanolithographic techniques are mostly serial and time-consuming for large-area patterning. This paper describes a novel, simple and inexpensive parallel technique for fabricating nanoscale pattern moulds by silicon etching followed by thermal oxidation. The mask pattern can be made by direct photolithography or photolithography followed by metal overetching for submicron- and nanoscale features, respectively. To successfully make nanoscale channels having a post-oxidation cross-sectional shape similar to that of the original channel, an oxidation mask to promote unidirectional (specifically horizontal) oxide growth is found to be essential. A silicon nitride or metal mask layer prevents vertical oxidation of the Si directly beneath it. Without this mask, rectangular channels become smaller but are V-shaped after oxidation. By controlling the silicon etch depth and oxidation time, moulds with high aspect ratio channels having widths ranging from 500 to 50 nm and smaller can be obtained. The nanomould, when passivated with a Teflon-like layer, can be used for first-generation replication using ultraviolet (UV) nanoembossing and second-generation replication in other materials, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The PDMS stamp, which was subsequently coated with Au, was used for transfer printing of Au electrodes with a 600 nm gap which will find applications in plastics nanoelectronics

  5. Designing high performance precursors for atomic layer deposition of silicon oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallikarjunan, Anupama, E-mail: mallika@airproducts.com; Chandra, Haripin; Xiao, Manchao; Lei, Xinjian; Pearlstein, Ronald M.; Bowen, Heather R.; O' Neill, Mark L. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 1969 Palomar Oaks Way, Carlsbad, California 92011 (United States); Derecskei-Kovacs, Agnes [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 7201 Hamilton Blvd., Allentown, Pennsylvania 18195 (United States); Han, Bing [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 2 Dongsanhuan North Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100027 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Conformal and continuous silicon oxide films produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are enabling novel processing schemes and integrated device structures. The increasing drive toward lower temperature processing requires new precursors with even higher reactivity. The aminosilane family of precursors has advantages due to their reactive nature and relative ease of use. In this paper, the authors present the experimental results that reveal the uniqueness of the monoaminosilane structure [(R{sub 2}N)SiH{sub 3}] in providing ultralow temperature silicon oxide depositions. Disubstituted aminosilanes with primary amines such as in bis(t-butylamino)silane and with secondary amines such as in bis(diethylamino)silane were compared with a representative monoaminosilane: di-sec-butylaminosilane (DSBAS). DSBAS showed the highest growth per cycle in both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD. These findings show the importance of the arrangement of the precursor's organic groups in an ALD silicon oxide process.

  6. Complex radiological diagnosis of a breast cancer at women after augmentation mammоplasty of silicone gel implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Shumakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of leading problems of mammology is early diagnostics of a breast cancer. The work purpose studying of opportunities of a complex of radiological research techniques in diagnostics of a breast cancer at women after augmentation mammoplasty silicone gel implants. By results of сomplex kliniko-radiological examination of 630 women aged from 18 till 72 years (middle age made 35 ± 0.43 years with 1260 implants the breast cancer was revealed at 7 (1.1 % patients. The invasive pro-current cancer with local widespread type of body height of tumoral knot is histologically diagnosed. Sensitivity and specificity of methods of radiodiagnosis in identification of a cancer of mammary glands at women after endoprosthesis replacement made mammography – 28.6 % and 66.1 %, ultrasonography – 71.4 % and 85.7 %, magnetic resonance imaging – 85.7 % and 98.2 %, respectively. Thus, complex application of radiology research techniques raises level of diagnostics of breast cancer at patients after augmentation mammoplasty silicone gel implants that allows to choose an adequate method of treatment.

  7. Spiral patterns of gold nanoclusters in silicon (100) produced by metal vapour vacuum arc implantation of gold ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachalam, Dinesh Kumar; Sood, Dinesh Kumar; Bhargava, Suresh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Self-assembled gold nanoclusters are attractive building blocks for future nanoscale sensors and optical devices due to their exciting catalytic properties. In this work, we report direct bottom-up synthesis of spiral patterns of gold nanoclusters in silicon (100) substrates by Au ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. This unique phenomenon is observed only above a critical threshold implantation dose and annealing temperature. Systematic study by electron microscopy, analytical x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy shows the temperature- and time-dependent nucleation, growth of Au nanoclusters and evolution of the spiral patterns. The observed patterns of gold nanoclusters bear a resemblance to the spiral growth prevalent in some directionally solidified eutectic alloys. Based on this systematic study of the growth and morphology of nanoclusters, a tentative model has been proposed for the formation mechanism of this unusual self-assembled pattern in an amorphous Si/Au system. This model shows that melting of the implanted layer is essential and without which no spiral patterns are observed. A better understanding of this self-assembly process will open up new ways to fabricate ordered arrays of gold nanoclusters in silicon substrates for seeding selective growth of one-dimensional nanostructures

  8. Electronic structure of indium-tungsten-oxide alloys and their energy band alignment at the heterojunction to crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Dorothee; Mews, Mathias; Rech, Bernd; Korte, Lars

    2018-01-01

    The electronic structure of thermally co-evaporated indium-tungsten-oxide films is investigated. The stoichiometry is varied from pure tungsten oxide to pure indium oxide, and the band alignment at the indium-tungsten-oxide/crystalline silicon heterointerface is monitored. Using in-system photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and surface photovoltage measurements, we show that the work function of indium-tungsten-oxide continuously decreases from 6.3 eV for tungsten oxide to 4.3 eV for indium oxide, with a concomitant decrease in the band bending at the hetero interface to crystalline silicon than indium oxide.

  9. RBS and ERDA determinations of depth distributions of high-dose carbon ions implanted in silicon for silicon-carbide synthesis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intarasiri, S.; Kamwanna, T.; Hallen, A.; Yu, L.D.; Janson, M.S.; Thongleum, C.; Possnert, G.; Singkarat, S.

    2006-01-01

    For ion beam synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC), a knowledge of the depth distribution of implanted carbon ions in silicon is crucial for successful development. Based on its simplicity and availability, we selected Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) as an analysis technique for this purpose. A self-developed computer program dedicated to extract depth profiles of lighter impurities in heavier matrix is established. For control, calculated results are compared with an other ion beam analysis (IBA) technique superior for studying lighter impurity in heavier substrate i.e. elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The RBS was performed with a 1.7-MV Tandetron accelerator using He 2+ as the probe ions. The ERDA was performed with a 5-MV Pelletron accelerator using I 8+ as the probe ions. This work shows that the RBS-extracted data had no significant deviations from those of ERDA and simulations by SRIM2003 and SIIMPL computer codes. We also found that annealing at temperatures as high as 1000 deg. C had quite limited effect on the redistribution of carbon in silicon

  10. The influence of implanted yttrium on the cyclic oxidation behaviour of 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffard, F. [Laboratoire Vellave sur l' Elaboration et l' Etude des Materiaux (LVEEM), CNRS-EA 3864, Universite Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd II, 8 rue J.B. Fabre, B. P. 219, 43006 Le Puy-en-Velay (France)]. E-mail: riffard@iut.u-clermont1.fr; Buscail, H. [Laboratoire Vellave sur l' Elaboration et l' Etude des Materiaux (LVEEM), CNRS-EA 3864, Universite Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd II, 8 rue J.B. Fabre, B. P. 219, 43006 Le Puy-en-Velay (France); Caudron, E. [Laboratoire Vellave sur l' Elaboration et l' Etude des Materiaux (LVEEM), CNRS-EA 3864, Universite Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd II, 8 rue J.B. Fabre, B. P. 219, 43006 Le Puy-en-Velay (France); Cueff, R. [Laboratoire Vellave sur l' Elaboration et l' Etude des Materiaux (LVEEM), CNRS-EA 3864, Universite Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd II, 8 rue J.B. Fabre, B. P. 219, 43006 Le Puy-en-Velay (France); Issartel, C. [Laboratoire Vellave sur l' Elaboration et l' Etude des Materiaux (LVEEM), CNRS-EA 3864, Universite Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd II, 8 rue J.B. Fabre, B. P. 219, 43006 Le Puy-en-Velay (France); Perrier, S. [Laboratoire Vellave sur l' Elaboration et l' Etude des Materiaux (LVEEM), CNRS-EA 3864, Universite Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd II, 8 rue J.B. Fabre, B. P. 219, 43006 Le Puy-en-Velay (France)

    2006-03-15

    High-temperature alloys are frequently used in power plants, gasification systems, petrochemical industry, combustion processes and in aerospace applications. Depending on the application, materials are subjected to corrosive atmospheres and thermal cycling. In the present work, thermal cycling was carried out in order to study the influence of implanted yttrium on the oxide scale adherence on 304 steel specimens oxidised in air at 1273 K. In situ X-ray diffraction indicates that the oxides formed at 1273 K are different on blank specimens compared to implanted specimens. Glancing angle XRD allows to analyse the oxide scale composition after cooling to room temperature. Experimental results show that yttrium implantation at a nominal dose of 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2} does not improve significantly the cyclic oxidation behaviour of the austenitic AISI 304 steel. However, it appears that yttrium implantation remarkably enhance the oxidation resistance during isothermal oxidation. It reduces the transient oxidation stage and the parabolic oxidation rate constant by one order of magnitude.

  11. Tissue response to intraperitoneal implants of polyethylene oxide-modified polyethylene terephthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, N P; Hubbell, J A

    1992-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate films surface modified with polyethylene oxide of mol wt 18,500 g/mol (18.5 k) by a previously described technique, were implanted in the peritoneal cavity of mice, along with their respective untreated controls, for periods of 1-28 d. The implants were retrieved and examined for tissue reactivity and cellular adherence. The control polyethylene terephthalate surfaces showed an initial inflammatory reaction followed by an extensive fibrotic response with a mean thickness of 60 microns at 28 d. By contrast, polyethylene oxide-modified polyethylene terephthalate showed only a mild inflammatory response and no fibrotic encapsulation throughout the implantation period: at 28 d a cellular monolayer was observed. Apparently either the polyethylene oxide-modified surface was stimulating less inflammation, which was in turn stimulating less fibroblastic overgrowth, or the cellular adhesion to the polyethylene oxide-modified surface was too weak to support cellular multilayers.

  12. The effect of oxidation on physical properties of porous silicon layers for optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirasteh, Parasteh [Laboratoire d' Optronique, CNRS-UMR FOTON 6082, Universite de Rennes 1, ENSSAT Tecnhopole Anticipa, 6 rue de Kerampont, BP 447, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France); Charrier, Joel [Laboratoire d' Optronique, CNRS-UMR FOTON 6082, Universite de Rennes 1, ENSSAT Tecnhopole Anticipa, 6 rue de Kerampont, BP 447, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France)]. E-mail: joel.charrier@univ-rennes1.fr; Soltani, Ali [Institut d' Electronique, de Microemectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR 8520, Cite Scientifique Avenue Poincare, BP 69, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Haesaert, Severine [Laboratoire d' Optronique, CNRS-UMR FOTON 6082, Universite de Rennes 1, ENSSAT Tecnhopole Anticipa, 6 rue de Kerampont, BP 447, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France); Haji, Lazhar [Laboratoire d' Optronique, CNRS-UMR FOTON 6082, Universite de Rennes 1, ENSSAT Tecnhopole Anticipa, 6 rue de Kerampont, BP 447, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France); Godon, Christine [Laboratoire de Physique Crystalline, Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Errien, Nicolas [Laboratoire de Physique Crystalline, Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2006-12-15

    In order to understand the optical loss mechanisms in porous silicon based waveguides, structural and optical studies have been performed. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic observations of porous silicon layers are obtained before and after an oxidation process at high temperature in wet O{sub 2}. Pore size and shape of heavily p-type doped Si wafers are estimated and correlated to the optical properties of the material before and after oxidation. The refractive index was measured and compared to that determined by the Bruggeman model.

  13. Lithium-storage Properties of Gallic Acid-Reduced Graphene Oxide and Silicon-Graphene Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Binghui; Zhang, Jintao; Gu, Yi; Zhang, Zhi; Al Abdulla, Wael; Kumar, Nanjundan Ashok; Zhao, X.S.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was de-oxygenated using gallic acid under mild conditions to prepare reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The resultant RGO showed a lithium-ion storage capacity of 1280 mA h g −1 at a current density of 200 mA g −1 after 350 cycles when used as an anode for lithium ion batteries. The RGO was further used to stabilize silicon (Si) nanoparticles to prepare silicon-graphene composite electrode materials. Experimental results showed that a composite electrode prepared with a mass ratio of Si:GO = 1:2 exhibited the best lithium ion storage performance.

  14. Surface texture of single-crystal silicon oxidized under a thin V{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S. E., E-mail: nikitin@mail.ioffe.ru; Verbitskiy, V. N.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Trapeznikova, I. N.; Bobyl, A. V.; Terukova, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The process of surface texturing of single-crystal silicon oxidized under a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer is studied. Intense silicon oxidation at the Si–V{sub 2}O{sub 5} interface begins at a temperature of 903 K which is 200 K below than upon silicon thermal oxidation in an oxygen atmosphere. A silicon dioxide layer 30–50 nm thick with SiO{sub 2} inclusions in silicon depth up to 400 nm is formed at the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Si interface. The diffusion coefficient of atomic oxygen through the silicon-dioxide layer at 903 K is determined (D ≥ 2 × 10{sup –15} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}). A model of low-temperature silicon oxidation, based on atomic oxygen diffusion from V{sub 2}O{sub 5} through the SiO{sub 2} layer to silicon, and SiO{sub x} precipitate formation in silicon is proposed. After removing the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and silicon-dioxide layers, texture is formed on the silicon surface, which intensely scatters light in the wavelength range of 300–550 nm and is important in the texturing of the front and rear surfaces of solar cells.

  15. Influence of post-annealing on the electrical properties of metal/oxide/silicon nitride/oxide/silicon capacitors for flash memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Dong; An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Kyoung Chan; Seo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2008-01-01

    We report the effect of post-annealing on the electrical properties of metal/oxide/silicon nitride/oxide/silicon (MONOS) capacitors. Four samples, namely as-deposited and annealed at 750, 850 and 950 °C for 30 s in nitrogen ambient by a rapid thermal process, were prepared and characterized for comparison. The best performance with the largest memory window of 4.4 V and the fastest program speed of 10 ms was observed for the sample annealed at 850 °C. In addition, the highest traps density of 6.84 × 10 18 cm −3 was observed with ideal trap distributions for the same sample by capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurement. These results indicate that the memory traps in the ONO structure can be engineered by post-annealing to improve the electrical properties of the MONOS device

  16. Deep brain stimulation: custom-made silicone-coated pulse-generator implantation after allergic reaction to generator compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthofer, Judith; Herbst, Andreas; Janzen, Annettte; Lange, Max; Brawanski, Alexander; Schlaier, Juergen

    2018-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease has become an established treatment option in recent years. The method and its application in clinical practice has proved to be safe and effective. Nevertheless, procedure-related and hardware-related complications occur. We present a rare case of a patient with an allergic reaction to the impulse generator. The patient suffered from delayed wound-healing deficits with several wound revisions and generator repositionings. After diagnosis of an allergic reaction to components of the generator, a custom-made silicon-coated model was implanted. Hereafter, no wound healing-deficit occurred throughout long-term follow-up. Allergic reaction to hardware components may lead to wound-healing deficits. In such cases, custom-made silicon-coated models may be an effective treatment option.

  17. Arrays of suspended silicon nanowires defined by ion beam implantation: mechanical coupling and combination with CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, J.; Rius, G.; Chuquitarqui, A.; Borrisé, X.; Koops, R.; van Veghel, M.; Perez-Murano, F.

    2018-04-01

    We present the fabrication, operation, and CMOS integration of arrays of suspended silicon nanowires (SiNWs). The functional structures are obtained by a top-down fabrication approach consisting in a resistless process based on focused ion beam irradiation, causing local gallium implantation and silicon amorphization, plus selective silicon etching by tetramethylammonium hydroxide, and a thermal annealing process in a boron rich atmosphere. The last step enables the electrical functionality of the irradiated material. Doubly clamped silicon beams are fabricated by this method. The electrical readout of their mechanical response can be addressed by a frequency down-mixing detection technique thanks to an enhanced piezoresistive transduction mechanism. Three specific aspects are discussed: (i) the engineering of mechanically coupled SiNWs, by making use of the nanometer scale overhang that it is inherently-generated with this fabrication process, (ii) the statistical distribution of patterned lateral dimensions when fabricating large arrays of identical devices, and (iii) the compatibility of the patterning methodology with CMOS circuits. Our results suggest that the application of this method to the integration of large arrays of suspended SiNWs with CMOS circuitry is interesting in view of applications such as advanced radio frequency band pass filters and ultra-high-sensitivity mass sensors.

  18. Diffuse x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy study of defects in antimony-implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Y.; Marshall, A. F.; Mehta, A.; Arthur, J.; Griffin, P. B.; Plummer, J. D.; Patel, J. R.

    2004-04-01

    Ion implantation followed by laser annealing has been used to create supersaturated and electrically active concentrations of antimony in silicon. Upon subsequent thermal annealing, however, these metastable dopants deactivate towards the equilibrium solubility limit. In this work, the formation of inactive antimony structures has been studied with grazing incidence diffuse x-ray scattering, and transmission electron microscopy, and the results are correlated to previous high-resolution x-ray diffraction data. We find that at a concentration of 6.0×1020 cm-3, small, incoherent clusters of radius 3-4 Å form during annealing at 900 °C. At a higher concentration of 2.2×1021 cm-3, deactivation at 600 °C occurs through the formation of small, antimony aggregates and antimony precipitates. The size of these precipitates from diffuse x-ray scattering is roughly 15 Å in radius for anneal times from 15 to 180 seconds. This value is consistent with the features observed in high-resolution and mass contrast transmission electron microscopy images. The coherent nature of the aggregates and precipitates causes the expansion of the surrounding silicon matrix as the deactivation progresses. In addition, the sensitivity of the diffuse x-ray scattering technique has allowed us to detect the presence of small clusters of radius ˜2 Å in unprocessed Czochralski silicon wafers. These defects are not observed in floating zone silicon wafers, and are tentatively attributed to thermal donors.

  19. Combination of chemical suppression techniques for dual suppression of fat and silicone at diffusion-weighted MR imaging in women with breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dow-Mu; Hughes, J. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sutton (United Kingdom); Blackledge, M.; Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CR UK-EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton (United Kingdom); Burns, S. [Nuada 3T MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Stemmer, A.; Kiefer, B. [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Silicone breast prostheses prove technically challenging when performing diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the breasts. We describe a combined fat and chemical suppression scheme to achieve dual suppression of fat and silicone, thereby improving the quality of diffusion-weighted images in women with breast implants. MR imaging was performed at 3.0 and 1.5 T in women with silicone breast implants using short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) fat-suppressed echo-planar (EPI) diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) on its own and combined with the slice-select gradient-reversal (SSGR) technique. Imaging was performed using dedicated breast imaging coils. Complete suppression of the fat and silicone signal was possible at 3.0 T using EPI DWI with STIR and SSGR, evaluated with dedicated breast coils. However, a residual silicone signal was still perceptible at 1.5 T using this combined approach. Nevertheless, a further reduction in silicone signal at 1.5 T could be achieved by employing thinner slice partitions and the addition of the chemical-selective fat-suppression (CHESS) technique. DWI using combined STIR and SSGR chemical suppression techniques is feasible to eliminate or reduce silicone signal from prosthetic breast implants. (orig.)

  20. Study of ionic movements during anodic oxidation of nitrogen-implanted aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwagne, G.; Lucas, S.; Bodart, F.; Sorensen, G.; Jensen, H.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years there has been a considerable interest in synthesizing aluminium nitrides by ion implantation in order to modify the tribological properties of aluminium. The growth of an oxide layer by anodic process on these synthesized aluminium nitrides gives an interesting oxide-on-semiconductor material with surprising dynamic and decorative properties. During the anodic oxidation, ionic movements are involved in the near-surface region of the aluminium material; these ionic movements have been studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) on thin aluminium foils (7000 A) preimplanted with nitrogen and post-oxidized in an ammonium pentaborate solution. The growth of the oxide layer is reduced when the aluminium is preimplanted with nitrogen: the speed of oxidation depends on the implantation conditions (energy and fluence). Moreover, the aluminium nitride can be dissolved when all metallic aluminium staying between the surface and the AlN are consumed by the anodic process. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of junctions produced by medium-energy ion implantation in silicon; Caracterisation de jonctions obtenues par implantation d'ions de moyenne energie dans le silicium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monfret, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    Characteristics of diodes made by implanting 20 keV boron and phosphorus ions into silicon are reviewed. Special features of theses diodes are presented, and correlation with technology is studied. This paper includes three parts: - in the first part, the theory of range distribution is considered for both amorphous and single-crystal targets, - In the second part, a brief description of the experimental conditions is given. - In the third part, the experimental results are presented. The results lead to a schematic model of the component. They also show the influence of cleaning and annealing treatments from which optimized process of fabrication can be determined. In this study, the influence of a two stage annealing process is shown. For phosphorus and boron implants, the first stage is performed at 150 deg. C while the second stage is 450 deg. C for phosphorus and 550 deg. C for boron implants. The implanted diodes are found to exhibit good electrical characteristics. Comparisons with standard diffused diodes are quite favourable. (author) [French] On examine les caracteristiques de diodes obtenues par implantation d'ions bore et phosphore de 20 keV dans le silicium. On met en evidence le comportement particulier de ces diodes et on presente certaines correlations avec la technologie. L'expose comprend trois parties: - la premiere partie est consacree au calcul du profil de dopage en mode canalise ou non. - Dans la deuxieme partie, on decrit l'appareillage et les conditions experimentales d'implantation. - Dans la troisieme partie, on presente les resultats experimentaux. On propose un modele schematique pour expliquer le comportement des tenues en tension des diodes. L'etude des courants de fuite en fonction de la preparation des echantillons et des traitements thermiques permet de determiner des conditions optimales d'elaboration. Au cours de cette etude on met en evidence l'influence de deux stades de recuit: le premier a 150 deg. C pour les implantations de

  2. Transparent conducting oxide layers for thin film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, J.K.; Liu, Y.; de Jong, M.M.; de Wild, J.; Schuttauf, J.A.; Brinza, M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    Texture etching of ZnO:1%Al layers using diluted HCl solution provides excellent TCOs with crater type surface features for the front contact of superstrate type of thin film silicon solar cells. The texture etched ZnO:Al definitely gives superior performance than Asahi SnO2:F TCO in case of

  3. Self-supporting film method of silicon single crystal by ion implantation and it`s application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kazuo; Nakao, Setsuo; Niwa, Hiroaki; Miyagawa, Soji [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    A few {mu}m of thickness of self-supporting film of silicon single crystal was produced by the ion implantation and the selective etching. This materials are distinguished by a uniform film thickness, good controllability, crystallization and the mechanical strength. For applying it to device, the detailed process has to be established, because there are some improved problems such as pinhole and morphology on the surface. This materials are very useful to the basic experiment of the base for epitaxial growth under irradiation of ion beams and the ion beam analysis in the atmosphere. (S.Y.)

  4. Silicon heterojunction solar cell passivation in combination with nanocrystalline silicon oxide emitters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatz, H.A.; Rath, J.K.; Verheijen, M.A.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells (SHJ) are well known for their high efficiencies, enabled by their remarkably high open-circuit voltages (VOC). A key factor in achieving these values is a good passivation of the crystalline wafer interface. One of the restrictions during SHJ solar cell production

  5. Gas Permeation, Mechanical Behavior and Cytocompatibility of Ultrathin Pure and Doped Diamond-Like Carbon and Silicon Oxide Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen M. Lackner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Protective ultra-thin barrier films gather increasing economic interest for controlling permeation and diffusion from the biological surrounding in implanted sensor and electronic devices in future medicine. Thus, the aim of this work was a benchmarking of the mechanical oxygen permeation barrier, cytocompatibility, and microbiological properties of inorganic ~25 nm thin films, deposited by vacuum deposition techniques on 50 µm thin polyetheretherketone (PEEK foils. Plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (direct deposition from an ion source was applied to deposit pure and nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon films, while physical vapor deposition (magnetron sputtering in pulsed DC mode was used for the formation of silicon as well as titanium doped diamond-like carbon films. Silicon oxide films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The results indicate a strong influence of nanoporosity on the oxygen transmission rate for all coating types, while the low content of microporosity (particulates, etc. is shown to be of lesser importance. Due to the low thickness of the foil substrates, being easily bent, the toughness as a measure of tendency to film fracture together with the elasticity index of the thin films influence the oxygen barrier. All investigated coatings are non-pyrogenic, cause no cytotoxic effects and do not influence bacterial growth.

  6. Surface topography of silicon nitride affects antimicrobial and osseointegrative properties of tibial implants in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masahiro; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L; McEntire, Bryan J; Bal, B Sonny; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2017-12-01

    While silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) is an antimicrobial and osseointegrative orthopaedic biomaterial, the contribution of surface topography to these properties is unknown. Using a methicillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), this study evaluated Si 3 N 4 implants in vitro utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with colony forming unit (CFU) assays, and later in an established in vivo murine tibia model of implant-associated osteomyelitis. In vitro, the "as-fired" Si 3 N 4 implants displayed significant reductions in adherent bacteria versus machined Si 3 N 4 (2.6 × 10 4 vs. 8.7 × 10 4 CFU, respectively; p SEM imaging demonstrated that MRSA cannot directly adhere to native as-fired Si 3 N 4 . Subsequently, a cross-sectional study was completed in which sterile or MRSA contaminated as-fired and machined Si 3 N 4 implants were inserted into the tibiae of 8-week old female Balb/c mice, and harvested on day 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 14 post-operatively for SEM. The findings demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of the as-fired implants resulted from macrophage clearance of the bacteria during biofilm formation on day 1, followed by osseointegration through the apparent recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells on days 3-5, which differentiated into osteoblasts on days 7-14. In contrast, the antimicrobial behavior of the machined Si 3 N 4 was due to repulsion of the bacteria, a phenomenon that also limited osteogenesis, as host cells were also unable to adhere to the machined surface. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo biological behavior of Si 3 N 4 orthopaedic implants is driven by critical features of their surface nanotopography. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 3413-3421, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Gas sensing of ruthenium implanted tungsten oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfamichael, T., E-mail: t.tesfamichael@qut.edu.au [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Ahsan, M. [William A. Cook Australia, 95 Brandl Street Eight Mile Plains, Brisbane, QLD 4113 (Australia); Notarianni, M. [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Groß, A.; Hagen, G.; Moos, R. [University of Bayreuth, Faculty of Engineering Science, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstr. 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Ionescu, M. [ANSTO, Institute for Environmental Research, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Bell, J. [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2014-05-02

    Different amounts of Ru were implanted into thermally evaporated WO{sub 3} thin films by ion implantation. The films were subsequently annealed at 600 °C for 2 h in air to remove defects generated during the ion implantation. The Ru concentrations of four samples have been quantified by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry as 0.8, 5.5, 9 and 11.5 at.%. The un-implanted WO{sub 3} films were highly porous but the porosity decreased significantly after ion implantation as observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The thickness of the films also decreased with increasing Ru-ion dose, which is mainly due to densification of the porous films during ion implantation. From Raman Spectroscopy two peaks at 408 and 451 cm{sup −1} (in addition to the typical vibrational peaks of the monoclinic WO{sub 3} phase) associated with Ru were observed. Their intensity increased with increasing Ru concentration. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy showed a metallic state of Ru with binding energy of Ru 3d{sub 5/2} at 280.1 eV. This peak position remained almost unchanged with increasing Ru concentration. The resistances of the Ru-implanted films were found to increase in the presence of NO{sub 2} and NO with higher sensor response to NO{sub 2}. The effect of Ru concentration on the sensing performance of the films was not explicitly observed due to reduced film thickness and porosity with increasing Ru concentration. However, the results indicate that the implantation of Ru into WO{sub 3} films with sufficient film porosity and film thickness can be beneficial for NO{sub 2} sensing at temperatures in the range of 250 °C to 350 °C. - Highlights: • Densification of WO{sub 3} thin films has occurred after Ru ion implantation. • Thickness and porosity of the films decrease with increasing Ru ion dose. • The amount of oxygen vacancies and defects increases with increasing Ru ion dose. • Ru has shown a crucial role in enhancing sensor response

  8. Damage, trapping and desorption at the implantation of helium and deuterium in graphite, diamond and silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.A.R.

    1995-07-01

    The production, thermal stability and structure of ion induced defects have been studied by Rutherford backscattering in channeling geometry for the implantation of helium and deuterium in graphite, diamond and silicon carbide with energies of 8 and 20 keV. At the implantation of deuterium and helium ions more defects were measured in graphite than in diamond or silicon carbide at equal experimental conditions. This is due to increased backscattering in graphite, which is caused by the splitting and tilting of crystallites and a local reordering of lattice atoms around defects. At 300 K, Helium produces more defects in all three materials than deuterium with equal depth distribution of defects. The ratio of the defects produced by helium and deuterium agrees very well with the corresponding ratio of the energy deposited in nuclear collisions. In graphite, only small concentrations of deuterium induced defects anneal below 800 K, while in diamond small concentrations of deuterium as well as of helium induced defects anneal mostly below 800 K. This annealing behavior is considered to be due to recombination of point defects. The buildup of helium and deuterium in graphite is different. The trapping of deuterium proceeds until saturation is reached, while in the case of helium trapping is interrupted by flaking. In diamond, deuterium as well as helium are trapped almost completely until at higher fluences reemission starts and saturation is reached. Two desorption mechanisms were identified for the thermal desorption of helium from base-oriented graphite. Helium implanted at low fluences desorbs diffusing to the surface, while for the implantation of high fluences the release of helium due to blistering dominates. The desorption of deuterium from graphite and diamond shows differences. While in graphite the desorption starts already at 800 K, in diamond up to 1140 K only little desorption can be observed. These differences can be explained by the different transport

  9. Effects of incident energy and angle on carbon cluster ions implantation on silicon substrate: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ye; Sang, Shengbo; Zhou, Bing; Deng, Xiao; Chai, Jing; Ji, Jianlong; Ge, Yang; Huo, Yuanliang; Zhang, Wendong

    2017-09-01

    Carbon cluster ion implantation is an important technique in fabricating functional devices at micro/nanoscale. In this work, a numerical model is constructed for implantation and implemented with a cutting-edge molecular dynamics method. A series of simulations with varying incident energies and incident angles is performed for incidence on silicon substrate and correlated effects are compared in detail. Meanwhile, the behavior of the cluster during implantation is also examined under elevated temperatures. By mapping the nanoscopic morphology with variable parameters, numerical formalism is proposed to explain the different impacts on phrase transition and surface pattern formation. Particularly, implantation efficiency (IE) is computed and further used to evaluate the performance of the overall process. The calculated results could be properly adopted as the theoretical basis for designing nano-structures and adjusting devices’ properties. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51622507, 61471255, 61474079, 61403273, 51502193, 51205273), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi (Nos. 201601D021057, 201603D421035), the Youth Foundation Project of Shanxi Province (Nos. 2015021097), the Doctoral Fund of MOE of China (No. 20131402110013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2015AA042601), and the Specialized Project in Public Welfare from The Ministry of Water Resources of China (Nos. 1261530110110).

  10. Room temperature NO2-sensing properties of porous silicon/tungsten oxide nanorods composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yulong; Hu, Ming; Wang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Weiyi; Qin, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Porous silicon/WO 3 nanorods composite is synthesized via hydrothermal method. • The morphology of WO 3 nanorods depends on the amount of oxalic acid (pH value). • The sensor can detect ppb level NO 2 at room temperature. - Abstract: One-dimensional single crystalline WO 3 nanorods have been successfully synthesized onto the porous silicon substrates by a seed-induced hydrothermal method. The controlled morphology of porous silicon/tungsten oxide nanorods composite was obtained by using oxalic acid as an organic inducer. The reaction was carried out at 180 °C for 2 h. The influence of oxalic acid (pH value) on the morphology of porous silicon/tungsten oxide nanorods composite was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The NO 2 -sensing properties of the sensor based on porous silicon/tungsten oxide nanorods composite were investigated at different temperatures ranging from room temperature (∼25 °C) to 300 °C. At room temperature, the sensor behaved as a typical p-type semiconductor and exhibited high gas response, good repeatability and excellent selectivity characteristics toward NO 2 gas due to its high specific surface area, special structure, and large amounts of oxygen vacancies

  11. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence in silicon oxide films rich in silicon; Fluorescencia y termoluminiscencia en peliculas de oxido de silicio rico en silicio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman M, D.; Piters, T. M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 5-088, Hermosillo 83190, Sonora (Mexico); Aceves M, M.; Berriel V, L. R. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51, Puebla 72000, Puebla (Mexico); Luna L, J. A. [CIDS, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Postal 1651, Puebla 72000, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    In this work we determined the fluorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) creation spectra of silicon rich oxide films (SRO) with three different silicon excesses. To study the TL of SRO, 550 nm of SRO film were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition technique on N-type silicon substrates with resistivity in the order of 3 to 5 {omega}-cm with silicon excess controlled by the ratio of the gases used in the process, SRO films with Ro= 10, 20 and 30 (12-6% silicon excess) were obtained. Then, they were thermally treated in N{sub 2} at high temperatures to diffuse and homogenize the silicon excess. In the fluorescence spectra two main emission regions are observed, one around 400 nm and one around 800 nm. TL creation spectra were determined by plotting the integrated TL intensity as function of the excitation wavelength. (Author)

  12. Comparison of the Explantation Rate of Poly Implant Prothèse, Allergan, and Pérouse Silicone Breast Implants within the First Four Years after Reconstructive Surgery before the Poly Implant Prothèse Alert by the French Regulatory Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Leduey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In March 2010, ANSM (Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Medicament, the French Medical Regulatory Authority, withdrew Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP breast implants from the market due to the use of non-medical-grade silicone gel. The aim of this study was to compare the removal rate (and reasons thereof of breast implants produced by different manufacturers before the ANSM alert. Materials and Methods. From October 2006 to January 2010, 652 women received 944 implants after breast cancer surgery at the Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Center, Paris (France. The complications and removal rates of the different implant brands used (PIP, Allergan, and Pérouse were evaluated and compared. Results. PIP implants represented 50.6% of the used implants, Allergan 33.4%, and Pérouse 16%. The main reasons for implant removal were patient dissatisfaction due to aesthetic problems (43.2%, infection (22.2%, and capsular contracture (13.6%. Two years after implantation, 82% of Pérouse implants, 79% of PIP, and 79% of Allergan were still in situ. There was no difference in removal rate among implant brands. Conclusion. Before the ANSM alert concerning the higher rupture rate of PIP breast implants, our implant removal rate did not predict PIP implant failure related to the use of nonapproved silicone gel.

  13. Comparison of the Explantation Rate of Poly Implant Prothèse, Allergan, and Pérouse Silicone Breast Implants within the First Four Years after Reconstructive Surgery before the Poly Implant Prothèse Alert by the French Regulatory Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduey, Alexandre; Mazouni, Chafika; Leymarie, Nicolas; Alkhashnam, Heba; Sarfati, Benjamin; Garbay, Jean-Rémi; Gaudin, Amélie; Kolb, Frédéric; Rimareix, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Background. In March 2010, ANSM (Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Medicament), the French Medical Regulatory Authority, withdrew Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants from the market due to the use of non-medical-grade silicone gel. The aim of this study was to compare the removal rate (and reasons thereof) of breast implants produced by different manufacturers before the ANSM alert. Materials and Methods. From October 2006 to January 2010, 652 women received 944 implants after breast cancer surgery at the Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Center, Paris (France). The complications and removal rates of the different implant brands used (PIP, Allergan, and Pérouse) were evaluated and compared. Results. PIP implants represented 50.6% of the used implants, Allergan 33.4%, and Pérouse 16%. The main reasons for implant removal were patient dissatisfaction due to aesthetic problems (43.2%), infection (22.2%), and capsular contracture (13.6%). Two years after implantation, 82% of Pérouse implants, 79% of PIP, and 79% of Allergan were still in situ. There was no difference in removal rate among implant brands. Conclusion. Before the ANSM alert concerning the higher rupture rate of PIP breast implants, our implant removal rate did not predict PIP implant failure related to the use of nonapproved silicone gel.

  14. Possible sources of neuroprotection following subretinal silicon chip implantation in RCS rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Machelle T.; Phillips, Michael J.; Yin, Hang; Fernandes, Alcides; Cheng, Yian; Chow, Alan Y.; Ball, Sherry L.

    2005-03-01

    Current retinal prosthetics are designed to stimulate existing neural circuits in diseased retinas to create a visual signal. However, implantation of retinal prosthetics may create a neurotrophic environment that also leads to improvements in visual function. Possible sources of increased neuroprotective effects on the retina may arise from electrical activity generated by the prosthetic, mechanical injury due to surgical implantation, and/or presence of a chronic foreign body. This study evaluates these three neuroprotective sources by implanting Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model of retinitis pigmentosa, with a subretinal implant at an early stage of photoreceptor degeneration. Treatment groups included rats implanted with active and inactive devices, as well as sham-operated. These groups were compared to unoperated controls. Evaluation of retinal function throughout an 18 week post-implantation period demonstrated transient functional improvements in eyes implanted with an inactive device at 6, 12 and 14 weeks post-implantation. However, the number of photoreceptors located directly over or around the implant or sham incision was significantly increased in eyes implanted with an active or inactive device or sham-operated. These results indicate that in the RCS rat localized neuroprotection of photoreceptors from mechanical injury or a chronic foreign body may provide similar results to subretinal electrical stimulation at the current output evaluated here.

  15. Heterojunction Solar Cells Based on Silicon and Composite Films of Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, LePing; Tune, Daniel; Shearer, Cameron; Shapter, Joseph

    2015-09-07

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets have been used as the surfactant to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) in water to prepare GO/CNT electrodes that are applied to silicon to form a heterojunction that can be used in solar cells. GO/CNT films with different ratios of the two components and with various thicknesses have been used as semitransparent electrodes, and the influence of both factors on the performance of the solar cell has been studied. The degradation rate of the GO/CNT-silicon devices under ambient conditions has also been explored. The influence of the film thickness on the device performance is related to the interplay of two competing factors, namely, sheet resistance and transmittance. CNTs help to improve the conductivity of the GO/CNT film, and GO is able to protect the silicon from oxidation in the atmosphere. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Nanopatterning of Crystalline Silicon Using Anodized Aluminum Oxide Templates for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tsu-An

    A novel thin film anodized aluminum oxide templating process was developed and applied to make nanopatterns on crystalline silicon to enhance the optical properties of silicon. The thin film anodized aluminum oxide was created to improve the conventional thick aluminum templating method with the aim for potential large scale fabrication. A unique two-step anodizing method was introduced to create high quality nanopatterns and it was demonstrated that this process is superior over the original one-step approach. Optical characterization of the nanopatterned silicon showed up to 10% reduction in reflection in the short wavelength range. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to analyze the nanopatterned surface structure and it was found that interpore spacing and pore density can be tuned by changing the anodizing potential.

  17. Nano-size metallic oxide particle synthesis in Fe-Cr alloys by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, C.; Gentils, A.; Ribis, J.; Borodin, V. A.; Delauche, L.; Arnal, B.

    2017-10-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels reinforced with metal oxide nanoparticles are advanced structural materials for nuclear and thermonuclear reactors. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the precipitation of nano-oxides can help in improving mechanical properties of ODS steels, with a strong impact for their commercialization. A perfect tool to study these mechanisms is ion implantation, where various precipitate synthesis parameters are under control. In the framework of this approach, high-purity Fe-10Cr alloy samples were consecutively implanted with Al and O ions at room temperature and demonstrated a number of unexpected features. For example, oxide particles of a few nm in diameter could be identified in the samples already after ion implantation at room temperature. This is very unusual for ion beam synthesis, which commonly requires post-implantation high-temperature annealing to launch precipitation. The observed particles were composed of aluminium and oxygen, but additionally contained one of the matrix elements (chromium). The crystal structure of aluminium oxide compound corresponds to non-equilibrium cubic γ-Al2O3 phase rather than to more common corundum. The obtained experimental results together with the existing literature data give insight into the physical mechanisms involved in the precipitation of nano-oxides in ODS alloys.

  18. Ellipsometry measurements of thickness of oxide and water layers on spherical and flat silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, M.J.; Netterfield, R.; Wielunski, L.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Ellipsometry has been used to measure the thickness of oxide layers on single crystal silicon surfaces, both flat and spherical and also to measure the extent of adsorption of moisture on the surface as a function of partial water vapour pressure. The measurements form part of an international collaborative project to make a precise determination of the Avogadro constant (ΔN A /N A -8 ) which will then be used to obtain an absolute definition of the kilogram, rather than one in terms of an artefact. Typically the native oxide layer on a cleaned silicon wafer is about 2 nm thick. On a polished sphere this oxide layer is typically 8 to 10 nm thick, the increased thickness being attributed to parameters related to the polishing process. Ellipsometry measurements on an 89 mm diameter polished silicon sphere at both VUW and CSIRO indicated a SiO 2 layer at 7 to 10 nm thick. It was observed that this thickness varied regularly. The crystal orientation of the sphere was determined using electron patterns generated from an electron microscope and the oxide layer was then measured through 180 arcs of great circles along (110) and (100) planes. It was observed that the thickness varied systematically with orientation. The minimum thickness was 7.4 nm at the axis (softest direction in silicon) and the greatest thickness was 9.5 nm at the axis (hardest direction in silicon). This is similar to an orientation dependent cubic pattern which has been observed to be superimposed on polished silicon spheres. At VUW, the sphere was placed in an evacuated bell jar and the ellipsometry signal was observed as the water vapour pressure was progressively increased up to saturation. The amount of water vapour adsorbed at saturation was one or two monolayers, indicating that the sphere does not wet

  19. Improved reaction sintered silicon nitride. [protective coatings to improve oxidation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processing treatments were applied to as-nitrided reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) with the purposes of improving strength after processing to above 350 MN/m2 and improving strength after oxidation exposure. The experimental approaches are divided into three broad classifications: sintering of surface-applied powders; impregnation of solution followed by further thermal processing; and infiltration of molten silicon and subsequent carburization or nitridation of the silicon. The impregnation of RSSN with solutions of aluminum nitrate and zirconyl chloride, followed by heating at 1400-1500 C in a nitrogen atmosphere containing silicon monoxide, improved RSSN strength and oxidation resistance. The room temperature bend strength of RSSN was increased nearly fifty percent above the untreated strength with mean absolute strengths up to 420 MN/m2. Strengths of treated samples that were measured after a 12 hour oxidation exposure in air were up to 90 percent of the original as-nitrided strength, as compared to retained strengths in the range of 35 to 60 percent for untreated RSSN after the same oxidation exposure.

  20. Recent progress in the development and understanding of silicon surface passivation by aluminum oxide for photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, G.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the unique silicon surface passivation properties of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films including its underlying mechanisms. Containing a high fixed negative charge density located close to the Si interface, Al2O3 provides a

  1. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Electron-Selective Titanium Oxide Contacts in Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Haider; Yang, Xinbo; Weber, Klaus; Schoenfeld, Winston V.; Davis, Kristopher O.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the cross-section of electron-selective titanium oxide (TiO2) contacts for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the excellent cell efficiency of 21

  2. Mechanical anomaly impact on metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors on flexible silicon fabric

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Kutbee, Arwa T.; Ghodsi Nasseri, Seyed Faizelldin; Bersuker, G.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    We report the impact of mechanical anomaly on high-κ/metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors built on flexible silicon (100) fabric. The mechanical tests include studying the effect of bending radius up to 5 mm minimum bending radius with respect

  3. Electrical and crystallographic evaluation of SOS implanted with silicon and/or oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Inada, T.

    1985-01-01

    RBS and Hall measurements have revealed that the formation of an amorphous laer in SOS near in the Si/sapphire interface by oxygen implantation at 130 K followed by regrowth by thermal annealing above 800 0 C for 20 min in N 2 is effective in improving crystalline quality and Hall mobility as well as in increasing activation of implanted P. The temperature dependence of the mobility was measured. The mobility increased by 80% and 40% at 77 K and RT, respectively, after improvement in crystalline quality. The costly low temperature implantation of O can be replaced with dual implantation of Si and O; formation of an amorphous layer by Si implantation and Al gettering by oxygen implantation. (orig.)

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of channeled and random profiles of heavy ions implanted in silicon at high energy (1.2 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzone, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to study channeling effects and implants of heavy ions with energy of few MeV in silicon, ion distributions are calculated with a Monte Carlo method for axial [(001) axis], planar, and nominally random directions for As + and P + ions implanted into silicon with energies in the range 100 keV to 2 MeV. The calculation indicates an appreciable channeling at the higher energy only for the (001) axis and the (110) planes. For heavy ions with energy in the MeV range the subsidence of channeling into major channels and the disappearance of minor channels are shown

  5. Biofunctionalization of silicone rubber with microgroove-patterned surface and carbon-ion implantation to enhance biocompatibility and reduce capsule formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZY

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ze-yuan Lei, Ting Liu, Wei-juan Li, Xiao-hua Shi, Dong-li Fan Department of Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery, XinQiao Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, ChongQing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Silicone rubber implants have been widely used to repair soft tissue defects and deformities. However, poor biocompatibility can elicit capsule formation, usually resulting in prosthesis contracture and displacement in long-term usage. To overcome this problem, this study investigated the properties of silicone rubber materials with or without a microgroove-patterned surface and with or without carbon (C-ion implantation. Materials and methods: Atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and a water contact angle test were used to characterize surface morphology and physicochemical properties. Cytocompatibility was investigated by a cell adhesion experiment, immunofluorescence staining, a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, and scanning electron microscopy in vitro. Histocompatibility was evaluated by studying the inflammatory response and fiber capsule formation that developed after subcutaneous implantation in rats for 7 days, 15 days, and 30 days in vivo. Results: Parallel microgrooves were found on the surfaces of patterned silicone rubber (P-SR and patterned C-ion-implanted silicone rubber (PC-SR. Irregular larger peaks and deeper valleys were present on the surface of silicone rubber implanted with C ions (C-SR. The silicone rubber surfaces with microgroove patterns had stable physical and chemical properties and exhibited moderate hydrophobicity. PC-SR exhibited moderately increased dermal fibroblast cell adhesion and growth, and its surface microstructure promoted orderly cell growth. Histocompatibility experiments on animals showed that both the anti-inflammatory and antifibrosis properties of PC-SR were slightly better than those of the other materials, and there was also a lower capsular contracture rate and less

  6. Polydopamine deposition with anodic oxidation for better connective tissue attachment to transmucosal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, F; Chen, H; Xu, Y; Liu, Y; Ou, G

    2018-04-01

    Nowadays, most designs for the transmucosal surface of implants are machined-smooth. However, connective tissue adhered to the smooth surface of an implant has poor mechanical resistance, which can render separation of tissue from the implant interface and induce epithelial downgrowth. Modification of the transmucosal surface of implants, which can help form a good seal of connective tissue, is therefore desired. We hypothesized that anodic oxidation (AO) and polydopamine (PD) deposition could be used to enhance the attachment between an implant and peri-implant connective tissue. We tested this hypothesis in the mandibles of Beagle dogs. AO and PD were used to modify the transmucosal region of transmucosal implants (implant neck). The surface microstructure, surface roughness and elemental composition were investigated in vitro. L929 mouse fibroblasts were cultured to test the effect of PD on cell adhesion. Six Beagle dogs were used for the in vivo experiment (n = 6 dogs per group). Three months after building the edentulous animal model, four groups of implants (control, AO, PD and AO + PD) were inserted. After 4 months of healing, samples were harvested for histometric analyses. The surfaces of anodized implant necks were overlaid with densely distributed pores, 2-7 μm in size. On the PD-modified surfaces, N1s, the chemical bond of nitrogen in PD, was detected using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. L929 developed pseudopods more quickly on the PD-modified surfaces than on the surfaces of the control group. The in vivo experiment showed a longer connective tissue seal and a more coronally located peri-implant soft-tissue attachment in the AO + PD group than in the control group (P connective tissue. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Amorphous-polycrystal transition induced by laser pulse in self-ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foti, G.; Rimini, E.; Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.

    1977-01-01

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction has been used to investigate the amorphous to polycrystalline structure transition in silicon induced by laser pulse. The power density of the ruby laser pulse, in the free generation mode, has been maintained below the threshold to induce surface damage. Depth analysis has been carried out in silicon crystal using the channeling effect technique. (orig.) [de

  8. Electrical Activation Studies of Silicon Implanted Aluminum Gallium Nitride with High Aluminum Mole Fraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    ...) alloys, and represents a comprehensive analysis of the resulting material's electrical and optical properties as a function of Al mole fraction, anneal temperature, anneal time, and implantation dose...

  9. The influence of ion implantation on the surface properties of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, W.A.; Carter, G.

    1975-10-01

    The report falls into three sections: (1) annealing behaviour of high dose rare gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) implantations into silicon; (2) measurement of projected and lateral range parameters for low energy heavy ions (Ar, Cu, Kr, Cd, Xe, Cs, Dy, W, Au, Pb, Bi) in silicon by Rutherford backscattering; (3) surface chemistry of ion implanted solids (e.g. corrosion, catalysis, oxidation, synthesis of compounds in ion implanted layers). (U.K.)

  10. Fabrication of disposable topographic silicon oxide from sawtoothed patterns: control of arrays of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heesook; Yoo, Hana; Park, Soojin

    2010-05-18

    Disposable topographic silicon oxide patterns were fabricated from polymeric replicas of sawtoothed glass surfaces, spin-coating of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) thin films, and thermal annealing at certain temperature and followed by oxygen plasma treatment of the thin PDMS layer. A simple imprinting process was used to fabricate the replicated PDMS and PS patterns from sawtoothed glass surfaces. Next, thin layers of PDMS films having different thicknesses were spin-coated onto the sawtoothed PS surfaces and annealed at 60 degrees C to be drawn the PDMS into the valley of the sawtoothed PS surfaces, followed by oxygen plasma treatment to fabricate topographic silicon oxide patterns. By control of the thickness of PDMS layers, silicon oxide patterns having various line widths were fabricated. The silicon oxide topographic patterns were used to direct the self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) block copolymer thin films via solvent annealing process. A highly ordered PS-b-P2VP micellar structure was used to let gold precursor complex with P2VP chains, and followed by oxygen plasma treatment. When the PS-b-P2VP thin films containing gold salts were exposed to oxygen plasma environments, gold salts were reduced to pure gold nanoparticles without changing high degree of lateral order, while polymers were completely degraded. As the width of trough and crest in topographic patterns increases, the number of gold arrays and size of gold nanoparticles are tuned. In the final step, the silicon oxide topographic patterns were selectively removed by wet etching process without changing the arrays of gold nanoparticles.

  11. Magnetic oxide heterostructures. EuO on cubic oxides and on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspers, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In the thesis at hand, we explore fundamental properties of ultrathin europium oxide (EuO) films. EuO is a model system of a localized 4f Heisenberg ferromagnet, in which the ferromagnetic coupling. provided a high crystalline quality. can be tuned by biaxial lattice strain. Moreover, the magnetic oxide EuO is perfectly suited as a spin-functional tunnel contact for silicon spintronics. However, up to now a challenging bulk and interface chemistry of EuO and Si has hampered a seamless integration into functional silicon heterostructures. In order to investigate fundamental aspects of the magnetic and electronic structure of ultrathin EuO, in the first part of this thesis, we synthesize EuO thin films on conductive YSZ substrates from bulklike thicknesses down to one nanometer by oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The EuO thin films are of textbook-like single-crystalline quality, and show bulk-like magnetic properties. We control the stoichiometry of buried EuO thin films by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES); even a 1 nm ultrathin EuO film exhibits no valence change or interface shifts. Furthermore, we conduct an advanced magnetic characterization by the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of Eu core-levels in photoemission, this gives us insight into the intra-atomic exchange coupling of EuO thin films. The MCD reveals large asymmetries of up to 49% in the well-resolved Eu 4d photoemission multiplet. Thus, ultrathin EuO coherently grown on conductive YSZ allows us to explore fundamental magnetic and electronic properties of a 4f magnetic oxide. Biaxial lateral strain applied to single-crystalline EuO is of fundamental interest, since it alters the electronic structure and magnetic coupling in a controlled way. We apply +4.2% tensile biaxial strain to EuO by epitaxial EuO/LaAlO 3 (100) heterostructures. EuO seamlessly adapts the lateral lattice parameter of LaAlO 3 , while the perpendicular parameter of EuO is the unchanged EuO bulk value, thus the

  12. The air oxidation behavior of lanthanum ion implanted zirconium at 500 deg. C

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, D Q; Chen, X W; Zhou, Q G

    2003-01-01

    The beneficial effect of lanthanum ion implantation on the oxidation behavior of zirconium at 500 deg. C has been studied. Zirconium specimens were implanted by lanthanum ions using a MEVVA source at energy of 40 keV with a fluence range from 1x10 sup 1 sup 6 to 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 ions/cm sup 2 at maximum temperature of 130 deg. C, The weight gain curves were measured after being oxidized in air at 500 deg. C for 100 min, which showed that a significant improvement was achieved in the oxidation behavior of zirconium ion implanted with lanthanum compared with that of the as-received zirconium. The valence of the oxides in the scale was analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy; and then the depth distributions of the elements in the surface of the samples were obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction at 0.3 deg. incident angles was employed to examine the modification of its phase transformation because of the lanthanum ion implantation in the oxide films. It was obviously fou...

  13. High performance high-κ/metal gate complementary metal oxide semiconductor circuit element on flexible silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-02-29

    Thinned silicon based complementary metal oxide semiconductor(CMOS)electronics can be physically flexible. To overcome challenges of limited thinning and damaging of devices originated from back grinding process, we show sequential reactive ion etching of silicon with the assistance from soft polymeric materials to efficiently achieve thinned (40 μm) and flexible (1.5 cm bending radius) silicon based functional CMOSinverters with high-κ/metal gate transistors. Notable advances through this study shows large area of silicon thinning with pre-fabricated high performance elements with ultra-large-scale-integration density (using 90 nm node technology) and then dicing of such large and thinned (seemingly fragile) pieces into smaller pieces using excimer laser. The impact of various mechanical bending and bending cycles show undeterred high performance of flexible siliconCMOSinverters. Future work will include transfer of diced silicon chips to destination site, interconnects, and packaging to obtain fully flexible electronic systems in CMOS compatible way.

  14. Long-term safety and effectiveness of style 410 highly cohesive silicone breast implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedén, Per; Bronz, Giorgio; Elberg, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    years after implantation. Capsular contracture was the most common complication noted at the physical examination, occurring for 5.3% of implants, and there were no cases of grade 4 capsular contracture. The postimplantation rates for lactation and reproductive problems and breast disease were lower...

  15. Coating of tips for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy by means of silicon, magnesium, and tungsten oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Marco

    2010-09-01

    Different combinations of metal tips and oxide coatings have been tested for possible operation in electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy. Silicon and magnesium oxides have been thermally evaporated onto gold and platinum-iridium tips, respectively. Two different thickness values have been explored for both materials, namely, 40 and 120 nm for silicon oxide and 20 and 60 nm for magnesium oxide. Alternatively, tungsten oxide has been grown on tungsten tips via electrochemical anodization. In the latter case, to seek optimal results we have varied the pH of the anodizing electrolyte between one and four. The oxide coated tips have been first inspected by means of scanning electron microscopy equipped with microanalysis to determine the morphological results of the coating. Second, the coated tips have been electrically characterized ex situ for stability in time by means of cyclic voltammetry in 1 M aqueous KCl supporting electrolyte, both bare and supplemented with K3[Fe(CN)6] complex at 10 mM concentration in milliQ water as an analyte. Only the tungsten oxide coated tungsten tips have shown stable electrical behavior in the electrolyte. For these tips, the uncoated metal area has been estimated from the electrical current levels, and they have been successfully tested by imaging a gold grating in situ, which provided stable results for several hours. The successful tungsten oxide coating obtained at pH=4 has been assigned to the WO3 form.

  16. Formation of silicon Oxide nano thickness on Si (III) with the assistance of Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahari, A.; Bagheri, M.

    2006-01-01

    : The possibility of controlling the growth of a uniform ultra thin oxide on silicon via oxygen dosing at low temperatures, would be a great interest for the projected further development of nano electronics. One way to achieve this is to be able to control the conversion of chemically adsorbed oxygen and retained at room temperature into oxide during subsequent heating. Oxygen is chemisorbed at room temperature on Si(111) surface to saturation ( >100 L O 2 ), and the experimental chamber is then evacuated. This leaves adsorbed oxygen as atomically inserted on Si surface which sits on the back bonds. This surface is then used as a base for further processing which in one case consists of annealing to 600- 700 d eg C and subsequent exposures equivalent to the first step. This is repeated again. As the focus of this work, a series of experiments are done with adsorbed Cs, which assists in retaining oxygen and in transforming the adsorbed oxygen into oxide upon heating. It was found that the oxide formed on the surface at low coverage clusters. Without any external influence, the clusters may be made to coalesce upon further oxygen adsorption at room temperature, and annealing terminates as a continuous monolayer of amorphous oxide on top of a well-ordered silicon substrate. This configuration is inert to further uptake of oxygen. A higher oxide thickness could be obtained with Cs. Also in this case, the oxide growth saturates in an inert oxide Iayer

  17. The role of extra-atomic relaxation in determining Si2p binding energy shifts at silicon/silicon oxide interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K.Z.; Greeley, J.N.; Banaszak Holl, M.M.; McFeely, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed binding energy shift for silicon oxide films grown on crystalline silicon varies as a function of film thickness. The physical basis of this shift has previously been ascribed to a variety of initial state effects (Si endash O ring size, strain, stoichiometry, and crystallinity), final state effects (a variety of screening mechanisms), and extrinsic effects (charging). By constructing a structurally homogeneous silicon oxide film on silicon, initial state effects have been minimized and the magnitude of final state stabilization as a function of film thickness has been directly measured. In addition, questions regarding the charging of thin silicon oxide films on silicon have been addressed. From these studies, it is concluded that initial state effects play a negligible role in the thickness-dependent binding energy shift. For the first ∼30 Angstrom of oxide film, the thickness-dependent binding energy shift can be attributed to final state effects in the form of image charge induced stabilization. Beyond about 30 Angstrom, charging of the film occurs. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Study of low energy hydrogen ion implantation effects in silicon: electric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barhdadi, A.

    1985-07-01

    Several analysis methods have been developed: hydrogen distribution analysis by nuclear reaction, crystal disorder evaluation by R.B.S., chemical impurities identification by SIMS, optical measurements, electrical characterization of surface barriers, deep level spectroscopy DLTS, ... All these analyses have been made after implantation then after thermal annealing. A model explaining the effect of implantation then after thermal annealing. A model explaining the effect of implanted hydrogen is proposed, the implantation creates an important quantity of defects in a thin layer near the surface; a chemical attack removes them. In Schottky devices, this layer has a basic role on carrier transport phenomena. Other results are given, some of them allow to give an account of the passivation by hydrogen implantation [fr

  19. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  20. Characterization of lattice damage in ion implanted silicon: a Monte Carlo simulation combined with double crystal X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cembali, F.; Mazzone, A.M.; Servidori, M.; Gabilli, E.; Lotti, R.

    1985-01-01

    Double crystal X-ray diffractometry is applied to the characterization of damage in silicon samples, irradiated with 60 keV self-ions for doses ranging from 5 x 10 12 cm -2 to the threshold for amorphisation. The samples were also electron beam annealed in such a condition as to give rise to a temperature of 800 0 C. The in-depth strain and atomic disorder distributions, due to the implantation defects, were determined for the specimens before and after high temperature annealing. This was possible by application of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction from imperfect crystals and by taking into account the diffuse (thermal, Compton) scattering accompanying Bragg diffraction intensity measurements. Transmission electron microscopy observations, in conventional (planar) and cross-section mode, were also performed. The results of these analyses were compared with a complex simulation method, designed to account for the physical origin of the disorder. The method consists of a Monte Carlo simulation of the damage growth during implantation and of the defect annealing and clustering in a warm lattice. The evolution of disorder is examined either in the phase of spontaneous annealing subsequent to the implantation or during the externally induced annealing. Theory and experiments led to a close characterization of damage in terms of cluster size, type and concentration, both before and after annealing. (author)