WorldWideScience

Sample records for implanted silicon oxide

  1. Thin buried oxide in oxygen-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaggiari, C.; Bertoni, S.; Cerofolini, G.F.; Fumagalli, P.; Meda, L. (Istituto Guido Donegani, Novara (Italy))

    1993-01-01

    SiO[sub 2] precipitation in oxygen-supersaturated silicon was studied. Oxygen was inserted by ion implantation into single-crystal silicon. Evidence is given for a special phenomenon of oxygen blocking due to hot clouds resulting from collisional cascades. In the region where blocking is active, precipitates are formed in as-implanted conditions. A model is formulated and specialized to predict the dependence on depth of precipitate density and size. The existence of a buried region of precipitates is useful for producing a thin buried oxide. The Low-Dose SIMOX (LODOX) structure obtained provides a solution for many problems that are typical of silicon substrates for complementary metal-oxide silicon (CMOS) applications. (Author).

  2. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  3. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christian; Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2015-11-01

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiOx/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF2), the ion implantation dose (5 × 1014 cm-2 to 1 × 1016 cm-2), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iVoc) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF2 implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iVoc of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iVoc of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved Voc of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF2 implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with Voc of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  4. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... differ in material and consistency, however. Saline breast implants Saline implants are filled with sterile salt water. ... of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with silicone gel — ...

  5. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichel, Christian, E-mail: christian.reichel@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiO{sub x}/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF{sub 2}), the ion implantation dose (5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} to 1 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iV{sub oc}) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF{sub 2} implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iV{sub oc} of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iV{sub oc} of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved V{sub oc} of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF{sub 2} implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with V{sub oc} of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  6. Total dose radiation response of modified commercial silicon-on-insulator materials with nitrogen implanted buried oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhong-Shan; Liu Zhong-Li; Yu Fang; Li Ning

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen ions of various doses are implanted into the buried oxide (BOX) of commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI)materials,and subsequent annealings are carried out at various temperatures.The total dose radiation responses of the nitrogen-implanted SOI wafers are characterized by the high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) technique after irradiation using a Co-60 source.It is found that there exist relatively complex relationships between the radiation hardness of the nitrogen implanted BOX and the nitrogen implantation dose at different irradiation doses.Fhe experimental results also suggest that a lower dose nitrogen implantation and a higher post-implantation annealing temperature are suitable for improving the radiation hardness of SOI wafer.Based on the measured C-V data,secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS),and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy,the total dose responses of the nitrogen-implanted SOI wafers are discussed.

  7. Silicon technologies ion implantation and thermal treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrant, Annie

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to remind new engineers in silicon foundry, the fundamental physical and chemical rules in major Front end treatments: oxidation, epitaxy, ion implantation and impurities diffusion.

  8. Germanium nanoparticles formed in silicon dioxide layer by multi-energy implantation and oxidation state of Ge atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, H.; Arai, N.; Gotoh, N.; Minotani, T.; Kojima, K.; Adachi, K.; Kotaki, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J.

    2007-04-01

    Ge nanoparticles (NPs) embedded silicon oxide is expected to be promising light emission source, especially, UV - blue light region. We have tried to form Ge NPs in a 100- nm-thick SiO2 layer on Si substrate by multi-energy implantation of Ge negative ions with energies of 50, 20 and 10 keV and doses of 1.4 × 1016, 3.2 × 1015 and 2.2 × 1015 ions/cm2, respectively. Samples were annealed for 1 h at a temperature less than 900oC. By this implantation, Formations of Ge nanoparticles in a surface 50-nm depth region were expected. The depth distribution of implanted Ge atoms in the oxide was measured by XPS (Ge 2p, O 1s, Si 2p) with monochromatic Al K.. and Ar etching at 4 keV. The depth profiles were well agreed with the cross-sectional TEM image. But some extent of Ge atoms diffused to the SiO2/Si interface at 900 oC. The chemical sifted spectra of Ge 2p3/2 showed about 60 % of the oxidation of Ge atom around the end of the range (EOR) even in the as-implanted sample. This oxidation was considered to be due to the excess oxygen atoms near EOR by forward of sputtered oxygen atoms from SiO2 layer. Raman spectra supported this oxidation. In a preliminary investigation of cathode luminescence, the Ge-implanted sample with annealing at 600oC showed CL peak at 3.12 eV (397 nm in wavelength) in UV-blue region at room temperature. This means the Ge-implanted sample has a possibility for light emission in the UV-blue region.

  9. Germanium nanoparticles formed in silicon dioxide layer by multi-energy implantation and oxidation state of Ge atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, H [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Arai, N [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Gotoh, N [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Minotani, T [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kojima, K [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Adachi, K [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Sharp Corporation, Ichikonomoto, Tenri 632-8567 (Japan); Kotaki, H [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Sharp Corporation, Ichikonomoto, Tenri 632-8567 (Japan); Ishibashi, T [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Gotoh, Y [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Ishikawa, J [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Ge nanoparticles (NPs) embedded silicon oxide is expected to be promising light emission source, especially, UV - blue light region. We have tried to form Ge NPs in a 100- nm-thick SiO2 layer on Si substrate by multi-energy implantation of Ge negative ions with energies of 50, 20 and 10 keV and doses of 1.4 x 1016, 3.2 x 1015 and 2.2 x 1015 ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Samples were annealed for 1 h at a temperature less than 900oC. By this implantation, Formations of Ge nanoparticles in a surface 50-nm depth region were expected. The depth distribution of implanted Ge atoms in the oxide was measured by XPS (Ge 2p, O 1s, Si 2p) with monochromatic Al K.. and Ar etching at 4 keV. The depth profiles were well agreed with the cross-sectional TEM image. But some extent of Ge atoms diffused to the SiO2/Si interface at 900 oC. The chemical sifted spectra of Ge 2p3/2 showed about 60 % of the oxidation of Ge atom around the end of the range (EOR) even in the as-implanted sample. This oxidation was considered to be due to the excess oxygen atoms near EOR by forward of sputtered oxygen atoms from SiO2 layer. Raman spectra supported this oxidation. In a preliminary investigation of cathode luminescence, the Ge-implanted sample with annealing at 600oC showed CL peak at 3.12 eV (397 nm in wavelength) in UV-blue region at room temperature. This means the Ge-implanted sample has a possibility for light emission in the UV-blue region.

  10. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse M; Conrad, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Implant rupture is a well-known complication of breast implant surgery that can pass unnoticed by both patient and physician. To date, no prospective study has addressed the possible health implications of silicone breast implant rupture. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether...... untreated ruptures are associated with changes over time in magnetic resonance imaging findings, serologic markers, or self-reported breast symptoms. A baseline magnetic resonance imaging examination was performed in 1999 on 271 women who were randomly chosen from a larger cohort of women having cosmetic...... breast implants for a median period of 12 years (range, 3 to 25 years). A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging examination was carried out in 2001, excluding women who underwent explantation in the period between the two magnetic resonance imaging examinations (n = 44). On the basis of these examinations...

  11. Photoluminescence enhancement through silicon implantation on SRO-LPCVD films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Sanchez, A., E-mail: amorales@inaoep.mx [INAOE, Electronics Department, Apartado 51, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Leyva, K.M.; Aceves, M. [INAOE, Electronics Department, Apartado 51, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Barreto, J.; Dominguez, C. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Luna-Lopez, J.A.; Carrillo, J. [CIDS-BUAP, Apdo. 1651, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Pedraza, J. [INAOE, Electronics Department, Apartado 51, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2010-10-25

    Photoluminescence (PL) properties of thin and thick silicon-rich oxide (SRO) and silicon implanted SRO (SI-SRO) films with different silicon excess fabricated by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) were studied. The effects of the annealing temperature and silicon implantation on the PL were also studied. Maximum luminescence intensity was observed with an annealing temperature of 1150 and 1100 deg. C for thin and thick SRO films, respectively. The PL intensity is strongly enhanced when SRO films are implanted with silicon, especially for thin SRO films. Thin SI-SRO films emit up to six times more than non-implanted films, meanwhile the PL in thick SI-SRO films is only improved less than two times. Therefore, thin SI-SRO films are an interesting alternative for applications such as the fabrication of efficient Si-nps based LEDs.

  12. Fracture dynamics in implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massy, D.; Tardif, S.; Penot, J. D.; Ragani, J.; Rieutord, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Mazen, F.; Madeira, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Landru, D.; Kononchuk, O. [SOITEC, Parc Technologique des Fontaines, 38190 Bernin (France)

    2015-08-31

    Crack propagation in implanted silicon for thin layer transfer is experimentally studied. The crack propagation velocity as a function of split temperature is measured using a designed optical setup. Interferometric measurement of the gap opening is performed dynamically and shows an oscillatory crack “wake” with a typical wavelength in the centimetre range. The dynamics of this motion is modelled using beam elasticity and thermodynamics. The modelling demonstrates the key role of external atmospheric pressure during crack propagation. A quantification of the amount of gas trapped inside pre-existing microcracks and released during the fracture is made possible, with results consistent with previous studies.

  13. Interstitial-type defects in implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhnov, N.I.; Stel' makh, V.F.; Chelyadinskij, A.R.

    1984-07-01

    Boron-, lithium-, phosphorus- and silicon-implanted silicon layers were investigated using X-ray diffraction method for measuring the crystal lattice parameters. It was established that stable interstitial complexes in concentrations comparable with concentrations of vacancy type defects occur in silicon as a result of ion implantation. The interstitial complexes are annealed at the following stages: 1 - 140, 2 - 500 deg C in the case of silicon irradiation by light ions and 1 - 180, 2 - 560 deg C in crystals irradiated by medium mass ions.

  14. Silicone breast implants and connective tissue disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipworth, Loren; Holmich, Lisbet R; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2011-01-01

    The association of silicone breast implants with connective tissue diseases (CTDs), including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia, as well as a hypothesized new "atypical" disease, which does not meet established diagnostic criteria for any known...

  15. Avaliação da biocompatibilidade de implantes mamários de silicone esterilizados por calor seco e pelo óxido de etileno Biocompatibility assessment of silicone gel breast implants sterilized by dry-heat and by ethylene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Campos de Azevedo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Os implantes mamários de silicone têm sido empregados, tanto nas cirurgias de aumento de mama, quanto na reconstrução do tecido mamário. A segurança biológica deste tipo de implante deve ser garantida, pois, em função da esterilização estes materiais, podem sofrer alterações oriundas dos processos esterilizantes por comprometimento da estrutura química dos polímeros. O objetivo deste trabalho consistiu na avaliação da biocompatibilidade de implantes mamários preenchidos com gel de silicone, de superfície lisa e texturizada submetidos à esterilização por calor seco e óxido de etileno. Empregou-se, para tanto, método in vitro, avaliando a citotoxicidade pelo método de captura do vermelho neutro, utilizando a linhagem celular NCTC clone 929. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram não haver comprometimento da biocompatibilidade dos biomateriais submetidos aos dois processos (calor seco e óxido de etileno, assim como comprovaram a eficácia de ambos na esterilização dos implantes.Silicone breast implants have been widely used for mammary augmentation and reconstruction surgery. Biological safety of these implants can be altered by sterilization methods. This study consisted of the biocompatibility assessment of smooth and textured silicone gel breast implants sterilized by dry-heat and ethylene oxide through cell viability, employing neutral red uptake method. The NCTC clone 929 cell were employed and the results showed no cytotoxicity of implants after both sterilization processes.

  16. Silicone breast implants and immune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shons, A R; Schubert, W

    1992-05-01

    Silicone was originally regarded as inert in the human body. Silicone medical devices have been associated with various complications that may involve an immune reaction to silicone or a silicone organic complex. There have been more than 80 cases reported in the medical literature of a varied systemic autoimmune illness in patients who have had various foreign materials placed in the breast. Controversy exists as to which complications have a cause and effect relationship, and which represent coincidental findings. It is difficult to distinguish between nonspecific local reactions and reactions that have an immunological basis. Approximately 1,000,000 to 2,000,000 women in the United States have had silicone breast implants inserted for reconstruction or augmentation mammaplasty; 28 of those patients have been reported to have developed a systemic autoimmune disease. Data on the 28 reported cases do not in any way prove a causal relationship between breast implants and immune disease. Given the natural incidence of autoimmune diseases, we would expect a coincidental occurrence in the United States of more than 1,000 cases of autoimmune disease in women who had undergone breast implant surgery. Additional information must be obtained to resolve the question. The true incidence of autoimmune disease in patients with implants needs to be determined. A prospective registry of implant patients should be established and comprehensive retrospective information obtained on the implant patient population. Further experimental work is necessary on the bioreactivity of silicone. Patients with implants and autoimmune disease, once identified, must be carefully evaluated by physicians who are experienced in the treatment of autoimmune disease.

  17. Effects of Helium and Oxygen Common Implantation in Silicon Wafer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bing-Sheng; ZHANG Chong-Hong; ZHOU Li-Hong; YANG Yi-Tao

    2008-01-01

    Defect engineering for SiO2 precipitation is investigated using He-ion implantation as the first stage of separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX). Cavities are created in Si by implantation with helium ions. After thermal annealing at different temperatures, the sample is implanted with 120 keV 8.0 × 1016 cm-2 O ions. The O ion energy is chosen such that the peak of the concentration distribution is centred at the cavity band. For comparison,another sample is implanted with O ions alone. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), Fourier transform infrared absorbance spectrometry (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements are used to investigate the samples. The results show that a narrow nano-cavity layer is found to be excellent nucleation sites that effectively assisted SiO2 formation and released crystal lattice strain associated with silicon oxidation.

  18. Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants: Updated Safety Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants: Updated Safety Information Share Tweet ... When the Food and Drug Administration allowed silicone gel-filled breast implants back on the market in ...

  19. Stabilization of elusive silicon oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuzhong; Chen, Mingwei; Xie, Yaoming; Wei, Pingrong; Schaefer, Henry F; Schleyer, Paul von R; Robinson, Gregory H

    2015-06-01

    Molecular SiO2 and other simple silicon oxides have remained elusive despite the indispensable use of silicon dioxide materials in advanced electronic devices. Owing to the great reactivity of silicon-oxygen double bonds, as well as the low oxidation state of silicon atoms, the chemistry of simple silicon oxides is essentially unknown. We now report that the soluble disilicon compound, L:Si=Si:L (where L: = :C{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)CH}2), can be directly oxidized by N2O and O2 to give the carbene-stabilized Si2O3 and Si2O4 moieties, respectively. The nature of the silicon oxide units in these compounds is probed by spectroscopic methods, complementary computations and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  20. Depth resolved investigations of boron implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztucki, M. E-mail: michael@sztucki.de; Metzger, T.H.; Milita, S.; Berberich, F.; Schell, N.; Rouviere, J.L.; Patel, J

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the depth distribution and structure of defects in boron implanted silicon (0 0 1). Silicon wafers were implanted with a boron dose of 6x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup -2} at 32 keV and went through different annealing treatments. Using diffuse X-ray scattering at grazing incidence and exit angles we are able to distinguish between different kinds of defects (point defect clusters and extrinsic stacking faults on {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} planes) and to determine their depth distribution as a function of the thermal budget. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to gain complementary information. In addition we have determined the strain distribution caused by the boron implantation as a function of depth from rocking curve measurements.

  1. Implantation damage and anomalous diffusion of implanted boron in silicon through SiO[sub 2] films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabi, L. (Lab. de Physique de la Matiere, Inst. National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)); Gontrand, C. (Lab. de Physique de la Matiere, Inst. National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)); Lemiti, M. (Lab. de Physique de la Matiere, Inst. National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)); Balland, B. (Lab. de Physique de la Matiere, Inst. National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-07-16

    Boron is implanted in crystalline silicon through oxide layers with different thicknesses. The implantation is carried out at various doses and energies of interest in ultra large scale integration (ULSI) application. Rapid thermal annealings (RTA) are used to obtain shallow junctions and electrical activation of the B atoms. However, transient enhanced diffusion induced by implantation damage can be observed. The boron concentration profiles before and after annealing are obtained with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). It is found that the diffusion transient in the tail region of the boron profile increases with decreasing oxide thickness. Even more, if the implantation damage concerns mostly the oxide, i.e. when the concentration peak is located in this oxide, the oxygen knocked into the silicon substrate could play this way an important role in restricting the boron diffusion, which is good to obtain very shallow junctions. On the other hand, for thinner oxide, boron enhanced diffusion is attributed to the implantation induced damage into silicon at high doses. The diffusion process of boron in oxide and moncrystalline silicon during rapid thermal annealing is investigated. The boron diffusion profiles obtained by computer simulation are compared with the measured results. It is shown by this comparison that the intrinsic coefficient cannot be considered as constant along all the silicon depth. (orig.)

  2. Silicone implant incompatibility syndrome (SIIS) in a 57-year-old woman with unilateral silicone breast implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, Juliane; Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Grindsted Nielsen, Sanne

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1960s, silicone implants have been used for breast augmentations, both cosmetically and in reconstructive surgery. Tissue exposed to silicone can react with multiple adverse advents. Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants due to silicone exposure from ruptured silicone...... implants can lead to different interstitial lung manifestations predominantly with granuloma evolvement, leading to the so-called silicone implant incompatibility syndrome (SIIS). This case describes a 57-year-old woman with multiple lung infiltrations and a left-sided breast implant. The implant had been...

  3. Photoluminescence of Silicon Nanocrystals in Silicon Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ferraioli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results on the photoluminescence properties of silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide are reviewed and discussed. The attention is focused on Si nanocrystals produced by high-temperature annealing of silicon rich oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of deposition parameters and layer thickness is analyzed in detail. The nanocrystal size can be roughly controlled by means of Si content and annealing temperature and time. Unfortunately, a technique for independently fine tuning the emission efficiency and the size is still lacking; thus, only middle size nanocrystals have high emission efficiency. Interestingly, the layer thickness affects the nucleation and growth kinetics so changing the luminescence efficiency.

  4. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  5. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E. [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Pathology, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Walker, Eric A. [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bethesda, MD, 20814 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition. (orig.)

  6. Nanoporous silicon oxide memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gunuk; Yang, Yang; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Abramova, Vera; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Thomas, Edwin L; Tour, James M

    2014-08-13

    Oxide-based two-terminal resistive random access memory (RRAM) is considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation nonvolatile memory. We introduce here a new RRAM memory structure employing a nanoporous (NP) silicon oxide (SiOx) material which enables unipolar switching through its internal vertical nanogap. Through the control of the stochastic filament formation at low voltage, the NP SiOx memory exhibited an extremely low electroforming voltage (∼ 1.6 V) and outstanding performance metrics. These include multibit storage ability (up to 9-bits), a high ON-OFF ratio (up to 10(7) A), a long high-temperature lifetime (≥ 10(4) s at 100 °C), excellent cycling endurance (≥ 10(5)), sub-50 ns switching speeds, and low power consumption (∼ 6 × 10(-5) W/bit). Also provided is the room temperature processability for versatile fabrication without any compliance current being needed during electroforming or switching operations. Taken together, these metrics in NP SiOx RRAM provide a route toward easily accessed nonvolatile memory applications.

  7. Rapid thermal anneal of arsenic implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feygenson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of arsenic implanted into silicon during rapid thermal anneal (RTA) was investigated. Secondary ion mass spectrometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and channeling techniques were used for the measurement of the total (chemical) dopant profile. The electrically active dopant profiles were measured with sheet resistance, sheet-resistance maps, spreading resistance and pinch resistors. It was found that arsenic profile after RTA is influenced by many parameters including crystallographic orientation of the sample, temperature gradient, and defect structure in the surface part affected by heavy arsenic implant. A diffusion model based on inhomogeneous medium was examined. Exact solutions of the diffusion equation were obtained for the rectangular and Gaussian initial dopant profiles. Calculated results are compared to the measured profiles. It is concluded that model satisfactory predicts the major features of the arsenic diffusion into silicon during RTA.

  8. Rapid Thermal Anneal of Arsenic Implanted Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feygenson, Anatoly

    1985-12-01

    The distribution of arsenic implanted into silicon during rapid thermal anneal (RTA) has been investigated. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and channeling techniques were used for the measurement of the total (chemical) dopant profile. The electrically active dopant profiles were measured with sheet resistance, sheet resistance maps, spreading resistance, and pinch resistors. It has been found that arsenic profile after RTA is influenced by many parameters including crystallographic orientation of the sample, temperature gradient, and defect structure in the surface part affected by heavy arsenic implant. A diffusion model based on inhomogeneous medium was examined. Exact solutions of the diffusion equation were obtained for the rectangular and Gaussian initial dopant profiles. Calculated results are compared to the measured profiles. It is concluded that model satisfactory predicts the major features of the arsenic diffusion into silicon during RTA.

  9. Ion-implantation and analysis for doped silicon slot waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum J. C.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have utilised ion implantation to fabricate silicon nanocrystal sensitised erbium-doped slot waveguide structures in a Si/SiO2/Si layered configuration and photoluminescence (PL and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS to analyse these structures. Slot waveguide structures in which light is confined to a nanometre-scale low-index region between two high-index regions potentially offer significant advantages for realisation of electrically-pumped Si devices with optical gain and possibly quantum optical devices. We are currently investigating an alternative pathway in which high quality thermal oxides are grown on silicon and ion implantation is used to introduce the Er and Si-ncs into the SiO2 layer. This approach provides considerable control over the Er and Si-nc concentrations and depth profiles which is important for exploring the available parameter space and developing optimised structures. RBS is well-suited to compositional analysis of these layered structures. To improve the depth sensitivity we have used a 1 MeV α beam and results indicate that a layered silicon-Er:SiO2/silicon structure has been fabricated as desired. In this paper structural results will be compared to Er photoluminescence profiles for samples processed under a range of conditions.

  10. Implantation induced extended defects and transient enhanced diffusion in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Liu, J.; Listebarger, J.; Krishnamoorthy, W.; Zhang, L.; Jones, K.S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of dopant in silicon caused by point defects during annealing of implanted. Si has become one of the essential concerns in miniaturization of silicon device technology. In order to control and minimize the TED effect, a fundamental understanding of the evolution of the point defects upon annealing and the interaction between point defects and extended defects and their effects on dopant diffusion is necessary. Our studies were carried out by two parts; (1) For understanding the evolution of <311> and <110> defects, B{sup +} and Si{sup +} implantation at energies (from 5 keV to 40 keV) and doses in the range from 5 x 10{sup 12} to 1 x 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2} were used. The annealing kinetics were investigated using a N{sub 2} ambient with temperatures for time ranging from 500{degrees}C to 1100{degrees}C for time ranging from 3 min to 3 hours. A matrix of implant energy vs. dose on formation threshold of <311> and <110> defect, interstitials napped and dissolved condition were obtained. (2) For Understanding the interaction between Type II dislocation loop and point defect a B doped buried marker layer was used. The oxidation of silicon surface used as a interstitials injection source and a buried type II loop layer as a point defect detector used to quantify the flux of interstitials injected. Combining the flux measured by loops and dopant diffusion the D{sub I} C{sub I} was determined. The diffusion limited kinetics was concluded. The TED from <311> and EOR (End of Range) <110> defect was studied using 8keV B{sup +} implanted Si to a dose of the le14 and 190keV Ge{sub +} implanted to a dose of le15. Subsequent anneals are done for 5 min and 30 min, respectively, These defects affect dopant diffusion by trapping and releasing point defects.

  11. Bioactivation of biomorphous silicon carbide bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Julia; Hoppe, Alexander; Müller, Frank A; Raya, Carmen T; Fernández, Julián M; Greil, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Wood-derived silicon carbide (SiC) offers a specific biomorphous microstructure similar to the cellular pore microstructure of bone. Compared with bioactive ceramics such as calcium phosphate, however, silicon carbide is considered not to induce spontaneous interface bonding to living bone. Bioactivation by chemical treatment of biomorphous silicon carbide was investigated in order to accelerate osseointegration and improve bone bonding ability. Biomorphous SiC was processed from sipo (Entrandrophragma utile) wood by heating in an inert atmosphere and infiltrating the resulting carbon replica with liquid silicon melt at 1450°C. After removing excess silicon by leaching in HF/HNO₃ the biomorphous preform consisted of β-SiC with a small amount (approximately 6wt.%) of unreacted carbon. The preform was again leached in HCl/HNO₃ and finally exposed to CaCl₂ solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared analyses proved that oxidation of the residual carbon at the surface induced formation of carboxyl [COO⁻] groups, which triggered adsorption of Ca(2+), as confirmed by XPS and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy measurements. A local increase in Ca(2+) concentration stimulated in vitro precipitation of Ca₅(PO₄)₃OH (HAP) on the silicon carbide preform surface during exposure to simulated body fluid, which indicates a significantly increased bone bonding activity compared with SiC.

  12. [Breast repaired by silicone implant. Case report of necrobiosis lipoidica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, B; Bosque, T; Burin des Roziers, B; Daoud, G; Cartier, S

    2012-02-01

    The authors report a very rare case of necrobiosis lipoidica, histopathologically confirmed, which happened in the breast a few months following the insertion of a silicone implant (post-mastectomy reconstruction). This case raises two problems: the physiopathology (role of the silicone implant) and the treatment of this accident, resistant to current therapy.

  13. Use of Silicone Sizers in Implantation of Porous Polyethylene Nasal Dorsal Implants in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal Pham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A new technique of implantation of high-density porous polyethylene nasal dorsal implants in Asians is described in this paper. Silicone sizers, which have smooth surfaces, were used to facilitate implantation of porous polyethylene implants in Asian patients. Materials and Methods. Twenty-three patients of Asian descent underwent dorsal augmentation rhinoplasty with open technique using high-density porous polyethylene implants. In all cases, silicone sizers were used to facilitate implantations of high-density porous polyethylene nasal dorsal implants. Patient selection criteria exclude patients with history of cocaine use, history of nasal or sinus disorders, previous nasal surgery, deviated septum, poor cartilage support, and thin skin. Results. No bleeding, infection, rejection, displacement, or extrusion was noted. One implant was removed because of a patient's dissatisfaction with the resulting tip height. Conclusion. The use of silicone sizers to facilitate implantations of high-density porous polyethylene nasal dorsal implants was safe and efficacious.

  14. Silicone Breast Implant and Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: Can They Coexist? A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Or, Friedman; Arik, Zaretski

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present a case of a silicone breast implant rupture after insertion of an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD). A 51-year-old woman presented to our plastic surgery clinic to exchange her silicone breast implants. The patient underwent cosmetic mastopexy and breast augmentation in 2008. Because of recurrent myocardial infarctions and chronic heart failure, she underwent an insertion of an AICD in 2014 in which the left breast implant was hit. In this report, we ...

  15. Ion implantation phenomena in 4H-silicon carbide

    CERN Document Server

    Phelps, Gordon James

    2003-01-01

    Silicon Carbide is a promising wide band gap semiconductor with many new properties yet to be established and investigated. Ion implantation is the dominant method of incorporating dopant materials into the Silicon Carbide crystalline structure for electronic device fabrication. The implantation process of dopants into Silicon Carbide, both theoretical and practical, is described in this Thesis. Additional fabrication process steps, such as annealing, and their implications are also described. To gain further insight into the process of ion implantation into Silicon Carbide, the detailed design of a special test die is discussed. The aim of the special test die was to obtain general information such as implanted dopant sheet resistivity and to test a novel bipolar transistor design. The fabrication steps involved for the special test die are discussed in detail. The results from the special test die take the form of specific electrical measurements, together with detailed visual observations provided by a sca...

  16. EPR of ion-implanted, laser-annealed silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, K.L.; Peercy, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and ion backscattering measurements were made on ion-implanted, pulsed laser-annealed silicon. For phosphorus-implanted silicon (3 x 10/sup 13/ 200 keV P/sup +//cm/sup 2/) the electrical activity of the implanted donors is restored after laser annealing with greater than or equal to 1.8 J/cm/sup 2/. Silicon made amorphous with 2 x 10/sup 15/ 200 keV Si/sup +//cm/sup 2/ and implanted with 3 x 10/sup 13/ 200 keV P/sup +//cm/sup 2/ can be restored to crystallinity after laser annealing, but electrical activity of the P was not restored due to residual defects for laser energies less than or equal to 3 J/cm/sup 2/. Electrical activity can be restored, at least in part, for amorphous silicon implanted at lower energies (approx. = 50 keV). We also observed that N/sub 2/ reacts with amorphous silicon surfaces to form silicon-nitride. Under laser annealing the N is redistributed and exists as an N interstitial within the implanted layer.

  17. Incoherent-light-flash annealing of phosphorus-implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correra, L.; Pedulli, L.

    1980-07-01

    Incoherent light pulses emitted from a xenon flash lamp were used to anneal radiation damage in (100) silicon implanted with 2×1015 31P+/cm2 at 100 keV. Electrical carrier concentration has been determined by means of differential sheet resistivity and Hall effect together with the anodic oxidation stripping technique; the surface photovoltage technique has been used to evaluate bulk lifetime and Rutherford backscattering and transmission electron microscopy for analysis of radiation damage. Damage recovery appears to take place via a solid phase epitaxial process. Electrical activity and carrier mobility values of samples annealed by incoherent light are similar to those obtained by laser, electron beam, and furnace annealing. The bulk lifetime of minority carriers is not degraded.

  18. Ion implantation in silicon to facilitate testing of photonic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Graham T.; Milosevic, Milan M.; Chen, Xia; Cao, Wei; Littlejohns, Callum G.; Wang, Hong; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Thomson, David J.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, we have presented results on the development of erasable gratings in silicon to facilitate wafer scale testing of photonics circuits via ion implantation of germanium. Similar technology can be employed to develop a range of optical devices that are reported in this paper. Ion implantation into silicon causes radiation damage resulting in a refractive index increase, and can therefore form the basis of multiple optical devices. We demonstrate the principle of a series of devices for wafers scale testing and have also implemented the ion implantation based refractive index change in integrated photonics devices for device trimming.

  19. 3D silicone rubber interfaces for individually tailored implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieghorst, Jan; Bondarenkova, Alexandra; Burblies, Niklas; Behrens, Peter; Doll, Theodor

    2015-01-01

    For the fabrication of customized silicone rubber based implants, e.g. cochlear implants or electrocortical grid arrays, it is required to develop high speed curing systems, which vulcanize the silicone rubber before it runs due to a heating related viscosity drop. Therefore, we present an infrared radiation based cross-linking approach for the 3D-printing of silicone rubber bulk and carbon nanotube based silicone rubber electrode materials. Composite materials were cured in less than 120 s and material interfaces were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, curing related changes in the mechanical and cell-biological behaviour were investigated with tensile and WST-1 cell biocompatibility tests. The infrared absorption properties of the silicone rubber materials were analysed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in transmission and attenuated total reflection mode. The heat flux was calculated by using the FTIR data, emissivity data from the infrared source manufacturer and the geometrical view factor of the system.

  20. Ion implantation of silicon in gallium arsenide: Damage and annealing characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribat, D.; Dieumegard, D.; Croset, M.; Cohen, C.; Nipoti, R.; Siejka, J.; Bentini, G. G.; Correra, L.; Servidori, M.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold: (i) to study the damage induced by ion implantation, with special attention to low implanted doses; (ii) to study the efficiency of annealing techniques — particularly incoherent light annealing — in order to relate the electrical activity of implanted atoms to damage annealing. We have used three methods to study the damage induced by ion implantation: (1) RBS (or nuclear reactions) in random or in channeling geometry (2) RX double crystal diffractometry and (3) electrical measurements (free carrier profiling). Damage induced by silicon implantation at doses >10 14at/cm 2 can be monitored by all three techniques. However, the sensitivity of RBS is poor and hence this technique is not useful for low implantation doses. As device technology requires dopant levels in the range of 5 × 10 12 atoms/cm 2, we are particularly interested to the development of analytical techniques able to detect the damage at this implantation level. The sensitivity of such techniques was checked by studying homogeneously doped (5 × 10 16 e -/cm 3) and semi-insulating GaAs samples implanted with 3 × 10 12 silicon atoms/cm 2 at 150 keV. The substrate temperature during implantation was 200°C. The damage produced in these samples and its subsequent annealing are evidenced by strong changes in X-ray double crystal diffraction spectra. This method hence appears as a good monitoring technique. Annealing of the implanted layers has been performed using incoherent light sources (xenon lamps) either in flash or continuous conditions. Reference samples have also been thermally annealed (850°C, 20 min in capless conditions). The results are compared, and the electrical carrier profiles obtained after continuous incoherent light irradiation indicate that the implanted silicon atoms are almost dully activated. The advantages and disadvantages of incoherent light irradiation are discussed (surface oxidation, surface damage) in comparison with standard

  1. Microbial Load Analysis in Silicone Gel Breast Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GLAUCIA CRISTINA MELLO SANTOS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicone breast implants consist of biomaterials widely used in breast reconstitution surgeries or in mammary augmentation for esthetic reasons. A preliminary stage of the implant production process is vulcanization, which consists of heating the implant to 165±5°C for approximately 9 hours. The aim of this work was to evaluate the bioburden of silicone breast implants prior to the vulcanization process and the decline in bioburden due to this process, and to confirm the sterility of the gel contained in the membrane. Breast implant production stages were evaluated by microbial counting in different steps, according to the USP 32 methodology. To evaluation of decrease in microbial load, spores strips were introduced inside the implant, and after vulcanization cycles the strips were removed from the implant. The strips were transferred to tubes containing TSB, followed by incubation for 7 days at 30-35°C. The results obtained showed that the level of microbial contamination of gel implants is relatively low, and that vulcanization allowed for the inactivation of up to 108 spores. This study led us to the conclusion that vulcanization leaded to sterility of the gel inside the product. Thus, the final sterilizing process contributed to an increase in the Sterility Assurance Level 1. Keywords: Silicone. Breast implant. Sterilization. Dry heat. Vulcanization. Bioburden. RESUMO Análise da Carga Microbiana de Implantes Mamários de Silicone Os implantes mamários de silicone constituem-se em biomateriais que têm sido amplamente utilizados em cirurgias para reconstituição da mama ou para o aumento do tamanho da mama por motivos estéticos. Uma etapa preliminar do processo produtivo do implante é a vulcanização, que consiste no aquecimento do implante a 165±5°C por aproximadamente 9 horas. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a carga microbiana dos implantes mamários de silicone antes do processo de vulcanização, o decaimento

  2. Simulation of wet oxidation of silicon based on the interfacial silicon emission model and comparison with dry oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, Masashi; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Silicon oxidation in wet ambients is simulated based on the interfacial silicon emission model and is compared with dry oxidation in terms of the silicon-atom emission. The silicon emission model enables the simulation of wet oxidation to be done using the oxidant self-diffusivity in the oxide with a single activation energy. The amount of silicon emission from the interface during wet oxidation is smaller than that during dry oxidation. The small emission rate for wet oxidation is responsibl...

  3. Optical attenuation in ion-implanted silicon waveguide racetrack resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doylend, J K; Jessop, P E; Knights, A P

    2011-08-01

    The optical absorption at wavelengths near 1550 nm has been quantified as a function of annealing temperature in ion-implanted silicon-on-insulator racetrack resonators. The variation of the output characteristics of the bus waveguide versus the concentration of implantation-induced lattice disorder in the ring is used to develop a novel method for the determination of the coupling and round-trip loss of the resonator, independently. This experimental procedure has general applicability for the determination of these parameters. Significant propagation loss is found to persist following annealing at temperatures previously observed to remove the majority of ion implantation damage. It is suggested that these annealing characteristics are a consequence of an ion implantation range which is greater than the silicon waveguide layer thickness.

  4. Implanted Bottom Gate for Epitaxial Graphene on Silicon Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Waldmann, Daniel; Jobst, Johannes; Fromm, Felix; Speck, Florian; Seyller, Thomas; Krieger, Michael; Weber, Heiko B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique to tune the charge density of epitaxial graphene via an electrostatic gate that is buried in the silicon carbide substrate. The result is a device in which graphene remains accessible for further manipulation or investigation. Via nitrogen or phosphor implantation into a silicon carbide wafer and subsequent graphene growth, devices can routinely be fabricated using standard semiconductor technology. We have optimized samples for room temperature as well as for cryogenic...

  5. Plasma immersion ion implantation of boron for ribbon silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derbouz K.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report for the first time on the solar cell fabrication on n-type silicon RST (for Ribbon on Sacrificial Template using plasma immersion ion implantation. The experiments were also carried out on FZ silicon as a reference. Boron was implanted at energies from 10 to 15 kV and doses from 1015 to 1016 cm-2, then activated by a thermal annealing in a conventional furnace at 900 and 950 °C for 30 min. The n+ region acting as a back surface field was achieved by phosphorus spin-coating. The frontside boron emitter was passivated either by applying a 10 nm deposited SiOX plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD or with a 10 nm grown thermal oxide. The anti-reflection coating layer formed a 60 nm thick SiNX layer. We show that energies less than 15 kV and doses around 5 × 1015 cm-2 are appropriate to achieve open circuit voltage higher than 590 mV and efficiency around 16.7% on FZ-Si. The photovoltaic performances on ribbon silicon are so far limited by the bulk quality of the material and by the quality of the junction through the presence of silicon carbide precipitates at the surface. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that plasma immersion ion implantation is very promising for solar cell fabrication on ultrathin silicon wafers such as ribbons.

  6. Plasma immersion ion implantation of boron for ribbon silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbouz, K.; Michel, T.; De Moro, F.; Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F.; Belouet, C.; Slaoui, A.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we report for the first time on the solar cell fabrication on n-type silicon RST (for Ribbon on Sacrificial Template) using plasma immersion ion implantation. The experiments were also carried out on FZ silicon as a reference. Boron was implanted at energies from 10 to 15 kV and doses from 1015 to 1016 cm-2, then activated by a thermal annealing in a conventional furnace at 900 and 950 °C for 30 min. The n+ region acting as a back surface field was achieved by phosphorus spin-coating. The frontside boron emitter was passivated either by applying a 10 nm deposited SiOX plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or with a 10 nm grown thermal oxide. The anti-reflection coating layer formed a 60 nm thick SiNX layer. We show that energies less than 15 kV and doses around 5 × 1015 cm-2 are appropriate to achieve open circuit voltage higher than 590 mV and efficiency around 16.7% on FZ-Si. The photovoltaic performances on ribbon silicon are so far limited by the bulk quality of the material and by the quality of the junction through the presence of silicon carbide precipitates at the surface. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that plasma immersion ion implantation is very promising for solar cell fabrication on ultrathin silicon wafers such as ribbons.

  7. Implanted bottom gate for epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, D.; Jobst, J.; Fromm, F.; Speck, F.; Seyller, T.; Krieger, M.; Weber, H. B.

    2012-04-01

    We present a technique to tune the charge density of epitaxial graphene via an electrostatic gate that is buried in the silicon carbide substrate. The result is a device in which graphene remains accessible for further manipulation or investigation. Via nitrogen or phosphor implantation into a silicon carbide wafer and subsequent graphene growth, devices can routinely be fabricated using standard semiconductor technology. We have optimized samples for room temperature as well as for cryogenic temperature operation. Depending on implantation dose and temperature we operate in two gating regimes. In the first, the gating mechanism is similar to a MOSFET, the second is based on a tuned space charge region of the silicon carbide semiconductor. We present a detailed model that describes the two gating regimes and the transition in between.

  8. Photoluminescence in silicon implanted with silicon ions at amorphizing doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru; Kalyadin, A. E.; Kyutt, R. N.; Sakharov, V. I.; Serenkov, I. T.; Shek, E. I.; Afrosimov, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Tetel' baum, D. I. [Lobachevsky State University, Physicotechnical Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    Luminescent and structural properties of n-FZ-Si and n-Cz-Si implanted with Si ions at amorphizing doses and annealed at 1100 Degree-Sign C in a chlorine-containing atmosphere have been studied. An analysis of proton Rutherford backscattering spectra of implanted samples demonstrated that an amorphous layer is formed, and its position and thickness depend on the implantation dose. An X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that defects of the interstitial type are formed in the samples upon annealing. Photoluminescence spectra measured at 78 K and low excitation levels are dominated by the dislocation-related line D1, which is also observed at 300 K. The peak position of this line, its full width at half-maximum, and intensity depend on the conduction type of Si and implantation dose. As the luminescence excitation power is raised, a continuous band appears in the spectrum. A model is suggested that explains the fundamental aspects of the behavior of the photoluminescence spectra in relation to the experimental conditions.

  9. Raman scattering in silicon disordered by gold ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri; Vosecek, Vaclav [NS Lab, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Rez-130, Husinec 250 68 (Czech Republic); Vorlicek, Vladimir [Institute of Physics AS CR, Na Slovance 2, Prague 182 21 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Si (111) covered by a 250-nm thick SiO{sub 2} surface layer has been disordered through implantation of 3.035 MeV gold ions within broad range of fluences from 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy (514.5 nm laser) was applied for characterization of the silicon disordering. Variation of the Raman spectra of silicon after low-fluence implantation (fluences lower than 5 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the transverse optical phonon (1TO) peak reflects the coexistence of bulk Si crystals (c-Si) and Si nanocrystals (nc-Si) in the implanted layer. Implantation with higher fluences yields only the stable 470 cm{sup -1} 1TO peak, corresponding to formation of amorphous phase (a-Si), in this region of the spectra. Detailed analysis of the silicon disorder was performed through calculation of the transverse acoustical phonon (1TA) peak area. The fluence dependence of the peak area reveals qualitative correlation with the depth profile of structural defects in the modified Si layer evaluated from RBS (Rutherford backscattering) experiment and from SRIM (stopping and range of ions in matter) code simulation. This correlation suggests a decrease of the structural disorder in the modified layer region enriched by vacancies. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Silicon exfoliation by hydrogen implantation: Actual nature of precursor defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuisseu, Pauline Sylvia Pokam; Pingault, Timothée; Ntsoenzok, Esidor; Regula, Gabrielle; Mazen, Frédéric; Sauldubois, Audrey; Andreazza, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    MeV energy hydrogen implantation in silicon followed by a thermal annealing is a very smart way to produce high crystalline quality silicon substrates, much thinner than what can be obtained by diamond disk or wire sawing. Using this kerf-less approach, ultra-thin substrates with thicknesses between 15 μm and 100 μm, compatible with microelectronic and photovoltaic applications are reported. But, despite the benefits of this approach, there is still a lack of fundamental studies at this implantation energy range. However, if very few papers have addressed the MeV energy range, a lot of works have been carried out in the keV implantation energy range, which is the one used in the smart-cut® technology. In order to check if the nature and the growth mechanism of extended defects reported in the widely studied keV implantation energy range could be extrapolated in the MeV range, the thermal evolution of extended defects formed after MeV hydrogen implantation in (100) Si was investigated in this study. Samples were implanted at 1 MeV with different fluences ranging from 6 × 1016 H/cm2 to 2 × 1017 H/cm2 and annealed at temperatures up to 873 K. By cross-section transmission electron microscopy, we found that the nature of extended defects in the MeV range is quite different of what is observed in the keV range. In fact, in our implantation conditions, the generated extended defects are some kinds of planar clusters of gas-filled lenses, instead of platelets as commonly reported in the keV energy range. This result underlines that hydrogen behaves differently when it is introduced in silicon at high or low implantation energy. The activation energy of the growth of these extended defects is independent of the chosen fluence and is between (0.5-0.6) eV, which is very close to the activation energy reported for atomic hydrogen diffusion in a perfect silicon crystal.

  11. Characteristics of Si+/B+ dual implanted silicon wafers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Thin p+ layers with good electrical properties were fabricated by RTA (rapid thermal annealing) with post-FA (furance annealing) of Si+/B+ dual implanted silicon wafers. The electrical and structural characteristics of thin p+ layers have been measured by FPP (four-point probe), SRP (spreading resistance probe), RBS/channelling. Optimizing the implantation and annealing processes, especially using the thermal cycle of RTA followed by FA, shallow p+n junctions can be fabricated, which shows excellent I-V characteristics with revers-bias leakage current densities of 1.8?nA/cm2 at -1.4?V.

  12. Mathematical Model of Silicon Oxidation in Microelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bondarev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper involves analytical solutions and formulae for determination of the oxide film thickness in the silicon oxidation while using nitride mask. Calculations are based on solutions of a three-dimensional diffusion equation and new mathematical functions that are firstly defined by the author. Suitable analytical and numerical solutions based on the diffusion equation have not yet been obtained

  13. FTIR and RBS study of ion-beam synthesized buried silicon oxide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, A.P. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400098 (India); Yadav, A.D. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400098 (India)], E-mail: adyadav@physics.mu.ac.in; Dubey, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400098 (India); Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2008-04-15

    Single crystal silicon samples were implanted at 140 keV by oxygen ({sup 16}O{sup +}) ion beam to fluence levels of 1.0 x 10{sup 17}, 2.5 x 10{sup 17} and 5.0 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to synthesize buried silicon oxide insulating layers by SIMOX (separation by implanted oxygen) process at room temperature and at high temperature (325 deg. C). The structure and composition of the ion-beam synthesized buried silicon oxide layers were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques. The FTIR spectra of implanted samples reveal absorption in the wavenumber range 1250-750 cm{sup -1} corresponding to the stretching vibration of Si-O bonds indicating the formation of silicon oxide. The integrated absorption band intensity is found to increase with increase in the ion fluence. The absorption peak was rather board for 325 deg. C implanted sample. The FTIR studies show that the structures of ion-beam synthesized buried oxide layers are strongly dependent on total ion fluence. The RBS measurements show that the thickness of the buried oxide layer increases with increase in the oxygen fluence. However, the thickness of the top silicon layer was found to decrease with increase in the ion fluence. The total oxygen fluence estimated from the RBS data is found to be in good agreement with the implanted oxygen fluence. The high temperature implantation leads to increase in the concentration of the oxide formation compared to room temperature implantation.

  14. Thermal Oxidation of Structured Silicon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    The topography of thermally oxidized, structured silicon dioxide is investigated through simulations, atomic force microscopy, and a proposed analytical model. A 357 nm thick oxide is structured by removing regions of the oxide in a masked etch with either reactive ion etching or hydrofluoric acid....... Subsequent thermal oxidation is performed in both dry and wet ambients in the temperature range 950◦C to 1100◦C growing a 205 ± 12 nm thick oxide in the etched mask windows. Lifting of the original oxide near the edge of the mask in the range 6 nm to 37 nm is seen with increased lifting for increasing...

  15. Impact of implanted phosphorus on the diffusivity of boron and its applicability to silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrof, Julian, E-mail: julian.schrof@ise.fraunhofer.de; Müller, Ralph; Benick, Jan; Hermle, Martin [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Reedy, Robert C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Boron diffusivity reduction in extrinsically doped silicon was investigated in the context of a process combination consisting of BBr{sub 3} furnace diffusion and preceding Phosphorus ion implantation. The implantation of Phosphorus leads to a substantial blocking of Boron during the subsequent Boron diffusion. First, the influences of ion implantation induced point defects as well as the initial P doping on B diffusivity were studied independently. Here, it was found that not the defects created during ion implantation but the P doping itself results in the observed B diffusion retardation. The influence of the initial P concentration was investigated in more detail by varying the P implantation dose. A secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of the BSG layer after the B diffusion revealed that the B diffusion retardation is not due to potential P content in the BSG layer but rather caused by the n-type doping of the crystalline silicon itself. Based on the observations the B diffusion retardation was classified into three groups: (i) no reduction of B diffusivity, (ii) reduced B diffusivity, and (iii) blocking of the B diffusion. The retardation of B diffusion can well be explained by the phosphorus doping level resulting in a Fermi level shift and pairing of B and P ions, both reducing the B diffusivity. Besides these main influences, there are probably additional transient phenomena responsible for the blocking of boron. Those might be an interstitial transport mechanism caused by P diffusion that reduces interstitial concentration at the surface or the silicon/BSG interface shift due to oxidation during the BBr{sub 3} diffusion process. Lifetime measurements revealed that the residual (non-blocked) B leads to an increased dark saturation current density in the P doped region. Nevertheless, electrical quality is on a high level and was further increased by reducing the B dose as well as by removing the first few nanometers of the silicon surface after

  16. Impact of implanted phosphorus on the diffusivity of boron and its applicability to silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrof, Julian; Müller, Ralph; Reedy, Robert C.; Benick, Jan; Hermle, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Boron diffusivity reduction in extrinsically doped silicon was investigated in the context of a process combination consisting of BBr3 furnace diffusion and preceding Phosphorus ion implantation. The implantation of Phosphorus leads to a substantial blocking of Boron during the subsequent Boron diffusion. First, the influences of ion implantation induced point defects as well as the initial P doping on B diffusivity were studied independently. Here, it was found that not the defects created during ion implantation but the P doping itself results in the observed B diffusion retardation. The influence of the initial P concentration was investigated in more detail by varying the P implantation dose. A secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of the BSG layer after the B diffusion revealed that the B diffusion retardation is not due to potential P content in the BSG layer but rather caused by the n-type doping of the crystalline silicon itself. Based on the observations the B diffusion retardation was classified into three groups: (i) no reduction of B diffusivity, (ii) reduced B diffusivity, and (iii) blocking of the B diffusion. The retardation of B diffusion can well be explained by the phosphorus doping level resulting in a Fermi level shift and pairing of B and P ions, both reducing the B diffusivity. Besides these main influences, there are probably additional transient phenomena responsible for the blocking of boron. Those might be an interstitial transport mechanism caused by P diffusion that reduces interstitial concentration at the surface or the silicon/BSG interface shift due to oxidation during the BBr3 diffusion process. Lifetime measurements revealed that the residual (non-blocked) B leads to an increased dark saturation current density in the P doped region. Nevertheless, electrical quality is on a high level and was further increased by reducing the B dose as well as by removing the first few nanometers of the silicon surface after the BBr3

  17. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  18. Synthesis of buried silicon oxynitride layers by ion implantation for silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, A.D. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India)]. E-mail: adyadav@physics.mu.ac.in; Polji, Rucha H. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Singh, Vibha [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Dubey, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Gundu Rao, T.K. [Regional Sophisticated Instrumentation Center, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2006-04-15

    Silicon oxynitride (Si {sub x}O {sub y}N {sub z}) buried insulating layers were synthesized by SIMNOX (separation by implanted nitrogen-oxygen) process by {sup 14}N{sup +} and {sup 16}O{sup +} ion implantation to high fluence levels 1 x 10{sup 17}, 2.5 x 10{sup 17} and 5 x 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2} sequentially in the ratio 1:1 at 150 keV into p-type (1 0 0) silicon wafers. The identification of structures and defects in the ion beam synthesized buried layers were carried out by FTIR, XRD and ESR measurements before and after RTA treatments at different temperatures in nitrogen ambient. The FTIR spectra show single broad absorption band in the wavenumber range 1250-600 cm{sup -1} confirming the formation of silicon oxynitride. The integrated absorption band intensity is found to increase with increasing ion fluence and on annealing indicating gradual chemical transformation of the ion implanted layer into silicon oxynitride. The XRD data of the implanted samples show the formation of Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}O (O) phase of silicon oxynitride. On annealing the samples, SiO{sub 2} (H)/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (H) phases are also formed in addition to Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}O (O) phase. The concentration of the formed phases is found to increase with increase in the ion fluence as well as the annealing temperature. The ESR studies both at room temperature and at low temperatures reveal the presence of a defect center associated with silicon dangling bonds. The increase in ion fluence gives rise to small variations in g-values and increase in the spin density. The spin density decreases in general with increasing the annealing temperature.

  19. Simulation of the proton implantation process in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccinelli, Martin; Hadley, Peter [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Solid State Physics (Austria); Jelinek, Moriz; Wuebben, Thomas [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Laven, Johannes G.; Schulze, Hans-Joachim [Infineon Technologies AG, Neubiberg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Proton implantation is one of many processes used to ad-just the electronic and mechanical properties of silicon. Though the process has been extensively studied, it is still not clear which exact defects are formed and what their concentration profiles are. In this article, a simulation method is presented, which provides a better understanding of the implantation process. The simulation takes into account the diffusion of mobile point defects and their reactions to defect complexes, as well as the dissociation of defect complexes. Concentration profiles for a set of defect complexes after an implantation at 400 keV and a dose of 5 x 10{sup 14} H{sup +}cm{sup -2} are presented. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T., E-mail: atz2@cornell.edu [Field of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Milosevic, Erik [Department of Nanoengineering, SUNY Polytechnic University, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Boyce, Brad L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0889 (United States)

    2015-11-21

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  1. 360-nm Photoluminescence from Silicon Oxide Films Embedded with Silicon Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin-lin; GUO Heng-qun; ZENG You-hua; WANG Qi-ming

    2006-01-01

    Si-rich silicon oxide films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering onto composite Si/SiO2 targets. After annealed at different temperature, the silicon oxide films embedded with silicon nanocrystals were obtained. The photoluminescence(PL) from the silicon oxide films embedded with silicon nanocrystals was observed at room temperature. The strong peak is at 360nm, its position is independent of the annealing temperature. The origin of the 360-nm PL in the silicon oxide films embedded with silicon nanocrystals was discussed.

  2. Effects of post-deposition argon implantation on the memory properties of plasma-deposited silicon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Q. A.; Brown, W. D.

    1989-10-01

    Post-deposition ion implantation has been used to introduce argon into plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon nitride films in an attempt to influence the transfer, trapping, and emission of charge during write/erase exercising of the metal-silicon nitride-silicon oxide-silicon structure. Argon was implanted into the SiH4 -NH3 -N2 deposited films at energies ranging from 25 to 75 keV, current densities ranging from 0.1 to 75 μA/cm2 and fluences ranging from 1×1012 to 1×1016 ions/cm2. Physical properties of the films were studied by ellipsometry and infrared spectroscopy, while high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves were used to obtain programming, retention, and endurance characteristics.

  3. Role of masking oxide on silicon in processes of defect generation at formation of SIMOX structures

    CERN Document Server

    Askinazi, A Y; Miloglyadova, L V

    2002-01-01

    One investigated into Si-SiO sub 2 structures formed by implantation of oxygen ions into silicon (SIMOX-technology) by means of techniques based on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics and by means of electroluminescence. One determined existence of electrically active centres and of luminescence centres in the formed oxide layer near boundary with silicon. One clarified the role SiO sub 2 masking layer in silicon in defect generation under formation of the masked oxide layer. One established dependence of concentration of electrically active and luminescence centres on thickness of masking layer

  4. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  5. Histopathological reaction over prosthesis surface covered with silicone and polyurethane foam implanted in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Wagenführ-Júnior; Jurandir Marcondes Ribas Filho; Marcelo Mazza do Nascimento; Fernanda Marcondes Ribas; Marcus Vinícius Wanka; Andressa de Lima Godoi

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSES: To evaluate whether polyurethane foam leads more intense foreign-body reaction than silicone foam. To compare the vascularization of the capsules surrounding the foam implants. To investigate if the capsule of polyurethane foam implanted has greater amount of collagen than that of silicone foam. METHODS: Sixty-four young male Wistar rats were allocated into two groups: polyurethane foam and silicone foam. Subcutaneous discs were implanted into the dorsum of the animals in both group...

  6. Factors affecting the ion beam implantation in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    El-Shanshoury, A I

    2003-01-01

    The factors affecting the ion beam implantation in silicon have been studied using boron, phosphorus, oxygen, and argon ions having energy range 0.5 ke V-200 ke V. It was found that the range of the ions in silicon increases with the increase of their energy and decreases with the increase of their masses. The ionization process is found to be the main process for causing damage in the silicon matrix whether it is produced by the accelerated ions or by the recoiled silicon atoms. The magnitude of ionization in silicon is found to be inversely proportional to the mass of ions. Ionization produced by ions or recoils shows different contributions to the damage depending on the mass of ions where the ions energy loss to ionization decreases from 70% to 23% as the mass is increased from 11 for boron (B) to 40 for argon (Ar). Its magnitude, as produced by ions, is found to decrease with the increase of their masses. Its value is observed to increase in a complementary way with the mass increase. Ions energy loss to...

  7. Comprehensive modeling of ion-implant amorphization in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, K.R.C. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain) and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: g0202446@nus.edu.sg; Jaraiz, M. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Synopsys, Karl-Hammerschmidt Strasse 34, D-85609 Aschheim/Dornach (Germany); Rubio, J.E. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Castrillo, P. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pinacho, R. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Srinivasan, M.P. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Benistant, F. [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing. 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2005-12-05

    A physically based model has been developed to simulate the ion-implant induced damage accumulation up to amorphization in silicon. Based on damage structures known as amorphous pockets (AP), which are three-dimensional, irregularly shaped agglomerates of interstitials (I) and vacancies (V) surrounded by crystalline silicon, the model is able to reproduce a wide range of experimental observations of damage accumulation and amorphization with interdependent implantation parameters. Instead of recrystallizing the I's and V's instantaneously, the recrystallization rate of an AP containing nI and mV is a function of its effective size, defined as min(n, m), irrespective of its internal spatial configuration. The parameters used in the model were calibrated using the experimental silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature as a function of dose rate for C, Si, and Ge. The model is able to show the superlinear damage build-up with dose, the extent of amorphous layer and the superadditivity effect of polyatomic ions.

  8. Osseointegrated silicone finger prosthesis using dental implants: a renovated technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Sankar, V Vijay; Chirumamilla, Naveen; Reddy, V Vamsikrishna

    2014-11-01

    In clinical practice, we come across patients with traumatically amputated or congenitally missing partial or complete fingers that can be restored using microsurgical replantation or transplantation procedures. However, in some cases this might not be possible due to systemic or local factors and the lost or missing part has to be replaced prosthetically to offer psychological and functional wellbeing. These prostheses can be constructed with various materials like acrylics or silicone retained with the help of auxiliary aids. However, these prostheses cause some hindrance in performing functions like writing, typing, etc. The aim of the present trial was to ameliorate the existing design of implant supported finger prosthesis. Distal phalange of middle finger replaced with implant supported silicone finger prosthesis is modified by utilizing a metal framework to support silicone material to improve rigidity while working. We could achieve a good function, esthetics and tactile sensibility with this modified design. Whenever, feasible this design can improve the performance and patients feel a deep sense of satisfaction and improved self-esteem with this modified prosthesis.

  9. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  10. Influence of high-dose nitrogen implantation on the positive charge density of the buried oxide of silicon-on-insulator wafers%高剂量注氮对注氧隔离硅材料埋氧层中正电荷密度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐海马; 郑中山; 张恩霞; 于芳; 李宁; 王宁娟; 李国花; 马红芝

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nitrogen implantation on the properties of silicon-on-insulator buried oxide using separation by oxygen implantation was studied. Nitrogen ions were implanted into the buried oxide layer with a high-dose of 1016 cm-2.The experimental results showed that the positive charge density of the nitrogen-implanted buried oxide was obviously increased, compared with the control sampes without nitrogen implantation. It was also found that the post-implantation annealing caused an additional increase of the positive charge density in the nitrogen implanted samples. However,annealing time displayed a small effect on the positive charge density of the nitrogen implanted buried oxide, compared with the significant increase induced by nitrogen implantation. Moreover, the capacitance-voltage results showed that the positive charge density of the unannealed sample with nitrogen implanted is approximately equal to that of the sample annealed at 1100 ℃ for 2. 5 h in N2 ambient, despite an additional increase brought with annealing, and the buried oxide of the sample after 0.5 h annealing has a maximum value of positive charge density. According to the simulating results,the nitrogen implantation resulted in a heavy damage to the buried oxide, a lot of silicon and oxygen vacancies were introduced in the buried oxide during implantation. However, the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the samples indicates that implantation induced defects can be basically eliminated after an annealing at 1100 ℃ for 0. 5 h. The increase of the positive charge density of the nitrogen implanted buried oxide is ascribed to the accumulation of implanted nitrogen near the interface of buried oxide and silicon, which caused the break of weak Si - Si bonds and the production of positive silicon ions in the silicon-rich region of the buried oxide near the interface, and this conclusion is supported by the results of secondary ion mass spectrometry.%为研究注氮改性对注氧

  11. Photoluminescence study of 1018 meV defect lines from ion-implanted silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H S; Seong, E Z; Kim, S M; Lim, H J

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the defects of ion-implanted silicon with boron and argon ions using photoluminescence method. The 1018 meV line, so called I sub 1 line, and its phonon side bands were observed in both boron- and argon-implanted silicon crystals. In argon-implanted silicon crystals, we observed 1009 meV line (I sub r - Ar) and its phonon side bands which arose from argon-I sub 1 complex in addition to the splitting of the I sub 1 line. Annealing temperature dependence of the intensities of the I sub 1 and I sub 1 -Ar lines in argon-implanted silicon was very similar for both Czochralski and float zone silicon crystals whereas that of boron-implanted silicon was very different between the two growing methods. We discussed on the origin of the defects responsible for the I sub 1 and I sub 1 - Ar lines.

  12. Functionalised silicon oxide nanoparticles for fingermark detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Sébastien; Bécue, Andy; Champod, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, the use of nanotechnology for fingermark detection has been attracting a lot of attention. A substantial number of nanoparticle types has thus been studied and applied with varying success. However, despite all efforts, few publications present clear supporting evidence of their superiority over standard and commonly used techniques. This paper focuses on a rarely studied type of nanoparticles that regroups all desired properties for effective fingermark detection: silicon oxide. These nanoparticles offer optical and surface properties that can be tuned to provide optimal detection. This study explores their potential as a new method for fingermark detection. Detection conditions, outer functionalisations and optical properties were optimised and a first evaluation of the technique is presented. Dye-doped silicon oxide nanoparticles were assessed against a one-step luminescent cyanoacrylate. Both techniques were compared on natural fingermarks from three donors collected on four different non-porous substrates. On average, the two techniques performed similarly but silicon oxide detected marks with a better homogeneity and was less affected by donor inter-variability. The technique remains to be further optimised and yet silicon oxide nanoparticles already show great promises for effective fingermark detection.

  13. Luminescence from Erbium Oxide Grown on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    H9.14 Luminescence from erbium oxide grown on silicon E. Nogales’, B. Mrndez , J.Piqueras’, R.Plugaru2 , J. A. Garcfa3 and T. J. Tate4 ’ Universidad ... Complutense de Madrid, Dpto. Ffsica de Materiales, 28040 Madrid, Spain.2Inst. of Microtechnology, Bucharest, Romania.3Universidad del Pais Vasco, Dpto

  14. Thermal Oxidation of Silicon Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufang Chen; Li'na Ning; Yingmin Wang; Juan Li; Xiangang Xu; Xiaobo Hu; Minhua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Thermal oxidation was used to remove the subsurface damage of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces. The anisotrow of oxidation and the composition of oxide layers on Si and C faces were analyzed. Regular pits were observed on the surface after the removal of the oxide layers, which were detrimental to the growth of high quality epitaxial layers. The thickness and composition of the oxide layers were characterized by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Epitaxial growth was performed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The substrate surface morphol-ogy after removing the oxide layer and gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer surface were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the GaN epilayer grown on the oxidized substrates was superior to that on the unoxidized substrates.

  15. A novel implantable multichannel silicon-based microelectrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui Xiao-Hong; Zhang Ruo-Xin; Pei Wei-Hua; Chen Hong-Da

    2007-01-01

    Silicon-based microelectrodes have been confirmed to be helpful in neural prostheses. The fabricated 7-channel silicon-based microelectrode was feasible to be implanted into the brain cortex. The manufacturing process by microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology was detailed with four photolithographic masks. The microscopic photographs and SEM images indicated that the probe shank was 3 mm long, 100μm wide and 20μm thick with the recording sites spaced 120μm apart for good signal isolation. To facilitate the insertion and minimize the trauma,the microelectrode is narrowed down gradually near the tip with the tip taper angle of 6 degrees. Curve of the single recording site impedance versus frequency was shown by test in vitro and the impedance declined from 150.5 kΩ to 6.0 kΩwith frequency changing from 10 k to 10 MHz.

  16. Molecular dynamics characterization of as-implanted damage in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ivan [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: ivasan@ele.uva.es; Marques, Luis A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pelaz, Lourdes [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Lopez, Pedro [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Aboy, Maria [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Barbolla, Juan [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2005-12-05

    We have analyzed the as-implanted damage produced in silicon by B, Si and Ge ions using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Implantations were carried out at 50 K to avoid damage migration and annealing. In order to make a statistical study of the damage features, we have simulated hundreds of independent cascades for each ion for the same nuclear deposited energy. We have obtained that the average number of displaced atoms (DA) from perfect lattice positions and the size of defect clusters formed increases with ion mass. This dependence has not been obtained from equivalent binary collisions simulations. This indicates that multiple interactions play an important role in the generation of damage. Amorphous regions are directly formed during the collisional phase of the cascade of Ge and Si ions.

  17. DLTS and EPR study of defects in H implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miksic, V.; Pivac, B. E-mail: pivac@rudjer.irb.hr; Rakvin, B.; Zorc, H.; Corni, F.; Tonini, R.; Ottaviani, G

    2002-01-01

    Single crystal CZ Si samples were implanted with hydrogen ions to the dose of 2E16 He ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature and subsequently annealed in vacuum in the temperature interval from 100 to 900 deg. C. The aim of the experiment was to determine the conditions for bubble formation within the solid film, which may have important technological application. Defects produced in such samples were studied by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. It is shown that high dose hydrogen implantation produces vacancy-related and silicon selfinterstitial clusters. The latter are thought to be responsible for the formation of the weak displacement field. The annealing at higher temperatures creates multivacancy-related clusters responsible for the strong displacement field formation.

  18. Detection of ion implanted patterns in silicon using STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Dwyer, K. J.; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Pomeroy, J. M.

    Ion implanted regions in silicon are scanned using STM to detect features which will facilitate in-situ overlay and alignment of STM hydrogen patterned nano-devices. STM hydrogen lithography is used to make atomically precise devices such as single electron transistors and single atom qubits. However, with currently available imaging techniques, we are limited to make devices on a single plane using STM lithography. In-situ detection of high local doping concentrations using STM will allow precise alignment between the multiple layers of buried nano-devices and metal electrodes.

  19. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojak, S.; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors - Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 1017 ions/cm2. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  20. Tailored emitter, low-resistivity, ion-implanted silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnucci, J. A.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Matthei, K. W.

    1980-01-01

    Open-circuit voltages as high as 0.645 V (AM0, 25 C) have been obtained by a new process developed for low-resistivity silicon. The process utilizes high-dose phosphorus implantation followed by furnace annealing and simultaneous oxide growth. The effect of the thermally grown oxide is a reduction of surface recombination velocity; the oxide also acts as a moderately efficient antireflection (AR) coating. Boron-doped, float-zone silicon with resistivities from 0.1 to 1.0 (omega)(cm) has been processed according to this sequence; results show that the highest open-circuit voltage is obtained with 0.1(omega)(cm) starting material. The effects of Auger recombination and bandgap narrowing caused by high doping concentrations in the n(+)junction region have been investigated by implanting phosphorus over a wide range of dose levels. The effects of emitter-phosphorus concentrations tailored to optimize electric fields in the emitter have also been investigated.

  1. Photoconduction in silicon rich oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Lopez, J A; Carrillo-Lopez, J; Flores-Gracia, F J; Garcia-Salgado, G [CIDS-ICUAP, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. Ed. 103 D and C, col. San Manuel, Puebla, Pue. Mexico 72570 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, M; Morales-Sanchez, A, E-mail: jluna@buap.siu.m, E-mail: jluna@inaoep.m [INAOE, Luis Enrique Erro No. 1, Apdo. 51, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico 72000 (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Photoconduction of silicon rich oxide (SRO) thin films were studied by current-voltage (I-V) measurements, where ultraviolet (UV) and white (Vis) light illumination were applied. SRO thin films were deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) technique, using SiH{sub 4} (silane) and N{sub 2}O (nitrous oxide) as reactive gases at 700 {sup 0}. The gas flow ratio, Ro = [N{sub 2}O]/[SiH{sub 4}] was used to control the silicon excess. The thickness and refractive index of the SRO films were 72.0 nm, 75.5 nm, 59.1 nm, 73.4 nm and 1.7, 1.5, 1.46, 1.45, corresponding to R{sub o} = 10, 20, 30 and 50, respectively. These results were obtained by null ellipsometry. Si nanoparticles (Si-nps) and defects within SRO films permit to obtain interesting photoelectric properties as a high photocurrent and photoconduction. These effects strongly depend on the silicon excess, thickness and structure type. Two different structures (Al/SRO/Si and Al/SRO/SRO/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS)-like structures) were fabricated and used as devices. The photocurrent in these structures is dominated by the generation of carriers due to the incident photon energies ({approx}3.0-1.6 eV and 5 eV). These structures showed large photoconductive response at room temperature. Therefore, these structures have potential applications in optoelectronics devices.

  2. The use of processed silicone to retain the implant-supported tissue-borne overdenture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, E D; Krantz, W A; Ivanhoe, J R

    1992-02-01

    A technique is described for constructing the implant-retained overdenture with heat-polymerized silicone that is processed around undercuts in a round bar framework connecting the implants. An acrylic resin circular rest contacting the bar ensures that the implants are loaded in occlusion for stress distribution over the fixtures.

  3. Implanted Silicon Resistor Layers for Efficient Terahertz Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Abrahams, J.; Allen, C. A.; Benford, D. J.; Henry, R.; Stevenson, T.; Wollack, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2005-01-01

    Broadband absorption structures are an essential component of large format bolometer arrays for imaging GHz and THz radiation. We have measured electrical and optical properties of implanted silicon resistor layers designed to be suitable for these absorbers. Implanted resistors offer a low-film-stress, buried absorber that is robust to longterm aging, temperature, and subsequent metals processing. Such an absorber layer is readily integrated with superconducting integrated circuits and standard micromachining as demonstrated by the SCUBA II array built by ROE/NIST (1). We present a complete characterization of these layers, demonstrating frequency regimes in which different recipes will be suitable for absorbers. Single layer thin film coatings have been demonstrated as effective absorbers at certain wavelengths including semimetal (2,3), thin metal (4), and patterned metal films (5,6). Astronomical instrument examples include the SHARC II instrument is imaging the submillimeter band using passivated Bi semimetal films and the HAWC instrument for SOFIA, which employs ultrathin metal films to span 1-3 THz. Patterned metal films on spiderweb bolometers have also been proposed for broadband detection. In each case, the absorber structure matches the impedance of free space for optimal absorption in the detector configuration (typically 157 Ohms per square for high absorption with a single or 377 Ohms per square in a resonant cavity or quarter wave backshort). Resonant structures with -20% bandwidth coupled to bolometers are also under development; stacks of such structures may take advantage of instruments imaging over a wide band. Each technique may enable effective absorbers in imagers. However, thin films tend to age, degrade or change during further processing, can be difficult to reproduce, and often exhibit an intrinsic granularity that creates complicated frequency dependence at THz frequencies. Thick metal films are more robust but the requirement for

  4. Dislocation-related luminescence in Er-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, N.A.; Gusev, O.B.; Shek, E.I. [Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute, Polytechnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vdovin, V.I.; Yugova, T.G. [Institute for Chemical Problems of Microelectronics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Emel' yanov, A.M. [St. Petersburg State Technical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-01

    The behavior of luminescence spectra and structural defects in single crystal Czochralski silicon after erbium implantation at 1-1.8 MeV energies and 1x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} dose with subsequent annealing at 1000-1200C for 0.25-3 h in argon and a chlorine-containing ambience (CCA) was studied by photoluminescence (PL), transmission electron microscopy and chemical etching/Nomarski microscopy. We have found that annealing in CCA gives rise to dislocation loops and pure edge dislocations with dominant dislocation-related lines in the PL spectrum. Pure edge dislocations are responsible for the appearance of the lines. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Feasibility study for future implantable neural-silicon interface devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Armaghany, Allann; Yu, Bo; Mak, Terrence; Tong, Kin-Fai; Sun, Yihe

    2011-01-01

    The emerging neural-silicon interface devices bridge nerve systems with artificial systems and play a key role in neuro-prostheses and neuro-rehabilitation applications. Integrating neural signal collection, processing and transmission on a single device will make clinical applications more practical and feasible. This paper focuses on the wireless antenna part and real-time neural signal analysis part of implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) devices. We propose to use millimeter-wave for wireless connections between different areas of a brain. Various antenna, including microstrip patch, monopole antenna and substrate integrated waveguide antenna are considered for the intra-cortical proximity communication. A Hebbian eigenfilter based method is proposed for multi-channel neuronal spike sorting. Folding and parallel design techniques are employed to explore various structures and make a trade-off between area and power consumption. Field programmable logic arrays (FPGAs) are used to evaluate various structures.

  6. PHASE CONVERSIONS IN METAL-OXIDE COMPOSITIONS ON THE BASIS OF ALUMINIUM AND SILICON OXIDE

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The regularities of phase conversions in metal-oxide compositions on the basis of aluminium and silicon oxide with the purpose of silumins synthesis by means of direct restoration of aluminium silicon are studied.

  7. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mula, Guido, E-mail: guido.mula@unica.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Tiddia, Maria V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Falqui, Andrea [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Palmas, Simonetta; Mascia, Michele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica Chimica e dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Piazza d' Armi, 09126 Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    We present a study of the electrochemical oxidation process of porous silicon. We analyze the effect of the layer thickness (1.25–22 μm) and of the applied current density (1.1–11.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, values calculated with reference to the external samples surface) on the oxidation process by comparing the galvanostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and the optical specular reflectivity of the samples. The results of EIS were interpreted using an equivalent circuit to separate the contribution of different sample parts. A different behavior of the electrochemical oxidation process has been found for thin and thick samples: whereas for thin samples the oxidation process is univocally related to current density and thickness, for thicker samples this is no more true. Measurements by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy using a Scanning Electron Microscopy confirmed that the inhomogeneity of the electrochemical oxidation process is increased by higher thicknesses and higher currents. A possible explanation is proposed to justify the different behavior of thin and thick samples during the electrochemical process. - Highlights: • A multidisciplinary approach on porous Si electrochemical oxidation is proposed. • Electrochemical, optical, and structural characterizations are used. • Layer thickness and oxidation current effects are shown. • An explanation of the observed behavior is proposed.

  8. Silicone implants and lymphoma: The role of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizjak, Mojca; Selmi, Carlo; Praprotnik, Sonja; Bruck, Or; Perricone, Carlo; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-12-01

    The risk of hematological malignancies is mainly determined by genetic background, age, sex, race and ethnicity, geographic location, exposure to certain chemicals and radiation; along with the more recently proposed immune factors such as chronic inflammation, immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity, and infections. Paradigmatic examples include the development of lymphoma in Sjögren's syndrome and Hashimoto thyroiditis, gastric MALT lymphoma in Helicobacter pylori infection, or lymphomas associated with infections by Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8 (HHV 8) and leukemia/lymphoma virus 1 (HTLV-1). A growing number of reports indicates an increased risk of lymphoma, particularly of the anaplastic large cell (ALCL) type. The implants, specifically those used in the past, elicit chronic stimulation of the immune system against the prosthetic material. This is particularly the case in genetically susceptible hosts. We suggest that polyclonal activation may result in monoclonality in those at risk hosts, ultimately leading to lymphoma. We suggest that patients with an inflammatory response against silicone implants be monitored carefully.

  9. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  10. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants — Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing...... from silicone to the H295R steroidogenesis assay: (1) Measured concentrations of POPs in silicone breast implants were taken from a recent study and silicone disks were loaded according to these measurements. (2) Silicone disks were transferred into H295R cell culture plates in order to control...

  11. Deep level transient spectroscopy study for the development of ion-implanted silicon field-effect transistors for spin-dependent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B.C., E-mail: johnsonb@unimelb.edu.a [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computer Technology, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); McCallum, J.C. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computer Technology, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Willems van Beveren, L.H.; Gauja, E. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computer Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2010-02-26

    A deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study of defects created by low-fluence, low-energy ion implantation for development of ion-implanted silicon field-effect transistors for spin-dependent transport experiments is presented. Standard annealing strategies are considered to activate the implanted dopants and repair the implantation damage in test metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. Fixed oxide charge, interface trapped charge and the role of minority carriers in DLTS are investigated. A furnace anneal at 950 {sup o}C was found to activate the dopants but did not repair the implantation damage as efficiently as a 1000 {sup o}C rapid thermal anneal. No evidence of bulk traps was observed after either of these anneals. The ion-implanted spin-dependent transport device is shown to have expected characteristics using the processing strategy determined in this study.

  12. Nano-ridge fabrication by local oxidation of silicon edges with silicon nitride as a mask

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneveld, Jeroen; Berenschot, Erwin; Maury, Pascale; Jansen, Henri

    2006-01-01

    A method to fabricate nano-ridges over a full wafer is presented. The fabrication method uses local oxidation of silicon, with silicon nitride as a mask, and wet anisotropic etching of silicon. The realized structures are 7–20 nm wide, 40–100 nm high and centimeters long. All dimensions are easily a

  13. Nano-ridge fabrication by local oxidation of silicon edges with silicon nitride as a mask

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneveld, Jeroen; Berenschot, Erwin; Maury, Pascale; Jansen, Henri

    2005-01-01

    A method to fabricate nano-ridges over a full wafer is presented. The fabrication method uses local oxidation of silicon, with silicon nitride as a mask, and wet anisotropic etching of silicon. The realized structures are 7-20 nm wide, 40-100 nm high and centimeters long. All dimensions are easily a

  14. Silicon defects characterization for low temperature ion implantation and RTA process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirani Paolillo, Diego; Margutti, Giovanni; De Biase, Marco [LFoundry s.r.l. Avezzano (Italy); Barozzi, Mario; Giubertoni, Damiano [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento (Italy); Spaggiari, Claudio [Axcelis Technologies Srl, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    In the last years a lot of effort has been directed in order to reduce silicon defects eventually formed during the ion implantation/anneal sequence used in the fabrication of CMOS devices. In this work we explored the effect of ion implant dose rate and temperature on the formation of silicon defects for high fluence {sup 49}BF{sub 2} implantations. The considered processes (implantation and annealing) conditions are those typically used to form the source/drain regions of p-channel transistors in the submicron technology node and will be detailed in the document. Characterization of implant damage and extended silicon defects left after anneal has been performed by TEM. Dopant distribution and dopant activation has been investigated by SIMS and SRP analysis. We have verified that implant dose rate and temperature modulate the thickness of the amorphous silicon observed after implant, as well as the concentrations of silicon defects left after anneal. Effect of high dose rate low temperature implantation on product device was also evaluated, showing a reduction of leakage current on p-channel transistors. Experimental set up, results and possible explanation will be reported and discussed in the paper.

  15. Silicon defects characterization for low temperature ion implantation and RTA process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirani Paolillo, Diego; Margutti, Giovanni; De Biase, Marco; Barozzi, Mario; Giubertoni, Damiano; Spaggiari, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    In the last years a lot of effort has been directed in order to reduce silicon defects eventually formed during the ion implantation/anneal sequence used in the fabrication of CMOS devices. In this work we explored the effect of ion implant dose rate and temperature on the formation of silicon defects for high fluence 49BF2 implantations. The considered processes (implantation and annealing) conditions are those typically used to form the source/drain regions of p-channel transistors in the submicron technology node and will be detailed in the document. Characterization of implant damage and extended silicon defects left after anneal has been performed by TEM. Dopant distribution and dopant activation has been investigated by SIMS and SRP analysis. We have verified that implant dose rate and temperature modulate the thickness of the amorphous silicon observed after implant, as well as the concentrations of silicon defects left after anneal. Effect of high dose rate low temperature implantation on product device was also evaluated, showing a reduction of leakage current on p-channel transistors. Experimental set up, results and possible explanation will be reported and discussed in the paper.

  16. Ultrafast laser functionalized rare phased gold-silicon/silicon oxide nanostructured hybrid biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premnath, P; Tan, B; Venkatakrishnan, K

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a hybrid nanostructured biomaterial that is a combination of rare phases of immiscible gold and silicon oxide, functionalized via ultrafast laser synthesis. For the first time, we show cancer controlling properties of rare phases of gold silicides, which include Au7Si, Au5Si, Au0.7Si2.3 and Au8Si2. Conventionally, pure forms of gold and silicon/silicon oxide are extensively employed in targeted therapy and drug delivery systems due to their unique properties. While silicon and silicon oxide nanoparticles have shown biocompatibility, gold nanoparticles show conflicting results based on their size and material properties. Several studies have shown that gold and silicon combinations produce cell controlling properties, however, these studies were not able to produce a homogenous combination of gold and silicon, owing to its immiscibility. A homogenous combination of gold and silicon may potentially enable properties that have not previously been reported. We describe rare phased gold-silicon oxide nanostructured hybrid biomaterials and its unique cancer controlling properties, owing to material properties, concentration, size and density. The gold-silicon oxide nanostructured hybrid is composed of individual gold-silicon oxide nanoparticles in various concentrations of gold and silicon, some nanoparticles possess a gold-core and silicon-shell like structure. The individual nanoparticles are bonded together forming a three dimensional nanostructured hybrid. The interaction of the nanostructured hybrids with cervical cancer cells showed a 96% reduction in 24h. This engineered nanostructured hybrid biomaterial presents significant potential due to the combination of immiscible gold and silicon oxide in varying phases and can potentially satiate the current vacuum in cancer therapy.

  17. Dependence of implantation sequence on surface blistering characteristics due to H and He ions co-implanted in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J.H. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsieh, H.Y.; Wu, C.W. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, C.M. [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-12-15

    This study investigated surface blistering characteristics due to H and He ions co-implanted in silicon at room temperature. The H and He ion energies were 40 and 50 keV, respectively, so that their depth profiles were similar. The total implantation fluence for the H and He ions was 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} under various fluence fractions in the H ions. The implantation sequences under investigation were He + H and H + He. Dynamic optical microscopy (DOM) was employed in order to dynamically analyze surface blistering characteristics. This study used DOM data to construct so-called time–temperature–transformation (T–T–T) curves to easily predict blistering and crater transformation at specific annealing times and temperatures. The results revealed that the curves of blister initialization, crater initialization, and crater completion in the He + H implant occurred at a lower annealing temperature but with a longer annealing time compared to those in the H + He implant. Furthermore, the threshold annealing temperatures for blister and crater formation in the He + H implant were lower than they were in the H + He implant. The size distributions of the blisters and craters in the He + H implant extended wider than those in the H + He implant. In addition, the He + H implant exhibited larger blisters and craters compared to the ones in the H + He implant. Since the former has a higher percentage of exfoliation area than the latter, it is regarded as the more optimal implantation sequence.

  18. Paramagnetism in ion-implanted oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, Torben Esmann; Gíslason, Hafliði Pétur; Ólafsson, Sveinn

    This thesis describes the investigation on para-magnetism in dilute ion-implanted single-crystal oxide samples studied by on- and off-line $^{57}$Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ion-implantation of the radioactive isotopes ( $^{57}$Mn and $^{57}$Co) was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The off-line measurements were performed at Aarhus University, Denmark. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a unique method, giving simultaneously local information on valence/spin state of the $^{57}$Fe probe atoms, site symmetry and magnetic properties on an atomic scale. The utilisation of emission Mössbauer spectroscopy opens up many new possibilities compared with traditional transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with a low concentration below 10$^{-4}$ –10$^{-3}$ at.%, where the implanted Mössbauer $^{57}$Fe probes are truly dilute impurities exclusively interacting with their nearest neighbours and therefore the possibility of crea...

  19. The Active Oxidation of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2009-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in two very different modes. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits further attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and may lead to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g) Generally passive oxidation occurs at higher oxidant pressures and active oxidation occurs at lower oxidant pressures and elevated temperatures. Active oxidation is a concern for reentry, where the flight trajectory involves the latter conditions. Thus the transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major concern. Passive/active transitions have been studied by a number of investigators. An examination of the literature indicates many questions remain regarding the effect of impurity, the hysteresis of the transition (i.e. the difference between active-to-passive and passive-toactive), and the effect of total pressure. In this study we systematically investigate each of these effects. Experiments were done in both an alumina furnace tube and a quartz furnace tube. It is known that alumina tubes release impurities such as sodium and increase the kinetics in the passive region [1]. We have observed that the active-to-passive transition occurs at a lower oxygen pressure when the experiment is conducted in alumina tubes and the resultant passive silica scale contains sodium. Thus the tests in this study are conducted in quartz tubes. The hysteresis of the transition has been discussed in the detail in the original theoretical treatise of this problem for pure silicon by Wagner [2], yet there is little mention of it in subsequent literature. Essentially Wagner points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. A series of experiments were conducted for active-to-passive and passive

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF PRECIPITATES IN CUBIC SILICON CARBIDE IMPLANTED WITH 25Mg+ IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Liu, Jia; Edwards, Danny J.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2016-09-26

    The aim of this study is to characterize precipitates in Mg+ ion implanted and high-temperature annealed cubic silicon carbide using scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and atom probe tomography.

  1. A custom-made nasal implant: prefabrication from curing of silicone adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K; Kang, J

    1996-02-01

    When nasal augmentation is performed with implants fashioned from a piece of solid silicone block or commercially available prefabricated implants, the precise sculpturing of the ventral surface of the implant in order to conform to the convex contour of the nose is often difficult to achieve, increasing the possibility for malposition and extrusion. We devised two methods of making soft silicone elastomer implants from nasal cast models obtained from alginate impressions of patients' noses: type I, in which the implant is made from the curing of silicone adhesive that is spread on both sides of the sheet blueprint placed on the cast model, and type II, in which the implant is made only from the curing of silicone adhesive. Because these custom-made implants have a ventral surface of exact concave contour conforming to the convex surface of the nasal framework, they blend in nicely with the various configurations of the existing nasal framework and thus minimize malposition and extrusion. These implants also avoid having a prototype nose for everyone and are more cost-effective than commercially available implants.

  2. Algorithm and techniques for using Sientra's silicone gel shaped implants in primary and revision breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael R

    2014-07-01

    With the 2006 Food and Drug Administration approval of round silicone gel breast implants in the United States, there still remained a lack of versatility in implant options. The approval of Sientra's shaped cohesive implants in 2012 brought with it the innovations needed to address varying patient needs. Because access to shaped devices is still fairly recent in the United States, some surgeons remain uncomfortable with implementing shaped cohesive gel implants into their practice. The author outlines surgical techniques and algorithms from experience with the Sientra shaped device, covering the preoperative stage, measurements (base diameter, sternal notch to nipple, tissue pinch, and nipple to inframammary fold), ideal first candidates, operative techniques, and complication avoidance, as well as important factors for shaped-implant selection, including chest base diameter, implant height, implant volume, and implant projection for the patient's desired outcome. With experience, surgeons will find new utility with shaped implants for a variety of patients in their practices.

  3. Thermal oxidation of Ge-implanted Si: Role of defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedyulin, S. N.; Goncharova, L. V.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal oxidation of Ge-implanted Si (SiGe) was carried out in dry O at 1073, 1173, and 1273 K for various times. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in random and channeling geometry was used to characterize the SiO thickness and composition of the Si (dry oxidation) [3,4,8,9,13-17] or by bubbling N/O through HO (wet oxidation) [5-7,9-12,18]. In these studies SiGe thin films were obtained by different growth techniques such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) [4-6,19,12], molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) [7,8,14,19,21-23], physical evaporation [3,18] as well as Ge ion implantation in Si [9-11,13,15-17]. Despite the great differences in the preparation of SiGe samples and oxidation procedures, the main features of SiGe thermal oxidation may be summarized by the following: Pure SiO was formed during oxidation: Ge atoms that were rejected from the growing silicon oxide piled up at the interface. This was observed in all cases, unless the temperature was low enough (⩽973 K)[24], or the oxidation pressure was high [6,19], or the Ge concentration, x, in the alloy satisfied x⩾0.5[7,8], or the oxidation time was very short [22,23]. All these conditions prevent Ge diffusion away from the reacting interface. The oxidation rate of SiGe in a wet atmosphere was enhanced in comparison to pure Si [4,5,9-12,18,25], while there was no enhancement in the dry O[9,16,22,25] (unless the sample was first pre-enriched with Ge to form approximately one monolayer of Ge at the interface [9]). Oxidation rate enhancement occurs during an initial linear regime of oxide growth [10]. SiGe oxidation rate enhancement has been explained by: (i) the weaker Si-Ge bond [11], (ii) Ge catalytic role for oxidation reaction [12], and (iii) changes in defect generation at the reacting interface [12]. It was shown for Ge ion implanted samples that the Deal and Grove model (DG model) for Si oxidation can still be applied with the linear B/ A constant modified to take into account enhanced oxidation

  4. Alleviation of capsular formations on silicone implants in rats using biomembrane-mimicking coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Ung; Ham, Jiyeon; Kim, Sukwha; Seo, Ji-Hun; Kim, Sang-Hyon; Lee, Seonju; Min, Hye Jeong; Choi, Sunghyun; Choi, Ra Mi; Kim, Heejin; Oh, Sohee; Hur, Ji An; Choi, Tae Hyun; Lee, Yan

    2014-10-01

    Despite their popular use in breast augmentation and reconstruction surgeries, the limited biocompatibility of silicone implants can induce severe side effects, including capsular contracture - an excessive foreign body reaction that forms a tight and hard fibrous capsule around the implant. This study examines the effects of using biomembrane-mimicking surface coatings to prevent capsular formations on silicone implants. The covalently attached biomembrane-mimicking polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC), prevented nonspecific protein adsorption and fibroblast adhesion on the silicone surface. More importantly, in vivo capsule formations around PMPC-grafted silicone implants in rats were significantly thinner and exhibited lower collagen densities and more regular collagen alignments than bare silicone implants. The observed decrease in α-smooth muscle actin also supported the alleviation of capsular formations by the biomembrane-mimicking coating. Decreases in inflammation-related cells, myeloperoxidase and transforming growth factor-β resulted in reduced inflammation in the capsular tissue. The biomembrane-mimicking coatings used on these silicone implants demonstrate great potential for preventing capsular contracture and developing biocompatible materials for various biomedical applications.

  5. Infrared dielectric properties of low-stress silicon oxide

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Brown, Ari D; Miller, Kevin H

    2016-01-01

    Silicon oxide thin films play an important role in the realization of optical coatings and high-performance electrical circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-infrared regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectrum for a commonly employed low-stress silicon oxide formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric function are presented.

  6. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-Stress Silicon Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J.; Brown, Ari D.; Miller, Kevin H.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon oxide thin films play an important role in the realization of optical coatings and high-performance electrical circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-infrared regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectrum for a commonly employed low-stress silicon oxide formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric function are presented.

  7. Bound exciton photoluminescence from ion‑implanted phosphorus in thin silicon layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumikura, Hisashi; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori; Fujiwara, Akira; Notomi, Masaya

    2011-12-01

    We report the observation of clear bound exciton (BE) emission from ion-implanted phosphorus. Shallow implantation and high-temperature annealing successfully introduce active donors into thin silicon layers. The BE emission at a wavelength of 1079 nm shows that a part of the implanted donors are definitely activated and isolated from each other. However, photoluminescence and electron spin resonance studies find a cluster state of the activated donors. The BE emission is suppressed by this cluster state rather than the nonradiative processes caused by ion implantation. Our results provide important information about ion implantation for doping quantum devices with phosphorus quantum bits.

  8. Photoluminescence evolution in self-ion-implanted and annealed silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu; Wang Chong; Yang Rui-Dong; Li Liang; Xiong Fei; Bao Ji-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Si+ ion-implanted silicon wafers are annealed at different temperatures from room temperature to 950℃ and then characterized by using the photoluminescence (PL) technique at different recorded temperatures (RETs). Plentiful optical features are observed and identified clearly in these PL curves. The PL spectra of these samples annealed in different temperature ranges are correspondingly dominated by different emission peaks. Several characteristic features, such as an R line, S bands, a W line, the phonon-assistant W~(TA) and Si~(TO) peaks, can be detected in the PL spectra of samples annealed at different temperatures. For the samples annealed at 800 ℃, emission peaks from the dislocations bounded at the deep energy levels of the forbidden band, such as D_1 and D_2 bands, can be observed at a temperature as high as 280 K. These data strongly indicate that a severe transformation of defect structures could be manipulated by the annealing and recorded temperatures. The deactivation energies of the main optical features are extracted from the PL data at different temperatures.

  9. MAGNESIUM PRECIPITATION AND DIFUSSION IN Mg+ ION IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-02

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. Calculations by Sawan et al. predict that at a dose of ~100 dpa (displacements per atom), there is ~0.5 at.% Mg generated in SiC. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the <100> axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C–SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C–SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4E-19 m2/s.

  10. Resistive switches and memories from silicon oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Sun, Zhengzong; Zhong, Lin; Natelson, Douglas; Tour, James M

    2010-10-13

    Because of its excellent dielectric properties, silicon oxide (SiO(x)) has long been used and considered as a passive, insulating component in the construction of electronic devices. In contrast, here we demonstrate resistive switches and memories that use SiO(x) as the sole active material and can be implemented in entirely metal-free embodiments. Through cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, we determine that the switching takes place through the voltage-driven formation and modification of silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in the SiO(x) matrix, with SiO(x) itself also serving as the source of the formation of this Si pathway. The small sizes of the Si NCs (d ∼ 5 nm) suggest that scaling to ultrasmall domains could be feasible. Meanwhile, the switch also shows robust nonvolatile properties, high ON/OFF ratios (>10(5)), fast switching (sub-100-ns), and good endurance (10(4) write-erase cycles). These properties in a SiO(x)-based material composition showcase its potentials in constructing memory or logic devices that are fully CMOS compatible.

  11. Oxidation of Silicon and Boron in Boron Containing Molten Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new process of directly smelting boron steel from boron-containing pig iron has been established. The starting material boron-containing pig iron was obtained from ludwigite ore, which is very abundant in the eastern area of Liaoning Province of China. The experiment was performed in a medium-frequency induction furnace, and Fe2O3 powder was used as the oxidizing agent. The effects of temperature, addition of Fe2O3, basicity, stirring, and composition of melt on the oxidation of silicon and boron were investigated respectively. The results showed that silicon and boron were oxidized simultaneously and their oxidation ratio exceeded 90% at 1 400 ℃. The favorable oxidation temperature of silicon was about 1 300-1 350 C. High oxygen potential of slag and strong stirring enhanced the oxidation of silicon and boron.

  12. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Cavallaro, Alex; Delalat, Bahman; Harding, Frances J.; McInnes, Steven JP; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vasilev, Krasimir; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

  13. High resolution Laplace DLTS studies of defects in ion-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans-Freeman, J.H. E-mail: j.evans-freeman@umist.ac.uk; Abdelgader, N.; Kan, P.Y.Y.; Peaker, A.R

    2002-01-01

    We have used high resolution Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) to investigate defects in n-type silicon caused by implantation of Si, Ge or Er with doses of the order of 1x10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}. These are compared with defects created in proton irradiated n-type silicon. Unlike the simple proton irradiated case, LDLTS spectra of ion implanted silicon show that there are many emission rates associated with defects with energies in the region of E{sub c}-400 meV. We have carried out annealing studies and Laplace DLTS depth profiling and show that the complex spectra measured from a region less than half way through the implant simplify as the profile is moved through the implant and towards the tail. Annealing studies show that these defects survive an anneal that should remove the E-centre.

  14. Recrystallization and reactivation of dopant atoms in ion-implanted silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, Naoki; Takiguchi, Ryo; Ishida, Shinya; Yokono, Shigeki; Hishita, Shunichi; Murakami, Kouichi

    2012-04-24

    Recrystallization of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) after ion implantation strongly depends on the ion doses and species. Full amorphization by high-dose implantation induces polycrystal structures in SiNWs even after high-temperature annealing, with this tendency more pronounced for heavy ions. Hot-implantation techniques dramatically suppress polycrystallization in SiNWs, resulting in reversion to the original single-crystal structures and consequently high reactivation rate of dopant atoms. In this study, the chemical bonding states and electrical activities of implanted boron and phosphorus atoms were evaluated by Raman scattering and electron spin resonance, demonstrating the formation of p- and n-type SiNWs.

  15. Histopathological reaction over prosthesis surface covered with silicone and polyurethane foam implanted in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenführ-Júnior, Jorge; Ribas Filho, Jurandir Marcondes; Nascimento, Marcelo Mazza do; Ribas, Fernanda Marcondes; Wanka, Marcus Vinícius; Godoi, Andressa de Lima

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate whether polyurethane foam leads more intense foreign-body reaction than silicone foam. To compare the vascularization of the capsules surrounding the foam implants. To investigate if the capsule of polyurethane foam implanted has greater amount of collagen than that of silicone foam. Sixty-four young male Wistar rats were allocated into two groups: polyurethane foam and silicone foam. Subcutaneous discs were implanted into the dorsum of the animals in both groups. The capsules were assessed 28 days, two months, three months and six months postoperatively. Microscopic analysis with H&E stain was performed to evaluate the acute and chronic inflammatory process, foreign-body reaction and neovascularization. The analysis with picrosirius red was performed using the ImageProPlus software, to measure the number of vessels and collagen types I and III. There were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding the acute and chronic inflammatory processes. All rats from the polyurethane group, in all times, exhibited moderate or intense foreign-body reaction, with statistic significant difference (p=0.046) when compared with the silicone group, in which the reaction was either mild or nonexistent at two months. Vascular proliferation was significantly different between the groups at 28 days (p=0.0002), with the polyurethane group displaying greater neovascularization with H&E stain. Similar results were obtained with picrosirius red, which revealed in the polyurethane group a much greater number of vessels than in the silicone group (p=0.001). The collagen area was larger in the polyurethane group, significantly at 28 days (p=0.001) and at two months (p=0.030). Polyurethane foam elicited more intense foreign-body reaction when compared with silicone foam. The number of vessels was higher in the capsules of the polyurethane foam implants 28 days after the operation. The capsule of the polyurethane foam implants showed a greater amount of collagen

  16. Development of Doped Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide and its Application to Thin‑Film Silicon Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertz, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the development of doped microcrystalline silicon oxide (µc‑SiOx:H) alloys and its application in thin‑film silicon solar cells. The doped µc‑SiOx:H material was prepared from carbon dioxide (CO2), silane (SiH4), hydrogen (H2) gas mixtures using plasma enhanced

  17. Development of Doped Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide and its Application to Thin‑Film Silicon Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertz, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the development of doped microcrystalline silicon oxide (µc‑SiOx:H) alloys and its application in thin‑film silicon solar cells. The doped µc‑SiOx:H material was prepared from carbon dioxide (CO2), silane (SiH4), hydrogen (H2) gas mixtures using plasma enhanced chemic

  18. Structural characterization of buried nitride layers formed by nitrogen ion implantation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, A.D. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai, Maharashtra 400098 (India)], E-mail: adyadav@physics.mu.ac.in; Patel, A.P.; Dubey, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai, Maharashtra 400098 (India); Panigrahi, B.K.; Kesavamoorthy, R.; Nair, K.G.M. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2008-04-15

    The synthesis of buried silicon nitride insulating layers was carried out by SIMNI (separation by implanted nitrogen) process using implantation of 140 keV nitrogen ({sup 14}N{sup +}) ions at fluence of 1.0 x 10{sup 17}, 2.5 x 10{sup 17} and 5.0 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} into <1 1 1> single crystal silicon substrates held at elevated temperature (410 deg. C). The structures of ion-beam synthesized buried silicon nitride layers were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The XRD studies reveal the formation of hexagonal silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) structure at all fluences. The concentration of the silicon nitride phase was found to be dependent on the ion fluence. The intensity and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of XRD peak were found to increase with increase in ion fluence. The Raman spectra for samples implanted with different ion fluences show crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrate peak at wavenumber 520 cm{sup -1}. The intensity of the silicon peak was found to decrease with increase in ion fluence.

  19. Density of oxidation-induced stacking faults in damaged silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, F.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Verwey, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    A model for the relation between density and length of oxidation-induced stacking faults on damaged silicon surfaces is proposed, based on interactions of stacking faults with dislocations and neighboring stacking faults. The model agrees with experiments.

  20. Treatment of Neovascular Glaucoma Using Trabeculectomy Combined with Implantation of Silicon Rubber Slice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weizhong Yang; Fengang Deng

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To observe clinical effect of treatment for neovascular glaucoma using trabeculectomy combined with implantation of silicon rubber slice. Methods: 28 cases(28 eyes)with neovascular glaucoma were performed trabeculectomy combined with a piece of 3 × 5 mm silicon rubber implantation, and their lowing intraocular pressure effect was observed.Results: All patients were follow-up for 9 ~ 24 months (mean: 18.3 months). The average intraocular pressure at last visit was 21.65 mmHg (rang: 17.30 ~ 28.97 mmHg , 1mmHg = 0. 133 kPa). The symptom of eye pain was disappeared after surgery.Conclusion: Trabeculectomy with a piece of silicon rubber implantation is ideal therapy for neovascular glaucoma.

  1. The influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulinich O. A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface silicon layers in silicon – dioxide silicon systems with modern methods of research are investigated. It is shown that these layers have compound structure and their parameters depend on oxidation and initial silicon parameters. It is shown the influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon.

  2. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis for certification of ion-implanted phosphorus in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rick L; Simons, David S; Guthrie, William F; Lu, John

    2003-08-15

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis procedure has been developed, critically evaluated, and shown to have the necessary sensitivity, chemical specificity, matrix independence, and precision to certify phosphorus at ion implantation levels in silicon. 32P, produced by neutron capture of 31P, is chemically separated from the sample matrix and measured using a beta proportional counter. The method is used here to certify the amount of phosphorus in SRM 2133 (Phosphorus Implant in Silicon Depth Profile Standard) as (9.58 +/- 0.16) x 10(14) atoms x cm(-2). A detailed evaluation of uncertainties is given.

  3. The association of Matrix Gla protein isomers with calcification in capsules surrounding silicone breast implants

    OpenAIRE

    Larry W. Hunter; Lieske, John C.; Tran, Nho V.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2011-01-01

    Implanted silicone medical prostheses induce a dynamic sequence of histologic events in adjacent tissue resulting in the formation of a fibrotic peri-prosthetic capsule. In some cases, capsular calcification occurs, requiring surgical intervention. In this study we investigated capsules from silicone gel-filled breast prostheses to test the hypothesis that this calcification might be regulated by the small vitamin K-dependent protein, matrix Gla protein (MGP), a potent inhibitor of arterial c...

  4. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M., E-mail: msingh@sandia.gov; Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87175 (United States); Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  5. Radiological and echographic aspects of breasts with silicone implants; Aspectos radiologicos e ecograficos das mamas com protese de silicone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace Bauab, S. de [Instituto de Radiodiagnostico Rio Preto, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil)

    1994-10-01

    The silicone prosthesis, its application in breast augmentation mammoplasty and the studies about its association with auto-immune diseases and cancer, are commented. The normal and the pathologic radiologic and echographic aspects of breasts with implants are discussed, concerning to the prosthesis itself and to the adjacent parenchyma. The validity of mammographic and ultrasound mammography in the detection of cancer and of alterations of the implants are emphasized and also the importance of exams of high technical quality.(author). 16 refs, 13 figs.

  6. Oxidation of ultra low carbon and silicon bearing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Lucia [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: lucia.suarez@ctm.com.es; Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es; Houbaert, Yvan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be; Colas, Rafael [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)], E-mail: rcolas@mail.uanl.mx

    2010-06-15

    Oxidation tests were carried out in samples from an ultra low carbon and two silicon bearing steels to determine the distribution and morphology of the oxide species present. The ultra low carbon steel was oxidized for short periods of time within a chamber designed to obtain thin oxide layers by controlling the atmosphere, and for longer times in an electric furnace; the silicon steels were reheated only in the electric furnace. The chamber was constructed to study the behaviour encountered during the short period of time between descaling and rolling in modern continuous mills. It was found that the oxide layers formed on the samples reheated in the electric furnace were made of different oxide species. The specimens treated in the chamber had layers made almost exclusively of wustite. Selected oxide samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy to obtain electron backscattered diffraction patterns, which were used to identify the oxide species in the layer.

  7. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants--Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing from silicone to the H295R steroidogenesis assay: (1) Measured concentrations of POPs in silicone breast implants were taken from a recent study and silicone disks were loaded according to these measurements. (2) Silicone disks were transferred into H295R cell culture plates in order to control exposure of the adrenal cells by equilibrium partitioning. (3) Hormone production of the adrenal cells was measured as toxicity endpoint. 4-Nonylphenol was used for method development, and the new dosing method was compared to conventional solvent-dosing. The two dosing modes yielded similar dose-dependent hormonal responses of H295R cells. However, with the partitioning-controlled freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree) as dose metrics, dose-response curves were left-shifted by two orders of magnitude relative to spiked concentrations. Partitioning-controlled dosing of POPs resulted in up to 2-fold increases in progestagen and corticosteroid levels at Cfree of individual POPs in or below the femtomolar range. Silicone acted not only as source of the POPs but also as a sorption sink for lipophilic hormones, stimulating the cellular hormone production. Methodologically, the study showed that silicone can be used as reference partitioning phase to transfer in vivo exposure in humans (silicone implants) to in vitro assays (partition-controlled dosing). The main finding was that POPs at the levels at which they are found in humans can interfere with steroidogenesis in a human adrenocortical cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of nitrogen dose on the charge density of nitrogen-implanted buried oxide in SOI wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Zhongshan [Department of Physics, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Liu Zhongli; Li Ning; Li Guohua [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang Enxia, E-mail: ss_zhengzs@ujn.edu.c [College of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2010-02-15

    To harden silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers fabricated using separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX) to total-dose irradiation, the technique of nitrogen implantation into the buried oxide (BOX) layer of SIMOX wafers can be used. However, in this work, it has been found that all the nitrogen-implanted BOX layers reveal greater initial positive charge densities, which increased with increasing nitrogen implantation dose. Also, the results indicate that excessively large nitrogen implantation dose reduced the radiation tolerance of BOX for its high initial positive charge density. The bigger initial positive charge densities can be ascribed to the accumulation of implanted nitrogen near the Si-BOX interface after annealing. On the other hand, in our work, it has also been observed that, unlike nitrogen-implanted BOX, all the fluorine-implanted BOX layers show a negative charge density. To obtain the initial charge densities of the BOX layers, the tested samples were fabricated with a metal-BOX-silicon (MBS) structure based on SIMOX wafers for high-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) analysis. (semiconductor technology)

  9. Coulomb blockade effects in silicon nanoparticles embedded in thin silicon-rich oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Sanchez, A; Barreto, J; Dominguez, C [IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain); Aceves, M; Yu, Z [INAOE, Electronics Department, Apartado 51, Puebla, 72000 (Mexico); Luna-Lopez, J A [CCMC, UNAM, Optics Department, Ensenada, BC, 22800 (Mexico)], E-mail: alfredo.morales@cnm.es

    2008-04-23

    Silicon nanoparticles (Si-nps) embedded in silicon oxide matrix were created using silicon-rich oxide (SRO) films deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) followed by a thermal annealing at 1100 deg. C. The electrical properties were studied using metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures with the SRO films as the active layers. Capacitance versus voltage (C-V) exhibited downward and upward peaks in the accumulation region related to charge trapping and de-trapping effects of Si-nps, respectively. Current versus voltage (I-V) measurements showed fluctuations in the form of spike-like peaks and a clear staircase at room temperature. These effects have been related to the Coulomb blockade (CB) effect in the silicon nanoparticles embedded in SRO films. The observed quantum effects are due to 1 nm nanoparticles.

  10. Mechanical grooving of oxidized porous silicon to reduce the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarroug, A.; Dimassi, W.; Ouertani, R.; Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre des Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, we are interested to use oxidized porous silicon (ox-PS) as a mask. So, we display the creating of a rough surface which enhances the absorption of incident light by solar cells and reduces the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si). It clearly can be seen that the mechanical grooving enables us to elaborate the texturing of monocrystalline silicon wafer. Results demonstrated that the application of a PS layer followed by a thermal treatment under O2 ambient easily gives us an oxide layer of uniform size which can vary from a nanometer to about ten microns. In addition, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy investigations of the PS layer illustrates the possibility to realize oxide layer as a mask for porous silicon. We found also that this simple and low cost method decreases the total reflectivity (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed.

  12. Biocompatibility of implantable materials: An oxidative stress viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthuy, Pierre-Alexis; Snelling, Sarah J B; Dakin, Stephanie G; Milković, Lidija; Gašparović, Ana Čipak; Carr, Andrew J; Žarković, Neven

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when the production of oxidants surpasses the antioxidant capacity in living cells. Oxidative stress is implicated in a number of pathological conditions such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases but it also has crucial roles in the regulation of cellular activities. Over the last few decades, many studies have identified significant connections between oxidative stress, inflammation and healing. In particular, increasing evidence indicates that the production of oxidants and the cellular response to oxidative stress are intricately connected to the fate of implanted biomaterials. This review article provides an overview of the major mechanisms underlying the link between oxidative stress and the biocompatibility of biomaterials. ROS, RNS and lipid peroxidation products act as chemo-attractants, signalling molecules and agents of degradation during the inflammation and healing phases. As chemo-attractants and signalling molecules, they contribute to the recruitment and activation of inflammatory and healing cells, which in turn produce more oxidants. As agents of degradation, they contribute to the maturation of the extracellular matrix at the healing site and to the degradation of the implanted material. Oxidative stress is itself influenced by the material properties, such as by their composition, their surface properties and their degradation products. Because both cells and materials produce and react with oxidants, oxidative stress may be the most direct route mediating the communication between cells and materials. Improved understanding of the oxidative stress mechanisms following biomaterial implantation may therefore help the development of new biomaterials with enhanced biocompatibility.

  13. Effect of the technology of implanting nitrogen into buried oxide on the radiation hardness of the top gate oxide for partially depleted SOI PMOSFET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhong-Shan; Liu Zhong-Li; Zhang Guo-Qiang; Li Ning; Fan Kai; Zhang En-Xia; Yi Wan-Bing; Chen Meng; Wang Xi

    2005-01-01

    The effect of implanting nitrogen into buried oxide on the top gate oxide hardness against total irradiation does has been investigated with three nitrogen implantation doses(8×1015,2×1016 and 1×1017cm -2) for partially depleted SOI PMOSFET.The experimental results reveal the trend of negative shift of the thershold voltages of the studied transistors with the incerase of nitrogen implantation dose before irradition. After the irradiation with a total dose of 5×105 rad (Si)under a positive gate voltage of 2V,the threshold voltage shift of the transistors corresponding to the nitrogen implantation dose 8×1015cm -2 is smaller than that of the transistors without implantation.However, when the implantation dose reaches 2×1016 and 1×1017cm-2, for the majority of the tested transistors,their top gate oxide was badly damaged due to irratiation. In addition, the radiation also causes damage to the body -drain junctions of thetransistors with the gate oxide damaged.All the results can be interpreted by tracing back to the nitrogen implantation damage to the crystal lattices in the top silicon.

  14. Doped nanocrystalline silicon oxide for use as (intermediate) reflecting layers in thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babal, P.

    2014-01-01

    In summary, this thesis shows the development and nanostructure analysis of doped silicon oxide layers. These layers are applied in thin-film silicon single and double junction solar cells. Concepts of intermediate reflectors (IR), consisting of silicon and/or zinc oxide, are applied in tandem cells

  15. Integration of functional complex oxide nanomaterials on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel eVila-Fungueiriño

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of standard wafer-scale semiconductor processing with the properties of functional oxides opens up to innovative and more efficient devices with high value applications that can be produced at large scale. This review uncovers the main strategies that are successfully used to monolithically integrate functional complex oxide thin films and nanostructures on silicon: the chemical solution deposition approach (CSD and the advanced physical vapor deposition techniques such as oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Special emphasis will be placed on complex oxide nanostructures epitaxially grown on silicon using the combination of CSD and MBE. Several examples will be exposed, with a particular stress on the control of interfaces and crystallization mechanisms on epitaxial perovskite oxide thin films, nanostructured quartz thin films, and octahedral molecular sieve nanowires. This review enlightens on the potential of complex oxide nanostructures and the combination of both chemical and physical elaboration techniques for novel oxide-based integrated devices.

  16. Behaviour of implanted arsenic in silicon single crystals subjected to transient heating with incoherent light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Borisenko, V. E.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of ion-implanted arsenic in -oriented silicon single crystals exposed to continuous incoherent light from a xenon arc lamp has been analyzed with sheet resistivity measurements, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and ion channeling including angular scans. Redistribution, substitutionality, and electrical activity of arsenic were followed as functions of exposure time (6 20s) and induced temperature (1000° 1100°C). Redistribution was observed for implanted concentrations exceeding ˜4×1020 at.%/cm3. High substitutional fractions, between 95% and 99%, and low sheet resistivities were found for all annealed samples. Formation mechanism of arsenic substitutional solid solutions during transient heating of implanted layers is discussed.

  17. Peculiarities of the electron structure of nanosized ion-implanted layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysbaev, A. S.; Khuzhaniyazov, Zh. B.; Normuradov, M. T.; Rakhimov, A. M.; Bekpulatov, I. R.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of implantation of Ba, P, B, and alkali element ions with a low energy ( E 0 narrowing of the band gap in silicon, which can be explained by overlapping of the wavefunctions of electrons of impurity atoms and the formation of the impurity subband overlapping with the allowed band. After implantation thermal annealing, SiP, BaSi, and SiB3 films of nano-sized thickness are obtained for the first time. Optimal regimes of ion implantation and subsequent annealing for the formation of silicide films are determined, and their electron structure is investigated.

  18. Peripheral nerve regeneration through a silicone chamber implanted with negative carbon ions: Possibility to clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether a tube with its inner surface implanted with negative-charged carbon ions (C- ions) would enable axons to extend over a distance greater than 10 mm. The tube was found to support nerves regenerating across a 15-mm-long inter-stump gap. We also investigated whether a C- ion-implanted tube pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. The C- ion implanted tube accelerated nerve regeneration, and this effect was enhanced by bFGF. Silicone treated with C- ions showed increased hydrophilic properties and cellular affinity, and axon regeneration was promoted with this increased biocompatibility.

  19. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Zou, Xingquan; Chi, Lingfei; Li, Qiang; Xiao, Tan

    2007-03-01

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO2 and active carbon at 1000 °C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 µm. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiOx nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  20. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ping; Zou Xingquan; Chi Lingfei; Li Qiang; Xiao Tan [Department of Physics, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China)

    2007-03-28

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO{sub 2} and active carbon at 1000 deg. C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 {mu}m. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiO{sub x} nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  1. Comparative investigation of damage induced by diatomic and monoatomic ion implantation in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohner, T.; Toth, L.; Fried, M.; Khanh, N.Q.; Yang, Gen Qing; Lu, Lin Chen; Zou, Shichang; Hanekamp, L.J.; Silfhout, van A.; Gyulai, J.

    1994-01-01

    The damaging effect of mono- and diatomic phosphorus and arsenic ions implanted into silicon was investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and high-depth-resolution Rutherford backscattering and channeling techniques. A comparison was made between the two methods to check the capability of ell

  2. First stages of silicon oxidation with the activation relaxation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganster, Patrick; Béland, Laurent Karim; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-08-01

    Using the art nouveau method, we study the initial stages of silicon oxide formation. After validating the method's parameters with the characterization of point defects diffusion mechanisms in pure Stillinger-Weber silicon, which allows us to recover some known results and to detail vacancy and self-interstitial diffusion paths, the method is applied onto a system composed of an oxygen layer deposited on a silicon substrate. We observe the oxygen atoms as they move rapidly into the substrate. From these art nouveau simulations, we extract the energy barriers of elementary mechanisms involving oxygen atoms and leading to the formation of an amorphouslike silicon oxide. We show that the kinetics of formation can be understood in terms of the energy barriers between various coordination environments.

  3. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Microporous Silicon Nitride Membranes for Medical Implant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A.; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Narayan, Roger J.

    2012-04-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) exhibits excellent biological and mechanical properties, which make it an appropriate choice for promoting epidermal cell migration on the surfaces of percutaneous implants. We deposited a ~150 nm thick UNCD film on a microporous silicon nitride membrane using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to examine the pore structure and chemical bonding of this material, respectively. Growth of human epidermal keratinocytes on UNCD-coated microporous silicon nitride membranes and uncoated microporous silicon nitride membranes was compared using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results show that the UNCD coating did not significantly alter the viability of human epidermal keratinocytes, indicating potential use of this material for improving skin sealing around percutaneous implants.

  4. Non-invasive nano-imaging of ion implanted and activated copper in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballout, Fouad; Samson, Jean-Sébastien; Schmidt, Diedrich A.; Bründermann, Erik; Mathis, Yves-Laurent; Gasharova, Biliana; Dirk Wieck, Andreas; Havenith, Martina

    2011-07-01

    Using vibrational imaging techniques including Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) synchrotron microscopy, Raman microscopy, and scattering scanning near-field infrared microcscopy (s-SNIM), we mapped a sample of phosphor and copper ions implanted in a high-purity silicon wafer. While Raman microscopy monitors the structural disorder within the implantation fields, the aforementionedinfrared techniques provide a detailed picture of the distribution of the free carriers. On a large scale (tens of micrometers), we visualized the channeling effects of phosphor dopants in silicon using FTIR microscopy. In comparison, using s-SNIM we were able to image, on a nanometer scale, local variations of the dielectric properties of the silicon substrate due to the activation of copper dopants.

  5. Activation energy of thermal desorption of silicon oxide layers on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enta, Yoshiharu; Osanai, Shodai; Ogasawara, Takahito

    2017-02-01

    Thermal desorption rates of silicon oxide layers, from 20 to 120 nm in thickness, on silicon substrates in vacuum have been accurately obtained from intervals between ring structures formed inside voids on the oxide layers. From the temperature dependence of the desorption rate, the activation energy and frequency factor of the desorption reaction have been derived as a function of the oxide thickness. The obtained values are compared with the previous studies, and as a result, the activation energy is found to be almost constant ( 4 eV) in a wide range of the oxide thickness. The frequency factor decreases as the inverse square of the oxide thickness. The decomposition kinetics of the oxide layer is also discussed from the obtained results.

  6. A Novel Method to Fabricate Silicon Nanowire p-n Junctions by a Combination of Ion Implantation and in-situ Doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanungo, Pratyushdas; Kögler, Reinhard; Werner, Peter; Gösele, Ulrich; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2009-11-08

    We demonstrate a novel method to fabricate an axial p-n junction inside oriented short vertical silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy by combining ion implantation with in-situ doping. The lower halves of the nanowires were doped in-situ with boron (concentration ~1018cm-3), while the upper halves were doubly implanted with phosphorus to yield a uniform concentration of 2 × 1019 cm-3. Electrical measurements of individually contacted nanowires showed excellent diode characteristics and ideality factors close to 2. We think that this value of ideality factors arises out of a high rate of carrier recombination through surface states in the native oxide covering the nanowires.

  7. Contracted Nose after Silicone Implantation: A New Classification System and Treatment Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Kyu; Shin, Seungho; Kim, Joo Heon

    2017-01-01

    Background Silicone implants are frequently used in augmentation rhinoplasty in Asians. A common complication of silicone augmentation rhinoplasty is capsular contracture. This is similar to the capsular contracture after augmentation mammoplasty, but a classification for secondary contracture after augmentation rhinoplasty with silicone implants has not yet been established, and treatment algorithms by grade or severity have yet to be developed. Methods Photographs of 695 patients who underwent augmentation rhinoplasty with a silicone implant from May 2001 to May 2015 were analyzed. The mean observation period was 11.4 months. Of the patients, 81 were male and 614 were female, with a mean age of 35.9 years. Grades were assigned according to postoperative appearance. Grade I was a natural appearance, as if an implant had not been inserted. Grade II was an unnatural lateral margin of the implant. Clearly identifiable implant deviation was classified as grade III, and short nose deformation was grade IV. Results Grade I outcomes were found in 498 patients (71.7%), grade II outcomes in 101 (14.5%), grade III outcomes in 75 (10.8%), and grade IV outcomes in 21 patients (3.0%). Revision surgery was indicated for the 13.8% of all patients who had grade III or IV outcomes. Conclusions It is important to clinically classify the deformations due to secondary contracture after surgery and to establish treatment algorithms to improve scientific communication among rhinoplasty surgeons. In this study, we suggest guidelines for the clinical classification of secondary capsular contracture after augmentation rhinoplasty, and also propose a treatment algorithm. PMID:28194349

  8. Contracted Nose after Silicone Implantation: A New Classification System and Treatment Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Kyu Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSilicone implants are frequently used in augmentation rhinoplasty in Asians. A common complication of silicone augmentation rhinoplasty is capsular contracture. This is similar to the capsular contracture after augmentation mammoplasty, but a classification for secondary contracture after augmentation rhinoplasty with silicone implants has not yet been established, and treatment algorithms by grade or severity have yet to be developed.MethodsPhotographs of 695 patients who underwent augmentation rhinoplasty with a silicone implant from May 2001 to May 2015 were analyzed. The mean observation period was 11.4 months. Of the patients, 81 were male and 614 were female, with a mean age of 35.9 years. Grades were assigned according to postoperative appearance. Grade I was a natural appearance, as if an implant had not been inserted. Grade II was an unnatural lateral margin of the implant. Clearly identifiable implant deviation was classified as grade III, and short nose deformation was grade IV.ResultsGrade I outcomes were found in 498 patients (71.7%, grade II outcomes in 101 (14.5%, grade III outcomes in 75 (10.8%, and grade IV outcomes in 21 patients (3.0%. Revision surgery was indicated for the 13.8% of all patients who had grade III or IV outcomes.ConclusionsIt is important to clinically classify the deformations due to secondary contracture after surgery and to establish treatment algorithms to improve scientific communication among rhinoplasty surgeons. In this study, we suggest guidelines for the clinical classification of secondary capsular contracture after augmentation rhinoplasty, and also propose a treatment algorithm.

  9. [Improvement of fecal incontinence with silicone implants in patients with internal anal sphincter injury: First report in North America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Valdovinos-Díaz, M A; Hagerman-Ruiz Galindo, G; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Ruíz-Campos, M; Castillo-Machado, W

    2011-01-01

    The injection of bulking agents has been described as a useful treatment of urinary and fecal incontinence. Among them, silicone implants have shown benefits in patients with internal anal sphincter (IAS) injury. We describe two patients with a history of hemorrhoidectomy and IAS injuries, which underwent placement of silicone implants. The implants were inserted into the intersphincteric space and the IAS under ultrasound guidance. The Wexner continente score fell from 17 and 19 before treatment, to 6 and 8 at six months follow up, respectively. Patients had no postoperative complications or implants migration. In our patients, injection of silicone implants improved fecal continence score, without postoperative complications or implants migration at six month follow up.

  10. Characterization of in-depth cavity distribution after thermal annealing of helium-implanted silicon and gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, B., E-mail: fodor.balint@ttk.mta.hu [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences (MTA TTK MFA), 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege u. 29-33 (Hungary); Faculty of Science, University of Pécs, 7624 Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6 (Hungary); Cayrel, F. [GREMAN, pôle MTECH, Université François Rabelais, 16 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, B.P. 7155, F37071 Tours Cedex (France); Agocs, E. [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences (MTA TTK MFA), 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege u. 29-33 (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem 8200 (Hungary); Alquier, D. [GREMAN, pôle MTECH, Université François Rabelais, 16 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, B.P. 7155, F37071 Tours Cedex (France); Fried, M.; Petrik, P. [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences (MTA TTK MFA), 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege u. 29-33 (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem 8200 (Hungary)

    2014-11-28

    Single-crystalline silicon wafers covered with sacrificial oxide layer and epitaxially grown gallium nitride layers were implanted with high-fluence helium ions (2–6 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}) at energies of 20–30 keV. Thermal annealings at 650–1000 °C, 1 h were performed on the Si samples and rapid thermal annealings at 600–1000 °C, 120 s under N{sub 2} were performed on the GaN samples. The as-implanted samples and the near-surface cavity distributions of the annealed samples were investigated with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. In-depth defect profiles and cavity profiles can be best described with multiple independent effective medium sublayers of varying ratio of single-crystal/void. The number of sublayers was chosen to maximize the fit quality without a high parameter cross-correlation. The dependence of the implantation fluence, oxide layer thickness and annealing temperature on the cavity distribution was separately investigated. The ellipsometric fitted distributions were compared and cross-checked with analyses of transmission electron micrographs where the average surface cavity was determined sublayer by sublayer. The in-depth profiles were also compared with simulations of He and vacancy distributions. - Highlights: • He implanted and annealed Si and GaN measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry • Effective medium approximation models developed • Cavity formation as function of oxide thickness, ion dose, annealing temperature • Cavity in-depth distributions compared with transmission electron micrographs.

  11. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  12. Silicone oil implantation in penetrating injuries complicated by PVR. Results from 1982 to 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorpik, C; Menapace, R; Gnad, H D; Paroussis, P

    1989-01-01

    Between 1982 and 1986, the authors implanted silicone oil in 34 eyes with retinal detachment and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) stages C-3 to D-3 caused by penetrating injuries. The retina had failed to reattach after initial vitrectomy, membrane peeling, and scleral buckling. Complete anatomic reattachment was achieved in 62%, partial reattachment in an additional 9%. Useful functional results were achieved in 68% of cases (visual acuity of 1/60 to 20/20). Postoperative complications included elevated intraocular pressure in 38% and progress of PVR with membrane formation under the silicone oil in 21% of the cases. Sixty-eight percent of the aphakic eyes developed band-shaped keratopathy. Because most of the eyes were aphakic, the authors do not report cataract incidence. In 15 eyes (44%) the silicone oil was removed. In 14 of these eyes the retina remains attached, in one eye silicone oil removal was followed by phthisis bulbi.

  13. DC and AC electroluminescence in silicon nanoparticles embedded in silicon-rich oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Sanchez, A; Aceves-Mijares, M [INAOE, Electronics Department, Apartado 51, Puebla, 72000 (Mexico); Barreto, J; DomInguez, C [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Peralvarez, M; Garrido, B [EME, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, MartI i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Luna-Lopez, J A, E-mail: amorales@inaoep.mx [CIDS-BUAP, Apartado 1651, Puebla, Pue, 72000 (Mexico)

    2010-02-26

    Electroluminescent properties of silicon-rich oxide (SRO) films were studied using metal oxide semiconductor-(MOS)-like devices. Thin SRO films with 4 at.% of silicon excess were deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition followed by a thermal annealing at 1100 deg. C. Intense continuous visible and infrared luminescence has been observed when devices are reversely and forwardly bias, respectively. After an electrical stress, the continuous electroluminescence (EL) is quenched but devices show strong field-effect EL with pulsed polarization. A model based on conductive paths-across the SRO film- has been proposed to explain the EL behaviour in these devices.

  14. Capsular contracture by silicone breast implants: possible causes, biocompatibility, and prophylactic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiert AE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Andreas E Steiert, Maria Boyce, Heiko Sorg Department of Plastic, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Abstract: The most common implanted material in the human body consists of silicone. Breast augmentation and breast reconstruction using silicone-based implants are procedures frequently performed by reconstructive and aesthetic surgeons. A main complication of this procedure continues to be the development of capsular contracture (CC, displaying the result of a fibrotic foreign body reaction after the implantation of silicone. For many years, experimental and clinical trials have attempted to analyze the problem of its etiology, treatment, and prophylaxis. Different theories of CC formation are known; however, the reason why different individuals develop CC in days or a month, or only after years, is unknown. Therefore, we hypothesize that CC formation, might primarily be induced by immunological mechanisms along with other reasons. This article attempts to review CC formation, with special attention paid to immunological and inflammatory reasons, as well as actual prophylactic strategies. In this context, the word “biocompatibility” has been frequently used to describe the overall biological innocuousness of silicone in the respective studies, although without clear-cut definitions of this important feature. We have therefore developed a new five-point scale with distinct key points of biocompatibility. Hence, this article might provide the basis for ongoing discussion in this field to reduce single-publication definitions as well as increase the understanding of biocompatibility. Keywords: biofilm, foreign body reaction, breast augmentation, biocompatibility, fibrosis

  15. The association of matrix Gla protein isomers with calcification in capsules surrounding silicone breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Larry W; Lieske, John C; Tran, Nho V; Miller, Virginia M

    2011-11-01

    Implanted silicone medical prostheses induce a dynamic sequence of histologic events in adjacent tissue resulting in the formation of a fibrotic peri-prosthetic capsule. In some cases, capsular calcification occurs, requiring surgical intervention. In this study we investigated capsules from silicone gel-filled breast prostheses to test the hypothesis that this calcification might be regulated by the small vitamin K-dependent protein, matrix Gla protein (MGP), a potent inhibitor of arterial calcification, or by Fetuin-A, a hepatocyte-derived glycoprotein also implicated as a regulator of pathologic calcification. Immunolocalization studies of explanted capsular tissue, using conformation-specific antibodies, identified the mineralization-protective γ-carboxylated MGP isomer (cMGP) within cells of uncalcified capsules, whereas the non-functional undercarboxylated isomer (uMGP) was typically absent. Both were upregulated in calcific capsules and co-localized with mineral plaque and adjacent fibers. Synovial-like metaplasia was present in one uncalcified capsule in which MGP species were differentially localized within the pseudosynovium. Fetuin-A was localized to cells within uncalcified capsules and to mineral deposits within calcific capsules. The osteoinductive cytokine bone morphogenic protein-2 localized to collagen fibers in uncalcified capsules. These findings demonstrate that MGP, in its vitamin K-activated conformer, may represent a pharmacological target to sustain the health of the peri-prosthetic tissue which encapsulates silicone breast implants as well as other implanted silicone medical devices.

  16. Structure of silicon/oxide and nitride/oxide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, Vladimir A [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-30

    We systematize and generalize modern concepts on the atomic structure of silicon/insulator (Si/SiO{sub 2}, Si/SiO{sub x}N{sub y}) and insulator/insulator (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}) interfaces in the structures underlying the operation of silicon devices. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. The silicon-silicon oxide multilayers utilization as intrinsic layer on pin solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colder, H. [SIFCOM, CNRS-UMR 6176, ENSICAEN, 6 boulevard Mal Juin, 14050 Caen (France)], E-mail: heloise.taupin@ensicaen.fr; Marie, P.; Gourbilleau, F. [SIFCOM, CNRS-UMR 6176, ENSICAEN, 6 boulevard Mal Juin, 14050 Caen (France)

    2008-08-30

    Silicon nanostructures are promising candidate for the intrinsic layer on pin solar cells. In this work we report on new material: silicon-rich silicon oxide (SRSO) deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering of a pure silica target and an interesting structure: multilayers consisting of a stack of SRSO and pure silicon oxide layers. Two thicknesses of the SRSO sublayer, t{sub SRSO}, are studied 3 nm and 5 nm whereas the thickness of silica sublayer is maintaining at 3 nm. The presence of nanocrystallites of silicon, evidenced by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), leads to photoluminescence (PL) emission at room temperature due to the quantum confinement of the carriers. The PL peak shifts from 1.3 eV to 1.5 eV is correlated to the decreasing of t{sub SRSO} from 5 nm down to 3 nm. In the purpose of their potential utilization for i-layer, the optical properties are studied by absorption spectroscopy. The achievement a such structures at promising absorption properties. Moreover by favouring the carriers injection by the tunnel effect between silicon nanograins and silica sublayers, the multilayers seem to be interesting for solar cells.

  18. Structural studies of silicon oxynitride layers formed by low energy ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Alka R. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Yadav, A.D. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India)], E-mail: adyadav@physics.mu.ac.in; Dubey, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Gundu Rao, T.K. [SAIF, IIT Bombay, Mumbai (India)

    2008-04-15

    Silicon oxynitride (Si{sub x}O{sub y}N{sub z}) layers were synthesized by implanting {sup 16}O{sub 2}{sup +} and {sup 14}N{sub 2}{sup +} 30 keV ions in 1:1 ratio with fluences ranging from 5 x 10{sup 16} to 1 x 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup -2} into single crystal silicon at room temperature. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of the samples was carried out at different temperatures in nitrogen ambient for 5 min. The FTIR studies show that the structures of ion-beam synthesized oxynitride layers are strongly dependent on total ion-fluence and annealing temperature. It is found that the structures formed at lower ion fluences ({approx}1 x 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}) are homogenous oxygen-rich silicon oxynitride. However, at higher fluence levels ({approx}1 x 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup -2}) formation of homogenous nitrogen rich silicon oxynitride is observed due to ion-beam induced surface sputtering effects. The Micro-Raman studies on 1173 K annealed samples show formation of partially amorphous oxygen and nitrogen rich silicon oxynitride structures with crystalline silicon beneath it for lower and higher ion fluences, respectively. The Ellipsometry studies on 1173 K annealed samples show an increase in the thickness of silicon oxynitride layer with increasing ion fluence. The refractive index of the ion-beam synthesized layers is found to be in the range 1.54-1.96.

  19. Systemic Sclerosis and Silicone Breast Implant: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Psarras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally induced systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized condition, which is correlated with exposure to various chemical compounds or drugs. However, development of scleroderma-like disease after exposure to silicone has always been a controversial issue and, over time, it has triggered spirited debate whether there is a certain association or not. Herein, we report the case of a 35-year-old female who developed Raynaud’s phenomenon and, finally, systemic sclerosis shortly after silicone breast implantation surgery.

  20. Origin of reverse annealing effect in hydrogen-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, Zengfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In contradiction to conventional damage annealing, thermally annealed H-implanted Si exhibits an increase in damage or reverse annealing behavior, whose mechanism has remained elusive. On the basis of quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with channeling Rutherford backscattering analysis, we conclusively elucidate that the reverse annealing effect is due to the nucleation and growth of hydrogen-induce platelets. Platelets are responsible for an increase in the height and width the channeling damage peak following increased isochronal anneals.

  1. Implantation of high concentration noble gases in cubic zirconia and silicon carbide: A contrasted radiation tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velişa, Gihan, E-mail: gihan@tandem.nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Debelle, Aurélien; Thomé, Lionel; Mylonas, Stamatis [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 108, F-91405 Orsay (France); Vincent, Laetitia [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 108, F-91405 Orsay (France); Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, Université Paris-Sud, UMR 8622, Bât. 220, 91405 Orsay (France); Boulle, Alexandre [Science des Procédés Céramiques et de Traitements de Surface, CNRS UMR 7315, Centre Européen de la Céramique, 12 rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges (France); Jagielski, Jacek [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); National Center for Nuclear Research, PL-05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Pantelica, Dan [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2014-08-01

    The modifications of the microstructure of yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia and silicon carbide single crystals implanted with high concentrations of noble gas ions and subsequently annealed at high temperature were characterized using RBS/C, XRD and TEM. It is found that the annealing behavior is strongly dependent on both the material and the implanted noble gases. Ar-implanted yttria-stabilized zirconia shows no significant microstructural modification upon annealing at 800 °C, e.g. dislocations are still present and the size of the Ar bubbles does not evolve. This is in strong contrast with previous observations on helium-implanted zirconia, where the formation of bubbles and elongated fractures were observed. In the case of SiC, thermal annealing at 1000 °C shows an enhanced damage recovery when He is implanted as compared to Ar implantation and the recrystallization of the matrix is accompanied with the release of noble gas atoms. This difference can be ascribed to different atomic radii, and thus mobility of implanted species.

  2. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hattum, E.D. van

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology, w

  3. Transparent conductive oxides for thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes research on thin-film silicon solar cells with focus on the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) for such devices. In addition to the formation of a transparent and electrically conductive front electrode for the solar cell allowing photocurrent collection with low ohmic losses,

  4. Light-Induced Absorption in Nominally Pure Bismuth Silicon Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李飞飞; 许京军; 孔勇发; 黄辉; 张光寅; 杨春晖; 徐玉恒

    2001-01-01

    Light-induced absorption in the nominally pure bismuth silicon oxide is investigated experimentally and the result shows that it consists of transient and persistent parts. The experimental evidence is analysed based on the model of three groups of trap (donor) centres.

  5. Transparent conductive oxides for thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes research on thin-film silicon solar cells with focus on the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) for such devices. In addition to the formation of a transparent and electrically conductive front electrode for the solar cell allowing photocurrent collection with low ohmic losses,

  6. Formation of donor centers upon the annealing of silicon light-emitting structures implanted with oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru; Danilov, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, O. V. [St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University LETI (Russian Federation); Loshachenko, A. S.; Sakharov, V. I.; Serenkov, I. T.; Shek, E. I.; Trapeznikova, I. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    It is found that the implantation of silicon with oxygen ions and subsequent annealing at high temperatures are accompanied by the formation of electrically active donor centers and by the p-n conversion of the conductivity of silicon. The concentration and spatial distribution of these centers depend on the annealing temperature. The results are accounted for by the interaction of oxygen atoms with intrinsic point defects formed upon the annealing of implantation damages.

  7. A Simple and Practical Method for Setting Up a Criterion of Projection of Silicone Breast Implant After Simple Mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Naohiro; Ando, Jiro; Harao, Michiko; Takemae, Masaru; Kishi, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In breast reconstruction, decision of projection of silicone breast implant in tissue expander replacement is difficult because of the need to consider several parameters that cannot be expressed in accurate numerical form. The present study aimed at a quantitative analysis based on decreased projection of the reconstructed side compared with silicone breast implant projection and to develop a new method for simple and practical decision of silicone breast implant projection. Methods: Thirty-five patients who had mammary carcinoma and were treated with simple mastectomy, tissue expander insertion, and replacement with anatomical silicone breast implant from April 2013 to March 2016 were retrospectively identified. We recorded the projection of used silicone breast implant (Pi). The projections of reconstructed breast 6 months after silicone breast implant insertion (Pr) and that of the unaffected breast during silicone breast implant selection (Pu) were measured. The difference between Pi and Pr was defined as the revised numerical value (Rev). We investigated whether Rev significantly differed according to age, body mass index, or Pu and analyzed correlations between Rev and age, Pu, and body mass index. Results: Mean Rev in all patients was 1.2 ± 0.3 cm. Rev was significantly higher in patients with higher body mass index than in those with lower body mass index (P < .01) and in patients with higher Pu than in those with lower Pu (P < .01). Significant positive correlations of Rev with body mass index and Pu were found (β = .63, P < .01 and β = .67, P < .01, respectively). Conclusions: Rev was a simple, practical, and cost-effective concept. We believe that it is a useful indicator for deciding silicone breast implant projection.

  8. The effects of copper additives on the quantity and cell viability of adherent Staphylococcus epidermidis in silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosau, Martin; Prantl, Lukas; Feldmann, Martina; Kokott, Andreas; Hahnel, Sebastian; Burgers, Ralf

    2010-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the antibacterial effect of copper additives in silicone implants. Specimens of a standard silicone material used in breast augmentation and modified copper-loaded silicone specimens were prepared and incubated in a Staphylococcus epidermidis suspension (2 h, 37 degrees C). After the quantification of adhering staphylococci using a biofluorescence assay (Resazurin), the viability of the adhering bacterial cells was quantified by live or dead cell labeling in combination with fluorescence microscopy. In the Resazurin fluorometric quantification, a higher amount of adhering S. epidermidis cells was detected on pure silicone (4612 [2319/7540] relative fluorescence units [rfu]) than on silicone with copper additives (2701 [2158/4153] rfu). Additionally, a significantly higher amount of adhering bacterial cells (5.07% [2.03%/8.93%]) was found for pure silicone than for silicone with copper additives (1.72% [1.26%/2.32%]); (p < 0.001). Calculations from live or dead staining showed that the percentage of dead S. epidermidis cells adhered on pure silicone (52.1%) was significantly lower than on silicone with copper additives (79.7%); (p < 0.001). In vitro, silicone material with copper additives showed antibacterial effects against S. epidermidis. Copper-loaded silicone may prevent bacterial colonization, resulting in lower infection rates of silicone implants.

  9. Study of the amorphization of surface silicon layers implanted by low-energy helium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomov, A. A.; Myakon'kikh, A. V.; Oreshko, A. P.; Shemukhin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural changes in surface layers of Si(001) substrates subjected to plasma-immersion implantation by (2-5)-keV helium ions to a dose of D = 6 × 1015-5 × 1017 cm-2 have been studied by highresolution X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering, and spectral ellipsometry. It is found that the joint application of these methods makes it possible to determine the density depth distribution ρ( z) in an implanted layer, its phase state, and elemental composition. Treatment of silicon substrates in helium plasma to doses of 6 × 1016 cm-2 leads to the formation of a 20- to 30-nm-thick amorphized surface layer with a density close to the silicon density. An increase in the helium dose causes the formation of an internal porous layer.

  10. A Self-Consistent Model for Thermal Oxidation of Silicon at Low Oxide Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Gerlach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal oxidation of silicon belongs to the most decisive steps in microelectronic fabrication because it allows creating electrically insulating areas which enclose electrically conductive devices and device areas, respectively. Deal and Grove developed the first model (DG-model for the thermal oxidation of silicon describing the oxide thickness versus oxidation time relationship with very good agreement for oxide thicknesses of more than 23 nm. Their approach named as general relationship is the basis of many similar investigations. However, measurement results show that the DG-model does not apply to very thin oxides in the range of a few nm. Additionally, it is inherently not self-consistent. The aim of this paper is to develop a self-consistent model that is based on the continuity equation instead of Fick’s law as the DG-model is. As literature data show, the relationship between silicon oxide thickness and oxidation time is governed—down to oxide thicknesses of just a few nm—by a power-of-time law. Given by the time-independent surface concentration of oxidants at the oxide surface, Fickian diffusion seems to be neglectable for oxidant migration. The oxidant flux has been revealed to be carried by non-Fickian flux processes depending on sites being able to lodge dopants (oxidants, the so-called DOCC-sites, as well as on the dopant jump rate.

  11. Endoprosthetic reconstructive surgery with medical grade long term implantable silicone in facial asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Lăţcan, E; Popescu, CR

    2012-01-01

    The authors present their experience over a period of 13 years (1998-2011) regarding a cohort of 54 patients. In an extensive loss of tissues resulted from congenital malformations (maxillary and mandibular malformations, micro stoma), collagenosis (scleroderma, Romberg Syndrome), traffic and work accidents, post surgical (cancer and facial nerve paralyze), when usual surgical procedures fail to establish the normal look of the patient medical grade long-term implantable silicone endoprosthet...

  12. p-Type Quasi-Mono Silicon Solar Cell Fabricated by Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ming Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The p-type quasi-mono wafer is a novel type of silicon material that is processed using a seed directional solidification technique. This material is a promising alternative to traditional high-cost Czochralski (CZ and float-zone (FZ material. Here, we evaluate the application of an advanced solar cell process featuring a novel method of ion implantation on p-type quasi-mono silicon wafer. The ion implantation process has simplified the normal industrial process flow by eliminating two process steps: the removal of phosphosilicate glass (PSG and the junction isolation process that is required after the conventional thermal POCl3 diffusion process. Moreover, the good passivation performance of the ion implantation process improves Voc. Our results show that, after metallization and cofiring, an average cell efficiency of 18.55% can be achieved using 156 × 156 mm p-type quasi-mono silicon wafer. Furthermore, the absolute cell efficiency obtained using this method is 0.47% higher than that for the traditional POCl3 diffusion process.

  13. Seeding of silicon by copper ion implantation for selective electroless copper plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhansali, S.; Sood, D.K.; Zmood, R.B. [Microelectronic and Materials Technology Centre, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technolgy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    We report on the successful use of copper(self) ion implantation into silicon to seed the electroless plating of copper on silicon (100) surfaces. Copper ions have been implanted to doses of 5E14-6.4E16 ions/cm{sup 2} using a MEEVA ion implanter at extraction voltage of 40kV. Dose was varied in fine steps to determine the threshold dose of 2E15 Cu ions/cm{sup 2} for `seed` formation of copper films on silicon using a commercial electroless plating solution. Plated films were studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, EDX and profilometry . The adhesion of films was measured by `scotch tape test`. The adhesion was found to improve with increasing dose. However thicker films exhibited rather poor adhesion and high internal stress. SEM results show that the films grow first as isolated islands which become larger and eventually impinge into a continuous film as the plating time is increased. (authors). 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  14. Optimization of a plasma immersion ion implantation process for shallow junctions in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Ashok; Nori, Rajashree; Bhatt, Piyush; Lodha, Saurabh; Pinto, Richard, E-mail: rpinto@ee.iitb.ac.in; Rao, Valipe Ramgopal [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Jomard, François; Neumann-Spallart, Michael [Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée, C.N.R.S./Université de Versailles-St.Quentin, 45, Avenue des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01

    A plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process has been developed for realizing shallow doping profiles of phosphorus and boron in silicon using an in-house built dual chamber cluster tool. High Si etch rates observed in a 5% PH{sub 3} in H{sub 2} plasma have been ascribed to high concentration of H(α) radicals. Therefore, subsequent work was carried out with 5% PH{sub 3} in He, leading to much smaller etch rates. By optical emission spectroscopy, the radical species H(α), PH*{sub 2}, and PH* have been identified. The concentration of all three species increased with pressure. Also, ion concentrations increased with pressure as evidenced by Langmuir data, with a maximum occurring at 0.12 mbar. The duty cycle of pulsed DC bias has a significant bearing on both the implantation and the etching process as it controls the leakage of positive charge collected at the surface of the silicon wafer during pulse on-time generated primarily due to secondary electron emission. The P implant process was optimized for a duty cycle of 10% or less at a pressure of 0.12 mbar with implant times as low as 30 s. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed a P dopant depth of 145 nm after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 950 °C for 5 s, resulting in a sheet resistance of 77 Ω/◻. Si n{sup +}/p diodes fabricated with phosphorus implantation using optimized PIII and RTA conditions exhibit J{sub on}/J{sub off} > 10{sup 6} with an ideality factor of nearly 1.2. Using similar conditions, shallow doping profiles of B in silicon have also been realized.

  15. New insights into the effects of silicon content on the oxidation process in silicon-containing steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Xu, Guang; Zhou, Ming-xing; He, Bei

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) was used to investigate the effects of silicon content on the oxidation kinetics of silicon- containing steels under an atmosphere and heating procedures similar to those used in industrial reheating furnaces for the production of hot-rolled strips. Our results show that when the heating temperature was greater than the melting point of Fe2SiO4, the oxidation rates of steels with different silicon contents were the same; the total mass gain decreased with increasing silicon content, whereas it increased with increasing oxygen content. The oxidation rates for steels with different silicon contents were constant with respect to time under isothermal conditions. In addition, the starting oxidation temperature, the intense oxidation temperature, and the finishing oxidation temperature increased with increasing silicon content; the intense oxidation temperature had no correlation with the melting of Fe2SiO4. Moreover, the silicon distributed in two forms: as Fe2SiO4 at the interface between the innermost layer of oxide scale and the iron matrix, and as particles containing silicon in grains and grain boundaries in the iron matrix.

  16. A Ferroelectric Oxide Made Directly on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-17

    structural transition (7, 8, 32) that should coincide with TC. The aver- age out-of-plane lattice constant was extracted from scans made of the SrTiO3...carbohydrates, hydrocarbons, amino acids, bitumen , and type I, II, and III kerogens). BSR is carried out by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), 1The NASA... extract the in-plane lattice constant of the SrTiO3 film. In practice, the crystal truncation rods that connect the allowed 111 and 111 silicon

  17. Diffusion of Hydrogen in Proton Implanted Silicon: Dependence on the Hydrogen Concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Faccinelli, Martin; Jelinek, Moriz; Wuebben, Thomas; Laven, Johannes G; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Hadley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The reported diffusion constants for hydrogen in silicon vary over six orders of magnitude. This spread in measured values is caused by the different concentrations of defects in the silicon that has been studied. Hydrogen diffusion is slowed down as it interacts with impurities. By changing the material properties such as the crystallinity, doping type and impurity concentrations, the diffusivity of hydrogen can be changed by several orders of magnitude. In this study the influence of the hydrogen concentration on the temperature dependence of the diffusion in high energy proton implanted silicon is investigated. We show that the Arrhenius parameters, which describe this temperature dependence decrease with increasing hydrogen concentration. We propose a model where the relevant defects that mediate hydrogen diffusion become saturated with hydrogen at high concentrations. When the defects that provide hydrogen with the lowest energy positions in the lattice are saturated, hydrogen resides at energetically le...

  18. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-02-26

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants.

  19. Influence of experimental parameters on physical properties of porous silicon and oxidized porous silicon layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, J.; Alaiwan, V.; Pirasteh, P.; Najar, A.; Gadonna, M.

    2007-08-01

    This paper reports physical properties of porous silicon and oxidized porous silicon, manufactured by anodisation from heavily p-type doped silicon wafers as a function of experimental parameters. The growth rate and refractive index of the layers were studied at different applied current densities and glycerol concentrations in electrolyte. When the current density varied from 5 to 100 mA/cm 2, the refractive index was between 1.2 and 2.4 which corresponded to a porosity range from 42 to 85%. After oxidation, the porosity decreased and was between 2 and 45% for a refractive index range from 1.22 to 1.46. The thermal processing also induced an increase in thickness which was dependent on the initial porosity. This increase in thickness was more important for the lowest porosities. Lastly, the roughness of the porous layer/silicon substrate interface was studied at different applied current densities and glycerol concentrations in solution. Roughness decreased when the current density or glycerol concentration increased. Moreover, roughness was also reduced by thermal oxidation.

  20. Annealing-related electrical and piezoresistive properties of Band As-implanted LPCVD silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanjean, P.; Sicart, J.; Robert, J. L.; Le Berre, M.; Pinard, P.; Conedera, V.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the electrical properties of polycrystalline silicon thin films implanted with arsenic or boron ions. Two types of post-implantation annealing have been performed on the samples: a conventional thermal annealing (CTA) and a rapid thermal annealing (RTA). We find that RTA improves the electrical properties. Measurements of gauge factors have been carried out on both films. We conclude that RTA can be applied successfully in thin film silicon integrated sensor technology. Nous étudions les propriétés électriques de films silicium polycristallin implantés au bore ou à l'arsenic. Deux types de recuit post-implantation ont été effectués: un recuit conventionnel (CTA) et un recuit rapide (RTA). Nous montrons que le recuit RTA améliore les propriétés électriques. Les facteurs de gauge ont été déterminés et nous concluons que le recuit RTA est adapté à la technologie des capteurs intégrés silicium.

  1. Oxidation of polyethylene implanted with low energy magnesium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, Alec, E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail, E-mail: mio@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Karatchevtseva, Inna, E-mail: ikm@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Siegele, Rainer, E-mail: rns@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Cohen, David D., E-mail: dcz@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    The oxidation of polyethylene implanted with low energy, i.e. 25–50 keV, Mg ions to fluences from 5 × 10{sup 12}–5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} was studied. Rutherford back-scattering spectroscopy showed all implanted samples gained oxygen but the distribution did not match that of the implanted Mg. An increase in carbon content was also observed for the near-surface region. Depth profiles of hydrogen were obtained via elastic recoil detection analysis, showing that hydrogen was lost throughout and beyond the range of the Mg ions, producing unsaturated and chemically active sites available for oxidation. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the formation of carbon–oxygen bonding such as carbonyl groups, but showed no evidence of oxidised magnesium. Raman spectroscopy showed disordered and graphitic carbon bonding configurations were created by the irradiation, but no evidence of oxidised magnesium. The implantation of films to high fluence produced a carbonized surface-layer that made the irradiated polymer more resistant to oxidation.

  2. Formation of silicon nanocrystals in sapphire by ion implantation and the origin of visible photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerci, S.; Serincan, U.; Dogan, I.; Tokay, S.; Genisel, M.; Aydinli, A.; Turan, R.

    2006-10-01

    Silicon nanocrystals, average sizes ranging between 3 and 7nm, were formed in sapphire matrix by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Evolution of the nanocrystals was detected by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Raman spectra display that clusters in the matrix start to form nanocrystalline structures at annealing temperatures as low as 800°C in samples with high dose Si implantation. The onset temperature of crystallization increases with decreasing dose. Raman spectroscopy and XRD reveal gradual transformation of Si clusters into crystalline form. Visible photoluminescence band appears following implantation and its intensity increases with subsequent annealing process. While the center of the peak does not shift, the intensity of the peak decreases with increasing dose. The origin of the observed photoluminescence is discussed in terms of radiation induced defects in the sapphire matrix.

  3. Investigation of defects in boron implanted silicon by means of p-n junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhard, R. (Tesla, Roznov pod Radhostem (Czechoslovakia)); Luby, S. (Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Fyzikalny Ustav)

    1990-01-01

    A simple electrical method for the evaluation of radiation damage in implanted silicon is described. It is based on the measurement of reverse current of a p-n junction. Radiation defects were formed by implantation of boron at the doses of N{sub d} = 10{sup 11} and 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The maxima of the distribution of defects were within the depletion region of the junctions. Samples were annealed at temperatures up to 500{sup 0}C. These conditions were sufficient for the recombination of practically all defects. The activation energy of the radiation damage recovery had values between 0.14 and 0.26 eV. The recovery of defects during ion implantation was observed. (author).

  4. Copper gettering by aluminum precipitates in aluminum-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN,GARY A.; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.

    2000-03-20

    Copper in Si is shown to be strongly gettered by Al-rich precipitates formed by implanting Al to supersaturation and followed by annealing. At temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C a layer containing Al precipitates is found to getter Cu from Cu silicide located on the opposite side of a 0.25-mm Si wafer, indicating a substantially lower chemical potential for the Cu in the molten-A1 phase. Cu gettering proceeds rapidly until an atomic ratio of approximately 2 Cu atoms to 1 Al atom is reached in the precipitated Al region, after which the gettering process slows. Redistribution of Cu from one Al-rich layer to another at low Cu concentrations demonstrates that a segregation-type gettering mechanism is operating. Cu gettering occurs primarily in the region containing the precipitated Al rather than the region where the Al is entirely substitutional.

  5. Recoil implantation of boron into silicon by high energy silicon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, L.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, X. M.; Rusakova, I.; Mount, G.; Zhang, L. H.; Liu, J. R.; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2001-07-01

    A recoil implantation technique for shallow junction formation was investigated. After e-gun deposition of a B layer onto Si, 10, 50, or 500 keV Si ion beams were used to introduce surface deposited B atoms into Si by knock-on. It has been shown that recoil implantation with high energy incident ions like 500 keV produces a shallower B profile than lower energy implantation such as 10 keV and 50 keV. This is due to the fact that recoil probability at a given angle is a strong function of the energy of the primary projectile. Boron diffusion was showed to be suppressed in high energy recoil implantation and such suppression became more obvious at higher Si doses. It was suggested that vacancy rich region due to defect imbalance plays the role to suppress B diffusion. Sub-100 nm junction can be formed by this technique with the advantage of high throughput of high energy implanters.

  6. Strained silicon/silicon germanium heterojunction n-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, S H

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into the performance of strained silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) have been carried out. Theoretical predictions suggest that use of a strained Si/SiGe material system with advanced material properties compared with conventional silicon allows enhanced MOSFET device performance. This study has therefore investigated the practical feasibility of obtaining superior electrical performance using a Si/SiGe material system. The MOSFET devices consisted of a strained Si surface channel and were fabricated on relaxed SiGe material using a reduced thermal budget process in order to preserve the strain. Two batches of strained Si/SiGe devices fabricated on material grown by differing methods have been analysed and both showed good transistor action. A correlation of electrical and physical device data established that the electrical device behaviour was closely related to the SiGe material quality, which differed depending on growt...

  7. Effects of Medical Chitosan on Capsular Formation Following Silicone Implant Insertion in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shasha; Ren, Liwen; Xu, Haiqian; Jia, Di; Luo, Sai; Hao, Lijun; Yang, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Capsular contracture is a serious complication that occurs after breast implant surgery. This study was performed to confirm that medical chitosan (MC) affects capsule formation and elucidates a possible mechanism. In this study, we used 18 female adult New Zealand White rabbits. In each rabbit, two silicone implants were placed under the pectoralis muscle layer on both sides (one side was included in the experimental group and the other side was included in the control group). MC was applied around the silicone implant of the experiment group, while the control group received no treatment. The capsular thickness was calculated by Masson's trichrome stain. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs were determined by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Compared to the control group, the capsular thickness of the MC group was significantly reduced at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the operation (4 week: 229.3 ± 72.2 vs 76.1 ± 12.6 µm, p  0.05). MC reduced the risk of developing capsular contracture around silicone implants, possibly by blocking the signaling pathway of TIMPs. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  8. Mechanism of β-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates growth-and-dissolution and pyramidal defects' formation during oxidation of Fe-contaminated silicon wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Luca, Anthony; Texier, Michaël, E-mail: michael.texier@univ-amu.fr; Portavoce, Alain; Burle, Nelly [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, IM2NP UMR 7334, bd Escadrille Normandie Niémen, F-13397 Marseille (France); Grosjean, Catherine [ST MicroElectronics, 190 av. Célestin Coq, Z.I. Peynier Rousset, F-13106 Rousset (France); Morata, Stéphane [Ion Beam Services, rue G. Imbert prolongée, Z.I. Peynier Rousset, F-13790 Rousset (France); Michel, Fabrice [Vegatec, 150 av. Célestin Coq, Z.I. Peynier Rousset, F-13106 Rousset (France)

    2015-03-21

    Fe-implanted Si-wafers have been oxidized at 900 °C and 1100 °C in order to investigate the behaviour of Fe atoms at the growing SiO{sub 2}/Si interface and the impact on the integrity of microelectronic devices of an involuntary Fe contamination before or during the oxidation process. As-implanted and oxidized wafers have been characterized using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, atom probe tomography, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Experimental results were compared to calculated implantation profiles and simulated images. Successive steps of iron disilicide precipitation and oxidation were evidenced during the silicon oxidation process. The formation of characteristic pyramidal-shaped defects, at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, was notably found to correlate with the presence of β-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates. Taking into account the competitive oxidation of these precipitates and of the surrounding silicon matrix, dynamic mechanisms are proposed to model the observed microstructural evolution of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, during the growth of the silicon oxide layer.

  9. SIMS Analysis on Ion Implantation of Fluorine at Interface between Top Silicon and Insulator Layers in SOI Materials%SOI材料中绝缘层界面处离子注入氟的SIMS剖析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方培源; 曹永明

    2005-01-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) is well known as "new technology of Si semiconductor IC process in 21 Contrary". Recently, SOI materials have been identified as the first choice of the semiconductor materials for fabricating low voltage and low power circuits. In order to improve the working performance of the SOI circuit under the radiating circumstance, ion implantation of fluorine impurity into the insulator layers in SOI materials is used for hardening the thermal gate oxide layer. Proper implantation depth of fluorine would further improve radiate resistance performance of the SOI circuit. This paper describes the SIMS analysis results of fluorine impurity implantation profile at the interface between top silicon layer and oxide insulator layer.

  10. Advantages of N-Type Hydrogenated Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide Films for Micromorph Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornrat Limmanee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development and application of n-type hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon oxide films (n μc-SiO:H in hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide/hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (a-SiO:H/μc-Si:H micromorph solar cells. The n μc-SiO:H films with high optical bandgap and low refractive index could be obtained when a ratio of carbon dioxide (CO2 to silane (SiH4 flow rate was raised; however, a trade-off against electrical property was observed. We applied the n μc-SiO:H films in the top a-SiO:H cell and investigated the changes in cell performance with respect to the electrical and optical properties of the films. It was found that all photovoltaic parameters of the micromorph silicon solar cells using the n top μc-SiO:H layer enhanced with increasing the CO2/SiH4 ratio up to 0.23, where the highest initial cell efficiency of 10.7% was achieved. The enhancement of the open circuit voltage (Voc was likely to be due to a reduction of reverse bias at subcell connection—n top/p bottom interface—and a better tunnel recombination junction contributed to the improvement in the fill factor (FF. Furthermore, the quantum efficiency (QE results also have demonstrated intermediate-reflector function of the n μc-SiO:H films.

  11. Mullite Coating on Recrytallized Silicon Carbide and Its Cycling Oxidation Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Mullite coating on recrystallized silicon carbide was successfully prepared by the sol-gel route. The cycling oxidation of coated recrystallized silicon carbide was performed at 1500℃. For comparison, the oxidation of uncoated recrystallized silicon carbide was also carried out at the same condition. The results indicated that a layer of compact, adhesive and crack free mullite coating was found on the recrystallized silicon carbide. After oxidation, the new coatings exhibit adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1500℃, therefore the oxidation resistance capability of silicon carbide was enhanced. With the increase of the dipping frequencies, namely, the increase of the thickness of mullite coating, the oxidation resistance of silicon carbide would be further improved. The formation mechanism of mullite coating was analyzed and discussed and the oxidation dynamics model of coatedmullite silicon carbide has been also proposed.

  12. Multiple extracorporeal shock wave therapy degrades capsular fibrosis after insertion of silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sebastian; Mueller, Wolf; Schulte, Matthias; Kiefer, Jurij; Hirche, Christoph; Heimer, Sina; Köllensperger, Eva; Germann, Günter; Reichenberger, Matthias A

    2015-03-01

    Capsular fibrosis is the most frequent long-term complication after insertion of silicone devices. Today, mainly direct immunostimulation and subclinical infection are held responsible for inducing and maintaining inflammatory reactions, which lead to overwhelming extracellular matrix formation. Extracorporeal shock waves (ESWs) are capable of inhibiting inflammatory processes and revealing antibacterial capacity. In our previous study, we observed decelerated capsule development after application of a single shock wave immediately after surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of multiple ESWT after insertion of silicone implants in the same rodent model. Therefore, silicone prostheses were inserted into a submuscular pocket in 12 additional male Lewis rats, and shock waves were administered over a 14-d interval. At 35 d (n = 6) and 100 d (n = 6) after insertion, silicone implants and surrounding capsule tissue were removed and prepared for histologic and immunohistochemical analysis, as well as polymerase chain reaction (Ccl2, CD68, transforming growth factor β1, matrix metalloproteinase 2). Compared with the control group, multiple ESWT had no effect on day 35, but resulted in a significantly thinner capsule on day 100 (825.8 ± 313.2 vs. 813.3 ± 47.9, p = 0.759, and 1062.3 ± 151.9 vs. 495.4 ± 220.4, p shock wave application, which had been found to result in thinner capsules at every time point in our previous study. This active degradation of the fibrous envelope caused by multiple ESWs was accompanied by synergistic alterations in pro- and anti-fibrotic proteins (transforming growth factor β1 and matrix metalloproteinase 2, respectively). In conclusion, after insertion of silicone devices, single ESWT is capable of decelerating capsule formation in contrast to multiple ESWT, which degrades fibrotic tissue. These findings seem to be associated with inhibition of inflammation and beneficial effects on pro- and anti-fibrotic proteins.

  13. Suppression of ion-implantation induced porosity in germanium by a silicon dioxide capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan T.; Alkhaldi, Huda S.; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Pastor, David; Huston, Larissa Q.; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Aziz, Michael J.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Ion implantation with high ion fluences is indispensable for successful use of germanium (Ge) in the next generation of electronic and photonic devices. However, Ge readily becomes porous after a moderate fluence implant ( ˜1 ×1015 ion cm-2 ) at room temperature, and for heavy ion species such as tin (Sn), holding the target at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature suppresses porosity formation only up to a fluence of 2 ×1016 ion cm-2 . We show, using stylus profilometry and electron microscopy, that a nanometer scale capping layer of silicon dioxide significantly suppresses the development of the porous structure in Ge during a S n - implant at a fluence of 4.5 ×1016 ion cm-2 at LN2 temperature. The significant loss of the implanted species through sputtering is also suppressed. The effectiveness of the capping layer in preventing porosity, as well as suppressing sputter removal of Ge, permits the attainment of an implanted Sn concentration in Ge of ˜15 at.% , which is about 2.5 times the maximum value previously attained. The crystallinity of the Ge-Sn layer following pulsed-laser-melting induced solidification is also greatly improved compared with that of uncapped material, thus opening up potential applications of the Ge-Sn alloy as a direct bandgap material fabricated by an ion beam synthesis technique.

  14. Single electron charging and transport in silicon rich oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhenrui; Aceves-Mijares, Mariano; Cabrera, Marco Antonio Ipina [Department of Electronics, INAOE, Apartado 51, Puebla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2006-08-14

    Single electron charging and single electron tunnelling effects were observed in silicon rich oxide (SRO). The devices used in this study have an Al/SRO/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor-like structure, where the SRO layer was deposited using low pressure chemical vapour deposition. Two types of Si nanodots (NDs), interface NDs and bulk NDs, were identified by transmission electron microscopy measurements. Under electric field, charges from the Si substrate are transferred into the interface NDs that locate at the interface, and each interface ND traps only one carrier. As the voltage increases, conduction paths between the Al electrode and the silicon substrate are formed, and the conduction of electrons is via sequential tunnelling through the bulk NDs. Due to the Coulomb blockade effect, only one electron tunnels on each nanodot at a specific electric field. The transport of the electrons through the Si nanodots is due to the Poole-Frenkel mechanism in the voltage regime studied.

  15. Oxidized zirconium: a potentially longer lasting hip implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, V. [Smith and Nephew Inc., Memphis, TN 38116 (United States)]. E-mail: victoria.good@smithnephew.com; Widding, K. [Smith and Nephew Inc., Memphis, TN 38116 (United States); Hunter, G. [Smith and Nephew Inc., Memphis, TN 38116 (United States); Heuer, D. [Smith and Nephew Inc., Memphis, TN 38116 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Because younger, more active patients are receiving total hip replacements, it is necessary to develop materials, which would increase the life span of the implants and challenge their wear potential under adverse conditions. Oxidized zirconium (OxZr) is a metal with the surface transformed to ceramic by oxidation that offers low fracture risk and excellent abrasion resistance. This study compared wear of polyethylene (non-irradiated and highly crosslinked) with OxZr and CoCr heads under smooth and rough (clinically relevant) conditions. Wear was up to 15-fold less and up to 4-fold fewer particles were produced when coupled with OxZr than with CoCr, demonstrating that OxZr heads should increase clinical implant longevity.

  16. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenlong; Wang, Guangfu; Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi

    2016-03-01

    A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C1- implantation dose was increased to 1 × 1016 ions/cm2, and the effects of C1-, C2- and O1- implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 1015 ions/cm2. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Sisbnd CH3, Sisbnd Osbnd Si, Csbnd H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (sbnd COOH, sbnd OH, Sisbnd (O)x (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method to improve the cell biocompatibility of RTV SR.

  17. Modeling of the transient interstitial diffusion of implanted atoms during low-temperature annealing of silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velichko, O.I., E-mail: velichkomail@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, 6, P. Brovki Str., Minsk 220013 (Belarus); Kavaliova, A.P. [Department of Physics, Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, 6, P. Brovki Str., Minsk 220013 (Belarus)

    2012-06-15

    It has been shown that many of the phenomena related to the formation of 'tails' in the low-concentration region of ion-implanted impurity distribution are due to the anomalous diffusion of nonequilibrium impurity interstitials. These phenomena include boron implantation in preamorphized silicon, a 'hot' implantation of indium ions, annealing of ion-implanted layers et cetera. In particular, to verify this microscopic mechanism, a simulation of boron redistribution during low-temperature annealing of ion-implanted layers has been carried out under different conditions of transient enhanced diffusion suppression. Due to the good agreement with the experimental data, the values of the average migration length of nonequilibrium impurity interstitials have been obtained. It has been shown that for boron implanted into a silicon layer preamorphized by germanium ions the average migration length of impurity interstitials at the annealing temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C can be reduced from 11 nm to approximately 6 nm due to additional implantation of nitrogen. The further shortening of the average migration length is observed if the processing temperature is reduced to 750 Degree-Sign C. It is also found that for implantation of BF{sub 2} ions into silicon crystal, the value of the average migration length of boron interstitials is equal to 7.2 nm for thermal treatment at a temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C.

  18. The structural, chemical, and electrical properties of He-implantation-induced nanocavities in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seager, C.H.; Myers, S.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Stein, H.J.; Wampler, W.R.

    1993-11-01

    Si implanted with He to doses of about 2 {times} 10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2} and greater and annealed at high temperatures develops a layer of internal nanocavities near the end of the He range. Above an annealing temperature of 700 C, all the implanted He escapes from these implanted samples, and the resultant internal cavity surfaces can be shown to possess a high density of chemically reactive Si dangling orbitals. These structures, in addition to possessing a variety of interesting electronic properties, have recently been shown to hold great promise as getters for removing undesirable impurities from the silicon matrix. Here the authors describe some of the structural features of these nanocavities and studies which have been used to accurately determine the binding energy of H and Cu to Si atoms at the cavity walls. Recently, they have also demonstrated that these nanocavities capture large densities of majority carriers in n- and p-type silicon. These electrical measurements have demonstrated that the nanocavity electronic states possess both acceptor and donor levels in the Si forbidden gap. The approximate location of these levels has been determined by a variety of different types of capacitance transient spectroscopy.

  19. Biological characterization of a new silicon based coating developed for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ibáñez, M; Juan-Díaz, M J; Lara-Saez, I; Coso, A; Franco, J; Gurruchaga, M; Suay Antón, J; Goñi, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Taking into account the influence of Si in osteoblast cell proliferation, a series of sol-gel derived silicon based coating was prepared by controlling the process parameters and varying the different Si-alkoxide precursors molar rate in order to obtain materials able to release Si compounds. For this purpose, methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were hydrolysed together and the sol obtained was used to dip-coat the different substrates. The silicon release ability of the coatings was tested finding that it was dependent on the TEOS precursor content, reaching a Si amount value around ninefolds higher for coatings with TEOS than for the pure MTMOS material. To test the effect of this released Si, the in vitro performance of developed coatings was tested with human adipose mesenchymal stem cells finding a significantly higher proliferation and mineralization on the coating with the higher TEOS content. For in vivo evaluation of the biocompatibility, coated implants were placed in the tibia of the rabbit and a histological analysis was performed. The evaluation of parameters such as the bone marrow state, the presence of giant cells and the fibrous capsule proved the biocompatibility of the developed coatings. Furthermore, coated implants seemed to produce a qualitatively higher osteoblastic activity and a higher number of bone spicules than the control (uncoated commercial SLA titanium dental implant).

  20. Localization of dislocation-related luminescence centers in self-ion implanted silicon and effect of additional boron ion doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetelbaum, D.I.; Mikhaylov, A.N.; Belov, A.I.; Korolev, D.S.; Shushunov, A.N.; Bobrov, A.I.; Pavlov, D.A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Shek, E.I.; Sobolev, N.A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-01

    The depth distribution of light-emitting centers of the D1 dislocation-related photoluminescence line (∝ 1.5 μm) in silicon implanted with Si{sup +} ions and annealed at 1100 C in the oxidizing chlorine-containing atmosphere has been investigated by means of the layer-by-layer chemical etching. It is established with the application of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy that the main contribution to the D1 line is made by the centers located at the depths of up to ∝ 150 nm, i.e. in the region of Si{sup +} ion ranges, whereas the dislocations produced by Si{sup +} implantation and annealing at 1100 C penetrate to the depth of ∝ 1000 nm. Additional boron ion doping with subsequent annealing at 800 C in N{sub 2} atmosphere improves the emission in comparison with the undoped but annealed reference sample, however the additional annealing at 800 C per se results in the photoluminescence weakening. The dependence of the D1 line intensity on boron ion dose is found to be nonmonotonous. The interpretation of the obtained results is given in relation to the key role of selfinterstitials and boron impurity in the formation of radiative and nonradiative centers. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Utilización de implantes de silicona en la enfermedad de Dupuytren Use of silicone implants in Dupuytren's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ballesta Alcaraz

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos nuestra experiencia en el tratamiento de la enfermedad de Dupuytren mediante la utilización de unos implantes de silicona que se colocan en la palma de la mano una vez efectuada la aponeurectomia. Efectuamos este tratamiento en un grupo de 44 pacientes afectos de dicha enfermedad a los que hemos aplicado unos criterios de selección tales como el grado de afectación y que no fueran manos ya intervenidas con anterioridad. La idea es presentar una técnica quirúrgica que soluciona de una manera eficaz un determinado tipo de casos. La tolerancia y resultados dan validez a la técnica.We present our experience in the treatment of Dupuytren's disease by the use of a silicone implants in the palm of the hand after the aponeurectomy. The above mentioned treatment has been carried out in a group of 44 patients with Dupuytren's disease to whom we have applied selection criteria such as afectation degree and were not operated hands. The idea is to present a surgical technique that solves in an effective way specific cases. The tolerance and the obtained results state that the technique is valid.

  2. Oxidation of silicon surface with atomic oxygen radical anions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lian; Song Chong-Fu; Sun Jian-Qiu; Hou Ying; Li Xiao-Guang; Li Quan-Xin

    2008-01-01

    The surface oxidation of silicon (Si) wafers by atomic oxygen radical anions (O- anions) and the preparation of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors on the O--oxidized Si substrates have been examined for the first time. The O- anions are generated from a recently developed O- storage-emission material of [Ca24Al28O64]4+.4O- (C12A7-O- for short). After it has been irradiated by an O- anion beam (0.5 μA/cm2) at 300℃ for 1-10 hours, the Si wafer achieves an oxide layer with a thickness ranging from 8 to 32 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results reveal that the oxide layer is of a mixture of SiO2, Si2O3, and Si2O distributed in different oxidation depths. The features of the MOS capacitor of are investigated by measuring capacitance-voltage (C - V) and current-voltage (Ⅰ - Ⅴ) curves. The oxide charge density is about 6.0×1011 cm-2 derived from the C - V curves. The leakage current density is in the order of 10-6 A/cm2 below 4 MV/cm, obtained from the Ⅰ - Ⅴ curves. The Oanions formed by present method would have potential applications to the oxidation and the surface-modification of materials together with the preparation of semiconductor devices.

  3. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)]. E-mail: jesus.hernandez.mangas@tel.uva.es; Arias, J. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Marques, L.A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Ruiz-Bueno, A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Bailon, L. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results.

  4. Temperature dependences of the photoluminescence intensities of centers in silicon implanted with erbium and oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru; Shtel’makh, K. F.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Low-temperature photoluminescence in n-Cz-Si after the implantation of erbium ions at an elevated temperature and subsequent implantation of oxygen ions at room temperature is studied. So-called X and W centers formed from self-interstitial silicon atoms, H and P centers containing oxygen atoms, and Er centers containing Er{sup 3+} ions are observed in the photoluminescence spectra. The energies of enhancing and quenching of photoluminescence for these centers are determined. These energies are determined for the first time for X and H centers. In the case of P and Er centers, the values of the energies practically coincide with previously published data. For W centers, the energies of the enhancing and quenching of photoluminescence depend on the conditions of the formation of these centers.

  5. Photoluminescence in silicon implanted with erbium ions at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Sakharov, V. I.; Serenkov, I. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Vdovin, V. I. [St. Petersburg University, Fock Research Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Parshin, E. O.; Makoviichuk, M. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yaroslavl Branch, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15

    Photoluminescence spectra of n-type silicon upon implantation with erbium ions at 600 Degree-Sign C and oxygen ions at room temperature and subsequent annealings at 1100 Degree-Sign C in a chlorine-containing atmosphere have been studied. Depending on the annealing duration, photoluminescence spectra at 80 K are dominated by lines of the Er{sup 3+} ion or dislocation-related luminescence. The short-wavelength shift of the dislocation-related luminescence line observed at this temperature is due to implantation of erbium ions at an elevated temperature. At room temperature, lines of erbium and dislocation-related luminescence are observed in the spectra, but lines of near-band-edge luminescence predominate.

  6. Physics and modeling of ion implantation induced transient deactivation and diffusion processes in boron doped silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Srinivasan

    The economics of silicon processing requires predictive modeling capabilities for the continued rapid advancement of semiconductor technology. This is because it has become prohibitively expensive to develop a new process by running a large series of test lots through multi-billion dollar fabrication facilities. Effective process modeling requires an accurate physical understanding of the various interacting processes. The complexity of this problem is compounded by highly non-equilibrium phenomena associated with IC fabrication processes such as implantation annealing. Point defect supersaturations of many orders of magnitude are introduced following ion implantation, which is used to introduce the dopants into silicon. Such supersaturations dramatically alter the diffusion of dopants and reduce the electrical activation during the initial phase of the anneal. Boron is the primary p-type dopant used in silicon and thus understanding and modeling its deactivation/activation and diffusion is critical to predictive process simulation. Since boron is smaller than silicon, boron agglomerates with interstitials becoming electrically inactive. Modeling of boron clusters is complicated, as there is a huge array of potential boron-interstitial cluster compositions. A physical model for boron clustering is derived by identifying dominant clusters and rate limiting steps via atomistic calculations performed at Lawrence Livermore National Labs. The model is then used successfully to match a wide variety of chemical and electrical data. We further apply this model to understand and successfully predict ultra shallow junction formation. We find it is possible to explain some intriguing phenomenon observed during the formation of ultra shallow junctions, like saturation in junction depth despite increasing ramp-up rates. Researchers are exploring novel experimental processing steps like high energy Si pre-implants to produce highly active and shallow B junctions. To understand

  7. Study of phosphorus implanted and annealed silicon by electrical measurements and ion channeling technique

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjersi, T; Zilabdi, M; Benazzouz, C

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of annealing temperature on the electrical activation of phosphorus implanted into silicon. The measurements performed using spreading resistance, four-point probe and ion channeling techniques have allowed us to establish the existence of two domains of variation of the electrical activation (350-700 deg. C) and (800-1100 deg. C). The presence of reverse annealing and the annihilation of defects have been put in a prominent position in the first temperature range. It has been shown that in order to achieve a complete electrical activation, the annealing temperature must belong to the second domain (800-1100 deg. C).

  8. Interfacial oxide formation and oxygen diffusion in rare earth oxide-silicon epitaxial heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V.; Guha, S.; Copel, M.; Bojarczuk, N. A.; Flaitz, P. L.; Gribelyuk, M.

    2002-11-01

    We report on controlled interfacial oxide formation within epitaxial (LaxY1-x)2O3/Si(111) heterostructures under UHV environments. Results indicate that exposure of these epitaxial films to molecular oxygen right after deposition results in the formation of an amorphous interfacial layer thicker than that expected when a bare silicon surface is exposed to molecular oxygen under the same conditions. The results imply significant oxygen diffusion through the epitaxial dielectric and reaction at the silicon-oxide interface. Arguments have been developed to explain these observations.

  9. A study of defect evolution in multi-energy helium implanted monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, K.J.; Donnelly, S.E. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford (United Kingdom); Beaufort, M.F. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, Universite de Poitiers, Futuroscope-Chasseneuill (France); Terry, J.; Haworth, L.I. [Scottish Microelectronics Centre, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Alquier, D. [Universite Francois Rabelais Tours, L.M.P, Tours (France)

    2009-08-15

    Upon implantation, He ions interact with radiation damage in metals and semiconductors to form bubbles (V. Raineri, Phys. Rev. B 2, 937 (2000)). As far as Si is concerned, recent literature contains much information on the effects of ion implantation, defect formation and the transport of point defects in He-irradiated crystalline silicon (c-Si) whereas little information exists on the effects of He implantation on polycrystalline Si (poly-Si). This paper reports on a systematic comparison of the effects of He implantation on c-Si and poly-Si. Interesting and significant differences were observed in the defect morphology in the two cases. Results on the differences between the two materials are presented and discussed in terms of the role that grain boundaries in poly-Si play in trapping interstitials and the effects that this may have on the overall defect morphology. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Annealing studies of cluster defects in ion-implanted silicon using high resolution DLTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gad, M.A. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Evans-Freeman, J.H. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: j.evans-freeman@shu.ac.uk

    2006-12-15

    High resolution Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) has been applied to investigate the annealing behaviour of small cluster defects in n-type Si. The Si was implanted with either Ge or Si, with energies 1500 keV and 850 keV respectively, and doses of 1 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. The low dose ensured that there was a minimum of carrier removal due to deep defect states after implantation. Defect states in the as-implanted samples were attributed to VO pairs, divacancies and very small interstitial cluster defects, after detailed depth profiling. LDLTS of Ge{sup +} and Si{sup +} implanted silicon shows that there are three closely spaced deep levels associated with these clusters, with energies in the region of E {sub c}-400 meV. Samples were then isochronally annealed in very small temperature intervals up to 560 K, in situ in our high temperature measurement cryostat, and the LDLTS re-examined as a function of annealing temperature. A new deeper energy level emerges as the cluster-related signal reduces, and it is suggested that this new trap is a major recombination centre, by comparison with current-voltage data.

  11. Annealing studies of cluster defects in ion-implanted silicon using high resolution DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, M. A.; Evans-Freeman, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    High resolution Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) has been applied to investigate the annealing behaviour of small cluster defects in n-type Si. The Si was implanted with either Ge or Si, with energies 1500 keV and 850 keV respectively, and doses of 1 × 10 10 cm -2. The low dose ensured that there was a minimum of carrier removal due to deep defect states after implantation. Defect states in the as-implanted samples were attributed to VO pairs, divacancies and very small interstitial cluster defects, after detailed depth profiling. LDLTS of Ge + and Si + implanted silicon shows that there are three closely spaced deep levels associated with these clusters, with energies in the region of Ec-400 meV. Samples were then isochronally annealed in very small temperature intervals up to 560 K, in situ in our high temperature measurement cryostat, and the LDLTS re-examined as a function of annealing temperature. A new deeper energy level emerges as the cluster-related signal reduces, and it is suggested that this new trap is a major recombination centre, by comparison with current-voltage data.

  12. Histological evaluation of bone reactions to aluminium oxide dental implants in man: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattelli, A; Podda, G; Scarano, A

    1996-04-01

    Alumina implants have been shown to possess high biocompatibility. The authors present the case of an aluminium oxide ceramic implant removed because of fracture of the abutment after a 30-month loading period. It was possible to observe microscopically that the implant was covered by highly mineralized mature compact lamellar bone; no connective tissue or inflammatory cells were present at the interface. Osteocytes were observed very close to the bone-implant interface. These features indicate the good biocompatibility of the implant.

  13. Evaluation of low intensity laser's action on silicone mammary implant pseudocapsules in rats Avaliação do laser de baixa intensidade sobre a pseudocápsula de implantes mamários de silicone em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristides Palhares

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of low intensity laser on the pseudocapsula contraction that occurs around silicone implants. METHODS: 60 male rats divided in two experimental groups received a silicone implant in the subcutaneous of the dorsal region. Group I: animals received implants in the subcutaneous dorsal region and did not receive any treatment; Group II: animals received seven irradiation sessions with low intensity laser after they had received subcutaneous implants. Thirty, 60 and 180 days after the surgery, tonometric evaluation of the implants was conducted. After that, the animals were sacrificed, study material was removed and prepared for histological examination. The thickness of the pseudocapsule and the inflammatory reaction were morphometrically quantified. Data obtained were statistically analyzed using the Variance method, and Tukey's Test(POBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito do laser de baixa intensidade sobre a contração da pseudocápsula que ocorre ao redor de implantes de silicone. MÉTODOS: 60 ratos machos divididos em dois grupos receberam implante de silicone. Grupo I: implante no subcutâneo da região dorsal, sem tratamento após a cirurgia; Grupo II: animais receberam sete sessões de irradiação com laser de baixa intensidade após o implante. Trinta, 60 e 180 dias após a cirurgia, foi feita a tonometria dos implantes, Em seguida, os animais foram sacrificados, removendo-se o material de estudo que foi preparado para exame histológico, avaliando-se morfometricamente a espessura da pseudocápsula e a reação inflamatória. A análise estatistica pela técnica da Análise de Variância e Teste de Tukey (P<0.0 5. RESULTADOS: Pressões significativamente menores foram encontradas nos animais do grupo Grupo II. O estudo histológico não mostrou diferença significativa entre os grupos, destacando-se apenas maior quantidade de vasos intumescidos no Grupo II. A espessura da pseudocápsula foi menor no Grupo II. CONCLUS

  14. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chenlong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Wang, Guangfu, E-mail: 88088@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Beijing Radiation Center, 100875 Beijing (China); Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2016-03-01

    Highlights: • The radiation effect has a greater influence than doping effect on the hydrophilicity of RTV SR. • The implanted ions result in a new surface atomic bonding state and morphology. • Generating hydrophilic functional groups is a reason for the improved cell biocompatibility. • The micro roughness makes the hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect. • Cell culture demonstrates that negative-ion implantation can improve biocompatibility. - Abstract: A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C{sub 1}{sup −} implantation dose was increased to 1 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, and the effects of C{sub 1}{sup −}, C{sub 2}{sup −} and O{sub 1}{sup −} implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Si−CH{sub 3}, Si−O−Si, C−H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (−COOH, −OH, Si−(O){sub x} (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method

  15. The role of oxide interlayers in back reflector configurations for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demontis, V.; Sanna, C.; Melskens, J.; Santbergen, R.; Smets, A.H.M.; Damiano, A.; Zeman, M.

    2013-01-01

    Thin oxide interlayers are commonly added to the back reflector of thin-film silicon solar cells to increase their current. To gain more insight in the enhancement mechanism, we tested different back reflector designs consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) and/or hydrogenated silicon oxid

  16. The role of oxide interlayers in back reflector configurations for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demontis, V.; Sanna, C.; Melskens, J.; Santbergen, R.; Smets, A.H.M.; Damiano, A.; Zeman, M.

    2013-01-01

    Thin oxide interlayers are commonly added to the back reflector of thin-film silicon solar cells to increase their current. To gain more insight in the enhancement mechanism, we tested different back reflector designs consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) and/or hydrogenated silicon oxid

  17. Structural and optical properties of silicon rich oxide films in graded-stoichiometric multilayers for optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios-Huerta, L.; Aceves-Mijares, M. [Electronics Department, INAOE, Apdo. 51, Puebla, Pue. 72000, México (Mexico); Cabañas-Tay, S. A.; Cardona-Castro, M. A.; Morales-Sánchez, A., E-mail: alfredo.morales@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Unidad Monterrey-PIIT, Apodaca, NL 66628, México (Mexico); Domínguez-Horna, C. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-07-18

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si-ncs) are excellent candidates for the development of optoelectronic devices. Nevertheless, different strategies are still necessary to enhance their photo and electroluminescent properties by controlling their structural and compositional properties. In this work, the effect of the stoichiometry and structure on the optical properties of silicon rich oxide (SRO) films in a multilayered (ML) structure is studied. SRO MLs with silicon excess gradually increased towards the top and bottom and towards the center of the ML produced through the variation of the stoichiometry in each SRO layer were fabricated and confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Si-ncs with three main sizes were observed by a transmission electron microscope, in agreement with the stoichiometric profile of each SRO layer. The presence of the three sized Si-ncs and some oxygen related defects enhances intense violet/blue and red photoluminescence (PL) bands. The SRO MLs were super-enriched with additional excess silicon by Si{sup +} implantation, which enhanced the PL intensity. Oxygen-related defects and small Si-ncs (<2 nm) are mostly generated during ion implantation enhancing the violet/blue band to become comparable to the red band. The structural, compositional, and luminescent characteristics of the multilayers are the result of the contribution of the individual characteristics of each layer.

  18. Research on total-dose hardening for H-gate PD NMOSFET/SIMOX by ion implanting into buried oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Cong; ZHANG Zheng-Xuan; ZHANG Feng; LIN Cheng-Lu

    2008-01-01

    In this work,we investigate the back-gate I-V characteristics for two kinds of NMOSFET/SIMOX transistors with H gate structure fabricated on two different SOI wafers.A transistors are made on the wafer implanted with Si+ and then annealed in N2,and B transistors are made on the wafer without implantation and annealing.It is demonstrated experimentally that A transistors have much less back-gate threshold voltage shift AVth than B transistors under X-ray total dose irradiation.Subthreshold charge separation technique is employed to estimate the build-up of oxide charge and interface traps during irradiation,showing that the reduced △Vth for A transistors is mainly due to its less build-up of oxide charge than B transistors.Photoluminescence (PL) research indicates that Si implantation results in the formation of silicon nanocrystalline (nanocluster) whose size increases with the implant dose.This structure can trap electrons to compensate the positive charge build-up in the buried oxide during irradiation,and thus reduce the threshold voltage negative shift.

  19. Atomic structure of the amorphous nonstoichiometric silicon oxides and nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, V A [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-31

    In addition to amorphous SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, the two key dielectric film materials used in modern silicon devices, the fabrication technology of nonstoichiometric SiO{sub x}N{sub y}, SiN{sub x}, and SiO{sub x} compounds is currently under development. Varying the chemical composition of these compounds allows a wide range of control over their physical - specifically, optical and electrical - properties. The development of technology for synthesizing such films requires a detailed understanding of their atomic structure. Current views on the atomic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitrides and oxides are reviewed and summarized. (reviews of topical problems)

  20. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  1. Enhancing Hydrogen Diffusion in Silica Matrix by Using Metal Ion Implantation to Improve the Emission Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bornacelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient silicon-based light emitters continue to be a challenge. A great effort has been made in photonics to modify silicon in order to enhance its light emission properties. In this aspect silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs have become the main building block of silicon photonic (modulators, waveguide, source, and detectors. In this work, we present an approach based on implantation of Ag (or Au ions and a proper thermal annealing in order to improve the photoluminescence (PL emission of Si-NCs embedded in SiO2. The Si-NCs are obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy and nucleated at high depth into the silica matrix (1-2 μm under surface. Once Si-NCs are formed inside the SiO2 we implant metal ions at energies that do not damage the Si-NCs. We have observed by, PL and time-resolved PL, that ion metal implantation and a subsequent thermal annealing in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere could significantly increase the emission properties of Si-NCs. Elastic Recoil Detection measurements show that the samples with an enhanced luminescence emission present a higher hydrogen concentration. This suggests that ion metal implantation enhances the hydrogen diffusion into silica matrix allowing a better passivation of surface defects on Si NCs.

  2. Synthesis of silicon carbide films by combined implantation with sputtering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaobao; Zhang, Jizhong; Meng, Qingli; Li, Wenzhi

    2007-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) films were synthesized by combined metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) techniques. Carbon ions with 40 keV energy were implanted into Si(1 0 0) substrates at ion fluence of 5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Then silicon and carbon atoms were co-sputtered on the Si(1 0 0) substrate surface, at the same time the samples underwent assistant Ar-ion irradiation at 20 keV energy. A group of samples with substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 °C were used to analyze the effect of temperature on formation of the SiC film. Influence of the assistant Ar-ion irradiation was also investigated. The structure, morphology and mechanical properties of the deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoindentation, respectively. The bond configurations were obtained from IR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate that microcrystalline SiC films were synthesized at 600 °C. The substrate temperature and assistant Ar-ion irradiation played a key role in the process. The assistant Ar-ion irradiation also helps increasing the nanohardness and bulk modulus of the SiC films. The best values of nanohardness and bulk modulus were 24.1 and 282.6 GPa, respectively.

  3. Synthesis of silicon carbide films by combined implantation with sputtering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Gaobao [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Jizhong [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); International Centre for Materials Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: zjz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Meng Qingli [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Wenzhi [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-08-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC) films were synthesized by combined metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) techniques. Carbon ions with 40 keV energy were implanted into Si(1 0 0) substrates at ion fluence of 5 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Then silicon and carbon atoms were co-sputtered on the Si(1 0 0) substrate surface, at the same time the samples underwent assistant Ar-ion irradiation at 20 keV energy. A group of samples with substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 deg. C were used to analyze the effect of temperature on formation of the SiC film. Influence of the assistant Ar-ion irradiation was also investigated. The structure, morphology and mechanical properties of the deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoindentation, respectively. The bond configurations were obtained from IR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate that microcrystalline SiC films were synthesized at 600 deg. C. The substrate temperature and assistant Ar-ion irradiation played a key role in the process. The assistant Ar-ion irradiation also helps increasing the nanohardness and bulk modulus of the SiC films. The best values of nanohardness and bulk modulus were 24.1 and 282.6 GPa, respectively.

  4. Low-temperature technique of thin silicon ion implanted epitaxial detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyasz, A. J.; Le Neindre, N.; Parlog, M.; Casini, G.; Bougault, R.; Poggi, G.; Bednarek, A.; Kowalczyk, M.; Lopez, O.; Merrer, Y.; Vient, E.; Frankland, J. D.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Gruyer, D.; Borderie, B.; Ademard, G.; Edelbruck, P.; Rivet, M. F.; Salomon, F.; Bini, M.; Valdré, S.; Scarlini, E.; Pasquali, G.; Pastore, G.; Piantelli, S.; Stefanini, A.; Olmi, A.; Barlini, S.; Boiano, A.; Rosato, E.; Meoli, A.; Ordine, A.; Spadaccini, G.; Tortone, G.; Vigilante, M.; Vanzanella, E.; Bruno, M.; Serra, S.; Morelli, L.; Guerzoni, M.; Alba, R.; Santonocito, D.; Maiolino, C.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Kozik, T.; Kulig, P.; Twaróg, T.; Sosin, Z.; Gaşior, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W.; Sarnecki, J.; Lipiński, D.; Wodzińska, H.; Brzozowski, A.; Teodorczyk, M.; Gajewski, M.; Zagojski, A.; Krzyżak, K.; Tarasiuk, K. J.; Khabanowa, Z.; Kordyasz, Ł.

    2015-02-01

    A new technique of large-area thin ion implanted silicon detectors has been developed within the R&D performed by the FAZIA Collaboration. The essence of the technique is the application of a low-temperature baking process instead of high-temperature annealing. This thermal treatment is performed after B+ ion implantation and Al evaporation of detector contacts, made by using a single adjusted Al mask. Extremely thin silicon pads can be therefore obtained. The thickness distribution along the X and Y directions was measured for a prototype chip by the energy loss of α-particles from 241Am ( = 5.5 MeV). Preliminary tests on the first thin detector (area ≈ 20 × 20 mm2) were performed at the INFN-LNS cyclotron in Catania (Italy) using products emitted in the heavy-ion reaction 84Kr ( E = 35 A MeV) + 112Sn. The ΔE - E ion identification plot was obtained using a telescope consisting of our thin ΔE detector (21 μm thick) followed by a typical FAZIA 510 μm E detector of the same active area. The charge distribution of measured ions is presented together with a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the Z resolution. The threshold is lower than 2 A MeV depending on the ion charge.

  5. Low-temperature technique of thin silicon ion implanted epitaxial detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordyasz, A.J.; Bednarek, A. [Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Lopez, O.; Merrer, Y.; Vient, E. [Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN, Caen-Cedex (France); Parlog, M. [Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN, Caen-Cedex (France); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Casini, G.; Poggi, G.; Bini, M.; Valdre, S.; Scarlini, E.; Pasquali, G.; Pastore, G.; Piantelli, S.; Stefanini, A.; Olmi, A.; Barlini, S. [INFN Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Universita di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Kowalczyk, M. [Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Frankland, J.D.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Gruyer, D. [CEA et IN2P3-CNRS, GANIL, Caen-Cedex 05 (France); Borderie, B.; Ademard, G.; Edelbruck, P.; Rivet, M.F.; Salomon, F. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay-Cedex (France); Boiano, A.; Rosato, E.; Meoli, A.; Ordine, A.; Spadaccini, G.; Tortone, G.; Vigilante, M.; Vanzanella, E. [Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Bruno, M.; Serra, S.; Morelli, L.; Guerzoni, M. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alba, R.; Santonocito, D.; Maiolino, C. [INFN, Catania (Italy); Universita di Catania, LNS, Catania (Italy); Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T. [INFN LNL Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Kozik, T.; Kulig, P.; Twarog, T.; Sosin, Z. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Gasior, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Silesian University, Katowice (Poland); Sarnecki, J.; Lipinski, D.; Wodzinska, H.; Brzozowski, A.; Teodorczyk, M.; Gajewski, M.; Zagojski, A.; Krzyzak, K. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Tarasiuk, K.J. [University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Khabanowa, Z. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Kordyasz, L. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechatronics, Institute of Mikromechanics and Photonics, Department of Design of Precision Devices, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-02-01

    A new technique of large-area thin ion implanted silicon detectors has been developed within the R and D performed by the FAZIA Collaboration. The essence of the technique is the application of a low-temperature baking process instead of high-temperature annealing. This thermal treatment is performed after B{sup +} ion implantation and Al evaporation of detector contacts, made by using a single adjusted Al mask. Extremely thin silicon pads can be therefore obtained. The thickness distribution along the X and Y directions was measured for a prototype chip by the energy loss of α-particles from {sup 241}Am (left angle E{sub α} right angle = 5.5 MeV). Preliminary tests on the first thin detector (area ∼ 20 x 20 mm{sup 2}) were performed at the INFN-LNS cyclotron in Catania (Italy) using products emitted in the heavy-ion reaction {sup 84}Kr (E = 35 A MeV) + {sup 112}Sn. The ΔE - E ion identification plot was obtained using a telescope consisting of our thin ΔE detector (21 μm thick) followed by a typical FAZIA 510 μm E detector of the same active area. The charge distribution of measured ions is presented together with a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the Z resolution. The threshold is lower than 2 A MeV depending on the ion charge. (orig.)

  6. A Novel Method to Fabricate Silicon Nanowire p–n Junctions by a Combination of Ion Implantation and in-situ Doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kögler Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We demonstrate a novel method to fabricate an axial p–n junction inside <111> oriented short vertical silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy by combining ion implantation with in-situ doping. The lower halves of the nanowires were doped in-situ with boron (concentration ~1018cm−3, while the upper halves were doubly implanted with phosphorus to yield a uniform concentration of 2 × 1019 cm−3. Electrical measurements of individually contacted nanowires showed excellent diode characteristics and ideality factors close to 2. We think that this value of ideality factors arises out of a high rate of carrier recombination through surface states in the native oxide covering the nanowires.

  7. Indications for the use of MemoryShape breast implants in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery: long-term clinical outcomes of shaped versus round silicone breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplin, David A

    2014-09-01

    The availability of different styles of silicone gel implants-including traditional round devices and shaped, form-stable implants-offers a variety of choices for women undergoing breast augmentation and reconstruction. The purpose of this analysis was to characterize clinical outcomes associated with the Mentor MemoryGel (round) MemoryShape/Contour Profile Gel (shaped) devices through 9 years of use in women undergoing breast augmentation or reconstruction. The Mentor Core studies are nonrandomized, open-label clinical trials designed to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of silicone gel breast implants. The cumulative incidence of selected complications and reoperations was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Patient satisfaction was assessed by asking the patient if she would decide to have breast implant surgery again. Shaped implants were associated with lower cumulative incidence rates of Baker Grade III/IV capsular contracture compared with round implants (3.4% vs 11.3%, respectively, in primary augmentation, P < 0.0001; 15.6% vs 24.4% in revision-augmentation, P < 0.05). Reoperation, explantation, and infection rates were comparable between devices across cohorts, except for lower incidence of infection with shaped than round implants in primary reconstruction (1.6% vs 6.2%, P < 0.05). Rupture rates were lower with shaped implants, with significance reached in primary augmentation patients at 8 years (3.1% vs 10.3%, P < 0.05). High levels of patient satisfaction (exceeding 94%) with both devices were reported at 9 years across cohorts. Prospective data through 9 years support comparable safety of round and shaped breast implants, and high levels of patient satisfaction, in patients undergoing primary and revision breast augmentation and reconstruction.

  8. Positive Biomechanical Effects of Titanium Oxide for Sandblasting Implant Surface as an Alternative to Aluminium Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Taschieri, Silvio; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Coelho, Paulo Guilherme

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physico-chemical properties and the in vivo host response of a surface sandblasted with particles of titanium oxide (TiO2) followed by acid etching as an alternative to aluminium oxide. Thirty titanium disks manufactured in the same conditions as the implants and 24 conventional cylindrical implants were used. Half of the implants had a machined surface (Gcon) while in the other half; the surface was treated with particles of TiO2 followed by acid etching (Gexp). Surface characterization was assessed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), profilometry, and wettability. For the in vivo test, 12 implants of each group were implanted in the tibia of 6 rabbits, and were reverse torque tested after periods of 30 or 60 days after implantation. Following torque, SEM was utilized to assess residual bone-implant contact. The surface characterization by SEM showed a very homogeneous surface with uniform irregularities for Gexp and a small amount of residues of the blasting procedure, while Gcon presented a surface with minimal irregularities from the machining tools. Wettability test showed decreased contact angle for the Gcon relative to the Gexp. The Gexp removal torque at 30 and 60 days was 28.7%, and 33.2% higher relative to the Gcon, respectively. Blasting the surface with particles of TiO2 represents an adequate option for the surface treatment of dental implants, with minimal risk of contamination by the residual debris from the blasting procedure.

  9. MRI screening for silicone breast implant rupture: accuracy, inter- and intraobserver variability using explantation results as reference standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maijers, M.C.; Ritt, M.J.P.F. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, F.B. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jan van Goyen Clinic, Department of Plastic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veldhuizen, J.F.H. [MRI Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Manoliu, R.A. [MRI Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    The recall of Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) silicone breast implants in 2010 resulted in large numbers of asymptomatic women with implants who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening. This study's aim was to assess the accuracy and interobserver variability of MRI screening in the detection of rupture and extracapsular silicone leakage. A prospective study included 107 women with 214 PIP implants who underwent explantation preceded by MRI. In 2013, two radiologists blinded for previous MRI findings or outcome at surgery, independently re-evaluated all MRI examinations. A structured protocol described the MRI findings. The ex vivo findings served as reference standard. In 208 of the 214 explanted prostheses, radiologists agreed independently about the condition of the implants. In five of the six cases they disagreed (2.6 %), but subsequently reached consensus. A sensitivity of 93 %, specificity of 93 %, positive predictive value of 77 % and negative predictive value of 98 % was found. The interobserver agreement was excellent (kappa value of 0.92). MRI has a high accuracy in diagnosing rupture in silicone breast implants. Considering the high kappa value of interobserver agreement, MRI appears to be a consistent diagnostic test. A simple, uniform classification, may improve communication between radiologist and plastic surgeon. (orig.)

  10. Floating substrate luminescence from silicon rich oxide metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Sánchez, A., E-mail: alfredo.morales@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S. C., Unidad Monterrey-PIIT, 66600 Apodaca, Nuevo León (Mexico); Domínguez, C. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC). 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Barreto, J. [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Aceves-Mijares, M. [INAOE, Electronics Department, Apartado 51, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Licea-Jiménez, L. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S. C., Unidad Monterrey-PIIT, 66600 Apodaca, Nuevo León (Mexico); Luna-López, J.A.; Carrillo, J. [CIDS-ICUAP. Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla. 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    The electro-optical properties of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with embedded Si nanoparticles in silicon-rich (4 at.%) oxide films have been studied. Devices show intense visible continuous luminescence not only in the regular metal-oxide-semiconductor configuration, but when biased via surface electrodes (floating substrate) separated 10 μm. Electroluminescence manifests as extremely bright randomly scattered discrete spots on the gate area or the periphery of the devices depending on the bias direction. The mechanism responsible for the surface-electroluminescence has been related to the recombination of electron–hole pairs injected through enhanced current paths within the silicon-rich oxide film. - Highlights: ► Silicon rich oxide (SRO) based metal-oxide-semiconductor like luminescent devices. ► Electroluminescence (EL) in floating-substrate, horizontal electrodes configuration. ► EL is observed as multiple shining spots with surface electrodes. ► Preferential current paths established in the SRO between several electrodes.

  11. Phase transitions in ferroelectric silicon doped hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böscke, T. S.; Teichert, St.; Bräuhaus, D.; Müller, J.; Schröder, U.; Böttger, U.; Mikolajick, T.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated phase transitions in ferroelectric silicon doped hafnium oxide (FE-Si:HfO2) by temperature dependent polarization and x-ray diffraction measurements. If heated under mechanical confinement, the orthorhombic ferroelectric phase reversibly transforms into a phase with antiferroelectric behavior. Without confinement, a transformation into a monoclinic/tetragonal phase mixture is observed during cooling. These results suggest the existence of a common higher symmetry parent phase to the orthorhombic and monoclinic phases, while transformation between these phases appears to be inhibited by an energy barrier.

  12. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar; Rajkumar; Dinesh Kumar; P J George

    2002-11-01

    Many semiconductor integrated circuit manufacturing processes require high dose of implantation at very low energies. Conventional beam line ion implantation system suffers from low beam current at low energies, therefore, cannot be used economically for high dose applications. Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is emerging as a potential technique for such implantations. This method offers high dose rate irrespective of implantation energy. In the present study nitrogen ions were implanted using PIII in order to modify the properties of silicon and some refractory metal films. Oxidation behaviour of silicon was observed for different implantation doses. Diffusion barrier properties of refractory barrier metals were studied for copper metallization.

  13. Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in human blood as markers for ruptured silicone gel-filled breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, Pia; Hippler, Joerg; Schmitz, Oliver J; Hoffmann, Oliver; Rusch, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The replacement of medical-grade silicone with industrial-grade silicone material in some silicone gel-filled breast implants (SBI) manufactured by Poly Implant Prothèse and Rofil Medical Nederland B.V., reported in 2010, which resulted in a higher rupture tendency of these SBI, demonstrates the need for non-invasive, sensitive monitoring and screening methods. Therefore a sensitive method based on large volume injection-gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LVI-GC/MS) was developed to determine octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclo-hexasiloxane (D6) in blood samples from women with intact (n = 13) and ruptured SBI (n = 11). With dichloromethane extraction, sample cooling during preparation, and analysis extraction efficiencies up to 100 % and limits of detection of 0.03-0.05 ng D4-D6/g blood were achieved. Blood samples from women with SBI were investigated. In contrast to women with intact SBI, in blood from women with ruptured SBI higher D4 and D6 concentrations up to 0.57 ng D4/g blood and 0.16 ng D6/g blood were detected. With concentrations above 0.18 D4 ng/blood and 0.10 ng D6/g blood as significant criteria for ruptured SBI, this developed analytical preoperative diagnostic method shows a significant increase of the recognition rate. Finally a higher precision (error rate 17%) than the commonly used clinical diagnostic method, mamma sonography (error rate 46%), was achieved.

  14. Effect of Graphene Oxide on the Properties of Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenych, Igor B.; Aksimentyeva, Olena I.; Monastyrskii, Liubomyr S.; Horbenko, Yulia Yu.; Partyka, Maryan V.; Luchechko, Andriy P.; Yarytska, Lidia I.

    2016-02-01

    We studied an effect of the graphene oxide (GO) layer on the optical and electrical properties of porous silicon (PS) in hybrid PS-GO structure created by electrochemical etching of silicon wafer and deposition of GO from water dispersion on PS. With the help of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic-force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, it was established that GO formed a thin film on the PS surface and is partly embedded in the pores of PS. A comparative analysis of the FTIR spectra for the PS and PS-GO structures confirms the passivation of the PS surface by the GO film. This film has a sufficient transparency for excitation and emission of photoluminescence (PL). Moreover, GO modifies PL spectrum of PS, shifting the PL maximum by 25 nm towards lower energies. GO deposition on the surface of the porous silicon leads to the change in the electrical parameters of PS in AC and DC modes. By means of current-voltage characteristics (CVC) and impedance spectroscopy, it is shown that the impact of GO on electrical characteristics of PS manifests in reduced capacitance and lower internal resistance of hybrid structures.

  15. Synthesis of Bioactive Three-dimensional Silicon-oxide Nanofibrous Structures on the Silicon Substrate for Bionic Devices’ Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Colpitts

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bionic devices are implants that replace biological functions that have been lost due to damaged or lost tissue. The challenge of this area is to find the appropriate materials to match the biocompatible criteria with the same mechanical and electrical performance. In this research, a new method is introduced for the enhance‐ ment of silicon biocompatibility by fabrication of a 3D nanofibrous layer on the silicon surface, induced by nanosecond laser pulses at a high repetition rate and power. It was found that the laser treatment with small‐ er line spacing and a higher overlap number enhanced the biocompatibility of silicon. The results display a promis‐ ing improvement in the biocompatibility of silicon for the production of biomedical devices such as sensors, bio- MEMS and nano-biomaterial fabrications.

  16. Formation of silicon carbide and diamond nanoparticles in the surface layer of a silicon target during short-pulse carbon ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnev, G. E.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Naiden, E. P.; Saltymakov, M. S.; Stepanov, A. V.; Shtan'ko, V. F.

    2009-04-01

    Synthesis of silicon carbide and diamond nanoparticles is studied during short-pulse implantation of carbon ions and protons into a silicon target. The experiments are carried out using a TEMP source of pulsed powerful ion beams based on a magnetically insulated diode with radial magnetic field B r . The beam parameters are as follows: the ion energy is 300 keV, the pulse duration is 80 ns, the beam consists of carbon ions and protons, and the ion current density is 30 A/cm2. Single-crystal silicon wafers serve as a target. SiC nanoparticles and nanodiamonds form in the surface layer of silicon subjected to more than 100 pulses. The average coherent domain sizes in the SiC particles and nanodiamonds are 12-16 and 8-9 nm, respectively.

  17. Microfabrication of an Implantable silicone Microelectrode array for an epiretinal prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, M

    2003-06-10

    Millions of people suffering from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration are legally blind due to the loss of photoreceptor function. Fortunately a large percentage of the neural cells connected to the photoreceptors remain viable, and electrical stimulation of these cells has been shown to result in visual perception. These findings have generated worldwide efforts to develop a retinal prosthesis device, with the hope of restoring vision. Advances in microfabrication, integrated circuits, and wireless technologies provide the means to reach this challenging goal. This dissertation describes the development of innovative silicone-based microfabrication techniques for producing an implantable microelectrode array. The microelectrode array is a component of an epiretinal prosthesis being developed by a multi-laboratory consortium. This array will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces. Because the array is intended as a long-term implant, vital biological and physical design requirements must be met. A retinal implant poses difficult engineering challenges due to the size of the intraocular cavity and the delicate retina. Not only does it have to be biocompatible in terms of cytotoxicity and degradation, but it also has to be structurally biocompatible, with regard to smooth edges and high conformability; basically mimicking the biological tissue. This is vital to minimize stress and prevent physical damage to the retina. Also, the device must be robust to withstand the forces imposed on it during fabrication and implantation. In order to meet these biocompatibility needs, the use of non-conventional microfabrication materials such as silicone is required. This mandates the enhancement of currently available polymer-based fabrication techniques and the development of new microfabrication methods. Through an iterative process, devices

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy characterization of magnetron sputtered silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinho, V., E-mail: godinho@icmse.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla-CSIC/US, Avda. Americo Vespucio no 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Denisov, V.N.; Mavrin, B.N.; Novikova, N.N.; Vinogradov, E.A.; Yakovlev, V.A. [Institute for Spectroscopy - Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow reg. (Russian Federation); Fernandez-Ramos, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla-CSIC/US, Avda. Americo Vespucio no 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Institute for Prospective and Technological Studies-JRC European Commission, C/Inca Garcilaso s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain); Jimenez de Haro, M.C.; Fernandez, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla-CSIC/US, Avda. Americo Vespucio no 49, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    Vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectroscopy has been used to characterize SiO{sub x}N{sub y} and SiO{sub x} films prepared by magnetron sputtering on steel and silicon substrates. Interference bands in the infrared reflectivity measurements provided the film thickness and the dielectric function of the films. Vibrational modes bands were obtained both from infrared and Raman spectra providing useful information on the bonding structure and the microstructure (formation of nano-voids in some coatings) for these amorphous (or nanocrystalline) coatings. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis have also been carried out to determine the composition and texture of the films, and to correlate these data with the vibrational spectroscopy studies. The angular dependence of the reflectivity spectra provides the dispersion of vibrational and interference polaritons modes, what allows to separate these two types of bands especially in the frequency regions where overlaps/resonances occurred. Finally the attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared measurements have been also carried out demonstrating the feasibility and high sensitivity of the technique. Comparison of the spectra of the SiO{sub x}N{sub y} films prepared in various conditions demonstrates how films can be prepared from pure silicon oxide to silicon oxynitride with reduced oxygen content.

  19. Spin-dependent recombination at arsenic donors in ion-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, David P., E-mail: david.franke@wsi.tum.de; Brandt, Martin S. [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Otsuka, Manabu; Matsuoka, Takashi; Itoh, Kohei M. [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Vlasenko, Marina P. [A. F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15

    Spin-dependent transport processes in thin near-surface doping regions created by low energy ion implantation of arsenic in silicon are detected by two methods, spin-dependent recombination using microwave photoconductivity and electrically detected magnetic resonance monitoring the direct current through the sample. The high sensitivity of these techniques allows the observation of the magnetic resonance, in particular, of As in weak magnetic fields and at low resonance frequencies (40–1200 MHz), where high-field-forbidden transitions between the magnetic sublevels can be observed due to the mixing of electron and nuclear spin states. Several implantation-induced defects are present in the samples studied and act as spin readout partner. We explicitly demonstrate this by electrically detected electron double resonance experiments and identify a pair recombination of close pairs formed by As donors and oxygen-vacancy centers in an excited triplet state (SL1) as the dominant spin-dependent process in As-implanted Czochralski-grown Si.

  20. Silicon and tungsten oxide nanostructures for water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Gil, Karla R.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2009-08-01

    Inorganic semiconductors are promising materials for driving photoelectrochemical water-splitting reactions. However, there is not a single semiconductor material that can sustain the unassisted splitting of water into H2 and O2. Instead, we are developing a three part cell design where individual catalysts for water reduction and oxidation will be attached to the ends of a membrane. The job of splitting water is therefore divided into separate reduction and oxidation reactions, and each catalyst can be optimized independently for a single reaction. Silicon might be suitable to drive the water reduction. Inexpensive highly ordered Si wire arrays were grown on a single crystal wafer and transferred into a transparent, flexible polymer matrix. In this array, light would be absorbed along the longer axial dimension while the resulting electrons or holes would be collected along the much shorter radial dimension in a massively parallel array resembling carpet fibers on a microscale, hence the term "solar carpet". Tungsten oxide is a good candidate to drive the water oxidation. Self-organized porous tungsten oxide was successfully synthesized on the tungsten foil by anodization. This sponge-like structure absorbs light efficiently due to its high surface area; hence we called it "solar sponge".

  1. New perspectives on thermal and hyperthermal oxidation of silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Umedjon

    The growth of (ultra)thin silica (SiO2) layers on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and controlling the thickness of SiO2 is an important issue in the fabrication of microelectronics and photovoltaic devices (e.g., MOSFETs, solar cells, optical fibers etc.). Such ultrathin oxide can be grown and tuned even at low temperature (including room temperature), by hyperthermal oxidation or when performed on non-planar Si surfaces (e.g., Si nanowires or spheres). However, hyperthermal silica growth as well as small Si-NW oxidation in general and the initial stages in particular have not yet been investigated in full detail. This work is therefore devoted to controlling ultrathin silica thickness on planar and non-planar Si surfaces, which can open new perspectives in nanodevice fabrication. The simulation of hyperthermal (1-100 eV) Si oxidation demonstrate that at low impact energy (nanotechnology. Above the transition temperature such core-shell nanowires are completely converted to a-SiO2 nanowires. It can be concluded that an accurate control over the interfacial stress by choosing a suitable oxidation temperature and Si-NW diameter can lead to precise nanoscale control over the Si-core radius. All investigations were carried out by applying molecular dynamics calculations using the ReaxFF potential, allowing a accurately study of the underpinning physical and chemical processes.

  2. Anisotropic interpolation method of silicon carbide oxidation growth rates for three-dimensional simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimonka, Vito; Nawratil, Georg; Hössinger, Andreas; Weinbub, Josef; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2017-02-01

    We investigate anisotropical and geometrical aspects of hexagonal structures of Silicon Carbide and propose a direction dependent interpolation method for oxidation growth rates. We compute three-dimensional oxidation rates and perform one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations for 4H- and 6H-Silicon Carbide thermal oxidation. The rates of oxidation are computed according to the four known growth rate values for the Si- (0 0 0 1) , a- (1 1 2 bar 0) , m- (1 1 bar 0 0) , and C-face (0 0 0 1 bar) . The simulations are based on the proposed interpolation method together with available thermal oxidation models. We additionally analyze the temperature dependence of Silicon Carbide oxidation rates for different crystal faces using Arrhenius plots. The proposed interpolation method is an essential step towards highly accurate three-dimensional oxide growth simulations which help to better understand the anisotropic nature and oxidation mechanism of Silicon Carbide.

  3. Transparent Conductive Oxides for Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, J.

    2005-04-25

    This thesis describes research on thin-film silicon solar cells with focus on the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) for such devices. In addition to the formation of a transparent and electrically conductive front electrode for the solar cell allowing photocurrent collection with low ohmic losses, the front TCO plays an important role for the light enhancement of thin-film silicon pin type solar cells. If the TCO is rough, light scattering at rough interfaces in the solar cell in combination with a highly reflective back contact leads to an increase in optical path length of the light. Multiple (total) internal reflectance leads to virtual 'trapping' of the light in the solar cell structure, allowing a further decrease in absorber thickness and thus thin-film silicon solar cell devices with higher and more stable efficiency. Here, the optical mechanisms involved in the light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells have been studied, and two types of front TCO materials have been investigated with respect to their suitability as front TCO in thin-film silicon pin type solar cells. Undoped and aluminum doped zinc oxide layers have been fabricated for the first time by the expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP CVD) technique at substrate temperatures between 150C and 350C, and successfully implemented as a front electrode material for amorphous silicon pin superstrate type solar cells. Solar cells with efficiencies comparable to cells on Asahi U-type reference TCO have been reproducibly obtained. A higher haze is needed for the ZnO samples studied here than for Asahi U-type TCO in order to achieve comparable long wavelength response of the solar cells. This is attributed to the different angular distribution of the scattered light, showing higher scattering intensities at large angles for the Asahi U-type TCO. A barrier at the TCO/p interface and minor collection problems may explain the slightly lower fill factors obtained for the

  4. Transparent conductive oxides for thin-film silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, J.

    2005-04-01

    This thesis describes research on thin-film silicon solar cells with focus on the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) for such devices. In addition to the formation of a transparent and electrically conductive front electrode for the solar cell allowing photocurrent collection with low ohmic losses, the front TCO plays an important role for the light enhancement of thin-film silicon pin type solar cells. If the TCO is rough, light scattering at rough interfaces in the solar cell in combination with a highly reflective back contact leads to an increase in optical path length of the light. Multiple (total) internal reflectance leads to virtual 'trapping' of the light in the solar cell structure, allowing a further decrease in absorber thickness and thus thin-film silicon solar cell devices with higher and more stable efficiency. Here, the optical mechanisms involved in the light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells have been studied, and two types of front TCO materials have been investigated with respect to their suitability as front TCO in thin-film silicon pin type solar cells. Undoped and aluminum doped zinc oxide layers have been fabricated for the first time by the expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP CVD) technique at substrate temperatures between 150 º C and 350 º C, and successfully implemented as a front electrode material for amorphous silicon pin superstrate type solar cells. Solar cells with efficiencies comparable to cells on Asahi U-type reference TCO have been reproducibly obtained. A higher haze is needed for the ZnO samples studied here than for Asahi U-type TCO in order to achieve comparable long wavelength response of the solar cells. This is attributed to the different angular distribution of the scattered light, showing higher scattering intensities at large angles for the Asahi U-type TCO. A barrier at the TCO/p interface and minor collection problems may explain the slightly lower fill factors obtained for the cells

  5. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissbühler, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.geissbuehler@epfl.ch; Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Barraud, Loris; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain [CSEM PV-Center, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Ballif, Christophe [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); CSEM PV-Center, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2015-08-24

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  6. Layer disordering and doping compensation of an intersubband AlGaN/AlN superlattice by silicon implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, J. J.; Allerman, A. A.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Alford, C.; Vawter, G. A.; Montaño, I.

    2014-09-01

    Layer disordering and doping compensation of an Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattice by implantation are demonstrated. The as-grown sample exhibits intersubband absorption at ˜1.56 μm which is modified when subject to a silicon implantation. After implantation, the intersubband absorption decreases and shifts to longer wavelengths. Also, with increasing implant dose, the intersubband absorption decreases. It is shown that both layer disordering of the heterointerfaces and doping compensation from the vacancies produced during the implantation cause the changes in the intersubband absorption. Such a method is useful for removing absorption in spatially defined areas of III-nitride optoelectronic devices by, for example, creating low-loss optical waveguides monolithically that can be integrated with as-grown areas operating as electro-absorption intersubband modulators.

  7. Enhanced photothermal effect of surface oxidized silicon nanocrystals anchored to reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshani, Parichehr; Moussa, Sherif; Atkinson, Garrett; Kisurin, Vitaly Y.; Samy El-Shall, M.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of the photothermal effects of silicon nanocrystals and graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in water. Using laser irradiation (532 nm or 355 nm) of suspended Si nanocrystals in an aqueous solution of GO, the synthesis of surface oxidized Si-reduced GO nanocomposites (SiOx/Si-RGO) is reported. The laser reduction of GO is accompanied by surface oxidation of the Si nanocrystals resulting in the formation of the SiOx/Si-RGO nanocomposites. The SiOx/Si-RGO nanocomposites are proposed as promising materials for photothermal therapy and for the efficient conversion of solar energy into usable heat for a variety of thermal and thermomechanical applications.

  8. New approach: removal of silicone oil and trocar assisted sutureless scleral fixated intraocular lens implantation at the same session

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuksel; Totan; Remzi; Karadag

    2014-01-01

    Dear Sir,Iam Dr.Remzi Karadag,from the Department of Ophthalmology,Istanbul Medeniyet University School of Medicine,Istanbul,Turkey.I write to present two case reports of removal of silicone oil and trocar assisted sutureless scleral fixated intraocular lens implantation at the same session.

  9. Pectus Excavatum Reconstruction With Silicone Implants Long-Term Results and a Review of the English-Language Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, Bart Jorrit; SpronkMd, Cees A.; Werker, Paul M. N.; van der Lei, Berend

    2009-01-01

    Pectus excavatum, or funnel chest, is an anterior chest wall deformity, characterized by a depressed sternum. Frequently used techniques for pectus excavatum repair are extensive thoracic surgical corrections at a young age. At an adult age, custom-made silicone implants can be used as, a less exten

  10. "Ride-on" technique and other simple and logical solutions to counter most common complications of silicone implants in augmentation rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil S Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmentation rhinoplasty can be carried out using a wide range of materials including autologous bone and/or cartilage as well as alloplasts. Use of biologic bone and cartilage grafts results in lower infection rates, but they are associated with long-term resorption and donor-site morbidity. Alloplastic materials, in particular silicone, have been associated in literature with extrusion, necrosis of the tip, mobility and deviation or displacement of the implant, immobile nasal tip and infection. However, they have the advantages of being readily available and easy to reshape with no requirement for harvesting autografts. Aim: To overcome these problems associated with silicone implants for which the authors have devised a novel technique, the "rideon technique". Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out on 11 patients over a period of 4 years. The authors have devised a simple technique to fix the silicone implant and retain it in place. Restricting the implant to only dorsum avoided common complications related to the silicone implant. Results: The authors have used this technique in 11 patients with encouraging results. Follow-up ranged from 12 months to 36 months during which patients were assessed for implant mobility, implant extrusion and tip necrosis. There was no incidence of above mentioned complications in these patients. Conclusion: The "rideon technique" provides excellent stability to silicone implants and restricting the implant only to dorsum not only eliminates chances of tip necrosis and thus implant extrusion but also maintains natural shape, feel and mobility of the tip.

  11. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is attrib

  12. An approach to modeling of silicon oxidation in a wet ultra-diluted ambient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, A.Y.; Hof, A.J.; Schmitz, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we make steps towards developing a new wet-oxidation model of silicon based on electron-stimulated dissociation of H2O molecules. The need for a new model arises from the fact that existing physical models are inadequate to describe the thin-oxide regime. Two regimes of silicon oxidati

  13. Laser direct writing of oxide structures on hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Birkelund, Karen; Grey, Francois;

    1996-01-01

    A focused laser beam has been used to induce oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon. The scanning laser beam removes the hydrogen passivation locally from the silicon surface, which immediately oxidizes in air. The process has been studied as a function of power density and excitation wavelengt...

  14. Direct chemical vapour deposited grapheme synthesis on silicon oxide by controlled copper dewettting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beld, Wesley Theodorus Eduardus; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for direct uniform graphene synthesis onto silicon oxide in a controlled manner. On a grooved silicon oxide wafer is copper deposited under a slight angle and subsequently the substrate is treated by a typical graphene synthesis process. During this process

  15. Direct chemical vapour deposited grapheme synthesis on silicon oxide by controlled copper dewettting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beld, van den Wesley T.E.; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for direct uniform graphene synthesis onto silicon oxide in a controlled manner. On a grooved silicon oxide wafer is copper deposited under a slight angle and subsequently the substrate is treated by a typical graphene synthesis process. During this process di

  16. Histological study on acute inflammatory reaction to polyurethane-coated silicone implants in rats Estudo histológico da reação inflamatória aguda ao implante de silicone revestido com poliuretano em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto da Silva Mendes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluating histologically the silicone peri-implant coated by polyurethane inflammation associated to the use of anti-microbial and bacterial contamination. METHODS: It was used 35 Wistar rats. The animals were divided in seven groups: I - Control; II - implant cavity contamination with10 bacteria/ml; III - implant cavity contamination with 10 bacteria/ml; IV - implant cavity contamination with 10 bacteria/ml; V - identical contamination to group II and implant immersions in anti-microbial solution; VI - identical contamination in group III and implant immersions in the anti-microbial solution; VII - identical contamination of group IV and implant immersions in anti-microbial solution. It was evaluated morphometrically the peri-implant capsules after 30 days of introduction. RESULTS: The factors with more discriminating power were the giants cells of a strange body and the mononuclear. There was no correlation between the bacterial concentrations and the histological alterations. CONCLUSION: 1 The histological standard of the inflammatory reaction around the silicone implant coated with polyurethan is chronic granulomatosis type of a strange body; 2 There isn´t correlation between concentration of Staphylococcus epidermidis and histological changes; 3 The use of anti-microbial solution decreased the mononuclear cell reactions, with the increase of giant cells in a strange body.OBJETIVO: Avaliar, histologicamente, a reação inflamatória aos implantes de silicone revestidos por poliuretano, com contaminação bacteriana, associada ou não ao uso de antimicrobianos. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se 35 ratos Wistar. Os animais foram divididos em 7 grupos: I- Controle, II- contaminação da cavidade do implante com 10¹ bactérias/ml, III- contaminação da cavidade do implante com 10³ bactérias/ml, IV- contaminação da cavidade do implante com 10(5 bactérias/ml, V- contaminação idêntica ao grupo II e imersão dos implantes em solu

  17. Effect of argon implantation on solid-state dewetting: control of size and surface density of silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadori, Y.; Borowik, Ł.; Chevalier, N.; Barbé, J.-C.

    2017-01-01

    Thermally induced solid-state dewetting of ultra-thin films on insulators is a process of prime interest, since it is capable of easily forming nanocrystals. If no particular treatment is performed to the film prior to the solid-state dewetting, it is already known that the size, the shape and the density of nanocrystals is governed by the initial film thickness. In this paper, we report a novel approach to control the size and the surface density of silicon nanocrystals based on an argon-implantation preliminary surface treatment. Using 7.5 nm thin layers of silicon, we show that increasing the implantation dose tends to form smaller silicon nanocrystals with diameter and height lower than 50 nm and 30 nm, respectively. Concomitantly, the surface density is increased by a factor greater than 20, going from 5 μm‑2 to values over 100 μm‑2.

  18. Isolated Islands by Selective Local Oxidation (islo): a Silicon-On (soi) Technology for Nanoelectronic and Nanoelectromechanical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, Susanne Christine

    aspect ratio structure by RIE and ion implantation, gate oxide integrity, source/drain junction formation and contacts have been evaluated. The effects of doping, silicon volume, and degree of isolation on device performance have been simulated.

  19. Acute Immunologic Reaction to Silicone Breast Implant after Mastectomy and Immediate Reconstruction: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoome Najafi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the introduction of silicone based medical devices in to clinical practice, several reports appeared in the medical literature regarding their adverse effects. However, there are few reports of immunologic reactions to these implants.Case presentation: A case of systemic reaction to a breast implant inserted for immediate breast reconstruction in a breast cancer patient is presented. The patient developed fever and skin rash two months after the surgery. Investigations disclosed no infectious origin for the fever and a dramatic response to steroid therapy was observed.Conclusion: Immunologic reaction should be considered in case of systemic signs and symptoms after silicone breast implant placement as a rare complication. 

  20. Computer simulation for the formation of the insulator layer of silicon-on-insulator devices by N sup + and O sup + Co-implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Lin Qing; Xie Xin Yun; Lin Chenglu; Liu Xiang Hua

    2002-01-01

    A buried sandwiched layer consisting of silicon dioxide (upper part), silicon oxynitride (medium part) and silicon nitride (lower part) is formed by N sup + and O sup + co-implantation in silicon wafers at a constant temperature of 550 degree C. The microstructure is performed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. To predict the quality of the buried sandwiched layer, the authors study the computer simulation for the formation of the SIMON (separated by implantation of oxygen and nitrogen) structure. The simulation program for SIMOX (separated by implantation of oxygen) is improved in order to be applied in O sup + and N sup + co-implantation on the basis of different formation mechanism between SIMOX and SIMNI (separated by implantation of nitrogen) structures. There is a good agreement between experiment and simulation results verifying the theoretical model and presumption in the program

  1. Kinetics of thermal oxidation of 6H silicon carbide in oxygen plus trichloroethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, BL; Lin, LM; Lo, HB; Lai, PT; Chan, CL

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the behaviors of the trichloroethylene (TCE) thermal oxidation of 6H silicon carbide (SiC) are investigated. The oxide growth of 6H SiC under different TCE concentrations (ratios of TCE to O2) follows the linear-parabolic oxidation law derived for silicon oxidation by Deal and Grove, J. Appl. Phys., 36 (1965). The oxidation rate with TCE is much higher than that without TCE and strongly depends on the TCE ratio in addition to oxidation temperature and oxidation time. The increas...

  2. Ellipsometric study of crystalline silicon hydrogenated by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szekeres, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Alexandrova, S. [Department of Applied Physics, Technical University of Sofia, Kl. Ohridski 8, 1797 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrik, P., E-mail: petrik@mfa.kfki.hu [MFA Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, TTK Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Konkoly Thege Rd. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Fodor, B. [MFA Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, TTK Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Konkoly Thege Rd. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Bakalova, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-09-15

    The structure and the optical properties of thin Si layer hydrogenated by shallow plasma ion implantation with different fluences up to 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} are studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry and simulation of the distributions of the ions and implantation induced defects. The implantation was regarded to proceed into Si through the native SiO{sub 2}. Two-layer optical models are applied for examination of the composition and dielectric function behavior of the formed structures. The native oxide is found to be 3 nm thick. The thickness of the Si modified layer decreased 23 to 14 nm with ion fluence due to increased formation of highly hydrogenated surface region that hinder further H-penetration into the Si bulk, especially at the highest fluence. Shifts of the features in the obtained dielectric functions related with Si interband transitions at about 3.4 and 4.2 eV are found caused by process-induced tensile stress. The modified Si region is related rather to defects created by the ion implantation process than the projected range of hydrogen ions. The overall layer modification can be characterized by a low degree of amorphization (up to 5.8%), creation of structural defects and internal tensile stress.

  3. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull; Avaliacao radiologica de implantes de carbono vitreo poroso ou silicone em cranio de ratos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari-Mazzetti, Marcelo Paulo; Kobata, Celio Toshiro [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Hospital Defeitos da Face. Dept. of Surgery]. E-mail: mmgvaccari@ig.com.br; Fabiani, Paulo [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Martins, Dulce Maria Fonseca Soares [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Plastic Surgery; Gomes, Paulo de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Operatory Technique and Experimental Surgery; Martins, Jose Luiz [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Pediatric Surgery

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC) and silicon (S) implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. Methods: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20) PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O) and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. Results: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo capsule), that do not appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (p{<=}0,05), in all implants. Conclusion: In CT evaluation the implants of CPV have greater deformation that the S, which makes them not suitable for replacement of membranous bone in the rat skull. (author)

  4. Nanosecond optical transmission studies of laser annealing in ion-implanted silicon-on-sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.C.; Lo, H.W.; Aydinli, A.; Trott, G.J.; Compaan, A. (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan (USA). Dept. of Physics); Hale, E.B. (Missouri Univ., Rolla (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1983-06-01

    Time-resolved optical transmission has been studied using 633 and 514 nm CW probes on ion-implantation-amorphized silicon-on-sapphire during annealing by a 10 nsec, approximately 1 J/cm/sup 2/ pulse at either 532 nm or 485 nm. As recrystallization sets in the transmitted signal at 514 nm rises by approximately 10/sup 3/ in approximately 60 nsec and provides a measure of regrowth velocity. Beyond 200 nsec the much slower transmission rise is used to provide an estimate of the Si cooling rate. The difference in transmission observed between initially crystalline and initially amorphous Si provide an estimate of the latent heat of recrystallization of the amorphous phase.

  5. Direct observation of the lattice sites of implanted manganese in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Amorim, Lígia; Decoster, Stefan; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel; Esteves De Araujo, Araujo Joao Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Mn-doped Si has attracted significant interest in the context of dilute magnetic semiconductors. We investigated the lattice location of implanted Mn in silicon of different doping types (n, n+ and p+) in the highly dilute regime. Three different lattice sites were identified by means of emission channeling experiments: ideal substitutional sites; sites displaced from bond-centered towards substitutional sites and sites displaced from anti-bonding towards tetrahedral interstitial sites. For all doping types investigated, the substitutional fraction remained below ∼ 30%. We discuss the origin of the observed lattice sites as well as the implications of such structures on the understanding of Mn-doped Si systems.

  6. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following...... intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes...... (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria...

  7. Shallow bistable non-effective-mass-like donors in hydrogen-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmoldin, S.Zh. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, Almaty 050032 (Kazakhstan)]. E-mail: serik@sci.kz; Issova, A.T. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, Almaty 050032 (Kazakhstan); Abdullin, Kh.A. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, Almaty 050032 (Kazakhstan); Mukashev, B.N. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, Almaty 050032 (Kazakhstan)

    2006-04-01

    Infrared absorption of float-zone-refined silicon crystals implanted with protons and annealed at 450 deg. C has been investigated in the range 150-1800 cm{sup -1}. Along with the presence of well-known prominent bands related to higher-order electronic transitions of intrinsic defects at 700-1200 cm{sup -1} and wagging vibrations of Si-H bonds in 600-800 cm{sup -1} range, four effective-mass-like donors with binding energies in the range 32.6-38.7 meV and dominating sharp absorption peaks at 309, 373 and 444 cm{sup -1} were observed. The dominant sharp peaks as well as a broad band in the spectral region 200-1800 cm{sup -1} with the maximum at {approx}450 cm{sup -1} demonstrate bistable behavior and arise from hydrogen-related non-effective-mass-like shallow donors.

  8. Oxide impurities in silicon oxide intermetal dielectrics and their potential to elevate via-resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wentao; Alldredge, Donavan; Heleotes, Douglas; Elkind, Alexander; Theodore, N David; Fejes, Peter; Vadipour, Mostafa; Godek, Bill; Lerner, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Silicon oxide used as an intermetal dielectric (IMD) incorporates oxide impurities during both its formation and subsequent processing to create vias in the IMD. Without a sufficient degassing of the IMD, oxide impurities released from the IMD during the physical vapor deposition (PVD) of the glue layer of the vias had led to an oxidation of the glue layer and eventual increase of the via resistances, which correlated with the O-to-Si atomic ratio of the IMD being ~10% excessive as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. A vacuum bake of the IMD was subsequently implemented to enhance outgassing of the oxide impurities in the IMD before the glue layer deposition. The implementation successfully reduced the via resistances to an acceptable level.

  9. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull Avaliação radiológica de implantes de carbono vítreo poroso ou silicone em crânio de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Paulo Vaccari-Mazzetti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC and silicon (S implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. METHODS: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20 PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. RESULTS: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo-capsule, that don't appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (pOBJETIVO: Realizar avaliação através de tomografia computadorizada (TC de implantes de carbono vítreo poroso (CVP e silicone (S para sua utilização na substituição óssea no esqueleto craniofacial de ratos. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 40 ratos Wistar divididos em: Grupo A (n=20, implantes subperiostais de CVP no crânio. Após o momento da eutanásia os animais foram divididos em dois subgrupos: A I: 10 animais, estudados no 7(0 dia pós-operatório (PO e AII: 10 animais, estudados no 28(0 PO. No grupo B (n=20, os ratos foram submetidos ao implante de silicone no crânio. Todas outras etapas foram idênticas ao grupo A, com a designação de subgrupos BI e BII. Foi realizada tomografia computadorizada com cortes axiais de 1 mm de espessura para obtenção de imagens tridimensionais. A escala de Hounsfield

  10. Osteopontin (OPN is an important protein to mediate improvements in the biocompatibility of C ion-implanted silicone rubber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-liang Wang

    Full Text Available Medical device implants are drawing increasing amounts of interest from modern medical practitioners. However, this attention is not evenly spread across all such devices; most of these implantable devices can cause adverse reactions such as inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis, and infection. In this work, the biocompatibility of silicone rubber (SR was improved through carbon (C ion implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD results confirmed that these newly generated carbon-implanted silicone rubbers (C-SRs had large, irregular peaks and deep valleys on their surfaces. The water contact angle of the SR surface decreased significantly after C ion implantation. C ion implantation also changed the surface charge distribution, silicone oxygen rate, and chemical-element distribution of SR to favor cell attachment. The dermal fibroblasts cultured on the surface C-SR grew faster and showed more typical fibroblastic shapes. The expression levels of major adhesion proteins, including talin-1, zyxin, and vinculin, were significantly higher in dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR coated plates than in dermal fibroblasts cultured on SR. Those same dermal fibroblasts on C-SRs showed more pronounced adhesion and migration abilities. Osteopontin (OPN, a critical extracellular matrix (ECM protein, was up-regulated and secreted from dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 activity was also increased. These cells were highly mobile and were able to adhere to surfaces, but these abilities were inhibited by the monoclonal antibody against OPN, or by shRNA-mediated MMP-9 knockdown. Together, these results suggest that C ion implantation significantly improves SR biocompatibility, and that OPN is important to promote cell adhesion to the C-SR surface.

  11. A comparative study of donor formation in dysprosium, holmium, and erbium implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emtsev, V.V.; Emtsev, V.V. Jr.; Poloskin, D.S.; Shek, E.I.; Sobolev, N.A. [Division of Solid State Electronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-01

    Formation of donor centers in Czochralski grown silicon doped with dysprosium, holmium, and erbium is discussed. Donor states of three kinds are introduced in the implanted layers after annealing at T=700C. Shallow donor states with ionization energies between 20 and 40 meV are attributed to oxygen -related thermal donors. Other donor centers in the energy range of E{sub C}-(60...70) meV and E{sub C}-(100...120) meV appear to be dependent on dopants. After a 900C anneal strong changes in the donor formation are observed only in silicon doped with erbium. Instead of donors at E{sub C}-(118{+-}5) meV, new donor centres at E{sub C}-(145{+-}5) meV are formed. Reportedly, the latter ones are involved in the excitation process of the Er{sup 3+} ions with a characteristic luminescence line at {approx}1.54 {mu}m. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  13. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  14. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  15. Structure of silicon oxide films prepared by vacuum deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshio; Kaito, Chihiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Naiki, Toshio

    1985-05-01

    The structure of thin silicon oxide films 5 nm in thickness, which were prepared by electron beam evaporation of SiO 2 glass onto a NaCl substrate, has been examined by high resolution electron microscopy and diffraction. Although the films which were prepared with substrate temperatures ranging from room up to 400°C gave rise to amorphous haloes, lattice fringes in areas 1-2 nm in extent were, however, seen in the micrographs. It is shown that the film is composed of α-quartz micro-crystallites. Crystals of α-cristobalite with sizes of several tens of nanometers appeared at a substrate temperature of 500°C. At a substrate temperature of 600°C, β-cristobalite crystals with sizes of several tens of nanometers appeared. The structural changes due to the substrate temperature were attributed to incorporation of sodium atoms from the substrate into the SiO 2 film.

  16. Quantifying shape changes of silicone breast implants in a murine model using in vivo micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily E; Perilli, Egon; Carati, Colin J; Reynolds, Karen J

    2017-08-01

    A major complication of silicone breast implants is the formation of a capsule around the implant known as capsular contracture which results in the distortion of the implant. Recently, a mouse model for studying capsular contracture was examined using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), however, only qualitative changes were reported. The aim of this study was to develop a quantitative method for comparing the shape changes of silicone implants using in vivo micro-CT. Mice were bilaterally implanted with silicone implants and underwent ionizing radiation to induce capsular contracture. On day 28 post-surgery mice were examined in vivo using micro-CT. The reconstructed cross-section images were visually inspected to identify distortion. Measurements were taken in 2D and 3D to quantify the shape of the implants in the normal (n = 11) and distorted (n = 5) groups. The degree of anisotropy was significantly higher in the distorted implants in the transaxial view (0.99 vs. 1.19, p = 0.002) and the y-axis lengths were significantly shorter in the sagittal (9.27 mm vs. 8.55 mm, p = 0.015) and coronal (9.24 mm vs. 8.76 mm, p = 0.031) views, indicating a deviation from the circular cross-section and shortening of the long axis. The 3D analysis revealed a significantly lower average thickness (sphere-fitting method) in distorted implants (6.86 mm vs. 5.49 mm, p = 0.002), whereas the volume and surface area did not show significant changes. Statistically significant differences between normal and distorted implants were found in 2D and 3D using distance measurements performed via micro-CT. This objective analysis method can be useful for a range of studies involving deformable implants using in vivo micro-CT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1447-1452, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Influence of Ring Oxidation-Induced Stack Faults on Efficiency in Silicon Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Chun-Lan; WANG Wen-Jing; LI Hai-Ling; ZHAO Lei; DIAO Hong-Wei; LI Xu-Dong

    2008-01-01

    @@ We observe a strong correlation between the ring oxidation-induced stack faults (OISF) formed in the course of phosphor diffusion and the efficiency of Czochralski-grown silicon solar cells. The main reason for ring-OISF formation and growth in substrate is the silicon oxidation and phosphorus diffusion process induced silicon self-interstitial point defect during POCl3 diffusion. The decreasing of minority carrier diffusion length in crystal silicon solar cell induced by ring-OISF defects is identified to be one of the major causes of efficiency loss.

  18. Silicone-modified graphene oxide fillers via the Piers-Rubinsztajn reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Liang, Shuai; Yu, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    While graphene or graphene oxide can make significantimprovements in the properties of a wide variety of polymericmaterials, their incorporation can be challenged byincompatibility with the polymeric matrix. The modification ofgraphene oxide with silicones or silanes using the Piers......-Rubinsztajn reaction improves dispersibility in nonpolar materials,including organic solvents and silicone pre-elastomers. Ahigh loading (up to 10 wt %) of modified graphene oxide insilicone elastomers could be achieved, which resulted inenhanced mechanical performance and reduced gas permeability....

  19. Study of an Amorphous Silicon Oxide Buffer Layer for p-Type Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide/n-Type Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells and Their Temperature Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweewat Krajangsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (i-a-SiO:H films were used as front and rear buffer layers in crystalline silicon heterojunction (c-Si-HJ solar cells. The surface passivity and effective lifetime of these i-a-SiO:H films on an n-type silicon wafer were improved by increasing the CO2/SiH4 ratios in the films. Using i-a-SiO:H as the front and rear buffer layers in c-Si-HJ solar cells was investigated. The front i-a-SiO:H buffer layer thickness and the CO2/SiH4 ratio influenced the open-circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and temperature coefficient (TC of the c-Si-HJ solar cells. The highest total area efficiency obtained was 18.5% (Voc=700 mV, Jsc=33.5 mA/cm2, and FF=0.79. The TC normalized for this c-Si-HJ solar cell efficiency was −0.301%/°C.

  20. Histological evaluation of capsules formed by silicon implants coated with polyurethane foam and with a textured surface in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Eduardo Nascimento; Ribas-Filho, Jurandir Marcondes; Czeczko, Nicolau Gregori; Pachnicki, Jan Pawel Andrade; Netto, Mário Rodrigues Montemor; Lipinski, Leandro Cavalcante; Noronha, Lucia de; Colman, Joelmir; Zeni, João Otavio; Carvalho, Caroline Aragão de

    2016-12-01

    To assess the capsules formed by silicone implants coated with polyurethane foam and with a textured surface. Sixty-four Wistar albinus rats were divided into two groups of 32 each using polyurethane foam and textured surface. The capsules around the implants were analyzed for 30, 50, 70 and 90 days. Were analyzed the following parameters: foreign body reaction, granulation tissue, presence of myofibroblasts, neoangiogenesis, presence of synovial metaplasia, capsular thickness, total area and collagen percentage of type I and III, in capsules formed around silicone implants in both groups. The foreign body reaction was only present in the four polyurethane subgroups. The formation of granulation tissue and the presence of myofibroblasts were higher in the four polyurethane subgroups. Regarding to neoangiogenesis and synovial metaplasia, there was no statistical difference between the groups. Polyurethane group presented (all subgroups) a greater capsule thickness, a smaller total area and collagen percentage of type I and a higher percentage area of type III, with statistical difference. The use of polyurethane-coated implants should be stimulated by the long-term results in a more stable capsule and a lower incidence of capsular contracture, despite developing a more intense and delayed inflammatory reaction in relation to implants with textured surface.

  1. A parametric study of laser induced ablation-oxidation on porous silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Stefano, Luca; Rea, Ilaria; Nigro, M Arcangela; Della Corte, Francesco G; Rendina, Ivo [National Council of Research-Institute for Microelectronic and Microsystems-Department of Naples, Via P Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: luca.destefano@na.imm.cnr.it

    2008-07-02

    We have investigated the laser induced ablation-oxidation process on porous silicon layers having different porosities and thicknesses by non-destructive optical techniques. In particular, the interaction between a low power blue light laser and the porous silicon surfaces has been characterized by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The oxidation profiles etched on the porous samples can be tuned as functions of the layer porosity and laser fluence. Oxide stripes of width less than 2 {mu}m and with thicknesses between 100 nm and 5 {mu}m have been produced, depending on the porosity of the porous silicon, by using a 40 x focusing objective.

  2. Location of a Dexamethasone Implant at the Macula after Intravitreal Injection in a Silicone Oil-Filled Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenap Mahmut Esenulku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a case with cystoid macular edema (CME due to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO presented with a dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex trapped at the macula in her silicone oil- (SO- filled eye after injection. No additional complications such as intraocular pressure (IOP rise or retinal damage were observed. The CME was resolved during the follow-up period. At the last visit, 3 months following the injection, Ozurdex implant was found to be mostly dissolved without any additional ocular complications.

  3. Influence of Yttrium Implantation on Oxidation Behavior of Pure Nickel at 1 000℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Shi-hang; JIN Hui-ming; YAN Kun; GONG Ze-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Isothermal and cyclic oxidation behaviors of pure and yttrium-implanted nickel were studied at 1000℃ in air. The oxide scales formed on nickel substrates were performed using SEM and TEM. It was found that Yimplantation greatly improved the anti-oxidation ability of nickel both in isothermal and cyclic oxidizing experiments. Laser Raman microscopy was also used to study the stress status of oxide scales formed on nickel with and without yttrium. The main reason for the improvement in antioxidation and adhesion of oxide scale was Y-implantation greatly reduced the grain size of NiO and lowered the compressive stress within the scale. Yttrium implantation enhanced the adhesion of protective NiO oxide scale formed on nickel substrate.

  4. Effect of graphene oxide ratio on the cell adhesion and growth behavior on a graphene oxide-coated silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Tak; Choi, Mun-Ki; Sim, Yumin; Lim, Jung-Taek; Kim, Gil-Sung; Seong, Maeng-Je; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Keun Soo; Umar, Ahmad; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-09-01

    Control of living cells on biocompatible materials or on modified substrates is important for the development of bio-applications, including biosensors and implant biomaterials. The topography and hydrophobicity of substrates highly affect cell adhesion, growth, and cell growth kinetics, which is of great importance in bio-applications. Herein, we investigate the adhesion, growth, and morphology of cultured breast cancer cells on a silicon substrate, on which graphene oxides (GO) was partially formed. By minimizing the size and amount of the GO-containing solution and the further annealing process, GO-coated Si samples were prepared which partially covered the Si substrates. The coverage of GO on Si samples decreases upon annealing. The behaviors of cells cultured on two samples have been observed, i.e. partially GO-coated Si (P-GO) and annealed partially GO-coated Si (Annealed p-GO), with a different coverage of GO. Indeed, the spreading area covered by the cells and the number of cells for a given culture period in the incubator were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and the presence of oxygenated groups on GO and Si substrates, suggesting hydrophobicity-driven cell growth. Thus, the presented method can be used to control the cell growth via an appropriate surface modification.

  5. Silicon-technology based microreactors for high-temperature heterogeneous partial oxidation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiggelaar, Roald Michel

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the results of a study into the feasibility of silicon-technology based microreactors for fast oxidation reactions have been discussed. When designed properly, silicon microreactors are suitable for studying heterogeneous gas phase reactions, such as reaction kinetics of direct cataly

  6. Short circuit current in indium tin oxide/silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.

    1980-09-01

    The short-circuit current density of indium tin oxide/single and polycrystalline silicon solar cells reported by Schunck and Coche (1979) is much higher than other silicon solar cells. It is shown that the short-circuit current density reported in the above reference does not represent the true value of these devices.

  7. Exploring the deposition of oxides on silicon for photovoltaic cells by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, Lianne M.; Moor, de Hugo H.C.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, Dave H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Since most commercially available solar cells are still made from silicon, we are exploring the introduction of passivating qualities in oxides, with the potential to serve as an antireflection coating. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit TiO2 and SrTiO3 coatings on silicon substrates.

  8. Galactorrhea after aesthetic breast augmentation with silicone implants: report of two cases and management of postoperative galactorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayestaray, Benoit; Dudrap, Emmanuel; Chaibi, Amir

    2011-06-01

    Galactorrhea is a rare event after breast augmentation. The physiopathologic bases of galactorrhea depend on the central secretion of prolactin. These physiopathologic bases must be clearly understood for the prevention and treatment of postoperative galactorrhea. This report describes two cases of a postoperative galactorrhea after aesthetic breast augmentation with silicone implants. The clinical appearance closely resembles a postoperative sepsis without hyperthermia. Bacteriologic samples are negative. Endocrinologic examination finds a characteristic hyperprolactinemia. The evolution is favorable under dopaminergic agonists.

  9. Fracture of flash oxidized, yttria-doped sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govila, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a slip cast, yttria-doped, sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride after 'flash oxidation' was investigated. It was found that both the static oxidation resistance and flexural stress rupture life (creep deformation) were improved at 1000 C in air compared to those of the same material without flash oxidation. Stress rupture data at high temperatures (1000 to 1200 C) are presented to indicate applied stress levels for oxidation-dependent and independent failures.

  10. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application.

  11. Corneal Endothelial Cell Changes Due to Combined Phacoemulsification-Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens Implantation and Transpupillary Silicone Oil Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Hanifi Alp

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of combined phacoemulsification-posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL implantation and removal of transpupillary silicone oil on the corneal endothelial cell layer. Materials and Methods: In this study, we included seven eyes of 7 patients who had intravitreal hemorrhage resulting from retinal detachment or tractional retinal detachment due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy and who underwent pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil injection. Complicated cataract developed, and phacoemulsification-PC-IOL implantation combined with transpupillary silicon oil removal were performed. Preoperative and postoperative corneal endothelial cell count values were taken by Topcon SP-2000P automatic non-contact specular microscopy and were assessed by IMAGEnet 2000 Endothelial Cell Analysis. The results were compared with the findings in the literature. Results: The mean endothelial cell density (ECD was 2461 cell/mm2 preoperatively. The silicone oil removal was performed after an average of 10±3.5 months (range 5-14 months, and then endothelial cells were counted after a mean of 17±21.2 months (range 1-49 months of the combined surgery. The mean ECD was determined as 1906 cell/mm2 postoperatively. While mean endothelial cell loss was found to be 32% in two patients with diabetes mellitus, five non-diabetic patients had 19% cell loss. Corneal decompensation was not observed in any patient during the follow-up period. Conclusion: After combined phacoemulsification-PC-IOL implantation and transpupillary silicone oil removal, significant reduction in endothelial cells was observed. We detected that this reduction was greater in diabetics. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 424-7

  12. Modelling and engineering of stress based controlled oxidation effects for silicon nanostructure patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiang-Lei; Larrieu, Guilhem; Krzeminski, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Silicon nanostructure patterning with tight geometry control is an important challenge at the bottom level. In that context, stress based controlled oxidation appears to be an efficient tool for precise nanofabrication. Here, we investigate the stress-retarded oxidation phenomenon in various silicon nanostructures (nanobeams, nanorings and nanowires) at both the experimental and the theoretical levels. Different silicon nanostructures have been fabricated by a top-down approach. Complex dependence of the stress build-up on the nano-object’s dimension, shape and size has been demonstrated experimentally and physically explained by modelling. For the oxidation of a two-dimensional nanostructure (nanobeam), relative independence to size effects has been observed. On the other hand, radial stress increase with geometry downscaling of a one-dimensional nanostructure (nanowire) has been carefully emphasized. The study of shape engineering by retarded oxidation effects for vertical silicon nanowires is finally discussed.

  13. Nitric oxide levels in the anterior chamber of vitrectomized eyes with silicon oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Escarião

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the nitric oxide levels in the anterior chamber of eyes who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV with silicone oil. METHODS: Patients who underwent PPV with silicon oil injection, from february 2005 to august 2007, were selected. Nine patients (nine eyes participated in the study (five women and four men. Nitric oxide concentration was quantified after the aspiration of aqueous humor samples during the procedure of silicon oil removal. Data such as: oil emulsification; presence of oil in the anterior chamber; intraocular pressure and time with silicone oil were evaluated. Values of p <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: A positive correlation between nitric oxide concentration and time with silicon oil in the vitreous cavity (r=0.799 was observed. The nitric oxide concentration was significantly higher (p=0.02 in patients with silicon oil more than 24 months (0.90µmol/ml ± 0.59, n=3 in the vitreous cavity comparing to patients with less than 24 months (0.19µmol/ml ± 0.10, n=6. CONCLUSION: A positive correlation linking silicone oil time in the vitreous cavity with the nitric oxide concentration in the anterior chamber was observed.

  14. Effect of Ce+ Ion Implantation upon Oxidation Resistance of Superalloy K38G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Yuhai; Li Meishuan; Duo Shuwang; Zhao Youming

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation behavior (isothermal and cyclic oxidation) of cast superalloy K38G and the effect of Ce+ ion implantation with dose of 1×1017 ions/cm2 upon its oxidation resistance at 900 and 1000 ℃ in air were investigated. Meanwhile, the influence of Ce+ implantation on oxidation behavior of K38G with pre-oxide scale at 1000 ℃ in air was compared. The pre-oxidation was performed at 1000 ℃ in static air for 0.25 and 1.5 h, respectively. It is shown that the homogeneous external mixture oxide of rutile TiO2+Cr2O3 and non-continuous internal oxide of Al2O3 are formed during the oxidation procedure in all the cases. The isothermal oxidation resistance and the cracking or spallation resistance of superalloy K38G implanted with Ce+ by both of the two different implantation ways are not improved notably. This may be attributed to the mixed oxide composition characteristics and the blocking effect differences of Ce+ segregation along the oxide grain boundaries on the transport process for different diffusing ions.

  15. Development of a Silicon Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor-Based Qubit Using Spin Exchange Interactions Alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The objective of this project is to implement an electron spin qubit system on a silicon metal-oxide- semiconductor ...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 31-03-2016 1-Nov-2010 30-Apr-2014 Final Report: Development of a Silicon Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor -Based Qubit Using Spin... Semiconductor -Based Qubit Using Spin Exchange Interactions Alone Report Title The objective of this project is to implement an electron spin qubit system on

  16. Effective dopant activation by susceptor-assisted microwave annealing of low energy boron implanted and phosphorus implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; David Theodore, N.; Vemuri, Rajitha N. P.; Lu, Wei; Lau, S. S.; Lanz, A.; Alford, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid processing and reduced end-of-range diffusion result from susceptor-assisted microwave (MW) annealing, making this technique an efficient processing alternative for electrically activating dopants within ion-implanted semiconductors. Sheet resistance and Hall measurements provide evidence of electrical activation. Susceptor-assisted MW annealing, of ion-implanted Si, enables more effective dopant activation and at lower temperatures than required for rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Raman spectroscopy and ion channeling analyses are used to monitor the extent of ion implantation damage and recrystallization. The presence and behavior of extended defects are monitored by cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Phosphorus implanted Si samples experience effective electrical activation upon MW annealing. On the other hand, when boron implanted Si is MW annealed, the growth of extended defects results in reduced crystalline quality that hinders the electrical activation process. Further comparison of dopant diffusion resulting from MW annealing and rapid thermal annealing is performed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. MW annealed ion implanted samples show less end-of-range diffusion when compared to RTA samples. In particular, MW annealed P+ implanted samples achieve no visible diffusion and equivalent electrical activation at a lower temperature and with a shorter time-duration of annealing compared to RTA. In this study, the peak temperature attained during annealing does not depend on the dopant species or dose, for susceptor-assisted MW annealing of ion-implanted Si.

  17. Effective dopant activation by susceptor-assisted microwave annealing of low energy boron implanted and phosphorus implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhao; Vemuri, Rajitha N. P.; Alford, T. L., E-mail: TA@asu.edu [School of Matter, Transport, and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); David Theodore, N. [CHD-Fab, Freescale Semiconductor Inc., 1300 N. Alma School Rd., Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States); Lu, Wei; Lau, S. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Lanz, A. [Department of Mathematics, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia 23504 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    Rapid processing and reduced end-of-range diffusion result from susceptor-assisted microwave (MW) annealing, making this technique an efficient processing alternative for electrically activating dopants within ion-implanted semiconductors. Sheet resistance and Hall measurements provide evidence of electrical activation. Susceptor-assisted MW annealing, of ion-implanted Si, enables more effective dopant activation and at lower temperatures than required for rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Raman spectroscopy and ion channeling analyses are used to monitor the extent of ion implantation damage and recrystallization. The presence and behavior of extended defects are monitored by cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Phosphorus implanted Si samples experience effective electrical activation upon MW annealing. On the other hand, when boron implanted Si is MW annealed, the growth of extended defects results in reduced crystalline quality that hinders the electrical activation process. Further comparison of dopant diffusion resulting from MW annealing and rapid thermal annealing is performed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. MW annealed ion implanted samples show less end-of-range diffusion when compared to RTA samples. In particular, MW annealed P{sup +} implanted samples achieve no visible diffusion and equivalent electrical activation at a lower temperature and with a shorter time-duration of annealing compared to RTA. In this study, the peak temperature attained during annealing does not depend on the dopant species or dose, for susceptor-assisted MW annealing of ion-implanted Si.

  18. Near Infrared Photoluminescence from Yb,Al Co-implanted SiO2 Films on Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Guo; WANG Xiao-Xin; CHENG Bu-Wen; YU Jin-Zhong; WANG Qi-Ming

    2006-01-01

    @@ Intense room-temperature near infrared (NIR) photoluminescence (980 nm and 1032nm) is observed from Yb, Al co-implanted SiO2 films on silicon. The optical transitions occur between the 2F5/2 and 2F7/2 levels of Yb3+ in SiO2. The additional Al-implantation into SiO2 films can effectively improve the concentration quenching effect of Yb3+ in SiO2. Photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy shows that the NIR photoluminescence is due to the non-radiative energy transfer from Al-implantation-induced non-bridging oxygen hole defects in SiO2 to Yb3+ in the Yb-related luminescent complexes. It is believed that the defect-mediated luminescence of rare-earth ions in SiO2 is very effective.

  19. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria and PMNs, which we found to consist of DNA and other polymers. Here we present a novel method to study a pathogen-host interaction in detail. The data presented provide the first direct, high-resolution visualization of the failure of PMNs to protect against bacterial biofilms.

  20. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg{sup +} ion implanted silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin, E-mail: weilin.jiang@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2015-03-15

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the 〈1 0 0〉 axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C–SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg{sub 2}Si and tetragonal MgC{sub 2}. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C–SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4 × 10{sup −19} m{sup 2}/s.

  1. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, Hee Joon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kovarik, Libor [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Zhaoying [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Roosendaal, Timothy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhu, Zihua [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Danny J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kurtz, Richard J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state suggests that there are preferred Si <100> interstitial splits. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8±0.4×10e-19 m2/sec.

  2. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-01

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4 × 10-19 m2/s.

  3. Nafion/Silicon Oxide Composite Membrane for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membranes were produced via in situ sol-gel reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) in Nafion membranes. The physicochemical properties of the membranes were studied by FT-IR, TG-DSC and tensile strength. The results show that the silicon oxide is compatible with the Nafion membrane and the thermo stability of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is higher than that of Nafion membrane. Furthermore, the tensile strength of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is similar to that of the Nafion membrane. The proton conductivity of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is higher than that of Nafion membrane. When the Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane was employed as an electrolyte in H2/O2 PEMFC, a higher current density value (1 000 mA/cm2 at 0.38 V) than that of the Nafion 1135 membrane (100 mA/cm2 at 0.04 V) was obtained at 110 ℃.

  4. Silicon oxide permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have displaced established materials in many areas of food and beverage packaging. Plastic packing materials offer are various advantages concerning production and handling. PET bottles for instance are non-breakable and lightweight compared to glass and metal containers. However, PET offers poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf live of packaged food is reduced. Permeation of gases can be reduced by depositing transparent plasma polymerized silicon oxide (SiOx) barrier coatings. A microwave (2.45 GHz) driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna to treat PET foils or bottles. To increase the barrier properties of the coatings furthermore a RF substrate bias (13.56 MHz) is applied. The composition of the coatings is analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy regarding carbon and hydrogen content. Influence of gas phase composition and substrate bias on chemical composition of the coatings is discussed. A strong relation between barrier properties and film composition is found: good oxygen barriers are observed as carbon content is reduced and films become quartz-like. Regarding oxygen permeation a barrier improvement factor (BIF) of 70 is achieved.

  5. Laser-Doping through Anodic Aluminium Oxide Layers for Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that silicon can be locally doped with aluminium to form localised p+ surface regions by laser-doping through anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) layers formed on the silicon surface. The resulting p+ regions can extend more than 10 μm into the silicon and the electrically active p-type dopant concentration exceeds 1020 cm−3 for the first 6-7 μm of the formed p+ region. Anodic aluminium oxide layers can be doped with other impurities, such as boron and phosphorus, by anodisin...

  6. Tromboflebitis del miembro inferior postruptura de implante de silicona para aumento de pantorrillas Lower limb trombophlebitis post-rupture of silicone calf augmentation implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Moretti

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available La colocación de implantes de silicona en los miembros inferiores con el objetivo de embellecimiento es una práctica no exenta de complicaciones. La mayoría de ellas se describen en el postoperatorio inmediato y están relacionadas con procesos infecciosos. Las complicaciones de tipo fibrosis capsular no son motivo frecuente de queja, como acontece en la región mamaria, ya que dicho endurecimiento no preocupa al paciente. Por lo tanto, las complicaciones tardías de este procedimiento no son descritas con gran frecuencia. Presentamos un caso de una paciente de 44 años que se había sometido a una cirugía de colocación de implantes de gel de silicona para corrección de la zona de los gastrocnemios 8 años antes y que debuta con tromboflebitis de miembro inferior y rotura espontánea del implante. Se describe el caso clínico, los estudios efectuados y el tratamiento instituido en esta complicación.Correction of lower limbs for cosmetic purpose with silicone implants is not a practice free of com- plications. Most of them are described in the inme- diate postoperative and are related to infections. The capsular contraction is not a frecuent cause of com- plaint because the hardness does not worry the patients. That is the reason why later complicatones are not frecuently described. We present a 44 years old female patient with sili- cone calf implants that had been operated 8 years ago. She consulted because of lower limb trombophlebitis and spontaneous rupture of the implant. We described the clinical case, study procedures and treatment to resolve this complication.

  7. Silicon-on-insulator-based complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated optoelectronic platform for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujeeb-U-Rahman, Muhammad; Scherer, Axel

    2016-12-01

    Microscale optical devices enabled by wireless power harvesting and telemetry facilitate manipulation and testing of localized biological environments (e.g., neural recording and stimulation, targeted delivery to cancer cells). Design of integrated microsystems utilizing optical power harvesting and telemetry will enable complex in vivo applications like actuating a single nerve, without the difficult requirement of extreme optical focusing or use of nanoparticles. Silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based platforms provide a very powerful architecture for such miniaturized platforms as these can be used to fabricate both optoelectronic and microelectronic devices on the same substrate. Near-infrared biomedical optics can be effectively utilized for optical power harvesting to generate optimal results compared with other methods (e.g., RF and acoustic) at submillimeter size scales intended for such designs. We present design and integration techniques of optical power harvesting structures with complementary metal oxide semiconductor platforms using SOI technologies along with monolithically integrated electronics. Such platforms can become the basis of optoelectronic biomedical systems including implants and lab-on-chip systems.

  8. Silicon Needles Fabricated by Highly Selective Anisotropic Dry Etching and Their Field Emission Current Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanechika, Masakazu; Mitsushima, Yasuichi

    2000-12-01

    A new process to fabricate a silicon needle, whose tip radius is about 5 nm and aspect ratio is about 7, was developed. The silicon needles were fabricated by highly selective anisotropic dry etching. The etching mask was oxygen precipitation, which was formed by nitrogen ion implantation and the subsequent oxidation. The process is simple enough to be integrated with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. The density of the silicon needle can be controlled by adjusting the dose for nitrogen ion implantation. The position of the silicon needle can be controlled by adjusting the position for nitrogen ion implantation, because silicon needles are formed only in the nitrogen ion implantation area. Furthermore, using these silicon needles as micro emitters, a field emission diode was fabricated. The Fowler-Nordheim plot shows that the field around the tip of the silicon needles was highly enhanced.

  9. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  10. Method for one-to-one polishing of silicon nitride and silicon oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Suryadevara V. (Inventor); Natarajan, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of removing silicon nitride at about the same removal rate as silicon dioxide by CMP. The method utilizes a polishing slurry that includes colloidal silica abrasive particles dispersed in water and additives that modulate the silicon dioxide and silicon nitride removal rates such that they are about the same. In one embodiment of the invention, the additive is lysine or lysine mono hydrochloride in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 8. In another embodiment of the invention, the additive is arginine in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 10.

  11. Biofunctionalization of silicone rubber with microgroove-patterned surface and carbon-ion implantation to enhance biocompatibility and reduce capsule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ze-Yuan; Liu, Ting; Li, Wei-Juan; Shi, Xiao-Hua; Fan, Dong-Li

    Silicone rubber implants have been widely used to repair soft tissue defects and deformities. However, poor biocompatibility can elicit capsule formation, usually resulting in prosthesis contracture and displacement in long-term usage. To overcome this problem, this study investigated the properties of silicone rubber materials with or without a microgroove-patterned surface and with or without carbon (C)-ion implantation. Atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and a water contact angle test were used to characterize surface morphology and physicochemical properties. Cytocompatibility was investigated by a cell adhesion experiment, immunofluorescence staining, a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, and scanning electron microscopy in vitro. Histocompatibility was evaluated by studying the inflammatory response and fiber capsule formation that developed after subcutaneous implantation in rats for 7 days, 15 days, and 30 days in vivo. Parallel microgrooves were found on the surfaces of patterned silicone rubber (P-SR) and patterned C-ion-implanted silicone rubber (PC-SR). Irregular larger peaks and deeper valleys were present on the surface of silicone rubber implanted with C ions (C-SR). The silicone rubber surfaces with microgroove patterns had stable physical and chemical properties and exhibited moderate hydrophobicity. PC-SR exhibited moderately increased dermal fibroblast cell adhesion and growth, and its surface microstructure promoted orderly cell growth. Histocompatibility experiments on animals showed that both the anti-inflammatory and antifibrosis properties of PC-SR were slightly better than those of the other materials, and there was also a lower capsular contracture rate and less collagen deposition around implants made from PC-SR. Although the surface chemical properties, dermal fibroblast cell growth, and cell adhesion were not changed by microgroove pattern modification, a more orderly cell arrangement was obtained, leading to enhanced

  12. Ethylene oxide-block-butylene oxide copolymer uptake by silicone hydrogel contact lens materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Yuchen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Rhines Hall 100, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ketelson, Howard [Alcon Inc., Research and Development, Vision Care, 6201 South Freeway, Fort Worth, TX 76134 (United States); Perry, Scott S., E-mail: ssp@mse.ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Rhines Hall 100, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Four major types of silicone hydrogel contact lens material have been investigated following treatments in aqueous solutions containing poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(butylenes oxide) block copolymer (EO–BO). The extent of lens surface modification by EO–BO and the degree of bulk uptake were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), respectively. The experimental results suggest that different interaction models exist for the lenses, highlighting the influence of both surface and bulk composition, which greatly differs between the lenses examined. Specifically, lenses with hydrophilic surface treatments, i.e., PureVision{sup ®} (balafilcon A) and O{sub 2}OPTIX (lotrafilcon B), demonstrated strong evidence of preferential surface adsorption within the near-surface region. In comparison, surface adsorption on ACUVUE{sup ®} Oasys{sup ®} (senofilcon A) and Biofinity{sup ®} (comfilcon A) was limited. As for bulk absorption, the amount of EO–BO uptake was the greatest for balafilcon A and comfilcon A, and least for lotrafilcon B. These findings confirm the presence of molecular concentration gradients within the silicone hydrogel lenses following exposure to EO–BO solutions, with the nature of such concentration gradients found to be lens-specific. Together, the results suggest opportunities for compositional modifications of lenses for improved performance via solution treatments containing surface-active agents.

  13. Surface etching, chemical modification and characterization of silicon nitride and silicon oxide - Selective functionalization of Si

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Li Hong; Michalak, David J.; Chopra, Tatiana P.; Pujari, Sidharam P.; Zuilhof, Han

    2016-01-01

    The ability to selectively chemically functionalize silicon nitride (Si3N4) or silicon dioxide (SiO2) surfaces after cleaning would open interesting technological applications. In order to achieve this goal, the chemical composition of surfaces needs to be careful

  14. Fabrication of a silicon oxide stamp by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride for nanoimprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of a stamp reinforced with silicon nitride is presented for its use in nanoimprint lithography. The fabrication process is based on edge lithography using conventional optical lithography and wet anisotropic etching of 110 silicon wafers. SiO2 nano-ridges of 20 nm in width were

  15. Interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium: radiation enhanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium is of significant interest in the application of first wall coatings and other components of fusion reactors. Electropolished polycrystalline beryllium was first implanted with an Xe backscatter marker at 1.98 MeV followed by either implantation with 5 keV diatomic deuterium or helium. A 2.0 MeV He beam was used to analyze for impurity buildup; namely oxygen. The oxide layer thickness was found to increase linearly with increasing implant fluence. A 2.5 MeV H/sup +/ beam was used to depth profile the D and He by ion backscattering. In addition the retention of the implant was measured as a function of the implant fluence. The mean depth of the implant was found to agree with theoretical range calculations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe blister formation. No blisters were observed for implanted D but for implanted He blisters occurred at approx. 1.75 x 10/sup 17/ He cm/sup -2/. The blister diameter increased with increasing implant fluence from about 0.8 ..mu..m at 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/ to 5.5 ..mu..m at 3 x 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/.

  16. The complex interface chemistry of thin-film silicon/zinc oxide solar cell structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, D; Wimmer, M; Wilks, R G; Félix, R; Kronast, F; Ruske, F; Bär, M

    2014-12-21

    The interface between solid-phase crystallized phosphorous-doped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si(n(+))) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) was investigated using spatially resolved photoelectron emission microscopy. We find the accumulation of aluminum in the proximity of the interface. Based on a detailed photoemission line analysis, we also suggest the formation of an interface species. Silicon suboxide and/or dehydrated hemimorphite have been identified as likely candidates. For each scenario a detailed chemical reaction pathway is suggested. The chemical instability of the poly-Si(n(+))/ZnO:Al interface is explained by the fact that SiO2 is more stable than ZnO and/or that H2 is released from the initially deposited a-Si:H during the crystallization process. As a result, Zn (a deep acceptor in silicon) is "liberated" close to the silicon/zinc oxide interface presenting the inherent risk of forming deep defects in the silicon absorber. These could act as recombination centers and thus limit the performance of silicon/zinc oxide based solar cells. Based on this insight some recommendations with respect to solar cell design, material selection, and process parameters are given for further knowledge-based thin-film silicon device optimization.

  17. Oxidation Refinement of Crude Silicon%粗硅的氧化精炼

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴永年; 马文会; 杨斌; 刘大春; 栗曼; 魏钦帅

    2012-01-01

    The metallurgical method to refine silicon for making multi - crystalline silicon can meet the need of solar cell production. The method has drawn people's attention due to its low production cost. As an important part of the metallurgical method to refine silicon, oxidation method makes many impurities of crude silicon that has low oxidized free energy (△G) level be oxides to leave silicon, such as Al, Ca, Ti, B and C. Its apparatus includes furnaces with plasma jet over the surface of the silicon melt, and blowing gas from the furnace's bottom pipe. The reacting gases can be Ar, N2, O2, air, H2O, CO2 and H2. In this paper the research works and plant production practices of refining silicon are collected to find the law of oxidation refining silicon for advanced research and production of 6N silicon.%冶金法精炼硅制多晶硅(6N),供太阳能电池使用,其成本可能较低而受到关注.冶金法中重要的一步是氧化法,它将粗硅中的杂质氧化成化合物的自由能(△G)位低的全部或部分除去,如Al、Ca、Ti、B、C等.氧化精炼硅用的方法有炉中吹炼、等离子吹炼;吹的气体有氩气、氮气、氧气、空气、H2O、CO2和氢气等.本文将研究工作和工厂实践集中归纳,力图明晰氧化法精炼硅的规律,以利于进一步深入研究和生产实践.

  18. Effect of the order of He+ and H+ ion co-implantation on damage generation and thermal evolution of complexes, platelets, and blisters in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghbouj, N.; Cherkashin, N.; Darras, F.-X.; Paillard, V.; Fnaiech, M.; Claverie, A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen and helium co-implantation is nowadays used to efficiently transfer thin Si layers and fabricate silicon on insulator wafers for the microelectronic industry. The synergy between the two implants which is reflected through the dramatic reduction of the total fluence needed to fracture silicon has been reported to be strongly influenced by the implantation order. Contradictory conclusions on the mechanisms involved in the formation and thermal evolution of defects and complexes have been drawn. In this work, we have experimentally studied in detail the characteristics of Si samples co-implanted with He and H, comparing the defects which are formed following each implantation and after annealing. We show that the second implant always ballistically destroys the stable defects and complexes formed after the first implant and that the redistribution of these point defects among new complexes drives the final difference observed in the samples after annealing. When H is implanted first, He precipitates in the form of nano-bubbles and agglomerates within H-related platelets and nano-cracks. When He is implanted first, the whole He fluence is ultimately used to pressurize H-related platelets which quickly evolve into micro-cracks and surface blisters. We provide detailed scenarios describing the atomic mechanisms involved during and after co-implantation and annealing which well-explain our results and the reasons for the apparent contradictions reported at the state of the art.

  19. Influences of H2+ and He+ Co-implantation into Silicon on Electric Characteristics of MOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIMing; HUANGRu; WANGYangyuan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the influences of H2+ and He+ co-implantation on electric characteristics of MOSFETs are experimentally investigated. H2+ and He+ are implanted into crystalline silicon substrates at different doses with the incident energy of 40keV. The substrates are annealed in mixture gas of H2 and N2 (1:10) at 1100℃ for 30 minutes. Transmission electron measurement on the samples shows that a dense voids layer has been formed in the substrates, which is called “nothing” layer. Afterward, on the top silicon film, n type MOSFETs, called SON MOSFETs, are fabricated with conventional MOS technology.Compared to bulk transistors, SON MOSFETs show lower off-state drain leakage and higher over drive capability. Besides, obvious kink currents are observed on the output curves. The experimental investigation implies that using H2+ and He+ co-implantation may form SOI-like structure devices in a single process flow so as to reduce SOI wafer cost.

  20. RF Magnetron Sputtering Aluminum Oxide Film for Surface Passivation on Crystalline Silicon Wafers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siming Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum oxide films were deposited on crystalline silicon substrates by reactive RF magnetron sputtering. The influences of the deposition parameters on the surface passivation, surface damage, optical properties, and composition of the films have been investigated. It is found that proper sputtering power and uniform magnetic field reduced the surface damage from the high-energy ion bombardment to the silicon wafers during the process and consequently decreased the interface trap density, resulting in the good surface passivation; relatively high refractive index of aluminum oxide film is benefic to improve the surface passivation. The negative-charged aluminum oxide film was then successfully prepared. The surface passivation performance was further improved after postannealing by formation of an SiOx interfacial layer. It is demonstrated that the reactive sputtering is an effective technique of fabricating aluminum oxide surface passivation film for low-cost high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells.

  1. Evaluation of transition metal oxide as carrier-selective contacts for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Boccard, Matthieu [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Holman, Zachary [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Bertoni, M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-04-06

    "Reducing light absorption in the non-active solar cell layers, while enabling the extraction of the photogenerated minority carriers at quasi-Fermi levels are two key factors to improve current generation and voltage, and therefore efficiency of silicon heterojunction solar devices. To address these two critical aspects, transition metal oxide materials have been proposed as alternative to the n- and p-type amorphous silicon used as electron and hole selective contacts, respectively. Indeed, transition metal oxides such as molybdenum oxide, titanium oxide, nickel oxide or tungsten oxide combine a wide band gap typically over 3 eV with a band structure and theoretical band alignment with silicon that results in high transparency to the solar spectrum and in selectivity for the transport of only one carrier type. Improving carrier extraction or injection using transition metal oxide has been a topic of investigation in the field of organic solar cells and organic LEDs; from these pioneering works a lot of knowledge has been gained on materials properties, ways to control these during synthesis and deposition, and their impact on device performance. Recently, the transfer of some of this knowledge to silicon solar cells and the successful application of some metal oxide to contact heterojunction devices have gained much attention. In this contribution, we investigate the suitability of various transition metal oxide films (molybdenum oxide, titanium oxide, and tungsten oxide) deposited either by thermal evaporation or sputtering as transparent hole or electron selective transport layer for silicon solar cells. In addition to systematically characterize their optical and structural properties, we use photoemission spectroscopy to relate compound stoichiometry to band structure and characterize band alignment to silicon. The direct silicon/metal oxide interface is further analyzed by quasi-steady state photoconductance decay method to assess the quality of surface

  2. RBS and ERDA determinations of depth distributions of high-dose carbon ions implanted in silicon for silicon carbide synthesis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarasiri, S.; Kamwanna, T.; Hallén, A.; Yu, L. D.; Janson, M. S.; Thongleum, C.; Possnert, G.; Singkarat, S.

    2006-08-01

    For ion beam synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC), a knowledge of the depth distribution of implanted carbon ions in silicon is crucial for successful development. Based on its simplicity and availability, we selected Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) as an analysis technique for this purpose. A self-developed computer program dedicated to extract depth profiles of lighter impurities in heavier matrix is established. For control, calculated results are compared with an other ion beam analysis (IBA) technique superior for studying lighter impurity in heavier substrate i.e. elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The RBS was performed with a 1.7-MV Tandetron accelerator using He2+ as the probe ions. The ERDA was performed with a 5-MV Pelletron accelerator using I8+ as the probe ions. This work shows that the RBS-extracted data had no significant deviations from those of ERDA and simulations by SRIM2003 and SIIMPL computer codes. We also found that annealing at temperatures as high as 1000 °C had quite limited effect on the redistribution of carbon in silicon.

  3. RBS and ERDA determinations of depth distributions of high-dose carbon ions implanted in silicon for silicon-carbide synthesis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intarasiri, S. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand) and Institute for Science and Technology Research and Development, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)]. E-mail: saweat@yahoo.com; Kamwanna, T. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Hallen, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Microelectronics and Information Technology, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden); Yu, L.D. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Janson, M.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, B140, Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92 697 (United States); Thongleum, C. [Institute for Science and Technology Research and Development, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Possnert, G. [Angstrom Laboratory, Division of Ion Physics, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Singkarat, S. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2006-08-15

    For ion beam synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC), a knowledge of the depth distribution of implanted carbon ions in silicon is crucial for successful development. Based on its simplicity and availability, we selected Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) as an analysis technique for this purpose. A self-developed computer program dedicated to extract depth profiles of lighter impurities in heavier matrix is established. For control, calculated results are compared with an other ion beam analysis (IBA) technique superior for studying lighter impurity in heavier substrate i.e. elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The RBS was performed with a 1.7-MV Tandetron accelerator using He{sup 2+} as the probe ions. The ERDA was performed with a 5-MV Pelletron accelerator using I{sup 8+} as the probe ions. This work shows that the RBS-extracted data had no significant deviations from those of ERDA and simulations by SRIM2003 and SIIMPL computer codes. We also found that annealing at temperatures as high as 1000 deg. C had quite limited effect on the redistribution of carbon in silicon.

  4. Effect of trichloroethylene enhancement on deposition rate of low-temperature silicon oxide films by silicone oil and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Susumu; Jain, Puneet

    2017-08-01

    A low-temperature silcon oxide film was deposited at 160 to 220 °C using an atmospheric pressure CVD system with silicone oil vapor and ozone gases. It was found that the deposition rate is markedly increased by adding trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor, which is generated by bubbling TCE solution with N2 gas flow. The increase is more than 3 times that observed without TCE, and any contamination due to TCE is hardly observed in the deposited Si oxide films from Fourier transform infrared spectra.

  5. Selective surface modification of lithographic silicon oxide nanostructures by organofunctional silanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Baumgärtel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the controlled chemical functionalization of silicon oxide nanostructures prepared by AFM-anodization lithography of alkyl-terminated silicon. Different conditions for the growth of covalently bound mono-, multi- or submonolayers of distinctively functional silane molecules on nanostructures have been identified by AFM-height investigations. Routes for the preparation of methyl- or amino-terminated structures or silicon surfaces are presented and discussed. The formation of silane monolayers on nanoscopic silicon oxide nanostructures was found to be much more sensitive towards ambient humidity than, e.g., the silanization of larger OH-terminated silica surfaces. Amino-functionalized nanostructures have been successfully modified by the covalent binding of functional fluorescein dye molecules. Upon excitation, the dye-functionalized structures show only weak fluorescence, which may be an indication of a relatively low surface coverage of the dye molecules on length scale that is not accessible by standard AFM measurements.

  6. Preparation of highly aligned silicon oxide nanowires with stable intensive photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M., E-mail: duraia_physics@yahoo.co [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mansurov, Z.A. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tokmolden, S. [Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Beall, Gary W. [Texas State University-San Marcos, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 601 University Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In this work we report the successful formation of highly aligned vertical silicon oxide nanowires. The source of silicon was from the substrate itself without any additional source of silicon. X-ray measurement demonstrated that our nanowires are amorphous. Photoluminescence measurements were conducted through 18 months and indicated that there is a very good intensive emission peaks near the violet regions. The FTIR measurements indicated the existence of peaks at 463, 604, 795 and a wide peak at 1111 cm{sup -1} and this can be attributed to Si-O-Si and Si-O stretching vibrations. We also report the formation of the octopus-like silicon oxide nanowires and the growth mechanism of these structures was discussed.

  7. Tunnel oxide passivated rear contact for large area n-type front junction silicon solar cells providing excellent carrier selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguo Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrier-selective contact with low minority carrier recombination and efficient majority carrier transport is mandatory to eliminate metal-induced recombination for higher energy conversion efficiency for silicon (Si solar cells. In the present study, the carrier-selective contact consists of an ultra-thin tunnel oxide and a phosphorus-doped polycrystalline Si (poly-Si thin film formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD and subsequent thermal crystallization. It is shown that the poly-Si film properties (doping level, crystallization and dopant activation anneal temperature are crucial for achieving excellent contact passivation quality. It is also demonstrated quantitatively that the tunnel oxide plays a critical role in this tunnel oxide passivated contact (TOPCON scheme to realize desired carrier selectivity. Presence of tunnel oxide increases the implied Voc (iVoc by ~ 125 mV. The iVoc value as high as 728 mV is achieved on symmetric structure with TOPCON on both sides. Large area (239 cm2 n-type Czochralski (Cz Si solar cells are fabricated with homogeneous implanted boron emitter and screen-printed contact on the front and TOPCON on the back, achieving 21.2% cell efficiency. Detailed analysis shows that the performance of these cells is mainly limited by boron emitter recombination on the front side.

  8. MeV Si ion beam implantation as an effective patterning tool for the localized formation of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punzon-Quijorna, E., E-mail: esther.punzon@uam.es [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. Fisica Aplicada C-XII-104, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Torres-Costa, V.; Manso-Silvan, M.; Martin-Palma, R.J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. Fisica Aplicada C-XII-104, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. Fisica Aplicada C-XII-104, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    Porous silicon (PS), in the form of single layer and multilayer structures, is a low-cost nanomaterial with applications in a wide range of fields. Hence, there is an increasing interest on the fabrication of laterally patterned PS structures. In biophysics for example, PS is a promising material for the development of low cost optical biochips, due to its remarkable biocompatibility and adjustable surface chemistry and optical properties. However, conventional lithography processes have shown to be not suitable for the proper patterning of PS. In this work, implantation of MeV Si ions is proposed as an effective tool for the localized formation of PS in the micrometer range. As previously reported by other groups, irradiation of silicon with H and He keV ions can inhibit the formation of PS. In the case of heavier ions, its higher damage efficiency allows for lower implantation doses to achieve PS growth inhibition, which allows shorter process times, and at the same time provides good lateral resolution below the micrometric range. Besides, the usage of ions of the same elementary nature as the target material avoids inconvenient side effects that may be ascribed to the implanted species. Two dimensional PS patterns with feature size of few micrometers have been successfully fabricated. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy reveal the proper transfer of different mask motifs into a PS/silicon patterned structure. Patterns present well defined lateral contrast and flat surface with no significant height variations, mandatory features for the development of PS based biochips. A resistivity increase has been observed on irradiated samples which could explain the inhibition of PS formation. This effect is attributed to dopant deactivation by the ion beam, since backscattering channeling measurements show no significant lattice damage.

  9. Improving the corrosion resistance of nitinol by plasma-immersion ion implantation with silicon for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramova, P. V.; Korshunov, A. V.; Lotkov, A. I.; Kashin, O. A.; Borisov, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic polarization have been applied to study electrochemical behavior and to determine corrosion resistance of nitinol, which surface was modified with silicon using plasma-immersion ion implantation, in 0.9 % NaCl solution and in artificial blood plasma. It was found out that continuous, and also homogeneous in composition thin Si-containing layers are resistant to corrosion damage at high positive potentials in artificial physiological solutions due to formation of stable passive films. Breakdown potential Eb of Si-modified NiTi depends on the character of silicon and Ni distribution at the alloy surface, Eb values amounted to 0.9-1.5 V (Ag/AgCl/KCl sat.) for the alloy samples with continuous Si-containing surface layers and with decreased Ni surface concentration.

  10. Combination of chemical suppression techniques for dual suppression of fat and silicone at diffusion-weighted MR imaging in women with breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dow-Mu; Hughes, J. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sutton (United Kingdom); Blackledge, M.; Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CR UK-EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton (United Kingdom); Burns, S. [Nuada 3T MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Stemmer, A.; Kiefer, B. [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Silicone breast prostheses prove technically challenging when performing diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the breasts. We describe a combined fat and chemical suppression scheme to achieve dual suppression of fat and silicone, thereby improving the quality of diffusion-weighted images in women with breast implants. MR imaging was performed at 3.0 and 1.5 T in women with silicone breast implants using short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) fat-suppressed echo-planar (EPI) diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) on its own and combined with the slice-select gradient-reversal (SSGR) technique. Imaging was performed using dedicated breast imaging coils. Complete suppression of the fat and silicone signal was possible at 3.0 T using EPI DWI with STIR and SSGR, evaluated with dedicated breast coils. However, a residual silicone signal was still perceptible at 1.5 T using this combined approach. Nevertheless, a further reduction in silicone signal at 1.5 T could be achieved by employing thinner slice partitions and the addition of the chemical-selective fat-suppression (CHESS) technique. DWI using combined STIR and SSGR chemical suppression techniques is feasible to eliminate or reduce silicone signal from prosthetic breast implants. (orig.)

  11. Corrosion resistant three-dimensional nanotextured silicon for water photo-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rachel; Chatterjee, Shahana; Gordon, Evan; Share, Keith; Erwin, William R.; Cohn, Adam P.; Bardhan, Rizia; Pint, Cary L.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm-2 under 100 mW cm-2 (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications.We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm-2 under 100 mW cm-2 (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental details, (ii) Nyquist plot from EIS data, (iii) FTIR of H-terminated silicon, (iv) reflectance measurements to quantify light trapping in nanotextured silicon, (v) LSV from Tafel analysis, and (vi) J-V curves for H-terminated flat samples, (vii) stability test of photoanode, and (viii) forward and reverse scans for each sample type. See DOI: 10

  12. Gas sensing of ruthenium implanted tungsten oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfamichael, T., E-mail: t.tesfamichael@qut.edu.au [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Ahsan, M. [William A. Cook Australia, 95 Brandl Street Eight Mile Plains, Brisbane, QLD 4113 (Australia); Notarianni, M. [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Groß, A.; Hagen, G.; Moos, R. [University of Bayreuth, Faculty of Engineering Science, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstr. 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Ionescu, M. [ANSTO, Institute for Environmental Research, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Bell, J. [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2014-05-02

    Different amounts of Ru were implanted into thermally evaporated WO{sub 3} thin films by ion implantation. The films were subsequently annealed at 600 °C for 2 h in air to remove defects generated during the ion implantation. The Ru concentrations of four samples have been quantified by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry as 0.8, 5.5, 9 and 11.5 at.%. The un-implanted WO{sub 3} films were highly porous but the porosity decreased significantly after ion implantation as observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The thickness of the films also decreased with increasing Ru-ion dose, which is mainly due to densification of the porous films during ion implantation. From Raman Spectroscopy two peaks at 408 and 451 cm{sup −1} (in addition to the typical vibrational peaks of the monoclinic WO{sub 3} phase) associated with Ru were observed. Their intensity increased with increasing Ru concentration. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy showed a metallic state of Ru with binding energy of Ru 3d{sub 5/2} at 280.1 eV. This peak position remained almost unchanged with increasing Ru concentration. The resistances of the Ru-implanted films were found to increase in the presence of NO{sub 2} and NO with higher sensor response to NO{sub 2}. The effect of Ru concentration on the sensing performance of the films was not explicitly observed due to reduced film thickness and porosity with increasing Ru concentration. However, the results indicate that the implantation of Ru into WO{sub 3} films with sufficient film porosity and film thickness can be beneficial for NO{sub 2} sensing at temperatures in the range of 250 °C to 350 °C. - Highlights: • Densification of WO{sub 3} thin films has occurred after Ru ion implantation. • Thickness and porosity of the films decrease with increasing Ru ion dose. • The amount of oxygen vacancies and defects increases with increasing Ru ion dose. • Ru has shown a crucial role in enhancing sensor response

  13. The effect of nanocrystalline silicon host on magnetic properties of encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitzer, P; Rumpf, K; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, R; Coffer, J L; Reissner, M

    2015-12-21

    The purpose of this work is a detailed comparison of the fundamental magnetic properties of nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe3O4 nanoparticle-loaded porous silicon as well as silicon nanotubes. Such composite structures are of potential merit in the area of magnetically guided drug delivery. For magnetic systems to be utilized in biomedical applications, there are certain magnetic properties that must be fulfilled. Therefore magnetic properties of embedded Fe3O4-nanoparticles in these nanostructured silicon host matrices, porous silicon and silicon nanotubes, are investigated. Temperature-dependent magnetic investigations have been carried out for four types of iron oxide particle sizes (4, 5, 8 and 10 nm). The silicon host, in interplay with the iron oxide nanoparticle size, plays a sensitive role. It is shown that Fe3O4 loaded porous silicon and SiNTs differ significantly in their magnetic behavior, especially the transition between superparamagnetic behavior and blocked state, due to host morphology-dependent magnetic interactions. Importantly, it is found that all investigated samples meet the magnetic precondition of possible biomedical applications of exhibiting a negligible magnetic remanence at room temperature.

  14. Comparison of the Explantation Rate of Poly Implant Prothèse, Allergan, and Pérouse Silicone Breast Implants within the First Four Years after Reconstructive Surgery before the Poly Implant Prothèse Alert by the French Regulatory Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Leduey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In March 2010, ANSM (Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Medicament, the French Medical Regulatory Authority, withdrew Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP breast implants from the market due to the use of non-medical-grade silicone gel. The aim of this study was to compare the removal rate (and reasons thereof of breast implants produced by different manufacturers before the ANSM alert. Materials and Methods. From October 2006 to January 2010, 652 women received 944 implants after breast cancer surgery at the Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Center, Paris (France. The complications and removal rates of the different implant brands used (PIP, Allergan, and Pérouse were evaluated and compared. Results. PIP implants represented 50.6% of the used implants, Allergan 33.4%, and Pérouse 16%. The main reasons for implant removal were patient dissatisfaction due to aesthetic problems (43.2%, infection (22.2%, and capsular contracture (13.6%. Two years after implantation, 82% of Pérouse implants, 79% of PIP, and 79% of Allergan were still in situ. There was no difference in removal rate among implant brands. Conclusion. Before the ANSM alert concerning the higher rupture rate of PIP breast implants, our implant removal rate did not predict PIP implant failure related to the use of nonapproved silicone gel.

  15. Optimization of contaminated oxide inversion layer solar cell. [considering silicon oxide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Contaminated oxide cells have been fabricated with efficiencies of 8.6% with values of I sub sc = 120 ma, V sub oc = .54 volts, and curve factor of .73. Attempts to optimize the fabrication step to yield a higher output have not been successful. The fundamental limitation is the inadequate antireflection coating afforded by the silicon dioxide coating used to hold the contaminating ions. Coatings of SiO, therefore, were used to obtain a good antireflection coating, but the thinness of the coatings prevented a large concentration of the contaminating ions, and the cells was weak. Data of the best cell were .52 volts V sub oc, 110 ma I sub sc, .66 CFF and 6.7% efficiency.

  16. Effects of incident energy and angle on carbon cluster ions implantation on silicon substrate: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ye; Sang, Shengbo; Zhou, Bing; Deng, Xiao; Chai, Jing; Ji, Jianlong; Ge, Yang; Huo, Yuanliang; Zhang, Wendong

    2017-09-01

    Carbon cluster ion implantation is an important technique in fabricating functional devices at micro/nanoscale. In this work, a numerical model is constructed for implantation and implemented with a cutting-edge molecular dynamics method. A series of simulations with varying incident energies and incident angles is performed for incidence on silicon substrate and correlated effects are compared in detail. Meanwhile, the behavior of the cluster during implantation is also examined under elevated temperatures. By mapping the nanoscopic morphology with variable parameters, numerical formalism is proposed to explain the different impacts on phrase transition and surface pattern formation. Particularly, implantation efficiency (IE) is computed and further used to evaluate the performance of the overall process. The calculated results could be properly adopted as the theoretical basis for designing nano-structures and adjusting devices’ properties. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51622507, 61471255, 61474079, 61403273, 51502193, 51205273), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi (Nos. 201601D021057, 201603D421035), the Youth Foundation Project of Shanxi Province (Nos. 2015021097), the Doctoral Fund of MOE of China (No. 20131402110013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2015AA042601), and the Specialized Project in Public Welfare from The Ministry of Water Resources of China (Nos. 1261530110110).

  17. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast reconstruction with implants Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Breast reconstruction is a surgical procedure that restores shape to ... treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implantssilicone devices filled with silicone ...

  18. In situ luminescence and IR study of porous silicon during and after anodic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubin, V.M. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Ozanam, F. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Chazalviel, J.N. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    1995-01-15

    When porous silicon is transferred into a non-fluoride electrolyte and anodically oxidized, the onset of red electroluminescence during anodic oxidation appears correlated with a decrease in the OH IR absorption bands, indicating significant electrolyte removal from the pores. The electron states whose population is affected by carrier injection or light excitation have been investigated using in situ electromodulated or photomodulated IR spectroscopy. The modulated IR absorption of red-luminescent electro-oxidized porous silicon exhibits an extra absorption of localized carriers in the 1000-2500cm{sup -1} region, suggesting that the red luminescence occurs through carriers trapped in localized states. The localization process may be efficiently affected by the dielectric constant of the medium surrounding the silicon nanocrystallites. ((orig.))

  19. Elimination of the beam effect on channeling dips of bismuth implanted in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, A. G.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Kansara, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the analysing He + ion beam has been eliminated from channeling measurements on Si(Bi) by extrapolating the plot of normalised yield against He + dose to zero ion dose. The magnitude of the beam effect varies with the angle of incidence, being minimum for beam incidence along the crystallographic axis. The axial channeling dips thus obtained exhibit similar minimum yields for bismuth and silicon. The bismuth dips are, however, narrower than for silicon. The planar channeling experiments, on the other hand, yield nearly identical bismuth and silicon dips. The results indicate that the bismuth atom occupies the substitutional site in silicon, but the lattice is strained in its vicinity.

  20. MRI and MRS in patients with silicon implants of the breast; MRT und MRS nach Silikonaufbau der weiblichen Brust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfleiderer, B.; Heindel, W. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2001-07-01

    This paper reviews the evaluation of the breast of women by MR-techniques after implantation with silicon gel protheses. The main topics are the diagnosis of implant defects such as extensive ''gel bleed'' and intra- and extracapsular ruptures. Moreover, the MR-detection of siliconomas (encapsulated silicone) and differentiation from malignomas as well as MR-features of chronic foreign body reactions are presented. ''Gel bleed'' is difficult to diagnose unambiguously by MRI alone. The ''linguini'' sign is the only reliable mans to diagnose intracapsular ruptures. The presence of silicone outside the implant capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The MR-spectroscopic detection of silicone in the liver suggests after short implantation times and a normal MR scan the diagnosis ''gel bleed'', and after longer implantation times of more than 10 years and missing ''linguini'' sign the diagnosis of ruptures due to a dissolved shell of the implant. MRI, in comparison to other imaging modalities, has the highest specificity and sensitivity in the diagnosis of implant defects. Due to its high costs, however, MR is not suitable as a screening tool and should only be used in cases of sonographic suspected rupture or after radical mastectomy. In these cases MRI is the method of choice. (orig.) [German] In dieser Uebersicht wird die Evaluation der weiblichen Brust nach Aufbau mit Silikonmammaprothesen mittels MR-Techniken vorgestellt. Ein Schwerpunkt liegt dabei auf der Defektdiagnostik, d.h. dem Nachweis des so genannten ''Gelblutens'', der intra- und der extrakapsulaeren Ruptur. Daneben wird auf die MR-Detektion von Silikonomen (abgekapseltes Silikon) und deren Abgrenzung von einem Malignom eingegangen und das typische MR-Erscheinungsbild von chronischer Fremdkoerperreaktion vorgestellt. ''Gelbluten'' ist mittels MR-Bildgebung (MRT

  1. Surface morphology and structure of ultra-thin magnesium oxide grown on (100) silicon by atomic layer deposition oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochdi, N., E-mail: rochdi.nabil@gmail.com [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanoscience de Marseille (CINaM), CNRS UPR 3118, Aix-Marseille Universite, Case 913, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France); Liudvikouskaya, K. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, P. Browka 6, 220013 Minsk (Belarus); Descoins, M.; Raissi, M.; Coudreau, C.; Lazzari, J.-L. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanoscience de Marseille (CINaM), CNRS UPR 3118, Aix-Marseille Universite, Case 913, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France); Oughaddou, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DSM-IRAMIS-SPCSI, Bat. 462, Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, LAMAp, 95000 Cergy-Pontoise cedex (France); D' Avitaya, F. Arnaud [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanoscience de Marseille (CINaM), CNRS UPR 3118, Aix-Marseille Universite, Case 913, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2011-07-29

    Ultra-thin magnesium oxide layers were elaborated by atomic layer deposition and oxidation process on silicon (100) starting from (2 x 1) thermally-reconstructed or hydrogen-terminated Si surfaces. Low-energy electron diffraction experiments show (2 x 3) and (3 x 3) reconstructions while depositing a magnesium monolayer on Si clean surfaces, and a 3-dimentional growth of the oxide as confirmed by ex-situ atomic force microscopy. For hydrogen-terminated or clean surfaces previously physisorbed by oxygen, uniform cobalt/magnesium-oxide/silicon stacks of layers are observed by transmission electron microscopy. Annealing above 150 deg. C leads to MgO dissolution and formation of an interfacial complex compound by inter-diffusion of Si and Co.

  2. Comparative analysis of oxidation methods of reaction-sintered silicon carbide for optimization of oxidation-assisted polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinmin; Dai, Yifan; Deng, Hui; Guan, Chaoliang; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2013-11-04

    Combination of the oxidation of reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) and the polishing of the oxide is an effective way of machining RS-SiC. In this study, anodic oxidation, thermal oxidation, and plasma oxidation were respectively conducted to obtain oxides on RS-SiC surfaces. By performing scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analysis and scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) measurement, the oxidation behavior of these oxidation methods was compared. Through ceria slurry polishing, the polishing properties of the oxides were evaluated. Analysis of the oxygen element on polished surfaces by SEM-EDX was conducted to evaluate the remaining oxide. By analyzing the three oxidation methods with corresponding polishing process on the basis of schematic diagrams, suitable application conditions for these methods were clarified. Anodic oxidation with simultaneous polishing is suitable for the rapid figuring of RS-SiC with a high material removal rate; polishing of a thermally oxidized surface is suitable for machining RS-SiC mirrors with complex shapes; combination of plasma oxidation and polishing is suitable for the fine finishing of RS-SiC with excellent surface roughness. These oxidation methods are expected to improve the machining of RS-SiC substrates and promote the application of RS-SiC products in the fields of optics, molds, and ceramics.

  3. Formation and growth of fractal patterns in high energy P+-implanted silicon and N+Zn-implanted SiO2/GaAsP during thermal annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴瑜光; 张通和

    1997-01-01

    The fractal patterns in implanted samples are observed. Possible correlation of fractal patterns with the annealing temperature and the electrical activation ratio are given. The formation and growth process of fractal patterns are compared for implanted layers both in silicon and in SiO2/GaAsP during thermal annealing. The mechanism of formation and growth process of fractal pattern is discussed.

  4. Advanced transmission electron microscopy studies in low-energy ion implanted Si Semiconductors; Junctions; Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T S

    2002-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices shrink down to 0.1 mu m and beyond, low energy ion implantation is required to introduce shallower junctions to match such small devices. In this work, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is employed to analyse low energy implanted junctions with both structural and chemical analyses. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been employed to observe Si crystal damage and amorphization due to low energy B sup + /As sup + ion implantations, and also, defect formation/annihilation during rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The damage effects due to different implant temperatures between 300 deg C and -150 deg C are also discussed. Since knowledge of the distribution of low energy ion implanted dopants in Si is extremely important for semiconductor device processing, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) has been employed to determine implanted B distributions in Si while Z-contrast imaging and X-ray analytical mapping techniques are ...

  5. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  6. Back-junction back-contact n-type silicon solar cell with diffused boron emitter locally blocked by implanted phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ralph; Schrof, Julian; Reichel, Christian; Benick, Jan; Hermle, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The highest energy conversion efficiencies in the field of silicon-based photovoltaics have been achieved with back-junction back-contact (BJBC) silicon solar cells by several companies and research groups. One of the most complex parts of this cell structure is the fabrication of the locally doped p- and n-type regions, both on the back side of the solar cell. In this work, we introduce a process sequence based on a synergistic use of ion implantation and furnace diffusion. This sequence enables the formation of all doped regions for a BJBC silicon solar cell in only three processing steps. We observed that implanted phosphorus can block the diffusion of boron atoms into the silicon substrate by nearly three orders of magnitude. Thus, locally implanted phosphorus can be used as an in-situ mask for a subsequent boron diffusion which simultaneously anneals the implanted phosphorus and forms the boron emitter. BJBC silicon solar cells produced with such an easy-to-fabricate process achieved conversion efficiencies of up to 21.7%. An open-circuit voltage of 674 mV and a fill factor of 80.6% prove that there is no significant recombination at the sharp transition between the highly doped emitter and the highly doped back surface field at the device level.

  7. Back-junction back-contact n-type silicon solar cell with diffused boron emitter locally blocked by implanted phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.mueller@ise.fraunhofer.de; Schrof, Julian; Reichel, Christian; Benick, Jan; Hermle, Martin [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, Freiburg D-79110 (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    The highest energy conversion efficiencies in the field of silicon-based photovoltaics have been achieved with back-junction back-contact (BJBC) silicon solar cells by several companies and research groups. One of the most complex parts of this cell structure is the fabrication of the locally doped p- and n-type regions, both on the back side of the solar cell. In this work, we introduce a process sequence based on a synergistic use of ion implantation and furnace diffusion. This sequence enables the formation of all doped regions for a BJBC silicon solar cell in only three processing steps. We observed that implanted phosphorus can block the diffusion of boron atoms into the silicon substrate by nearly three orders of magnitude. Thus, locally implanted phosphorus can be used as an in-situ mask for a subsequent boron diffusion which simultaneously anneals the implanted phosphorus and forms the boron emitter. BJBC silicon solar cells produced with such an easy-to-fabricate process achieved conversion efficiencies of up to 21.7%. An open-circuit voltage of 674 mV and a fill factor of 80.6% prove that there is no significant recombination at the sharp transition between the highly doped emitter and the highly doped back surface field at the device level.

  8. Selective tuning of high-Q silicon photonic crystal nanocavities via laser-assisted local oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Charlton J; Gu, Tingyi; McMillan, James F; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2011-01-01

    We examine the cavity resonance tuning of high-Q silicon photonic crystal heterostructures by localized laser-assisted thermal oxidation using a 532 nm continuous wave laser focused to a 2.5 mm radius spot-size. The total shift is consistent with the parabolic rate law. A tuning range of up to 8.7 nm is achieved with ~ 30 mW laser powers. Over this tuning range, the cavity Q decreases from 3.2\\times10^5 to 1.2\\times10^5. Numerical simulations model the temperature distributions in the silicon photonic crystal membrane and the cavity resonance shift from oxidation.

  9. Functional biocompatibility testing of silicone breast implants and a novel classification system based on surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, S; Hill, E W; Bayat, A

    2017-06-27

    Increasing numbers of women undergo breast implantation for cosmetic and reconstructive purposes. Contracture of the fibrous capsule, which encases the implant leads to significant pain and reoperation. Texture, wettability and the cellular reaction to implant surfaces are poorly understood determinants of implant biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro characteristics of a range of commercial available implants using a macrophage based assay of implant biocompatibility and a quantitative assessment of wettability and texture. Thirteen commercially available surfaces were subjected to wettability and texture characterisation using scanning and laser confocal microscopy. THP-1 macrophages were cultured on their surfaces and assessed using Integrin αV immunocytochemistry, SEM and RT-PCR for the expression of TNF-Alpha, IL-6, IL-10 and a cytokine array for the production of TNF-alpha, IL-10, IL-1RA and IL1β; important indicators of inflammation and macrophage polarization. Textured surfaces can be accurately sub-categorized dependent upon roughness and re-entrant features into four main types (macro, micro, meso and nano-textured surfaces). Significant (P based on roughness and present a macrophage based assay of breast implant biocompatibility with a quantitative assessment of implant wettability and texture. The breast implant surface-cell interaction is variable and sufficient to alter healing response and capsular contracture fate in-vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Transport properties of silicon complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor quantum well field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naquin, Clint Alan

    Introducing explicit quantum transport into silicon (Si) transistors in a manner compatible with industrial fabrication has proven challenging, yet has the potential to transform the performance horizons of large scale integrated Si devices and circuits. Explicit quantum transport as evidenced by negative differential transconductances (NDTCs) has been observed in a set of quantum well (QW) n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) transistors fabricated using industrial silicon complementary MOS processing. The QW potential was formed via lateral ion implantation doping on a commercial 45 nm technology node process line, and measurements of the transfer characteristics show NDTCs up to room temperature. Detailed gate length and temperature dependence characteristics of the NDTCs in these devices have been measured. Gate length dependence of NDTCs shows a correlation of the interface channel length with the number of NDTCs formed as well as with the gate voltage (VG) spacing between NDTCs. The VG spacing between multiple NDTCs suggests a quasi-parabolic QW potential profile. The temperature dependence is consistent with partial freeze-out of carrier concentration against a degenerately doped background. A folding amplifier frequency multiplier circuit using a single QW NMOS transistor to generate a folded current-voltage transfer function via a NDTC was demonstrated. Time domain data shows frequency doubling in the kHz range at room temperature, and Fourier analysis confirms that the output is dominated by the second harmonic of the input. De-embedding the circuit response characteristics from parasitic cable and contact impedances suggests that in the absence of parasitics the doubling bandwidth could be as high as 10 GHz in a monolithic integrated circuit, limited by the transresistance magnitude of the QW NMOS. This is the first example of a QW device fabricated by mainstream Si CMOS technology being used in a circuit application and establishes the feasibility

  11. ZnTe nanoparticles formed by ion implantation in a SiO{sub 2} layer on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemam, R. E-mail: che_raf@yahoo.fr; Bouabellou, A.; Grob, J.J.; Muller, D.; Schmerber, G

    2004-02-01

    Ion implantation is a very simple and suitable way, compatible with the silicon technology, to form nanometric precipitates in materials. Sequential high dose (3-5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}) implantations of tellurium and zinc ions have been performed in a 250 nm thick SiO{sub 2} layer thermally grown on <1 1 1> silicon. Their respective energies (180 and 104 keV) have been chosen to produce 5-10 at.% profiles overlapping at a mean depth of about 80 nm. Subsequent thermal treatments (800-1100 deg. C) lead to the formation of nanometric precipitates of the compound semiconductor ZnTe. Their size, crystalline structure and depth distribution have been studied as a function of annealing temperature using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. For the highest temperatures, the nanoparticles progressively redistribute in two bands located close to the surface and interface. Their mean diameter ranges between 13 and 26 nm, as a function of annealing temperature.

  12. Gas Permeation, Mechanical Behavior and Cytocompatibility of Ultrathin Pure and Doped Diamond-Like Carbon and Silicon Oxide Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen M. Lackner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Protective ultra-thin barrier films gather increasing economic interest for controlling permeation and diffusion from the biological surrounding in implanted sensor and electronic devices in future medicine. Thus, the aim of this work was a benchmarking of the mechanical oxygen permeation barrier, cytocompatibility, and microbiological properties of inorganic ~25 nm thin films, deposited by vacuum deposition techniques on 50 µm thin polyetheretherketone (PEEK foils. Plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (direct deposition from an ion source was applied to deposit pure and nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon films, while physical vapor deposition (magnetron sputtering in pulsed DC mode was used for the formation of silicon as well as titanium doped diamond-like carbon films. Silicon oxide films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The results indicate a strong influence of nanoporosity on the oxygen transmission rate for all coating types, while the low content of microporosity (particulates, etc. is shown to be of lesser importance. Due to the low thickness of the foil substrates, being easily bent, the toughness as a measure of tendency to film fracture together with the elasticity index of the thin films influence the oxygen barrier. All investigated coatings are non-pyrogenic, cause no cytotoxic effects and do not influence bacterial growth.

  13. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-04-21

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications.

  14. Transparent conducting oxide layers for thin film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830585; Liu, Y.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831743; de Jong, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325844208; de Wild, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314641378; Schuttauf, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314118039; Brinza, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823325; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2009-01-01

    Texture etching of ZnO:1%Al layers using diluted HCl solution provides excellent TCOs with crater type surface features for the front contact of superstrate type of thin film silicon solar cells. The texture etched ZnO:Al definitely gives superior performance than Asahi SnO2:F TCO in case of nanocry

  15. Doped and Undoped Zinc Oxide Nanostructures on Silicon Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubenko, E.; Bondarenko, V.

    2013-05-01

    We present results of hydrothermal deposition of undoped and Al doped ZnO nanocrystals on nanocrystalline silicon. ZnO nanocrystals were deposited in an equimolar zinc nitride and hexamethylenetetramine solution. Aluminum nitride was used as Al precursor. The difference of the morphology of doped and undoped ZnO nanocrystals is discussed. Photoluminescence properties of the obtained nanocrystals are shown.

  16. A feasibility study of magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, Ilona; Boice, John D; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2005-01-01

    Cosmetic breast implants have become increasingly popular throughout the world. However, there is insufficient knowledge about the frequency and severity of local complications such as rupture and capsular contracture. A pilot study of 25 Finnish women with 50 cosmetic breast implants was organized...

  17. Long-term safety and effectiveness of style 410 highly cohesive silicone breast implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedén, Per; Bronz, Giorgio; Elberg, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    years after implantation. Capsular contracture was the most common complication noted at the physical examination, occurring for 5.3% of implants, and there were no cases of grade 4 capsular contracture. The postimplantation rates for lactation and reproductive problems and breast disease were lower...

  18. Long-term health status of Danish women with silicone breast implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Vibeke B; Hölmich, Lisbet R; Brandt, Bodil

    2004-01-01

    autoantibodies. Self-reported use of psychotropic drugs was higher among women with breast implants than among either control group. The authors conclude that long-term cosmetic breast implantation may cause capsular contracture and breast pain but does not appear to be associated with other symptoms, diseases...

  19. The air oxidation behavior of lanthanum ion implanted zirconium at 500 deg. C

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, D Q; Chen, X W; Zhou, Q G

    2003-01-01

    The beneficial effect of lanthanum ion implantation on the oxidation behavior of zirconium at 500 deg. C has been studied. Zirconium specimens were implanted by lanthanum ions using a MEVVA source at energy of 40 keV with a fluence range from 1x10 sup 1 sup 6 to 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 ions/cm sup 2 at maximum temperature of 130 deg. C, The weight gain curves were measured after being oxidized in air at 500 deg. C for 100 min, which showed that a significant improvement was achieved in the oxidation behavior of zirconium ion implanted with lanthanum compared with that of the as-received zirconium. The valence of the oxides in the scale was analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy; and then the depth distributions of the elements in the surface of the samples were obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction at 0.3 deg. incident angles was employed to examine the modification of its phase transformation because of the lanthanum ion implantation in the oxide films. It was obviously fou...

  20. Laser-Doping through Anodic Aluminium Oxide Layers for Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Hsuan Doris Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that silicon can be locally doped with aluminium to form localised p+ surface regions by laser-doping through anodic aluminium oxide (AAO layers formed on the silicon surface. The resulting p+ regions can extend more than 10 μm into the silicon and the electrically active p-type dopant concentration exceeds 1020 cm−3 for the first 6-7 μm of the formed p+ region. Anodic aluminium oxide layers can be doped with other impurities, such as boron and phosphorus, by anodising in electrolytes containing the extrinsic impurities in ionic form. The ions become trapped in the formed anodic oxide during anodisation, therefore enabling the impurity to be introduced into the silicon, with aluminium, during laser-doping. This codoping process can be used to create very heavily doped surface layers which can reduce contact resistance on metallisation, whilst the deeper doping achieved by the intrinsic aluminium may act to shield the surface from minority carriers. laser-doping through AAO layers can be performed without introducing any voids in the silicon or fumes which may be harmful to human health.

  1. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence in silicon oxide films rich in silicon; Fluorescencia y termoluminiscencia en peliculas de oxido de silicio rico en silicio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman M, D.; Piters, T. M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 5-088, Hermosillo 83190, Sonora (Mexico); Aceves M, M.; Berriel V, L. R. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51, Puebla 72000, Puebla (Mexico); Luna L, J. A. [CIDS, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Postal 1651, Puebla 72000, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    In this work we determined the fluorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) creation spectra of silicon rich oxide films (SRO) with three different silicon excesses. To study the TL of SRO, 550 nm of SRO film were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition technique on N-type silicon substrates with resistivity in the order of 3 to 5 {omega}-cm with silicon excess controlled by the ratio of the gases used in the process, SRO films with Ro= 10, 20 and 30 (12-6% silicon excess) were obtained. Then, they were thermally treated in N{sub 2} at high temperatures to diffuse and homogenize the silicon excess. In the fluorescence spectra two main emission regions are observed, one around 400 nm and one around 800 nm. TL creation spectra were determined by plotting the integrated TL intensity as function of the excitation wavelength. (Author)

  2. Charge trapping and de-trapping in Si-nanoparticles embedded in silicon oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Sanchez, A.; Barreto, J.; Dominguez, C. [IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Aceves, M.; Yu, Z. [INAOE, Electronics Department, Puebla, Pue., 72000 (Mexico); Luna, J.A. [CCMC, UNAM, Optics Department, Ensenada, BC, 22800 (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Electrical properties of silicon nanoparticles (Si-np's) embedded in a silicon oxide matrix were studied using MOS-like structures. Si-np's were created after silicon rich oxide (SRO) films were thermally annealed at 1100 C. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics showed downward and upward peaks in the accumulation region. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements exhibited current valleys and downward and upward peaks. Current versus time (I-t) measurements were also done at a negative constant gate voltage. A switching behaviour between two current states (ON and OFF) was observed. These effects have been related to the charge trapping and de-trapping of the Si-np's embedded in the SRO films. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Nanopatterning of Crystalline Silicon Using Anodized Aluminum Oxide Templates for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tsu-An

    A novel thin film anodized aluminum oxide templating process was developed and applied to make nanopatterns on crystalline silicon to enhance the optical properties of silicon. The thin film anodized aluminum oxide was created to improve the conventional thick aluminum templating method with the aim for potential large scale fabrication. A unique two-step anodizing method was introduced to create high quality nanopatterns and it was demonstrated that this process is superior over the original one-step approach. Optical characterization of the nanopatterned silicon showed up to 10% reduction in reflection in the short wavelength range. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to analyze the nanopatterned surface structure and it was found that interpore spacing and pore density can be tuned by changing the anodizing potential.

  4. Nanophotonic devices on thin buried oxide Silicon-On-Insulator substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Sridaran, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon photonic platform using thin buried oxide silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates using localized substrate removal. We show high confinement silicon strip waveguides, micro-ring resonators and nanotapers using this technology. Propagation losses for the waveguides using the cutback method are 3.88 dB/cm for the quasi-TE mode and 5.06 dB/cm for the quasi-TM mode. Ring resonators with a loaded quality factor (Q) of 46,500 for the quasi-TM mode and intrinsic Q of 148,000 for the quasi-TE mode have been obtained. This process will enable the integration of photonic structures with thin buried oxide SOI based electronics.

  5. Silicon oxide nanowire growth mechanisms revealed by real-time electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolíbal, Miroslav; Novák, Libor; Shanley, Toby; Toth, Milos; Šikola, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    Growth of one-dimensional materials is possible through numerous mechanisms that affect the nanowire structure and morphology. Here, we explain why a wide range of morphologies is observed when silicon oxide nanowires are grown on silicon substrates using liquid gallium catalyst droplets. We show that a gallium oxide overlayer is needed for nanowire nucleation at typical growth temperatures, and that it can decompose during growth and, hence, dramatically alter the nanowire morphology. Gallium oxide decomposition is attributed to etching caused by hydrogen that can be supplied by thermal dissociation of H2O (a common impurity). We show that H2O dissociation is catalyzed by silicon substrates at temperatures as low as 320 °C, identify the material supply pathways and processes that rate-limit nanowire growth under dry and wet atmospheres, and present a detailed growth model that explains contradictory results reported in prior studies. We also show that under wet atmospheres the Ga droplets can be mobile and promote nanowire growth as they traverse the silicon substrate.Growth of one-dimensional materials is possible through numerous mechanisms that affect the nanowire structure and morphology. Here, we explain why a wide range of morphologies is observed when silicon oxide nanowires are grown on silicon substrates using liquid gallium catalyst droplets. We show that a gallium oxide overlayer is needed for nanowire nucleation at typical growth temperatures, and that it can decompose during growth and, hence, dramatically alter the nanowire morphology. Gallium oxide decomposition is attributed to etching caused by hydrogen that can be supplied by thermal dissociation of H2O (a common impurity). We show that H2O dissociation is catalyzed by silicon substrates at temperatures as low as 320 °C, identify the material supply pathways and processes that rate-limit nanowire growth under dry and wet atmospheres, and present a detailed growth model that explains

  6. An Kinetics Study of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Oxidation of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    for the bare silicon and thin oxides are in a region where the accuracy of the rotating analyzer ellipsometer is good. Second, the dependance of...constant. In order to compare our experimental results to this model, the dependance of the growth rate with the temperature and the bias is examined...show the dependance of temperature and bias are close to the Mott-Cabrera theory for the oxidation by the charged species in the limit of the low

  7. Photoluminescence and Electroluminescence Studies on Tb-Doped Silicon Rich Oxide Materials and Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of Tb-doped silicon rich oxide (SRO) films prepared by DC-sputtering and post-annealing processes were studied. The silicon richness of the SRO film could be controlled by varying the sputtering power and oxygen concentration in the sputtering chamber. PL emission from the as-deposited sample was found to be composed of Tb3+ intra 4f transition-related emission and the silicon nano particle-related broad bandwidth emission. Thermal annealing could significantly improve the material properties as well as the PL signals. PL properties depended strongly upon the annealing scheme and silicon richness. Annealing at high temperatures (900~1050 ℃) enhanced Tb-related emission and suppressed the silicon nano particle-related emission. For samples with different silicon richness, annealing at 950 ℃ was found to produce higher PL signals than at other temperatures. It was attributed more to lifetime quenching than to concentration quenching. Electroluminescent (EL) devices with a capacitor structure were fabricated, the optimized process condition for the EL device was found to be different from that of PL emission. Among the annealing schemes that were used, wet oxidation was found to improve device performance the most, whereas, dry oxidation was found to improve material property the most. Wet oxidation allowed the breakdown electrical field to increase significantly and to reach above 10 mV·cm-1. The EL spectra showed a typical Tb3+ emission, agreeing well with the PL spectra. The I-V measurements indicated that for 100 nm thick film, the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling started at an electrical field of around 6 mV·cm-1 and the light emission became detectable at a current density of around 10-4 A·cm-2 and higher. Strong electroluminescence light emission was detected when the electrical field was close to 10 mV·cm-1.

  8. High Temperature Oxidation and Mechanical properties of Silicon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-30

    Rowcliffe, and R. H. Lamoreaux Prepared for: Air Force Office of Scientific Research/NE Building 410 Boiling Air Force Base, D.C. 20332 Attention: Captain...samples were examined by x-ray dif- fraction. Cristobalite and a-Si 3N4 lines were found, but there was no evidence of silicon oxynitride. In most... cristobalite is the stable form.𔃾 A large amount of evi- dence indicates that this phase transiticn was not the primary reason for the increased

  9. Electrical properties of plasma-deposited silicon oxide clarified by chemical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, A.Y.; Boogaard, A.; Brunets, I.; Aarnink, A.A.I.; Wolters, R.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Our study is focused on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon dioxide films at low temperatures (< 150 oC) using Inductively Coupled (IC) High-Density (HD) plasma source. We recently fabricated Thin Film Transistors (TFTs) with high-quality ICPECVD gate oxides, which exhibited

  10. Solution titration by wall deprotonation during capillary filling of silicon oxide nanochannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Kjeld G.H.; Hoang, Hanh T.; Floris, Jan; Vries, de Jeroen; Tas, Niels R.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a fundamental challenge when using silicon oxide nanochannels for analytical systems, namely the occurrence of a strong proton release or proton uptake from the walls in any transient situation such as channel filling. Experimentally, when fluorescein solutions were introduced i

  11. Molecular printboards on silicon oxide: lithographic patterning of cyclodextrin monolayers with multivalent, fluorescent guest molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.; Onclin, S.; Péter, M.; Hoogenboom, Jacob; Hoogenboom, J.P.; Beijleveld, Hans; Beijleveld, H.; ter Maat, Jurjen; Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Ravoo, B.J.; Huskens, Jurriaan; van Hulst, N.F.; Reinhoudt, David

    2005-01-01

    Three compounds bearing multiple adamantyl guest moieties and a fluorescent dye have been synthesized for the supramolecular patterning of -cyclodextrin (CD) host monolayers on silicon oxide using microcontact printing and dip-pen nanolithography. Patterns created on monolayers on glass were viewed

  12. Evidence of wettability variation on carbon nanofiber layers grown on oxidized silicon substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, H.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Thakur, D.B.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; van Houselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how layers of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with a controllable wettability can be synthesized by means of thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition on nickel-based thin films on oxidized silicon supports. In order to achieve well-adhesive CNF-layers with a uniform surface coverage

  13. Fluorinated alkyne-derived monolayers on oxide-free silicon nanowires via one-step hydrosilylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Quyen; Pujari, Sidharam P.; Wang, Bin; Wang, Zhanhua; Haick, Hossam; Zuilhof, Han; Rijn, van Cees J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Passivation of oxide-free silicon nanowires (Si NWs) by the formation of high-quality fluorinated 1-hexadecyne-derived monolayers with varying fluorine content has been investigated. Alkyl chain monolayers (C16H30−xFx) with a varying number of fluorine substituents (x = 0, 1, 3, 9, 17) were attached

  14. Fibromatosis associated with silicone breast implant: ultrasonography and MR imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyun Seok; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Kim, Ok Hwa; Jung, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Suk Jung; Kim, Woogyeong; Kim, Woon Won

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid type fibromatosis is an uncommon benign disease entity of which its etiology is currently unknown. It constitutes 0.3% of all solid neoplasms, but it is rarely seen in the breast and even more scarcely reported to develop in association with breast implant. We present ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 29-year-old female patient with fibromatosis after breast implant surgery. Knowledge of imaging findings of breast fibromatosis associated with implant will be helpful for accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effective surface passivation of p-type crystalline silicon with silicon oxides formed by light-induced anodisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jie, E-mail: j.cui@unsw.edu.au [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Grant, Nicholas [Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 0200 (Australia); Lennon, Alison [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-12-30

    Highlights: • The surface passivation by anodic SiO{sub 2} formed by light-induced anodisation is investigated. • The anodic SiO{sub 2} grows lower temperatures with shorter growth times. After annealing in oxygen and then forming gas the effective minority carrier lifetime is increased to 150 μs. • It shows a very low positive Q{sub eff} of 3.4 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}, a moderate D{sub it} of 6 × 10{sup 11} eV{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. • It has a very low leakage current density suggesting its application in solar cell as a functional dielectric. - Abstract: Electronic surface passivation of p-type crystalline silicon by anodic silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) was investigated. The anodic SiO{sub 2} was grown by light-induced anodisation (LIA) in diluted sulphuric acid at room temperature, a process that is significantly less-expensive than thermal oxidation which is widely-used in silicon solar cell fabrication. After annealing in oxygen and then forming gas at 400 °C for 30 min, the effective minority carrier lifetime of 3–5 Ω cm, boron-doped Czochralski silicon wafers with a phosphorus-doped 80 Ω/□ emitter and a LIA anodic SiO{sub 2} formed on the p-type surface was increased by two orders of magnitude to 150 μs. Capacitance–voltage measurements demonstrated a very low positive charge density of 3.4 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} and a moderate density of interface states of 6 × 10{sup 11} eV{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. This corresponded to a silicon surface recombination velocity of 62 cm s{sup −1}, which is comparable with values reported for other anodic SiO{sub 2} films, which required higher temperatures and longer growth times, and significantly lower than oxides grown by chemical vapour deposition techniques. Additionally, a very low leakage current density of 3.5 × 10{sup −10} and 1.6 × 10{sup −9} A cm{sup −2} at 1 and −1 V, respectively, was measured for LIA SiO{sub 2} suggesting its potential application as insulation layer in

  16. Study of near-surface nanostructures in silicon systems after ion implantation and in the epitaxial growth by means of X-ray scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, U W L

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis sample systems on silicon base, the doped regions of which were fabricated by ion implantation respectively by epitaxial layer growth, were studied by means of surface-sensitive X-ray scattering. In the foreground thereby lies the identification and characterization of defects and real structures, which influence the electronic properties.

  17. Fabrication of disposable topographic silicon oxide from sawtoothed patterns: control of arrays of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heesook; Yoo, Hana; Park, Soojin

    2010-05-18

    Disposable topographic silicon oxide patterns were fabricated from polymeric replicas of sawtoothed glass surfaces, spin-coating of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) thin films, and thermal annealing at certain temperature and followed by oxygen plasma treatment of the thin PDMS layer. A simple imprinting process was used to fabricate the replicated PDMS and PS patterns from sawtoothed glass surfaces. Next, thin layers of PDMS films having different thicknesses were spin-coated onto the sawtoothed PS surfaces and annealed at 60 degrees C to be drawn the PDMS into the valley of the sawtoothed PS surfaces, followed by oxygen plasma treatment to fabricate topographic silicon oxide patterns. By control of the thickness of PDMS layers, silicon oxide patterns having various line widths were fabricated. The silicon oxide topographic patterns were used to direct the self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) block copolymer thin films via solvent annealing process. A highly ordered PS-b-P2VP micellar structure was used to let gold precursor complex with P2VP chains, and followed by oxygen plasma treatment. When the PS-b-P2VP thin films containing gold salts were exposed to oxygen plasma environments, gold salts were reduced to pure gold nanoparticles without changing high degree of lateral order, while polymers were completely degraded. As the width of trough and crest in topographic patterns increases, the number of gold arrays and size of gold nanoparticles are tuned. In the final step, the silicon oxide topographic patterns were selectively removed by wet etching process without changing the arrays of gold nanoparticles.

  18. The effect of nanocrystalline silicon host on magnetic properties of encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitzer, P.; Rumpf, K.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, R.; Coffer, J. L.; Reissner, M.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work is a detailed comparison of the fundamental magnetic properties of nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe3O4 nanoparticle-loaded porous silicon as well as silicon nanotubes. Such composite structures are of potential merit in the area of magnetically guided drug delivery. For magnetic systems to be utilized in biomedical applications, there are certain magnetic properties that must be fulfilled. Therefore magnetic properties of embedded Fe3O4-nanoparticles in these nanostructured silicon host matrices, porous silicon and silicon nanotubes, are investigated. Temperature-dependent magnetic investigations have been carried out for four types of iron oxide particle sizes (4, 5, 8 and 10 nm). The silicon host, in interplay with the iron oxide nanoparticle size, plays a sensitive role. It is shown that Fe3O4 loaded porous silicon and SiNTs differ significantly in their magnetic behavior, especially the transition between superparamagnetic behavior and blocked state, due to host morphology-dependent magnetic interactions. Importantly, it is found that all investigated samples meet the magnetic precondition of possible biomedical applications of exhibiting a negligible magnetic remanence at room temperature.The purpose of this work is a detailed comparison of the fundamental magnetic properties of nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe3O4 nanoparticle-loaded porous silicon as well as silicon nanotubes. Such composite structures are of potential merit in the area of magnetically guided drug delivery. For magnetic systems to be utilized in biomedical applications, there are certain magnetic properties that must be fulfilled. Therefore magnetic properties of embedded Fe3O4-nanoparticles in these nanostructured silicon host matrices, porous silicon and silicon nanotubes, are investigated. Temperature-dependent magnetic investigations have been carried out for four types of iron oxide particle sizes (4, 5, 8 and 10 nm). The silicon host, in interplay

  19. Graphene oxide-immobilized NH₂-terminated silicon nanoparticles by cross-linked interactions for highly stable silicon negative electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Deng, Yuanfu; Wan, Lina; Qin, Xusong; Chen, Guohua

    2014-07-23

    There is a great interest in the utilization of silicon-based anodes for lithium-ion batteries. However, its poor cycling stability, which is caused by a dramatic volume change during lithium-ion intercalation, and intrinsic low electric conductivity hamper its industrial applications. A facile strategy is reported here to fabricate graphene oxide-immobilized NH2-terminated silicon nanoparticles (NPs) negative electrode (Si@NH2/GO) directed by hydrogen bonding and cross-linked interactions to enhance the capacity retention of the anode. The NH2-modified Si NPs first form strong hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds with GO. The Si@NH2/GO composite further forms hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds with sodium alginate, which acts as a binder, to yield a stable composite negative electrode. These two chemical cross-linked/hydrogen bonding interactions-one between NH2-modified Si NPs and GO, and another between the GO and sodium alginate-along with highly mechanically flexible graphene oxide, produced a robust network in the negative electrode system to stabilize the electrode during discharge and charge cycles. The as-prepared Si@NH2/GO electrode exhibits an outstanding capacity retention capability and good rate performance, delivering a reversible capacity of 1000 mAh g(-1) after 400 cycles at a current of 420 mA g(-1) with almost 100% capacity retention. The results indicated the importance of system-level strategy for fabricating stable electrodes with improved electrochemical performance.

  20. Magnetic oxide heterostructures. EuO on cubic oxides and on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspers, Christian

    2013-07-01

    In the thesis at hand, we explore fundamental properties of ultrathin europium oxide (EuO) films. EuO is a model system of a localized 4f Heisenberg ferromagnet, in which the ferromagnetic coupling. provided a high crystalline quality. can be tuned by biaxial lattice strain. Moreover, the magnetic oxide EuO is perfectly suited as a spin-functional tunnel contact for silicon spintronics. However, up to now a challenging bulk and interface chemistry of EuO and Si has hampered a seamless integration into functional silicon heterostructures. In order to investigate fundamental aspects of the magnetic and electronic structure of ultrathin EuO, in the first part of this thesis, we synthesize EuO thin films on conductive YSZ substrates from bulklike thicknesses down to one nanometer by oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The EuO thin films are of textbook-like single-crystalline quality, and show bulk-like magnetic properties. We control the stoichiometry of buried EuO thin films by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES); even a 1 nm ultrathin EuO film exhibits no valence change or interface shifts. Furthermore, we conduct an advanced magnetic characterization by the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of Eu core-levels in photoemission, this gives us insight into the intra-atomic exchange coupling of EuO thin films. The MCD reveals large asymmetries of up to 49% in the well-resolved Eu 4d photoemission multiplet. Thus, ultrathin EuO coherently grown on conductive YSZ allows us to explore fundamental magnetic and electronic properties of a 4f magnetic oxide. Biaxial lateral strain applied to single-crystalline EuO is of fundamental interest, since it alters the electronic structure and magnetic coupling in a controlled way. We apply +4.2% tensile biaxial strain to EuO by epitaxial EuO/LaAlO{sub 3} (100) heterostructures. EuO seamlessly adapts the lateral lattice parameter of LaAlO{sub 3}, while the perpendicular parameter of EuO is the unchanged EuO bulk value, thus

  1. Silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule (SIGBIC): similarities and differences with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and their differential diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Rêgo, Milena Morais; Ramalho, Luciana Costa; Ayres, Veronica Jorge; Seleti, Rodrigo Oliveira; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci; Roveda, Decio

    2017-01-01

    Primary breast lymphoma is a rare disease and accounts for 0.5% of cases of breast cancer. Most primary breast lymphomas develop from B cells, and the involvement of T cells is rare. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently discovered T-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants. Only a few cases have been reported to date. It is believed that the incidence of ALCL is increasing because of the increasing number of breast implants. The clinical presentation is variable and can manifest as a palpable mass in the breast or armpit, breast pain, or capsular contracture. Because of the rarity of the disease and the lack of knowledge to date, clinical diagnosis is often delayed, with consequent delays in treatment. The cause and pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated, and there are no evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, or follow-up of this disease. We present a review of cases of patients with silicone breast implants, including ALCL, a rare type of breast cancer that is still under study, and silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule and its differential diagnosis, and discuss if a silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule could be the precursor of the disease.

  2. Activation of macrophages by silicones: phenotype and production of oxidant metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodero Natalia

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of silicones on the immune function is not fully characterized. In clinical and experimental studies, immune alterations associated with silicone gel seem to be related to macrophage activation. In this work we examined in vivo, phenotypic and functional changes on peritoneal macrophages early (24 h or 48 h and late (45 days after the intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of dimethylpolysiloxane (DMPS (silicone. We studied the expression of adhesion and co-stimulatory molecules and both the spontaneous and the stimulated production of reactive oxygen intermediates and nitric oxide (NO. Results The results presented here demonstrate that the fluid compound DMPS induced a persistent cell recruitment at the site of the injection. Besides, cell activation was still evident 45 days after the silicone injection: activated macrophages exhibited an increased expression of adhesion (CD54 and CD44 and co-stimulatory molecules (CD86 and an enhanced production of oxidant metabolites and NO. Conclusions Silicones induced a persistent recruitment of leukocytes at the site of the injection and macrophage activation was still evident 45 days after the injection.

  3. High performance high-κ/metal gate complementary metal oxide semiconductor circuit element on flexible silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-02-29

    Thinned silicon based complementary metal oxide semiconductor(CMOS)electronics can be physically flexible. To overcome challenges of limited thinning and damaging of devices originated from back grinding process, we show sequential reactive ion etching of silicon with the assistance from soft polymeric materials to efficiently achieve thinned (40 μm) and flexible (1.5 cm bending radius) silicon based functional CMOSinverters with high-κ/metal gate transistors. Notable advances through this study shows large area of silicon thinning with pre-fabricated high performance elements with ultra-large-scale-integration density (using 90 nm node technology) and then dicing of such large and thinned (seemingly fragile) pieces into smaller pieces using excimer laser. The impact of various mechanical bending and bending cycles show undeterred high performance of flexible siliconCMOSinverters. Future work will include transfer of diced silicon chips to destination site, interconnects, and packaging to obtain fully flexible electronic systems in CMOS compatible way.

  4. Electrophysical properties of silicon layers implanted with erbium and oxygen ions over a wide dose range and heat treated with different temperature regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, O V; Sobolev, N A; Nikolaev, Y A

    2002-01-01

    The electrophysical properties of silicon implanted with erbium and oxygen ions over a wide dose range have been studied. The electron mobility dependence on the electrically active center concentration has been obtained in erbium-doped silicon with a concentration varied over 9 x 10 sup 1 sup 5 - 8 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 3 range. In the concentration profiles of electrically active centers n(x) and erbium atoms C(x), irregularities related to some peculiarities of the Er segregation during solid phase epitaxial recrystallization were found. They are regarded as peculiar to erbium ion implantation doses higher than the amorphization thresholds. A linear increase of a maximum concentration of electrically active centers and practically constant effective coefficient k of their activation have been observed at the erbium ion implantation doses higher than the amorphization threshold. An increase in the electrically active center concentration gains saturation and k drops at the erbium concentration highe...

  5. Coating of tips for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy by means of silicon, magnesium, and tungsten oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Marco

    2010-09-01

    Different combinations of metal tips and oxide coatings have been tested for possible operation in electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy. Silicon and magnesium oxides have been thermally evaporated onto gold and platinum-iridium tips, respectively. Two different thickness values have been explored for both materials, namely, 40 and 120 nm for silicon oxide and 20 and 60 nm for magnesium oxide. Alternatively, tungsten oxide has been grown on tungsten tips via electrochemical anodization. In the latter case, to seek optimal results we have varied the pH of the anodizing electrolyte between one and four. The oxide coated tips have been first inspected by means of scanning electron microscopy equipped with microanalysis to determine the morphological results of the coating. Second, the coated tips have been electrically characterized ex situ for stability in time by means of cyclic voltammetry in 1 M aqueous KCl supporting electrolyte, both bare and supplemented with K(3)[Fe(CN)(6)] complex at 10 mM concentration in milliQ water as an analyte. Only the tungsten oxide coated tungsten tips have shown stable electrical behavior in the electrolyte. For these tips, the uncoated metal area has been estimated from the electrical current levels, and they have been successfully tested by imaging a gold grating in situ, which provided stable results for several hours. The successful tungsten oxide coating obtained at pH=4 has been assigned to the WO(3) form.

  6. Electrical properties of metal-oxide-semiconductor structures with low-energy Ge-implanted and annealed thin gate oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, E.; Normand, P.; Holliger, P.

    2008-03-01

    The electrical characteristics of low-energy (3keV) Ge-implanted and, subsequently, thermal annealed SiO2 layers are investigated through capacitance-voltage (C-V ) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors. Particular emphasis is placed on the properties of such gate oxides for memory applications. Capacitance measurements at flatband voltage before and after the application of constant voltage stress in the accumulation regime indicate that the charge trapping behavior of the devices undergoes a major change after annealing at temperatures higher than 910°C. The latter change is identified as a relocation of Ge atoms mainly toward the upper portion of the oxide with a significant fraction of them leaving the oxide; a finding in harmony with secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis. The interface trap density (Dit) for the thin (9-12nm) implanted oxides decreases with increasing annealing temperature, approaching at 950°C the Dit levels in the mid-1010eV-1cm-2 range of the nonimplanted samples. At elevated annealing temperatures (>1000°C), the device C-V characteristics are substantially disturbed. In this case, the presence of electrically active Ge atoms at an extended depth in the substrate modifies the intrinsic electrical properties of the n-Si substrate, lending a p-type conductivity character to the device high-frequency C-V curves. Substrate electrical modification is interpreted through a model that takes into account the formation of a SiO2/Ge-rich-Si /n-Si system. The SiO2/Ge-rich-Si interface presents very low Dit levels as revealed by conductance loss characteristics. The present study suggests that a combination of Ge implantation into SiO2 films and thermal annealing may be exploited in damage-free SiGe epitaxial growth technology based on Ge implantation.

  7. Prostaglandin release from rat femurs after implantation of hydroxylapatite and aluminium oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, J M; Wittenberg, R H; Osborn, J F

    1995-12-01

    The bony reaction after implantation of uncemented ceramics is of special interest. Therefore porous and dense hydroxylapatite and aluminium oxide ceramics were implanted in rat femurs. One group received no surgical manipulation and another with a sham procedure where no ceramics were implanted served as controls. After 6 and 10 days the rat femurs were harvested and the release of PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha was measured with specific radioimmunoassays. Decrease in the release of PGE2 from day 6 to day 10 was present in all three implants. In contrast, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha increased from day 6 to day 10. Comparing the ceramic types an increase in 6-keto-PGF1 alpha release was seen in the porous hydroxylapatite group. These prostaglandin (PG) release patterns after ceramic implantation are similar to those of fracture healing, but aluminium oxide seems to be inert, while hydroxylapatite, especially the porous type, stimulates 6-keto-PGF1 alpha release.

  8. Impact of implantation on the properties of N 2O-nitrided oxides of p +- and n +-gate MOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, O. V.; Fomin, B. I.; Sakharova, N. V.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P.

    2009-05-01

    The impact of the gate implantation on properties of N2O-nitrided thermal oxides MOS dielectric layers were evaluated in this study via current-voltage, j-ramp and current-temperature techniques. The data obtained show that implantation with boron of poly-Si gates can result in generation of border traps in oxides. The energy position of traps generated in the oxides after Fowler-Nordheim voltage stress and after hard breakdown treatments were evaluated.

  9. Multifunctional silicon-based light emitting device in standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei; Huang Bei-Ju; Dong Zan; Chen Hong-Da

    2011-01-01

    A three-terminal silicon-based light emitting device is proposed and fabricated in standard 0.35μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. This device is capable of versatile working modes: it can emit visible to near infra-red (NIR) light (the spectrum ranges from 500 nm to 1000 nm) in reverse bias avalanche breakdown mode with working voltage between 8.35 V-12 V and emit NIR light (the spectrum ranges from 900 nm to 1300 nm) in the forward injection mode with working voltage below 2 V. An apparent modulation effect on the light intensity from the polysilicon gate is observed in the forward injection mode. Furthermore, when the gate oxide is broken down, NIR light is emitted from the polysilicon/oxide/silicon structure. Optoelectronic characteristics of the device working in different modes are measured and compared. The mechanisms behind these different emissions are explored.

  10. Memory effects in metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors incorporating dispensed highly monodisperse 1 nm silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Osama M.; Antoniadis, Dimitri A.; Mantey, Kevin; Nayfeh, Munir H.

    2007-04-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors containing various densities of ex situ produced, colloidal, highly monodisperse, spherical, 1nm silicon nanoparticles were fabricated and evaluated for potential use as charge storage elements in future nonvolatile memory devices. The capacitance-voltage characteristics are well behaved and agree with similarly fabricated zero-nanoparticle control samples and with an ideal simulation. Unlike larger particle systems, the demonstrated memory effect exhibits effectively pure hole storage. The nature of charging, hole type versus electron type may be understood in terms of the characteristics of ultrasmall silicon nanoparticles: large energy gap, large charging energy, and consequently a small electron affinity.

  11. Preparation, structural and electrical properties of zinc oxide grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Polycrystalline thick film of zinc oxide (ZnO) is grown on a unique silicon substrate with a hierarchical structure,silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA), by using a vapour phase transport method. It is found that as-grown ZnO film is composed of closely packed ZnO crystallites with an average size of ~10 μm. The film resistivity of ZnO/Siheterostructure is measured. Theoretical analysis shows that the carrier transport across ZnO/Si-NPA heterojunction is dominated by two mechanisms, i.e. a thermionic process at high voltages and a quantum tunnelling process at low voltages.

  12. Participation of oxygen and carbon in formation of oxidation-induced stacking faults in monocrystalline silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Иван Федорович Червоный

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is experimentally established, that density of oxidation-induced stacking faults (OISF in the boron doped monocrystalline silicon plates, that above, than it is more relation of oxygen atoms concentration to carbon atoms concentration in them.On research results of geometry of OISF rings in the different sections of single-crystal geometry of areas is reconstructed with their different closeness. At adjustment of the growing modes of single-crystals of silicon the increase of output of suitable product is observed

  13. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration.

  14. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  15. Influence of Fluorine on the Conductivity and Oxidation of Silicon Nanomembranes after Hydrofluoric Acid Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiang-Fu; HAN Ping; ZHANG Rong; ZHENG You-Dou

    2011-01-01

    @@ After immersion in hydrofluoric acid, the sheet resistance of a 220-nm-thick silicon nanomembrane, measured in dry air by van der Pauw method, drops around two orders of magnitude initially, then increases and reaches the level of a sample with a native oxide surface in about one month.The surface component and oxidation rate are also characterized by x-ray photo electronic spectroscopy measurement.Fluorine is found to play a significant role in improving conductivity and has no apparent influence on the oxidation rate after hydrofluoric acid treatment.

  16. Rate equation modelling of erbium luminescence dynamics in erbium-doped silicon-rich-silicon-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Miraj, E-mail: m.shah@ee.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Wojdak, Maciej; Kenyon, Anthony J. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Halsall, Matthew P.; Li, Hang; Crowe, Iain F. [Photon Science Institute and School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Sackville St Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Erbium doped silicon-rich silica offers broad band and very efficient excitation of erbium photoluminescence (PL) due to a sensitization effect attributed to silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc), which grow during thermal treatment. PL decay lifetime measurements of sensitised Er{sup 3+} ions are usually reported to be stretched or multi exponential, very different to those that are directly excited, which usually show a single exponential decay component. In this paper, we report on SiO{sub 2} thin films doped with Si-nc's and erbium. Time resolved PL measurements reveal two distinct 1.54 {mu}m Er decay components; a fast microsecond component, and a relatively long lifetime component (10 ms). We also study the structural properties of these samples through TEM measurements, and reveal the formation of Er clusters. We propose that these Er clusters are responsible for the fast {mu}s decay component, and we develop rate equation models that reproduce the experimental transient observations, and can explain some of the reported transient behaviour in previously published literature.

  17. Restraint stress alters immune parameters and induces oxidative stress in the mouse uterus during embryo implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guanhui; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2014-12-01

    The influence of stress on embryo implantation is not well understood. Prior studies have focused on later gestational stages and the long-term impact of stress on immune function. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of restraint stress on the immune parameters and the oxidative states of the uterus during implantation. In this study, pregnant CD1 mice were subjected to restraint stress (4 h/d) on embryonic day 1 (E1) and sacrificed on E3, E5, and E7. Maternal plasma corticosterone (CORT) secretion and implantation sites in the uterus were examined. The uterine (excluding embryos) homogenate and uterine lymphocytes were collected to examine oxidative stress states and associated immune parameters. The results demonstrated that restraint stress increased maternal plasma CORT secretion and reduced the number of implantation sites by 15.3% on E5 and by 26.1% on E7. Moreover, restraint stress decreased the density of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in the endometrium by 22.1-47.9% and increased the density of mast cells in the myometrium by 55.6-76.9%. Restraint stress remarkably decreased the CD3(+)CD4(+) T/CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell ratio (by 26.2-28.9%) and attenuated uterine lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of cytokines. In addition, restraint stress threatened the intracellular equilibrium between oxidants and antioxidants, resulting in decreased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) (32.2% and 45.7%), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (15.5% and 26.1%), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) (18.4% and 18.2%) activities and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) (34.4% and 43.0%) contents on E5 and E7. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that restraint stress causes abnormal implantation and negatively impacts immune parameters in association with oxidative stress in mice.

  18. Implante de tubo de silicone com e sem colágeno na regeneração de nervos em eqüinos Implant of silicone tube with or without collagen in nerve regeneration of horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Delistoianov

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A reconstituição cirúrgica de nervos em humanos, em cães e em diversos animais de laboratório é bastante utilizada e tem indicações clínicas e experimentais importantes. No entanto, em eqüinos há poucas informações sobre esta prática. Há relatos sobre a excessiva proliferação de tecido conjuntivo e a formação de neuromas à neurorrafia experimental, mesmo quando se utilizam tubos de silicone para condução do crescimento axonal. O presente estudo teve o objetivo de acrescentar informações sobre o processo de reparação de nervos periféricos em eqüinos por meio de implante de tubo de silicone preenchido ou não com colágeno. Para tanto, foram utilizados oito eqüinos, alocados em dois grupos: GI-13 semanas e GII-26 semanas de observação. Foi realizada secção dos nervos ulnares (NUs e dos ramos cutâneos laterais dos 17° nervos torácicos (NTs, bilateralmente, seguindo tubulização, realizada em cada animal, alternando-se tubos de silicone vazios (TS, em um dos antímeros, ou preenchidos com solução de colágeno (TSC, no contralateral, deixando-se um espaço de 5mm entre os cotos. Nenhuma alteração foi encontrada ao exame do aparelho locomotor e as primeiras reações positivas ao teste de sensibilidade cutânea nos NUs e NTs com TS e TSC foram observadas a partir da 9ª semana, em ambos os grupos. Ao final do período de observação, verificou-se, macroscopicamente, que os nervos encontravam-se envolvidos por tecido conjuntivo e o interior da câmara estava preenchido por tecido de coloração esbranquiçada, de forma cilíndrica, interligando os cotos proximal e distal. Microscopicamente, constatou-se a presença de axônios mielinizados interligando os cotos, as células de Schwann e o processo de remielinização do coto distal, principalmente no TSC. Em ambos os grupos, não houve formação de neuromas e o processo inflamatório limitou-se às áreas perineurais. Concluiu-se que o implante de tubo de

  19. X-ray diffuse scattering investigation of defects in ion implanted and annealed silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.H.; Patel, J.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Beck, U.; Metzger, T.H. [Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Sektion Physik

    1998-12-31

    To characterize the point defects and point defect clusters introduced by ion implantation and annealing, the authors have used grazing incidence x-rays to measure the diffuse scattering in the tails of Bragg peaks (Huang Scattering). An analysis of the diffuse scattered intensity will allow the authors to characterize the nature of point defects or defect clusters introduced by ion implantation. They have also observed unexpected satellite peaks in the diffuse scattering tails. Possible causes for the occurrence of the peaks will be discussed.

  20. Activation of arsenic-implanted silicon using an incoherent light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R. A.; Yep, T. O.; Fulks, R. T.

    1981-07-01

    We report that continuous, incoherent light from a xenon arc lamp can be used to completely activate implanted Si (100) samples (75As+:100 keV, 1×1015 cm-2) with negligible dopant redistribution and excellent uniformity (sheet resistivity variation less than ±2% over a 3-in.-diam wafer). An entire 3-in. wafer could be activated in only about 10 sec without relative motion of wafer and light beam. The extent to which implant damage was removed by the incoherent light anneal is qualitatively indicated by the carrier mobilities which were within 10% of single-crystal values.

  1. Rehabilitation of orbital defect with silicone orbital prosthesis retained by dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Desai, Jhanvi; Kudva, Adarsh; Patil, Basavaraj R

    2016-01-01

    Orbital defects can result from cancer, birth anomalies, or trauma leading to an onslaught of problems in the function and psyche of the patient. These defects are restored by surgical reconstruction and followed by placement of orbital prosthesis for cosmetic makeup. The use of dental implants in retaining orbital prosthesis improves patient acceptance of the prosthesis owing to better retention and stability than conventional adhesive retained prosthesis. This case report describes a custom-made magnetic retentive assembly anchored by a dental implant which offers the orbital prosthesis the simplicity of self-alignment and ease of use. PMID:26953033

  2. Rehabilitation of orbital defect with silicone orbital prosthesis retained by dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Desai, Jhanvi; Kudva, Adarsh; Patil, Basavaraj R

    2016-01-01

    Orbital defects can result from cancer, birth anomalies, or trauma leading to an onslaught of problems in the function and psyche of the patient. These defects are restored by surgical reconstruction and followed by placement of orbital prosthesis for cosmetic makeup. The use of dental implants in retaining orbital prosthesis improves patient acceptance of the prosthesis owing to better retention and stability than conventional adhesive retained prosthesis. This case report describes a custom-made magnetic retentive assembly anchored by a dental implant which offers the orbital prosthesis the simplicity of self-alignment and ease of use.

  3. Lattice location and thermal stability of implanted nickel in silicon studied by on-line emission channeling

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel José; Correia, Joaõ Guilherme; Pereira, Lino Miguel da Costa; Amorim, Lígia Marina; da Silva, Manuel Ribeiro; David-Bosne, Eric; Araújo, João Pedro

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the lattice location of implanted nickel in silicon, for different doping types (n, n$^{+}$ and p$^{+}$). By means of on-line emission channeling, $^{65}$Ni was identified on three different sites of the diamond lattice: ideal substitutional sites, displaced bond-center towards substitutional sites (near-BC) and displaced tetrahedral interstitial towards anti-bonding sites (near-T). We suggest that the large majority of the observed lattice sites are not related to the isolated form of Ni but rather to its trapping into vacancy-related defects produced during the implantation. While near-BC sites are prominent after annealing up to 300-500°C, near-T sites are preferred after 500-600°C anneals. Long-range diffusion starts at 600-700°C. We show evidence of Ni diffusion towards the surface and its further trapping on near-T sites at the R$_p$/2 region, providing a clear picture of the microscopic mechanism of Ni gettering by vacancy-type defects. The high thermal stability of near-BC sites in ...

  4. Gettering of diffused Au and of Cu and Ni contamination in silicon by cavities induced by high energy He implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouayadi, R. el; Regula, G.; Pichaud, B.; Lancin, M. [Faculte des Sciences et Techniques de St Jerome, Marseille (France). Lab. TECSEN; Dubois, C.; Ntsoenzok, E.

    2000-11-01

    Silicon samples were gold-diffused at different temperatures (870-950 C) and implanted with He ions at 1.6 MeV and fluences ranging from 2 x 10{sup 16} up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The implantation induced defects observed by conventional and high resolution cross section electron microscopy were found to be essentially cavities 10 to 100 nm in size which are faceted mainly along {l_brace}111{r_brace}, but also along {l_brace}110{r_brace} and {l_brace}100{r_brace} planes. The cavities are located at the sample depth predicted by the transport range of ions in matter simulation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles exhibit a shouldered shape with a maximum at the projected range. They demonstrate that the cavities are very efficient sinks for Au atoms; the shoulder of the profile could be related to the presence of smaller cavities and dislocations in the vicinity of the projected range. Gold concentration in the cavity area was below the detection limit of the energy dispersive spectroscopy technique, but both Cu and Ni contamination gave rise to silicides and could be chemically analysed. Cu{sub 3}Si precipitates have grown in cavities as already reported in the literature, while NiSi{sub 2} precipitates were observed for the first time in cavities. (orig.)

  5. Effect of insertion speed on tissue response and insertion mechanics of a chronically implanted silicon-based neural probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welkenhuysen, M; Andrei, A; Ameye, L; Eberle, W; Nuttin, B

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the effect of insertion speed on long-term tissue response and insertion mechanics was investigated. A dummy silicon parylene-coated probe was used in this context and implanted in the rat brain at 10 μm/s (n = 6) or 100 μm/s (n = 6) to a depth of 9 mm. The insertion mechanics were assessed by the dimpling distance, and the force at the point of penetration, at the end of the insertion phase, and after a 3-min rest period in the brain. After 6 weeks, the tissue response was evaluated by estimating the amount of gliosis, inflammation, and neuronal cell loss with immunohistochemistry. No difference in dimpling, penetration force, or the force after a 3-min rest period in the brain was observed. However, the force at the end of the insertion phase was significantly higher when inserting the probes at 100 μm/s compared to 10 μm/s. Furthermore, an expected tissue response was seen with an increase of glial and microglial reactivity around the probe. This reaction was similar along the entire length of the probe. However, evidence for a neuronal kill zone was observed only in the most superficial part of the implant. In this region, the lesion size was also greatest. Comparison of the tissue response between insertion speeds showed no differences.

  6. Gentamicin coating of plasma chemical oxidized titanium alloy prevents implant-related osteomyelitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbeck, M; Schrader, C; Gras, F; Mückley, T; Schmidt, J; Zankovych, S; Bossert, J; Jandt, K D; Völpel, A; Sigusch, B W; Schubert, H; Bischoff, S; Pfister, W; Edel, B; Faucon, M; Finger, U

    2016-09-01

    Implant related infection is one of the most feared and devastating complication associated with the use of orthopaedic implant devices. Development of anti-infective surfaces is the main strategy to prevent implant contamination, biofilm formation and implant related osteomyelitis. A second concern in orthopaedics is insufficient osseointegration of uncemented implant devices. Recently, we reported on a macroporous titanium-oxide surface (bioactive TiOB) which increases osseointegration and implant fixation. To combine enhanced osseointegration and antibacterial function, the TiOB surfaces were, in addition, modified with a gentamicin coating. A rat osteomyelitis model with bilateral placement of titanium alloy implants was employed to analyse the prophylactic effect of gentamicin-sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) and gentamicin-tannic acid coatings in vivo. 20 rats were randomly assigned to four groups: (A) titanium alloy; PBS inoculum (negative control), (B) titanium alloy, Staphylococcus aureus inoculum (positive control), (C) bioactive TiOB with gentamicin-SDS and (D) bioactive TiOB plus gentamicin-tannic acid coating. Contamination of implants, bacterial load of bone powder and radiographic as well as histological signs of implant-related osteomyelitis were evaluated after four weeks. Gentamicin-SDS coating prevented implant contamination in 10 of 10 tibiae and gentamicin-tannic acid coating in 9 of 10 tibiae (infection prophylaxis rate 100% and 90% of cases, respectively). In Group (D) one implant showed colonisation of bacteria (swab of entry point and roll-out test positive for S. aureus). The interobserver reliability showed no difference in the histologic and radiographic osteomyelitis scores. In both gentamicin coated groups, a significant reduction of the histological osteomyelitis score (geometric mean values: C = 0.111 ± 0.023; D = 0.056 ± 0.006) compared to the positive control group (B: 0.244 ± 0.015; p < 0.05) was observed. The

  7. Fabrication of Ultrathin SiO2 Gate Dielectric by Direct Nitrogen Implantation into Silicon Substrate%硅衬底注氮方法制备超薄SiO2栅介质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓燕; 程行之; 黄如; 张兴

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen implantation in silicon substrate at fixed energy of 35keV and split dose of 1014~5×1014cm-2 is performed before gate oxidation.The experiment results indicate that with the increasing of implantation dose of nitrogen,oxidation rate of gate decreases.The retardation in oxide growth is weakened due to thermal annealing after nitrogen implantation.After nitrogen is implanted at the dose of 2×1014cm-2,initial O2 injection method which is composed of an O2 injection/N2 annealing/main oxidation,is applied for preparation of 3.4nm gate oxide.Compared with the control process,which is composed of N2 annealing/main oxidation,initial O2 injection process suppresses leakage current of the gate oxide.But Qbd and HF C-V characteristics are almost identical for the samples fabricated by two different oxidation processes.%利用栅氧化前在硅衬底内注氮可抑制氧化速率的方法,制得3.4nm厚的SiO2栅介质,并将其应用于MOS电容样品的制备.研究了N+注入后在Si/SiO2中的分布及热退火对该分布的影响;考察了不同注氮剂量对栅氧化速率的影响.对MOS电容样品的I-V特性,恒流应力下的Qbd,SILC及C-V特性进行了测试,分析了不同氧化工艺条件下栅介质的性能.实验结果表明:注氮后的热退火过程会使氮在Si/SiO2界面堆积;硅衬底内注入的氮的剂量越大,对氧化速率的抑制作用越明显;高温栅氧化前进行低温预氧化的注氮样品较不进行该工艺步骤的注氮样品具有更低的低场漏电流和更小的SILC电流密度,但二者恒流应力下的Qbd值及高频C-V特性相近.

  8. Synthesis, crystal growth and mechanical properties of Bismuth Silicon Oxide (BSO) single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riscob, B. [CSIR – National Physical Laboratory, Crystal Growth and X-ray Analysis, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India); Shkir, Mohd. [CSIR – National Physical Laboratory, Crystal Growth and X-ray Analysis, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Ganesh, V. [Department of Physics, Kakatiya University, Warangal 506 009 (India); Vijayan, N.; Maurya, K.K. [CSIR – National Physical Laboratory, Crystal Growth and X-ray Analysis, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Kishan Rao, K. [Department of Physics, Kakatiya University, Warangal 506 009 (India); Bhagavannarayana, G., E-mail: bhagavan@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [CSIR – National Physical Laboratory, Crystal Growth and X-ray Analysis, New Delhi 110 012 (India)

    2014-03-05

    Highlights: • Synthesis of Bismuth Silicon Oxide (BSO). • Single crystal growth of BSO by Czochralski (Cz) method. • Complete mechanical analysis by device fabrication point of view. • Theoretical and experimental calculations of mechanical properties. -- Abstract: Bismuth Silicon Oxide (BSO) is an efficient material for piezo-electric and electro-optic applications. In this article, growth of BSO single crystal by high temperature Czochralski melt growth technique and its detailed mechanical characterization by Vickers microhardness, fracture toughness, crack propagation, brittleness index and yield strength have been reported. The raw material was synthesized by solid state reaction using the stoichiometric ratio of high purity bismuth tri-oxide and silicon di-oxide. The synthesized material was charged in the platinum crucible and then melted. The required rotation and pulling rate was optimized for BSO single crystal growth and good quality single crystal has been harvested after a time span of 5 days. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the parent crystallization phase of BSO. The experimentally studied mechanical behavior of the crystal is explained using various theoretical models. The anisotropic nature of the crystals is studied using Knoop indentation technique.

  9. Characterization of Transition Metal Oxide/Silicon Heterojunctions for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Gerling

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, transition metal oxides have been actively investigated as hole- and electron-selective materials in organic electronics due to their low-cost processing. In this study, four transition metal oxides (V2O5, MoO3, WO3, and ReO3 with high work functions (>5 eV were thermally evaporated as front p-type contacts in planar n-type crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. The concentration of oxygen vacancies in MoO3−x was found to be dependent on film thickness and redox conditions, as determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Transfer length method measurements of oxide films deposited on glass yielded high sheet resistances (~109 Ω/sq, although lower values (~104 Ω/sq were measured for oxides deposited on silicon, indicating the presence of an inversion (hole rich layer. Of the four oxide/silicon solar cells, ReO3 was found to be unstable upon air exposure, while V2O5 achieved the highest open-circuit voltage (593 mV and conversion efficiency (12.7%, followed by MoO3 (581 mV, 12.6% and WO3 (570 mV, 11.8%. A short-circuit current gain of ~0.5 mA/cm2 was obtained when compared to a reference amorphous silicon contact, as expected from a wider energy bandgap. Overall, these results support the viability of a simplified solar cell design, processed at low temperature and without dopants.

  10. The evolution of the fraction of Er ions sensitized by Si nanostructures in silicon-rich silicon oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noe, P; Okuno, H; Jager, J-B; Delamadeleine, E; Demichel, O; Rouviere, J-L; Calvo, V [INAC/SP2M, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique-MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Maurizio, C; D' Acapito, F [CNR-INFM-OGG c/o ESRF, GILDA-CRG, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2009-09-02

    Photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL experiments as a function of the elaboration process are performed on Er-doped silicon-rich silicon oxide (SRO:Er) thin films grown under NH{sub 3} atmosphere. These PL measurements of the Er{sup 3+} emission at 1.54 {mu}m under non-resonant pumping with the Er f-f transitions are obtained for different Er{sup 3+} concentrations, ranging from 0.05 to 1.4 at.%, and various post-growth annealing temperatures of the layers. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis show a high density of Si nanostructures composed of amorphous and crystalline nanoclusters varying from 2.7 x 10{sup 18} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} as a function of the post-growth annealing temperature. Measurements of PL lifetime and effective Er excitation cross section for all the samples under non-resonant optical excitation with the Er{sup 3+} atomic energy levels show that the number of Er{sup 3+} ions sensitized by the silicon-rich matrix decreases as the annealing temperature is increased from 500 to 1050 {sup 0}C. The origin of this effect is attributed to the reduction of the density of sensitizers for Er ions in the SRO matrix when the annealing temperature increases. Finally, extended x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) shows a strong correlation between the number of emitters and the mean local order around the erbium ions.

  11. Electrical Activation Studies of Silicon Implanted Aluminum Gallium Nitride with High Aluminum Mole Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    important to minimize imperfections and defects as well as the amount of unwanted impurities. The most common bulk method is the Czochralski Method , in...demonstrates a method for producing highly conductive Si- implanted n-type aluminum gallium nitride (AlxGa1-xN) alloys, and represents a comprehensive...54 IV. Experimental Method ..................................................................................... 57 Sample

  12. Hydrogen- and helium-implanted silicon: Low-temperature positron-lifetime studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkinen, S.; Rajainmäki, H.; Linderoth, Søren

    1991-01-01

    in Si. The results have been compared with those of proton-irradiated Si. A 100–300-K annealing stage was clearly observed in hydrogen (H+) -implanted Si, and this stage was almost identical to that in the p-irradiated Si. The final annealing state of the H+-implanted Si started at about 400 K......High-purity single-crystal samples of float-zoned Si have been implanted with 6.95-MeV protons and with 25-MeV 3He2 ions at 15 K, and the positron-lifetime technique has been used to identify the defects created in the samples, and to study the effects of H and He on the annealing of point defects......, and it is connected to annealing out of negatively charged divacancy-oxygen pairs. This stage was clearly longer than that for the p-irradiated Si, probably due to the breakup of Si-H bonds at about 550 K. The 100-K annealing stage was not seen with the He-implanted samples. This has been explained by assuming...

  13. Design and fabrication of stiff silicon probes: A step towards sophisticated cochlear implant electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawand, N.S.; French, P.J.; Briare, J.J.; Frijns, J.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implants work on the principle of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. It has advantages to replace their traditional wired electrodes by a high-density thin-film multielectrode stimulation array which is relatively small in dimensions, stable, resistant to electrolysis, and

  14. Microcrystalline silicon oxides for silicon-based solar cells: impact of the O/Si ratio on the electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, M.; Starr, D. E.; Lambertz, A.; Holländer, B.; Alsmeier, J.-H.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Gorgoi, M.; Yang, W.; Wilks, R. G.; Heske, C.

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon oxide (μc-SiOx:H) layers are one alternative approach to ensure sufficient interlayer charge transport while maintaining high transparency and good passivation in Si-based solar cells. We have used a combination of complementary x-ray and electron spectroscopies to study the chemical and electronic structure of the (μc-SiOx:H) material system. With these techniques, we monitor the transition from a purely Si-based crystalline bonding network to a silicon oxide dominated environment, coinciding with a significant decrease of the material's conductivity. Most Si-based solar cell structures contain emitter/contact/passivation layers. Ideally, these layers fulfill their desired task (i.e., induce a sufficiently high internal electric field, ensure a good electric contact, and passivate the interfaces of the absorber) without absorbing light. Usually this leads to a trade-off in which a higher transparency can only be realized at the expense of the layer's ability to properly fulfill its task. One alternative approach is to use hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon oxide (μc-SiOx:H), a mixture of microcrystalline silicon and amorphous silicon (sub)oxide. The crystalline Si regions allow charge transport, while the oxide matrix maintains a high transparency. To date, it is still unclear how in detail the oxygen content influences the electronic structure of the μc-SiOx:H mixed phase material. To address this question, we have studied the chemical and electronic structure of the μc-SiOx:H (0 0.5, we observe a pronounced decrease of Si 3s - Si 3p hybridization in favor of Si 3p - O 2p hybridization in the upper valence band. This coincides with a significant increase of the material's resistivity, possibly indicating the breakdown of the conducting crystalline Si network. Silicon oxide layers with a thickness of several hundred nanometres were deposited in a PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition) multi chamber system

  15. 信息动态%Surface Oxidation and Photoluminescence Properties of Silicon Nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The silicon nanoparticle have been grown by radio-frequency plasmas-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique and the photoluminescence (PL) of the silicon suspension have been studied by both steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectra. The steady-state PL spectra of the silicon suspension show that a blue PL band around 440 nm is found for the as-prepared silicon suspension emits. An increase of the intensity for the blue band around 440 nm followed by a red photoluminescence centered at 750nm after storing the suspension for two months. The steady-state PL spectra excited by different wavelength and time-resolved PL spectra of the samples demonstrate that the blue PL band with a delaytime of nanosecond order is caused by the band-to-band recombination in Si nanocrystals. The oxidation of the silicon nanoparticle causes the decaytime increasing. The red PL band originates from radiation recombination of carries via defect/surface-related states and the delay-time of which is on the order of microsecond.

  16. Effect of silicon on oxidation of Ni-15Al alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; NIU Yan; WU Wei-tao

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation of binary Ni-Al alloy containing 15% (mole fraction, the same below if not mentioned)Al (Ni-15Al), and of a ternary alloy with the same Al content but also containing 4% Si (Ni-4Si-15Al) has been studied at 1 000 ℃ under 1.0× 105Pa O2 to examine the effect of the addition of Si on the oxidation of Ni-15Al. Oxidation of Ni-15Al produces a duplex scale composed of an outer NiO layer and an inner layer riched in Al2O3. On the contrary, Ni-4Si-15Al forms an external alumina layer directly in contact with the alloy presenting only trace of NiO and the Ni-Al spinel. As a result, the kinetics of Ni-15Al shows a fast initial stage followed by two subsequent parabolic stages with decreasing rate constants, while Ni-4Si-15Al presents essentially a single nearly-parabolic behavior with a rate constant similar to that of the final stage of Ni-15Al. Therefore, the addition of 4% Si significantly reduces the oxidation rate during the initial stage by preventing the formation of Ni-riched scales and promoting an earlier development of an exclusive external alumina layer on the alloy surface.

  17. Thermal oxidation of silicon in a residual oxygen atmosphere—the RESOX process—for self-limiting growth of thin silicon dioxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jason T.; Carbaugh, Daniel J.; Haggerty, Morgan E.; Richard, Andrea L.; Ingram, David C.; Kaya, Savas; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M.; Rahman, Faiz

    2016-10-01

    We describe in detail the growth procedures and properties of thermal silicon dioxide grown in a limited and dilute oxygen atmosphere. Thin thermal oxide films have become increasingly important in recent years due to the continuing down-scaling of ultra large scale integration metal oxide silicon field effect transistors. Such films are also of importance for organic transistors where back-gating is needed. The technique described here is novel and allows self-limited formation of high quality thin oxide films on silicon surfaces. This technique is easy to implement in both research laboratory and industrial settings. Growth conditions and their effects on film growth have been described. Properties of the resulting oxide films, relevant for microelectronic device applications, have also been investigated and reported here. Overall, our findings are that thin, high quality, dense silicon dioxide films of thicknesses up to 100 nm can be easily grown in a depleted oxygen environment at temperatures similar to that used for usual silicon dioxide thermal growth in flowing dry oxygen.

  18. High-stability transparent amorphous oxide TFT with a silicon-doped back-channel layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung-Rae; Park, Jea-Gun

    2014-10-01

    We significantly reduced various electrical instabilities of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) by using the co-deposition of silicon on an a-IGZO back channel. This process showed improved stability of the threshold voltage ( V th ) under high temperature and humidity and negative gate-bias illumination stress (NBIS) without any reduction of IDS. The enhanced stability was achieved with silicon, which has higher metal-oxide bonding strengths than gallium does. Additionally, SiO X distributed on the a-IGZO surface reduced the adsorption and the desorption of H2O and O2. This process is applicable to the TFT manufacturing process with a variable sputtering target.

  19. Aminosilane functionalizations of mesoporous oxidized silicon for oligonucleotide synthesis and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Luca; Oliviero, Giorgia; Amato, Jussara; Borbone, Nicola; Piccialli, Gennaro; Mayol, Luciano; Rendina, Ivo; Terracciano, Monica; Rea, Ilaria

    2013-06-06

    Direct solid phase synthesis of peptides and oligonucleotides (ONs) requires high chemical stability of the support material. In this work, we have investigated the passivation ability of porous oxidized silicon multilayered structures by two aminosilane compounds, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane (APDMES), for optical label-free ON biosensor fabrication. We have also studied by spectroscopic reflectometry the hybridization between a 13 bases ON, directly grown on the aminosilane modified porous oxidized silicon by in situ synthesis, and its complementary sequence. Even if the results show that both devices are stable to the chemicals (carbonate/methanol) used, the porous silica structure passivated by APDMES reveals higher functionalization degree due to less steric hindrance of pores.

  20. Characterization of highly hydrophobic coatings deposited onto pre-oxidized silicon from water dispersible organosilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almanza-Workman, A. Marcia; Raghavan, Srini; Petrovic, Slobodan; Gogoi, Bishnu; Deymier, Pierre; Monk, David J.; Roop, Ray

    2003-01-01

    The formation and quality of highly hydrophobic coatings deposited from water dispersible organosilanes onto pre-oxidized single crystal silicon were studied using atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, dynamic contact angle measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Highly hydrophobic films of a commercially available water dispersible silane and two different cationic alkoxysilanes were prepared by dip coating. It was found using atomic force microscopy that, in general, the structure of these highly hydrophobic films is a continuous film with some particulates attributed to bulk polymerization of the precursor molecule in water. Film defects were quantified using EIS by the value of charge transfer resistance at the hydrofluoric acid/silicon interface. Potential applications of this type of coatings include reduction/elimination of stiction in micro-electromechanical systems, contact printing in materials microfabrication, inhibition of corrosion and oxidation, prevention of water wetting, lubrication and protein adsorption.

  1. Silicon based solar cells using a multilayer oxide as emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie; Wu, Weiliang; Liu, Zongtao; Shen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    In this work, n-type silicon based solar cells with WO3/Ag/WO3 multilayer films as emitter (WAW/n-Si solar cells) were presented via simple physical vapor deposition (PVD). Microstructure and composition of WAW/n-Si solar cells were studied by TEM and XPS, respectively. Furthermore, the dependence of the solar cells performances on each WO3 layer thickness was investigated. The results indicated that the bottom WO3 layer mainly induced band bending and facilitated charge-carriers separation, while the top WO3 layer degraded open-circuit voltage but actually improved optical absorption of the solar cells. The WAW/n-Si solar cells, with optimized bottom and top WO3 layer thicknesses, exhibited 5.21% efficiency on polished wafer with area of 4 cm2 under AM 1.5 condition (25 °C and 100 mW/cm2). Compared with WO3 single-layer film, WAW multilayer films demonstrated better surface passivation quality but more optical loss, while the optical loss could be effectively reduced by implementing light-trapping structures. These results pave a new way for dopant-free solar cells in terms of low-cost and facile process flow.

  2. Silicon based solar cells using a multilayer oxide as emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Bao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, n-type silicon based solar cells with WO3/Ag/WO3 multilayer films as emitter (WAW/n-Si solar cells were presented via simple physical vapor deposition (PVD. Microstructure and composition of WAW/n-Si solar cells were studied by TEM and XPS, respectively. Furthermore, the dependence of the solar cells performances on each WO3 layer thickness was investigated. The results indicated that the bottom WO3 layer mainly induced band bending and facilitated charge-carriers separation, while the top WO3 layer degraded open-circuit voltage but actually improved optical absorption of the solar cells. The WAW/n-Si solar cells, with optimized bottom and top WO3 layer thicknesses, exhibited 5.21% efficiency on polished wafer with area of 4 cm2 under AM 1.5 condition (25 °C and 100 mW/cm2. Compared with WO3 single-layer film, WAW multilayer films demonstrated better surface passivation quality but more optical loss, while the optical loss could be effectively reduced by implementing light-trapping structures. These results pave a new way for dopant-free solar cells in terms of low-cost and facile process flow.

  3. Porous Spherical Cellulose Composites Coated by Aluminum (Ⅲ) Oxide and Silicone: Preparation,Characterization and Adsorption Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Porous spherical cellulose composite (PSCA) coated by aluminum (Ⅲ) oxide was prepared andmodified by organosilicone. SEM images of the surface morphology of the bead cellulose shows that it hasspherical shape and abundant porous structure on its surface. The mapping images of aluminum and silicon ofthe composite (PSCAS) present aluminum( Ⅲ ) oxide and silicone are uniformly dispersed on the surface. Theadsorption behavior of PSCAS toward metal ions was determined.

  4. ELLIPSOMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE SILICON / ANODIC-OXIDE INTERFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Palik, E.; Bermudez, V.

    1983-01-01

    Ellipsometric measurements have been carried out during growth and etch back of anodic oxides on Si in 2M KOH. Pronounced variations in ψ and Ɗ occur as etching proceeds through the SiO2/Si interface and also during the initial stages of re-anodization. The results are interpreted in terms of changes in the stoichiometry and thickness of an SiOx (0⩽x⩽2) connective layer.

  5. Mechanical anomaly impact on metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors on flexible silicon fabric

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.

    2014-06-09

    We report the impact of mechanical anomaly on high-κ/metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors built on flexible silicon (100) fabric. The mechanical tests include studying the effect of bending radius up to 5 mm minimum bending radius with respect to breakdown voltage and leakage current of the devices. We also report the effect of continuous mechanical stress on the breakdown voltage over extended periods of times.

  6. Single crystals of bismuth silicon oxide grown by the Czochralski technique and their characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREJA VALCIC

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of Bi12SiO20 were grown by the Czochralski technique. The critical diameter and the critical rate of rotation were calculated. Suitable polishing and etching solutions were determined. X-Ray measurements were performed on powdered samples to obtain the lattice parameters. The optical properties of the bismuth silicon oxide single crystals were investigated. The obtained results are discussed and compared with published data.

  7. Cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of swift ion irradiation modified zinc oxide-porous silicon nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Yogesh [CIICAp, UAEM, Av. Univ. 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuer., Mor., C.P. 62209 (Mexico); CIMAV, Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Compl. Indus. Chih., Chih., C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Herrera, Manuel [CNyN-UNAM, Ensenada Apdo. Postal 14, CP. 22800, Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelarator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India); Olive-Mendez, S.F. [CIMAV, Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Compl. Indus. Chih., Chih., C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Kanjilal, D.; Kumar, Shiv [Inter University Accelarator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India); Agarwal, V., E-mail: vagarwal@uaem.mx [CIICAp, UAEM, Av. Univ. 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuer., Mor., C.P. 62209 (Mexico)

    2012-09-20

    We report the room temperature cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of swift ion irradiated (130 MeV Nickel ion) porous silicon zinc oxide nanocomposites. The evolution of a broad and flat emission band from 1.5 to 3.5 eV is demonstrated. Annealing effect of irradiation is found to result in a relative increase in the band edge emission. Emission wavelength can be tuned in the complete visible range by changing the substrate characteristics.

  8. Silicon oxide based high capacity anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbong; Masarapu, Charan; Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Lopez, Herman A.; Kumar, Sujeet

    2017-03-21

    Silicon oxide based materials, including composites with various electrical conductive compositions, are formulated into desirable anodes. The anodes can be effectively combined into lithium ion batteries with high capacity cathode materials. In some formulations, supplemental lithium can be used to stabilize cycling as well as to reduce effects of first cycle irreversible capacity loss. Batteries are described with surprisingly good cycling properties with good specific capacities with respect to both cathode active weights and anode active weights.

  9. Scalable Preparation of Ternary Hierarchical Silicon Oxide-Nickel-Graphite Composites for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Bao, Wurigumula; Ma, Lu; Tan, Guoqiang; Su, Yuefeng; Chen, Shi; Wu, Feng; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-12-07

    Silicon monoxide is a promising anode candidate because of its high theoretical capacity and good cycle performance. To solve the problems associated with this material, including large volume changes during charge-discharge processes, we report a ternary hierarchical silicon oxide-nickel-graphite composite prepared by a facile two-step ball-milling method. The composite consists of nano-Si dispersed silicon oxides embedded in nano-Ni/graphite matrices (Si@SiOx /Ni/graphite). In the composite, crystalline nano-Si particles are generated by the mechanochemical reduction of SiO by ball milling with Ni. These nano-Si dispersed oxides have abundant electrochemical activity and can provide high Li-ion storage capacity. Furthermore, the milled nano-Ni/graphite matrices stick well to active materials and interconnect to form a crosslinked framework, which functions as an electrical highway and a mechanical backbone so that all silicon oxide particles become electrochemically active. Owing to these advanced structural and electrochemical characteristics, the composite enhances the utilization efficiency of SiO, accommodates its large volume expansion upon cycling, and has good ionic and electronic conductivity. The composite electrodes thus exhibit substantial improvements in electrochemical performance. This ternary hierarchical Si@SiOx /Ni/graphite composite is a promising candidate anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries. Additionally, the mechanochemical ball-milling method is low cost and easy to reproduce, indicating potential for the commercial production of the composite materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Specific features of the current–voltage characteristics of SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC MIS structures with phosphorus implanted into silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhaylova, A. I., E-mail: m.aleksey.spb@gmail.com; Afanasyev, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Luchinin, V. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University LETI (Russian Federation); Sledziewski, T. [Friedrich–Alexander–Universität Erlangen–Nürnberg (Germany); Reshanov, S. A.; Schöner, A. [Ascatron AB (Sweden); Krieger, M. [Friedrich–Alexander–Universität Erlangen–Nürnberg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of phosphorus implantation into a 4H-SiC epitaxial layer immediately before the thermal growth of a gate insulator in an atmosphere of dry oxygen on the reliability of the gate insulator is studied. It is found that, together with passivating surface states, the introduction of phosphorus ions leads to insignificant weakening of the dielectric breakdown field and to a decrease in the height of the energy barrier between silicon carbide and the insulator, which is due to the presence of phosphorus atoms at the 4H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface and in the bulk of silicon dioxide.

  11. High precision measurements of arsenic and phosphorous implantation dose in silicon by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Chi, P H; McKinley, J M; Stevie, F A; Granger, C N

    2002-01-01

    The metrology section of the 1999 International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors specifies in-line dopant profile concentration precision requirements ranging from a value of 5% in 1999 to a value of 2% in 2008. These values are to be accomplished with ''low systematic error.'' Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has demonstrated the capability to meet these requirements for B, As, and P. However, the detailed analytical protocols required to achieve these goals have not been completely specified. This article reports the parameters that must be controlled to make highly repeatable dose measurements of As and P implants in Si with magnetic sector SIMS instruments. Instrument conditions that were investigated include analytical species, matrix ion species, energy bandpass, and sample holder design. With optimized settings, we demonstrate the ability to distinguish As or P implant doses differing by 5%.

  12. Solution titration by wall deprotonation during capillary filling of silicon oxide nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Kjeld G H; Hoang, T Hanh; Floris, Jan; de Vries, Jeroen; Tas, Niels R; Eijkel, Jan C T; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a fundamental challenge when using silicon oxide nanochannels for analytical systems, namely the occurrence of a strong proton release or proton uptake from the walls in any transient situation such as channel filling. Experimentally, when fluorescein solutions were introduced into silicon oxide nanochannels through capillary pressure, a distinct bisection of the fluorescence was observed, the zone of the fluid near the entrance fluoresced, while the zone near the meniscus, was dark. The ratio between the zones was found to be constant in time and to depend on ionic strength, pH, and the presence of a buffer and its characteristics. Theoretically, using the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of the electrochemical double layer, we demonstrate that this phenomenon can be effectively modeled as a titration of the solution by protons released from silanol groups on the walls, as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the introduced solution. The results demonstrate the dominant influence of the surface on the fluid composition in nanofluidic experiments, in transient situations such as filling, and changes in solvent properties such as the pH or ionic strength. The implications of these fundamental properties of silicon oxide nanochannels are important for analytical strategies and in particular the analysis of complex biological samples.

  13. Thermal annealing of thin PECVD silicon-oxide films for airgap-based optical filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, M.; de Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the mechanical and optical properties of thin PECVD silicon-oxide layers for optical applications. The different deposition parameters in PECVD provide a promising tool to manipulate and control the film structure. Membranes for use in optical filters typically are of ~λ/4n thickness and should be slightly tensile for remaining flat, thus avoiding scattering. The effect of the thermal budget of the process on the mechanical characteristics of the deposited films was studied. Films with compressive stress ranging from  -100 to 0 MPa were deposited. Multiple thermal annealing cycles were applied to wafers and the in situ residual stress and ex situ optical properties were measured. The residual stress in the films was found to be highly temperature dependent. Annealing during the subsequent process steps results in tensile stress from 100 to 300 MPa in sub-micron thick PECVD silicon-oxide films. However, sub-100 nm thick PECVD silicon-oxide layers exhibit a lower dependence on the thermal annealing cycles, resulting in lower stress variations in films after the annealing. It is also shown that the coefficient of thermal expansion, hence the residual stress in layers, varies with the thickness. Finally, several free-standing membranes were fabricated and the results are compared.

  14. Tuning Oleophobicity of Silicon Oxide Surfaces with Mixed Monolayers of Aliphatic and Fluorinated Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-12-13

    We demonstrate the formation of mixed monolayers derived from a microwave-assisted reaction of alcohols with silicon oxide surfaces in order to tune their surface oleophobicity. This simple, rapid method provides an opportunity to precisely tune the constituents of the monolayers. As a demonstration, we sought fluorinated alcohols and aliphatic alcohols as reagents to form monolayers from two distinct constituents for tuning the surface oleophobicity. The first aspect of this study sought to identify a fluorinated alcohol that formed monolayers with a relatively high surface coverage. It was determined that 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-1-octanol yielded high quality monolayers with a water contact angle (WCA) value of ∼110° and contact angle values of ∼80° with toluene and hexadecane exhibiting both an excellent hydrophobicity and oleophobicity. Tuning of the oleophobicity of the modified silicon oxide surfaces was achieved by controlling the molar ratio of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-1-octanol within the reaction mixtures. Surface oleophobicity progressively decreased with a decrease in the fluorinated alcohol content while the monolayers maintained their hydrophobicity with WCA values of ∼110°. The simple and reliable approach to preparing monolayers of a tuned composition that is described in this article can be utilized to control the fluorocarbon content of the hydrophobic monolayers on silicon oxide surfaces.

  15. Low Temperature Photoluminescence Study of Holmium and Thulium Implanted into III-V Semiconductors and Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    Iwhere m* is the reduced mass formed from the nuclear mass and the electron or hole effective mass, and the other variables are as described for...Implanted Samples COND DOPING ANNEAL VENDOR3 TYPE TEMP/TIME/GAS n ? 750"C/15 min/N2 Wacker p B 750"C/15 min/N2 Reticon SI - 850"C/15 min/H2 MW SI

  16. Co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into silicon dioxide for synthesis of carbon nitride materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, M B; Nuesca, G; Moore, R

    2002-01-01

    Materials synthesis of carbon nitride has been attempted with co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into thermally grown SiO sub 2. Following implantation of C and N ions to doses of 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 , thermal annealing of the implanted SiO sub 2 sample was conducted at 1000 degree sign C in an N sub 2 ambient. As evidenced in Fourier transform infrared measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, different bonding configurations between C and N, including C-N single bonds, C=N double bonds and C=N triple bonds, were found to develop in the SiO sub 2 film after annealing. Chemical composition profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectroscopy were correlated with the depth information of the chemical shifts of N 1s core-level electrons, allowing us to examine the formation of C-N bonding for different atomic concentration ratios between N and C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed no sign of the formation of crystalline C sub 3 N sub 4 precipitates in the SiO ...

  17. Tuning of structural, light emission and wetting properties of nanostructured copper oxide-porous silicon matrix formed on electrochemically etched copper-coated silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, M.

    2017-01-01

    Matrices of copper oxide-porous silicon nanostructures have been formed by electrochemical etching of copper-coated silicon surfaces in HF-based solution at different etching times (5-15 min). Micro-Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the nature of copper oxide in the matrix changes from single-phase copper (I) oxide (Cu2O) to single-phase copper (II) oxide (CuO) on increasing the etching time. This is accompanied with important variation in the content of carbon, carbon hydrides, carbonyl compounds and silicon oxide in the matrix. The matrix formed at the low etching time (5 min) exhibits a single broad "blue" room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) band. On increasing the etching time, the intensity of this band decreases and a much stronger "red" PL band emerges in the PL spectra. The relative intensity of this band with respect to the "blue" band significantly increases on increasing the etching time. The "blue" and "red" PL bands are attributed to Cu2O and porous silicon of the matrix, respectively. In addition, the water contact angle measurements reveal that the hydrophobicity of the matrix surface can be tuned from hydrophobic to superhydrophobic state by controlling the etching time.

  18. A sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process for deposition of oxide liner in high aspect ratio through silicon vias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Marco; Marschmeyer, Steffen; Kaynak, Mehmet; Tekin, Ibrahim

    2011-09-01

    The formation of a Through Silicon Via (TSV) includes a deep Si trench etching and the formation of an insulating layer along the high-aspect-ratio trench and the filling of a conductive material into the via hole. The isolation of the filling conductor from the silicon substrate becomes more important for higher frequencies due to the high coupling of the signal to the silicon. The importance of the oxide thickness on the via wall isolation can be verified using electromagnetic field simulators. To satisfy the needs on the Silicon dioxide deposition, a sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (SA-CVD) process has been developed to deposit an isolation oxide to the walls of deep silicon trenches. The technique provides excellent step coverage of the 100 microm depth silicon trenches with the high aspect ratio of 20 and more. The developed technique allows covering the deep silicon trenches by oxide and makes the high isolation of TSVs from silicon substrate feasible which is the key factor for the performance of TSVs for mm-wave 3D packaging.

  19. Oxidation in silicon nitride. Part I - preliminary studies; Oxidacao no nitreto de silicio. Parte I: estudos preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, Celso Berilo Cidade; Piorino Neto, Francisco; Shibuya, Newton Hissao; Silva, Vitor Alexandre da; Silva, Oliverio Moreira Macedo; Silva, Cosme Roberto Moreira da [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Aeronautica e Espaco

    1995-12-31

    Silicon nitride ceramics have excellent thermo-mechanical properties, showing high hardness, temperature strength, oxidation resistance and inertness. It can be used nearly 1.400 deg C. At 900 deg C starts a external silica layer formation, as final oxidation product. The present work is a review of some oxidation mechanisms for silicon nitride based materials, and their relationship with sintering additives. The diffusion of existing impurities occurs via intergranular glassy an/or crystalline phases, and have strong influence on the involved oxidation mechanisms. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Sintering of silicon nitride ceramics with magnesium silicon nitride and yttrium oxide as sintering aids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J; Xu, J Y [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Peng, G H [Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004, Guangxi (China); Zhuang, H R; Li, W L; Xu, S Y [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Mao, Y J, E-mail: guojianjiang@sit.edu.cn [Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics had been produced through pressureless sintering and hot-pressing sintering with MgSiN{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} or only MgSiN{sub 2} as sintering aids. The influences of the amount of MgSiN{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and sintering methods on the properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics were investigated. The results show that the bend strength of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic fabricated through pressureless sintering at 1820 deg. C for 4 h with 5.6 wt.% MgSiN{sub 2}-15.8 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering additive could achieve 839 MPa. However, the bend strength of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic produced by hot-pressing sintering at 1750 deg. C for 1 h under uniaxial pressure of 20 MPa with 4.76 wt.% MgSiN{sub 2} was 1149 MPa. The thermal conductivity of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic 2 3 4 could reach to 129 W{center_dot}m{sup -1{center_dot}}K{sup 1}. The present work demonstrated that MgSiN{sub 2} aids and hot-pressing sintering were effective to improve the thermal conductivity of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic.

  1. The Role of Silicon Oxide Layers in Luminescence of Ensembles of Silicon Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Si-Hui; QIN Guo-Yi; REN Shang-Fen; QIN Guo-Gang

    2001-01-01

    Based on the quantum confinement-luminescence center model, to ensembles of spherical silicon nanocrystals(nc-Si) containing two kinds of luminescence centers (LCs) in the SiOx layers surrounding the nc-Si, the relationship between the photolurminescence (PL) and the thickness of the SiOx layer is studied with the excitation energy flux density as a parameter. When there is no SiOx layer surrounding the nc-Si, the electron-heavy hole pair can only recombine inside the nc-Si, then the PL blueshift with reducing particle sizes roughly accords with the rule predicted by the quantum confinement model of Canham. When there presences a SiOx layer, some of the carriers may tunnel into it and recombine outside the nc-Si at the LCs to emit visible light. The thicker the SiOx layer is, the higher the radiative recombination rate occurred outside the nc-Si will be. When the central scale of the nc-Si is much smaller than the critical scale, the radiative recombination rate outside the nc-Si dominates, and visible PL will be possible for some nc-Si samples with big average radius, greater than 4 nm, for example. When there is only one kind of LC in the SiOx layer, the PL peak position does not shift with reducing particle sizes. All these conclusions are in accord with the experimental results. When there are two or more kinds of LCs in the SiOx layer, the PL peak position energy and intensity swing with reducing particle sizes.

  2. Formation of silicon nanoislands on crystalline silicon substrates by thermal annealing of silicon rich oxide deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhenrui [Department of Electronics, INAOE, Apartado 51, Puebla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, Mariano [Department of Electronics, INAOE, Apartado 51, Puebla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Luna-Lopez, A [Department of Electronics, INAOE, Apartado 51, Puebla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Du Jinhui [College of Material Science and Chemistry Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnical University (China); Bian Dongcai [College of Material Science and Chemistry Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnical University (China)

    2006-10-14

    We report the preparation and characterization of Si nanoislands grown on a c-Si substrate by thermal annealing of silicon-rich oxide (SRO) films deposited using a conventional low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) technique. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that a high density of Si nanoislands was formed on the surface of the c-Si substrate during thermal annealing. The nanoislands are nanocrystallites with the same crystal orientation as the substrate. The strain at the c-Si/SRO interface is probably the main reason for the nucleation of the self-assembled Si nanoislands that epitaxially grow on the c-Si substrate. The proposed method is very simple and compatible with Si integrated circuit technology.

  3. The electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors fabricated on cubic silicon carbide

    CERN Document Server

    Ohshima, T; Ishida, Y

    2003-01-01

    The n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) were fabricated on cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) epitaxial layers grown on 3C-SiC substrates. The gate oxide of the MOSFETs was formed using pyrogenic oxidation at 1100 degC. The 3C-SiC MOSFETs showed enhancement type behaviors after annealing at 200degC for 30 min in argon atmosphere. The maximum value of the effective channel mobility of the 3C-SiC MOSFETs was 260cm sup 2 /V centre dot s. The leakage current of gate oxide was of a few tens of nA/cm sup 2 at an electric field range below 8.5 MV/cm, and breakdown began around 8.5MV/cm. (author)

  4. Local anodic oxidation on hydrogen-intercalated graphene layers: oxide composition analysis and role of the silicon carbide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Piazza, Vincenzo; Coletti, Camilla; Roddaro, Stefano; Beltram, Fabio; Pingue, Pasqualantonio

    2017-03-10

    We investigate nanoscale local anodic oxidation (LAO) on hydrogen-intercalated graphene grown by controlled sublimation of silicon carbide (SiC). Scanning probe microscopy was used as a lithographic and characterization tool in order to investigate the local properties of the nanofabricated structures. The anomalous thickness observed after the graphene oxidation process is linked to the impact of LAO on the substrate. Micro-Raman (μ-Raman) spectroscopy was employed to demonstrate the presence of two oxidation regimes depending on the applied bias. We show that partial and total etching of monolayer graphene can be achieved by tuning the bias voltage during LAO. Finally, a complete compositional characterization was achieved by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  5. Local anodic oxidation on hydrogen-intercalated graphene layers: oxide composition analysis and role of the silicon carbide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Piazza, Vincenzo; Coletti, Camilla; Roddaro, Stefano; Beltram, Fabio; Pingue, Pasqualantonio

    2017-03-01

    We investigate nanoscale local anodic oxidation (LAO) on hydrogen-intercalated graphene grown by controlled sublimation of silicon carbide (SiC). Scanning probe microscopy was used as a lithographic and characterization tool in order to investigate the local properties of the nanofabricated structures. The anomalous thickness observed after the graphene oxidation process is linked to the impact of LAO on the substrate. Micro-Raman (μ-Raman) spectroscopy was employed to demonstrate the presence of two oxidation regimes depending on the applied bias. We show that partial and total etching of monolayer graphene can be achieved by tuning the bias voltage during LAO. Finally, a complete compositional characterization was achieved by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  6. Electron trapping in 4H-SiC MOS capacitors fabricated by pre-oxidation nitrogen implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, A. F.; Dhar, S.; Mooney, P. M.

    2011-06-01

    Incorporation of nitrogen (N) atoms by ion implantation prior to oxidation of SiO2/4H-SiC interfaces has been investigated by capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics and constant capacitance deep-level-transient spectroscopy (CCDLTS) measurements. The shift of the C-V curves to negative voltages can be explained by the partial activation of implanted N atoms during oxidation. The maximum amplitude of the CCDLTS spectra, proportional to the density of near-interface oxide traps, decreases with increasing N dose, but remains significantly larger than that of SiO2/SiC interfaces fabricated by post oxidation annealing in nitric oxide (NO). Intrinsic defects in the SiC epi-layer associated with implantation damage are also observed in N-implanted samples. In contrast, electron traps energetically close to the SiC conduction band, detected in NO annealed samples and presumably introduced during oxidation, are not observed in N-implanted samples. The improved transport characteristics of MOS transistors fabricated on N-implanted epi-layers compared to those fabricated by NO annealing is suggested to result from the effects of the greater N donor concentration and also possibly to the suppression of shallow electron traps in the SiC epilayer.

  7. Photo and cathode luminescence emission in oxide silicium films implanted with silicium; Emision de foto y catodoluminiscencia en peliculas de oxido de silicio termico implantadas con silicio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, F; Aceves, M. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Carrillo, J. [Benemrita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Dominguez, C. [Universida Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Falcony, C. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-10-01

    We studied the photo and cathodoluminescence of Silicon Rich Oxides (SRO) obtained by ion implant of Si in thermal oxides. Doses of 10{sup 1}6 cm{sup -}2 (low dose) and 10{sup 1}7 cm{sup -}2 (high dose) and implant energy of 150 keV were used. The films were annealed for 30, 60 and 180 minutes in nitrogen at 1100 Celsius degrees. The spectra show photo and cathodoluminescence emission in the visible range, the bands in the spectra change with the conditions of ion implant and annealing. The films without thermal treatment in both dose present photoluminescence bands around 1.9 eV (band B) and 2.4 eV (band C). With the thermal treatments, the band B disappears. In the case of the films with low dose, the band C shows a blue shift and a decrease in intensity. The high dose films have a band centered in 1.7 eV (band A) that increases its intensity with annealings. The cathodoluminescence bands in all the cases are in 2.7 eV (band D) and they present changes with the thermal treatments that it seems they depend on the variation in the implant parameters. [Spanish] Se estudian las propiedades de foto y la catodoluminiscencia de peliculas de oxidos de silicio ricos en Si (Silicon Rich Oxide SRO) obtenidas por implantacion ionica de Si en oxidos termicos. Se usaron dosis de 10{sup 1}6 cm{sup -}2 (dosis baja) y 10{sup 1}7 cm{sup -}2 (dosis alta) y energia de implantacion de 150 keV. Las peliculas se sometieron a tratamientos termicos por 30, 60 y 180 minutos en nitrogeno de 1100 grados centigrados. Se encontro emision foto y catodoluminiscente en el rango visible, las bandas en los espectros cambian con las condiciones de implantacion ionica y con los tratamientos termicos. Las peliculas sin tratamiento termico en ambas dosis presentan bandas de fotoluminiscencia alrededor de 1.9 eV (banda B) y 2.4 eV (banda C). Con los tratamientos termicos, la banda B desaparece. En el caso de las peliculas con dosis baja, la banda C muestra un corrimiento hacia el azul junto con una

  8. Gate length and temperature dependence of negative differential transconductance in silicon quantum well metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naquin, Clint; Lee, Mark [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Edwards, Hal; Mathur, Guru; Chatterjee, Tathagata; Maggio, Ken [Texas Instruments Inc., Richardson, Texas 75243 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Introducing quantum transport into silicon transistors in a manner compatible with industrial fabrication has the potential to transform the performance horizons of large scale integrated silicon devices and circuits. Explicit quantum transport as evidenced by negative differential transconductances (NDTCs) has been observed in a set of quantum well (QW) transistors fabricated using industrial silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processing. Detailed gate length and temperature dependence characteristics of the NDTCs in these devices have been measured. The QW potential was formed via lateral ion implantation doping on a commercial 45 nm technology node process line, and measurements of the transfer characteristics show NDTCs up to room temperature. Gate length dependence of NDTCs shows a correlation of the interface channel length with the number of NDTCs formed as well as with the gate voltage (V{sub G}) spacing between NDTCs. The V{sub G} spacing between multiple NDTCs suggests a quasi-parabolic QW potential profile. The temperature dependence is consistent with partial freeze-out of carrier concentration against a degenerately doped background.

  9. Simultaneous generation of intersubband absorption and quantum well intermixing through silicon ion implantation in undoped InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, G. W.; Akimoto, R.; Gozu, S.; Mozume, T.; Hasama, T.; Ishikawa, H.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrated the intersubband absorption in undoped InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells through silicon ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing. For an implantation dose of 1×1014 cm-2, the actual carrier density of a sample annealed at 600 °C for 1 min was ˜7.5×1013 cm-2 (˜75% activation efficiency); the activation energy was ˜1.41 eV. The simultaneously generated quantum well intermixing (QWI) was nonuniform due to the silicon ion distribution. The effects of QWI nonuniformity on both intersubband and interband transitions were explained by eight-band k ṡp calculation. This study will open a route for monolithic integration of intersubband-transition-based high-speed all-optical switches.

  10. Compatibility of cancer cells with nanostructured oxidized porous silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidman, Tal; Parush, Ran; Massad, Na' ama [Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Segal, Ester [Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2011-06-15

    The attachment and long-term viability of three types of human cancer cell lines (glioma U87, breast cancer MDA-MB-231, and cervical cancer HeLa) onto nanostructured oxidized porous Si substrates is investigated. The porous layers are fabricated to give cylindrically-shaped structures with pore diameters in the tunable range of 10 to 150 nm by anodizing a heavily-doped p-type Si. The Alamar Blue viability assay and optical microscopy are employed to assess the attachment, viability and the morphology of the cells. The results show that cells remain viable and proliferate on all surfaces. The nano-architecture of the studied scaffolds does not exert a deleterious effect on cancer cells. Cell coverage levels comparable to standard culture preparations on tissue culture polystyrene are observed (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Resistive switching characteristics and mechanisms in silicon oxide memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Wu, Xiaohan; Chen, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yanzhen; Xue, Fei; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic unipolar SiOx-based resistance random access memories (ReRAM) characterization, switching mechanisms, and applications have been investigated. Device structures, material compositions, and electrical characteristics are identified that enable ReRAM cells with high ON/OFF ratio, low static power consumption, low switching power, and high readout-margin using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS)-compatible SiOx-based materials. These ideas are combined with the use of horizontal and vertical device structure designs, composition optimization, electrical control, and external factors to help understand resistive switching (RS) mechanisms. Measured temperature effects, pulse response, and carrier transport behaviors lead to compact models of RS mechanisms and energy band diagrams in order to aid the development of computer-aided design for ultralarge-v scale integration. This chapter presents a comprehensive investigation of SiOx-based RS characteristics and mechanisms for the post-CMOS device era.

  12. Nanoscale laminin coating modulates cortical scarring response around implanted silicon microelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; McConnell, George C.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2006-12-01

    Neural electrodes could significantly enhance the quality of life for patients with sensory and/or motor deficits as well as improve our understanding of brain functions. However, long-term electrical connectivity between neural tissue and recording sites is compromised by the development of astroglial scar around the recording probes. In this study we investigate the effect of a nanoscale laminin (LN) coating on Si-based neural probes on chronic cortical tissue reaction in a rat model. Tissue reaction was evaluated after 1 day, 1 week, and 4 weeks post-implant for coated and uncoated probes using immunohistochemical techniques to evaluate activated microglia/macrophages (ED-1), astrocytes (GFAP) and neurons (NeuN). The coating did not have an observable effect on neuronal density or proximity to the electrode surface. However, the response of microglia/macrophages and astrocytes was altered by the coating. One day post-implant, we observed an ~60% increase in ED-1 expression near LN-coated probe sites compared with control uncoated probe sites. Four weeks post-implant, we observed an ~20% reduction in ED-1 expression along with an ~50% reduction in GFAP expression at coated relative to uncoated probe sites. These results suggest that LN has a stimulatory effect on early microglia activation, accelerating the phagocytic function of these cells. This hypothesis is further supported by the increased mRNA expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6) in cultured microglia on LN-bound Si substrates. LN immunostaining of coated probes immediately after insertion and retrieval demonstrates that the coating integrity is not compromised by the shear force during insertion. We speculate, based on these encouraging results, that LN coating of Si neural probes could potentially improve chronic neural recordings through dispersion of the astroglial scar.

  13. Monte Carlo study of the electrothermal phenomenon in silicon-on-insulator and silicon-germanium-on-insulator metal-oxide field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Toufik; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2010-03-01

    Self-heating effects are investigated in silicon-on-insulator (SOI), silicon-germanium-on-insulator (SGOI), and strained-silicon-directly-on-insulator (SSDOI) metal-oxide field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), using a Monte Carlo simulator self-consistently coupled with the solution of the heat diffusion equation. Although the influence of thermal effects is in general higher in these structures, as compared to bulk Si MOSFETs, its impact is much more important in SGOI and SSDOI FET structures incorporating ultrathin Si channels, with SGOI FETs giving the worst thermal performance. A study of the dependence of the extent of self-heating on the buried-oxide thickness is also performed, showing that this parameter is important in designing SOI structures with better thermal management.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of residual breast tissue following mastectomy and reconstruction with silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel, Douglas; Tsehmaister-Abitbol, Vered; Rundstein, Arie; Shalmon, Anat; Zbar, Andrew; Nardini, Gil; Novikov, Ilya; Sklair-Levy, Miri

    2015-01-01

    We present our use of magnetic resonance (MR) measurement to determine the amount of residual breast tissue (RBT) following total mastectomy with reconstruction. Breast MR images of 45 women who underwent surgery between January and November 2011 were reviewed. The cohort included therapeutic and prophylactic mastectomies. RBT was evaluated at four points with a digital caliper assessing T2-weighted and T1-weighted images. Patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma tended to have less RBT than in prophylactic surgery. Greater age and recent surgery both correlated with larger RBT. Variable thickness of RBT is demonstrable following mastectomy and implant reconstruction using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retention of implant-supported zirconium oxide ceramic restorations using different luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Savabi, Omid; Shahtoosi, Mojtaba

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the retention value of implant-supported zirconium oxide ceramic copings using different luting agents. Twenty ITI solid abutments of 5.5 mm height and ITI implant analogs were mounted vertically into autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Ninety zirconium oxide copings (Cercon, Degudent) with a loop on the occlusal portion were made. All samples were airborne particle abraded with 110 μm Al₂O₃ and luted using different types of luting agents: resin cements (Clearfil SA, Panavia F2.0, Fuji Plus), conventional cements (Fleck's, Poly F, Fuji I), and temporary cements (Temp Bond, GC free eugenol, TempSpan) with a load of 5 Kg. (N = 10) All copings were incubated at 37°C for 24 h and conditioned in artificial saliva for 1 week, and thermal cycled for 5000 cycles 5-55°C with a 30-s dwell time. The dislodging force of the copings along the long axis of the implant-abutment complex was recorded using universal testing machine with 5 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis (α = 0.05) and Mann-Whitney tests with Bonferroni step down correction (α = 0.001). There was significant difference between the mean rank retention values of different luting agents (P ceramic restorations, over ITI solid abutments may be influenced by the type of cement. The application of an MDP-containing resin and resin-modified glass ionomer luting agents increase the retentive value of implant-supported zirconium oxide restorations. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. A Theoretical Approach to the Calculation of Annealed Impurity Profiles of Ion Implanted Boron into Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    they are used in conjunction with a layer removal technique such as anodic oxidation and oxide stripping (,r sputtering with an argon ion beam. The data...e r8V 0 rr esed Bdd B BOB, a. . lower ig branc Tere Et ETRICA ACTVAIO AND FR.1bhntEDISTaIBorn-n Cssa rcpiae *’it Bhuy ea sotaeuLy ozeo TION- BEAIRO OO

  17. Fabricating nanostructures through a combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching on silicon wafers with different surface conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ching

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the surface conditions of silicon wafers with native oxide layers (NOL) or hydrogen passivated layers (HPL) and how they influence the processes of nano-oxidation and wet etching. We also explore the combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching processes to produce nanostructures. Experimental results reveal that the surface conditions of silicon wafers have a considerable impact on the results of nano-oxidation when combined with wet etching. The height and width of oxides on NOL samples exceeded the dimensions of oxides on HPL samples, and this difference became increasingly evident with an increase in applied bias voltage. The height of oxidized nanolines on the HPL sample increased after wet etching; however, the width of the lines increased only marginally. After wet etching, the height and width of oxides on the NOL were more than two times greater than those on the HPL. Increasing the applied bias voltage during nano-oxidation on NOL samples increased both the height and width of the oxides. After wet etching however, the increase in bias voltage appeared to have little effect on the height of oxidized nanolines, but the width of oxidized lines increased. This study also discovered that the use of higher applied bias voltages on NOL samples followed by wet etching results in nanostructures with a section profile closely resembling a curved surface. The use of this technique enabled researchers to create molds in the shape of a silicon nanolens array and an elegantly shaped nanoscale complex structures mold.

  18. Correlation between defect structure and luminescence spectra in monocrystalline erbium-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, N A [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194021 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Emel' yanov, A M [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194021 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shek, E I [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194021 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vdovin, V I [Institute for Chemical Problems of Microelectronics, 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yugova, T G [Institute of Rare Metals ' Giredmet' , 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pizzini, S [INFM and Department of Materials Science, I-20126 Milan (Italy)

    2002-12-09

    The transformation of structural defects and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of n- and p-type Cz-Si after implantation with erbium ions at 1 MeV energy to doses of 1x10{sup 13} and 1x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} followed by annealing at 620-1100 deg. C for 0.25-3.0 h in chlorine-containing atmosphere or oxygen have been studied by transmission electron microscopy, optical microscopy in combination with selective chemical etching, and PL. For the doses used, annealing at a temperature lower than 1100 deg. C leads to the formation of different extended defects (partial Frank or perfect prismatic dislocation loops) of submicron sizes which do not prevent the appearance of Er-related lines and do not give rise to dislocation-related lines in the PL spectrum. In contrast, high-temperature annealing at 1100 deg. C results in the development of similar three-dimensional networks of pure edge dislocations with a density of {approx}10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}. These dislocations are responsible for the appearance of quite intensive dislocation-related luminescence (DRL). For high-dose implantation, when annealing at 1100 deg. C is used, the same dislocation networks have been found to form in the n- and p-Si wafers with different low-temperature annealing stages (if any). However, all these parameters exert the peculiar influence upon the intensity of DRL lines.

  19. Optimization of oxidation processes to improve crystalline silicon solar cell emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Shen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Control of the oxidation process is one key issue in producing high-quality emitters for crystalline silicon solar cells. In this paper, the oxidation parameters of pre-oxidation time, oxygen concentration during pre-oxidation and pre-deposition and drive-in time were optimized by using orthogonal experiments. By analyzing experimental measurements of short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, series resistance and solar cell efficiency in solar cells with different sheet resistances which were produced by using different diffusion processes, we inferred that an emitter with a sheet resistance of approximately 70 Ω/□ performed best under the existing standard solar cell process. Further investigations were conducted on emitters with sheet resistances of approximately 70 Ω/□ that were obtained from different preparation processes. The results indicate that emitters with surface phosphorus concentrations between 4.96 × 1020 cm−3 and 7.78 × 1020 cm−3 and with junction depths between 0.46 μm and 0.55 μm possessed the best quality. With no extra processing, the final preparation of the crystalline silicon solar cell efficiency can reach 18.41%, which is an increase of 0.4%abs compared to conventional emitters with 50 Ω/□ sheet resistance.

  20. Robust p-type doping of copper oxide using nitrogen implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Marina; Polyakov, Stanislav M.; Cooil, Simon; Schenk, Alex K.; Edmonds, Mark; Thomsen, Lars; Mazzola, Federico; Wells, Justin W.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate robust p-type doping of Cu2O using low/medium energy ion implantation. Samples are made by controlled oxidation of annealed Cu metal foils, which results in Cu2O with levels of doping close to intrinsic. Samples are then implanted with nitrogen ions using a kinetic energy in the few keV range. Using this method, we are able to produce very high levels of doping, as evidenced by a 350 meV shift in the Fermi level towards the VB maximum. The robustness of the nitrogen implanted samples are tested by exposing them to atmospheric contaminants, and elevated temperatures. The samples are found to survive an increase in temperature of many hundreds of degrees. The robustness of the samples, combined with the fact that the materials used are safe, abundant and non-toxic and that the methods used for the growth of Cu2O and N+ implantation are simple and cheap to implement industrially, underlines the potential of Cu2O:N for affordable intermediate band photovoltaics.

  1. Fluorinated alkyne-derived monolayers on oxide-free silicon nanowires via one-step hydrosilylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh, Quyen [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands); Nanosens, IJsselkade 7, 7201 HB Zutphen (Netherlands); Pujari, Sidharam P. [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands); Wang, Bin [The Department of Chemical Engineering and Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003 (Israel); Wang, Zhanhua [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands); Haick, Hossam [The Department of Chemical Engineering and Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003 (Israel); Zuilhof, Han [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands); Rijn, Cees J.M. van, E-mail: cees.vanrijn@wur.nl [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Oxide-free H-terminated silicon nanowires undergo efficient surface modification by reaction with fluorinated 1-alkynes (HC≡C−(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}C{sub 8}H{sub 17−x}F{sub x}; x = 0–17). • These surface-modified Si NWs are chemically stable under range of conditions (including acid, base). • The surface coating yields efficient electrical passivation as demonstrated by a near-zero electrochemical activity of the surface. - Abstract: Passivation of oxide-free silicon nanowires (Si NWs) by the formation of high-quality fluorinated 1-hexadecyne-derived monolayers with varying fluorine content has been investigated. Alkyl chain monolayers (C{sub 16}H{sub 30−x}F{sub x}) with a varying number of fluorine substituents (x = 0, 1, 3, 9, 17) were attached onto hydrogen-terminated silicon (Si−H) surfaces with an effective one-step hydrosilylation. This surface chemistry gives well-defined monolayers on nanowires that have a cylindrical core–shell structure, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and static contact angle (SCA) analysis. The monolayers were stable under acidic and basic conditions, as well as under extreme conditions (such as UV exposure), and provide excellent surface passivation, which opens up applications in the fields of field effect transistors, optoelectronics and especially for disease diagnosis.

  2. Oxide-free hybrid silicon nanowires: From fundamentals to applied nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashouti, Muhammad Y.; Sardashti, Kasra; Schmitt, Sebastian W.; Pietsch, Matthias; Ristein, Jürgen; Haick, Hossam; Christiansen, Silke H.

    2013-02-01

    The ability to control physical properties of silicon nanowires (Si NWs) by designing their surface bonds is important for their applicability in devices in the areas of nano-electronics, nano-photonics, including photovoltaics and sensing. In principle a wealth of different molecules can be attached to the bare Si NW surface atoms to create e.g. Si-O, Si-C, Si-N, etc. to mention just the most prominent ones. Si-O bond formation, i.e. oxidation usually takes place automatically as soon as Si NWs are exposed to ambient conditions and this is undesired is since a defective oxide layer (i.e. native silicon dioxide - SiO2) can cause uncontrolled trap states in the band gap of silicon. Surface functionalization of Si NW surfaces with the aim to avoid oxidation can be carried out by permitting e.g. Si-C bond formation when alkyl chains are covalently attached to the Si NW surfaces by employing a versatile two-step chlorination/alkylation process that does not affect the original length and diameter of the NWs. Termination of Si NWs with alkyl molecules through covalent Si-C bonds can provide long term stability against oxidation of the Si NW surfaces. The alkyl chain length determines the molecular coverage of Si NW surfaces and thus the surface energy and next to simple Si-C bonds even bond types such as Cdbnd C and Ctbnd C can be realized. When integrating differently functionalized Si NWs in functional devices such as field effect transistors (FETs) and solar cells, the physical properties of the resultant devices vary.

  3. Spectroscopic measurements with a silicon drift detector having a continuous implanted drift cathode-voltage divider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; D'Acunto, L; Franck, D; Gregorio, A; Pihet, P; Rashevsky, A; Vacchi, A; Vinogradov, L I; Zampa, N

    2000-01-01

    A silicon drift detector (SDD) prototype where the drift electrode also plays the role of a high-voltage divider has been realised and characterised for spectroscopic applications at near-room temperatures. Among the advantages of this design, is the absence of metal on the sensitive surface which makes this detector interesting for soft X-rays. The detector prototype has a large sensitive area (2x130 mm sup 2) and the charge is collected by two anodes (butterfly-like detector). The energy resolution of a such a detector has been investigated at near-room temperatures using a commercial, hybrid, low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier. The results obtained for the X-ray lines from sup 5 sup 5 Fe and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am are presented.

  4. High holding voltage segmentation stacking silicon-controlled-rectifier structure with field implant as body ties blocking layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shiang-Shiou; Cheng, Chun-Hu; Lan, Yu-Pin; Chiu, Yu-Chien; Fan, Chia-Chi; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsuan; Chang, Shao-Chin; Jiang, Zhe-Wei; Hung, Li-Yue; Tsai, Chi-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-04-01

    High electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection robustness and good transient-induced latchup immunity are two important issues for high voltage integrate circuit application. In this study, we report a high-voltage-n-type-field (HVNF) implantation to act as the body ties blocking layer in segmented topology silicon-controlled-rectifier (SCR) structure in 0.11 µm 32 V high voltage process. This body ties blocking layer eliminate the elevated triggered voltage in segmented technique. Using a large resistance as shunt resistor in resistor assisted triggered SCRs stacking structure, the double snapback phenomenon is eliminate. The series SCR could be decoupled a sufficient voltage drop to turned-on when a very low current flow through the shunt resistor. The holding voltage and the failure current of 22 V and 3.4 A are achieved in the best condition of segmented topology SCR stacking structure, respectively. It improves the latchup immunity at high voltage ICs application. On the other hand, the triggered voltage almost keep the same value which is identical to SCR single cell without using segmented topology.

  5. Phase transitions from semiconductive amorphous to conductive polycrystalline in indium silicon oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Da, Bo; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nabatame, Toshihide; Takahashi, Makoto; Ito, Kazuhiro; Kizu, Takio; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2016-11-01

    The enhancement in electrical conductivity and optical transparency induced by a phase transition from amorphous to polycrystalline in lightly silicon-doped indium oxide (InSiO) thin films is studied. The phase transition caused by simple thermal annealing transforms the InSiO thin films from semiconductors to conductors. Silicon atoms form SiO4 tetrahedra in InSiO, which enhances the overlap of In 5s orbitals as a result of the distortion of InO6 octahedral networks. Desorption of weakly bonded oxygen releases electrons from deep subgap states and enhances the electrical conductivity and optical transparency of the films. Optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal that the phase transition causes a Fermi energy shift of ˜0.2 eV.

  6. Effects of indium tin oxide on the performance of heterojunction silicon wafer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei; Aberle, Armin G.; Mueller, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    The effects of indium tin oxide (ITO) films on the performance of heterojunction silicon wafer solar cells is investigated, using heterojunction (HET) solar cell precursors. Different ITO deposition conditions are used, which result in significant differences in the performance of HET solar cells. It is found that HET solar cells with ITO films deposited at room temperature exhibit severer sputter damage, while those with substrate heating show less damage. Besides the ITO deposition temperature, the sputtering gas ambient is also investigated. The hydrogen gas used in the ITO deposition can greatly affect the interface properties between the ITO film and the amorphous silicon layers. The champion solar cell fabricated under the optimum ITO deposition conditions (a deposition temperature of 150 °C with optimal gas concentration) shows a conversion efficiency of 19.7%.

  7. Fluorinated alkyne-derived monolayers on oxide-free silicon nanowires via one-step hydrosilylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Minh, Quyen; Pujari, Sidharam P.; Wang, Bin; Wang, Zhanhua; Haick, Hossam; Zuilhof, Han; van Rijn, Cees J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Passivation of oxide-free silicon nanowires (Si NWs) by the formation of high-quality fluorinated 1-hexadecyne-derived monolayers with varying fluorine content has been investigated. Alkyl chain monolayers (C16H30-xFx) with a varying number of fluorine substituents (x = 0, 1, 3, 9, 17) were attached onto hydrogen-terminated silicon (Sisbnd H) surfaces with an effective one-step hydrosilylation. This surface chemistry gives well-defined monolayers on nanowires that have a cylindrical core-shell structure, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and static contact angle (SCA) analysis. The monolayers were stable under acidic and basic conditions, as well as under extreme conditions (such as UV exposure), and provide excellent surface passivation, which opens up applications in the fields of field effect transistors, optoelectronics and especially for disease diagnosis.

  8. Electrical activation of ultra-shallow B and BF 2 implanted silicon by flash anneal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woo Sik; Kang, Kitaek

    2005-08-01

    Ultra-shallow ion implanted Si wafers, both with and without Ge pre-amorphization, were annealed using xenon arc flash lamps. The duration of flash illumination was controlled between 1 ms and 20 ms. Changes in sheet resistance and dopant profiles after flash anneal were measured and investigated, along with crystal defect densities. Sheet resistance was measured using a four-point probe. Dopant depth profiling and defect characterization were done using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Sheet resistance values of 250-350 Ω/sq. at a junction depth of 24 nm (at B concentration of 1.0 × 1018 cm-3) were achieved. No significant dopant diffusion was observed after the Xe arc flash lamp annealing.

  9. Fabrication and evaluation of series-triple quantum dots by thermal oxidation of silicon nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Takafumi, E-mail: takafumi-uchida@frontier.hokudai.ac.jp; Jo, Mingyu; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-0814 Japan (Japan); Fujiwara, Akira [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, 243-0198 Japan (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Series-connected triple quantum dots were fabricated by a simple two-step oxidation technique using the pattern-dependent oxidation of a silicon nanowire and an additional oxidation of the nanowire through the gap of the fine gates attached to the nanowire. The characteristics of multi-dot single-electron devices are obtained. The formation of each quantum dot beneath an attached gate is confirmed by analyzing the electrical characteristics and by evaluating the gate capacitances between all pairings of gates and quantum dots. Because the gate electrode is automatically attached to each dot, the device structure benefits from scalability. This technique promises integrability of multiple quantum dots with individual control gates.

  10. Control of the optical properties of silicon and chromium mixed oxides deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergara, L., E-mail: vergara@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Galindo, R. Escobar [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, R. [AIN, Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies, 31191 Cordovilla, Pamplona (Spain); Sanchez, O. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palacio, C. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Albella, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-03-31

    The development of mixed-oxide thin films allows obtaining materials with better properties than those of the different binary oxides, which makes them suitable for a great number of applications in different fields, such as tribology, optics or microelectronics. In this paper we investigate the deposition of mixed chromium and silicon oxides deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering with a view to use them as optical coatings with an adjustable refractive index. These films have been characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry so as to determine how the deposition conditions influence the characteristics of the material. We have found that the deposition parameter whose influence determines the properties of the films to a greater extent is the amount of oxygen in the reactive sputtering gas.

  11. Fabrication of piezodriven, free-standing, all-oxide heteroepitaxial cantilevers on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Banerjee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the fabrication and mechanical properties of all-oxide, free-standing, heteroepitaxial, piezoelectric, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS on silicon, using PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 as the key functional material. The fabrication was enabled by the development of an epitaxial lift-off strategy for the patterning of multilayer oxide heterostructures grown on Si(001, employing a high temperature stable, sacrificial oxide template mask to obtain freestanding cantilever MEMS devices after substrate etching. All cantilevers, with lengths in the range 25–325 μm, width 50 μm, and total thickness of 300 nm, can be actuated by an external AC-bias. For lengths 50–125 μm, the second order bending mode formed the dominant resonance, whereas for the other lengths different or multiple modes were present.

  12. Self-limiting and complete oxidation of silicon nanostructures produced by laser ablation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, L.; Popescu, R.; Messina, F.; Camarda, P.; Schneider, R.; Gerthsen, D.; Gelardi, F. M.; Cannas, M.

    2016-07-01

    Oxidized Silicon nanomaterials produced by 1064 nm pulsed laser ablation in deionized water are investigated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy allows to characterize the structural and chemical properties at a sub-nanometric scale. This analysis clarifies that laser ablation induces both self-limiting and complete oxidation processes which produce polycrystalline Si surrounded by a layer of SiO2 and amorphous fully oxidized SiO2, respectively. These nanostructures exhibit a composite luminescence spectrum which is investigated by time-resolved spectroscopy with a tunable laser excitation. The origin of the observed luminescence bands agrees with the two structural typologies: Si nanocrystals emit a μs-decaying red band; defects of SiO2 give rise to a ns-decaying UV band and two overlapping blue bands with lifetime in the ns and ms timescale.

  13. Oxidative stress status and placental implications in diabetic rats undergoing swimming exercise after embryonic implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Ribeiro, Viviane Maria; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2015-05-01

    The potential benefits and risks of physical exercise on fetal development during pregnancy remain unclear. The aim was to analyze maternal oxidative stress status and the placental morphometry to relate to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) from diabetic female rats submitted to swimming program after embryonic implantation. Pregnant Wistar rats were distributed into 4 groups (11 animals/group): control-nondiabetic sedentary rats, control exercised-nondiabetic exercised rats, diabetic-diabetic sedentary rats, and diabetic exercised-diabetic exercised rats. A swimming program was used as an exercise model. At the end of pregnancy, the maternal oxidative stress status, placental morphology, and fetal weight were analyzed. The swimming program was not efficient to reduce the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. This fact impaired placental development, resulting in altered blood flow and energy reserves, which contributed to a deficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen for the fetal development, leading to IUGR. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Modeling Optical and Electronic Properties of Silica Nano-Clusters in Silicon Rich Oxide Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Espinosa-Torres

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum effects are very important in nano scale systems such as molecules and clusters constituted of particles from a few to hundreds or a few thousands of atoms. Their optical and electronic properties are often dependent on the size of the systems and the way in which the atoms in these molecules or clusters are bonded. Generally, these nano-structures display optical and electronic properties significantly different of the bulk materials. Silica agglomerates expected in Silicon Rich Oxide (SRO films have optical properties, which depend directly on size, and their rationalization can lead to new applications with a potential impact on many fields of science and technology. On the other hand, the room temperature photoluminescence (PL of Si : SiO2 or Si : SiOx structures usually found in SRO has recently generated an enormous interest due to their possible applications in optoelectronic devices. However, the understanding of the emission mechanism is still under debate. In this research, we employed the Density Functional Theory with a functional B3LYP and a basis set 6-31 G* to calculate the electronic and optical properties of molecules and clusters of silicon dioxide. With the theoretical calculation of the structural and optical properties of silicon dioxide clusters is possible to evaluate the contribution of silica in the luminescent emission mechanism experimentally found in thin SRO films. It was found that silica contribution to the luminescent phenomenon in SRO thin films is less important than that of the silicon monoxide agglomerates because the number of silica structures, which may show emission in the visible spectrum, is much lower [1], compared to the number of silicon monoxide structures which emit in this region.

  15. Temperature dependence of nickel oxide effect on the optoelectronic properties of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, R.; Derbali, L.; Ouertani, B.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the effect of Nickel oxide (NiO) on the structural and optical properties of porous silicon (PS). Our investigations showed an obvious improvement of porous silicon optoelectronique properties after coating the PS with NiO thin film as a passivating process. The as-prepared NiO/PS thin film was subjected to a thermal annealing to study the effect of temperature on the efficiency of this treatment. The deposition of NiO onto the porous silicon layer was performed using the spray pyrolysis method. The surface modification of the as-prepared NiO/PS samples was investigated after annealing at various temperatures, using an infrared furnace, ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. The X-ray Diffraction results showed that obtained films show cubic structure with preferred (200) plane orientation. We found an obvious dependence of the PS nanocrystallites size (nc-Si) to the annealing temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) is directly related to the electronic structure and transitions. The characteristic change of the band gap with decrease in size of the nanostructures can be pointed out by the observed blue shift in the photoluminescence spectra. Nickel oxide treatment of Porous silicon led to a significant increase of photoluminescence with a resulting blue-shift at higher annealing temperature. The surface morphology was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the chemical composition of the films. Moreover, the total reflectivity of NiO/PS samples decreases noticeably comparing to an untreated PS layer due to an enhanced light absorption.

  16. Solubilization of silica: Synthesis, characterization and study of penta-coordinated pyridine N-oxide silicon complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subramania Ranganathan; Ch Chandrashekhar Rao; Suvarchala Devi Vudayagiri; Y B R D Rajesh; B Jagadeesh

    2004-03-01

    In an effort to design agents that could solubilize silica in water, under ambient conditions and pH, as takes place in nature, novel zwitterionic, penta-oxo-coordinated silicon compounds with siliconate cores have been prepared from 4-substituted pyridine N-oxides (H, OMe, morpholino, NO2) as donor ligands, their structures established by 1H, 13C and MS, and the coordination number of silicon, by 29Si NMR. The formation of complexes from pyridine N-oxides is noteworthy since they arise from interaction with a weakly nucleophilic oxygen centre. The ability of the pyridine N-oxides to enhance the solubilization of silica in water has been experimentally demonstrated. Possible rationalization of this observation on the basis of O→Si coordination via the oxygen atom of pyridine N-oxide is suggested.

  17. Interaction of silicon-based quantum dots with gibel carp liver: oxidative and structural modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanca, Loredana; Petrache, Sorina Nicoleta; Serban, Andreea Iren; Staicu, Andrea Cristina; Sima, Cornelia; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Zărnescu, Otilia; Dinu, Diana; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2013-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) interaction with living organisms is of central interest due to their various biological and medical applications. One of the most important mechanisms proposed for various silicon nanoparticle-mediated toxicity is oxidative stress. We investigated the basic processes of cellular damage by oxidative stress and tissue injury following QD accumulation in the gibel carp liver after intraperitoneal injection of a single dose of 2 mg/kg body weight Si/SiO2 QDs after 1, 3, and 7 days from their administration. QDs gradual accumulation was highlighted by fluorescence microscopy, and subsequent histological changes in the hepatic tissue were noted. After 1 and 3 days, QD-treated fish showed an increased number of macrophage clusters and fibrosis, while hepatocyte basophilia and isolated hepatolytic microlesions were observed only after substantial QDs accumulation in the liver parenchyma, at 7 days after IP injection. Induction of oxidative stress in fish liver was revealed by the formation of malondialdehyde and advanced oxidation protein products, as well as a decrease in protein thiol groups and reduced glutathione levels. The liver enzymatic antioxidant defense was modulated to maintain the redox status in response to the changes initiated by Si/SiO2 QDs. So, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were upregulated starting from the first day after injection, while the activity of superoxide dismutase increased only after 7 days. The oxidative damage that still occurred may impair the activity of more sensitive enzymes. A significant inhibition in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione-S-transferase activity was noted, while glutathione reductase remained unaltered. Taking into account that the reduced glutathione level had a deep decline and the level of lipid peroxidation products remained highly increased in the time interval we studied, it appears that the liver antioxidant defense of Carassius gibelio does not counteract the

  18. Influence of Yttrium Ion-Implantation on the Growth Kinetics and Micro-Structure of NiO Oxide Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Huiming; Adriana FELIX; Majorri AROYAVE

    2008-01-01

    Isothermal and cyclic oxidation behaviours of pure and yttrium-implanted nickel were studied at 1000℃ in air. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the micro-morphology and structure of oxide scales formed on the nickel substrate. It was found that Y-implantation significantly improved the anti-oxidation ability of nickel in both isothermal and cyclic oxidizing experiments. Laser Raman microscopy was also used to study the stress status of oxide scales formed on nickel with and without yttrium. The main reason for the improvement in anti-oxidation of nickel was that Y-implantation greatly reduced the growing speed and grain size of NiO. This fine-grained NiO oxide film might have better high temperature plasticity and could relieve parts of compressive stress by means of creeping, and maintained a ridge character and a relatively low internal stress level. Hence yttrium ion-implantation remarkably enhanced the adhesion of protective NiO oxide scale formed on the nickel substrate.

  19. Silicon improves seed germination and alleviates oxidative stress of bud seedlings in tomato under water deficit stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Zhang, Yi; Yao, Hejin; Wu, Jiawen; Sun, Hao; Gong, Haijun

    2014-05-01

    The beneficial effects of silicon on plant growth and development under drought have been widely reported. However, little information is available on the effects of silicon on seed germination under drought. In this work, the effects of exogenous silicon (0.5 mM) on the seed germination and tolerance performance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) bud seedlings under water deficit stress simulated by 10% (w/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG-6000) were investigated in four cultivars ('Jinpengchaoguan', 'Zhongza No.9', 'Houpi L402' and 'Oubao318'). The results showed that the seed germination percentage was notably decreased in the four cultivars under water stress, and it was significantly improved by added silicon. Compared with the non-silicon treatment, silicon addition increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and decreased the production of superoxide anion (O2·) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the radicles of bud seedlings under water stress. Addition of silicon decreased the total phenol concentrations in radicles under water stress, which might contribute to the decrease of peroxidase (POD) activity, as observed in the in vivo and in vitro experiments. The decrease of POD activity might contribute to a less accumulation of hydroxyl radical (·OH) under water stress. Silicon addition also decreased the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the radicles under stress, indicating decreased lipid peroxidation. These results suggest that exogenous silicon could improve seed germination and alleviate oxidative stress to bud seedling of tomato by enhancing antioxidant defense. The positive effects of silicon observed in a silicon-excluder also suggest the active involvement of silicon in biochemical processes in plants.

  20. PreImplantation Factor (PIF*) endogenously prevents preeclampsia: Promotes trophoblast invasion and reduces oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, E R; Vialard, F; Moindjie, H; Ornaghi, S; Dieudonne, M N; Paidas, M J

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a unique pregnancy disorder whose patho-physiology is initiated early in gestation, while clinical manifestations typically occur in mid-to-late pregnancy. Thus, prevention should optimally be initiated in early gestation. The intimate interaction between PIF, secreted early by viable embryos, and its host-mother provides insight into putative mechanisms of preeclampsia prevention. PIF is instrumental at the two critical events underlying preeclampsia. At first, shallow implantation leads to impaired placentation, oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and endothelial dysfunction. Later in gestation, hyper-oxygenation due to overflow of maternally derived oxygenated blood compromises the placenta. The first is likely involved in early preeclampsia occurrence due to reduced effectiveness of trophoblast/uterus interaction. The latter is observed with later-onset preeclampsia, caused by a breakdown in placental blood flow regulation. We reported that 1. PIF promotes implantation, endometrium receptivity, trophoblast invasion and increases pro-tolerance trophoblastic HLA-G expression and, 2. PIF protects against oxidative stress and protein misfolding, interacting with specific targets in embryo, 3. PIF regulates systemic immunity to reduce oxidative stress. Using PIF as an early preventative preeclampsia intervention could ameliorate or even prevent the disease, whose current main solution is early delivery.

  1. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang; Piper, Daniela M.; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J.; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X.; Zhang, Jiguang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-11-25

    Surface modification of silicon nanoparticle via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism as how this thin layer of coating function is not known, which is even complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in-situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation, and therefore low coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD coated particles show extremely fast, thorough and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li+/e- conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer and therefore mitigates side reaction and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the coulombic efficiency and preserve capacity and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrated that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance as the coating layer itself.

  2. Influence of Lanthanum Ion-Implantation on Adhesive Property of Oxide Film Formed on Co-40Cr Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hui-ming; ZHANG Lin-nan; LIU Xiao-jun

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidizing kinetics of Co-40Cr alloy and its lanthanum ion-implanted samples were studied at 1 000 ℃ in air by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the Cr2O3 oxide film's morphology after oxidation. Secondary ion mass spectrum (SIMS) method was used to examine the binding energy change of chromium caused by La-doping and its influence on the formation of Cr2O3 film. Acoustic emission (AE) method was used in situ to monitor the cracking and spalling of oxide films during oxidizing and subsequent air-cooling stages. Laser Raman spectrum was used to examine the stress changes within oxide films. A theoretical model was proposed relating to the film fracture process and was used to analyze the AE spectrum both on time domain and AE-event number domain. It was found that lanthanum implantation remarkably reduced the isothermal oxidizing rate of Co-40Cr and improved the anti-cracking and anti-spalling properties of Cr2O3 oxide film. The reasons for the improvement were mainly that the implanted lanthanum reduced the grain size and internal stress of Cr2O3 oxide, increased the high temperature plasticity of oxide film, and remarkably reduced the number and size of Cr2O3/Co-40Cr interfacial defects.

  3. Superconductivity in gallium-implanted silicon; Supraleitung in Gallium-implantiertem Silizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrotzki, Richard

    2016-07-12

    The following thesis is devoted to the electrical characterization of 10 nm thin layers consisting of amorphous Ga nanoclusters embedded in Ga-doped polycrystalline Si. The preparation of the layers is realized via ion implantation in Si wafers plus subsequent thermal annealing. Electrical-transport measurements in magnetic fields of up to 50 T show that the layers undergo two structural superconductor-insulator transitions upon variation of the annealing parameters. Structural analyzes based on TEM investigations reveal an underlying transformation of the size and distance of the clusters. This influences the interplay of the superconducting cluster coupling and capacitive charging energy as well as the extent of thermal and quantum fluctuations. In the superconducting regime (Tc ∼ 7 K) a double-reentrant phenomenon is observed. Here, magnetic fields of several Tesla facilitate superconductivity in an anisotropic way. A qualitative explanation is given via a self-developed theoretical model based on phase-slip events for Josephson-junction arrays. With respect to applications regarding sensor technology and quantum logic circuits the layers are successfully micro- and nanostructured via photolithography and FIB. This allows for the first observation of the Little-Parks effect in a nanostructure of amorphous Ga.

  4. Electro-oxidation of organic fuels catalyzed by ultrasmall silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongki; Wang, Gang; Nayfeh, Munir H.; Yau, Siu-Tung

    2008-10-01

    Ultrasmall colloidal silicon nanoparticles behave as electrocatalysts for the oxidation of ethanol, methanol, and glucose. Electrochemical characterization of particle-immobilized electrodes shows a catalytic onset between -0.4 and 0 V versus Ag/AgCl at neutral pH. The onset potential and the catalytic strength are dependent on the particle size. A prototype hybrid biofuel cell was constructed, using the particles as the anode catalyst. The catalytic activity undergoes a 50-fold increase under alkaline condition compared to that under acidic condition. An unexpected light dependence of the catalytic current was observed. A significant increase in the catalytic current is obtained when the catalysis is performed in darkness.

  5. Insights into electrical characteristics of silicon doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dayu; Müller, J.; Xu, Jin; Knebel, S.; Bräuhaus, D.; Schröder, U.

    2012-02-01

    Silicon doped hafnium oxide thin films were recently discovered to exhibit ferroelectricity. In the present study, metal-ferroelectric-metal capacitors with Si:HfO2 thin films as ferroelectric material and TiN as electrodes have been characterized with respect to capacitance and current density as functions of temperature and applied voltage. Polarity asymmetry of the frequency dependent coercive field was explained by interfacial effects. No ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition was observed at temperatures up to 478 K. Clear distinctions between current evolutions with or without polarization switching were correlated to the time competition between the measurement and the response of relaxation mechanisms.

  6. Electronic detection of surface plasmon polaritons by metal-oxide-silicon capacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Peale

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An electronic detector of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs is reported. SPPs optically excited on a metal surface using a prism coupler are detected by using a close-coupled metal-oxide-silicon (MOS capacitor. Incidence-angle dependence is explained by Fresnel transmittance calculations, which also are used to investigate the dependence of photo-response on structure dimensions. Electrodynamic simulations agree with theory and experiment and additionally provide spatial intensity distributions on and off the SPP excitation resonance. Experimental dependence of the photoresponse on substrate carrier type, carrier concentration, and back-contact biasing is qualitatively explained by simple theory of MOS capacitors.

  7. Electronic detection of surface plasmon polaritons by metal-oxide-silicon capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peale, Robert E.; Smith, Evan; Smith, Christian W.; Khalilzadeh-Rezaie, Farnood; Ishigami, Masa; Nader, Nima; Vangala, Shiva; Cleary, Justin W.

    2016-09-01

    An electronic detector of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is reported. SPPs optically excited on a metal surface using a prism coupler are detected by using a close-coupled metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor. Incidence-angle dependence is explained by Fresnel transmittance calculations, which also are used to investigate the dependence of photo-response on structure dimensions. Electrodynamic simulations agree with theory and experiment and additionally provide spatial intensity distributions on and off the SPP excitation resonance. Experimental dependence of the photoresponse on substrate carrier type, carrier concentration, and back-contact biasing is qualitatively explained by simple theory of MOS capacitors.

  8. Oxidation of Self Lift-off Silicon Microchannels%自分离硅微通道的氧化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田菲; 袁丁; 王连卫

    2009-01-01

    本文研究了自分离硅微通道(self lift-off silicon microchannels)的氧化问题.自分离是在特定的实验条件下,在完成电化学刻蚀后,硅微通道可以自动和衬底分离的一种新技术.研究发现,在使用传统的干氧-湿氧-干氧氧化化过程中,硅微通道出现了弯曲变形的现象.微通道越薄,其形变越大.通过使用较厚的硅微通道以及在干-湿-干氧化过程之前增加了干氧,以及先进行激光切割的步骤,改善和基本消除了弯曲变形的现象.%The oxidation of the self lift-off silicon microchannels is studied. Self lift-off silicon micro-channels are fabricated by a new technology; under certain experimental conditions, the silicon micro-channels can lift off from the substrate automatically after electrochemical etching. In the process of the traditional dry-wet-dry oxidation, damages and distortion of the silicon microchannels occurred. It was found that the thinner the silicon microchannels, the more serious the distortion and damages are. By u-sing thicker silicon microchannels and adding a procedure of dry oxidation before the dry-wet-dry oxi-dation, the damages and distortion of the silicon microchannels can be eliminated.

  9. Drug delivery via porous silicon: a focused patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyavtsev, Paulina A; Spencer, Roxanne P

    2017-03-01

    Although silicon is more commonly associated with computer chips than with drug delivery, with the discovery that porous silicon is a viable biocompatible material, mesoporous silicon with pores between 2 and 50 nm has been loaded with small molecule and biomolecule therapeutics and safely implanted for controlled release. As porous silicon is readily oxidized, porous silica must also be considered for drug delivery applications. Since 2010, only a limited number of US patents have been granted, primarily for ophthalmologic and immunotherapy applications, in contrast to the growing body of technical literature in this area.

  10. Development of calcium titanium oxide coated silicon solar cells for enhanced voltage generation capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathirvel K.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Depletion of fossil fuel based energy sources drive the present scenario towards development of solar based alternative energy. Polycrystalline silicon solar cells are preferred due to low cost and abundant availability. However, the power conversion efficiency of polycrystalline silicon is lesser compared to monocrystalline one. The present study aims at analyzing the effect of calcium titanium oxide (CaTiO3 antireflection (AR coating on the power conversion of polycrystalline solar cells. CaTiO3 offers unique characteristics, such as non-radioactive and non-magnetic orthorhombic biaxial structure with bulk density of 3.91 g/cm3. CaTiO3 film deposition on the solar cell substrate has been carried out using Radio Frequency (RF magnetron sputter coating technique under varying time durations (10 min to 45 min. Morphological studies proved the formation of CaTiO3 layer and respective elemental percentages on the coated substrate. Open circuit voltage studies were conducted on bare and coated silicon solar substrates under open and controlled atmospheric conditions. CaTiO3 coated on a solar cell substrate in a deposition time of 30 min showed 8.76 % improvement in the cell voltage compared to the bare solar cell.

  11. Silicon induced stability and mobility of indium zinc oxide based bilayer thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ram Narayan; Tiwari, Nidhi; Liu, Po-Tsun; Shieh, Han-Ping D.; Kumar, Jitendra

    2016-11-01

    Indium zinc oxide (IZO), silicon containing IZO, and IZO/IZO:Si bilayer thin films have been prepared by dual radio frequency magnetron sputtering on glass and SiO2/Si substrates for studying their chemical compositions and electrical characteristics in order to ascertain reliability for thin film transistor (TFT) applications. An attempt is therefore made here to fabricate single IZO and IZO/IZO:Si bilayer TFTs to study the effect of film thickness, silicon incorporation, and bilayer active channel on device performance and negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) stability. TFTs with increasing single active IZO layer thickness exhibit decrease in carrier mobility but steady improvement in NBIS; the best values being μFE ˜ 27.0, 22.0 cm2/Vs and ΔVth ˜ -13.00, -6.75 V for a channel thickness of 7 and 27 nm, respectively. While silicon incorporation is shown to reduce the mobility somewhat, it raises the stability markedly (ΔVth ˜ -1.20 V). Further, IZO (7 nm)/IZO:Si (27 nm) bilayer based TFTs display useful characteristics (field effect mobility, μFE = 15.3 cm2/Vs and NBIS value, ΔVth =-0.75 V) for their application in transparent electronics.

  12. Supersaturating silicon with transition metals by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recht, Daniel; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Smith, Matthew J.; Gradečak, Silvija [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Williams, James S. [Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Sullivan, Joseph T.; Winkler, Mark T.; Buonassisi, Tonio [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Mathews, Jay; Warrender, Jeffrey M. [Benet Laboratories, U.S. Army ARDEC, Watervliet, New York 12189 (United States)

    2013-09-28

    We investigate the possibility of creating an intermediate band semiconductor by supersaturating Si with a range of transition metals (Au, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pd, Pt, W, and Zn) using ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (PLM). Structural characterization shows evidence of either surface segregation or cellular breakdown in all transition metals investigated, preventing the formation of high supersaturations. However, concentration-depth profiling reveals that regions of Si supersaturated with Au and Zn are formed below the regions of cellular breakdown. Fits to the concentration-depth profile are used to estimate the diffusive speeds, v{sub D,} of Au and Zn, and put lower bounds on v{sub D} of the other metals ranging from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} m/s. Knowledge of v{sub D} is used to tailor the irradiation conditions and synthesize single-crystal Si supersaturated with 10{sup 19} Au/cm{sup 3} without cellular breakdown. Values of v{sub D} are compared to those for other elements in Si. Two independent thermophysical properties, the solute diffusivity at the melting temperature, D{sub s}(T{sub m}), and the equilibrium partition coefficient, k{sub e}, are shown to simultaneously affect v{sub D}. We demonstrate a correlation between v{sub D} and the ratio D{sub s}(T{sub m})/k{sub e}{sup 0.67}, which is exhibited for Group III, IV, and V solutes but not for the transition metals investigated. Nevertheless, comparison with experimental results suggests that D{sub s}(T{sub m})/k{sub e}{sup 0.67} might serve as a metric for evaluating the potential to supersaturate Si with transition metals by PLM.

  13. Magnetic-ion-doped silicon nanostructures fabricated by ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Fang, E-mail: v.fang@gns.cri.nz [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Johnson, Peter B. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Kennedy, John; Markwitz, Andreas [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2013-07-15

    Magnetic-ion-doped Si nanostructures (nanowhiskers) were fabricated by a two-step process on Si (1 0 0) substrates. The substrates were implanted with 7 keV Fe{sup +} to a fluence (F) in the range 1 × 10{sup 13}–4 × 10{sup 15} Fe{sup +} cm{sup −2} prior to electron beam annealing (EBA) for 15 s at a maximum temperature, T, in the range 600–1100 °C. The two-step process was found to produce nanowhiskers at higher surface densities than those produced by applying EBA alone. With increase in Fe{sup +} fluence there is a striking increase in the surface density of the Si nanowhiskers, together with a decrease in the average height. For example, for T = 1000 °C, the density and average height are respectively 12 μm{sup −2} and 8.8 nm for F = 1 × 10{sup 13} Fe{sup +} cm{sup −2}, and 82 μm{sup −2} and 3.1 nm for F = 4 × 10{sup 15} Fe{sup +} cm{sup −2}. The results are compared with those from a three-step process in which the nanowhiskers are pre-formed in a prior EBA treatment. The two-step process is found to be superior for producing high densities with height distributions having lower fractional spreads. The mechanism of the nucleation and growth of nanowhiskers in the final EBA step is discussed. Selected results are presented to show the possibility of controlling the density and average height of Si nanowhiskers doped with magnetic ions for spin-dependent enhanced field emission.

  14. Characterization of Breast Implant Surfaces, Shapes, and Biomechanics: A Comparison of High Cohesive Anatomically Shaped Textured Silicone, Breast Implants from Three Different Manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlan, Michael; Bigerelle, Maxence; Larreta-garde, Véronique; Hindié, Mathilde; Hedén, Per

    2016-02-01

    Several companies offer anatomically shaped breast implants but differences among manufacturers are often misunderstood. The shell texture is a crucial parameter for anatomically shaped implants to prevent rotation and to decrease the risk of capsular contracture, even though concerns have recently been raised concerning the complications associated with textured breast implants. The aim of this study was to characterize differences in terms of texture, cell adhesion, shape, and stiffness between some commonly used anatomically shaped implants from three different manufacturers. Five commercially available anatomically shaped breast implants from 3 different manufacturers (Allergan, Mentor, and Sebbin) were used. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microtomography, and scanning mechanical microscopy were used to characterize the shell texture. Human fibroblast adhesion onto the shells was evaluated. 3D models of the implants were obtained using CT-scan acquisitions to analyze their shape. Implant stiffness was evaluated using a tractiometer. Major differences were observed in the topography of the textures of the shells, but this was not conveyed by a statistically significant fibroblast adhesion difference. However, fibroblasts adhered better on anatomically shaped textured implants than on smooth implants (p Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  15. Effects of lanthanum ion-implantation on microstructure of oxide film formed on Co-Cr alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Huiming; ZHOU Xiaowei; ZHANG Linnan

    2008-01-01

    Isothermal and cyclic oxidizing behavior of Co-40Cr alloy and its lanthanum ion-implanted samples were studied at 1000℃ in the air by thermal-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the morphology and structure of oxide film after oxidation. Secondary ion mass spectrum (SIMS) method was used to examine the binding energy change of chromium caused by La-doping and its influence on the formation of Cr2O3 film. Laser Raman spectrum was used to examine the stress changes within the oxide film. It was found that lanthanum implantation remarkably reduced isothermal oxidizing rate of Co-40Cr and improved anti-cracking and anti-spalling properties of Cr2O3 oxide film. The reasons for the improvement were mainly that the implanted lanthanum reduced the grain size and internal stress of Cr2O3 oxide and increased high temperature plasticity of the oxide film. Lanthanum mainly existed on the outer surface of Cr2O3 oxide film in the form of fine La2O3 and LaCrO3 spinel particles.

  16. Controlled Oxidation, Biofunctionalization, and Patterning of Alkyl Monolayers on Silicon and Silicon Nitride Surfaces using Plasma Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosso, M.; Giesbers, M.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Zuilhof, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for the fast and reproducible functionalization of silicon and silicon nitride surfaces coated with covalently attached alkyl monolayers. After formation of a methyl-terminated 1-hexadecyl monolayer on H-terminated Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces, short plasma treatments (1-3

  17. Surface Oxidation and Fast 18O Implant Diffusion in Nanostructured Layers of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Duvanov; A.G. Balogh

    2015-01-01

    A formation of the near surface barrier composite oxide film and two-stage 18O implant diffusion in modified layers of Ti-6Al-4V alloy were observed in the present work. Fast and super fast regimes occur during second stage of the diffusion. Sample modification was performed using ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) atmosphere. Parameters of ion implantation are the following: 18O+ ion energy of 30 keV; fluence of 3 × 1017 ion/cm2; RT. Post-implantatio...

  18. CO oxidation catalyzed by silicon carbide (SiC) monolayer: A theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Jingxiang; Jin, Peng

    2016-05-01

    Developing metal-free catalysts for CO oxidation has been a key scientific issue in solving the growing environmental problems caused by CO emission. In this work, the potential of the silicon carbide (SiC) monolayer as a metal-free catalyst for CO oxidation was systematically explored by means of density functional theory (DFT) computations. Our results revealed that CO oxidation reaction can easily proceed on SiC nanosheet, and a three-step mechanism was proposed: (1) the coadsorption of CO and O2 molecules, followed by (2) the formation of the first CO2 molecule, and (3) the recovery of catalyst by a second CO molecule. The last step is the rate-determining one of the whole catalytic reaction with the highest barrier of 0.65eV. Remarkably, larger curvature is found to have a negative effect on the catalytic performance of SiC nanosheet for CO oxidation. Therefore, our results suggested that flat SiC monolayer is a promising metal-free catalyst for CO oxidation.

  19. Influence of Yttrium Ion-implantation on Oxidation Kinetics of Co-40Cr Alloy and Property of