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Sample records for implanted atom density

  1. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilteanu, L.

    2010-12-01

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCut TM technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  2. Atomic retention and near infrared photoluminescence from PbSe nanocrystals fabricated by sequential ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carder, D.A.; Markwitz, A.; Reeves, R.J.; Kennedy, J.; Fang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystals of PbSe have been fabricated in a silicon dioxide matrix by sequential low energy ion implantation followed by an electron beam annealing step. Transmission electron microscopy reveals PbSe nanocrystals with typical sizes between 3 and 10 nm in the sub-surface region. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry has been used to study the total atomic retention, as a function of implanted atoms, following annealing. Photoluminescence was observed in various samples, at 4 K, as a broad peak between 1.4 and 2.0 μm, with observation of a dependence of the peak wavelength on annealing temperature. Room temperature photoluminescence was observed for samples with a high retention of implanted atoms, demonstrating the importance of nanocrystal density for achieving ambient temperature emission in these systems

  3. Modification of high density polyethylene by gold implantation using different ion energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenadović, M.; Potočnik, J. [INS Vinca, Laboratory of Atomic Physics, University of Belgrade, Mike Alasa 12–14, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Mitrić, M. [INS Vinca, Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, University of Belgrade, Mike Alasa 12–14, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Štrbac, S. [ICTM Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Belgrade, Njegoseva 12, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakočević, Z., E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [INS Vinca, Laboratory of Atomic Physics, University of Belgrade, Mike Alasa 12–14, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2013-11-01

    High density polyethylene (HDPE) samples were modified by Au{sup +} ion implantation at a dose of 5 × 10{sup 15} ions cm{sup −2}, using energies of 50, 100, 150 and 200 keV. The existence of implanted gold in the near-surface region of HDPE samples was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Surface roughness and Power Spectral Density analyses based on Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images of the surface topography revealed that the mechanism of HDPE modification during gold ion implantation depended on the energy of gold ions. Histograms obtained from phase AFM images indicated a qualitative change in the chemical composition of the surface during implantation with gold ions with different energies. Depth profiles obtained experimentally from cross-sectional Force Modulation Microscopy images and ones obtained from a theoretical simulation are in agreement for gold ions energies lower than 100 keV. The deviation that was observed for higher energies of the gold ions is explained by carbon precipitation in the near surface region of the HDPE, which prevented the penetration of gold ions further into the depth of the sample. - Highlights: • HDPE was implanted by Au{sup +} ions using energies of 50, 100, 150 and 200 keV. • Surface composition was analyzed from phase AFM images. • FMM depth profiles are in agreement with theoretical ones for energies up to 100 keV. • A deviation is observed for higher gold ion energies.

  4. Modification of high density polyethylene by gold implantation using different ion energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenadović, M.; Potočnik, J.; Mitrić, M.; Štrbac, S.; Rakočević, Z.

    2013-01-01

    High density polyethylene (HDPE) samples were modified by Au + ion implantation at a dose of 5 × 10 15 ions cm −2 , using energies of 50, 100, 150 and 200 keV. The existence of implanted gold in the near-surface region of HDPE samples was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Surface roughness and Power Spectral Density analyses based on Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images of the surface topography revealed that the mechanism of HDPE modification during gold ion implantation depended on the energy of gold ions. Histograms obtained from phase AFM images indicated a qualitative change in the chemical composition of the surface during implantation with gold ions with different energies. Depth profiles obtained experimentally from cross-sectional Force Modulation Microscopy images and ones obtained from a theoretical simulation are in agreement for gold ions energies lower than 100 keV. The deviation that was observed for higher energies of the gold ions is explained by carbon precipitation in the near surface region of the HDPE, which prevented the penetration of gold ions further into the depth of the sample. - Highlights: • HDPE was implanted by Au + ions using energies of 50, 100, 150 and 200 keV. • Surface composition was analyzed from phase AFM images. • FMM depth profiles are in agreement with theoretical ones for energies up to 100 keV. • A deviation is observed for higher gold ion energies

  5. Bond formation in hafnium atom implantation into SiC induced by high-energy electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, H.; Mori, H.; Sakata, T.; Naka, M.; Fujita, H.

    1992-01-01

    Bilayer films of Hf (target atoms)/α-SiC (substrate) were irradiated with 2 MeV electrons in an ultra-high voltage electron microscope (UHVEM), with the electron beam incident on the hafnium layer. As a result of the irradiation, hafnium atoms were implanted into the SiC substrate. Changes in the microstructure and valence electronic states associated with the implantation were studied by a combination of UHVEM and Auger valence electron spectroscopy. The implantation process is summarized as follows. (1) Irradiation with 2 MeV electrons first induces a crystalline-to-amorphous transition in α-SiC. (2) Hafnium atoms which have been knocked-off from the hafnium layer by collision with the 2 MeV electrons are implanted into the resultant amorphous SiC. (3) The implanted hafnium atoms make preferential bonding to carbon atoms. (4) With continued irradiation, the hafnium atoms repeat the displacement along the beam direction and the subsequent bonding with the dangling hybrids of carbon and silicon. The repetition of the displacement and subsequent bonding lead to the deep implantation of hafnium atoms into the SiC substrate. It is concluded that implantation successfully occurs when the bond strength between a constituent atom of a substrate and an injected atom is stronger than that between constituent atoms of a substrate. (Author)

  6. A=225 implantation for $^{221}$Fr source for TRIUMF atom trap

    CERN Multimedia

    The FrPNC Collaboration is mounting an atom trap for parity violation experiments and precision spectroscopy on francium atoms at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We would like to use ISOLDE's capability of simultaneously implanting A=225 (while another experiment runs online) to make a long-lived source feeding $^{221}$Fr for tests of the trap. $^{225}$Ra $\\beta$-decays to $^{225}$Ac, which then $\\alpha$-decays, producing 100 keV $^{221}$Fr t$_{1/2}$= 4.8 minute recoils. The implanted A=225 source would be shipped to TRIUMF, where it would be held for several minutes at a time a few mm from the same yttrium foil that normally receives the ISAC beam. SRIM calculations imply that 20% of the $^{221}$Fr will be implanted in a 1 cm diameter spot on the yttrium. Then the yttrium foil is moved to the trap and heated to release the Fr atoms, just as in normal ISAC online operation. A test implantation will be done at 10$^{7}$/sec production for 1 day, testing whether carbon cracking on the implantation foil in the mass separ...

  7. Ballistic self-annealing during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prins, Johan F.

    2001-01-01

    Ion implantation conditions are considered during which the energy, dissipated in the collision cascades, is low enough to ensure that the defects, which are generated during these collisions, consist primarily of vacancies and interstitial atoms. It is proposed that ballistic self-annealing is possible when the point defect density becomes high enough, provided that none, or very few, of the interstitial atoms escape from the layer being implanted. Under these conditions, the fraction of ballistic atoms, generated within the collision cascades from substitutional sites, decreases with increasing ion dose. Furthermore, the fraction of ballistic atoms, which finally end up within vacancies, increases with increasing vacancy density. Provided the crystal structure does not collapse, a damage threshold should be approached where just as many atoms are knocked out of substitutional sites as the number of ballistic atoms that fall back into vacancies. Under these conditions, the average point defect density should approach saturation. This model is applied to recently published Raman data that have been measured on a 3 MeV He + -ion implanted diamond (Orwa et al 2000 Phys. Rev. B 62 5461). The conclusion is reached that this ballistic self-annealing model describes the latter data better than a model in which it is assumed that the saturation in radiation damage is caused by amorphization of the implanted layer. (author)

  8. Nonspherical atomic ground-state densities and chemical deformation densities from x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedenberg, K.; Schwarz, W.H.E.

    1990-01-01

    Presuming that chemical insight can be gained from the difference between the molecular electron density and the superposition of the ground-state densities of the atoms in a molecule, it is pointed out that, for atoms with degenerate ground states, an unpromoted ''atom in a molecule'' is represented by a specific ensemble of the degenerate atomic ground-state wave functions and that this ensemble is determined by the anisotropic local surroundings. The resulting atomic density contributions are termed oriented ground state densities, and the corresponding density difference is called the chemical deformation density. The constraints implied by this conceptual approach for the atomic density contributions are formulated and a method is developed for determining them from x-ray scattering data. The electron density of the appropriate promolecule and its x-ray scattering are derived, the determination of the parameters of the promolecule is outlined, and the chemical deformation density is formulated

  9. Local electronic and geometric structures of silicon atoms implanted in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao

    2002-01-01

    Low-energy Si + ions were implanted in highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) up to 1% of surface atomic concentration, and the local electronic and geometric structures around the silicon atoms were in situ investigated by means of the Si K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation. The resonance peak appeared at 1839.5 eV in the Si K-edge XANES spectra for Si + -implanted HOPG. This energy is lower than those of the Si 1s→σ * resonance peaks in any other Si-containing materials. The intensity of the resonance peak showed strong polarization dependence, which suggests that the final state orbitals around the implanted Si atoms have π * -like character. It is concluded that the σ-type Si-C bonds produced by the Si + -ion implantation are nearly parallel to the graphite plane, and Si x C phase forms two-dimensionally spread graphite-like layer with sp 2 bonds

  10. Nonlinear effects in defect production by atomic and molecular ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, C.; Dholakia, Manan; Chandra, Sharat; Nair, K. G. M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Amirthapandian, S.; Amarendra, G.; Varghese Anto, C.; Santhana Raman, P.; Kennedy, John

    2015-01-01

    This report deals with studies concerning vacancy related defects created in silicon due to implantation of 200 keV per atom aluminium and its molecular ions up to a plurality of 4. The depth profiles of vacancy defects in samples in their as implanted condition are carried out by Doppler broadening spectroscopy using low energy positron beams. In contrast to studies in the literature reporting a progressive increase in damage with plurality, implantation of aluminium atomic and molecular ions up to Al 3 , resulted in production of similar concentration of vacancy defects. However, a drastic increase in vacancy defects is observed due to Al 4 implantation. The observed behavioural trend with respect to plurality has even translated to the number of vacancies locked in vacancy clusters, as determined through gold labelling experiments. The impact of aluminium atomic and molecular ions simulated using MD showed a monotonic increase in production of vacancy defects for cluster sizes up to 4. The trend in damage production with plurality has been explained on the basis of a defect evolution scheme in which for medium defect concentrations, there is a saturation of the as-implanted damage and an increase for higher defect concentrations

  11. Correlation between radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around dental implant and resonance frequency of dental implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawoko, S. S.; Nelwan, L. C.; Odang, R. W.; Kusdhany, L. S.

    2017-08-01

    The histomorphometric test is the gold standard for dental implant stability quantification; however, it is invasive, and therefore, it is inapplicable to clinical patients. Consequently, accurate and objective alternative methods are required. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and digital radiographic analysis are noninvasive methods with excellent objectivity and reproducibility. To analyze the correlation between the radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around a dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant. Digital radiographic images for 35 samples were obtained, and the resonance frequency of the dental implant was acquired using Osstell ISQ immediately after dental implant placement and on third-month follow-up. The alveolar bone density around the dental implant was subsequently analyzed using SIDEXIS-XG software. No significant correlation was reported between the alveolar bone density around the dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant (r = -0.102 at baseline, r = 0.146 at follow-up, p > 0.05). However, the alveolar bone density and resonance frequency showed a significant difference throughout the healing period (p = 0.005 and p = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: Digital dental radiographs and Osstell ISQ showed excellent objectivity and reproducibility in quantifying dental implant stability. Nonetheless, no significant correlation was observed between the results obtained using these two methods.

  12. Emission Channeling Studies of the Lattice Site of Oversized Alkali Atoms Implanted in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS340 \\\\ \\\\ As alkali atoms have the largest atomic radius of all elements, the determination of their lattice configuration following implantation into metals forms a critical test for the various models predicting the lattice site of implanted impurity atoms. The site determination of these large atoms will especially be a crucial check for the most recent model that relates the substitutional fraction of oversized elements to their solution enthalpy. Recent exploratory $^{213}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr $\\alpha$-emission channeling experiments at ISOLDE-CERN and hyperfine interaction measurements on Fr implanted in Fe gave an indication for anomalously large substitutional fractions. To investigate further the behaviour of Fr and other alkali atoms like Cs and Rb thoroughly, more on-line emission channeling experiments are needed. We propose a number of shifts for each element, where the temperature of the implanted metals will be varied between 50$^\\circ$ and 700$^\\circ$~K. Temperature dependent measurements wi...

  13. Dopant density from maximum-minimum capacitance ratio of implanted MOS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brews, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    For uniformly doped structures, the ratio of the maximum to the minimum high frequency capacitance determines the dopant ion density per unit volume. Here it is shown that for implanted structures this 'max-min' dopant density estimate depends upon the dose and depth of the implant through the first moment of the depleted portion of the implant. A a result, the 'max-min' estimate of dopant ion density reflects neither the surface dopant density nor the average of the dopant density over the depletion layer. In particular, it is not clear how this dopant ion density estimate is related to the flatband capacitance. (author)

  14. Lattice site occupation of insoluble impurity atoms in aluminium after implantation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloska, M.K.

    1987-03-01

    Several elements, whose atoms are oversized and insoluble in aluminium, were implanted in aluminium single crystals at different temperatures. The substitutional fraction and the lattice site location were determined using the ion-channeling technique. The substitutional fractions obtained by in situ analyses are strongly dependent on the implantation temperature. At implantation and analysis temperatures below the temperature of stage III the substitutional fraction is significant larger than at temperatures above. With increasing heat of solution the substitutional fraction decreases for all implantation temperatures. The nonsubstitutional component consists of impurity atom-vacancy complexes. These complexes are formed in the cooling phase of the cascade. At temperatures above the temperature of stage III additional free mobile vacancies were captured by the impurity atoms. The capture radius is correlated with the heat of solution and the size mismatch energy. The results constitute for the first time an experimental confirmation of molecular dynamics calculations of cascade evolution. (orig./BHO)

  15. Primary stability and self-tapping blades: biomechanical assessment of dental implants in medium-density bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yung-Soo; Lim, Young-Jun

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this biomechanical study was to assess the influence of self-tapping blades in terms of primary implant stability between implants with self-tapping blades and implants without self-tapping blades using five different analytic methods, especially in medium-density bone. Two different types of dental implants (4 × 10 mm) were tested: self-tapping and non-self-tapping. The fixture design including thread profiles was exactly the same between the two groups; the only difference was the presence of cutting blades on one half of the apical portion of the implant body. Solid rigid polyurethane blocks with corresponding densities were selected to simulate medium-density bone. Five mechanical assessments (insertion torque, resonance frequency analysis [RFA], reverse torque, pull-out and push in test) were performed for primary stability. Implants without self-tapping blades showed significantly higher values (P0.05). The outcomes of the present study indicate that the implant body design without self-tapping blades has a good primary stability compared with that with self-tapping blades in medium-density bone. Considering the RFA, a distinct layer of cortical bone on marginal bone will yield implant stability quotient values similar to those in medium-bone density when implants have the same diameter. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Kinetic-energy density functional: Atoms and shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E.

    1996-01-01

    We present a nonlocal kinetic-energy functional which includes an anisotropic average of the density through a symmetrization procedure. This functional allows a better description of the nonlocal effects of the electron system. The main consequence of the symmetrization is the appearance of a clear shell structure in the atomic density profiles, obtained after the minimization of the total energy. Although previous results with some of the nonlocal kinetic functionals have given incipient structures for heavy atoms, only our functional shows a clear shell structure for most of the atoms. The atomic total energies have a good agreement with the exact calculations. Discussion of the chemical potential and the first ionization potential in atoms is included. The functional is also extended to spin-polarized systems. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Bone density around the fixture after function of implant molar prosthesis using CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae Hyun; Hwang, In Taik; Jung, Byung Hyun; Kim, Jae Duk; Kang, Dong Wan [School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the significance of increased bone density according to whether bone grafts were applied using demographic data with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to compare the bone densities between before and after implant prosthesis using the Hounsfield index. Thirty-six randomly selected computed tomography (CT) scans were used for the analysis. The same sites were evaluated digitally using the Hounsfield scale with V-Implant 2.0TM, and the results were compared with maxillary posterior bone graft. Statistical data analysis was carried out to determine the correlation between the recorded Hounsfield unit (HU) of the bone graft and implant prosthesis using a Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon Matched-pairs test. The bone grafted maxillary posterior teeth showed an increase in the mean values from-157 HU to 387 HU, whereas non-grafted maxillary posterior teeth showed an increase from 62 HU to 342 HU. After implantation, the grafted and non-grafted groups showed significantly higher bone density than before implantation. However, the grafted group showed significantly more changes than the non-grafted group. Bone density measurements using CBCT might provide an objective assessment of the bone quality as well as the correlation between bone density (Hounsfield scale) and bone grafts in the maxillary molar area.

  18. The appearance and effects of metallic implants in CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairn, T.; Crowe, S.B.; Trapp, J.V.; Fogg, P.

    2013-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging artefacts that metallic medical implants produce in surrounding tissues are usually contoured and over-ridden during radiotherapy treatment planning. In cases where radiotherapy treatment beams unavoidably pass though implants, it is especially important to understand the imaging artefacts that may occur within the implants themselves. This study examines CT images of a set of simple metallic objects, immersed in water, in order to evaluate reliability and variability of CT numbers (Hounsfield units, HUs) within medical implants. Model implants with a range of sizes (heights from 2.2 to 49.6 mm), electron densities (from 2.3 to 7.7 times the electron density of water) and effective atomic numbers (from 3.9 to 9.0 times the effective atomic number of water in a CT X-ray beam) were created by stacking metal coins from several currencies. These 'implants' were CT scanned within a large (31.0 cm across) and a small (12.8 cm across) water phantom. Resulting HU values are as much as 50 % lower than the result of extrapolating standard electron density calibration data (obtained for tissue and bone densities) up to the metal densities and there is a 6 % difference between the results obtained by scanning with 120 and 140 kVp tube potentials. Profiles through the implants show localised cupping artefacts, within the implants, as well as a gradual decline in HU outside the implants that can cause the implants' sizes to be over estimated by 1.3–9.0 mm. These effects are exacerbated when the implants are scanned in the small phantom or at the side of the large phantom, due to reduced pre-hardening of the X-ray beam in these configurations. These results demonstrate the necessity of over-riding the densities of metallic implants, as well as their artefacts in tissue, in order to obtain accurate radiotherapy dose calculations.

  19. The appearance and effects of metallic implants in CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Fogg, P; Trapp, J V

    2013-06-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging artefacts that metallic medical implants produce in surrounding tissues are usually contoured and over-ridden during radiotherapy treatment planning. In cases where radiotherapy treatment beams unavoidably pass though implants, it is especially important to understand the imaging artefacts that may occur within the implants themselves. This study examines CT images of a set of simple metallic objects, immersed in water, in order to evaluate reliability and variability of CT numbers (Hounsfield units, HUs) within medical implants. Model implants with a range of sizes (heights from 2.2 to 49.6 mm), electron densities (from 2.3 to 7.7 times the electron density of water) and effective atomic numbers (from 3.9 to 9.0 times the effective atomic number of water in a CT X-ray beam) were created by stacking metal coins from several currencies. These 'implants' were CT scanned within a large (31.0 cm across) and a small (12.8 cm across) water phantom. Resulting HU values are as much as 50 % lower than the result of extrapolating standard electron density calibration data (obtained for tissue and bone densities) up to the metal densities and there is a 6 % difference between the results obtained by scanning with 120 and 140 kVp tube potentials. Profiles through the implants show localised cupping artefacts, within the implants, as well as a gradual decline in HU outside the implants that can cause the implants' sizes to be over estimated by 1.3-9.0 mm. These effects are exacerbated when the implants are scanned in the small phantom or at the side of the large phantom, due to reduced pre-hardening of the X-ray beam in these configurations. These results demonstrate the necessity of over-riding the densities of metallic implants, as well as their artefacts in tissue, in order to obtain accurate radiotherapy dose calculations.

  20. Measurements of H-atom density by a catalytic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesel, A.; Drenik, A.; Mozetic, M.

    2006-01-01

    One of the important plasma parameters in tokamaks is the density of neutral hydrogen atoms which can be measured by catalytic probes. The method is based on the catalytic recombination of H atoms on the metal surface. In order to prevent a substantial drain of atoms by the probe, it should be made as small as possible. But still this effect can not be neglected. Therefore a study of the influence of a catalytic probe on the H-atom density was performed. The source of neutral H-atoms was inductively coupled RF hydrogen plasma. The gas from the discharge vessel was leaked to an experimental chamber through a narrow tube with the diameter of 5 mm and the length of 6 cm. Charged particles created in the discharge vessel were recombined on the walls of the narrow tube, so that the gas entering the experimental chamber was a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules only. The density of H-atoms in the experimental chamber was measured with two nickel catalytic probes. One probe was at fixed position and the other one was made movable. A change in the probe signal of the fixed probe was measured versus the position of the movable probe. The measurements were performed at the pressures between 10 Pa and 200 Pa and at two different RF powers 200 W and 300 W. It was found that the density of neutral hydrogen atoms was reduced for about 20% due to the presence of the probe. This result was independent from the pressure in the experimental chamber. (author)

  1. Negative-ion current density dependence of the surface potential of insulated electrode during negative-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Okayama, Yoshio; Toyota, Yoshitaka; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki; Tanjyo, Masayasu; Matsuda, Kouji.

    1994-01-01

    Positive ion implantation has been utilized as the method of impurity injection in ultra-LSI production, but the problem of substrate charging cannot be resolved by conventional charge compensation method. It was forecast that by negative ion implantation, this charging problem can be resolved. Recently the experiment on the negative ion implantation into insulated electrodes was carried out, and the effect of negative ion implantation to this problem was proved. However, the dependence of charged potential on the increase of negative ion current at the time of negative ion implantation is a serious problem in large current negative ion implantation hereafter. The charged potential of insulated conductor substrates was measured by the negative ion implantation using the current up to several mA/cm 2 . The experimental method is explained. Medium current density and high current density negative ion implantation and charged potential are reported. Accordingly in negative ion implantation, if current density is optimized, the negative ion implantation without charging can be realized. (K.I.)

  2. Implant planning on NobelClinician software‎ : incidence of bone density on the implants orientation for completely edentulous maxillae

    OpenAIRE

    Vankelst, Maëva

    2016-01-01

    The Purpose of this study wasto compare bone density in straight and tilted implants using the software NobelClinician on fifteen maxillary edentulous. For each patient, two schedules were created on NobelClinician: a first plan of 6 implants placed axially and a second plan where the last implant of each sector was tilted of 30 ° from the occlusal plane. The laying of the first four implants being common to both plans.The study was performed on DICOM files coming from the CBCT’s of 15 patien...

  3. CHAINS-PC, Decay Chain Atomic Densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CHAINS computes the atom density of members of a single radioactive decay chain. The linearity of the Bateman equations allows tracing of interconnecting chains by manually accumulating results from separate calculations of single chains. Re-entrant loops can be treated as extensions of a single chain. Losses from the chain are also tallied. 2 - Method of solution: The Bateman equations are solved analytically using double-precision arithmetic. Poles are avoided by small alterations of the loss terms. Multigroup fluxes, cross sections, and self-shielding factors entered as input are used to compute the effective specific reaction rates. The atom densities are computed at any specified times. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of 100 energy groups, 100 time values, 50 members in a chain

  4. Atomic layer deposited TiO2 for implantable brain-chip interfacing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianci, E.; Lattanzio, S.; Seguini, G.; Vassanelli, S.; Fanciulli, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO 2 thin films deposited on implantable neuro-chips based on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor (EOS) junctions, implementing both efficient capacitive neuron-silicon coupling and biocompatibility for long-term implantable functionality. The ALD process was performed at 295 °C using titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone as precursors on needle-shaped silicon substrates. Engineering of the capacitance of the EOS junctions introducing a thin Al 2 O 3 buffer layer between TiO 2 and silicon resulted in a further increase of the specific capacitance. Biocompatibility for long-term implantable neuroprosthetic systems was checked upon in-vitro treatment.

  5. Enhancing atom densities in solid hydrogen by isotopic substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, G.W.; Souers, P.C.; Mapoles, E.R.; Magnotta, F.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen inside solid H 2 increases the energy density by 200 MegaJoules/m 3 , for each percent mole fraction stored. How many atoms can be stored in solid hydrogen? To answer this, we need to know: (1) how to produce and trap hydrogen atoms in solid hydrogen, (2) how to keep the atoms from recombining into the ground molecular state, and (3) how to measure the atom density in solid hydrogen. Each of these topics will be addressed in this paper. Hydrogen atoms can be trapped in solid hydrogen by co-condensing atoms and molecules, external irradiation of solid H 2 , or introducing a radioactive impurity inside the hydrogen lattice. Tritium, a heavy isotope of hydrogen, is easily condensed as a radioactive isotopic impurity in solid H 2 . Although tritium will probably not be used in future rockets, it provides a way of applying a large, homogenious dose to solid hydrogen. In all of the data presented here, the atoms are produced by the decay of tritium and thus knowing how many atoms are produced from the tritium decay in the solid phase is important. 6 refs., 6 figs

  6. Dynamical density functional theory for dense atomic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, A J

    2006-01-01

    Starting from Newton's equations of motion, we derive a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) applicable to atomic liquids. The theory has the feature that it requires as input the Helmholtz free energy functional from equilibrium density functional theory. This means that, given a reliable equilibrium free energy functional, the correct equilibrium fluid density profile is guaranteed. We show that when the isothermal compressibility is small, the DDFT generates the correct value for the speed of sound in a dense liquid. We also interpret the theory as a dynamical equation for a coarse grained fluid density and show that the theory can be used (making further approximations) to derive the standard mode coupling theory that is used to describe the glass transition. The present theory should provide a useful starting point for describing the dynamics of inhomogeneous atomic fluids

  7. Cyclosporine-a and bone density around titanium implants: a histometric study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Eduardo Sakakura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cyclosporine A (CsA is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used to prevent organ transplantation rejection. It has been demonstrated that CsA may negatively affect osseointegration around dental implants. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CsA administration on bone density around titanium dental implants. Materials and Methods: Fourteen New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups with seven animals each. The test group (CsA received daily subcutaneous injection of CsA (10mg/kg body weight and the control group (CTL received saline solution by the same route of administration. Three days after the beginning of immunosuppressive therapy, one machined dental implant (7.00 mm in lenght and 3.75 mm in diameter was inserted bilaterally at the region of the tibial methaphysis. After 4 and 8 weeks the animals were sacrificed and the histometrical procedures were performed to analyse the bone density around the first four threads of the coronal part of the implant. Results: A significant increase in the bone density was observed from the 4- to the 8 week-period in the control group (37.41% + 14.85 versus 58.23% + 16.38 – p < 0.01. In contrast, bone density consistently decreased in the test group overtime (46.31% + 17.38 versus 16.28 + 5.08 – p <0.05. In the 8-week period, there was a significant difference in bone density between the control and the test groups (58.23 + 16.38 eand16.28 + 5.08 – p= 0.001. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, long-term CsA administration may reduce bone density around titanium dental implants during the osseointegration process.

  8. Long-Range Corrected Hybrid Density Functionals with Damped Atom-Atom Dispersion Corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Jeng-Da; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-06-14

    We report re-optimization of a recently proposed long-range corrected (LC) hybrid density functionals [J.-D. Chai and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 084106 (2008)] to include empirical atom-atom dispersion corrections. The resulting functional, {omega}B97X-D yields satisfactory accuracy for thermochemistry, kinetics, and non-covalent interactions. Tests show that for non-covalent systems, {omega}B97X-D shows slight improvement over other empirical dispersion-corrected density functionals, while for covalent systems and kinetics, it performs noticeably better. Relative to our previous functionals, such as {omega}B97X, the new functional is significantly superior for non-bonded interactions, and very similar in performance for bonded interactions.

  9. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Yeung, Kelvin W.K. [Division of Spine Surgery, Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics & Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wu, Shuilin, E-mail: shuilin.wu@gmail.com [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Carbon naonotubes/chitosan/ZnO coating was first constructed on Ti implants. • This system endowed Ti implants with excellent self-antibacterial activity. • The amount of Zn could be precisely controlled by atom layer deposition. • This system could regulate cell behaviors on metallic implants. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  10. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei; Yeung, Kelvin W.K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon naonotubes/chitosan/ZnO coating was first constructed on Ti implants. • This system endowed Ti implants with excellent self-antibacterial activity. • The amount of Zn could be precisely controlled by atom layer deposition. • This system could regulate cell behaviors on metallic implants. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  11. Ion-beam modification of 2-D materials - single implant atom analysis via annular dark-field electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangert, U., E-mail: Ursel.Bangert@ul.ie [Department of Physics, School of Sciences & Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Stewart, A.; O’Connell, E.; Courtney, E. [Department of Physics, School of Sciences & Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Ramasse, Q.; Kepaptsoglou, D. [SuperSTEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury Campus, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Hofsäss, H.; Amani, J. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-PLatz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Tu, J.-S.; Kardynal, B. [Peter Grünberg Institut 9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    Functionalisation of two-dimensional (2-D) materials via low energy ion implantation could open possibilities for fabrication of devices based on such materials. Nanoscale patterning and/or electronically doping can thus be achieved, compatible with large scale integrated semiconductor technologies. Using atomic resolution High Angle Annular Dark Field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy supported by image simulation, we show that sites and chemical nature of individual implants/ dopants in graphene, as well as impurities in hBN, can uniquely and directly be identified on grounds of their position and their image intensity in accordance with predictions from Z-contrast theories. Dopants in graphene (e.g., N) are predominantly substitutional. In other 2-Ds, e.g. dichalcogenides, the situation is more complicated since implants can be embedded in different layers and substitute for different elements. Possible configurations of Se-implants in MoS{sub 2} are discussed and image contrast calculations performed. Implants substituting for S in the top or bottom layer can undoubtedly be identified. We show, for the first time, using HAADF contrast measurement that successful Se-integration into MoS{sub 2} can be achieved via ion implantation, and we demonstrate the possibility of HAADF image contrast measurements for identifying impurities and dopants introduced into in 2-Ds. - Highlights: • Ion implantation of 2-dimensional materials. • Targeted and controlled functionalisation of graphene and 2-D dichalcocenides. • Atomic resolution High Angle Dark Field scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Determination of atomic site and elemental nature of dopants in 2-D materials. • Quantitative information from Z-contrast images.

  12. Atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} for implantable brain-chip interfacing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianci, E., E-mail: elena.cianci@mdm.imm.cnr.it [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Lattanzio, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Seguini, G. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Vassanelli, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited on implantable neuro-chips based on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor (EOS) junctions, implementing both efficient capacitive neuron-silicon coupling and biocompatibility for long-term implantable functionality. The ALD process was performed at 295 Degree-Sign C using titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone as precursors on needle-shaped silicon substrates. Engineering of the capacitance of the EOS junctions introducing a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer between TiO{sub 2} and silicon resulted in a further increase of the specific capacitance. Biocompatibility for long-term implantable neuroprosthetic systems was checked upon in-vitro treatment.

  13. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph [Physics Department, The College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10{sup −5} are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10{sup 4} atoms cm{sup −3}. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  14. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10 −5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10 4 atoms cm −3 . The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  15. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10 -5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10 4 atoms cm -3 . The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  16. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathomarco, R.V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C.N.; Prioli, R.

    2004-01-01

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle

  17. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathomarco, Ti R. V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C. N.; Prioli, R.

    2004-06-01

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle.

  18. Study of defects, radiation damage and implanted gases in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.; Amano, J.; Wagner, A.

    1980-10-01

    The ability of the field-ion microscope to image individual atoms has been applied, at Cornell University, to the study of fundamental properties of point defects in irradiated or quenched metals. The capability of the atom probe field-ion microscope to determine the chemistry - that is, the mass-to-charge ratio - of a single ion has been used to investigate the behavior of different implanted species in metals. A brief review is presented of: (1) the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; (2) the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and (3) the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He atoms in tungsten. The paper is heavily referenced so that the reader can pursue his specific research interests in detail

  19. Positivity of the spherically averaged atomic one-electron density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Maria; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the positivity of the spherically averaged atomic one-electron density . For a which stems from a physical ground state we prove that for r ≥  0. This article may be reproduced in its entirety for non-commercial purposes.......We investigate the positivity of the spherically averaged atomic one-electron density . For a which stems from a physical ground state we prove that for r ≥  0. This article may be reproduced in its entirety for non-commercial purposes....

  20. Exchange-correlation energies of atoms from efficient density functionals: influence of the electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Ye, Lin-Hui; Duan, Yuhua

    2017-12-01

    The primary goal of Kohn-Sham density functional theory is to evaluate the exchange-correlation contribution to electronic properties. However, the accuracy of a density functional can be affected by the electron density. Here we apply the nonempirical Tao-Mo (TM) semilocal functional to study the influence of the electron density on the exchange and correlation energies of atoms and ions, and compare the results with the commonly used nonempirical semilocal functionals local spin-density approximation (LSDA), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), and hybrid functional PBE0. We find that the spin-restricted Hartree-Fock density yields the exchange and correlation energies in good agreement with the Optimized Effective Potential method, particularly for spherical atoms and ions. However, the errors of these semilocal and hybrid functionals become larger for self-consistent densities. We further find that the quality of the electron density have greater effect on the exchange-correlation energies of kinetic energy density-dependent meta-GGA functionals TPSS and TM than on those of the LSDA and GGA, and therefore, should have greater influence on the performance of meta-GGA functionals. Finally, we show that the influence of the density quality on PBE0 is slightly reduced, compared to that of PBE, due to the exact mixing.

  1. Activation of boron and phosphorus atoms implanted in polycrystalline silicon films at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoh, Nobuyuki; Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Andoh, Yasunori

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus atoms implanted in laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon films were activated by a heat treatment in air at 260 deg. C for 1, 3 and 24 h. Analysis of ultraviolet reflectivity of phosphorus-doped silicon films implanted by ion doping method at 4 keV revealed that the thickness of the top disordered layer formed by ion bombardment was 6 nm. It is reduced to 4 nm by a 3 h heat treatment at 260 deg. C by recrystallization of disordered region. The electrical conductance of silicon films implanted increased to 1.7x10 5 S/sq after 3 h heat treatment

  2. Micro-computerised tomography optimisation for the measurement of bone mineral density around titanium dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C.; Swain, M.; Duncan, W.

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dental implants (screws) are commonly used to replace missing teeth by forming a biological union with bone ('osseointegration'). Micro-computerised tomography (μCT) may be useful for measuring bone mineral density around dental implants. Major issues arise because of various artefacts that occur with polychromatic X-rays associated bench type instruments that may compromise interpretation of the observations. In this study various approaches to minimise artefacts such as; beam hardening, filtering and edge effects are explored with a homogeneous polymeric material, Teflon, with and without an implant present. The implications of the limitations of using such polychromatic μCT systems to quantify bone mineral density adjacent to the implant are discussed. (author)

  3. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xianlong; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Tosi, M. P.; Fazio, Rosario; Campo, V. L. Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern

  4. Density functional calculations for atoms, molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, O.; Jones, R.O.

    1980-01-01

    The density functional formalism provides a framework for including exchange and correlation effects in the calculation of ground state properties of many-electron systems. The reduction of the problem to the solution of single-particle equations leads to important numerical advantages over other ab initio methods of incorporating correlation effects. The essential features of the scheme are outlined and results obtained for atomic and molecular systems are surveyed. The local spin density (LSD) approximation gives generally good results for systems where the bonding involves s and p electrons, but results are less satisfactory for d-bonded systems. Non-local modifications to the LSD approximation have been tested on atomic systems yielding much improved total energies. (Auth.)

  5. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were generated. Based on the consensus of the two observers, 15.6% of sites were of low bone density, 47.9% were of intermediate density, and 36.5% were of high density. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that CBCT intensity values had a high predictive power for predicting high density sites (area under the curve [AUC] =0.94, P < 0.005) and intermediate density sites (AUC = 0.81, P < 0.005). The best cut-off value for intensity to predict intermediate density sites was 218 (sensitivity = 0.77 and specificity = 0.76) and the best cut-off value for intensity to predict high density sites was 403 (sensitivity = 0.93 and specificity = 0.77). CBCT intensity values are considered useful for predicting bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites.

  6. Atomic scale Monte Carlo simulations of BF3 plasma immersion ion implantation in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Magna, Antonino; Fisicaro, Giuseppe; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Spiegel, Yohann; Torregrosa, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical model aimed to accurately simulate the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process in micro and nano-patterned Si samples. The code, based on the Monte Carlo approach, is designed to reproduce all the relevant physical phenomena involved in the process. The particle based simulation technique is fundamental to efficiently compute the material modifications promoted by the plasma implantation at the atomic resolution. The accuracy in the description of the process kinetic is achieved linking (one to one) each virtual Monte Carlo event to each possible atomic phenomenon (e.g. ion penetration, neutral absorption, ion induced surface modification, etc.). The code is designed to be coupled with a generic plasma status, characterized by the particle types (ions and neutrals), their flow rates and their energy/angle distributions. The coupling with a Poisson solver allows the simulation of the correct trajectories of charged particles in the void regions of the micro-structures. The implemented model is able to predict the implantation 2D profiles and significantly support the process design. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Bone mineral density after implantation of a femoral neck hip prosthesis--a prospective 5 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steens, Wolfram; Boettner, Friedrich; Bader, Rainer; Skripitz, Ralf; Schneeberger, Alberto

    2015-08-12

    Bone resorption in the proximal femur due to stress shielding has been observed in a number of conventional cementless implants used in total hip arthroplasty. Short femoral-neck implants are claiming less interference with the biomechanics of the proximal femur. The goal of this study was to prospectively investigate the in vivo changes of bone-mineral density as a parameter of bone remodeling around a short, femoral neck prosthesis over the first 5 years following implantation. The secondary goal was to report on its clinical outcome. We are reporting on the changes of bone mineral density of the proximal femur and the clinical outcome up to five years after implantation of a short femoral neck prosthesis. Bone mineral density was determined using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, performed 10 days, three, 12 and 60 months after surgery. 20 patients with a mean age of 47 years (range 17 to 65) were clinically assessed using the Harris Hip Score. The WOMAC was used as a patient-relevant outcome-measure. In contrast to conventional implants DEXA-scans overall revealed a slight increase of bone mineral density in the proximal femur in the 12 months following the implantation. The Harris Hip Score improved from an average preoperative score of 46 to a postoperative score at 12 months of 91 points and 95 points at 60 months, the global WOMAC index from 5.3 preoperatively to 0.8 at 12 months and 0.6 at 60 months postoperatively. At 60 months after implantation of a short femoral neck prosthesis, all regions except one (region of interest #5) showed no significant changes in BMD compared to baseline measurements at 10 days which is less to the changes in bone mineral density seen in conventional implants.

  8. Conventional multi-slice computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) for computer-assisted implant placement. Part I: relationship of radiographic gray density and implant stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisan, Volkan; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Avsever, Hakan; Özdemir, Tayfun

    2013-12-01

    The relationship of conventional multi-slice computed tomography (CT)- and cone beam CT (CBCT)-based gray density values and the primary stability parameters of implants that were placed by stereolithographic surgical guides were analyzed in this study. Eighteen edentulous jaws were randomly scanned by a CT (CT group) or a CBCT scanner (CBCT group) and radiographic gray density was measured from the planned implants. A total of 108 implants were placed, and primary stability parameters were measured by insertion torque value (ITV) and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Radiographic and subjective bone quality classification (BQC) was also classified. Results were analyzed by correlation tests and multiple regressions (p < .05). CBCT-based gray density values (765 ± 97.32 voxel value) outside the implants were significantly higher than those of CT-based values (668.4 ± 110 Hounsfield unit, p < .001). Significant relations were found among the gray density values outside the implants, ITV (adjusted r(2)  = 0.6142, p = .001 and adjusted r(2)  = 0.5166, p = .0021), and RFA (adjusted r(2)  = 0.5642, p = .0017 and adjusted r(2)  = 0.5423, p = .0031 for CT and CBCT groups, respectively). Data from radiographic and subjective BQC were also in agreement. Similar to the gray density values of CT, that of CBCT could also be predictive for the subjective BQC and primary implant stability. Results should be confirmed on different CBCT scanners. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Density-functional theory of atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, Robert G

    1995-01-01

    Provides an account of the fundamental principles of the density-functional theory of the electronic structure of matter and its applications to atoms and molecules. This book contains a discussion of the chemical potential and its derivatives. It is intended for physicists, chemists, and advanced students in chemistry.

  10. High dislocation density structures and hardening produced by high fluency pulsed-ion-beam implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharkeev, Yu.P.; Didenko, A.N.; Kozlov, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents a review of experimental data on the ''long-range effect'' (a change in dislocation structure and in physicomechanical properties at distances considerably greater than the ion range value in ion-implanted metallic materials and semiconductors). Our results of electron microscopy studies of high density dislocation structure in ion-implanted metallic materials with different initial states are given. It has been shown that the nature of the dislocation structure and its quantitative characteristics in the implanted metals and alloys depend on the target initial state, the ion type and energy and the retained dose. The data obtained by different workers are in good agreement both with our results and with each other as well as with the results of investigation of macroscopic characteristics (wear resistance and microhardness). It has been established that the ''long-range effect'' occurs in metallic materials with a low yield point or high plasticity level and with little dislocation density in their initial state prior to ion implantation. ((orig.))

  11. Effect of higher implant density on curve correction in dystrophic thoracic scoliosis secondary to neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yuan, Xinxin; Sha, Shifu; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Weiguo; Qiu, Yong; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Zezhang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate how implant density affects radiographic results and clinical outcomes in patients with dystrophic scoliosis secondary to neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). METHODS A total of 41 patients with dystrophic scoliosis secondary to NF1 who underwent 1-stage posterior correction between June 2011 and December 2013 were included. General information about patients was recorded, as were preoperative and postoperative scores from Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 questionnaires. Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyze the associations among implant density, coronal Cobb angle correction rate and correction loss at last follow-up, change of sagittal curve, and apical vertebral translation. Patients were then divided into 2 groups: those with low-density and those with high-density implants. Independent-sample t-tests were used to compare demographic data, radiographic findings, and clinical outcomes before surgery and at last follow-up between the groups. RESULTS Significant correlations were found between the implant density and the coronal correction rate of the main curve (r = 0.505, p density and change of sagittal profile (p = 0.662) or apical vertebral translation (p = 0.062). The SRS-22 scores improved in the appearance, activity, and mental health domains within both groups, but there was no difference between the groups in any of the SRS-22 domains at final follow-up (p > 0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS Although no significant differences between the high- and low-density groups were found in any of the SRS-22 domains at final follow-up, higher implant density was correlated with superior coronal correction and less postoperative correction loss in patients with dystrophic NF1-associated scoliosis.

  12. A theoretical-electron-density databank using a model of real and virtual spherical atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassour, Ayoub; Domagala, Slawomir; Guillot, Benoit; Leduc, Theo; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2017-08-01

    A database describing the electron density of common chemical groups using combinations of real and virtual spherical atoms is proposed, as an alternative to the multipolar atom modelling of the molecular charge density. Theoretical structure factors were computed from periodic density functional theory calculations on 38 crystal structures of small molecules and the charge density was subsequently refined using a density model based on real spherical atoms and additional dummy charges on the covalent bonds and on electron lone-pair sites. The electron-density parameters of real and dummy atoms present in a similar chemical environment were averaged on all the molecules studied to build a database of transferable spherical atoms. Compared with the now-popular databases of transferable multipolar parameters, the spherical charge modelling needs fewer parameters to describe the molecular electron density and can be more easily incorporated in molecular modelling software for the computation of electrostatic properties. The construction method of the database is described. In order to analyse to what extent this modelling method can be used to derive meaningful molecular properties, it has been applied to the urea molecule and to biotin/streptavidin, a protein/ligand complex.

  13. Sexuality and erectile function after implantation of an Adjustable Transobturator Male System (ATOMS) for urinary stress incontinence. A multi-institutional prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Alexander; Bauer, Wilhelm; Rom, Maximilian; Kivaranovic, Danijel; Lüftenegger, Werner; Brössner, Clemens

    2016-01-14

    To investigate erectile function and sexuality before/after implantation of the ATOMS device including continence outcome, pain perception and co-morbidities. We collected data from 34 patients (2010-2014) who were provided with an ATOMS implant due to mild or moderate stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after radical prostatectomy (RPE), transurethral resection (TURP) or radiotherapy. Previous failed implants were no contraindication. Sexuality was evaluated with the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) were used to analyse pain perception. Results regarding continence, influence of co-morbidities and drug intake were interpreted. IIEF-5 score increased 6 months after ATOMS implantation with a mean difference of 2.18 (Cl: 1.22, 3.14), p < 0,001). Non-sexually active patients had the greatest benefit. However, 50% of patients achieved a mean IIEF-5 of 10.1 and 38% of patients reported a new onset of sexual activity at follow up (mean IIEF-5 score of 12.9). This is in accordance with reduced SUI and absence of persistent pain syndrome. Overall success rate regarding 24h pad-use was 88% (no pad rate 38%). Previous failed implants did not influence results but diabetes, obesity and drug intake (beta-blockers, antidepressants) led to poorer outcomes. Sexuality and erectile function improves significantly 6 months after ATOMS implantation. We postulate that reduced SUI (also during sexual activity) and absence of chronic pain are the improving factors. ATOMS should be offered to men with mild to moderate SUI who are interested in regaining their erectile function and sexual activity.

  14. The effect of implant design and bone quality on insertion torque, resonance frequency analysis, and insertion energy during implant placement in low or low- to medium-density bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong-Mei; Lee, Ming-Shu; Wang, Juo-Song; Lin, Li-Deh

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of implant design and bone quality on insertion torque (IT), implant stability quotient (ISQ), and insertion energy (IE) by monitoring the continuous change in IT and ISQ while implants were inserted in artificial bone blocks that simulate bone of poor or poor-to-medium quality. Polyurethane foam blocks (Sawbones) of 0.16 g/cm³ and 0.32 g/cm³ were respectively used to simulate low density and low- to medium-density cancellous bone. In addition, some test blocks were laminated with a 1-mm 0.80 g/cm³ polyurethane layer to simulate cancellous bone with a thin cortical layer. Four different implants (Nobel Biocare Mk III-3.75, Mk III-4.0, Mk IV-4.0, and NobelActive-4.3) were placed into the different test blocks in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. The IT and ISQ were recorded at every 0.5-mm of inserted length during implant insertion, and IE was calculated from the torque curve. The peak IT (PIT), final IT (FIT), IE, and final ISQ values were statistically analyzed. All implants showed increasing ISQ values when the implant was inserted more deeply. In contrast to the ISQ, implants with different designs showed dissimilar IT curve patterns during the insertion. All implants showed a significant increase in the PIT, FIT, IE, and ISQ when the test-block density increased or when the 1-mm laminated layer was present. Tapered implants showed FIT or PIT values of more than 40 Ncm for all of the laminated test blocks and for the nonlaminated test blocks of low to medium density. Parallel-wall implants did not exhibit PIT or FIT values of more than 40 Ncm for all of the test blocks. NobelActive-4.3 showed a significantly higher FIT, but a significantly lower IE, than Mk IV-4.0. While the existence of cortical bone or implant designs significantly affects the dynamic IT profiles during implant insertion, it does not affect the ISQ to a similar extent. Certain implant designs are more suitable than others if high IT is

  15. Evaluation of periprosthetic bone mineral density and postoperative migration of humeral head resurfacing implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechlenburg, Inger; Klebe, Thomas Martin; Døssing, Kaj Verner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant migration, bone mineral density (BMD), length of glenohumeral offset (LGHO), and clinical results were compared for the Copeland (Biomet Inc, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Global C.A.P. (DePuy Int, Warsaw, IN, USA) humeral head resurfacing implants (HHRIs). METHODS: The study...... improved over time for both implant groups (P migration and good clinical results. Periprosthetic BMD and LGHO both increased for the Copeland HHRI more than for the Global C.A.P HHRI....

  16. Implantation rate effects on microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choyke, W.J.; Spitznagel, J.A.; Wood, S.; Doyle, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    We report a detailed TEM study of rate effects in a metal (304 SS) where we dope with an insoluble atom (He) and create the displacement damage with high energy Si. The rates of doping and the rates of producing lattice damage are independently varied during dual implantation. In addition to varying the doping rates of the He the magnitude of the displacement damage prior to He implantation is also varied (beam history). We find that the beam history has virtually no effect on maximum bubble size but it has a major effect on the average cavity diameter. A weak dependence of cavity number density on helium implantation rate is found. The total dislocation density is relatively independent of the doping rate and beam history at 550 and 700 0 C, whereas the loop fraction is sensitive to beam history at these temperatures. Acicular precipitate formation is weakly dependent on doping, doping rate and more strongly dependent on doping concentration and temperature. This form of solute segregation is very sensitive to beam history. (orig.)

  17. Dissecting molecular descriptors into atomic contributions in density functional reactivity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, Chunying; Lu, Tian; Liu, Shubin

    2014-01-01

    Density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) employs the electron density of a molecule and its related quantities such as gradient and Laplacian to describe its structure and reactivity properties. Proper descriptions at both molecular (global) and atomic (local) levels are equally important and illuminating. In this work, we make use of Bader's zero-flux partition scheme and consider atomic contributions for a few global reactivity descriptors in DFRT, including the density-based quantification of steric effect and related indices. Earlier, we proved that these quantities are intrinsically correlated for atomic and molecular systems [S. B. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 191107 (2007); ibid. 126, 244103 (2007)]. In this work, a new basin-based integration algorithm has been implemented, whose reliability and effectiveness have been extensively examined. We also investigated a list of simple hydrocarbon systems and different scenarios of bonding processes, including stretching, bending, and rotating. Interesting changing patterns for the atomic and molecular values of these quantities have been revealed for different systems. This work not only confirms the strong correlation between these global reactivity descriptors for molecular systems, as theoretically proven earlier by us, it also provides new and unexpected changing patterns for their atomic values, which can be employed to understand the origin and nature of chemical phenomena

  18. Dissecting molecular descriptors into atomic contributions in density functional reactivity theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Chunying [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China) and Key Laboratory of Resource Fine-Processing and Advanced Materials of Hunan Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Lu, Tian [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China); Liu, Shubin, E-mail: shubin@email.unc.edu [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China) and Key Laboratory of Resource Fine-Processing and Advanced Materials of Hunan Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Research Computing Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3420 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) employs the electron density of a molecule and its related quantities such as gradient and Laplacian to describe its structure and reactivity properties. Proper descriptions at both molecular (global) and atomic (local) levels are equally important and illuminating. In this work, we make use of Bader's zero-flux partition scheme and consider atomic contributions for a few global reactivity descriptors in DFRT, including the density-based quantification of steric effect and related indices. Earlier, we proved that these quantities are intrinsically correlated for atomic and molecular systems [S. B. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 191107 (2007); ibid. 126, 244103 (2007)]. In this work, a new basin-based integration algorithm has been implemented, whose reliability and effectiveness have been extensively examined. We also investigated a list of simple hydrocarbon systems and different scenarios of bonding processes, including stretching, bending, and rotating. Interesting changing patterns for the atomic and molecular values of these quantities have been revealed for different systems. This work not only confirms the strong correlation between these global reactivity descriptors for molecular systems, as theoretically proven earlier by us, it also provides new and unexpected changing patterns for their atomic values, which can be employed to understand the origin and nature of chemical phenomena.

  19. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. Materials and Methods: CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were g...

  20. Excitation dependence of resonance line self-broadening at different atomic densities

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hebin; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2009-01-01

    We study the dipole-dipole spectral broadening of a resonance line at high atomic densities when the self-broadening dominates. The selective reflection spectrum of a weak probe beam from the interface of the cell window and rubidium vapor are recorded in the presence of a far-detuned pump beam. The excitation due to the pump reduces the self-broadening. We found that the self-broadening reduction dependence on the pump power is atomic density independent. These results provide experimental e...

  1. Semiclassical neutral atom as a reference system in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Lucian A; Fabiano, E; Laricchia, S; Della Sala, F

    2011-05-06

    We use the asymptotic expansions of the semiclassical neutral atom as a reference system in density functional theory to construct accurate generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) for the exchange-correlation and kinetic energies without any empiricism. These asymptotic functionals are among the most accurate GGAs for molecular systems, perform well for solid state, and overcome current GGA state of the art in frozen density embedding calculations. Our results also provide evidence for the conjointness conjecture between exchange and kinetic energies of atomic systems.

  2. Atomic mixing effects on high fluence Ge implantation into Si at 40 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras-Marti, A.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.; Peon-Fernandez, J.; Rodriguez-Vidal, M.; Tognetti, N.P.; Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Armour, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Ion implanted profiles of 40 keV Ge + into Si at fluences ranging from approx. equal to 10 15 ions/cm 2 up to saturation have been measured using the RBS technique. The profiles compare well with the predictions of an analytical model encompasing sputter erosion plus atomic relocation. (orig.)

  3. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaginelli S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, m/r, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates. The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes.

  4. A radiographic evaluation of progressive loading on crestal and bone density changes around single osseointegrated implants in the posterior maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ommati Shabestari Gh.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to determine the effectiveness of progressive loading procedures on preserving crestal bone height and improving peri-implant bone density around maxillary implants restored with single crowns by an accurate longitudinal radiographic assessment technique. "n "n "nMaterials and Methods: Eleven Micro-Thread Osseo Speed dental implants were placed in 11 subjects and permitted to heal for 6 weeks before surgical uncovering. Following an 8-week healing period, implants underwent a progressive loading protocol by increasing the height of the occlusal table in increments from adding acrylic resin to an acrylic crown. The progressively loaded crowns were placed in 2 mm infraocclusion for the first 2 months, light occlusion for the second 2 months, and full occlusion for the third 2 months. At forth 2 months, a metal ceramic crown replaced the acrylic crown. Digital radiographs of each implant were made at the time of restoration, then after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 months of function. Digital image analysis was done to measure changes in crestal bone height and peri-implant bone density. "n "n "nResults: The mean values of crestal bone loss at 12 months were 0.11 ± 0.19 mm, and when tested with Friedman across the time periods, the differences were not statistically significant (p> 0.05. The mean values of bone density in the crestal, middle, and apical area were tested with Repeated Measure ANOVA across the time periods, the differences were statistically significant (p<0.05. "n "n "nConclusion: Progressive loading doesn’t cause crestal bone loss. The peri-implant density measurements of the progressively loaded implants show continuous increase in crestal, middle and apical peri-implant bone density by time. "n 

  5. Starting SCF Calculations by Superposition of Atomic Densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lenthe, J.H.; Zwaans, R.; van Dam, H.J.J.; Guest, M.F.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the procedure to start an SCF calculation of the general type from a sum of atomic electron densities, as implemented in GAMESS-UK. Although the procedure is well-known for closed-shell calculations and was already suggested when the Direct SCF procedure was proposed, the general

  6. Improved density functional calculations for atoms, molecules and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, B.; Anton, J.; Fritzsche, S.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.

    2005-01-01

    The non-collinear and collinear descriptions within relativistic density functional theory is described. We present results of both non-collinear and collinear calculations for atoms, diatomic molecules, and some surface simulations. We find that the accuracy of our density functional calculations for the smaller systems is comparable to good quantum chemical calculations, and thus this method provides a sound basis for larger systems where no such comparison is possible. (author)

  7. Arrays of Synthetic Atoms: Nanocapacitor Batteries with Large Energy Density and Small Leak Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-28

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2017-0169 TR-2017-0169 ARRAYS OF SYNTHETIC ATOMS: NANOCAPACITOR BATTERIES WITH LARGE ENERGY DENSITY AND SMALL LEAK...1-0247 Arrays of Synthetic Atoms: Nanocapacitor Batteries with Large Energy Density and Small Leak Currents 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...large dielectric strength to a nanoscale rechargeable battery . We fabricated arrays of one-, two- and three-dimensional synthetic atoms and comparison

  8. The reliability of cone-beam computed tomography to assess bone density at dental implant recipient sites: a histomorphometric analysis by micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Raúl; Monje, Florencio

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess the reliability of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool to pre-operatively determine radiographic bone density (RBD) by the density values provided by the system, analyzing its relationship with histomorphometric bone density expressed as bone volumetric fraction (BV/TV) assessed by micro-CT of bone biopsies at the site of insertion of dental implants in the maxillary bones. Thirty-nine bone biopsies of the maxillary bones at the sites of 39 dental implants from 31 edentulous healthy patients were analyzed. The NobelGuide™ software was used for implant planning, which also allowed fabrication of individual stereolithographic surgical guides. The analysis of CBCT images allowed pre-operative determination of mean density values of implant recipient sites along the major axis of the planned implants (axial RBD). Stereolithographic surgical guides were used to guide implant insertion and also to extract cylindrical bone biopsies from the core of the exact implant site. Further analysis of several osseous micro-structural variables including BV/TV was performed by micro-CT of the extracted bone biopsies. Mean axial RBD was 478 ± 212 (range: 144-953). A statistically significant difference (P = 0.02) was observed among density values of the cortical bone of the upper maxilla and mandible. A high positive Pearson's correlation coefficient (r = 0.858, P micro-CT at the site of dental implants in the maxillary bones. Pre-operative estimation of density values by CBCT is a reliable tool to objectively determine bone density. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Spinal Implant Density and Postoperative Lumbar Lordosis as Predictors for the Development of Proximal Junctional Kyphosis in Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Jamal; Smith, Timothy R; Sugrue, Patrick A; Thompson, Sara E; O'Shaughnessy, Brian A; Koski, Tyler R

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate spinal implant density and proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) in adult spinal deformity (ASD). Consecutive patients with ASD receiving ≥5 level fusions were retrospectively analyzed between 2007 and 2010. ASD, elective fusions, minimum 2-year follow-up. age lordosis (LL) were predictors for PJK (P = 0.018 and 0.045, respectively). Controlling for age, BMI, and gender, postoperative LL (not implant density) continued to show significance in multivariate logistic regression model. PJK, although influenced by a multitude of factors, may be statistically related to implant density and LL. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Self-consistent-field calculations of atoms and ions using a modified local-density approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, D.A.; Albritton, J.R.; Wilson, B.G.; Alley, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    Local-density-approximation calculations of atomic structure are useful for the description of atoms and ions in plasmas. The large number of different atomic configurations that exist in typical plasmas leads one to consider the expression of total energies in terms of a Taylor series in the orbital occupation numbers. Two schemes for computing the second derivative Taylor-series coefficients are given; the second, and better one, uses the linear response method developed by Zangwill and Soven [Phys. Rev. A 21, 1561 (1980)] for the calculation of optical response in atoms. A defect in the local-density approximation causes some second derivatives involving Rydberg orbitals to be infinite. This is corrected by using a modified local-density approximation that had previously been proposed [Phys. Rev. B 2, 244 (1970)

  11. Bremsstrahlung spectra for Al, Cs, and Au atoms in high-temperature, high-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, L.; Pratt, R.H.; Tseng, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented from a numerical calculation for the bremsstrahlung spectrum and Gaunt factors of Al, Cs, and Au atoms in high-temperature (-T), high-density (-rho) plasmas. Plasma temperatures kT = 0.1 and 1.0 keV and plasma densities rho = rho 0 (the normal solid density) and rho = 100rho 0 are considered. This allows us to determine the generality and identify the origins of features which we had previously identified in calculations for Cs. We also now present results for the total energy loss of an electron in such a plasma. We use a relativistic multipole code which treats the bremsstrahlung process as a single-electron transition in a static screened central potential. We take for the static potential corresponding to an atom in a hot dense plasma the finite-temperature, finite-density Thomas-Fermi model. This approach corresponds to an average atom in local thermodynamic equilibrium. In comparison to isolated-neutral-atom results we observe general suppression of cross sections and a particular suppression in the tip region of the spectrum. Within this model, both superscreening and shape resonances are found in the circumstances of extreme density. At more normal densities and except for the soft-photon end, the spectrum at these energies for an atom in a hot plasma (characterized by an average degree of ionization) can be well represented by the spectrum of the corresponding isolated ion, which has a similar potential shape at the distances which characterize the process

  12. Electrical activation and local structure of Se atoms in ion-implanted indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.; Chan, N.; Hsu, L.

    1996-01-01

    The solid phase regrowth, dopant activation, and local environments of Se-implanted InP are investigated with ion-beam techniques and extended x-ray-absorption fine structure spectroscopy. We find that the local Se endash In structure is already established in the as-implanted amorphous InP although the Se atoms have a lower average coordination number (∼3.5) and no long-range order. After high-temperature rapid thermal annealing (950 degree C, 5 s), the amorphous InP regrows, becoming a single crystal with the Se atoms bonded to four In neighbors; however, only ∼50% of the Se becomes electrically active. Part of the Se precipitates in the form of an In endash Se phase, another part is compensated by defects which are not totally removed by annealing. The Se emdash In bond distance for a Se on a P site is 4.5% longer than the matrix In emdash P bond length, introducing large strains in the crystal. The solid solubility of Se in InP is estimated from our results to be ≅8.7x10 19 /cm 3 while the electron concentration saturates at 5.4x10 19 /cm 3 . Se atoms in InP regrown at lower temperatures in a furnace are only ∼7% electrically active and are found to have different local environments (higher coordination number and shorter bond distance) than those in the InP perfectly regrown at higher temperature. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. High U-density nuclear fuel development with application of centrifugal atomization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Don Bae

    1997-01-01

    In order to simplify the preparation process and improve the properties of uranium silicide fuels prepared by mechanical comminution, a fuel fabrication process applying rotating-disk centrifugal atomization technology was invented in KAERI in 1989. The major characteristic of atomized U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 powders have been examined. The out-pile properties, including the thermal compatibility between atomized particle and aluminum matrix in uranium silicide dispersion fuels, have generally showed a superiority to the comminuted fuels. Moreover, the RERTR (reduced enrichment for research and test reactors) program, which recently begins to develop very-high-density uranium alloy fuels, including U-Mo fuels, requires the centrifugal atomization process to overcome the contaminations of impurities and the difficulties of the comminution process. In addition, a cooperation with ANL in the U.S. has been performed to develop high-density fuels with an application of atomization technology since December 1996. If the microplate and miniplate irradiation tests of atomized fuels, which have been performed with ANL, demonstrated the stability and improvement of in-reactor behaviors, nuclear fuel fabrication technology by centrifugal atomization could be most-promising to the production method of very-high-uranium-loading fuels. (author). 22 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs

  14. Quantification of ion or atom transfer phenomena in materials implanted by nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudadesse, Hassane

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of transfer of the constituents of a system from regions of higher to lower concentration is of interest for implanted bio-materials. It allows determining the rate at which this material is integrated in a living material. To evaluate the ossification kinetics and to study the bio-functionality in corals of Ca and Sr, irradiations with a 10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 was performed, followed by the examination of changes in the localization of these elements. By using PIXE analysis method the distribution of Ca, P, Sr, Zn and Fe in the implant, bone and bone-implant interfaces were determined. Thus, it was shown that resorption of coral in sheep is achieved in 5 months after implantation and is identical to the cortical tissues 4 months after implantation in animals as for instance in hares. We have analyzed the tissues from around the prostheses extracted from patients. The samples were calcined and reduced to powder weighting some milligrams. We have adopted for this study the PIXE analysis method. The samples were irradiated by a proton beam of 3 MeV and about 400 μm diameter. The results show the presence of the elements Ti, Fe, Cr, Ni or Zn according to the type of the implanted prosthesis. This dispersal of the metallic ions and atoms contaminate the tissues. The transfer factors translate the exchanges between bone and the implanted material. The solvatation phenomenon and the electric charge equilibrium explain the transfer order of cations Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ and of the anion PO 4 3- . We have also determined these factors for the elements Ti, Cr and Ni. An original technique to study the bone bio-functionality was used. Use of phosphate derivatives labelled by 99m Tc allows obtaining information about the fixation of radioactive tracer. It was found that only after the eighth month at the implantation the neo-formed bone fixes the MDP (methyl diphosphate) labelled by 99m Tc in a similar way as in the control sample. Starting from this moment the

  15. Enhancement of phase space density by increasing trap anisotropy in a magneto-optical trap with a large number of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vengalattore, M.; Conroy, R.S.; Prentiss, M.G.

    2004-01-01

    The phase space density of dense, cylindrical clouds of atoms in a 2D magneto-optic trap is investigated. For a large number of trapped atoms (>10 8 ), the density of a spherical cloud is limited by photon reabsorption. However, as the atom cloud is deformed to reduce the radial optical density, the temperature of the atoms decreases due to the suppression of multiple scattering leading to an increase in the phase space density. A density of 2x10 -4 has been achieved in a magneto-optic trap containing 2x10 8 atoms

  16. Implantation of β-emitters on biomedical implants: 32 P isotropic ion implantation using a coaxial plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, M.A.; Paynter, R.W.; Sarkissian, A.; Stansfield, B.L.; Terreault, B.; Dufresne, V.

    2003-01-01

    The development of endovascular brachytherapy and the treatment of certain types of cancers (liver, lung, prostate) often require the use of beta-emitters, sometimes in the form of radioisotope-implanted devices. Among the most commonly used isotopes figures 32 P, a pure beta-emitter (maximum energy: 1.7 MeV), of which the path in biological tissues is of a few cm, restricting the impact of electron bombardment to the immediate environment of the implant. Several techniques and processes have been tried to elaborate surfaces and devices showing strongly bonded, or implanted 32 P. Anodizing, vapor phase deposition, grafting of oligonucleotides, as well as ion implantation processes have been investigated by several research groups as methods to implant beta-radioisotopes into surfaces. A coaxial plasma reactor was developed at INRS to implant radioisotopes into cylindrical metallic objects, such as coronary stents commonly used in angioplasty procedures. The dispersion of 32 P atoms on the interior surfaces of the chamber can be investigated using radiographs, contributing to image the plasma ion transport mechanisms that guide the efficiency of the implantation procedure. The amount of radioactivity on the wall liner, on the internal components, and on the biomedical implants are quantified using a surface barrier detector. A comparative study establishes a relationship between the gray scale of the radiographs, and dose measurements. A program was developed to convert the digitized images into maps showing surface dose density in mCi/cm 2 . An integration process allows the quantification of the doses on the walls and components of the reactor. Finally, the resulting integral of the 32 P dose is correlated to the initial amount of radioactivity inserted inside the implanter before the dismantling procedure. This method could be introduced as a fast and reliable way to test, qualify and assess the amount of radioactivity present on the as-produced implants

  17. Determination of the neutral oxygen atom density in a plasma reactor loaded with metal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros

    2009-08-01

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms was determined during processing of metal samples in a plasma reactor. The reactor was a Pyrex tube with an inner diameter of 11 cm and a length of 30 cm. Plasma was created by an inductively coupled radiofrequency generator operating at a frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power up to 500 W. The O density was measured at the edge of the glass tube with a copper fiber optics catalytic probe. The O atom density in the empty tube depended on pressure and was between 4 and 7 × 1021 m-3. The maximum O density was at a pressure of about 150 Pa, while the dissociation fraction of O2 molecules was maximal at the lowest pressure and decreased with increasing pressure. At about 300 Pa it dropped below 10%. The measurements were repeated in the chamber loaded with different metallic samples. In these cases, the density of oxygen atoms was lower than that in the empty chamber. The results were explained by a drain of O atoms caused by heterogeneous recombination on the samples.

  18. Investigation of MeV-Cu implantation and channeling effects into porous silicon formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Naddaf, M.

    2011-01-01

    P-type (1 1 1) silicon wafers were implanted by copper ions (2.5 MeV) in channeling and random directions using ion beam accelerator of the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS). The effect of implantation direction on formation process of porous silicon (PS) using electrochemical etching method has been investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. SEM observations revealed that the size, shape and density of the formed pores are highly affected by the direction of beam implantation. This in turn is seen to influence the PL behavior of the PS.

  19. Investigation of MeV-Cu implantation and channeling effects into porous silicon formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Naddaf, M.

    2012-01-01

    P-type (1 1 1) silicon wafers were implanted by copper ions (2.5 MeV) in channeling and random directions using ion beam accelerator of the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS). The effect of implantation direction on formation process of porous silicon (PS) using electrochemical etching method has been investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. SEM observations revealed that the size, shape and density of the formed pores are highly affected by the direction of beam implantation. This in turn is seen to influence the PL behavior of the PS.(author)

  20. Investigation of MeV-Cu implantation and channeling effects into porous silicon formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M.; Naddaf, M.

    2011-11-01

    P-type (1 1 1) silicon wafers were implanted by copper ions (2.5 MeV) in channeling and random directions using ion beam accelerator of the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS). The effect of implantation direction on formation process of porous silicon (PS) using electrochemical etching method has been investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. SEM observations revealed that the size, shape and density of the formed pores are highly affected by the direction of beam implantation. This in turn is seen to influence the PL behavior of the PS.

  1. Accuracy of the Hartree-Fock and local density approximations for electron densities: a study for light atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almbladh, C.-O.; Ekenberg, U.; Pedroza, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors compare the electron densities and Hartree potentials in the local density and the Hartree-Fock approximations to the corresponding quantities obtained from more accurate correlated wavefunctions. The comparison is made for a number of two-electron atoms, Li, and for Be. The Hartree-Fock approximation is more accurate than the local density approximation within the 1s shell and for the spin polarization in Li, while the local density approximation is slightly better than the Hartree-Fock approximation for charge densities in the 2s shell. The inaccuracy of the Hartree-Fock and local density approximations to the Hartree potential is substantially smaller than the inaccuracy of the local density approximation to the ground-state exchange-correlation potential. (Auth.)

  2. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    Underlying ion-beam modification of surfaces is the more basic subject of particle-surface interaction. The ideas can be grouped into forward and backward features, i.e. those affecting the interior of the target and those leading to particle expulsion. Forward effects include the stopping of the incident particles and the deposition of energy, both governed by integral equations which are easily set up but difficult to solve. Closely related is recoil implantation where emphasis is placed not on the stopping of the incident particles but on their interaction with target atoms with resulting implantation of these atoms. Backward effects, all of which are denoted as sputtering, are in general either of collisional, thermal, electronic, or exfoliational origin. (Auth.)

  3. Dielectric functions, chemical and atomic compositions of the near surface layers of implanted GaAs by In+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, M.; Kołodyńska, D.; Bayramov, A.; Drozdziel, A.; Olejniczak, A.; Żuk, J.

    2018-06-01

    The surfaces of (100) GaAs were irradiated with In+ ions. The implanted samples were isobaric annealed at 800 °C and then of dielectric function, the surface atomic concentrations of atoms and also the chemical composition of the near surface layers in these implanted semiconductor samples were obtained. The following investigation methods were used: spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses (RBSA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the study of the above mentioned quantities, respectively. The change of the shape spectra of the dielectric functions at about 3.0 eV phonon energy, diffusion of In+ ions as well as chemical composition changes were observed after ion implantation and the thermal treatment. Due to displacement of Ga ions from GaAs by the In+ ions the new chemical compound InAs was formed. The relative amounts Ga2O3 and As2O3 ratio increase in the native oxide layers with the fluences increase after the thermal treatment of the samples. Additionally, it was noticed that the quantities of InO2 increase with the increasing values of the irradiated ions before thermal treatment.

  4. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilo, Fabjola [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Borgese, Laura, E-mail: laura.borgese@unibs.itl [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pazzaglia, Ugo [Dipartimento Specialità Medico Chirurgiche Sc. Radiol. e Sanità Pubblica, University of Brescia, v.le Europa, 11, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Co and Cr migrate from bare alloy implant to the surrounding tissue showing a cluster distribution. • Co and Cr migrate from the TiO{sub 2} coated implant to the surrounding tissue showing a decreasing gradient distribution from the alloy surface. • TiO{sub 2} coating layers obtained by ALD on Co–Cr alloy show a barrier effect for the migration of metals. • The thicker the TiO{sub 2} layer deposited by ALD, the lower the metal migration. • The migration of metals from bare alloy toward the surrounding tissue increases with time. This effect is not detected in the coated samples. - Abstract: We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co–Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO{sub 2}. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO{sub 2} layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  5. Application of laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation into atomic hydrogen density measurement in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiwara, Toshinori; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Hee Je; Park, Won Zoo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Density profiles of hydrogen atoms in reactive plasmas of hydrogen and methane gases were measured, for the first time, using the laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation of Lyman beta transition and observation at the Balmer alpha radiation. Absolute density determinations showed atomic densities of around 3 x 10 17 m -3 , or the degree of dissociation to be 10 -4 . Densities along the axis perpendicular to the RF electrode showed peaked profiles, which were due to the balance of atomic hydrogen production by electron impact on molecules against diffusion loss to the walls. (author)

  6. Density of states of adsorbed sulphur atoms on pristine and defective graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, J S

    2017-01-01

    The density of states for adsorbed sulphur atom on a graphene layer system is discussed for pristine graphene layer and for mono and divacancies on the graphene layer. To our knowledge this is the first time that an entire adsorption of the sulphur atom is reported at the plane of the carbon atoms, when there is a pair of closer vacancies at the graphene layer. (paper)

  7. Introduction to Density Functional Theory: Calculations by Hand on the Helium Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseden, Kyle A.; Tye, Jesse W.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a type of electronic structure calculation that has rapidly gained popularity. In this article, we provide a step-by-step demonstration of a DFT calculation by hand on the helium atom using Slater's X-Alpha exchange functional on a single Gaussian-type orbital to represent the atomic wave function. This DFT…

  8. Local energy equation for two-electron atoms and relation between kinetic energy and electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2002-08-01

    In early work, Dawson and March [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5850 (1984)] proposed a local energy method for treating both Hartree-Fock and correlated electron theory. Here, an exactly solvable model two-electron atom with pure harmonic interactions is treated in its ground state in the above context. A functional relation between the kinetic energy density t(r) at the origin r=0 and the electron density p(r) at the same point then emerges. The same approach is applied to the Hookean atom; in which the two electrons repel with Coulombic energy e 2 /r 12 , with r 12 the interelectronic separation, but are still harmonically confined. Again the kinetic energy density t(r) is the focal point, but now generalization away from r=0 is also effected. Finally, brief comments are added about He-like atomic ions in the limit of large atomic number. (author)

  9. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of ... The lanthanide oxides find remarkable applications in the field of medicine, biology, nuclear engineering and space technology.

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Stress Distribution in Three Commonly Used Implant Systems in D2 and D4 Bone Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Radha

    2016-01-01

    Materials and Methods : Pro-engineer 3-0 software was used to create the geometric models of the three implant systems (Nobel biocare, Biohorizon, Adin and two bone densities D2 and D4. Six 3D models were created to simulate each one of the three implant systems supporting a metal ceramic crown placed in two different densities of bone D2 and D4. The Poisson′s ratio(΅ and Youngs modulus(E of elasticity were assigned to different materials used for the models. Vertical and oblique loads of 450N each were applied on all six models. Von Mises stress analysis was done with ANSYS software. Results : Von Mises stresses were more within D4 type bone than D2 type, for all the three systems of implants and less stresses were seen in Biohorizon implant followed by Nobel Biocare and Adin implant particularly in D4 bone. Conclusion: The study concluded that the selection of a particular implant system should be based on the scientific research rather than on popularity.

  11. Dopant redistribution and electrical activation in silicon following ultra-low energy boron implantation and excimer laser annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, S.; La Magna, A.; Privitera, V.; Mannino, G.; Italia, M.; Bongiorno, C.; Fortunato, G.; Mariucci, L.

    2003-01-01

    Excimer laser annealing (ELA) of ultra-low-energy (ULE) B-ion implanted Si has been performed. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy has been used to assess the as-implanted damage and the crystal recovery following ELA. The electrical activation and redistribution of B in Si during ELA has been investigated as a function of the laser energy density (melted depth), the implant dose, and the number of laser pulses (melt time). The activated and retained dose has been evaluated with spreading resistance profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry. A significant amount of the implanted dopant was lost from the sample during ELA. However, the dopant that was retained in crystal material was fully activated following rapid resolidification. At an atomic concentration below the thermodynamic limit, the activation efficiency (dose activated/dose implanted into Si material) was a constant for a fixed melt depth, irrespective of the dose implanted and hence the total activated dose was raised as the implant dose was increased. The electrical activation was increased for high laser energy density annealing when the dopant was redistributed over a deeper range

  12. Implants delivering bisphosphonate locally increase periprosthetic bone density in an osteoporotic sheep model. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GVA Stadelmann

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available It is a clinical challenge to obtain a sufficient orthopaedic implant fixation in weak osteoporotic bone. When the primary implant fixation is poor, micromotions occur at the bone-implant interface, activating osteoclasts, which leads to implant loosening. Bisphosphonate can be used to prevent the osteoclastic response, but when administered systemically its bioavailability is low and the time it takes for the drug to reach the periprosthetic bone may be a limiting factor. Recent data has shown that delivering bisphosphonate locally from the implant surface could be an interesting solution. Local bisphosphonate delivery increased periprosthetic bone density, which leads to a stronger implant fixation, as demonstrated in rats by the increased implant pullout force. The aim of the present study was to verify the positive effect on periprosthetic bone remodelling of local bisphosphonate delivery in an osteoporotic sheep model. Four implants coated with zoledronate and two control implants were inserted in the femoral condyle of ovariectomized sheep for 4 weeks. The bone at the implant surface was 50% higher in the zoledronate-group compared to control group. This effect was significant up to a distance of 400µm from the implant surface. The presented results are similar to what was observed in the osteoporotic rat model, which suggest that the concept of releasing zoledronate locally from the implant to increase the implant fixation is not species specific. The results of this trial study support the claim that local zoledronate could increase the fixation of an implant in weak bone.

  13. Rapid-relocation model for describing high-fluence retention of rare gases implanted in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, K.

    2009-09-01

    It has been known for a long time that the maximum areal density of inert gases that can be retained in solids after ion implantation is significantly lower than expected if sputter erosion were the only limiting factor. The difference can be explained in terms of the idea that the trapped gas atoms migrate towards the surface in a series of detrapping-trapping events so that reemission takes place well before the receding surface has advanced to the original depth of implantation. Here it is shown that the fluence dependent shift and shape of implantation profiles, previously determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), can be reproduced surprisingly well by extending a simple retention model originally developed to account only for the effect of surface recession by sputtering ('sputter approximation'). The additional migration of inert gas atoms is formally included by introducing an effective shift parameter Yeff as the sum of the sputtering yield Y and a relocation efficiency Ψrel. The approach is discussed in detail for 145 keV Xe + implanted in Si at normal incidence. Yeff was found to increase with increasing fluence, to arrive at a maximum equivalent to about twice the sputtering yield. At the surface one needs to account for Xe depletion and the limited depth resolution of RBS. The (high-fluence) effect of implanted Xe on the range distributions is discussed on the basis of SRIM calculations for different definitions of the mean target density, including the case of volume expansion (swelling). To identify a 'range shortening' effect, the implanted gas atoms must be excluded from the definition of the depth scale. The impact-energy dependence of the relocation efficiency was derived from measured stationary Xe concentrations. Above some characteristic energy (˜20 keV for Ar, ˜200 keV for Xe), Y exceeds Ψrel. With decreasing energy, however, Ψrel increases rapidly. Below 2-3 keV more than 90% of the reemission of Ar and Xe is estimated

  14. Evaluation of electronic states of implanted materials by molecular orbital calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Kano, Shigeki

    1997-07-01

    In order to understand the effect of implanted atom in ceramics and metals on the sodium corrosion, the electronic structures of un-implanted and implanted materials were calculated using DV-Xα cluster method which was one of molecular orbital calculations. The calculated materials were β-Si 3 N 4 , α-SiC and β-SiC as ceramics, and f.c.c. Fe, b.c.c. Fe and b.c.c. Nb as metals. An Fe, Mo and Hf atom for ceramics, and N atom for metals were selected as implanted atoms. Consequently, it is expected that the corrosion resistance of β-Si 3 N 4 is improved, because the ionic bonding reduced by the implantation. When the implanted atom is occupied at interstitial site in α-SiC and β-SiC, the ionic bonding reduced. Hence, there is a possibility to improve the corrosion resistance of α-SiC and β-SiC. It is clear that Hf is most effective element among implanted atoms in this study. As the covalent bond between N atom and surrounding Fe atoms increased largely in f.c.c. Fe by N implantation, it was expected that the corrosion resistance of f.c.c. Fe improved in liquid sodium. (J.P.N.)

  15. On the influence of atomic mixing on the evolution of ion-implantation profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras-Marti, A.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.; Peon-Fernandez, J.; Rodriguez-Vidal, M.

    1982-01-01

    Various processes contributing to the evolution of high-fluence implantation profiles in solids are considered within a general scheme. In particular the influence of atomic mixing is analysed. A Green function is derived which contains all the information on the instantaneous profile. In the Gaussian approximation, simple expressions for parameters which describe the ion-induced relocation effects on the depth profile are found. The contributions of recoil and cascade mixing are discussed. The relative significance of diffusive and collisional processes on the profiles can also be assessed. (author)

  16. A numerical study of spin-dependent organization of alkali-metal atomic clusters using density-functional method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuan; Ito, Haruhiko; Torikai, Eiko

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the different geometric isomers of spin clusters composed of a small number of alkali-metal atoms using the UB3LYP density-functional method. The electron density distribution of clusters changes according to the value of total spin. Steric structures as well as planar structures arise when the number of atoms increases. The lowest spin state is the most stable and Li n , Na n , K n , Rb n , and Cs n with n = 2–8 can be formed in higher spin states. In the highest spin state, the preparation of clusters depends on the kind and the number of constituent atoms. The interaction energy between alkali-metal atoms and rare-gas atoms is smaller than the binding energy of spin clusters. Consequently, it is possible to self-organize the alkali-metal-atom clusters on a non-wetting substrate coated with rare-gas atoms.

  17. A numerical study of spin-dependent organization of alkali-metal atomic clusters using density-functional method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xuan, E-mail: liu.x.ad@m.titech.ac.jp; Ito, Haruhiko [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Torikai, Eiko [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    We calculate the different geometric isomers of spin clusters composed of a small number of alkali-metal atoms using the UB3LYP density-functional method. The electron density distribution of clusters changes according to the value of total spin. Steric structures as well as planar structures arise when the number of atoms increases. The lowest spin state is the most stable and Li{sub n}, Na{sub n}, K{sub n}, Rb{sub n}, and Cs{sub n} with n = 2-8 can be formed in higher spin states. In the highest spin state, the preparation of clusters depends on the kind and the number of constituent atoms. The interaction energy between alkali-metal atoms and rare-gas atoms is smaller than the binding energy of spin clusters. Consequently, it is possible to self-organize the alkali-metal-atom clusters on a non-wetting substrate coated with rare-gas atoms.

  18. Tetragonal fcc-Fe induced by κ -carbide precipitates: Atomic scale insights from correlative electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Christian H.; Yao, Mengji; Dey, Poulumi; Lipińska-Chwalek, Marta; Berkels, Benjamin; Gault, Baptiste; Hickel, Tilmann; Herbig, Michael; Mayer, Joachim; Neugebauer, Jörg; Raabe, Dierk; Dehm, Gerhard; Scheu, Christina

    2018-02-01

    Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory calculations resolve the correlation between elastic strain fields and local impurity concentrations on the atomic scale. The correlative approach is applied to coherent interfaces in a κ -carbide strengthened low-density steel and establishes a tetragonal distortion of fcc-Fe. An interfacial roughness of ˜1 nm and a localized carbon concentration gradient extending over ˜2 -3 nm is revealed, which originates from the mechano-chemical coupling between local strain and composition.

  19. Exact correlated kinetic energy related to the electron density for two-electron model atoms with harmonic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, Norman H.; Akbari, Ali; Rubio, Angel

    2007-01-01

    For arbitrary interparticle interaction u(r 12 ), the model two-electron atom in the title is shown to be such that the ground-state electron density ρ(r) is determined uniquely by the correlated kinetic energy density t R (r) of the relative motion. Explicit results for t R (r) are presented for the Hookean atom with force constant k=1/4, and also for u(r 12 )=(λ)/(r 12 2 ) . Possible relevance of the Hookean atom treatment to the ground state of the helium atom itself is briefly discussed

  20. Atomic hydrogen effects on high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantskevich, N.V.; Ulyashin, A.G.; Alifanov, A.V.; Stepanenko, A.V.; Fedotova, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic hydrogen effects on the properties of bulk high-temperature superconductors were investigated. It is shown that the insertion of the atomic hydrogen into the bulk of these materials from a DC plasma leads to the increase of the critical current density J c for YBaCuO(123) as well as for BiSrCaCuO(2223) high-temperature superconductors. It is found that the hydrogenation of the He implanted samples with following annealing leads to the optically detected blistering on the surface. It means that the textured thin subsurface layers of high-temperature superconductors can be formed by this method. The improvement of superconductivity by atomic hydrogen can be explained by the passivation of dangling bonds and defects on grain boundaries of these materials

  1. Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ensinger, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique / B. Rauschenbach ... - In: Nuclear instruments and methods in physics research. B. 113. 1996. S. 266-269

  2. Long range implantation by MEVVA metal ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tonghe; Wu Yuguang; Ma Furong; Liang Hong

    2001-01-01

    Metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source ion implantation is a new technology used for achieving long range ion implantation. It is very important for research and application of the ion beam modification of materials. The results show that the implanted atom diffusion coefficient increases in Mo implanted Al with high ion flux and high dose. The implanted depth is 311.6 times greater than that of the corresponding ion range. The ion species, doses and ion fluxes play an important part in the long-range implantation. Especially, thermal atom chemistry have specific effect on the long-range implantation during high ion flux implantation at transient high target temperature

  3. Virial theorem in the Kohn-Sham density-functional theory formalism: Accurate calculation of the atomic quantum theory of atoms in molecules energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A.; Ayers, P.W.; Gotz, A.W.; Castillo-Alvarado, F.L.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for computing the atom-in-molecule [quantum theory of atoms in molecule (QTAIM)] energies in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory is presented and tested by computing QTAIM energies for a set of representative molecules. In the new approach, the contribution for the correlation-kinetic

  4. Atomically resolved tissue integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Johan; Sundell, Gustav; Thuvander, Mattias; Andersson, Martin

    2014-08-13

    In the field of biomedical technology, a critical aspect is the ability to control and understand the integration of an implantable device in living tissue. Despite the technical advances in the development of biomaterials, the elaborate interplay encompassing materials science and biology on the atomic level is not very well understood. Within implantology, anchoring a biomaterial device into bone tissue is termed osseointegration. In the most accepted theory, osseointegration is defined as an interfacial bonding between implant and bone; however, there is lack of experimental evidence to confirm this. Here we show that atom probe tomography can be used to study the implant-tissue interaction, allowing for three-dimensional atomic mapping of the interface region. Interestingly, our analyses demonstrated that direct contact between Ca atoms and the implanted titanium oxide surface is formed without the presence of a protein interlayer, which means that a pure inorganic interface is created, hence giving experimental support to the current theory of osseointegration. We foresee that this result will be of importance in the development of future biomaterials as well as in the design of in vitro evaluation techniques.

  5. Effect of argon implantation on solid-state dewetting: control of size and surface density of silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadori, Y; Borowik, Ł; Chevalier, N; Barbé, J-C

    2017-01-27

    Thermally induced solid-state dewetting of ultra-thin films on insulators is a process of prime interest, since it is capable of easily forming nanocrystals. If no particular treatment is performed to the film prior to the solid-state dewetting, it is already known that the size, the shape and the density of nanocrystals is governed by the initial film thickness. In this paper, we report a novel approach to control the size and the surface density of silicon nanocrystals based on an argon-implantation preliminary surface treatment. Using 7.5 nm thin layers of silicon, we show that increasing the implantation dose tends to form smaller silicon nanocrystals with diameter and height lower than 50 nm and 30 nm, respectively. Concomitantly, the surface density is increased by a factor greater than 20, going from 5 μm -2 to values over 100 μm -2 .

  6. RBS/NRA/channeling analysis of implanted immiscible species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naramoto, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Narumi, K.

    2000-01-01

    Ion implantation of immiscible elements was performed to prepare supersaturated substance for further heat treatment. 63 Cu ion implantation was made at low temperature into Nb(1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) single crystal films on sapphire, and the induced lattice damage and the lattice location of implanted Cu atoms were analyzed by 2.7 MeV 4 He + RBS/channeling. The coherent segregation of 63 Cu atoms with specific crystallographic orientations was found in the near surface region (Cu(1 0 0)/Nb(1 0 0), Cu(1 1 1)/Nb(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0)/Nb(1 1 1)). The same kind of study was also made in Ir(1 0 0)/MgO(1 0 0) implanted with 50 keV 12 C + ions. In addition to 2 MeV 4 He + RBS/channeling, 1.22 MeV d + RBS/NRA/channeling was employed to detect implanted 12 C atoms. The results suggest that 12 C atoms are aligned along Ir direction at least by low temperature implantation followed by thermal annealing

  7. Influence of homeopathic treatment with comfrey on bone density around titanium implants: a digital subtraction radiography study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Celso Eduardo; Neto, Rubens Spin; Bellucci, Marina; Wenzel, Ann; Scaf, Gulnara; Marcantonio, Elcio

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of homeopathic treatment with comfrey (Shymphytum officinalis 6CH) on radiographic bone density and area around titanium implants. Forty-eight rats were divided into two groups of 24 animals each: a control group (C) and a test group (SO). Each animal received one titanium micro-implant placed in the tibia. The animals in Group SO were subjected to 10 drops of comfrey 6CH per day mixed into their drinking water until the day of sacrifice. Eight animals of each group were sacrificed at 7, 14 and 28 days post-surgery, respectively. Standardized digital radiographs were obtained on the day of implant installation (baseline images) and on the day of sacrifice (final images). Digital subtraction of the two corresponding images was performed to evaluate changes in bone density and the area related to change around the implant between baseline and final images. Subtraction images demonstrated that a significant difference existed in mean shade of gray at 14 days post-surgery between Group SO (mean 175.3+/-14.4) and Group C (mean 146.2+/-5.2). Regarding the area in pixels corresponding to the bone gain in Group SO, the differences observed between the sacrifice periods and groups were only significant at 7 days sacrifice between Group SO (mean 171.2+/-21.9) and Group C (mean 64.5+/-60.4). Within the limits of this study, comfrey administration promotes an increase in radiographic bone density around titanium implants in the initial period of bone healing.

  8. Density functional study of manganese atom adsorption on hydrogen-terminated armchair boron nitride nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullahi, Yusuf Zuntu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kaduna State University, P.M.B. 2339, Kaduna State (Nigeria); Rahman, Md. Mahmudur, E-mail: mahmudur@upm.edu.my [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Shuaibu, Alhassan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B 2109 Kaduna (Nigeria); Abubakar, Shamsu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yobe State University, P.M.B. 1144, Yobe State (Nigeria); Zainuddin, Hishamuddin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute for Mathematical Research, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Muhida, Rifki [Department of Physics-Energy Engineering, Surya University, Gedung 01 Scientia Business Park, Jl. Boulevard Gading Serpong Blok O/1, Summarecon Serpong, Tangerang 15810, Banten (Indonesia); Setiyanto, Henry [Analytical Chemistry Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-08-15

    In this paper, we have investigated stable structural, electric and magnetic properties of manganese (Mn) atom adsorption on armchair hydrogen edge-terminated boron nitride nanoribbon (A-BNNRs) using first principles method based on density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Calculation shows that Mn atom situated on the ribbons of A-BNNRs is the most stable configuration, where the bonding is more pronounced. The projected density of states (PDOS) of the favored configuration has also been computed. It has been found that the covalent bonding of boron (B), nitrogen (N) and Mn is mainly contributed by s, d like-orbitals of Mn and partially occupied by the 2p like-orbital of N. The difference in energy between the inner and the edge adsorption sites of A-BNNRs shows that Mn atoms prefer to concentrate at the edge sites. The electronic structures of the various configurations are wide, narrow-gap semiconducting and half-metallic, and the magnetic moment of Mn atoms are well preserved in all considered configurations. This has shown that the boron nitride (BN) sheet covered with Mn atoms demonstrates additional information on its usefulness in future spintronics, molecular magnet and nanoelectronics devices.

  9. Density functional study of manganese atom adsorption on hydrogen-terminated armchair boron nitride nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullahi, Yusuf Zuntu; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Shuaibu, Alhassan; Abubakar, Shamsu; Zainuddin, Hishamuddin; Muhida, Rifki; Setiyanto, Henry

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated stable structural, electric and magnetic properties of manganese (Mn) atom adsorption on armchair hydrogen edge-terminated boron nitride nanoribbon (A-BNNRs) using first principles method based on density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Calculation shows that Mn atom situated on the ribbons of A-BNNRs is the most stable configuration, where the bonding is more pronounced. The projected density of states (PDOS) of the favored configuration has also been computed. It has been found that the covalent bonding of boron (B), nitrogen (N) and Mn is mainly contributed by s, d like-orbitals of Mn and partially occupied by the 2p like-orbital of N. The difference in energy between the inner and the edge adsorption sites of A-BNNRs shows that Mn atoms prefer to concentrate at the edge sites. The electronic structures of the various configurations are wide, narrow-gap semiconducting and half-metallic, and the magnetic moment of Mn atoms are well preserved in all considered configurations. This has shown that the boron nitride (BN) sheet covered with Mn atoms demonstrates additional information on its usefulness in future spintronics, molecular magnet and nanoelectronics devices.

  10. Density determination in the TEXTOR boundary layer by laser-ablated fast lithium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Ross, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented which allows a determination of electron density profiles in the plasma boundary of a fusion device up to some 10 13 cm -3 within about 100 μs. For this purpose, the complete attenuation of an injected lithium beam is determined by measuring its optical emission profile. The beam is generated by a ruby laser, which ablates small portions of a LiF coating with a thickness of about 1000 A from the rear side of a glass substrate. The produced lithium atoms have velocities of 1 x 10 6 cm/s and can penetrate into the plasma until n/sub e/ x l ≅1 x 10 13 cm -2 . For the measurement of the optical emission profile of the excited lithium atoms, a silicon photodiode array camera is used. The emission profile is then converted into an electron density profile with the help of the ionization rate for lithium atoms by electron impact

  11. Low energy implantation of boron with decaborane ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Maria Angela

    The goal of this dissertation was to determine the feasibility of a novel approach to forming ultra shallow p-type junctions (tens of nm) needed for future generations of Si MOS devices. In the new approach, B dopant atoms are implanted by cluster ions obtained by ionization of decaborane (B 10H14) vapor. An experimental ion implanter with an electron impact ion source and magnetic mass separation was built at the Ion Beam and Thin Film Research Laboratory at NJIT. Beams of B10Hx+ ions with currents of a few microamperes and energies of 1 to 12 keV were obtained and used for implantation experiments. Profiles of B and H atoms implanted in Si were measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) before and after rapid thermal annealing (RTA). From the profiles, the junction depth of 57 nm (at 1018 cm-3 B concentration) was obtained with 12 keV decaborane ions followed by RTA. The dose of B atoms that can be implanted at low energy into Si is limited by sputtering as the ion beam sputters both the matrix and the implanted atoms. As the number of sputtered B atoms increases with the implanted dose and approaches the number of the implanted atoms, equilibrium of B in Si is established. This effect was investigated by comparison of the B dose calculated from the ion beam integration with B content in the sample measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). Maximum (equilibrium) doses of 1.35 x 1016 B cm -2 and 2.67 x 1016 B cm-2 were obtained at the beam energies of 5 and 12 keV, respectively. The problem of forming shallow p-type junctions in Si is related not only to implantation depth, but also to transient enhanced diffusion (TED). TED in Si implanted with B10Hx+ was measured on boron doping superlattice (B-DSL) marker layers. It was found that TED, following decaborane implantation, is the same as with monomer B+ ion implantation of equivalent energy and that it decreases with the decreasing ion energy. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  12. Concept of effective atomic number and effective mass density in dual-energy X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, Anne; Duvauchelle, Philippe; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Ponard, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on dual-energy X-ray computed tomography and especially the decomposition of the measured attenuation coefficient in a mass density and atomic number basis. In particular, the concept of effective atomic number is discussed. Although the atomic number is well defined for chemical elements, the definition of an effective atomic number for any compound is not an easy task. After reviewing different definitions available in literature, a definition related to the method of measurement and X-ray energy, is suggested. A new concept of effective mass density is then introduced in order to characterize material from dual-energy computed tomography. Finally, this new concept and definition are applied on a simulated case, focusing on explosives identification in luggage

  13. LET spectra behind high-density titanium and stainless steel hip implants irradiated with a therapeutic proton beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oancea, Cristina; Ambrožová, Iva; Popescu, A. I.; Mytsin, G. V.; Vondráček, V.; Davídková, Marie

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 3 (2018), s. 7-13 ISSN 1350-4487 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF16_013/0001677 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : proton therapy * metallic hip implant * titanium * stainless steel * track etched detectors Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2016

  14. Influence of irradiation spectrum and implanted ions on the amorphization of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    Polycrystalline Al2O3, magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4), MgO, Si3N4, and SiC were irradiated with various ions at 200-450 K, and microstructures were examined following irradiation using cross-section TEM. Amorphization was not observed in any of the irradiated oxide ceramics, despsite damage energy densities up to ∼7 keV/atom (70 displacements per atom). On the other hand, SiC readily amorphized after damage levels of ∼0.4 dpa at room temperature (RT). Si3N4 exhibited intermediate behavior; irradiation with Fe 2+ ions at RT produced amorphization in the implanted ion region after damage levels of ∼1 dpa. However, irradiated regions outside the implanted ion region did not amorphize even after damage levels > 5 dpa. The amorphous layer in the Fe-implanted region of Si3N4 did not appear if the specimen was simultaneoulsy irradiated with 1-MeV He + ions at RT. By comparison with published results, it is concluded that the implantation of certain chemical species has a pronounced effect on the amorphization threshold dose of all five materials. Intense ionizing radiation inhibits amorphization in Si3N4, but does not appear to significantly influence the amorphization of SiC

  15. Cell Seeding Densities in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques for Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage repair techniques have been among the most intensively investigated treatments in orthopedics for the past decade, and several different treatment modalities are currently available. Despite the extensive research effort within this field, the generation of hyaline cartilage remains a considerable challenge. There are many parameters attendant to each of the cartilage repair techniques that can affect the amount and types of reparative tissue generated in the cartilage defect, and some of the most fundamental of these parameters have yet to be fully investigated. For procedures in which in vitro-cultured autologous chondrocytes are implanted under a periosteal or synthetic membrane cover, or seeded onto a porous membrane or scaffold, little is known about how the number of cells affects the clinical outcome. Few published clinical studies address the cell seeding density that was employed. The principal objective of this review is to provide an overview of the cell seeding densities used in cell-based treatments currently available in the clinic for cartilage repair. Select preclinical studies that have informed the use of specific cell seeding densities in the clinic are also discussed.

  16. 3D printed Ti6Al4V implant surface promotes bone maturation and retains a higher density of less aged osteocytes at the bone-implant interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Furqan A; Snis, Anders; Matic, Aleksandar; Thomsen, Peter; Palmquist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    For load-bearing orthopaedic applications, metal implants having an interconnected pore structure exhibit the potential to facilitate bone ingrowth and the possibility for reducing the stiffness mismatch between the implant and bone, thus eliminating stress-shielding effects. 3D printed solid and macro-porous Ti6Al4V implants were evaluated after six-months healing in adult sheep femora. The ultrastructural composition of the bone-implant interface was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy, in a correlative manner. The mineral crystallinity and the mineral-to-matrix ratios of the interfacial tissue and the native bone were found to be similar. However, lower Ca/P ratios, lower carbonate content, but higher proline, phenylalanine and tyrosine levels indicated that the interfacial tissue remained less mature. Bone healing was more advanced at the porous implant surface (vs. the solid implant surface) based on the interfacial tissue ν1 CO3(2-)/ν2 PO4(3-) ratio, phenylalanine and tyrosine levels approaching those of the native bone. The mechanosensing infrastructure in bone, the osteocyte lacuno-canalicular network, retained ∼40% more canaliculi per osteocyte lacuna, i.e., a 'less aged' morphology at the interface. The osteocyte density per mineralised surface area was ∼36-71% higher at the interface after extended healing periods. In osseointegration research, the success of an implant surface or design is commonly determined by quantifying the amount of new bone, rather than its maturation, composition and structure. This work describes a novel correlative methodology to investigate the ultrastructure and composition of bone formed around and within 3D printed Ti6Al4V implants having an interconnected open-pore structure. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that the molecular composition of the interfacial tissue at different implant surfaces may vary, suggesting differences in the extent to which bone maturation occurs even after long

  17. Effective atomic number and electron density of marble concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; El-Khayatt, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and effective electron density (N e ) of different type concrete have been measured and the results were compared with the calculation obtained using the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) obtained via XCOM in the photon energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV. Six different concrete in where marble has been used in the rate of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 %, has been used in the study. (author)

  18. Automated voxelization of 3D atom probe data through kernel density estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Kaluskar, Kaustubh; Dumpala, Santoshrupa; Broderick, Scott; Rajan, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Identifying nanoscale chemical features from atom probe tomography (APT) data routinely involves adjustment of voxel size as an input parameter, through visual supervision, making the final outcome user dependent, reliant on heuristic knowledge and potentially prone to error. This work utilizes Kernel density estimators to select an optimal voxel size in an unsupervised manner to perform feature selection, in particular targeting resolution of interfacial features and chemistries. The capability of this approach is demonstrated through analysis of the γ / γ’ interface in a Ni–Al–Cr superalloy. - Highlights: • Develop approach for standardizing aspects of atom probe reconstruction. • Use Kernel density estimators to select optimal voxel sizes in an unsupervised manner. • Perform interfacial analysis of Ni–Al–Cr superalloy, using new automated approach. • Optimize voxel size to preserve the feature of interest and minimizing loss / noise.

  19. Precipitation processes in implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is a nonequilibrium process. It is possible to implant materials with impurities to concentration levels which exceed the solid solubilities. The return of the system to thermodynamic equilibrium is often accomplished by precipitation of the implanted species or a compound involving atoms of both the host and the implanted species. This may involve long time scales when taking place at room temperature or it may take place during the implantation

  20. Micro-cutting of silicon implanted with hydrogen and post-implantation thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenković, Emil V.; To, Suet; Sundaravel, B.; Xiao, Gaobo; Huang, Hu

    2016-07-01

    It was reported that non-amorphizing implantation by hydrogen has a potential in improving silicon machining. Post-implantation high-temperature treatment will affect implantation-induced damage, which can have impact on silicon machining. In this article, a relation of a thermal annealing of hydrogen implanted in silicon to micro-cutting experiment is investigated. Hydrogen ions were implanted into 4″ silicon wafers with 175 keV, 150 keV, 125 keV and doses of 2 × 1016 cm-2, 2 × 1016 cm-2 and 3 × 1016 cm-2, respectively. In this way, low hydrogen atom-low defect concentration was created in the region less than ~0.8 μm deep and high hydrogen atom-high defect concentration was obtained at silicon depth of ~0.8-1.5 μm. The post-implantation annealing was carried out at 300 and 400 °C in nitrogen for 1 h. Physical and electrical properties of implanted and annealed samples were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nanoindentation. Plunge cutting experiment was carried out in and silicon crystal direction. The critical depth of cut and cutting force were monitored and found to be influenced by the annealing. The limits of hydrogen implantation annealing contribution to the cutting characteristics of silicon are discussed in light of implantation process and redistribution of hydrogen and defects generation during annealing process.

  1. Influence of driving frequency on oxygen atom density in O2 radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Takeshi; Noro, Kouichi; Nakano, Toshiki; Makabe, Toshiaki

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the driving frequency on the absolute oxygen atom density in an O 2 radio frequency (RF) capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) was investigated using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with pulse modulation of the main plasma. A low-power operation of a compact inductively coupled plasma light source was enabled to avoid the significant measurement errors caused by self-absorption in the light source. The pulse modulation of the main plasma enabled accurate absorption measurement for high plasma density conditions by eliminating background signals due to light emission from the main plasma. As for the effects of the driving frequency, the effect of VHF (100 MHz) drive on oxygen atom production was small because of the modest increase in plasma density of electronegative O 2 in contrast to the significant increase in electron density previously observed for electropositive Ar. The recombination coefficient of oxygen atoms on the electrode surface was obtained from a decay rate in the afterglow by comparison with a diffusion model, and it showed agreement with previously reported values for several electrode materials

  2. Density-matrix-functional calculations for matter in strong magnetic fields: Ground states of heavy atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Yngvason, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of the density matrix functional introduced by Lieb, Solovej, and Yngvason for the investigation of heavy atoms in high magnetic fields. This functional describes exactly the quantum mechanical ground state of atoms and ions in the limit when the nuclear charge Z...... and the electron number N tend to infinity with N/Z fixed, and the magnetic field B tends to infinity in such a way that B/Z4/3→∞. We have calculated electronic density profiles and ground-state energies for values of the parameters that prevail on neutron star surfaces and compared them with results obtained...... by other methods. For iron at B=1012 G the ground-state energy differs by less than 2% from the Hartree-Fock value. We have also studied the maximal negative ionization of heavy atoms in this model at various field strengths. In contrast to Thomas-Fermi type theories atoms can bind excess negative charge...

  3. Transport calculations of. gamma. -ray flux density and dose rate about implantable californium-252 sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A; Lin, B I [Cincinnati Univ., Ohio (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-07-01

    ..gamma.. flux density and dose rate distributions have been calculated about implantable californium-252 sources for an infinite tissue medium. Point source flux densities as a function of energy and position were obtained from a discrete-ordinates calculation, and the flux densities were multiplied by their corresponding kerma factors and added to obtain point source dose rates. The point dose rates were integrated over the line source to obtain line dose rates. Container attenuation was accounted for by evaluating the point dose rate as a function of platinum thickness. Both primary and secondary flux densities and dose rates are presented. The agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation was excellent. The data presented should be useful for the design of new source configurations.

  4. Temperature, pressure, and density of electron, atom and ion, in the breaking arc of silver-cadmium contacts used in medium current region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Teizo

    1979-01-01

    Wear of silver-cadmium contacts at the time of breaking was studied. The materials of the contacts were silver-cadmium alloy and silver-cadmium oxide sinter. The spectra of arc discharge generated at the time of breaking contact were analyzed with a monochromator photo multiplier. The ratio of the densities of cadmium and silver atoms in the arc can be estimated from the observed intensities of spectrum lines. The electron density is obtained from the arc current density. The proportion of the cadmium atoms in the arc was about 30 percent. The densities of silver atoms and cadmium atoms can be estimated by the principle of thermal ionization equilibrium. The ion densities were also estimated. The partial pressures of silver and cadmium atoms in the arc can be obtained from the Boyle-Charles' law. A formula which gives the number of atoms liberated from the surfaces of contacts at the time of breaking was given by Boddy et al. (Kato, T.)

  5. Ion implantation for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey-Morgan, T.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Over the past two decades, thousands of particle accelerators have been used to implant foreign atoms like boron, phosphorus and arsenic into silicon crystal wafers to produce special embedded layers for manufacturing semiconductor devices. Depending on the device required, the atomic species, the depth of implant and doping levels are the main parameters for the implantation process; the selection and parameter control is totally automated. The depth of the implant, usually less than 1 micron, is determined by the ion energy, which can be varied between 2 and 600 keV. The ion beam is extracted from a Freeman or Bernas type ion source and accelerated to 60 keV before mass analysis. For higher beam energies postacceleration is applied up to 200 keV and even higher energies can be achieved by mass selecting multiplycharged ions, but with a corresponding reduction in beam output. Depending on the device to be manufactured, doping levels can range from 10 10 to 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and are controlled by implanter beam currents in the range up to 30mA; continuous process monitoring ensures uniformity across the wafer of better than 1 % . As semiconductor devices get smaller, additional sophistication is required in the design of the implanter. The silicon wafers charge electrically during implantation and this charge must be dissipated continuously to reduce the electrical stress in the device and avoid destructive electrical breakdown. Electron flood guns produce low energy electrons (below 10 electronvolts) to neutralize positive charge buildup and implanter design must ensure minimum contamination by other isotopic species and ensure low internal sputter rates. The pace of technology in the semiconductor industry is such that implanters are being built now for 256 Megabit circuits but which are only likely to be widely available five years from now. Several specialist companies manufacture implanter systems, each costing around US$5 million, depending on the

  6. Visual outcome and changes in corneal endothelial cell density following aphakic iris-fixated intraocular lens implantation in pediatric eyes with subluxated lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Khan, Ayesha

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell density after Artisan aphakic intraocular lens (IOL) implantation (Ophtec, Groningen, the Netherlands) in pediatric eyes with subluxated lenses. Artisan aphakic IOLs were implanted in 18 eyes of 11 children with subluxated lenses. Idiopathic subluxations and ectopia lentis due to Marfan syndrome were included, whereas subluxations due to trauma or buphthalmos were excluded. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and endothelial cell density were monitored. Mean postoperative BCVA and endothelial cell density at last follow-up visit were calculated. The age of children at the time of Artisan aphakic IOL implantation ranged from 8 to 16 years (mean: 11.58 ± 2.9 years). Mean follow-up was 9.12 ± 4.30 months. Mean postoperative logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA was 0.26 ± 0.13 (P = .001) and mean postoperative endothelial cell density was 2,860 ± 435 cells/mm(2) (P = .000). Mean endothelial cell loss was 17.1%. Artisan aphakic IOL implantation is a safe surgical choice in the management of ectopia lentis in the pediatric age group. It has minimal complications and is less traumatic to pediatric eyes. However, long-term follow-up of these children is required.[J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2013;50(3):178-182.]. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Al-Shawaf, Reema; Al-Sadhan, Ra' ed; Al-Ekrish, Asma' a A. [King Saud University, Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Hoermann, Romed [Medical University of Innsbruck, Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. (orig.)

  8. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Al-Shawaf, Reema; Al-Sadhan, Ra'ed; Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A.; Hoermann, Romed

    2017-01-01

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. (orig.)

  9. A descriptive study of the radiographic density of implant restorative cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Hess, Timothy; Faber, Thomas; Piñeyro, Alfonso; Chen, Curtis S K

    2010-05-01

    Cementation of implant prostheses is a common practice. Excess cement in the gingival sulcus may harm the periodontal tissues. Identification of the excess cement may be possible with the use of radiographs if the cement has sufficient radiopacity. The purpose of this study was to compare the radiographic density of different cements used for implant prostheses. Eight different cements were compared: TempBond Original (TBO), TempBond NE (TBN), Fleck's (FL), Dycal (DY), RelyX Unicem (RXU), RelyX Luting (RXL), Improv (IM), and Premier Implant Cement (PIC). Specimen disks, 2 mm in thickness, were radiographed. Images were made using photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plates with standardized exposure values. The average grey level of the central area of each specimen disk was selected and measured in pixels using a software analysis program, ImageTool, providing an average grey level value representative of radiodensity for each of the 8 cements. The radiodensity was determined using the grey level values of the test materials, which were recorded and compared to a standard aluminum step wedge. An equivalent thickness of aluminum in millimeters was calculated using best straight line fit estimates. To assess contrast effects by varying the exposure settings, a second experiment using 1-mm-thick cement specimens radiographed at both 60 kVp and 70 kVp was conducted. The PSP plates with specimens were measured for a grey level value comparison to the standard aluminum step wedge, using the same software program. The highest grey level values were recorded for the zinc cements (TBO, TBN, and FL), with the 1-mm specimen detectable at both 60- and 70-kVp settings. A lower grey level was recorded for DY, indicative of a lower radiodensity compared to the zinc cements, but higher than RXL and RXU. The implant-specific cements had the lowest grey level values. IM could only be detected in 2-mm-thick sections with a lower aluminum equivalence value than the previously mentioned

  10. Visualisation and orbital-free parametrisation of the large-Z scaling of the kinetic energy density of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Antonio C.; Redd, Jeremy J.

    2017-03-01

    The scaling of neutral atoms to large Z, combining periodicity with a gradual trend to homogeneity, is a fundamental probe of density functional theory, one that has driven recent advances in understanding both the kinetic and exchange-correlation energies. Although research focus is normally upon the scaling of integrated energies, insights can also be gained from energy densities. We visualise the scaling of the positive-definite kinetic energy density (KED) in closed-shell atoms, in comparison to invariant quantities based upon the gradient and Laplacian of the density. We notice a striking fit of the KED within the core of any atom to a gradient expansion using both the gradient and the Laplacian, appearing as an asymptotic limit around which the KED oscillates. The gradient expansion is qualitatively different from that derived from first principles for a slowly varying electron gas and is correlated with a nonzero Pauli contribution to the KED near the nucleus. We propose and explore orbital-free meta-GGA models for the kinetic energy to describe these features, with some success, but the effects of quantum oscillations in the inner shells of atoms make a complete parametrisation difficult. We discuss implications for improved orbital-free description of molecular properties.

  11. Noble gas atoms as chemical impurities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Mudryi, A.V.; Minaev, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of noble gas atoms implanted in silicon is studied by the luminescence method. The energy position of Moessbauer-type luminescence bands with zero-phonon lines 1.0148, 1.0120, 1.0097, 1.0048 eV and others connected with implanted atoms of neon, helium, argon, krypton, respectively, indicates the formation of deep energy levels in the forbidden gap of silicon. Implantation of the noble gas isotopes confirms their participation in formation processes of the luminescence centers in silicon. The temperature range of existence and the symmetry of defects incorporating the noble gas atoms are found. It is noted that noble gas atoms form impurity complexes with deep energy levels and their behaviour in crystals does not differ from that of main doped or residual technological impurity atoms. (author)

  12. Calculations with the quasirelativistic local-spin-density-functional theory for high-Z atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Y.; Whitehead, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The generalized-exchange local-spin-density-functional theory (LSD-GX) with relativistic corrections of the mass velocity and Darwin terms has been used to calculate statistical total energies for the neutral atoms, the positive ions, and the negative ions for high-Z elements. The effect of the correlation and relaxation correction on the statistical total energy is discussed. Comparing the calculated results for the ionization potentials and electron affinities for the atoms (atomic number Z from 37 to 56 and 72 to 80) with experiment, shows that for the atoms rubidium to barium both the LSD-GX and the quasirelativistic LSD-GX, with self-interaction correction, Gopinathan, Whitehead, and Bogdanovic's Fermi-hole parameters [Phys. Rev. A 14, 1 (1976)], and Vosko, Wilk, and Nusair's correlation correction [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)], are very good methods for calculating ionization potentials and electron affinities. For the atoms hafnium to mercury the relativistic effect has to be considered

  13. Effects of disorder on atomic density waves and spin-singlet dimers in one-dimensional optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xianlong

    2008-01-01

    Using the Bethe-ansatz density-functional theory, we study a one-dimensional Hubbard model of confined attractively interacting fermions in the presence of a uniformly distributed disorder. The strongly correlated Luther-Emery nature of the attractive one-dimensional Hubbard model is fully taken into account as the reference system in the density-functional theory. The effects of the disorder are investigated on the atomic density waves in the weak-to-intermediate attractive interaction and on the spin-singlet dimers of doubly occupied sites in the strongly attractive regime. It is found that atomic density waves are sensitive to the disorder and the spin-singlet dimers of doubly occupied sites are quite unstable against the disorder. We also show that a very weak disorder could smear the singularities in the stiffness, thus, suppresses the spin-singlet pairs

  14. Effects of recoil-implanted oxygen on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si studied using monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kitano, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Masahito; Kawano, Takao; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Mikado, Tomohisa

    1996-04-01

    Effects of oxygen atoms recoiled from SiO{sub 2} films on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. For an epitaxial Si specimen, the depth profile of defects was found to be shifted toward the surface by recoil implantation of oxygen atoms. This was attributed to the formation of vacancy-oxygen complexes and a resultant decrease in the diffusion length of vacancy-type defects. The recoiled oxygen atoms stabilized amorphous regions introduced by P{sup +}-implantation, and the annealing of these regions was observed after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 700degC. For a Czochralski-grown Si specimen fabricated by through-oxide implantation, the recoiled oxygen atoms introduced interstitial-type defects upon RTA below the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, and such defects were dissociated by annealing at 1000degC. (author)

  15. Atomic-partial vibrational density of states of i-AlCuFe quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, P.P.; Zemlyanov, M.; Brand, R.A.; Dianoux, A.J.; Calvayrac, Y.

    2002-01-01

    We present new results on the separation of the atomic-partial vibrational density of states for the ternary quasicrystal i-Al 62 Cu 25.5 Fe 12.5 . The decomposition into three atomic-partial functions, Al-, Cu- and Fe-g(E), has been performed self-consistently with the calculation of the multi-phonon contributions. The results show the surprising result that both Cu- and Fe-g(E) are strongly peaked. The low-energy regions of Al- and Cu-g(E) show strong deviations from Debye behaviour due to the presence of non-propagating low-energy vibrational states. (orig.)

  16. Effects of high-dose hydrogen implantation on defect formation and dopant diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaqoob, Faisal [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Huang, Mengbing, E-mail: mhuang@sunypoly.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    This work reports on the effects of a deep high-dose hydrogen ion implant on damage accumulation, defect retention, and silver diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals. Single-crystal ZnO samples were implanted with Ag ions in a region ∼150 nm within the surface, and some of these samples were additionally implanted with hydrogen ions to a dose of 2 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, close to the depth ∼250 nm. Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling measurements show that crystal damage caused by Ag ion implantation and the amount of defects retained in the near surface region following post-implantation annealing were found to diminish in the case with the H implantation. On the other hand, the additional H ion implantation resulted in a reduction of substitutional Ag atoms upon post-implantation annealing. Furthermore, the presence of H also modified the diffusion properties of Ag atoms in ZnO. We discuss these findings in the context of the effects of nano-cavities on formation and annihilation of point defects as well as on impurity diffusion and trapping in ZnO crystals.

  17. Detection of atomic and molecular hydrogen in post-discharge by resonant multi-photo-ionisation. Determination of absolute atomic densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persuy, Philippe

    1990-01-01

    Within the frame of studies on devices for physical vapour deposition, and on phenomena leading to these depositions, this research thesis reports the development of a laser-diagnosis based on the phenomenon of resonant multi-photo-ionisation, and an attempt to obtain from it values of the absolute concentration of atomic hydrogen. After some recalls on the diversity of multi-photon phenomena, their theoretical and experimental evolutions, and on the particular role of hydrogen, the author reports experiments performed at 307.7 and 364.7 nm which respectively addressed the post-discharge detection of molecular hydrogen and of atomic hydrogen. A model is presented which addresses the interaction volume, and results of experiments of atom multi-photo-ionisation are reported. One of the results of this model is an assessment of the cross-section of the excitation with three photons of the hydrogen atom. This result is then used to determine the absolute density of atoms in fundamental state for different discharge conditions. Finally, the author presents the calculation software and some curve examples displaying the evolution of the number of ions and of excited states within the interaction volume [fr

  18. The effect of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant on corneal endothelial cell density in children with glaucoma secondary to uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina Ayuso, Viera; Scheerlinck, Laura M; de Boer, Joke H

    2013-03-01

    To assess the effect of Ahmed glaucoma valve implants on corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) in children with uveitic glaucoma. Cross-sectional study. setting: Institutional. patientpopulation: Eighty eyes from 42 patients diagnosed with uveitis before the age of 16. Twenty-eight eyes had an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant because of secondary glaucoma. Fifty-two eyes without an implant served as controls. intervention orobservationprocedure(s): Corneal ECD was examined cross-sectionally using a noncontact specular microscope. Univariate and multivariate generalized estimating equations analyses with correction for paired eyes were performed. mainoutcomemeasure(s): Correlation of ECD with the presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant and with the time following implantation. ECD was significantly lower in the Ahmed glaucoma valve group than in controls (2359 and 3088 cells/mm(2), respectively; P Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant, previous intraocular surgery, age, duration of uveitis, and history of corneal touch by the implant tube were all significantly associated with decreased ECD. Following a multivariate analysis, presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant (B = -340; adjusted P Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation was highly correlated with decreased ECD (B = -558, P Ahmed glaucoma valve implants in children with uveitic glaucoma are independently associated with decreased ECD, and this effect is associated with the time interval following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of UV/ozone treatment on the nanoscale surface properties of gold implanted polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisić, Danilo; Nenadović, Miloš [INS Vinca, Laboratory of Atomic Physics, University of Belgrade, Mike Alasa 12-14, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Štrbac, Svetlana [ICTM Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Belgrade, Njegoseva 12, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Adnadjević, Borivoj [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakočević, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [INS Vinca, Laboratory of Atomic Physics, University of Belgrade, Mike Alasa 12-14, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-07-01

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) ozone treatment on the surface properties of gold implanted high density polyethylene (HDPE) was investigated at a nanoscale using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). HDPE samples were modified by the implantation of gold ions at a dose of 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, using energies of 50, 100, 150, and 200 keV, and subsequently treated with UV/ozone. AFM surface topography images revealed that after UV/ozone treatment, the surface roughness of all Au/HDPE samples increased, while Power Spectral Density function increased only for samples implanted using higher energies, with a maximum for 150 keV. The chemical surface composition was homogenous in all cases, which was evidenced by the appearance of single peaks in the histograms obtained from the phase AFM images. For UV/ozone treated samples, the shift of the peaks positions in the histograms to the higher values of the phase lag with respect to untreated ones indicated the decrease of surface hardness. Besides, a significant change of fractal dimension of surface grains is observed after UV/ozone treatment.

  20. The effect of varying implant position in immediately loaded implant-supported mandibular overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaarawy, Mohammed A; Aboelross, Ehab M

    2013-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of varying implant position in immediately loaded implant-supported mandibular overdentures on peri-implant bone density, muscle activity, and patient satisfaction. Fourteen completely edentulous patients were selected for the study. After complete denture construction, patients were divided into 2 equal groups. Four dental implants were installed bilaterally in the interforaminal region in the first group, while in the second group, 4 dental implants were inserted bilaterally: 2 in the interforaminal region and 2 in the first molar area. Immediately after suturing, telescopic abutments were screwed to the implants, and the retaining caps were picked up into the fitting surface of the lower denture, which was delivered to the patient. Patients were recalled for radiographic bone density evaluation just after denture delivery and then at 3, 6, and 12 months thereafter. Muscle activities of masseter and temporalis muscles as well as patient satisfaction were also evaluated. The results of the study showed a high success rate approximating 98.2% of the immediately loaded implants. The electromyographic (EMG) records of both muscles in group 1 were significantly higher during chewing hard food after 3 months compared with group 2 (P overdentures through posterior placement beyond the interforaminal area results in a favorable response in terms of increased peri-implant bone density as well as decreased EMG activity of masseter and temporalis muscles.

  1. Moessbauer effect studies of the recovery of iron after heavy-ion implantation at 7 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reintsema, S.R.; Drentje, S.A.; Waard, H. de

    1978-01-01

    Moessbauer effect measurements were performed with sources of 133 Xe implanted at 7 K in polycrystalline iron foils by means of an isotope separator. Information about the direct environment of an implanted radioactive probe atom is obtained through the hyperfine interaction of the daughter nucleus ( 133 Cs) with its surroundings. The Moessbauer spectra were analyzed on the basis of an earlier model, assuming three visible spectral components with high, intermediate and low hyperfine fields and recoilless fractions, respectively, and a fourth, invisible component with a recoilless fraction very close to zero. Annealing experiments showed no evidence for post-implantation recovery stage I in the iron foils, while recovery stage II only gave rise to small changes in the site occupations. These results can be explained in terms of the high energy density locally deposited in the lattice by each implanted atom, leading to stage I recovery during the very short time that is necessary for the thermal dissipation of this energy. Quantitatively, these results are confirmed by calculations of Sigmund on heavy-ion induced elastic-collision spikes in solids. After annealing at room temperature the site occupations agree with those obtained directly with room temperature implanted sources. In previous experiments it has been shown that different results are obtained for annealing and for implantation at 200 0 C. From these results the authors estimate the migration energy of vacancies in iron at 1.27 +- 0.09 eV. (Auth.)

  2. Ion implantation in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.; Gusevova, M.

    1980-01-01

    The historical development is described of the method of ion implantation, the physical research of the method, its technological solution and practical uses. The method is universally applicable, allows the implantation of arbitrary atoms to an arbitrary material, ensures high purity of the doping element. It is linked with sample processing at low temperatures. In implantation it is possible to independently change the dose and energy of the ions thereby affecting the spatial distribution of the ions. (M.S.)

  3. Ion implantation in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, V; Gusevova, M

    1980-06-01

    The historical development of the method of ion implantation, the physical research of the method, its technological solution and practical uses is described. The method is universally applicable, allows the implantation of arbitrary atoms to an arbitrary material and ensures high purity of the doping element. It is linked with sample processing at low temperatures. In implantation it is possible to independently change the dose and energy of the ions thereby affecting the spatial distribution of the ions.

  4. Intrinsic point-defect balance in self-ion-implanted ZnO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Pekka T; Vines, Lasse; Svensson, Bengt G; Kuznetsov, Andrej Yu

    2013-01-04

    The role of excess intrinsic atoms for residual point defect balance has been discriminated by implanting Zn or O ions into Li-containing ZnO and monitoring Li redistribution and electrical resistivity after postimplant anneals. Strongly Li-depleted regions were detected in the Zn-implanted samples at depths beyond the projected range (R(p)) upon annealing ≥ 600 °C, correlating with a resistivity decrease. In contrast, similar anneals of the O-implanted samples resulted in Li accumulation at R(p) and an increased resistivity. Control samples implanted with Ar or Ne ions, yielding similar defect production as for the Zn or O implants but with no surplus of intrinsic atoms, revealed no Li depletion. Thus, the depletion of Li shows evidence of excess Zn interstitials (Zn(I)) being released during annealing of the Zn-implanted samples. These Zn(I)'s convert substitutional Li atoms (Li(Zn)) into highly mobile interstitial ones leading to the strongly Li-depleted regions. In the O-implanted samples, the high resistivity provides evidence of stable O(I)-related acceptors.

  5. Atomic and ionic density measurement by laser absorption spectroscopy of magnetized or non-magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gourrierec, P.

    1989-11-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy is an appreciated diagnostic in plasma physics to measure atomic and ionic densities. We used it here more specifically on metallic plasmas. Firstly, a uranium plasma was created in a hollow cathode. 17 levels of U.I and U.II (12 for U.I and 5 for U.II) are measured by this method. The results are compared with the calculated levels of two models (collisional-radiative and LTE). Secondly, the theory of absorption in presence of a magnetic field is recalled and checked. Then, low-density magnetized plasma produced on our ERIC experiment (acronym for Experiment of Resonance Ionic Cyclotron), have been diagnosed successfully. The use of this technique on a low density plasma has not yet been published to our knowledge. The transverse temperature and the density of a metastable atomic level of a barium plasma has been derived. The evolution of a metastable ionic level of this element is studied in terms of two source parameters (furnace temperature and injected hyperfrequency power) [fr

  6. Atomic-partial vibrational density of states of i-AlCuFe quasicrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Parshin, P P; Brand, R A; Dianoux, A J; Calvayrac, Y

    2002-01-01

    We present new results on the separation of the atomic-partial vibrational density of states for the ternary quasicrystal i-Al sub 6 sub 2 Cu sub 2 sub 5 sub . sub 5 Fe sub 1 sub 2 sub . sub 5. The decomposition into three atomic-partial functions, Al-, Cu- and Fe-g(E), has been performed self-consistently with the calculation of the multi-phonon contributions. The results show the surprising result that both Cu- and Fe-g(E) are strongly peaked. The low-energy regions of Al- and Cu-g(E) show strong deviations from Debye behaviour due to the presence of non-propagating low-energy vibrational states. (orig.)

  7. Proton implantation effect on (SUS-316) stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.K.; Ishigami, R.; Kamal, I.

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural damage and nano hardness of the industrial grade stainless steel (SUS-316) have been studied under proton (H + ) implanted condition applying different doses at room temperature. The implantation scheme such as proton energy, fluence, irradiation time, and penetration depth in the target materials were estimated by Monte Carlo Simulation Code SRIM-2008. In the simulation, the parameters were chosen in such a way that the damage density (displacement per atom or dpa) would be uniform up to certain depth from the surface. X-ray diffraction study of the annealed samples prior to the proton implantation showed the austenitic fcc structure and no significant change was observed after proton implantation in it. Microstructural observation made by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) revealed that 1 dpa of proton-irradiation induced the structural damage extended up to 1 μm depth from the surface. The nano hardness study showed that the hardness level of the irradiated samples increased monotonically with the irradiation doses. Proton dose of 1 dpa caused 65% increment of hardness level on average in case of uniformly irradiated samples. It was realized that the increment of hardness was a consequence of microstructural damages caused by the formation of interstitial dislocation loops in the sample matrix keeping the lattice structure unaffected

  8. Implantation and annealing effects in molecular organic films

    CERN Document Server

    Pakhomov, G L; Shashkin, V I; Tura, J M; Ribo, J M; Ottaviano, L

    2002-01-01

    Ion implantation and annealing effects on the surface of phthalocyanine thin films have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Both the topology and the chemical composition of the surface are affected by irradiation. The influence of the irradiation dose is shown. The chemical degradation of the layer results mainly in the decrease of atomic concentration of nitrogen and chlorine, and in the increase of atomic concentration of oxygen. At highest dose, carbonization becomes important. Furthermore, N 1s, C 1s and Cl 2p core levels testify that the formation of new chemical species occurs in implanted pthalocyanine films. All these processes are modified by subsequent heat treatment in different ways, depending on the applied implantation fluence.

  9. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finzel, Kati, E-mail: kati.finzel@liu.se [Linköpings University, IFM Department of Physics, 58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  10. Investigation of the atomic interface structure of mesotaxial Si/CoSi2(100) layers formed by high-dose implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulle-Lieuwma, C.W.T.; Jong, A.F. de; Vandenhoudt, D.E.W.

    1991-01-01

    Aligned mesotaxial films of CoSi 2 in monocrystalline (100) oriented Si substrates have been formed by high-dose ion implantation of Co, followed by a high temperature treatment. The atomic structures of both the lower and upper Si/CoSi 2 (100) interfaces of the buried CoSi 2 layer have been investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) combined with image simulations. A domain-like structure is observed consisting of areas with different interfaces. In order to derive the atomic configuration, image simulations of different proposed models are presented. By comparing simulated images and HREM images, two different atomic structure models for the Si/CoSi 2 (100) interface have been found. In the first model the interfacial Co atoms are six-fold coordinated and the tetrahedral coordination and bond lengths of silicon atoms are everywhere maintained. In the second model we found evidence for a 2 x 1 interface reconstruction, involving a difference in composition. The interfacial Co atoms are seven-fold coordinated. It is shown that the boundaries between the domains are associated with interfacial dislocations of edge-type with Burgers vectors b a/4 inclined and b = a/2 parallel to the interfacial plane. (author)

  11. High density nitrogen-vacancy sensing surface created via He{sup +} ion implantation of {sup 12}C diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinsasser, Ed E., E-mail: edklein@uw.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2500 (United States); Stanfield, Matthew M.; Banks, Jannel K. Q. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Zhu, Zhouyang; Li, Wen-Di [HKU-Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation (HKU-SIRI), Shenzhen 518000 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Acosta, Victor M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Watanabe, Hideyuki [Correlated Electronics Group, Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Itoh, Kohei M. [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Fu, Kai-Mei C., E-mail: kaimeifu@uw.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2500 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    We present a promising method for creating high-density ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers with narrow spin-resonances for high-sensitivity magnetic imaging. Practically, narrow spin-resonance linewidths substantially reduce the optical and RF power requirements for ensemble-based sensing. The method combines isotope purified diamond growth, in situ nitrogen doping, and helium ion implantation to realize a 100 nm-thick sensing surface. The obtained 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} nitrogen-vacancy density is only a factor of 10 less than the highest densities reported to date, with an observed 200 kHz spin resonance linewidth over 10 times narrower.

  12. Improvement of in vitro corrosion and cytocompatibility of biodegradable Fe surface modified by Zn ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Yan; Jiang, Chengbao

    2017-05-01

    Pure Fe was surface-modified by Zn ion implantation to improve the biodegradable behavior and cytocompatibility. Surface topography, chemical composition, corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility were investigated. Atomic force microscopy, auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that Zn was implanted into the surface of pure Fe in the depth of 40-60 nm and Fe2O3/ZnO oxides were formed on the outmost surface. Electrochemical measurements and immersion tests revealed an improved degradable behavior for the Zn-implanted Fe samples. An approximately 12% reduction in the corrosion potential (Ecorr) and a 10-fold increase in the corrosion current density (icorr) were obtained after Zn ion implantation with a moderate incident ion dose, which was attributed to the enhanced pitting corrosion. The surface free energy of pure Fe was decreased by Zn ion implantation. The results of direct cell culture indicated that the short-term (4 h) cytocompatibility of MC3T3-E1 cells was promoted by the implanted Zn on the surface.

  13. Dopant site location in dual-implanted GaP using (111) planar channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, N.R.; Kao, C.T.; Lee, D.R.; Muse, J.; Swanson, M.L.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Timmons, M.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that dual implantation can efficiently introduce group IV dopant onto selected sub-lattice sites in III--V compound semiconductors, thus enhancing electrical activation. The authors have studied this phenomenon in GaP using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) to determine the lattice location of Sn atoms. The authors used single crystals of GaP (100) which had been implanted at 400 degrees C with 120 Sn + following previously implanted 69 Ga + or 31 P + . Energies were selected for equivalent projected ranges, and all species were implanted with doses of 1 x 10 15 atoms/cm 2 . Asymmetry in the angular scan of the {111} planar channel was then used to determine the sub-lattice location of the implanted Sn. RBS results indicated that for all implants Sn atoms were substituting Ga and P sites equally. However, Hall effect measurements gave p type conduction for GaP implanted with Sn alone, while those with prior implants of Ga or P resulted in n-type conduction. RBS and Hall effect results are explained by a vacancy complex model

  14. Role of atom--atom inelastic collisions in two-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunc, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contribution of inelastic atom--atom collisions to the production of electrons and excited atoms in two-temperature (with electron temperature T/sub e/, atomic temperature T/sub a/, and atomic density N/sub a/), steady-state, nonequilibrium atomic hydrogen plasma is investigated. The results are valid for plasmas having large amounts of atomic hydrogen as one of the plasma components, so that e--H and H--H inelastic collisions and interaction of these atoms with radiation dominate the production of electrons and excited hydrogen atoms. Densities of electrons and excited atoms are calculated in low-temperature plasma, with T/sub e/ and T/sub a/≤8000 K and 10 16 cm -3 ≤N/sub a/≤10 18 cm -3 , and with different degrees of the reabsorption of radiation. The results indicate that inelastic atom--atom collisions are important for production of electrons and excited atoms in partially ionized plasmas with medium and high atomic density and temperatures below 8000 K

  15. Determination of the number density of excited and ground Zn atoms during rf magnetron sputtering of ZnO target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maaloul, L.; Gangwar, R. K.; Stafford, L., E-mail: luc.stafford@umontreal.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    A combination of optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) and optical emission spectroscopy measurements was used to monitor the number density of Zn atoms in excited 4s4p ({sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable states as well as in ground 4s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) state in a 5 mTorr Ar radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering plasma used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. OAS measurements revealed an increase by about one order of magnitude of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms by varying the self-bias voltage on the ZnO target from −115 to −300 V. Over the whole range of experimental conditions investigated, the triplet-to-singlet metastable density ratio was 5 ± 1, which matches the statistical weight ratio of these states in Boltzmann equilibrium. Construction of a Boltzmann plot using all Zn I emission lines in the 200–500 nm revealed a constant excitation temperature of 0.33 ± 0.04 eV. In combination with measured populations of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms, this temperature was used to extrapolate the absolute number density of ground state Zn atoms. The results were found to be in excellent agreement with those obtained previously by actinometry on Zn atoms using Ar as the actinometer gas [L. Maaloul and L. Stafford, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 31, 061306 (2013)]. This set of data was then correlated to spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the deposition rate of Zn atoms on a Si substrate positioned at 12 cm away from the ZnO target. The deposition rate scaled linearly with the number density of Zn atoms. In sharp contrast with previous studies on RF magnetron sputtering of Cu targets, these findings indicate that metastable atoms play a negligible role on the plasma deposition dynamics of Zn-based coatings.

  16. Relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation theory and applications to atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.Z.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent linear-response theory appropriate to the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA) to quantum electrodynamics (QED) is developed. The resulting theory, the relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation (RTDLDA) is specialized to the treatment of electric excitations in closed-shell atoms. This formalism is applied to the calculation of atomic photoionization parameters in the dipole approximation. The static-field limit of the RTDLDA is applied to the calculation of dipole polarizabilities. Extensive numerical calculations of the photoionization parameters for the rare gases neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, and for mercury from the RTDLDA are presented and compared in detail with the results of other theories, in particular the relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA), and with experimental measurements. The predictions of the RTDLDA are comparable with the RRPA calculations made to date. This is remarkable in that the RTDLDA entails appreciably less computational effort. Finally, the dipole polarizabilities predicted by the static-field RTDLDA are compared with other determinations of these quantities. In view of its simplicity, the static-field RTDLDA demonstrates itself to be one of the most powerful theories available for the calculation of dipole polarizabilities

  17. Raman spectroscopy of few-layer graphene prepared by C2–C6 cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, Z.D.; Huang, Z.H.; Liu, C.S.; Fu, D.J.; Liu, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Few-layer graphene has been prepared on 300 nm-thick Ni films by C 2 –C 6 cluster ion implantation at 20 keV/cluster. Raman spectroscopy reveals significant influence of the number of atoms in the cluster, the implantation dose, and thermal treatment on the structure of the graphene layers. In particular, the graphene samples exhibit a sharp G peak at 1584 cm −1 and 2D peaks at 2711–2717 cm −1 . The I G /I 2D ratios higher than 1.70 and I G /I D ratio as high as 1.95 confirm that graphene sheets with low density of defects have been synthesized with much improved quality by ion implantation with larger clusters of C 4 –C 6

  18. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Al-Shawaf, Reema; Schullian, Peter; Al-Sadhan, Ra'ed; Hörmann, Romed; Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A

    2017-05-01

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. • Ultra-low-dose MDCT protocols allowed more than 90 % reductions in dose. • Decreasing the dose generally increased density and noise. • Effect of IRT on density and noise varies with reconstruction kernel. • Accuracy of low-dose protocols for interpretation of bony anatomy not known. • Effect of low doses on accuracy of computer-aided design models unknown.

  19. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, ChienHsu; Cho, I C; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H

    2017-02-09

    Here we present a simple physical method to prepare magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are embedded into NDs through Fe ion-implantation and the crystal structure of NDs are recovered by thermal annealing. The results of TEM and Raman examinations indicated the crystal structure of the Fe implanted NDs is recovered completely. The SQUID-VSM measurement shows the Fe-NDs possess room temperature ferromagnetism. That means the Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting NDs crystal structure, so the NDs can preserve the original physical and chemical properties of the NDs. In addition, the ion-implantation-introduced magnetic property might make the NDs to become suitable for variety of medical applications.

  20. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chienhsu; Cho, I. C.; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H.

    2017-02-01

    Here we present a simple physical method to prepare magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are embedded into NDs through Fe ion-implantation and the crystal structure of NDs are recovered by thermal annealing. The results of TEM and Raman examinations indicated the crystal structure of the Fe implanted NDs is recovered completely. The SQUID-VSM measurement shows the Fe-NDs possess room temperature ferromagnetism. That means the Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting NDs crystal structure, so the NDs can preserve the original physical and chemical properties of the NDs. In addition, the ion-implantation-introduced magnetic property might make the NDs to become suitable for variety of medical applications.

  1. Origin for the shape of Au small crystals formed inside sapphire by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, M.; Hioki, T.

    1989-01-01

    In ion-implanted oxides, precipitation is usually formed except the case of forming solid solution. The precipitation comprises the metallic particles of implanted atoms, the oxide of implanted atoms, the metal of matrix elements, the compound of implanted atoms and matrix and so on. In particular, the metallic particles of implanted atoms are frequently faceted. From the facets, the equilibrium shape of crystals can be imagined. The equilibrium shape is determined so that the surface free energy is to be minimized. However, the shape of the metallic particles precipitated inside oxides should not be such equilibrium shape because they come in contact with foreign crystals. As the result, in the precipitation phenomena induced by ion implantation, the crystal structures of precipitated particles and substrates, the crystallographic relation between two crystals, interfacial energy and so on must be taken in consideration. In this paper, the report is made on the shape of the metallic gold particles formed inside sapphires by ion implantation that it was caused by only the crystal habit of sapphires regardless of the above-mentioned complexity. (K.I.)

  2. Study of the effects of E × B fields as mechanism to carbon-nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation on stainless steel samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillaca, E. J. D. M.; Ueda, M.; Oliveira, R. M.; Pichon, L.

    2014-08-01

    Effects of E × B fields as mechanism to carbon-nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) have been investigated. This magnetic configuration when used in PIII allows obtaining high nitrogen plasma density close to the ion implantation region. Consequently, high ions dose on the target is possible to be achieved compared with standard PIII. In this scenario, nitrogen and carbon ions were implanted simultaneously on stainless steel, as measured by GDOES and detected by X-ray diffraction. Carbon-tape disposed on the sample-holder was sputtered by intense bombardment of nitrogen ions, being the source of carbon atoms in this experiment. The implantation of both N and C caused changes on sample morphology and improvement of the tribological properties of the stainless steel.

  3. Correlated kinetic energy density functional of ground states of harmonically confined two-electron atoms for arbitrary interparticle interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amovilli, C; March, N H

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing the earlier work of Holas et al (2003 Phys. Lett. A 310 451) and the more recent contribution of Akbari et al (2009 Phys. Rev. A 80 032509), we construct an integral equation for the relative motion (RM) contribution t RM (r) to the correlated kinetic energy density for modelling two-electron atoms with harmonic confinement but arbitrary interparticle interaction. It is stressed that t RM = t RM [f(G)], where f(G) is the atomic scattering factor: the Fourier transform of the density ρ(r). As a simple illustrative example of this functional relation for the correlated kinetic energy density, the harmonic Moshinsky case is investigated, the scattering factor then having a Gaussian form. (paper)

  4. Measurement of the Lyman-alpha radiation at ionization manometers for determination of the hydrogen atom number density in fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loercher, M.

    1990-01-01

    Codes like DEGAS which simulate the interaction of neutral gas with plasma (e.g. in a divertor), not only deliver the global density and flux of neutral particles, but also allow one, in addition, to distinguish between atoms and molecules. Whereas the global parameters of the neutral gas in a divertor can be measured by, for example, special ion gauges like those, which are installed in the divertor chamber, there has until now been no possibility of measuring the atomic and molecular density independently. In the frame of a diploma thesis (M. Loercher) an ASDEX neutral pressure gauge was modified in such a way that it delivers not only the global density of neutral particles (molecules and atoms) by ionization, but also the density of the atoms by measurement of the Lα-radiation produced by electron impact exitation. Owing to the very weak intensity the main effort was dedicated to developing a detector-filter combination which allows the Lα-radiation to be separated from, the H 2 bands in the VUV and be measured with a time resolution of at least of few ms. Several versions were tested theoretically and practically. The best solution was found to be a combination of an O 2 filter using MgF 2 windows and a multichannel plate. The arrangement was tested and calibrated with an atomic beam of known intensity from an oven. (orig.)

  5. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy He{sup +} implantation and thermal aging of nanocrystalline iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muntifering, Brittany, E-mail: brmunti@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208 (United States); Fang, Youwu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208 (United States); Leff, Asher C. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (United States); Dunn, Aaron [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech CNRS, 57070, Metz (France); Qu, Jianmin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208 (United States); School of Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA, 02155 (United States); Taheri, Mitra L. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (United States); Dingreville, Remi; Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The high density of interfaces in nanostructured materials are hypothesized to improve radiation tolerance compared to coarse-grained materials. In order to investigate the roles of vacancies, self-interstitials, and helium, both room temperature in situ TEM He{sup +} implantation and annealing, as well as high temperature He{sup +} implantation was performed on nanocrystalline iron. Dislocation loops are formed by the accumulation of mobile point defects rather than by displacement cascades at intermediate temperatures. Around 600 °C, loops disappeared through gradual shrinking, which is hypothesized to correspond to the annihilation of self-interstitial atoms by mobile vacancies that also resulted in cavity formation. The room temperature implantation resulted in cavities evenly distributed throughout the grain after annealing, whereas cavities were predominately observed at grain boundaries for the elevated temperature implantation. This difference is associated with the formation of stable helium-vacancy complexes in the grains during room temperature implantation, which is not present during high temperature implantation. - Highlights: • In situ TEM He{sup +} implantation and annealing was performed on nanocrystalline iron. • Small grains limited loop size and resulted in complete disappearance of loops by 600 °C. • Implantation followed by annealing resulted in cavities evenly distributed through grain. • Cavities predominately observed at grain boundaries after He{sup +} implantation at 600 °C.

  6. Partial differential equation for the idempotent Dirac density matrix characterized solely by the exact non-relativistic ground-state electron density for spherical atomic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2009-08-01

    In this Journal, March and Suhai have earlier set up a first-order Dirac idempotent density matrix theory for one- and two-level occupancy in which the only input required is the nonrelativistic ground-state electron density. Here, an analytic generalization is provided for the case of spherical electron densities for arbitrary level occupancy. Be-like atomic ions are referred to as an example, but 'almost spherical' molecules like SiH 4 and GeH 4 also become accessible. (author)

  7. Depth distribution of nitrogen in silicon from plasma ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajo, J.J.; Williams, J.D.; Wei, R.; Wilson, R.G.; Matossian, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma Ion Implantation (PII) is an ion implantation technique that eliminates the line-of-sight restriction of conventional ion-beam implantation and therefore allows for cost effective surface modification of large-scale objects or large-number of small-scale objects. In PII, a part to be implanted is immersed in a low-pressure (10 -4 --10 -5 Torr), partially-ionized plasma that surrounds the part with a plasma sheath. The part is negatively pulse biased up to 100 keV using a repetitive train (100--1,000 Hz) of short-duration (10--40 μsec) voltage pulses. The applied voltage develops across the sheath and accelerates plasma ions into the surface, implanting them omnidirectionally and simultaneously over the entire surface of the part. The depth distribution of the implanted ions influences the extent and type of surface modification achieved and depends upon many factors. These include three rise and fall time of the voltage-pulse waveform, the voltage-pulse amplitude, the ion specie, the ion density, and the temperature of the target. Understanding the contributions to the depth distribution from each of these factors will enable prediction of conditions that will be useful for implantation of large complex parts. To investigate the contributions to the measured depth distributions from these factors nitrogen, predominantly as N + 2 , has been implanted into silicon using PII at 50 and 100 keV (25 and 50 keV per N atom). The implanted depth distributions have been determined using secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. The distributions differ from the typical, approximately Gaussian, profiles that result from conventional mass selected monoenergetic ion beam implantation. In comparison with ion beam implants and numerical simulations the profiles appear ''filled-in'' with an approximately constant nitrogen concentration for depths less than the expected average ion range

  8. Atomic hydrogen and argon ground state density determination in a recombining plasma using visible light absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otorbaev, D.K.; Buuron, A.J.M.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Meulenbroeks, R.F.G.; Schram, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The atomic radical density in the first excited state, obtained by the technique of optical absorption spectroscopy, and a simple kinetic model are used to determine the radical ground state density in a recombining expanding plasma. The kinetic model used does not require knowledge of the shape of

  9. Production of solid deuterium targets by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csikai, J.; Szegedi, S.; Olah, L.; El-Megrab, A.M.; Molla, N.I.; Rahman, M.M.; Miah, R.U.; Habbani, F.; Shaddad, I.

    1997-01-01

    Solid metal, semiconductor and metallic glass samples were irradiated with deuteron atomic ions between 60 and 180 keV incident energies. Accumulation rates of deuterons in different targets were recorded by the detection of protons and neutrons via the 2 H(d,p) and 2 H(d,n) reactions. A simple analytical expression is given to describe the kinetics of the accumulation. The dependence of the reaction rate on the deuteron energy gives information on the concentration profile in addition to the neutron flux density spectra. A varying distortion of the implanted deuteron profiles by a change in the beam energy were also observed for different targets. (orig.)

  10. Dependence of ion - photon emission characteristics on the concentration of implanted atoms of the bombarding beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belykh, S.F.; Evtukhov, R.N.; Redina, I.V.; Ferleger, V.Kh.

    1989-01-01

    Results of experiment, where Dy + beams, its spraying products emitting intensively optical radiation with continuous spectrum (CSR), are used for tantalum surface bombardment, are presented. The given experiment allowed one to separate the scattered particle CSR contribution and was conducted under controlled beam n atom concentration on the target surface. E 0 energy and j 0 dysprosium ion flux density made up respectively 3.5 keV and 3x10 5 Axcm -2 . The obtained result analysis has shown that a notable dependence of spectrum type on n value is detected. Dy scattered atoms to not emit CSR. The main contribution to CSR is made by sprayed particles, containing dysprosium atoms

  11. Density functional theory calculations establish the experimental evidence of the DX center atomic structure in CdTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan; Wolf, Herbert; Wichert, Thomas

    2004-06-04

    The In DX center and the DX-like configuration of the Cd host atom in CdTe are investigated using density functional theory. The simultaneous calculation of the atomic structure and the electric field gradient (EFG) allows one to correlate the theoretically predicted structure of the DX center with an experimental observable, namely, the EFG obtained from radioactive 111In/111Cd probe atoms in In doped CdTe. In this way, the experimental identification of the DX center structure is established.

  12. Structural characterization of Mn implanted AlInN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, Abdul; Ali, Akbar [Advance Materials Physics Laboratory, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zhu, J J; Wang, Y T [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductor, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: abdulmajid40@yahoo.com, E-mail: akbar@qau.edu.pk

    2008-06-07

    AlInN/GaN thin films were implanted with Mn ions and subsequently annealed isochronically at 750 and 850 deg. C. X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques were employed to study the microstructural properties of the implanted/annealed samples. The effect of annealing on implantation-induced strain in thin films has been studied in detail. The strain was found to increase with dose until it reached a saturation value and after that it started decreasing with a further increase in the dose. RBS measurements indicated the atomic diffusion of In, Al, Ga and Mn in implanted samples. The in- and out-diffusion of atoms has been observed after annealing at 750 deg. C and 850 deg. C, respectively. Strong decomposition of the samples took place when annealed at 850 deg. C.

  13. Structural characterization of Mn implanted AlInN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, Abdul; Ali, Akbar; Zhu, J J; Wang, Y T

    2008-01-01

    AlInN/GaN thin films were implanted with Mn ions and subsequently annealed isochronically at 750 and 850 deg. C. X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques were employed to study the microstructural properties of the implanted/annealed samples. The effect of annealing on implantation-induced strain in thin films has been studied in detail. The strain was found to increase with dose until it reached a saturation value and after that it started decreasing with a further increase in the dose. RBS measurements indicated the atomic diffusion of In, Al, Ga and Mn in implanted samples. The in- and out-diffusion of atoms has been observed after annealing at 750 deg. C and 850 deg. C, respectively. Strong decomposition of the samples took place when annealed at 850 deg. C

  14. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s 5 ) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s 3 ) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations. (paper)

  15. Distribution of Fe atom density in a dc magnetron sputtering plasma source measured by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibagaki, K.; Nafarizal, N.; Sasaki, K.; Toyoda, H.; Iwata, S.; Kato, T.; Tsunashima, S.; Sugai, H.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetron sputtering discharge is widely used as an efficient method for thin film fabrication. In order to achieve the optimized fabrication, understanding of the kinetics in plasmas is essential. In the present work, we measured the density distribution of sputtered Fe atoms using laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A dc magnetron plasma source with a Fe target was used. An area of 20 × 2 mm in front of the target was irradiated by a tunable laser beam having a planar shape. The picture of laser-induced fluorescence on the laser beam was taken using an ICCD camera. In this way, we obtained the two-dimensional image of the Fe atom density. As a result, it has been found that the Fe atom density observed at a distance of several centimeters from the target is higher than that adjacent to the target, when the Ar gas pressure was relatively high. It is suggested from this result that some gas-phase production processes of Fe atoms are available in the plasma. This work has been performed under the 21st Century COE Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan.

  16. Mapping of the atomic hydrogen density in combustion processes at atmospheric pressure by two-photon polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiger, A.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Steiger, M.; Gonzalo, A.B.; Rosa, M.I. de la

    2001-01-01

    With laser spectroscopic techniques used so far, quantitative measurements of atomic number densities in flames and other combustion processes at atmospheric pressure yield no satisfying results because high quenching rates remarkably reduce the signal size and the results suffer from large uncertainties. Whereas, two-photon polarization spectroscopy is not limited by quenching, as the polarization signal is a direct measure of the two-photon absorption. This sensitive laser technique with high spatial and temporal resolution has been applied to determine absolute number densities and the kinetic temperatures of atomic hydrogen in flames for the first time. The great potential of this method of measurement comes into its own only in conjunction with laser radiation of highest possible spectral quality, i.e. single-frequency ns-pulses with peak irradiance of up to 1 GW/cm 2 tunable around 243 nm for 1S-2S two-photon transition of atomic hydrogen

  17. Atomic processes in high-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review covers dense atomic plasmas such as that produced in inertial confinement fusion. The target implosion physics along with the associated atomic physics, i.e., free electron collision phenomena, electron states I, electron states II, and nonequilibrium plasma states are described

  18. Atomic origin of the scanning tunneling microscopy images of charge-density-waves on 1T-TaSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoltz, D. [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)], E-mail: stoltz@physics.leidenuniv.nl; Bielmann, M.; Schlapbach, L. [Swiss Federal Lab for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA), CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Bovet, M. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Neuchatel, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Berger, H. [Institut de Physique Appliquee, EPF, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goethelid, M. [Materialfysik, MAP, KTH-Electrum, SE-16440 Kista (Sweden); Stoltz, S.E. [MAX-Lab, Lund University, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Starnberg, H.I. [Department of Physics, Goeteborg University and Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    We show atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of charge density waves (CDWs) at room temperature together with angle-resolved photoelectron band-mapping of 1T-TaSe{sub 2}. By comparing the results of these two techniques, we demonstrate the atomic structure of the CDW-features observed by the STM and atomic origin of the reconstructed band-structure in this material.

  19. Density-matrix formalism for the photoion-electron entanglement in atomic photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The density-matrix theory, based on Dirac's relativistic equation, is applied for studying the entanglement between the photoelectron and residual ion in the course of the photoionization of atoms and ions. In particular, emphasis is placed on deriving the final-state density matrix of the overall system 'photoion+electron', including interelectronic effects and the higher multipoles of the radiation field. This final-state density matrix enables one immediately to analyze the change of entanglement as a function of the energy, angle and the polarization of the incoming light. Detailed computations have been carried out for the 5s photoionization of neutral strontium, leading to a photoion in a 5s 2 S J f =1/2 level. It is found that the photoion-electron entanglement decreases significantly near the ionization threshold and that, in general, it depends on both the photon energy and angle. The possibility to extract photoion-electron pairs with a well-defined degree of entanglement may have far-reaching consequences for quantum information and elsewhere

  20. Study of gradual conversion of Al to insulator by oxygen implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhawalker, P.D.; Raole, P.M.; Kothari, D.C.; Pawer, P.S.; Gogawale, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    30 keV O 2 + ions are implanted in aluminium foil, at various doses ranging from 5 x 10 16 to 5 x 10 17 atoms cm -2 . The sheet resistance was measured for unimplanted and implanted specimens. Up to the dose of 3 x 10 17 atoms cm -2 , the sheet resistance gradually increased. It formed a perfect insulating layer on the surface, above a dose of 3 x 10 17 atoms cm -2 . X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy measurements indicated the formation of an Al 2 O 3 layer with the absence of a signal due to unbonded aluminium for a dose of 5 x 10 17 atoms cm -2 . Whereas a specimen implanted at 5 x 10 16 atoms cm -2 shows the presence of pure aluminium. Micrographs of the specimen implanted at the higher dose displayed the microtopography characteristic of alumina. The results are in agreement with a recently published mechanism of Al 2 O 3 formation. The Al 2 O 3 precipitates increasing with dose and a layer of Al 2 O 3 being formed at the doses higher than that required to form the stoichiometric Al 2 O 3 . (author)

  1. An Intraoperative Site-specific Bone Density Device: A Pilot Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Paolo; Moschioni, Monica; Banfi, Luca Maria; Di Stefano, Anilo Alessio

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports a case of all-on-four rehabilitation where bone density at implant sites was assessed both through preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans and using a micromotor working as an intraoperative bone density measurement device. Implant-supported rehabilitation is a predictable treatment option for tooth replacement whose success depends on the clinician's experience, the implant characteristics and location and patient-related factors. Among the latter, bone density is a determinant for the achievement of primary implant stability and, eventually, for implant success. The ability to measure bone density at the placement site before implant insertion could be important in the clinical setting. A patient complaining of masticatory impairment was presented with a plan calling for extraction of all her compromised teeth, followed by implant rehabilitation. A week before surgery, she underwent CT examination, and the bone density on the CT scans was measured. When the implant osteotomies were created, the bone density was again measured with a micromotor endowed with an instantaneous torque-measuring system. The implant placement protocols were adapted for each implant, according to the intraoperative measurements, and the patient was rehabilitated following an all-on-four immediate loading protocol. The bone density device provided valuable information beyond that obtained from CT scans, allowing for site-specific, intraoperative assessment of bone density immediately before implant placement and an estimation of primary stability just after implant insertion. Measuring jaw-bone density could help clinicians to select implant-placement protocols and loading strategies based on site-specific bone features.

  2. The effects of irradiation and proton implantation on the density of mobile protons in SiO2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanheusden, K.

    1998-04-01

    Proton implantation into the buried oxide of Si/SiO 2 /Si structures does not introduce mobile protons. The cross section for capture of radiation-induced electrons by mobile protons is two orders of magnitude smaller than for electron capture by trapped holes. The data provide new insights into the atomic mechanisms governing the generation and radiation tolerance of mobile protons in SiO 2 . This can lead to improved techniques for production and radiation hardening of radiation tolerant memory devices

  3. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2012-10-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations are based on the Müller-Schottky equation, which is modified to include different atomic neighborhoods and their characteristic bonds. The local environment is considered up to the fifth next nearest neighbors. To compare the experimental with simulated APT data, the AtomVicinity algorithm, which provides statistical information about the positions of the neighboring atoms, is applied. The quality of this information is influenced by the field evaporation behavior of the different species, which is connected to the bonding energies. © Microscopy Society of America 2012.

  4. Density-functional theory for ensembles of fractionally occupied states. II. Application to the He atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.N.; Gross, E.K.U.; Kohn, W.

    1988-01-01

    The two density-functional methods of calculating excitation energies proposed in the preceding paper, combined with the recently formulated quasi-local-density approximation for the equiensemble exchange-correlation energy functional [W. Kohn, Phys. Rev. A 34, 737 (1986)], are applied to the He atom. Although the splittings between nearly degenerate levels with different angular momenta are badly overestimated, in both approaches the averages over angular momentum and spin of the experimental excitation energies measured from the ionization threshold are reproduced within a few percent. The computed self-consistent ensemble-averaged densities and the Kohn-Sham potentials associated with them are discussed

  5. Ion implantation and amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmuth, K.; Rauschenbach, B.

    1981-01-01

    This review deals with ion implantation of metals in the high concentration range for preparing amorphous layers (>= 10 at%, implantation doses > 10 16 ions/cm 2 ). Different models are described concerning formation of amorphous phases of metals by ion implantation and experimental results are given. The study of amorphous phases has been carried out by the aid of Rutherford backscattering combined with the channeling technique and using transmission electron microscopy. The structure of amorphous metals prepared by ion implantation has been discussed. It was concluded that amorphous metal-metalloid compounds can be described by a dense-random-packing structure with a great portion of metal atoms. Ion implantation has been compared with other techniques for preparing amorphous metals and the adventages have been outlined

  6. Implanted-tritium permeation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Holland, D.F.; Casper, L.A.; Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.; Watts, K.D.; Wilson, C.J.; Kershner, C.J.; Rogers, M.L.

    1982-04-01

    In fusion reactors, charge exchange neutral atoms of tritium coming from the plasma will be implanted into the first wall and other interior structures. EG and G Idaho is conducting two experiments to determine the magnitude of permeation into the coolant streams and the retention of tritium in those structures. One experiment uses an ion gun to implant deuterium. The ion gun will permit measurements to be made for a variety of implantation energies and fluxes. The second experiment utilizes a fission reactor to generate a tritium implantation flux by the 3 He(n,p) 3 H reaction. This experiment will simulate the fusion reactor radiation environment. We also plan to verify a supporting analytical code development program, in progress, by these experiments

  7. On the atomic state densities of plasmas produced by the "torch a injection axiale"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, J.; Vos, H.P.C.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.; Timmermans, E.A.H.

    1996-01-01

    The atomic state densities of helium and argon plasmas produced by the microwave driven plasma torch called the "torche à injection axiale" are presented. They are obtained by absolute line intensity measurements of the excited states and by applying the ideal gas law to the ground state. It will be

  8. Simple fabrication of back contact heterojunction solar cells by plasma ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Noboru; Hironiwa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hideo; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2017-08-01

    A back-contact amorphous-silicon (a-Si)/crystalline silicon (c-Si) heterojunction is one of the most promising structures for high-efficiency solar cells. However, the patterning of back-contact electrodes causes the increase in fabrication cost. Thus, to simplify the fabrication of back-contact cells, we attempted to form p-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si and n-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si regions by the conversion of a patterned area of p-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si to n-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si by plasma ion implantation. It is revealed that the conversion of the conduction type can be realized by the plasma ion implantation of phosphorus (P) atoms into p-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si regions, and also that the quality of passivation can be kept sufficiently high, the same as that before ion implantation, when the samples are annealed at around 250 °C and also when the energy and dose of ion implantation are appropriately chosen for fitting to a-Si layer thickness and bulk c-Si carrier density.

  9. Paramagnetism in ion-implanted oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, Torben Esmann; Gíslason, Hafliði Pétur; Ólafsson, Sveinn

    This thesis describes the investigation on para-magnetism in dilute ion-implanted single-crystal oxide samples studied by on- and off-line $^{57}$Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ion-implantation of the radioactive isotopes ( $^{57}$Mn and $^{57}$Co) was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The off-line measurements were performed at Aarhus University, Denmark. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a unique method, giving simultaneously local information on valence/spin state of the $^{57}$Fe probe atoms, site symmetry and magnetic properties on an atomic scale. The utilisation of emission Mössbauer spectroscopy opens up many new possibilities compared with traditional transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with a low concentration below 10$^{-4}$ –10$^{-3}$ at.%, where the implanted Mössbauer $^{57}$Fe probes are truly dilute impurities exclusively interacting with their nearest neighbours and therefore the possibility of crea...

  10. Determination of Ar metastable atom densities in Ar and Ar/H2 inductively coupled low-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox-Lyon, N; Knoll, A J; Oehrlein, G S; Franek, J; Demidov, V; Koepke, M; Godyak, V

    2013-01-01

    Ar metastable atoms are important energy carriers and surface interacting species in low-temperature plasmas that are difficult to quantify. Ar metastable atom densities (N Ar,m ) in inductively coupled Ar and Ar/H 2 plasmas were obtained using a model combining electrical probe measurements of electron density (N e ) and temperature (T e ), with analysis of spectrally resolved Ar plasma optical emission based on 3p → 1s optical emission ratios of the 419.8 nm line to the 420.1 nm line. We present the variation of N Ar,m as the Ar pressure and the addition of H 2 to Ar are changed comparatively to recent adsorption spectroscopy measurements. (paper)

  11. Density functional approach to many-body effects in the optical response of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangwill, A.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method for calculating the optical response of finite electronic system which is accurate, computationally simple, and lends itself to a ready physical interpretation of the results. This work is concerned with the so-called many-body effects which render an independent particle calculation inappropriate for comparison with experimental photoabsorption and photoemission cross sections. Polarization effects are included which describe the response of the system to an external probe and self-energy effects, which describe the dynamics and decay of a single particle state. This work, which essentially reintroduces the residual Coulomb interactions among the electrons, is confined to atoms. The method is a time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) and represents a natural generalization of the usual local density approximation to the ground state properties of a many electron system. Using standard first-order time-dependent perturbation theory, a self-consistent mean field theory is derived for an effective field which replaces the external field in the dipole matrix elements of the Golden Rule for photoabsorption. This effective field includes a contribution from an induced classical Coulomb field as well as an induced exchange-correlation field. This work successfully demonstrates the applicability of time-dependent generalization of the local density approximation to the practical calculation of the photo-response of atoms. For the rare gases, barium, cerium and copper are obtained cross sections in quantitative agreement with recent experiments

  12. Improvement of in vitro corrosion and cytocompatibility of biodegradable Fe surface modified by Zn ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Henan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Yan, E-mail: liyan@buaa.edu.cn; Jiang, Chengbao

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZnO oxides were formed on the surface of Zn implanted pure Fe samples. • The corrosion rate of the pure Fe in SBF was increased after Zn implantation. • Cytocompatibility of the pure Fe was improved by Zn ion implantation. - Abstract: Pure Fe was surface-modified by Zn ion implantation to improve the biodegradable behavior and cytocompatibility. Surface topography, chemical composition, corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility were investigated. Atomic force microscopy, auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that Zn was implanted into the surface of pure Fe in the depth of 40–60 nm and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZnO oxides were formed on the outmost surface. Electrochemical measurements and immersion tests revealed an improved degradable behavior for the Zn-implanted Fe samples. An approximately 12% reduction in the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) and a 10-fold increase in the corrosion current density (i{sub corr}) were obtained after Zn ion implantation with a moderate incident ion dose, which was attributed to the enhanced pitting corrosion. The surface free energy of pure Fe was decreased by Zn ion implantation. The results of direct cell culture indicated that the short-term (4 h) cytocompatibility of MC3T3-E1 cells was promoted by the implanted Zn on the surface.

  13. Electron density and effective atomic number (Zeff) determination through x-ray Moiré deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Talbot-Lau based Moiré deflectometry is a powerful density diagnostic capable of delivering refraction information and attenuation from a single image, through the accurate detection of X-ray phase-shift and intensity. The technique is able to accurately measure both the real part of the index of refraction δ (directly related to electron density) and the attenuation coefficient μ of an object placed in the x-ray beam. Since the atomic number Z (or Zeff for a composite sample) is proportional to these quantities, an elemental map of the effective atomic number can be obtained with the ratio of the phase and the absorption image. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest in various fields of HED research such as shocked materials and ICF experiments as Zeff is linked, by definition, to the x-ray absorption properties of a specific material. This work is supported by U.S. DoE/NNSA Grant No. 435 DENA0001835.

  14. Melatonin implantation during the non-growing period of cashmere increases the cashmere yield of female Inner Mongolian cashmere goats by increasing fiber length and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.; Duan, C.; Li, Y.; Duan, T.; Mo, F.; Zhang, W.

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if melatonin implantation at the end of April and June was able to increase cashmere production in female Inner Mongolian cashmere goats and to search for contributing factors accounting for the melatonin increasing in cashmere production. One hundred and fifty female Inner Mongolian cashmere goats (initial body weight 37.2 ± 3.3 kg) were randomly assigned to either a control (n=75) or a treatment (n=75) group. Goats in the treatment group were implanted with melatonin (2 mg/kg of body weight) on April 30 and June 30, 2014 while goats in the control received no treatment. Melatonin implantation increased cashmere yield by 23.4% while increasing the length and density of the cashmere fiber by 19.8% and 11.4%, whereas it decreased cashmere fiber diameter by 4.4%. Melatonin treatment had no effect on doe growth, litter size or birth and weaning weights of kid. Melatonin implantation promoted cashmere yield by increasing fiber length and density without impacting the performance of goats and their offspring. Therefore, melatonin implantation during the cashmere non-growing period (late April and June) is an effective way to increase cashmere yield and improve cashmere characteristics of goats.

  15. Modeling of interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, O.I.; Knyazheva, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    A model of the interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron during rapid thermal annealing of silicon layers previously amorphized by implantation of germanium has been proposed. It is supposed that the boron interstitials are created continuously during annealing due to generation, dissolution, or rearrangement of the clusters of impurity atoms which are formed in the ion-implanted layers with impurity concentration above the solubility limit. The local elastic stresses arising due to the difference of boron atomic radius and atomic radius of silicon also contribute to the generation of boron interstitials. A simulation of boron redistribution during thermal annealing for 60 s at a temperature of 850 C has been carried out. The calculated profile agrees well with the experimental data. A number of the parameters of interstitial diffusion have been derived. In particular, the average migration length of nonequilibrium boron interstitials is equal to 12 nm. It was also obtained that approximately 1.94% of boron atoms were converted to the interstitial sites, participated in the fast interstitial migration, and then became immobile again transferring into a substitutional position or forming the electrically inactive complexes with crystal lattice defects. (authors)

  16. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Hallén, A.; Svensson, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon vacancy (VC) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the VC-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (Ci's) and annihilation of VC's in the epi-layer "bulk". Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the VC annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating VC's. Concentrations of VC below ˜2 × 1011 cm-3 can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the VC-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote Ci-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These Ci-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced Ci injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the VC-concentration, which limit the net effect of the Ci injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  17. Implantation profile of low-energy positrons in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.

    1990-01-01

    A simple form for an implantation profile of monoenergetic, low-energy (1--10 keV) positrons in solids is presented. Materials studied include aluminum, copper, molybdenum, palladium, and gold with atomic number ranging from 13 to 79. A simple set of parameters can describe the currently used Makhov profile in slow positron studies of solids. We provide curves and tables for the parameters that can be used to describe the implantation profiles of positrons in any material with atomic number in between 13 and 79

  18. Impact of implant size on cement filling in hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Roel; Buls, Nico; Scheerlinck, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Larger proportions of cement within femoral resurfacing implants might result in thermal bone necrosis. We postulate that smaller components are filled with proportionally more cement, causing an elevated failure rate. A total of 19 femoral heads were fitted with polymeric replicas of ReCap (Biomet) resurfacing components fixed with low-viscosity cement. Two specimens were used for each even size between 40 and 56 mm and one for size 58 mm. All specimens were imaged with computed tomography, and the cement thickness and bone density were analyzed. The average cement mantle thickness was 2.63 mm and was not correlated with the implant size. However, specimen with low bone density had thicker cement mantles regardless of size. The average filling index was 36.65% and was correlated to both implant size and bone density. Smaller implants and specimens with lower bone density contained proportionally more cement than larger implants. According to a linear regression model, bone density but not implant size influenced cement thickness. However, both implant size and bone density had a significant impact on the filling index. Large proportions of cement within the resurfacing head have the potential to generate thermal bone necrosis and implant failure. When considering hip resurfacing in patients with a small femoral head and/or osteoporotic bone, extra care should be taken to avoid thermal bone necrosis, and alternative cementing techniques or even cementless implants should be considered. This study should help delimiting the indications for hip resurfacing and to choose an optimal cementing technique taking implant size into account.

  19. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  20. Chemical characterization of 4140 steel implanted by nitrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nino, Ely Dannier V.; Duran, Fernando [Grupo de Investigacion en Tecnologia del Plasma (GINTEP), Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Pinto, Jose L.C. [Grupo de Investigacion en Quimica Estructural (GIQUE), Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Dugar-Zhabon, V.; Garnica, Hernan [Grupo de Fisica y Tecnologia del Plasma (FITEK), Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2010-07-01

    AISI-SAE 4140 sample surfaces of different roughness which are implanted by nitrogen ions of 20 keV and 30 keV at a dose of 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} through a three dimensional ion implantation technique are studied. Crystal phases of nitrogen compositions of the implanted samples, obtained with help of an x-ray diffraction method, are confronted with the data reported by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), PDF-2. It is observed that the implanted into the metal nitrogen atoms produce changes in orientation of crystal planes that is manifested as variations of the intensity of the refracted rays and of cell dimensions (a displacement of 2 theta of the maximum intensity position). An analysis for determining nitrogen atoms implanted by high-voltage pulsed discharges at low pressures in the crystal structure of the solid surface was carried out by X-Ray Diffraction due to this technique permits to assess the possibility of formation of new compounds. (author)

  1. Chemical characterization of 4140 steel implanted by nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nino, Ely Dannier V.; Duran, Fernando; Pinto, Jose L.C.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.; Garnica, Hernan

    2010-01-01

    AISI-SAE 4140 sample surfaces of different roughness which are implanted by nitrogen ions of 20 keV and 30 keV at a dose of 10"1"7 ions/cm"2 through a three dimensional ion implantation technique are studied. Crystal phases of nitrogen compositions of the implanted samples, obtained with help of an x-ray diffraction method, are confronted with the data reported by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), PDF-2. It is observed that the implanted into the metal nitrogen atoms produce changes in orientation of crystal planes that is manifested as variations of the intensity of the refracted rays and of cell dimensions (a displacement of 2 theta of the maximum intensity position). An analysis for determining nitrogen atoms implanted by high-voltage pulsed discharges at low pressures in the crystal structure of the solid surface was carried out by X-Ray Diffraction due to this technique permits to assess the possibility of formation of new compounds. (author)

  2. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damla, N.; Baltas, H.; Celik, A.; Kiris, E.; Cevik, U.

    2008-01-01

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic, numbers (Z eff ), effective electron densities (N e ) and photon interaction cross section (σ a ) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. (authors)

  3. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben; Zhu, Zhiyong; Al-Kassab, Talaat; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations

  4. Proton density modulation of D atoms in PdD/sub 1-x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.H.; Brun, T.O.; Hitterman, R.L.; Knott, H.W.; Satterthwaite, C.B.; Ellis, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    Recent resistivity and neutron diffraction measurements have provided evidence for ordering of D(H) atoms on the octahedral interstitial sites of PdD/sub 1-x/. This order--disorder transition is responsible for the 50 K anomaly which has been reported in many of the physical properties. Neutron diffraction measurements on a PdD 0 76 single crystal revealed satellite reflection at (4/5,2/5,0) and equivalent positions. These satellites can be accounted for by a multi-domained tetragonal unit cell with a/sub t/ = a/sub c/ root 5/2 and c/sub t/ = c/sub a/. This ordered state can be described as a deuteron density wave along a cubic direction. This density is modulated such that four fully occupied planes (Pd and D) are followed by a vacant plane

  5. The influence of ion implantation on the oxidation of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goode, P.D.

    1975-11-01

    The effects of ion implantation on the oxidation of polycrystalline nickel have been studied for a range of implanted species: viz. He, Li, Ne, Ca, Ti, Ni, Co, Xe, Ce and Bi. The oxides were grown in dry oxygen at 630 0 C and the 16 O(d,p) 17 O nuclear reaction technique used to determine the amount of oxygen taken up. The influence of atomic and ionic size, valency and electronegativity of the implanted impurities was studied as also were the effects of ion bombardment damage and the influence of sputtering during implantation. Atomic size and the annealing of disorder were found to have a marked influence on oxide growth rate. The dependence of oxidation on annealing was further studied by implanting polycrystalline specimens with self ions and observing the oxide growth rate as a function of annealing temperature. A peak in the curve was found at 400 0 C and a similar peak observed at a somewhat higher temperature for oxidised single crystals. It is concluded that the oxidation rate will be influenced by those factors which alter the epitaxial relationship between metal and growing oxide. Such factors include atomic size of the implanted species, surface strain induced by implantation and changes in surface topography as a result of sputtering. In addition a model based on vacancy assisted cation migration is proposed to explain enhanced oxidation observed over a limited temperature range. (author)

  6. Linear-chain model to explain density of states and Tsub(c) changes with atomic ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junod, A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of long-range atomic order on the electronic density of states has been recalculated for the A15-type structure within the linear-chain model. It is found that a defect concentration c reduces the density of states at the Fermi level by a factor (1 + c/c 0 )(c/c 0 ) -3 [ln(1 + c/c 0 )] 3 . This result is in qualitative agreement with experimental data on the specific heat, magnetic susceptibility and superconducting transition temperature of V 3 Au. (author)

  7. Electromagnetic interference of mobile phones with electronic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, W.

    2000-03-01

    transmission power were carried out to determine when and what kind of failures occur. The tests showed that inhibition occurs when the transmit power exceeded a defined level. When the transmit power was reduced the output signal appeared again. The program parameters were not changed. Subsequently the current density in tissue in the head was measured at a frequency of 900 MHz with two different implant electrode geometry: loop and meander. The source was a 900 MHz half-wave dipole with 787 mW transmit power. In the area around the electrode tip the current density increased locally 2.7-fold in comparison with the current density without implant. There was also an increase in current density in the area of the loop and the meander. The increase in current density in the area around the electrode tip was lower with the meander configuration. This electrode configuration should therefore be preferred if the induced current is to be minimized. Chapter 3:Simulation: The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method was used to determine the current density in three phantoms (without implant, 'loop' and 'meander' electrode geometry). The theoretical results for the current density in the area around the electrode tip tallied well with the measured results. Because of the different measuring and calculation coordinates for the loop and the meander, no comparison was made of the current density in the area around the loop and the meander. The relationship between the frequencies and the currents induced in the electrodes of both geometry was also determined by calculating the current density near the lead tip at 20 frequencies between 500 MHz and 2400 MHz. The resonance behavior of the loop geometry was greater and the corresponding current density 40% higher. This result confirms the advantage of meander electrode geometry. (author)

  8. Measuring and engineering the atomic mass density wave of a Gaussian mass-polariton pulse in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Mikko; Tulkki, Jukka

    2018-02-01

    Conventional theories of electromagnetic waves in a medium assume that only the energy of the field propagates inside the medium. Consequently, they neglect the transport of mass density by the medium atoms. We have recently presented foundations of a covariant theory of light propagation in a nondispersive medium by considering a light wave simultaneously with the dynamics of the medium atoms driven by optoelastic forces [Phys. Rev. A 95, 063850 (2017)]. In particular, we have shown that the mass is transferred by an atomic mass density wave (MDW), which gives rise to mass-polariton (MP) quasiparticles, i.e., covariant coupled states of the field and matter having a nonzero rest mass. Another key observation of the mass-polariton theory of light is that, in common semiconductors, most of the momentum of light is transferred by moving atoms, e.g., 92% in the case of silicon. In this work, we generalize the MP theory of light for dispersive media and consider experimental measurement of the mass transferred by the MDW atoms when an intense light pulse propagates in a silicon fiber. In particular, we consider optimal intensity and time dependence of a Gaussian pulse and account for the breakdown threshold irradiance of the material. The optical shock wave property of the MDW, which propagates with the velocity of light instead of the velocity of sound, prompts for engineering of novel device concepts like very high frequency mechanical oscillators not limited by the acoustic cutoff frequency.

  9. Influence of the surgical technique and surface roughness on the primary stability of an implant in artificial bone with a density equivalent to maxillary bone: a laboratory study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabassum, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this biomechanical study was to assess the effect of surgical technique and surface roughness on primary implant stability in low-density bone. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty screw-shaped (Biocomp) implants with machined or etched surface topography were inserted into a

  10. He reemission implanted in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Observation of He reemission of various metals under He + implantation at wide temperature range. • Materials examined are aluminum (Al), Nickel (Ni) and molybdenum (Mo). • He reemission is quite temperature dependent and different with materials. • Three metals show similar dependence on temperature normalized with respective melting point. • He reemission is successfully correlated with He behavior in metals. - Abstract: Helium (He) reemission of Al, Ni and Mo under energetic He implantation (10–30 keV) in wide temperature range is studied to understand behavior of implanted He in correlation with structure changes. The reemission behavior is categorized into 4 different temperature ranges with the normalized temperature (T m ) to the melting point of each metal. At elevated temperatures (well above ∼0.6 T m ), interstitial He atoms and/or He-vacancy (ies) clusters can migrate remaining no structure change and showing smooth reemission without any burst. Between ∼0.25 and 0.6 T m , He reemission always accompanies significant structure modification. For ∼04–0.6 T m , implanted He coalesce to make bubbles and the bubbles can move to the surface. Bubble migration accompanies materials flow to the surface resulting in fuzz surface or columnar structure, depending on implantation flux. Slower bubble motion at ∼0.25–0.4 prohibits the material migration. Instead the bubbles coalesce to grow large and multi-layered blistering appears as periodic reemission behavior. Below ∼0.25 T m , He migration is too slow for bubbles to grow large, but bubble density increases up to a certain fluence, where neighboring bubbles start to coalesce. Accordingly, He release is mostly caused by mechanical failure or blister rapture. With increasing fluence, all defects (bubbles and dislocation loops) tangle or inter connected with neighboring defects and accordingly He migration to the surface along the tangled or connected defects is enhanced

  11. The correlation between fragility, density, and atomic interaction in glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijin; Guan, Pengfei; Wang, W H

    2016-07-21

    The fragility that controls the temperature-dependent viscous properties of liquids as the glass transition is approached, in various glass-forming liquids with different softness of the repulsive part of atomic interactions at different densities, is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. We show that the landscape of fragility in purely repulsive systems can be separated into three regions denoted as RI, RII, and RIII, respectively, with qualitatively disparate dynamic behaviors: RI which can be described by "softness makes strong glasses," RII where fragility is independent of softness and can only be tuned by density, and RIII with constant fragility, suggesting that density plays an unexpected role for understanding the repulsive softness dependence of fragility. What is more important is that we unify the long-standing inconsistence with respect to the repulsive softness dependence of fragility by observing that a glass former can be tuned more fragile if nonperturbative attraction is added into it. Moreover, we find that the vastly dissimilar influences of attractive interaction on fragility could be estimated from the structural properties of related zero-temperature glasses.

  12. Rutherford backscatter measurements on tellurium and cadmium implanted gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, E.C.

    1979-10-01

    The primary aim of the work described in this thesis was to examine implanted layers of the dopant impurities cadmium and tellurium in gallium arsenide and to experimentally assess their potential for producing electrically active layers. 1.5 MeV Rutherford backscattering measurements of lattice disorder and atom site location have been used to assess post implantation thermal annealing and elevated temperature implantations to site the dopant impurities on either gallium or arsenic lattice positions in an otherwise undisordered lattice. Pyrolitically deposited silicon dioxide was used as an encapsulant to prevent thermal dissociation of the gallium arsenide during annealing. It has been shown that high doses of cadmium and tellurium can be implanted without forming amorphous lattice disorder by heating the gallium arsenide during implantation to relatively low temperatures. Atom site location measurements have shown that a large fraction of a tellurium dose implanted at 180 0 C is located on or near lattice sites. Channeled backscatter measurements have shown that there is residual disorder or lattice strain in gallium arsenide implanted at elevated temperatures. The extent of this disorder has been shown to depend on the implanted dose and implantation temperature. The channeling effect has been used to measure annealing of the disorder. (author)

  13. Temperature and phase-space density of a cold atom cloud in a quadrupole magnetic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, S. P.; Mishra, S. R.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India)

    2014-08-15

    We present studies on modifications in the temperature, number density and phase-space density when a laser-cooled atom cloud from optical molasses is trapped in a quadrupole magnetic trap. Theoretically, for a given temperature and size of the cloud from the molasses, the phase-space density in the magnetic trap is shown first to increase with increasing magnetic field gradient and then to decrease with it after attaining a maximum value at an optimum value of the magnetic-field gradient. The experimentally-measured variation in the phase-space density in the magnetic trap with changing magnetic field gradient is shown to exhibit a similar trend. However, the experimentally-measured values of the number density and the phase-space density are much lower than the theoretically-predicted values. This is attributed to the experimentally-observed temperature in the magnetic trap being higher than the theoretically-predicted temperature. Nevertheless, these studies can be useful for setting a higher phase-space density in the trap by establishing an optimal value of the field gradient for a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  14. Implantation of xenon in amorphous carbon and silicon for brachytherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, F.C.; Barbieri, P.F.; Viana, G.A.; Silva, D.S. da

    2013-01-01

    We report a procedure to implant high dose of xenon atoms (Xe) in amorphous carbon, a-C, and amorphous silicon, a-Si, for application in brachytherapy seeds. An ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) system was used for the deposition of the films, where one ion gun was used for sputtering a carbon (or silicon) target, while the other ion gun was used to simultaneously bombard the growing film with a beam of xenon ion Xe + in the 0–300 eV range. Xe atoms were implanted into the film with concentration up to 5.5 at.%, obtained with Xe bombardment energy in the 50–150 eV range. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the local arrangement of the implanted Xe atoms through the Xe L III absorption edge (4.75 keV). It was observed that Xe atoms tend to agglomerate in nanoclusters in a-C and are dispersed in a-Si.

  15. Effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities for trommel sieve waste and some commonly used building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, M.; Canimkurbey, B.; Coban, M.; Ayguen, M.; Erzeneoglu, S. Z.

    2010-01-01

    Trommel sieve waste and some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) have been investigated in terms of effective atomic numbers (Z e ff) and effective electron densities (N e ) by using X- and γ- rays at 22.1, 25 and 88 keV photon energies. A high resolution Si(Li) detector was employed to detect X- and/or γ- radiation coming through in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. Chemical compositions of the materials used in the present study were determined using a wave length dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). The variations in photon interaction parameters were discussed regarding the photon energy and chemical composition. The experimental values of effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities were compared with the ones obtained from theory.

  16. Implanted strontium titanate single crystals for energy storage applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeber, Max; Cherkouk, Charaf; Walter, Juliane; Strohmeyer, Ralph; Leisegang, Tilmann; Meyer, Dirk Carl [TU Bergakademie, Freiberg (Germany); Schelter, Matthias; Zosel, Jens [Kurt Schwabe Institute, Meinsberg (Germany); Prucnal, Slawomir [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A rapid increase of the demand on efficient energy storage solutions requires new approaches beyond the Li-ion technology. In particular, metal-air batteries as well as solid-state fuel cells offer a great potential for high-energy-density storage devices. Since the efficiency of such devices is significantly limited by the activation of both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the ionic and electronic conductivities, an adequate porosity as well as a controlled doping are required. The ion implantation is a key technology to achieve this goal. In this work, p- and n-doped strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) single crystals were used as oxidic materials. The oxygen exchange kinetics as well as the structural changes of the SrTiO{sub 3} crystal surface induced by the ion implantation were investigated. On one hand, the depth profile of dopant concentration and dopant valence state were determined using sputtered X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). On the other hand, the overall oxygen exchange kinetic of the implanted SrTiO{sub 3} crystal was quantitatively described by means of coulometric titration using Zirox system (ZIROX GmbH, Germany). Furthermore, the surface morphology of the samples was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  17. Exospheric density and escape fluxes of atomic isotopes on Venus and Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallis, M.K.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic neutrals in dissociative recombinations near or above the exobase provided an important component of exospheric density and escape fluxes. Plasma thermal velocities provide the main contribution to the velocity spread and an exact integral for the escape flux applicable in marginal cases is found for a simple atmosphere and collisional cut-off. Atomic fragments from recombination of diatomic oxygen and nitrogen ions in the Venus and Mars atmospheres are examined and density integrals derived. The oxygen escape flux on Mars is half that previously estimated and there is very little isotope preference supplementing diffusive separation. However, escape of the heavier 15 N isotope is low by a factor two. Reinterpretation of its 75% enrichment as detected by Viking leads to a range 0.4-1.4 mbar for the primeval nitrogen content on Mars. (author)

  18. Determination of the Rb atomic number density in dense rubidium vapors by absorption measurements of Rb2 triplet bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Veza, Damir; Niemax, Kay; Vadla, Cedomil

    2008-01-01

    A simple and accurate way of determining atom number densities in dense rubidium vapors is presented. The method relies on the experimental finding that the reduced absorption coefficients of the Rb triplet satellite bands between 740 nm and 750 nm and the triplet diffuse band between 600 nm and 610 nm are not temperature dependent in the range between 600 K and 800 K. Therefore, the absolute values of the reduced absorption coefficients of these molecular bands can provide accurate information about atomic number density of the vapor. The rubidium absorption spectrum was measured by spatially resolved white-light absorption in overheated rubidium vapor generated in a heat pipe oven. The absolute values for the reduced absorption coefficients of the triplet bands were determined at lower vapor densities, by using an accurate expression for the reduced absorption coefficient in the quasistatic wing of the Rb D1 line, and measured triplet satellite bands to the resonance wing optical depth ratio. These triplet satellite band data were used to calibrate in absolute scale the reduced absorption coefficients of the triplet diffuse band at higher temperatures. The obtained values for the reduced absorption coefficient of these Rb molecular features can be used for accurate determination of rubidium atomic number densities in the range from about 5 x 10 16 cm -3 to 1 x 10 18 cm -3

  19. Studies on effective atomic number, electron density and kerma for some fatty acids and carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), the effective electron density, N-el, and kerma have been calculated for some fatty acids and carbohydrates for photon interaction in the extended energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV using an accurate database of photon-interaction cross sections and the WinXCo...

  20. Molecular dynamic simulation on boron cluster implantation for shallow junction formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Li; Yu Min; Li Wei; Ji Huihui; Ren Liming; Zhan Kai; Huang Ru; Zhang Xing; Wang Yangyuan; Zhang Jinyu; Oka, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Boron cluster ion implantation is a potential technology for shallow junction formation in integrated circuits manufacture. A molecular dynamic method for cluster implantation simulation, aiming at microelectronics application, is presented in this paper. Accurate geometric structures of boron clusters are described by the model, and the H atoms in clusters are included. A potential function taking the form of combining the ZBL and the SW potentials is presented here to model interaction among the atoms in the boron cluster. The impact of these models on cluster implantation simulation is investigated. There are notable impact on dopant distribution and amount of implantation defects with consideration of these models. The simulation on the distributions of B and H are verified by SIMS data

  1. Neutron-induced helium implantation in GCFR cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Poeppel, R.B.; Sevy, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    The neutron-induced implantation of helium atoms on the exterior surfaces of the cladding of a prototypic gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) has been investigated analytically. A flux of recoil helium particles as high as 4.2 x 10 10 He/cm 2 .s at the cladding surface has been calculated at the peak power location in the core of a 300-MWe GCFR. The calculated profile of the helium implantation rates indicates that although some helium is implanted as deep as 20 μm, more than 99% of helium particles are implanted in the first 2-μm-deep layer below the cladding surface. Therefore, the implanted helium particles should mainly affect surface properties of the GCFR cladding

  2. Atomic Cholesky decompositions: A route to unbiased auxiliary basis sets for density fitting approximation with tunable accuracy and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilante, Francesco; Gagliardi, Laura; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Lindh, Roland

    2009-04-01

    Cholesky decomposition of the atomic two-electron integral matrix has recently been proposed as a procedure for automated generation of auxiliary basis sets for the density fitting approximation [F. Aquilante et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 114107 (2007)]. In order to increase computational performance while maintaining accuracy, we propose here to reduce the number of primitive Gaussian functions of the contracted auxiliary basis functions by means of a second Cholesky decomposition. Test calculations show that this procedure is most beneficial in conjunction with highly contracted atomic orbital basis sets such as atomic natural orbitals, and that the error resulting from the second decomposition is negligible. We also demonstrate theoretically as well as computationally that the locality of the fitting coefficients can be controlled by means of the decomposition threshold even with the long-ranged Coulomb metric. Cholesky decomposition-based auxiliary basis sets are thus ideally suited for local density fitting approximations.

  3. Kohn-Sham potentials from electron densities using a matrix representation within finite atomic orbital basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Carter, Emily A.

    2018-01-01

    We revisit the static response function-based Kohn-Sham (KS) inversion procedure for determining the KS effective potential that corresponds to a given target electron density within finite atomic orbital basis sets. Instead of expanding the potential in an auxiliary basis set, we directly update the potential in its matrix representation. Through numerical examples, we show that the reconstructed density rapidly converges to the target density. Preliminary results are presented to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a local potential in real space from the optimized potential in its matrix representation. We have further applied this matrix-based KS inversion approach to density functional embedding theory. A proof-of-concept study of a solvated proton transfer reaction demonstrates the method's promise.

  4. Measurement of the population densities in Gd atomic vapor using diode laser absorption spectroscopy in UV transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Duck Hee; Jung, E. C.; Ko, Kwang Hoon; Kim, Tack Soo

    2003-01-01

    We report on the ultraviolet laser absorption spectroscopy of atomic Gd at 394-554 nm where two transition lines are place very closely by using a frequency-doubled beam of external-cavity diode laser (ECDL). One is from 999.121 to 26337.071 cm -1 and the other from 0 to 25337.755 cm -1 . If two transition lines are placed closely within a continuous fine tuning range, the real-time measurement of the atomic excitation temperature is possible without any significant time consumption because at least two transition lines originating from different low-lying energy levels need to be investigated for the Boltzmann-plot. Since the spectral difference between the two transitions is only about 0.195 cm -1 (5.85 GHz), it is possible to record both the absorption spectra simultaneously as shown in Fig. 1. But the transition probabilities (or oscillator strengths) of these lines have not been measured accurately yet to the best of our knowledge. We report on the newly measured transition probabilities by analyzing their absorption spectra at known vapor density conditions. The simultaneous measurement of the atomic excitation temperature and the vapor density demonstrated. In addition we present another ultraviolet laser absorption spectroscopy of atomic Gd at 403.540 nm by means of a commercial blue diode laser and investigate the characteristics of the blue diode laser as well.

  5. Quantification of ion or atom transfer phenomena in materials implanted by nuclear methods; Quantification de phenomenes de transferts ioniques ou atomiques dans des materiaux implantes par la mise en oeuvre de methodes nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudadesse, Hassane [Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1998-05-18

    Knowledge of transfer of the constituents of a system from regions of higher to lower concentration is of interest for implanted bio-materials. It allows determining the rate at which this material is integrated in a living material. To evaluate the ossification kinetics and to study the bio-functionality in corals of Ca and Sr, irradiations with a 10{sup 13} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} was performed, followed by the examination of changes in the localization of these elements. By using PIXE analysis method the distribution of Ca, P, Sr, Zn and Fe in the implant, bone and bone-implant interfaces were determined. Thus, it was shown that resorption of coral in sheep is achieved in 5 months after implantation and is identical to the cortical tissues 4 months after implantation in animals as for instance in hares. We have analyzed the tissues from around the prostheses extracted from patients. The samples were calcined and reduced to powder weighting some milligrams. We have adopted for this study the PIXE analysis method. The samples were irradiated by a proton beam of 3 MeV and about 400 {mu}m diameter. The results show the presence of the elements Ti, Fe, Cr, Ni or Zn according to the type of the implanted prosthesis. This dispersal of the metallic ions and atoms contaminate the tissues. The transfer factors translate the exchanges between bone and the implanted material. The solvatation phenomenon and the electric charge equilibrium explain the transfer order of cations Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} and of the anion PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. We have also determined these factors for the elements Ti, Cr and Ni. An original technique to study the bone bio-functionality was used. Use of phosphate derivatives labelled by {sup 99m}Tc allows obtaining information about the fixation of radioactive tracer. It was found that only after the eighth month at the implantation the neo-formed bone fixes the MDP (methyl diphosphate) labelled by {sup 99m}Tc in a similar way as in the

  6. Surface morphologies of excimer-laser annealed BF2+ implanted Si diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtsev, A.; Schut, H.; Nanver, L.K.; Veen, A. van; Slabbekoorn, J.; Scholtes, T.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser-induced surface roughness and damage formation in ultra-shallow n + -p and p + -n junctions, formed by low energy (5 keV) As + and BF 2 + implantations in Si, respectively, with a dose of 1 x 10 15 cm -2 have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Positron Annihilation Doppler Broadening (PADB) technique. The Si surface roughness is found to increase with laser energy density, and reaches a value of 3.5 nm after excimer-laser annealing (ELA) at 1100 mJ/cm 2 . However, anomalous behavior is witnessed for BF 2 + -implanted Si sample at 800 mJ/cm 2 , at which energy very high surface protrusions up to 9 nm high are observed. By PADB this behavior is correlated to extensive deep microcavity formation in the Si whereby the volatile F 2 fraction can accumulate and evaporate/out-diffuse, leading to Si surface roughening. The consequences for the diode characteristics and contact resistivity are examined

  7. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  8. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of Al(2)O(3) and parylene C bi-layer encapsulation for chronic implantable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Merugu, Srinivas; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2012-08-27

    Encapsulation of biomedical implants with complex three dimensional geometries is one of the greatest challenges achieving long-term functionality and stability. This report presents an encapsulation scheme that combines Al(2)O(3) by atomic layer deposition with parylene C for implantable electronic systems. The Al(2)O(3)-parylene C bi-layer was used to encapsulate interdigitated electrodes, which were tested invitro by soak testing in phosphate buffered saline solution at body temperature (37 °C) and elevated temperatures (57 °C and 67 °C) for accelerated lifetime testing up to 5 months. Leakage current and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were measured for evaluating the integrity and insulation performance of the coating. Leakage current was stably about 15 pA at 5 V dc, and impedance was constantly about 3.5 MΩ at 1 kHz by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for samples under 67 °C about 5 months (approximately equivalent to 40 months at 37 °C). Alumina and parylene coating lasted at least 3 times longer than parylene coated samples tested at 80 °C. The excellent insulation performance of the encapsulation shows its potential usefulness for chronic implants.

  9. Local Atomic Structure and Discommensurations in the Charge Density Wave of CeTe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Tomic, A.T.; Tessmer, S.H.; Billinge, S.J.L.; Malliakas, C.D.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    The local structure of CeTe 3 in the incommensurate charge density wave (IC-CDW) state has been obtained using atomic pair distribution function analysis of x-ray diffraction data. Local atomic distortions in the Te nets due to the CDW are larger than observed crystallographically, resulting in distinct short and long Te-Te bonds. Observation of different distortion amplitudes in the local and average structures is explained by the discommensurated nature of the CDW, since the pair distribution function is sensitive to the local displacements within the commensurate regions, whereas the crystallographic result averages over many discommensurated domains. The result is supported by STM data. This is the first quantitative local structural study within the commensurate domains in an IC-CDW system

  10. Oxygen recoil implant from SiO2 layers into single-crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.; Chen, Y.; Li, D.; Oak, S.; Srivastav, G.; Banerjee, S.; Tasch, A.; Merrill, P.; Bleiler, R.

    2001-01-01

    It is important to understand the distribution of recoil-implanted atoms and the impact on device performance when ion implantation is performed at a high dose through surface materials into single crystalline silicon. For example, in ultralarge scale integration impurity ions are often implanted through a thin layer of screen oxide and some of the oxygen atoms are inevitably recoil implanted into single-crystalline silicon. Theoretical and experimental studies have been performed to investigate this phenomenon. We have modified the Monte Carlo ion implant simulator, UT-Marlowe (B. Obradovic, G. Wang, Y. Chen, D. Li, C. Snell, and A. F. Tasch, UT-MARLOWE Manual, 1999), which is based on the binary collision approximation, to follow the full cascade and to dynamically modify the stoichiometry of the Si layer as oxygen atoms are knocked into it. CPU reduction techniques are used to relieve the demand on computational power when such a full cascade simulation is involved. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiles of oxygen have been carefully obtained for high dose As and BF 2 implants at different energies through oxide layers of various thicknesses, and the simulated oxygen profiles are found to agree very well with the SIMS data. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  11. Enhanced electrical activation of Zn and Be implants in GaAs by the co-implantation of phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, A.C.T.; Sealy, B.J.; Rezazadeh, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we report that, through the use of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and the co-implantation of phosphorus, an effective way of preventing the in- and out-diffusion of zinc and beryllium has been achieved in GaAs. This is of particular significance in the case of the beryllium implanted samples because, to date, there has been no method for preventing the out-diffusion of beryllium atoms at high annealing temperatures. We have observed that the reverse annealing behaviour of the Be-implanted samples has been modified after the co-implantation of phosphorus. Furthermore, abrupt electrical profiles with hole concentrations of the order of 6x10 19 cm -3 have been achieved with the Zn+P implants after annealing at 850 0 C for 30 s. (author)

  12. Effect of titanium implantation on the mechanical properties of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihana, T.; Nishimura, O.; Yabe, K.; Hayashi, H.; Iwaki, M.

    1995-01-01

    A study has been made of the chemical composition and mechanical properties of Ti + -implanted Si 3 N 4 surface layers. Implantation of 48 Ti + was performed with doses ranging from 10 15 to 10 17 ions cm -2 at an energy of 150 keV, and at nearly room temperature. XPS was used to analyze the depth dependence of atomic fraction and chemical bonding states of Ti + -implanted layers. The near-surface hardness was measured by a Vickers hardness tester. The friction and wear properties were measured under unlubricated conditions at room temperature using a pin on disk-plane and a block on wheel-periphery configurations, in which the pin and wheel used were AISI 1045 and ASTM W1-9, respectively. Implanted Ti-atoms formed a gaussian distribution predicted by the range theory. At the average projected range, most of Ti-atoms existed as a metallic state and TiN bonding was also formed. Oxygen and carbon were found near the surface layers. In addition to the surface peak, O-atoms accumulated in front of the average projected range of Ti. Such O-atoms formed bonds of Si-oxides and Ti-oxides. Carbon existed as a graphitic state. With increasing a Ti dose, the near-surface hardness decreased, and the wear rate increased at the running-in stage having the high friction coefficient. The steady wear attributed to the stable friction coefficient appeared after the running-in stage, although such a stable stage was not observed for unimplanted Si 3 N 4 . The mechanism for the change in mechanical properties of Si 3 N 4 induced by Ti + -implantation will be discussed in relation to XPS characteristics

  13. Direct atomic imaging and density functional theory study of the Au24Pd1 cluster catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruma, A; Negreiros, F R; Xie, S; Tsukuda, T; Johnston, R L; Fortunelli, A; Li, Z Y

    2013-10-21

    In this study we report a direct, atomic-resolution imaging of calcined Au24Pd1 clusters supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes by employing aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using gold atoms as mass standards, we confirm the cluster size to be 25 ± 2, in agreement with the Au24Pd1(SR)18 precursor used in the synthesis. Concurrently, a Density-Functional/Basin-Hopping computational algorithm is employed to locate the low-energy configurations of free Au24Pd1 cluster. Cage structures surrounding a single core atom are found to be favored, with a slight preference for Pd to occupy the core site. The cluster shows a tendency toward elongated arrangements, consistent with experimental data. The degree of electron transfer from the Pd dopant to Au is quantified through a Löwdin charge analysis, suggesting that Pd may act as an electron promoter to the surrounding Au atoms when they are involved in catalytic reactions.

  14. Effects of weak magnetic fields on post-implantation damage in superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khait, Y.L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimentally verifiable effects of weak permanent magnetic fields (PMF's) acting during ion implantation in high-T c superconducting (HTSC) materials at T∼300 K on post-implantation damage (PID) and material parameters are considered. The presence of PMF's of H∼10 3 Oe during ion implantation can enlarge substantially the PID in HTSC materials implanted with ions of moderate energies (e.g. 200-400 keV) and dosage (10 11- 10 12 cm -3 ) at room temperature. The PMF-induced increase in the radiation damage causes the corresponding enhancement in the material resistivity R and reduction in the critical current j cir (measured after the cooling of the HTSC material down to T (L) c after the ion implantation). This is an extension of the PMF effects found experimentally (and explained theoretically) in semiconductors in our previous work. The experimentally verifiable PMF effects on the defect (atomic) migration and radiation damage is a generic consequence of the kinetic electron-related theory of atomic rate processes in solids. The theory links the PMF effects with electron transitions occurring in the nanometer vicinity of atoms overcoming energy barriers which affect exponentially rates of atomic (defect) diffusion. The magnetic field can enhance the number of downward electron transitions that accompany atomic (defect) jumps over energy barriers and synchronize with the jumps. This enhances exponentially the rates of defect migration out of thermal spikes that prevents the defects from fast recombination, and thus, the PMF increases the PID and changes correspondingly R and j cir . (orig.)

  15. First-principles study on the interaction of nitrogen atom with α–uranium: From surface adsorption to bulk diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Qiulei; Deng, Huiqiu; Xiao, Shifang; Li, Xiaofan; Hu, Wangyu; Ao, Bingyun; Chen, Piheng

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies of nitriding on uranium surfaces show that the modified layers provide considerable protection against air corrosion. The bimodal distribution of nitrogen is affected by both its implantation and diffusion, and the diffusion of nitrogen during implantation is also governed by vacancy trapping. In the present paper, nitrogen adsorption, absorption, diffusion, and vacancy trapping on the surface of and in the bulk of α–uranium are studied with a first-principles density functional theory approach and the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The calculated results indicate that, regardless of the nitrogen coverage, a nitrogen atom prefers to reside at the hollow1 site and octahedral (Oct) site on and below the surface, respectively. The lowest energy barriers for on-surface and penetration diffusion occur at a coverage of 1/2 monolayer. A nitrogen atom prefers to occupy the Oct site in bulk α–uranium. High energy barriers are observed during the diffusion between neighboring Oct sites. A vacancy can capture its nearby interstitial nitrogen atom with a low energy barrier, providing a significant attractive nitrogen-vacancy interaction at the trapping center site. This study provides a reference for understanding the nitriding process on uranium surfaces

  16. Study of the Local Environment of Mn Ions Implanted in GaSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolska, A.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Klepka, M.T.; Barcz, A.; Hallen, A.; Arvanitis, D.

    2010-01-01

    The first attempts to establish an implantation process leading to formation of ferromagnetic inclusions inside the GaSb matrix are presented. Gallium antimonide containing ferromagnetic MnSb precipitations is considered as a promising material for novel spintronic applications. It is possible to obtain such inclusions during the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. However, for commercial application it would be also important to find an optimal way of producing this kind of inclusions by Mn ions implantation. In order to achieve this goal, several parameters of implantation and post annealing procedures were tested. The ion energy was kept at 10 keV or 150 keV and four different ion doses were applied, as well as various annealing conditions. The analysis of X-ray absorption spectra allowed to estimate the local atomic order around Mn atoms. Depending on the implantation energy and annealing processes, the manganese oxides or manganese atoms located in a heavily defected GaSb matrix were observed. The performed analysis helped in indicating the main obstacles in formation of MnSb inclusions inside the GaSb matrix by Mn ion implantation. (author)

  17. The correlation between fragility, density, and atomic interaction in glass-forming liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijin; Guan, Pengfei, E-mail: pguan@csrc.ac.cn [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100193 (China); Wang, W. H. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-07-21

    The fragility that controls the temperature-dependent viscous properties of liquids as the glass transition is approached, in various glass-forming liquids with different softness of the repulsive part of atomic interactions at different densities, is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. We show that the landscape of fragility in purely repulsive systems can be separated into three regions denoted as R{sub I,} R{sub II}, and R{sub III}, respectively, with qualitatively disparate dynamic behaviors: R{sub I} which can be described by “softness makes strong glasses,” R{sub II} where fragility is independent of softness and can only be tuned by density, and R{sub III} with constant fragility, suggesting that density plays an unexpected role for understanding the repulsive softness dependence of fragility. What is more important is that we unify the long-standing inconsistence with respect to the repulsive softness dependence of fragility by observing that a glass former can be tuned more fragile if nonperturbative attraction is added into it. Moreover, we find that the vastly dissimilar influences of attractive interaction on fragility could be estimated from the structural properties of related zero-temperature glasses.

  18. The correlation between fragility, density, and atomic interaction in glass-forming liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lijin; Guan, Pengfei; Wang, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    The fragility that controls the temperature-dependent viscous properties of liquids as the glass transition is approached, in various glass-forming liquids with different softness of the repulsive part of atomic interactions at different densities, is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. We show that the landscape of fragility in purely repulsive systems can be separated into three regions denoted as R I, R II , and R III , respectively, with qualitatively disparate dynamic behaviors: R I which can be described by “softness makes strong glasses,” R II where fragility is independent of softness and can only be tuned by density, and R III with constant fragility, suggesting that density plays an unexpected role for understanding the repulsive softness dependence of fragility. What is more important is that we unify the long-standing inconsistence with respect to the repulsive softness dependence of fragility by observing that a glass former can be tuned more fragile if nonperturbative attraction is added into it. Moreover, we find that the vastly dissimilar influences of attractive interaction on fragility could be estimated from the structural properties of related zero-temperature glasses.

  19. Peri-implantitis: a complex condition with non-linear characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papantonopoulos, G.H.; Gogos, C.; Housos, E.; Bountis, T.; Loos, B.G.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To cluster peri-implantitis patients and explore non-linear patterns in peri-implant bone levels. Materials and Methods Clinical and radiographic variables were retrieved from 94 implant-treated patients (340 implants, mean 7.1 ± 4.1 years in function). Kernel probability density estimations on

  20. Heat generation during implant placement in low-density bone: effect of surgical technique, insertion torque and implant macro design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Aleksa; Mišić, Tijana; Miličić, Biljana; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Aleksić, Zoran; Ðinić, Ana

    2013-07-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of surgical technique, implant macrodesign and insertion torque on bone temperature changes during implant placement. In the in vitro study, 144 self-tapping (blueSKY(®) 4 × 10 mm; Bredent) and 144 non-self-tapping (Standard implant(®) 4.1 × 10 mm; Straumann) were placed in osteotomies prepared in pig ribs by lateral bone condensing or bone drilling techniques. The maximum insertion torque values of 30, 35 and 40 Ncm were used. Real-time bone temperature measurement during implant placement was performed by three thermocouples positioned vertically, in tripod configuration around every osteotomy, at a distance of 5 mm from it and at depths of 1, 5 and 10 mm. Data were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U-tests and Regression analysis. Significant predictor of bone temperature at the osteotomy depth of 1 mm was insertion torque (P = 0.003) and at the depth of 10-mm implant macrodesign (P = 0.029), while no significant predictor at depth of 5 mm was identified (P > 0.05). Higher insertion torque values as well as non-self-tapping implant macrodesign were related to higher temperatures. Implant placement in sites prepared by bone drilling induced significantly higher temperature increase (P = 0.021) compared with bone condensing sites at the depth of 5 mm, while no significant difference was recorded at other depths. Compared with 30 Ncm, insertion torque values of 35 and 40 Ncm produced significantly higher temperature increase (P = 0.005; P = 0.003, respectively) at the depth of 1 mm. There was no significant difference in temperature change induced by 35 and 40 Ncm, neither by implant macrodesign at all investigated depths (P > 0.05). Placement of self-tapping implants with low insertion torque into sites prepared by lateral bone condensing technique might be advantageous in terms of thermal effect on bone. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Electron spin torque in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Takaaki; Senami, Masato; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2012-01-01

    The spin torque and zeta force, which govern spin dynamics, are studied by using monoatoms in their steady states. We find nonzero local spin torque in transition metal atoms, which is in balance with the counter torque, the zeta force. We show that d-orbital electrons have a crucial effect on these torques. Nonzero local chirality density in transition metal atoms is also found, though the electron mass has the effect to wash out nonzero chirality density. Distribution patterns of the chirality density are the same for Sc–Ni atoms, though the electron density distributions are different. -- Highlights: ► Nonzero local spin torque is found in the steady states of transition metal atoms. ► The spin steady state is realized by the existence of a counter torque, zeta force. ► D-orbital electrons have a crucial effect on the spin torque and zeta force. ► Nonzero local chiral density is found in spite of the washout by the electron mass. ► Chiral density distribution have the same pattern for Sc–Ni atoms.

  2. Thermal evaluation by infrared measurement of implant site preparation between single and gradual drilling in artificial bone blocks of different densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlhenrich, S C; Abouridouane, M; Heussen, N; Hölzle, F; Klocke, F; Modabber, A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of bone density and drilling protocol on heat generation during implant bed preparation. Ten single and 10 gradual implant sites with diameters of 2.8, 3.5, and 4.2mm were prepared in four artificial bone blocks (density types I-IV; D1-D4). Drilling was done at constant speed (1500rpm) and with external irrigation (50ml/min); vertical speed was set at 2mm/s. An infrared camera was used for temperature measurements. Significantly higher temperatures for single drilling were found between 2.8-mm drills in D1 (P=0.0014) and D4 (P<0.0001) and between 3.5-mm drills in D3 (P=0.0087) and D4 (P<0.0001), as well as between 4.2-mm drills in D1 (P<0.0001) and D4 (P=0.0014). Low bone density led to a thermal decrease after single drilling and a thermal increase after gradual drilling. Burs with a large diameter always showed a higher temperature generation. In comparisons between 2.8- and 4.2-mm diameters for both single and gradual drills, significant differences (P<0.001) were noted for bone types II, III, and IV. Single drilling could generate more heat than traditional sequential drilling, and bone density, as well as drill diameter, influenced thermal increases. Particularly in lower-density bone, conventional sequential drilling seems to raise the temperature less. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4-37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2-7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8-28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  4. Defect-impurity interactions in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of defect-impurity interactions in metals is presented. When point defects become mobile they migrate towards the sinks and on the way can be captured by impurity atoms forming stable associations so-called complexes. In some metallic systems complexes can also be formed athermally during ion implantation by trapping point defects already in the collision cascade. An association of a point defect with an impurity atom leads to its displacement from the lattice site. The structure and stability of complexes are strongly temperature dependent. With increasing temperature they dissociate or grow by multiple defect trapping. The appearance of freely migrating point defects at elevated temperatures, due to ion bombardment or thermal annealing, causes via coupling with defect fluxes, important impurity redistribution. Because of the sensitivity of many metal-in-metal implanted systems to radiation damage the understanding of this processes is essential for a proper interpretation of the lattice occupancy measurements and the optimization of implantation conditions. (author)

  5. Shannon Entropy in Atoms: A Test for the Assessment of Density Functionals in Kohn-Sham Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Amovilli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron density is used to compute Shannon entropy. The deviation from the Hartree–Fock (HF of this quantity has been observed to be related to correlation energy. Thus, Shannon entropy is here proposed as a valid quantity to assess the quality of an energy density functional developed within Kohn–Sham theory. To this purpose, results from eight different functionals, representative of Jacob’s ladder, are compared with accurate results obtained from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC computations. For three series of atomic ions, our results show that the revTPSS and the PBE0 functionals are the best, whereas those based on local density approximation give the largest discrepancy from DMC Shannon entropy.

  6. Neutron activation analysis for calibration of phosphorus implantation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Rick L.; Simons, David S.

    2001-01-01

    A feasibility study was undertaken to determine if radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) can be used to certify the retained dose of phosphorus implanted in silicon, with the goal of producing a phosphorus SRM. Six pieces of silicon, implanted with a nominal phosphorus dose of 8.5x10 14 atoms·cm -2 were irradiated at a neutron flux of 1.05x10 14 cm -2 ·s -1 . The samples were mixed with carrier, dissolved in acid, the phosphorus isolated by chemical separation, and 32 P measured using a beta proportional counter. A mean phosphorus concentration of (8.35±0.20)x10 14 atoms·cm -2 (uncertainty=1 standard deviation) was determined for the six samples, in agreement with the nominal implanted dose

  7. Bone structure changes in iliac crest grafts combined with implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Jan Willem; Ruijter, Jan M.; Koole, Ronald; de Putter, Cornelis; Cune, Marco S.

    2010-01-01

    Remodeling of onlay grafts combined with implants to the mandible results in predictable changes in the graft's radiographic density. We studied the relationship between changes in radiographic density and trabecular structure during the first year after onlay grafting with simultaneous implant

  8. Studies of the energy density functional and its derivatives in atomic and molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, J.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter is a review of formal density functional theory, (DFT). In the second chapter, approximations to exact DFT are reviewed. In chapter three, the author proposes a modified molecular Thomas-Fermi, (TF) theory. He proceeds by imposing a continuity condition on the density. This avoids the singularities at the nuclei of classical TF. The method is sanctioned by Teller and Balasz theorems. However, it is found that while the classical TF theory is improved, the present method still predicts no-binding. In chapter four, it is suggested that the correlation energy, (E/sub c/), is proportional to the exchange energy, (K), E/sub c/ = cK. This idea is tested with Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT data. In HF, c = 1/40 for atoms and c = 1/25 for molecules. Furthermore, the method is used to estimate dissociation energies. Thereafter, the author studies the chemical potential, (μ), of atoms (chapter five) and molecules (chapter six). In chapter seven, the concept of local pressure in an inhomogeneous electronic system is studied and extended, within the local thermodynamic formulation of DFT. Finally, appendix A provides the required mathematical framework (basic functional calculus) to understand this work, while appendix B is essentially a summary of the HF method

  9. Room temperature diamond-like carbon coatings produced by low energy ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, A., E-mail: a.markwitz@gns.cri.nz [Department for Ion Beam Technologies, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, B.; Leveneur, J. [Department for Ion Beam Technologies, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2014-07-15

    Nanometre-smooth diamond-like carbon coatings (DLC) were produced at room temperature with ion implantation using 6 kV C{sub 3}H{sub y}{sup +} ion beams. Ion beam analysis measurements showed that the coatings contain no heavy Z impurities at the level of 100 ppm, have a homogeneous stoichiometry in depth and a hydrogen concentration of typically 25 at.%. High resolution TEM analysis showed high quality and atomically flat amorphous coatings on wafer silicon. Combined TEM and RBS analysis gave a coating density of 3.25 g cm{sup −3}. Raman spectroscopy was performed to probe for sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} bonds in the coatings. The results indicate that low energy ion implantation with 6 kV produces hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings with a sp{sup 3} content of about 20%. Results highlight the opportunity of developing room temperature DLC coatings with ion beam technology for industrial applications.

  10. Partition coefficients of methylated DNA bases obtained from free energy calculations with molecular electron density derived atomic charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, A; Riquelme, M; Vöhringer-Martinez, E

    2018-05-11

    Partition coefficients serve in various areas as pharmacology and environmental sciences to predict the hydrophobicity of different substances. Recently, they have also been used to address the accuracy of force fields for various organic compounds and specifically the methylated DNA bases. In this study, atomic charges were derived by different partitioning methods (Hirshfeld and Minimal Basis Iterative Stockholder) directly from the electron density obtained by electronic structure calculations in a vacuum, with an implicit solvation model or with explicit solvation taking the dynamics of the solute and the solvent into account. To test the ability of these charges to describe electrostatic interactions in force fields for condensed phases, the original atomic charges of the AMBER99 force field were replaced with the new atomic charges and combined with different solvent models to obtain the hydration and chloroform solvation free energies by molecular dynamics simulations. Chloroform-water partition coefficients derived from the obtained free energies were compared to experimental and previously reported values obtained with the GAFF or the AMBER-99 force field. The results show that good agreement with experimental data is obtained when the polarization of the electron density by the solvent has been taken into account, and when the energy needed to polarize the electron density of the solute has been considered in the transfer free energy. These results were further confirmed by hydration free energies of polar and aromatic amino acid side chain analogs. Comparison of the two partitioning methods, Hirshfeld-I and Minimal Basis Iterative Stockholder (MBIS), revealed some deficiencies in the Hirshfeld-I method related to the unstable isolated anionic nitrogen pro-atom used in the method. Hydration free energies and partitioning coefficients obtained with atomic charges from the MBIS partitioning method accounting for polarization by the implicit solvation model

  11. Effects of noble-metal ion implantation on corrosion inhibition and charge injection capability of surgical Ti and Ti-6Al-4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I.S.

    1989-01-01

    Studies are described involving effects of noble-metal ion implantation on corrosion inhibition and charge injection capabilities of surgical Ti and Ti-6Al-4V. With surgical alloys, harmful biological responses are principally due to the type and quantity of metal ions released by the corrosion process. One approach to improve long-term biological performance involves surface modifications to significantly reduce degradation rates. With regard to surface-modifications, one of the most effective methods is through ion implantation. Results are presented for ion-implanted Au, Rh, and Ir. For the static in vitro corrosion properties, the noble-metal ion implanted Ti-6Al-4V and commercially-pure (CP) Ti were investigated in non-passivating acid and passivating saline solutions. It was postulated that during the early stages of corrosion (or during a corrosion pretreatment) the implanted noble-metal would enrich at the surface and significantly reduce subsequent corrosion rates. The observed behavior for the Ir and Rh implanted materials appeared to follow the postulated mechanism, with both initial and time-dependent improvements in corrosion resistance. However, the Au implanted material yielded early benefits, but the enhanced corrosion resistance deteriorated with time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the implanted Au atoms remained as pure metallic Au, while the Ir and Rh atoms were in some oxide state, which gave the good adhesion of the Ir or Rh enriched surface to the Ti substrate. For a stimulating neural electrode, the charge density should be as large as possible to provide adequate stimulation of the nervous system while allowing for miniaturization of the electrode. Activated Ir has been known as having the highest charge injection capability of any material known

  12. Force-balance and differential equation for the ground-state electron density in atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amovilli, C.; March, N.H.; Gal, T.; Nagy, A.

    2000-01-01

    Holas and March (1995) established a force-balance equation from the many-electron Schroedinger equation. Here, the authors propose this as a basis for the construction of a (usually approximate) differential equation for the ground-state electron density. By way of example they present the simple case of two-electron systems with different external potentials but with weak electron-electron Coulomb repulsion λe 2 /r 12 . In this case first-order Rayleigh-Schroedinger (RS) perturbation theory of the ground-state wave function is known to lead to a compact expression for the first-order density matrix γ(r,rprime) in terms of its diagonal density ρ(r) and the density corresponding to λ = 0. This result allows the force-balance equation to be written as a third-order linear, differential homogeneous equation for the ground-state electron density ρ(r). The example of the two-electron Hookean atom is treated: For this case one can also transcend the first-order RS perturbation theory and get exact results for discrete choices of force constants (external potential)

  13. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics/Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hallén, A. [School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Royal Institute of Technology, SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-11-07

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the V{sub C}-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (C{sub i}'s) and annihilation of V{sub C}'s in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the V{sub C} annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating V{sub C}'s. Concentrations of V{sub C} below ∼2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the V{sub C}-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote C{sub i}-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These C{sub i}-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced C{sub i} injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the V{sub C}-concentration, which limit the net effect of the C{sub i} injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  14. Ab-initio calculation and experimental observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in 50 keV nitrogen implanted rutile TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luitel, Homnath; Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Sarkar, A.; Dechoudhury, S.; Bhowmick, D.; Naik, V.; Sanyal, D.

    2018-02-01

    Room temperature magnetic properties of 50 keV N4+ ion beam implanted rutile TiO2 have been theoretically and experimentally studied. Ab-initio calculation under the frame work of density functional theory has been carried out to study the magnetic properties of the different possible nitrogen related defects in TiO2. Spin polarized density of states calculation suggests that both Ninst and NO can induce ferromagnetic ordering in rutile TiO2. In both cases the 2p orbital electrons of nitrogen atom give rise to the magnetic moment in TiO2. The possibility of the formation of N2 molecule in TiO2 system is also studied but in this case no significant magnetic moment has been observed. The magnetic measurements, using SQUID magnetometer, results a ferromagnetic ordering even at room temperature for the 50 keV N4+ ion beam implanted rutile TiO2.

  15. Damage related deep electron levels in ion implanted GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allsopp, D.W.E.; Peaker, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of the deep electron levels in semi-insulating GaAs implanted with either 78 Se + or 29 Si + ions and rendered n-type by subsequent annealing without encapsulation in partial pressures of arsenic or arsine. Three implantation related deep states were detected with concentration profiles approximating to the type of Gaussian distributions expected for point defects related to ion implantation damage. Further heat treatment of the samples at 500 0 C in a gas ambient of U 2 /H 2 substantially reduced concentration of these deep levels. Two of these states were thought to be related to displacements of the substrate atoms. The third, at Esubc -0.67 eV, was found in only 78 Se + ion implanted GaAs substrates and was thought to be a defect involving both Se and As atoms, rather than intrinsic lattice disorder. It is proposed that the annealing rate of these implantation related deep levels depends crucially on the in-diffusion of arsenic vacancies during heat treatments. (author)

  16. Quantum Hall states of atomic Bose gases: Density profiles in single-layer and multilayer geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N. R.; Lankvelt, F. J. M. van; Reijnders, J. W.; Schoutens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the density profiles of confined atomic Bose gases in the high-rotation limit, in single-layer and multilayer geometries. We show that, in a local-density approximation, the density in a single layer shows a landscape of quantized steps due to the formation of incompressible liquids, which are analogous to fractional quantum Hall liquids for a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field. In a multilayered setup we find different phases, depending on the strength of the interlayer tunneling t. We discuss the situation where a vortex lattice in the three-dimensional condensate (at large tunneling) undergoes quantum melting at a critical tunneling t c 1 . For tunneling well below t c 1 one expects weakly coupled or isolated layers, each exhibiting a landscape of quantum Hall liquids. After expansion, this gives a radial density distribution with characteristic features (cusps) that provide experimental signatures of the quantum Hall liquids

  17. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chin-Yun; Chou, Szu-Ting; Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Chao-Yi; Lan, Ting-Hsun; Liu, Pao-Hsin; Chang, Hong-Po

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluates the influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants by measuring the resonance frequency. Twenty-five orthodontic mini-implants with a diameter of 2 mm were used. The first group contained stainless steel mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm). The second group included titanium alloy mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm) and stainless steel mini-implants 10 mm in length. The mini-implants were inserted into artificial bones with a 2-mm-thick cortical layer and 40 or 20 lb/ft(3) trabecular bone density at insertion depths of 2, 4, and 6 mm. The resonance frequency of the mini-implants in the artificial bone was detected with the Implomates(®) device. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α = 0.05). Greater insertion depth resulted in higher resonance frequency, whereas longer mini-implants showed lower resonance frequency values. However, resonance frequency was not influenced by the implant materials titanium alloy or stainless steel. Therefore, the primary stability of a mini-implant is influenced by insertion depth and not by implant material. Insertion depth is extremely important for primary implant stability and is critical for treatment success. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yun Pan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants by measuring the resonance frequency. Twenty-five orthodontic mini-implants with a diameter of 2 mm were used. The first group contained stainless steel mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm. The second group included titanium alloy mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm and stainless steel mini-implants 10 mm in length. The mini-implants were inserted into artificial bones with a 2-mm-thick cortical layer and 40 or 20 lb/ft3 trabecular bone density at insertion depths of 2, 4, and 6 mm. The resonance frequency of the mini-implants in the artificial bone was detected with the Implomates® device. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α = 0.05. Greater insertion depth resulted in higher resonance frequency, whereas longer mini-implants showed lower resonance frequency values. However, resonance frequency was not influenced by the implant materials titanium alloy or stainless steel. Therefore, the primary stability of a mini-implant is influenced by insertion depth and not by implant material. Insertion depth is extremely important for primary implant stability and is critical for treatment success.

  20. Absolute atomic hydrogen density distribution in a hollow cathode discharge by two-photon polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalo, A B; Rosa, M I de la; Perez, C; Mar, S; Gruetzmacher, K

    2004-01-01

    We report on quantitative measurements of ground-state atomic hydrogen densities in a stationary plasma far off thermodynamic equilibrium, generated in a hollow cathode discharge, by two-photon polarization spectroscopy via the 1S-2S transition. Absolute densities are obtained using a well established calibration method based on the non-resonant two-photon polarization signal of xenon gas at room temperature, which serves as the reference at the wavelength of the hydrogen transition. This study is dedicated to demonstrating the capability of two-photon polarization spectroscopy close to the detection limit. Therefore, it requires single-longitudinal mode UV-laser radiation provided by an advanced UV-laser spectrometer

  1. Electronic structure of xenon implanted with low energy in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, P.F.; Landers, R.; Oliveira, M.H. de; Alvarez, F.; Marques, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure of Xe implanted in amorphous silicon (a-Si) films are investigated. Xe atoms were implanted with low energy by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) technique during growth of the a-Si films. The Xe implantation energy varied in the 0-300 eV energy range. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Auger excited spectroscopy (XAES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used for investigating the Xe electronic structure. The Xe M 4 N 45 N 45 transitions were measured to extract the Auger parameter and to analyze the initial state and relaxation contributions. It was found that the binding energy variation is mainly due to initial state contribution. The relaxation energy variation also shows that the Xe trapped environment depends on the implantation energy. XAS measurements reveals that Xe atoms are dispersed in the a-Si matrix

  2. Limitations in accurate electron density studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wal, R. van der.

    1982-01-01

    Most of X-ray diffraction studies are devoted to the determination of three-dimensional crystal structures from the electron density distributions. In these cases the density distributions are described by the independent atom model (IAM model), which consists of a superposition of spherically averaged free atom densities, which are smeared by thermal vibrations. During the last few decades studies have been made into the deviations of the density distribution from the IAM model, which enables a study of the chemical binding between atoms. The total density can be described using pseudo-atom multipole models as a superposition of aspherical pseudo-atom densities. A fundamental problem is that the separation of this density into an IAM and a deformation part is not unique. This thesis considers the problem and besides deformation densities from X-ray diffraction also considers the corresponding deformation electric field and deformation potential. (C.F.)

  3. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field (B) of strength up to 10 11 G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >10 9 G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >10 9 G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs 'dynamically' from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints. (author)

  4. Experimental level densities of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttormsen, M.; Bello Garrote, F.L.; Eriksen, T.K.; Giacoppo, F.; Goergen, A.; Hagen, T.W.; Klintefjord, M.; Larsen, A.C.; Nyhus, H.T.; Renstroem, T.; Rose, S.J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.G.; Tveten, G.M. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Aiche, M.; Ducasse, Q.; Jurado, B. [University of Bordeaux, CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 120, Gradignan (France); Bernstein, L.A.; Bleuel, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Byun, Y.; Voinov, A. [Ohio University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Athens, Ohio (United States); Gunsing, F. [CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/SPhN, Cedex (France); Lebois, L.; Leniau, B.; Wilson, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Orsay Cedex (France); Wiedeking, M. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West (South Africa)

    2015-12-15

    It is almost 80 years since Hans Bethe described the level density as a non-interacting gas of protons and neutrons. In all these years, experimental data were interpreted within this picture of a fermionic gas. However, the renewed interest of measuring level density using various techniques calls for a revision of this description. In particular, the wealth of nuclear level densities measured with the Oslo method favors the constant-temperature level density over the Fermi-gas picture. From the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that nuclei exhibit a constant-temperature level density behavior for all mass regions and at least up to the neutron threshold. (orig.)

  5. Bone reactions at implants subjected to experimental peri-implantitis and static load. A study in the dog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    2002-01-01

    during a 12-week interval, the screws were reactivated. Thus, the model included 3 different experimental sites of each surface group: group M+L (mucositis+load); group P (peri-implantitis); group P+L (peri-implantitis+load). Fluorochrome labels were injected and standardized radiographs obtained....... The animals were sacrificed and block biopsies of all implant sites dissected and prepared for histological analysis. RESULTS: It was demonstrated that the lateral static load failed to induce peri-implant bone loss at implants with mucositis and failed to enhance the bone loss at implants with experimental...... peri-implantitis. The proportion of bone labels and the bone density in the interface zone were significantly higher in group P+L than in group P. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that a lateral static load with controlled forces may not be detrimental to implants exhibiting mucositis or peri-implantitis....

  6. Remodeling of the Mandibular Bone Induced by Overdentures Supported by Different Numbers of Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Xin, Haitao; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Yulu

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the process of mandibular bone remodeling induced by implant-supported overdentures. computed tomography (CT) images were collected from edentulous patients to reconstruct the geometry of the mandibular bone and overdentures supported by implants. Based on the theory of strain energy density (SED), bone remodeling models were established using the user material subroutine (UMAT) in abaqus. The stress distribution in the mandible and bone density change was investigated to determine the effect of implant number on the remodeling of the mandibular bone. The results indicated that the areas where high Mises stress values were observed were mainly situated around the implants. The stress was concentrated in the distal neck region of the distal-most implants. With an increased number of implants, the biting force applied on the dentures was almost all taken up by implants. The stress and bone density in peri-implant bone increased. When the stress reached the threshold of remodeling, the bone density began to decrease. In the posterior mandible area, the stress was well distributed but increased with decreased implant numbers. Changes in bone density were not observed in this area. The computational results were consistent with the clinical data. The results demonstrate that the risk of bone resorption around the distal-most implants increases with increased numbers of implants and that the occlusal force applied to overdentures should be adjusted to be distributed more in the distal areas of the mandible.

  7. Development of a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. 10. Reevaluation of atomic number density of JOYO Mk-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, Kazuyuki; Sato, Wakaei [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Ishikawa, Makoto; Arii, Yoshio [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    The material composition of JOYO Mk-II core components in its initial core was reevaluated as a part of the effort for developing a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. The special feature of the reevaluation is to treat the decay of Pu-241 isotope, so that the atomic number densities of Pu-241 and Am-241 in fuel assemblies can be exactly evaluated on the initial critical date, Nov. 22nd, 1982. Further, the atomic number densities of other core components were also evaluated to improve the analytical accuracy. Those include the control rods which were not so strictly evaluated in the past, and the dummy fuels and the neutron sources which were not treated in the analytical model so far. The results of the present reevaluation were as follows: (1) The changes of atomic number densities of the major nuclides such as Pu-239, U-235 and U-238 were about {+-}0.2 to 0.3%. On the other hand, the number density of Pu-241, which was the motivation of the present work, was reduced by 12%. From the fact, the number densities in the past analysis might be based on the isotope measurement of the manufacturing point of time without considering the decay of Pu-241. (2) As the other core components, the number densities of control rods and outer reflector-type A were largely improved. (author)

  8. Experimental study on bone tissue reaction around HA implants radiated after implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Masato; Matsui, Yoshiro; Tamura, Sayaka; Chen, Xuan; Uchida, Haruo; Mori, Kimie; Ohno, Kohsuke; Michi, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate histologically and histomorphometrically the tissue reaction around hydroxylapatite (HA) implants that underwent irradiation in 3 different periods in the course of bone healing after implantation. The cylindrical high-density HA implants were implanted in 48 Japanese white rabbit mandibles. A single 15 Gy dose was applied to the mandible 5, 14, or 28 days after implantation. The rabbits were sacrificed 7, 14, 28, and 90 days after irradiation. Nonirradiated rabbits were used as controls. CMR, labeling with tetracycline and calcein, and non-decalcified specimens stained with toluidine blue were used for histological analyses and histomorphometric measurements. The results were as follows: In the rabbits irradiated 5 days after implantation, the HA-bone contact was observed later than that in the controls and the bone-implant contact surface ratio was lower than that in the controls at examination because necrosis of the newly-formed bone occurred just after irradiation. HA-bone contact of the rabbits irradiated 14 and 28 days after implantation was similar to that of the controls. And, bone remodeling was suppressed in rabbits of each group sacrificed at 90 days after irradiation. The results suggested that a short interval between implantation and irradiation causes direct contact between HA implant and bone and a long lapse of time before irradiation hardly affects the bone-implant contact, but delays bone remodeling. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent overloading the HA implants irradiated after implantation and pay utmost attention to conditions around the bone-implant contact. (author)

  9. Structural investigations of amorphised iron and nickel by high-fluence metalloid ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.; Otto, G.; Hohmuth, K.; Heera, V.

    1987-01-01

    Boron, phosphorus and arsenic ions have been implanted into evaporated iron and nickel thin films at room temperature, and the implantation-induced microstructure has been investigated by high-voltage electron microscopy and transmission high energy electron diffraction. The metal films were implanted with ions to a constant dose of 1 x 10 17 and 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 respectively at energy of 50 keV. An amorphous layer was produced by boron and phosphorus ion implantation. Information on the atomic structure of the amorphous layers was obtained from the elastically diffracted electron intensity. On the basis of the correct scattering curves, the total interference function and the pair correlation function were determined. Finally, the atomic arrangement of the implantation-induced amorphous layers is discussed and structure produced by ion irradiation is compared with amorphous structures formed with other techniques. (author)

  10. Anomalous evolution of Ar metastable density with electron density in high density Ar discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min; Chang, Hong-Young; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Shin, Yong-Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Recently, an anomalous evolution of argon metastable density with plasma discharge power (electron density) was reported [A. M. Daltrini, S. A. Moshkalev, T. J. Morgan, R. B. Piejak, and W. G. Graham, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Although the importance of the metastable atom and its density has been reported in a lot of literature, however, a basic physics behind the anomalous evolution of metastable density has not been clearly understood yet. In this study, we investigated a simple global model to elucidate the underlying physics of the anomalous evolution of argon metastable density with the electron density. On the basis of the proposed simple model, we reproduced the anomalous evolution of the metastable density and disclosed the detailed physics for the anomalous result. Drastic changes of dominant mechanisms for the population and depopulation processes of Ar metastable atoms with electron density, which take place even in relatively low electron density regime, is the clue to understand the result.

  11. Model of the recrystallization mechanism of amorphous silicon layers created by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosd, R.M.

    1979-11-01

    The recrystallization behavior during annealing of thin films of amorphous (α) silicon, in contact with a single crystal silicon substrate (referred to as C), has been studied in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The amorphous film is created during high dose phosphorus ion implantation at 100 keV. It was found that the crystal substrate orientation and the implantation temperature have dramatic effects on the recrystallizaton rate, and the defect microstructure produced during annealing. Specifically, (100) wafers implanted at 77 0 K contain only a low density of dislocation loops, but when the same wafer is implanted at room temperature the dislocation density is increased drastically. (111) wafers, when implanted at 77 0 K show a high density of microtwins, but as the implantation temperature is increased a gradual increase in the density of dislocation loops is observed along with a reduction of the microtwins. At an implantation temperature of about 100 0 C both orientations give an identical defect microstructure when annealed, which is a dense tangle of dislocations

  12. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto, E-mail: hiroto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The reaction pathway of the hydrogen addition to graphene surface was determined by the DFT method. • Binding energies of atomic hydrogen to graphene surface were determined. • Absorption spectrum of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. • Hyperfine coupling constant of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4–37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2–7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8–28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  13. Arsenic implantation into polycrystalline silicon and diffusion to silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, K.; Akasaka, Y.; Horie, K.

    1977-01-01

    Arsenic implantation into polycrystalline silicon and drive-in diffusion to silicon substrate have been investigated by MeV He + backscattering analysis and also by electrical measurements. The range distributions of arsenic implanted into polycrystalline silicon are well fitted to Gaussian distributions over the energy range 60--350 keV. The measured values of R/sub P/ and ΔR/sub P/ are about 10 and 20% larger than the theoretical predictions, respectively. The effective diffusion coefficient of arsenic implanted into polycrystalline silicon is expressed as D=0.63 exp[(-3.22 eV/kT)] and is independent of the arsenic concentration. The drive-in diffusion of arsenic from the implanted polycrystalline silicon layer into the silicon substrate is significantly affected by the diffusion atmosphere. In the N 2 atmosphere, a considerable amount of arsenic atoms diffuses outward to the ambient. The outdiffusion can be suppressed by encapsulation with Si 3 N 4 . In the oxidizing atmosphere, arsenic atoms are driven inward by growing SiO 2 due to the segregation between SiO 2 and polycrystalline silicon, and consequently the drive-in diffusion of arsenic is enhanced. At the interface between the polycrystalline silicon layer and the silicon substrate, arsenic atoms are likely to segregate at the polycrystalline silicon side

  14. Reduction in Recombination Current Density in Boron Doped Silicon Using Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Matthew Garett

    The solar industry has grown immensely in recent years and has reached a point where solar energy has now become inexpensive enough that it is starting to emerge as a mainstream electrical generation source. However, recent economic analysis has suggested that for solar to become a truly wide spread source of electricity, the costs still need to plummet by a factor of 8x. This demands new and innovative concepts to help lower such cost. In pursuit of this goal, this dissertation examines the use of atomic hydrogen to lessen the recombination current density in the boron doped region of n-type silicon solar cells. This required the development of a boron diffusion process that maintained the bulk lifetime of n-type silicon such that the recombination current density could be extracted by photoconductance spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that by hydrogenating boron diffusions, the majority carrier concentration can be controlled. By using symmetrically diffused test structures with quinhydrone-methanol surface passivation the recombination current density of a hydrogenated boron profile is shown to be less than that of a standard boron profile, by as much as 30%. This is then applied to a modified industrial silicon solar cell process to demonstrate an efficiency enhancement of 0.4%.

  15. Local Atomic Structure and Discommensurations in the Charge Density Wave of CeTe{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H J; Tomic, A T; Tessmer, S H; Billinge, S J.L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Malliakas, C D; Kanatzidis, M G [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2006-06-09

    The local structure of CeTe{sub 3} in the incommensurate charge density wave (IC-CDW) state has been obtained using atomic pair distribution function analysis of x-ray diffraction data. Local atomic distortions in the Te nets due to the CDW are larger than observed crystallographically, resulting in distinct short and long Te-Te bonds. Observation of different distortion amplitudes in the local and average structures is explained by the discommensurated nature of the CDW, since the pair distribution function is sensitive to the local displacements within the commensurate regions, whereas the crystallographic result averages over many discommensurated domains. The result is supported by STM data. This is the first quantitative local structural study within the commensurate domains in an IC-CDW system.

  16. Assessment of the increased calcification of the jaw bone with CT-Scan after dental implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Barunawaty

    2011-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the changes of jaw bone density around the dental implant after placement using computed tomography scan (CT-Scan). This retrospective study consisted of 30 patients who had lost 1 posterior tooth in maxilla or mandible and installed dental implant. The patients took CT-Scan before and after implant placement. Hounsfield Unit (HU) was measured around the implants and evaluated the difference of HU before and after implant installation. The mean HU of jaw bone was 542.436 HU and 764.9 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). The means HUs for male were 632.3 HU and 932.2 HU and those for female 478.2 HU and 645.5 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). Also, the jaw bone with lower density needed longer period for implant procedure and the increased change of HU of jaw bone was less in the cases which needed longer period for osseointegration. CT-Scan could be used to assess the change of bone density around dental implants. Bone density around dental implant was increased after placement. The increased rate of bone density could be determined by the quality of jaw bone before implant placement.

  17. Assessment of the increased calcification of the jaw bone with CT-Scan after dental implant placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunus, Barunawaty [Faculty of Dentistry, Hasanuddin University, Makassar (Malaysia)

    2011-06-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the changes of jaw bone density around the dental implant after placement using computed tomography scan (CT-Scan). This retrospective study consisted of 30 patients who had lost 1 posterior tooth in maxilla or mandible and installed dental implant. The patients took CT-Scan before and after implant placement. Hounsfield Unit (HU) was measured around the implants and evaluated the difference of HU before and after implant installation. The mean HU of jaw bone was 542.436 HU and 764.9 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). The means HUs for male were 632.3 HU and 932.2 HU and those for female 478.2 HU and 645.5 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). Also, the jaw bone with lower density needed longer period for implant procedure and the increased change of HU of jaw bone was less in the cases which needed longer period for osseointegration. CT-Scan could be used to assess the change of bone density around dental implants. Bone density around dental implant was increased after placement. The increased rate of bone density could be determined by the quality of jaw bone before implant placement.

  18. Assessment of the increased calcification of the jaw bone with CT-Scan after dental implant placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, Barunawaty

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the changes of jaw bone density around the dental implant after placement using computed tomography scan (CT-Scan). This retrospective study consisted of 30 patients who had lost 1 posterior tooth in maxilla or mandible and installed dental implant. The patients took CT-Scan before and after implant placement. Hounsfield Unit (HU) was measured around the implants and evaluated the difference of HU before and after implant installation. The mean HU of jaw bone was 542.436 HU and 764.9 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). The means HUs for male were 632.3 HU and 932.2 HU and those for female 478.2 HU and 645.5 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). Also, the jaw bone with lower density needed longer period for implant procedure and the increased change of HU of jaw bone was less in the cases which needed longer period for osseointegration. CT-Scan could be used to assess the change of bone density around dental implants. Bone density around dental implant was increased after placement. The increased rate of bone density could be determined by the quality of jaw bone before implant placement.

  19. Recrystallization of implanted amorphous silicon layers. I. Electrical properties of silicon implanted with BF+2 or Si++B+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, M.Y.; Streetman, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical properties of recrystallized amorphous silicon layers, formed by BF + 2 implants or Si + +B + implants, have been studied by differential resistivity and Hall-effect measurements. Electrical carrier distribution profiles show that boron atoms inside the amorphized Si layers can be fully activated during recrystallization at 550 0 C. The mobility is also recovered. However, the tail of the B distribution, located inside a damaged region near the original amorphous-crystalline interface, remains inactive. This inactive tail has been observed for all samples implanted with BF + 2 . Only in a thicker amorphous layer, formed for example by Si + predamage implants, can the entire B profile be activated. The etch rate of amorphous silicon in HF and the effect of fluorine on the recrystallization rate are also reported

  20. Implantation damage in silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation, is an attractive technique for producing doped layers in silicon devices but the implantation process involves disruption of the lattice and defects are formed, which can degrade device properties. Methods of minimizing such damage are discussed and direct comparisons made between implantation and diffusion techniques in terms of defects in the final devices and the electrical performance of the devices. Defects are produced in the silicon lattice during implantation but they are annealed to form secondary defects even at room temperature. The annealing can be at a low temperature ( 0 C) when migration of defects in silicon in generally small, or at high temperature when they can grow well beyond the implanted region. The defect structures can be complicated by impurity atoms knocked into the silicon from surface layers by the implantation. Defects can also be produced within layers on top of the silicon and these can be very important in device fabrication. In addition to affecting the electrical properties of the final device, defects produced during fabrication may influence the chemical properties of the materials. The use of these properties to improve devices are discussed as well as the degradation they can cause. (author)

  1. Wave functions and low-order density matrices for a class of two-electron 'artificial atoms' embracing Hookean and Moshinsky models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.; Howard, I.A.; March, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    A class of model two-electron 'artificial atoms' is proposed which embraces both Hookean and Moshinsky models. Particle densities and spinless first-order density matrices are obtained for this class of models. These quantities and the interacting system kinetic energy can be calculated using the ground-state solution of an explicit single-particle radial Schroedinger equation

  2. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  3. Ninth international symposium on hot atom chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of the papers presented at the Symposium are compiled. The topics considered were chemical dynamics of high energy reactions, hot atom chemistry in organic compounds of tritium, nitrogen, oxygen, and halogens, theory and chemical dynamics of hot atom reactions as determined by beam studies, solid state reactions of recoil atoms and implanted ions, hot atom chemistry in energy-related research, hot atom chemistry in inorganic compounds of oxygen and tritium, hot positronium chemistry, applied hot atom chemistry in labelling, chemical effects of radioactive decay, decay-induced reactions and excitation labelling, physical methods in hot atom chemistry, and hot atom reactions in radiation and stratospheric chemistry

  4. Inhibitive formation of nanocavities by introduction of Si atoms in Ge nanocrystals produced by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, R. S.; Shang, L.; Liu, X. H.; Zhang, Y. J. [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Wang, Y. Q., E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn, E-mail: barba@emt.inrs.ca [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); College of Physics Science, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Ross, G. G.; Barba, D., E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn, E-mail: barba@emt.inrs.ca [INRS-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2014-05-28

    Germanium nanocrystals (Ge-nc) were successfully synthesized by co-implantation of Si and Ge ions into a SiO{sub 2} film thermally grown on (100) Si substrate and fused silica (pure SiO{sub 2}), respectively, followed by subsequent annealing at 1150 °C for 1 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examinations show that nanocavities only exist in the fused silica sample but not in the SiO{sub 2} film on a Si substrate. From the analysis of the high-resolution TEM images and electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra, it is revealed that the absence of nanocavities in the SiO{sub 2} film/Si substrate is attributed to the presence of Si atoms inside the formed Ge-nc. Because the energy of Si-Ge bonds (301 kJ·mol{sup −1}) are greater than that of Ge-Ge bonds (264 kJ·mol{sup −1}), the introduction of the Si-Ge bonds inside the Ge-nc can inhibit the diffusion of Ge from the Ge-nc during the annealing process. However, for the fused silica sample, no crystalline Si-Ge bonds are detected within the Ge-nc, where strong Ge outdiffusion effects produce a great number of nanocavities. Our results can shed light on the formation mechanism of nanocavities and provide a good way to avoid nanocavities during the process of ion implantation.

  5. Observation of dynamic atom-atom correlation in liquid helium in real space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmowski, W; Diallo, S O; Lokshin, K; Ehlers, G; Ferré, G; Boronat, J; Egami, T

    2017-05-04

    Liquid 4 He becomes superfluid and flows without resistance below temperature 2.17 K. Superfluidity has been a subject of intense studies and notable advances were made in elucidating the phenomenon by experiment and theory. Nevertheless, details of the microscopic state, including dynamic atom-atom correlations in the superfluid state, are not fully understood. Here using a technique of neutron dynamic pair-density function (DPDF) analysis we show that 4 He atoms in the Bose-Einstein condensate have environment significantly different from uncondensed atoms, with the interatomic distance larger than the average by about 10%, whereas the average structure changes little through the superfluid transition. DPDF peak not seen in the snap-shot pair-density function is found at 2.3 Å, and is interpreted in terms of atomic tunnelling. The real space picture of dynamic atom-atom correlations presented here reveal characteristics of atomic dynamics not recognized so far, compelling yet another look at the phenomenon.

  6. Tomography of atomic number and density of materials using dual-energy imaging and the Alvarez and Macovski attenuation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paziresh, M.; Kingston, A. M., E-mail: andrew.kingston@anu.edu.au; Latham, S. J.; Fullagar, W. K.; Myers, G. M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 2601 (Australia)

    2016-06-07

    Dual-energy computed tomography and the Alvarez and Macovski [Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] transmitted intensity (AMTI) model were used in this study to estimate the maps of density (ρ) and atomic number (Z) of mineralogical samples. In this method, the attenuation coefficients are represented [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] in the form of the two most important interactions of X-rays with atoms that is, photoelectric absorption (PE) and Compton scattering (CS). This enables material discrimination as PE and CS are, respectively, dependent on the atomic number (Z) and density (ρ) of materials [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)]. Dual-energy imaging is able to identify sample materials even if the materials have similar attenuation coefficients at single-energy spectrum. We use the full model rather than applying one of several applied simplified forms [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976); Siddiqui et al., SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2004); Derzhi, U.S. patent application 13/527,660 (2012); Heismann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 2073–2079 (2003); Park and Kim, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 59, 2709 (2011); Abudurexiti et al., Radiol. Phys. Technol. 3, 127–135 (2010); and Kaewkhao et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 109, 1260–1265 (2008)]. This paper describes the tomographic reconstruction of ρ and Z maps of mineralogical samples using the AMTI model. The full model requires precise knowledge of the X-ray energy spectra and calibration of PE and CS constants and exponents of atomic number and energy that were estimated based on fits to simulations and calibration measurements. The estimated ρ and Z images of the samples used in this paper yield average relative errors of 2.62% and 1.19% and maximum relative errors of 2.64% and 7.85%, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the method accounts for the beam hardening effect in density (

  7. Trapping of deuterium in argon-implanted nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, R.C.; Rehn, L.E.; Baldo, P.

    1985-01-01

    Argon ions with energy 250 keV were implanted at fluences of 2 x 10 16 cm -2 at temperatures of 500, 250, and 21 0 C, in the specimen of relatively pure polycrystalline nickel. Deuterium was introduced into the surface and implanted regions by making the specimen the negative electrode of an electrolytic cell containing 1-N pure deuterated sulfuric acid. Deuterium trapped in the vacancy complexes of the implanted regions was analyzed as a function of temperature using the vacancy complexes of the implanted regions was analyzed as a function of temperature using the 2 H( 3 He, 1 H) 4 He nuclear reaction during an isochronal annealing process. The results indicate that the types of traps and trap densities found in the regions implanted at 21 and 250 0 C were essentially identical while the trap density found in the region implanted at 500 0 C was approximately 40% of that found in the other regions. Math model comparison with the experimental results suggests the existence of at least two types of traps in each region. Trap binding enthalpies used in the math model to fit the experimental data were slightly higher for the region implanted with argon at 500 0 C than for the regions implanted at the lower temperatures. TEM studies revealed the presence of small voids in the region implanted at 500 0 as well as dislocation loops similar to those found in the regions implanted at the lower temperatures. 20 references, 2 figures

  8. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  9. Current status of grafts and implants in rhinoplasty: Part II. Homologous grafts and allogenic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadian, Ali; Naghshineh, Nima; Rubinstein, Roee

    2010-03-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the challenges in restoring volume and structural integrity in rhinoplasty. 2. Identify the appropriate uses of various homologous grafts and allogenic implants in reconstruction, including: (a) freeze-dried acellular allogenic cadaveric dermis grafts, (b) irradiated cartilage grafts, (c) hydroxyapatite mineral matrix, (d) silicone implants, (e) high-density polyethylene implants, (f) polytetrafluoroethylene implants, and (g) injectable filler materials. 3. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of each of these biomaterials. 4. Understand the specific techniques that may aid in the use these grafts or implants. This review specifically addresses the use of homologous grafts and allogenic implants in rhinoplasty. It is important to stress that autologous materials remain the preferred graft material for use in rhinoplasty, owing to their high biocompatibility and low risk of infection and extrusion. However, concerns of donor-site morbidity, graft availability, and graft resorption have motivated the development and use of homologous and allogenic implants.

  10. Empirical atom model of Vegard's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Shichun

    2014-01-01

    Vegard's law seldom holds true for most binary continuous solid solutions. When two components form a solid solution, the atom radii of component elements will change to satisfy the continuity requirement of electron density at the interface between component atom A and atom B so that the atom with larger electron density will expand and the atom with the smaller one will contract. If the expansion and contraction of the atomic radii of A and B respectively are equal in magnitude, Vegard's law will hold true. However, the expansion and contraction of two component atoms are not equal in most situations. The magnitude of the variation will depend on the cohesive energy of corresponding element crystals. An empirical atom model of Vegard's law has been proposed to account for signs of deviations according to the electron density at Wigner–Seitz cell from Thomas–Fermi–Dirac–Cheng model

  11. Multi-dimensional microanalysis of masklessly implanted atoms using focused heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokuno, Yoshiaki; Iiorino, Yuji; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Kiuchi, Masato; Fujii, Kanenaga; Satou, Mamoru

    1992-01-01

    Multi-dimensional structure fabricated by maskless MeV gold implantation in silicon wafer was analyzed by 3 MeV carbon ion microprobe using a microbeam line developed at GIRIO. The minimum line width of the implanted region was estimated to be about 5 μm. The advantages of heavy ions for microanalysis were demonstrated. (author)

  12. Atomically Smooth Epitaxial Ferroelectric Thin Films for the Development of a Nonvolatile, Ultrahigh Density, Fast, Low Voltage, Radiation-Hard Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahn, Charles H

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this research is to fabricate atomically smooth, single crystalline, complex oxide thin film nanostructures for use in a nonvolatile, ultrahigh density, fast, low voltage, radiation-hard memory...

  13. Comparison of low density and high density pedicle screw instrumentation in Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingkui; Jiang, Honghui; Luo, Ming; Wang, Wengang; Li, Ning; Wang, Lulu; Xia, Lei

    2017-08-02

    The correlation between implant density and deformity correction has not yet led to a precise conclusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low density (LD) and high density (HD) pedicle screw instrumentation in terms of the clinical, radiological and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 outcomes in Lenke 1 AIS. We retrospectively reviewed 62 consecutive Lenke 1 AIS patients who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis using all-pedicle screw instrumentation with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The implant density was defined as the number of screws per spinal level fused. Patients were then divided into two groups according to the average implant density for the entire study. The LD group (n = 28) had fewer than 1.61 screws per level, while the HD group (n = 34) had more than 1.61 screws per level. The radiographs were analysed preoperatively, postoperatively and at final follow-up. The perioperative and SRS-22 outcomes were also assessed. Independent sample t tests were used between the two groups. Comparisons between the two groups showed no significant differences in the correction of the main thoracic curve and thoracic kyphosis, blood transfusion, hospital stay, and SRS-22 scores. Compared with the HD group, there was a decreased operating time (278.4 vs. 331.0 min, p = 0.004) and decreased blood loss (823.6 vs. 1010.9 ml, p = 0.048), pedicle screws needed (15.1 vs. 19.6, p density and high density pedicle screw instrumentation achieved satisfactory deformity correction in Lenke 1 AIS patients. However, the operating time and blood loss were reduced, and the implant costs were decreased with the use of low screw density constructs.

  14. A time-dependent density functional theory investigation of plasmon resonances of linear Au atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dan-Dan; Zhang Hong

    2011-01-01

    We report theoretical studies on the plasmon resonances in linear Au atomic chains by using ab initio time-dependent density functional theory. The dipole responses are investigated each as a function of chain length. They converge into a single resonance in the longitudinal mode but split into two transverse modes. As the chain length increases, the longitudinal plasmon mode is redshifted in energy while the transverse modes shift in the opposite direction (blueshifts). In addition, the energy gap between the two transverse modes reduces with chain length increasing. We find that there are unique characteristics, different from those of other metallic chains. These characteristics are crucial to atomic-scale engineering of single-molecule sensing, optical spectroscopy, and so on. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Atomic collisions related to atomic laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    Atomic collisions are important in various places in atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). At a vaporization zone, many atomic collisions due to high density have influence on the atomic beam characteristics such as velocity distribution and metastable states' populations at a separation zone. In the separation zone, a symmetric charge transfer between the produced ions and the neutral atoms may degrade selectivity. We have measured atomic excitation temperatures of atomic beams and symmetric charge transfer cross sections for gadolinium and neodymium. Gadolinium and neodymium are both lanthanides. Nevertheless, results for gadolinium and neodymium are very different. The gadolinium atom has one 5d electron and neodymium atom has no 5d electron. It is considered that the differences are due to existence of 5d electron. (author)

  16. Study of crystal damage by ion implantation using micro RBS/channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambole, D.; Herrmann, F.; Heera, V.; Meijer, J.

    2007-01-01

    The combination of microbeam implantation and in-situ micro RBS/channeling analysis in the Rossendorf nuclear microprobe facility enables crystal damage studies with high current densities not achievable in standard ion implantation experiments. Si(1 0 0) samples were implanted with 600 keV Si + ions and a fluence of 1 x 10 16 cm -2 . Using a beam spot of 200 μm x 200 μm current densities from 4 to 120 μA/cm 2 were obtained. The substrate temperature was varied between RT and 265 deg. C. The implanted regions were subsequently analysed by micro RBS/channeling with a 3 MeV He + beam having a spot size of 50 μm x 50 μm. Crystal damage up to amorphisation was observed in dependence on the substrate temperature. Above a critical temperature T C no amorphisation occurs. T C was determined for each series of samples implanted with the same ion current density j. It was found that the empirical Arrhenius relation j ∼ exp(-E a /kT C ), known from standard implantation experiments, is also valid at high current densities. The observed Arrhenius law can be derived from a model of epitaxial crystallisation stimulated by defect diffusion

  17. Plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.R.; Forest, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors' technique allows the ion implantation to be performed directly within the ion source at higher currents without ion beam extraction and transport. The potential benefits include greatly increased production rates (factors of 10-1000) and the ability to implant non-planar targets without rastering or shadowing. The technique eliminates the ion extractor grid set, beam raster equipment, drift space and target manipulator equipment. The target to be implanted is placed directly within the plasma source and is biased to a large negative potential so that plasma ions gain energy as they accelerate through the potential drop across the sheath that forms at the plasma boundary. Because the sheath surrounds the target on all sides, all surfaces of the target are implanted without the necessity to raster the beam or to rotate the target. The authors have succeeded in implanting nitrogen ions in a silicon target to the depths and concentrations required for surface treatment of materials like stainless steel and titanium alloys. They have performed ESCA measurements of the penetration depth profile of a silicon target that was biased to 30 kV in a nitrogen discharge plasma. Nitrogen ions were implanted to a depth of 700A at a peak concentration of 30% atomic. The measured profile is quite similar to a previously obtained profile in titanium targets with conventional techniques

  18. Ab-initio study of the electronic structure of sup 1 sup 9 F implanted in GaAs and GaN crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Park, J H; Cho, H S; Shin, Y N

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the nuclear quadrupole interaction of a fluorine atom implanted in gallium arsenide and gallium nitride cluster models using the ab-initio Hartree-Fock theory. For the three possible fluorine sites in GaAs and GaN, we have determined the location of the implanted fluorine atom by using a self-consistent calculation, the electric field gradient at the implanted atom, and the electronic structure. Good agreement is found with experimental data wherever they are available. Predictions are made for the implanted fluorine site associated with the total energy and the electric field gradient which are expected to be measurable by a variety of experimental techniques.

  19. Ion-implanted Si-nanostructures buried in a SiO{sub 2} substrate studied with soft-x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.; Rubensson, J.E.; Eisebitt, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In recent years silicon nanostructures have gained great interest because of their optical luminescence, which immediately suggests several applications, e.g., in optoelectronic devices. Nanostructures are also investigated because of the fundamental physics involved in the underlying luminescence mechanism, especially attention has been drawn to the influence of the reduced dimensions on the electronic structure. The forming of stable and well-defined nanostructured materials is one goal of cluster physics. For silicon nanostructures this goal has so far not been reached, but various indirect methods have been established, all having the problem of producing less well defined and/or unstable nanostructures. Ion implantation and subsequent annealing is a promising new technique to overcome some of these difficulties. In this experiment the authors investigate the electronic structure of ion-implanted silicon nanoparticles buried in a stabilizing SiO{sub 2} substrate. Soft X-ray emission (SXE) spectroscopy features the appropriate information depth to investigate such buried structures. SXE spectra to a good approximation map the local partial density of occupied states (LPDOS) in broad band materials like Si. The use of monochromatized synchrotron radiation (MSR) allows for selective excitation of silicon atoms in different chemical environments. Thus, the emission from Si atom sites in the buried structure can be separated from contributions from the SiO{sub 2} substrate. In this preliminary study strong size dependent effects are found, and the electronic structure of the ion-implanted nanoparticles is shown to be qualitatively different from porous silicon. The results can be interpreted in terms of quantum confinement and chemical shifts due to neighboring oxygen atoms at the interface to SiO{sub 2}.

  20. Ab Initio Density Functional Calculations and Infra-Red Study of CO Interaction with Pd Atoms on θ-Al2O3 (010) Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K; Allard, Lawrence F; Wu, Zili

    2017-07-24

    The ab initio density functional theoretical studies show that energetics favor CO oxidation on single Pd atoms supported on θ-alumina. The diffuse reflectance infra-red spectroscopy (DRIFTS) results show that carbonates are formed as intermediates when single supported Pd atoms are exposed to a gaseous mixture of CO + O 2 . The rapid agglomeration of Pd atoms under CO oxidation conditions even at 6 °C leads to the presence of Pd particles along with single atoms during CO oxidation experiments. Thus, the observed CO oxidation has contributions from both single Pd atoms and Pd particles.

  1. XPS study of the passive films formed on nitrogen-implanted austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, P.; Bussell, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (304-type) have been implanted with nitrogen ions in order to investigate the effects of implanted nitrogen on their electrochemical behaviour and on the nature of the passive film formed on the steels in acid (0.5M H 2 SO 4 ). Alloys with two nitrogen doses have been prepared (2.5x10 16 and 2x10 17 N atoms/cm 2 ). The implanted alloys have been characterized by 15 N-NRA (nuclear reaction analysis) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Alloy surfaces with well-defined N concentrations were prepared, prior to the electrochemical measurements, by argon-ion sputtering of the implanted material for a fixed time in order to reach a well-defined point on the nitrogen depth profile. The samples were then transferred without exposure to air to an electrochemical cell mounted in an inert gas glove box. The implanted nitrogen modifies the electrochemical behaviour of the alloy. The anodic dissolution in the active state is enhanced, and the current density in the passive state is increased. Surface analysis of the alloys by XPS after passivation shows that implanted nitrogen is enriched on the surface during dissolution and passivation of the alloys. The process by which N is enriched on the surface is anodic segregation, which was first observed and characterized for S on Ni and Ni-Fe alloys. The passive films formed on both the unimplanted and implanted alloys have a bilayer structure with an inner oxide layer and an outer hydroxide layer, but on the nitrogen-implanted alloy, a chromium nitride phase is formed at the expense of the chromium oxide. After passivation of the implanted alloys, three chemical states of nitrogen are detected in the N 1s spectrum. The high binding energy (399.4 eV) peak corresponds to a nitrogen species located on the surface of the passive film, which is produced by reaction of the implanted nitrogen with the solution. (orig./WL)

  2. Assessment of microseeds biodegradability of Sm and Sm:Ba splenic implants in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Savio Lana; Barroso, Thiago Vinicius Villar; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2009-01-01

    The radioactive interstitial implants have applications in controlling neoplasm in several regions of the human body. Currently the permanent brachytherapy seeds implanted in the spleen and other organs are made of I-125 seeds. After the total emission of radiation, the metal encapsulated seed remains inert in the implanted area. Seeds of bioactive ceramics have been prepared with Sm-152 incorporation to be activated in Sm-153. This study aimed to develop surgical technique for implanting biodegradable micro-seeds in the spleen of the rabbit. Three micro-seeds were introduced by hypodermic needle in the spleen in eight rabbits by median laparotomy. Subsequently, there were clinical and functional reactions of the animal to the implanted foreign body. The other objective was to perform the animal monitoring by radiography, produced in time sequence, and pathological studies of a fragment of the spleens of rabbits. The results show the effectiveness of surgery, the identification of the implanted material by radiography in vivo, and the biocompatibility of micro-seeds most of Sm and Sm:Ba. These seeds of reduced volume, 0.3x 1.6 mm, could be monitored for radiological studies in 2 periods: early and later implant. On the later studies, radiography was taken at 60d post-implant. Biopsies were taken and radiographs of the samples were also performed for evidencing the degradation state of the seeds. The results of the two groups of four rabbits are presented. They show partial degradation of the seed verified by radiographic contrast which is related to the atomic number of the elements and mass density in the seed. The biopsy showed that the ceramic is clearly absorbed by the spleen tissue and form tissue-implant interface. The histological slides showed an inflammatory reaction with presence of fibrosis of the giant cell foreign body. In conclusion, the radiograph shows a suitable noninvasive technique for monitoring the degradation of micro-seed ceramics in vivo

  3. Assessment of microseeds biodegradability of Sm and Sm:Ba splenic implants in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Savio Lana; Barroso, Thiago Vinicius Villar [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Anatomia; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2009-07-01

    The radioactive interstitial implants have applications in controlling neoplasm in several regions of the human body. Currently the permanent brachytherapy seeds implanted in the spleen and other organs are made of I-125 seeds. After the total emission of radiation, the metal encapsulated seed remains inert in the implanted area. Seeds of bioactive ceramics have been prepared with Sm-152 incorporation to be activated in Sm-153. This study aimed to develop surgical technique for implanting biodegradable micro-seeds in the spleen of the rabbit. Three micro-seeds were introduced by hypodermic needle in the spleen in eight rabbits by median laparotomy. Subsequently, there were clinical and functional reactions of the animal to the implanted foreign body. The other objective was to perform the animal monitoring by radiography, produced in time sequence, and pathological studies of a fragment of the spleens of rabbits. The results show the effectiveness of surgery, the identification of the implanted material by radiography in vivo, and the biocompatibility of micro-seeds most of Sm and Sm:Ba. These seeds of reduced volume, 0.3x 1.6 mm, could be monitored for radiological studies in 2 periods: early and later implant. On the later studies, radiography was taken at 60d post-implant. Biopsies were taken and radiographs of the samples were also performed for evidencing the degradation state of the seeds. The results of the two groups of four rabbits are presented. They show partial degradation of the seed verified by radiographic contrast which is related to the atomic number of the elements and mass density in the seed. The biopsy showed that the ceramic is clearly absorbed by the spleen tissue and form tissue-implant interface. The histological slides showed an inflammatory reaction with presence of fibrosis of the giant cell foreign body. In conclusion, the radiograph shows a suitable noninvasive technique for monitoring the degradation of micro-seed ceramics in vivo

  4. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  5. Ion implantation into iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, Masaya

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of implanted ions in iron, the friction characteristics and the corrosion of iron were studied. The distribution of Ni or Cr ions implanted into mild steel was measured. The accelerated voltage was 150 keV, and the beam current density was about 2 microampere/cm 2 . The measurement was made with an ion microanalyzer. The measured distribution was compared with that of LSS theory. Deep invasion of Ni was seen in the measured distribution. The distribution of Cr ions was different from the distribution calculated by the LSS theory. The relative friction coefficient of mild steel varied according to the dose of implanted Cu or N ions, and to the accelerating voltage. Formation of compound metals on the surfaces of metals by ion-implantation was investigated for the purpose to prevent the corrosion of metals. The resistance of mild steel in which Ni ions were implanted was larger than that of mild steel without any treatment. (Kato, T.)

  6. Studies on effective atomic numbers and electron densities in amino acids and sugars in the energy range 30-1333 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowda, Shivalinge; Krishnaveni, S.; Gowda, Ramakrishna

    2005-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of the amino acids glycine, alanine, serine, valine, threonine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, lysine, glutamic acid, histidine, phenylalanine, arginine, tyrosine, tryptophane and the sugars arabinose, ribose, glucose, galactose, mannose, fructose, rhamnose, maltose, melibiose, melezitose and raffinose at the energies 30.8, 35.0, 81.0, 145, 276.4, 302.9, 356, 383.9, 661.6, 1173 and 1332.5 keV were calculated by using the measured total attenuation cross-sections. The interpolations of total attenuation cross-sections for photons of energy E in elements of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the XCOM data in the photon energy region 30-1500 keV. The best-fit coefficients obtained by a piece wise interpolation method were used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data

  7. Studies on effective atomic numbers and electron densities in amino acids and sugars in the energy range 30-1333 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowda, Shivalinge [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Krishnaveni, S. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Gowda, Ramakrishna [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India)]. E-mail: ramakrishnagowda@yahoo.com

    2005-10-15

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of the amino acids glycine, alanine, serine, valine, threonine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, lysine, glutamic acid, histidine, phenylalanine, arginine, tyrosine, tryptophane and the sugars arabinose, ribose, glucose, galactose, mannose, fructose, rhamnose, maltose, melibiose, melezitose and raffinose at the energies 30.8, 35.0, 81.0, 145, 276.4, 302.9, 356, 383.9, 661.6, 1173 and 1332.5 keV were calculated by using the measured total attenuation cross-sections. The interpolations of total attenuation cross-sections for photons of energy E in elements of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the XCOM data in the photon energy region 30-1500 keV. The best-fit coefficients obtained by a piece wise interpolation method were used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  8. Accelerating action of stresses on crystallization kinetics in silicon ion-implanted layers during pulsed heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the effect of stressed in ion-implanted layers on kinetics of amorphous phase transformations is performed. The suggested model of accounting stresses including concentration ones is based on the locality of action of interstitial addition atoms and on general structural inhomogeneity of amorphous semiconductor leading to the formation of areas of the facilitated phase transition. Accounting of effect of energy variation of silicon atoms interaction on probability of displacement events and atoms building in lattice points or atomic bonds disintegration allows one to trace the accelerating action of introduced by ion implantation stresses on the kinetics of layer crystallization during pulsed heating

  9. Matter density distribution in atomic nuclei as illuminated by high energy hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The method is proposed for the intranuclear matter density distribution study by means of high energy strongly interacting probes. The newly recognized process - the passage of hadrons through atomic nuclei - is employed as the physical basis of the operational principle of the method; the passage is accompanied by the nucleon emission from the target nuclei. It seems that the hadronic projectile sees a definite number of nucleons at a definite impact parameter, in passing through the target nucleus, but the number of the protons among the nucleus seen fluctuates according the binomial formula; in average, this number corresponds to the neutron-proton ratio (A-Z0/Z. 21 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Ti-13Nb-13Zr production for implant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, V.A.R.; Cairo, C.A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) of titanium alloys may lead to the obtainment of components having weak-to-absent textures, uniform grain structure and higher homogeneity compared with conventional wrought products. The production of the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy by P/M starting from blended elemental (BE) powders is a cost-effective route considering its versatility and also for allowing the manufacture of complex parts. This alloy due its high biocompatibility and lower modulus of elasticity is a promising candidate for implants fabrication. Samples were produced by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering in order to identify the microstructural evolution. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure, microhardness and density. The surface topography of the samples was studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was shown that the route is adequate to reach high densities with homogeneous microstructure. Representative AFM images allowed distinguishing a lamellar structure caused by the different phases that are present in the surface of the specimens. (author)

  11. A study on the resistance at bone-implant interface during implant insertion in a cadaver goat jaw model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study is to determine the resistance at bone-implant interface during insertion of dental implant. Materials and Methods: Freshly procured cadaver goat mandibles were collected from slaughterhouses. Four dental implants of two different diameters were inserted into osteotomized sites of the goat mandibles. The gradual changes in resonance frequency (RF were recorded in RF analyzer for the five consecutive turns of implant insertion. Results and Observations: RF was found to be positively correlated with diameter of dental implants. Conclusion: RF analysis can be used to determine the type of resistance the implant faces during insertion and the kind of bone density through which it passes. It gives a forecast of expected initial stability.

  12. Effect of thermal annealing on optical properties of implanted GaAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulik, M; Komarov, FF; Maczka, D

    GaAs samples doped with indium atoms by ion implantation and thermal annealed were studied using a channelling method, Rutherford backscattering, and an ellipsometry. From these measurements it was observed that the layer implanted with 3 x 10(16) cm(-2) indium dose was totally damaged and its

  13. Density Functional Theory and Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Oleate Functioned on Siderite Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiently discovering the interaction of the collector oleate and siderite is of great significance for understanding the inherent function of siderite weakening hematite reverse flotation. For this purpose, investigation of the adsorption behavior of oleate on siderite surface was performed by density functional theory (DFT calculations associating with atomic force microscopy (AFM imaging. The siderite crystal geometry was computationally optimized via convergence tests. Calculated results of the interaction energy and the Mulliken population verified that the collector oleate adsorbed on siderite surface and the covalent bond was established as a result of electrons transferring from O1 atoms (in oleate molecule to Fe1 atoms (in siderite lattice. Therefore, valence-electrons’ configurations of Fe1 and O1 changed into 3d6.514s0.37 and 2s1.832p4.73 from 3d6.214s0.31 and 2s1.83p4.88 correspondingly. Siderite surfaces with or without oleate functioned were examined with the aid of AFM imaging in PeakForce Tapping mode, and the functioned siderite surface was found to be covered by vesicular membrane matters with the average roughness of 16.4 nm assuring the oleate adsorption. These results contributed to comprehending the interaction of oleate and siderite.

  14. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentecoste, Lucile [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Thomann, Anne-Lise, E-mail: anne-lise.thomann@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex2 (France)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (10{sup 11}–10{sup 14} ions.cm{sup 2}.s{sup −1}) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He{sup +}), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  15. High fluence effects on ion implantation stopping and range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Tek, Z.; Oeztarhan, A.; Akbas, N.; Brown, I.G.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a code STOPPO which can be used to modify the more-widely used ion implantation codes to more accurately predict the mean nuclear and electronic stopping power, preferential sputtering and range of heavy ions in monatomic target materials. In our simulations an effective atomic number and effective atomic mass are introduced into conveniently available analytical stopping cross-sections and a better fitting function for preferential sputtering yield is carefully evaluated for each ion implantation. The accuracy of the code confirmed experimentally by comparison with measured Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) concentration profiles for 130 keV Zr ions implanted into Be to fluences of 1 x 10 17 , 2 x 10 17 and 4 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 . We find a steady increase in the mean nuclear and electronic stopping powers of the target; the increase in nuclear stopping power is much greater than the increase in electronic stopping power

  16. Changes in corneal endothelial cell density and the cumulative risk of corneal decompensation after Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Nam; Lee, Sung Bok; Lee, Yeon Hee; Lee, Jong Joo; Lim, Hyung Bin; Kim, Chang-Sik

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate changes in the corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) and corneal decompensation following Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation. This study was retrospective and observational case series. Patients with refractory glaucoma who underwent AGV implantation and were followed >5 years were consecutively enrolled. We reviewed the medical records, including the results of central corneal specular microscopy. Of the 127 enrolled patients, the annual change in ECD (%) was determined using linear regression for 72 eyes evaluated at least four times using serial specular microscopic examination and compared with 31 control eyes (fellow glaucomatous eyes under medical treatment). The main outcome measures were cumulative risk of corneal decompensation and differences in the ECD loss rates between subjects and controls. The mean follow-up after AGV implantation was 43.1 months. There were no cases of postoperative tube-corneal touch. The cumulative risk of corneal decompensation was 3.3%, 5 years after AGV implantation. There was a more rapid loss of ECD in the 72 subject eyes compared with the 31 controls (-7.0% and -0.1%/year, respectively; p<0.001). However, the rate of loss decreased over time and statistical significance compared with control eyes disappeared after 2 years postoperatively: -10.7% from baseline to 1 year (p<0.01), -7.0% from 1 year to 2 years (p=0.037), -4.2% from 2 years to 3 years (p=0.230) and -2.7% from 3 years to the final follow-up (p=0.111). In case of uncomplicated AGV implantation, the cumulative risk of corneal decompensation was 3.3%, 5 years after the operation. The ECD loss was statistically greater in eyes with AGV than in control eyes without AGV, but the difference was significant only up to 2 years post surgery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Ab initio full charge-density study of the atomic volume of α-phase Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We have used a full charge-density technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in first-principles calculations of the atomic volumes of the light actinides including Fr, Ra, and Ac in their low-temperature crystallographic phases. The good agreement between the theoretical and exper......We have used a full charge-density technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in first-principles calculations of the atomic volumes of the light actinides including Fr, Ra, and Ac in their low-temperature crystallographic phases. The good agreement between the theoretical...... and experimental values along the series support the picture of itinerant 5f electronic states in Th to Pu. The increased deviation between theory and experiment found in Np and Pu may be an indication of correlation effects not included in the local density approximation....

  18. Implanting very low energy atomic ions into surface adsorbed cage molecules: the formation/emission of Cs/C60+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodney, Eli; Kaplan, Andrey; Manor, Yoni; Bekkerman, Anatoly; Tsipinyuk, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Full Text: We demonstrate the formation of an endo-complex via a collision of energetic ions with molecular overlayers on a surface. An incoming atomic ion is encapsulated inside a very large molecule or cluster by implanting the primary ion into the target species, which then recovers its original structure or rearrange itself around the implanted ion in some stable configuration. Here we describe an experiment resulting in the formation and ejection of an endo-complex, within a single collision. We study the formation and emission of endohedral fullerenes, Cs/C 60 + and Cs/C 70 + , following a single collision of Cs + ion with a sub-monolayer of C 60 (steady state coverage) on gold and silicon surfaces and with a sub-monolayer of C 70 on gold. A continuous low energy (E 0 =35-220 eV) Cs + ion beam hit the Cs + covered surface and the collisional formation and ejection of the endohedral Cs/Cs 60 + complex, within a single Cs + /C 60 collision was observed and characterized. Several experimental observations clearly demonstrate the single collision nature of the combined atom penetration endo-complex ejection event. The fullerene molecule is actually being picked up off the surface by the penetrating Cs + ion. The evidence for the trapping of the Cs + ion inside the fullerene cage is given both by the appearance of the Cs/Cs (602-2n) + (n=1-5) sequence and its termination at Cs/Cs 50 + . Kinetic Energy Distributions (KEDs) of the outgoing Cs/Cs 60 + were measured for two different Cs + impact energies under field-free conditions. The most striking observation is the near independence of the KEDs on the impact energy. Both KEDs peak around 1.2 eV with similar line shapes. A simple model for the formation/ejection/fragmentation dynamics of the endohedral complex is proposed and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results

  19. SIMPLANT: analytic calculation of ion implantation within the Tadpance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, R.J.

    1988-04-01

    An analytic method for calculating the concentration distribution of dopant atoms introduced into a multilayer semiconductor device by ion beam implantation is explained. Computer software written to apply the method is described. The operation of the software within a semiconductor process and device modelling package is outlined. Implantation distributions generated by the software are illustrated. (author)

  20. Adsorption of selenium atoms at the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface: A combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.Q.; Zhou Yinghui; Wu Qihui; Pakes, C.I.; Zhu Zizhong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A selenium atom, which adsorbs at site close to a Si adatom and bonds with this Si adatom and one of its backbonding Si atoms on the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface, will break the Si-Si bond and consequently disorder the Si reconstruction surface. Research highlights: → STM and DFT are used to study the adsorption properties of Se atoms on a Si surface. → The adsorption site of Se atom on the Si surface has been identified. → The electronic effect of Se atom on the adsorbed Si surface has been ivestigaed. → The Se atom weakens the bond between two Si atom bonding with the Se atom. - Abstract: The adsorption of selenium (Se) atoms at the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface has been investigated using both scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. A single Se atom prefers to adsorb at sites close to a Si adatom and bonds with this Si adatom and one of its backbonding Si atoms. The adsorption sites are referred to as A*-type sites in this article. The density of the conduction band (empty states) of the Si adatom increases as a result of the adsorption of a Se atom, which causes the Si adatom to become brighter in the empty state STM images. At the same time, the adsorption of the Se atom weakens the bonding between the Si adatom and its backbonding Si atom due to the charge transfer from them to the Se atom, and consequently destructs the ordered Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface with increasing Se coverage.

  1. On-the-Fly Machine Learning of Atomic Potential in Density Functional Theory Structure Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, T. L.; Jørgensen, M. S.; Hammer, B.

    2018-01-01

    Machine learning (ML) is used to derive local stability information for density functional theory calculations of systems in relation to the recently discovered SnO2 (110 )-(4 ×1 ) reconstruction. The ML model is trained on (structure, total energy) relations collected during global minimum energy search runs with an evolutionary algorithm (EA). While being built, the ML model is used to guide the EA, thereby speeding up the overall rate by which the EA succeeds. Inspection of the local atomic potentials emerging from the model further shows chemically intuitive patterns.

  2. Copper ion implantation of polycarbonate matrices: Morphological and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resta, V., E-mail: vincenzo.resta@le.infn.it; Quarta, G.; Maruccio, L.; Calcagnile, L.

    2014-07-15

    The implantation of 1 MeV {sup 63}Cu{sup +} ions in polycarbonate (PC) matrices has been carried out in order to evaluate the morphological and structural modifications induced in the polymer as a function of the ion fluence in the range 5 × 10{sup 13} ions cm{sup −2} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2}. Atomic Force Microscopy analysis reveals a significant roughness increase of the polymer surface only for fluences higher than 5 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2} with the presence of hillock structures which surface density increases with increasing the ion fluence. X-ray Diffraction measurements of PC implanted with fluences in the range between 5 × 10{sup 15} at cm{sup −2} and 5 × 10{sup 16} at cm{sup −2} reveal an increase of the disorder inside the PC matrix, as a consequence of the damaging process induced by the ion irradiation. Evidences about the presence of exotic phase structures ascribed to both cubic Cu{sub 2}O and cubic Cu have been found.

  3. Zinc and phosphorus co-implantation in indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.; Ridgway, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    Electrical activation and dopant diffusion in Zn-implanted InP after rapid thermal annealing have been investigated. For an as-implanted Zn concentration of ∼4x10 19 thinspcm -3 , only ∼7% of the implanted Zn atoms formed electrically active shallow acceptors following a 950thinsp degree C/5 s annealing cycle. The low activation was the result of rapid Zn out-diffusion emdash only ∼14% of the implanted dopant was retained after annealing. A significant enhancement in electrical activation and a reduction in Zn loss were achieved in Zn+P co-implanted samples which yielded a net hole concentration of ≤6x10 18 thinspcm -3 and >50% Zn retention. The saturation of the free hole concentration in Zn+P co-implanted samples was attributed to the formation of Zn interstitial donors and Group-V-related donor-type native defects. For comparison, Zn+Al and Zn+Al+P co-implanted samples were also examined to distinguish the relative influences of implantation-induced disorder and nonstoichiometry on electrical activation and dopant diffusion. For the given implant conditions, we found that nonstoichiometry was the dominant influence. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  4. Radiographic examination for successful dental implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul

    2005-01-01

    Recently implant has become an important field in dental clinic. Radiographic examination of pre- and post-operation is essential for successful treatment. Clinicians should have knowledge about the purpose of the radiographic examination, suitable imaging modality for the cases, anatomic landmarks of tooth and jaw bone, advantage and limitation of panoramic radiographic examination for implant, principle and interpretation of cross-sectional imaging, bone mineral density, post-operative radiographic examination. This paper will be helpful to get above information for dentists who want to do dental implant successfully.

  5. Implantation activation annealing of Si-implanted gallium nitride at temperatures > 1,100 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolper, J.C.; Han, J.; Biefeld, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    The activation annealing of Si-implanted GaN is reported for temperatures from 1,100 to 1,400 C. Although previous work has shown that Si-implanted GaN can be activated by a rapid thermal annealing at ∼1,100 C, it was also shown that significant damage remained in the crystal. Therefore, both AlN-encapsulated and uncapped Si-implanted GaN samples were annealed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition system in a N 2 /NH 3 ambient to further assess the annealing process. Electrical Hall characterization shows increases in carrier density and mobility for annealing up to 1,300 C before degrading at 1,400 C due to decomposition of the GaN epilayer. Rutherford backscattering spectra show that the high annealing temperatures reduce the implantation induced damage profile but do not completely restore the as-grown crystallinity

  6. Electric field gradient calculation at atomic site of In implanted ZnO samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Leyva, A.; Pinnera; Van Espen, P.; Perez, C.

    2011-01-01

    The electric field gradient (EFG) calculated for 111 In→ 111 Cd implanted ZnO samples is reported. The study was made for ideal hexagonal ZnO structures and super-cells considering the In implantation environment at the cation site using the 'WIEN2k' code within the GGA(+U) approximation. The obtained EFG values are in good agreement with the experimental reports for ideal ZnO and 111 In→ 111 Cd implanted structures; measured by perturbed angular correlation (PAC) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The attribution of substitutional incorporation of 111 In at the ZnO cation site after annealing was confirmed. (Author)

  7. Effect of ion implantation on thermal shock resistance of magnesia and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurarie, V.N.; Williams, J.S.; Watt, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Monocrystals of magnesia together with glass samples have been subjected to ion implantation prior to thermal shock testing in an impulse plasma of continuously varied intensity. Measurements of the separation between fragments have been used to estimate the surface temperature. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the surface layer are measured in ion implanted and unimplanted samples using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Implantation-induced near-surface damage is analysed by ion channeling using 2 MeV He + ions. Ion implantation is shown to modify the near-surface structure of magnesia samples by introducing damage, which makes crack initiation easier under thermal stresses. The fracture threshold and maximum crack density are shifted towards the lower temperature range. Ion implanted MgO crystals show a ten fold increase in surface crack density. An increased crack density results in a decreased degree of damage characterised by the depth of crack penetration. The thermal stress resistance parameter of glass samples is increased at relatively small doses and decreased at higher doses. The results suggest that crack density and the degree of fracture damage in brittle ceramics operating under thermal shock conditions can be effectively controlled by ion implantation which provides crack initiating defects in the near-surface region. 23 refs., 7 figs

  8. Micro- and macro-structure of implantation-induced disorder in Ge

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, C J; Byrne, A P; Yu, K M; Foran, G J; Clerc, C; Hansen, J L; Nylandsted-Larsen, A

    2000-01-01

    The structure of ion implantation-induced damage in Ge substrates has been investigated with a combination of ion- and photon-based techniques including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), perturbed angular correlation (PAC) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. For MeV Ge ion implantation at -196 degrees C, the dose dependence of the decrease in local atomic order, determined from EXAFS and PAC, was compared to the number of displaced atoms determined from RBS measurements. An EXAFS determined damage fraction was shown to be a better estimate of amorphous fraction than the number of displaced atoms. PAC was used to elucidate the evolution of defective configurations, and was compared to the RBS and EXAFS results. A fit to the overlap model with the overlap of two ion cascades for complete amorphization best described the experimental results. (16 refs).

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH-DENSITY U/AL DISPERSION PLATES FOR MO-99 PRODUCTION USING ATOMIZED URANIUM POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HO JIN RYU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uranium metal particle dispersion plates have been proposed as targets for Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99 production to improve the radioisotope production efficiency of conventional low enriched uranium targets. In this study, uranium powder was produced by centrifugal atomization, and miniature target plates containing uranium particles in an aluminum matrix with uranium densities up to 9 g-U/cm3 were fabricated. Additional heat treatment was applied to convert the uranium particles into UAlx compounds by a chemical reaction of the uranium particles and aluminum matrix. Thus, these target plates can be treated with the same alkaline dissolution process that is used for conventional UAlx dispersion targets, while increasing the uranium density in the target plates

  10. Multiperturber effects in the Faraday spectrum of Rb atoms immersed in a high-density Xe gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdman, J. P.; Blok, F. J.; Kristensen, M.; Schrama, C. A.

    1996-02-01

    We have measured the D1 and D2 Faraday spectrum and absorption spectrum of Rb atoms immersed in high-density Xe buffer gas in the range nXe=0.8-4.5×1020 cm-3. We find that the shape of the Faraday spectrum obeys the Becquerel relation over this whole density range; however the relative strength of the Faraday effect compared to absorption changes rather abruptly near nXe=1×1020 cm-3. This is ascribed to the onset of a many-body nature (overlapping collisions) of the Rb:Xe line broadening; the number of perturbers within the Weisskopf sphere is unity at nXe~1×1020 cm-3.

  11. Change in equilibrium position of misfit dislocations at the GaN/sapphire interface by Si-ion implantation into sapphire—I. Microstructural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Bo, E-mail: bolee@snu.ac.kr; Han, Heung Nam, E-mail: hnhan@snu.ac.kr; Lee, Dong Nyung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Research Institute of Advanced Materials (RIAM), Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Jin-Woo [Korea Photonics Technology Institute, Gwangju 500-779 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Min; Yoo, Seung Jo; Kim, Jin-Gyu [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Much research has been done to reduce dislocation densities for the growth of GaN on sapphire, but has paid little attention to the elastic behavior at the GaN/sapphire interface. In this study, we have examined effects of the addition of Si to a sapphire substrate on its elastic property and on the growth of GaN deposit. Si atoms are added to a c-plane sapphire substrate by ion implantation. The ion implantation results in scratches on the surface, and concomitantly, inhomogeneous distribution of Si. The scratch regions contain a higher concentration of Si than other regions of the sapphire substrate surface, high-temperature GaN being poorly grown there. However, high-temperature GaN is normally grown in the other regions. The GaN overlayer in the normally-grown regions is observed to have a lower TD density than the deposit on the bare sapphire substrate (with no Si accommodated). As compared with the film on an untreated, bare sapphire, the cathodoluminescence defect density decreases by 60 % for the GaN layer normally deposited on the Si-ion implanted sapphire. As confirmed by a strain mapping technique by transmission electron microscopy (geometric phase analysis), the addition of Si in the normally deposited regions forms a surface layer in the sapphire elastically more compliant than the GaN overlayer. The results suggest that the layer can largely absorb the misfit strain at the interface, which produces the overlayer with a lower defect density. Our results highlight a direct correlation between threading-dislocation density in GaN deposits and the elastic behavior at the GaN/sapphire interface, opening up a new pathway to reduce threading-dislocation density in GaN deposits.

  12. A torque-measuring micromotor provides operator independent measurements marking four different density areas in maxillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Danilo Alessio; Arosio, Paolo; Piattelli, Adriano; Perrotti, Vittoria; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2015-02-01

    Bone density at implant placement site is a key factor to obtain the primary stability of the fixture, which, in turn, is a prognostic factor for osseointegration and long-term success of an implant supported rehabilitation. Recently, an implant motor with a bone density measurement probe has been introduced. The aim of the present study was to test the objectiveness of the bone densities registered by the implant motor regardless of the operator performing them. A total of 3704 bone density measurements, performed by means of the implant motor, were registered by 39 operators at different implant sites during routine activity. Bone density measurements were grouped according to their distribution across the jaws. Specifically, four different areas were distinguished: a pre-antral (between teeth from first right maxillary premolar to first left maxillary premolar) and a sub-antral (more distally) zone in the maxilla, and an interforaminal (between and including teeth from first left mandibular premolar to first right mandibular premolar) and a retroforaminal (more distally) zone in the lower one. A statistical comparison was performed to check the inter-operators variability of the collected data. The device produced consistent and operator-independent bone density values at each tooth position, showing a reliable bone-density measurement. The implant motor demonstrated to be a helpful tool to properly plan implant placement and loading irrespective of the operator using it.

  13. Systematic measurements of opacity dependence on temperature, density, and atomic number at stellar interior conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Taisuke

    2017-10-01

    Model predictions for iron opacity are notably different from measurements performed at matter conditions similar to the boundary between the solar radiation and convection zones. The calculated iron opacities have narrower spectral lines, weaker quasi-continuum at short wavelength, and deeper opacity windows than the measurements. If correct, these measurements help resolve a decade old problem in solar physics. A key question is therefore: What is responsible for the model-data discrepancy? The answer is complex because the experiments are challenging and opacity theories depend on multiple entangled physical processes such as the influence of completeness and accuracy of atomic states, line broadening, contributions from myriad transitions from excited states, and multi-photon absorption processes. To help determine the cause of this discrepancy, a systematic study of opacity variation with temperature, density, and atomic number is underway. Measurements of chromium, iron, and nickel opacities have been performed at two different temperatures and densities. The collection of measured opacities provides constraints on hypotheses to explain the discrepancy. We will discuss implications of measured opacities, experimental errors, and possible opacity model refinements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  14. Kinetic aspects of the growth of platelets and voids in H implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisolia, J.; Cristiano, F.; Ben Assayag, G.; Claverie, A.

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a systematic and quantitative study of the extended defects formed after high-dose proton implantation in silicon. This study is based on the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) experiments to 'follow' the thermal evolution of platelets and voids for a large variety of annealing conditions up to 900 deg. C. Up to about 500 deg. C, only platelets are observed and, as the anneal proceeds, they grow in size and reduce their density through the conservative exchange of hydrogen (H) atoms. On the contrary, above 500 deg. C, H starts to diffuse out of the defect-rich region and this out-diffusion can be completed after 700 deg. C anneals. Concurrently, platelets tend to disappear and voids appear. Above 700 deg. C anneals, hydrogen cannot be detected anymore in the layers and only voids remain. Upon time, they also grow in size and reduce their density. This is again attributed to the Ostwald ripening of voids which involves now vacancy diffusion from small voids to large ones. In summary, we have shown that platelets and voids both undergo quasi-conservative ripening upon annealing; at low-temperature (LT) platelets exchange the H atoms they are composed of while at high-temperature voids exchange vacancies

  15. Carbon dioxide ion implantation in Titanium Nitride (Ti N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torabi, Sh.; Sari, A. H.; Hojabri, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation on titanium samples performed at 3x10 18 , 8x10 17 , 3x10 18 doses. In addition CO 2 ions were also implanted at doses in the range of 1x10 17 ,4 x10 17 ,8x10 17 . Atomic Force Microscopy, used to investigate the topographical changes of implanted samples. The structure of samples and phase composition were characterized using x-ray diffraction. The results show that by increasing of nitrogen ions, the roughness, grain sizes and hardness will increase. But by further increasing of dose, hardness will be decreased. The CO 2 implantation also enhance the roughness, grain size and hardness which could be caused by phase composition.

  16. Evaluation of contiguous implants with cement-retained implant-abutment connections. A minipig study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rezende Martins de Barros

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The presence of a microgap at the implant-abutment interface may permit bacterial contamination and lead to bone resorption, interfering with papillae formation. The present study evaluated adjacent implants with cement-retained abutments as an option to control such deleterious effects. Materials and methods Seven minipigs had their bilateral mandibular premolars previously extracted. After 8 weeks, four implants were installed in each hemi-mandible of each animal. The adjacent implants were randomly inserted on one side at the crestal bone level and on the other, 1.5 mm subcrestally. Immediately, a non-submerged healing and functional loading were provided with the abutments cementation and prostheses installation. Clinical examination and histomorphometry served to analyze the implant success. Results A total of 52 implants were evaluated at the end of the study. The subcrestal group achieved statistical better results when compared to the crestal group, clinically in papillae formation (1.97 x 1.57 mm and histomorphometrically in crestal bone remodeling (1.17 x 1.63 mm, bone density (52.39 x 45.22% and bone-implant contact (54.13 x 42.46%. Conclusion The subcrestal placement of cement-retained abutment implants showed better indexes of osseointegration and also improved papillae formation and crestal bone remodeling at the interimplant area after immediate loading, making them a promising option for the treatment of esthetic regions.

  17. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li Jinsheng; Price, Robert A Jr; Wang Lu; Ma, C-M; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm 3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm 2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose–volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm 3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm 2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose

  18. Ground-state energies and highest occupied eigenvalues of atoms in exchange-only density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Harbola, Manoj K.; Krieger, J. B.; Sahni, Viraht

    1989-11-01

    The exchange-correlation potential of the Kohn-Sham density-functional theory has recently been interpreted as the work required to move an electron against the electric field of its Fermi-Coulomb hole charge distribution. In this paper we present self-consistent results for ground-state total energies and highest occupied eigenvalues of closed subshell atoms as obtained by this formalism in the exchange-only approximation. The total energies, which are an upper bound, lie within 50 ppm of Hartree-Fock theory for atoms heavier than Be. The highest occupied eigenvalues, as a consequence of this interpretation, approximate well the experimental ionization potentials. In addition, the self-consistently calculated exchange potentials are very close to those of Talman and co-workers [J. D. Talman and W. F. Shadwick, Phys. Rev. A 14, 36 (1976); K. Aashamar, T. M. Luke, and J. D. Talman, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 22, 443 (1978)].

  19. Ion-implantation dense cascade data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterbon, K.B.

    1983-04-01

    A tabulation is given of data useful in estimating various aspects of ion-implantation cascades in the nuclear stopping regime, particularly with respect to nonlinearity of the cascade at high energy densities. The tabulation is restricted to self-ion implantation. Besides power-cross-section cascade dimensions, various material properties are included. Scaling of derived quantities with input data is noted, so one is not limited to the values assumed by the author

  20. Implantation of 111In in NTDSi by heavy ion recoil technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakare, S.V.; Tomar, B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Heavy ion recoil implantation technique has been used to implant 111 In in n-type silicon using medium energy heavy ion accelerator Pelletron, at TIFR, Colaba, Mumbai. The nuclear reaction used for this purpose was 109 Ag( 7 Li,p4n) 111 In. The beam energy was optimised to be 50 MeV for maximum concentration of the implanted probe atoms. The gamma-ray spectrum of the implanted sample after 24 hours was found to contain only 171 and 245 keV gamma rays of 111 In. The penetration depth of ion is increased to 1.6 μm by heavy ion recoil implantation technique as compared to 0.16 μm with the conventional ion implantation technique. (author)

  1. Implanted ZnO thin films: Microstructure, electrical and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Metson, J.; Evans, P.J.; Kinsey, R.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetron sputtered polycrystalline ZnO thin films were implanted using Al, Ag, Sn, Sb and codoped with TiN in order to improve the conductivity and to attempt to achieve p-type behaviour. Structural and electrical properties of the implanted ZnO thin films were examined with X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductivity measurements. Depth profiles of the implanted elements varied with the implant species. Implantation causes a partial amorphisation of the crystalline structure and decreases the effective grain size of the films. One of the findings is the improvement, as a consequence of implantation, in the conductivity of initially poorly conductive samples. Heavy doping may help for the conversion of conduction type of ZnO thin films. Annealing in vacuum mitigated structural damage and stress caused by implantation, and improved the conductivity of the implanted ZnO thin films

  2. Growth of nanoparticles in hydrogen-implanted palladium subsurfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.

    2010-01-01

    Solid particles with nanometric dimensions are shown to grow in the opened subsurface of a polycrystalline palladium (Pd) hydrogen-implanted at around 500 C. The particles are Pd in main composition and densely grown on sloping walls of fissured grain boundaries or cracks. The average grain size increases from deeper to shallow regions, suggesting that a negative temperature gradient toward the surface existed along the crack walls. The nanoparticles are certain to arise from the condensation of Pd vapors on the walls, forcing us to assume that hydrogen atoms implanted in an overpopulation heated their implantation zone so strongly as to vaporize Pd. (orig.)

  3. Growth of nanoparticles in hydrogen-implanted palladium subsurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, F. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Solid particles with nanometric dimensions are shown to grow in the opened subsurface of a polycrystalline palladium (Pd) hydrogen-implanted at around 500 C. The particles are Pd in main composition and densely grown on sloping walls of fissured grain boundaries or cracks. The average grain size increases from deeper to shallow regions, suggesting that a negative temperature gradient toward the surface existed along the crack walls. The nanoparticles are certain to arise from the condensation of Pd vapors on the walls, forcing us to assume that hydrogen atoms implanted in an overpopulation heated their implantation zone so strongly as to vaporize Pd. (orig.)

  4. On I(5577 Å and I (7620 Å auroral emissions and atomic oxygen densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Gattinger

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A model of auroral electron deposition processes has been developed using Monte Carlo techniques to simulate electron transport and energy loss. The computed differential electron flux and pitch angle were compared with in situ auroral observations to provide a check on the accuracy of the model. As part of the energy loss process, a tally was kept of electronic excitation and ionization of the important atomic and molecular states. The optical emission rates from these excited states were computed and compared with auroral observations of η(3914 Å, η(5577 Å, η(7620 Å and η(N2VK. In particular, the roles played by energy transfer from N2(A3Σ+u and by other processes in the excitation of O(1S and O2(b1Σ+g were investigated in detail. It is concluded that the N2(A3Σ+u mechanism is dominant for the production of OI(5577 Å in the peak emission region of normal aurora, although the production efficiency is much smaller than the measured laboratory value; above 150 km electron impact on atomic oxygen is dominant. Atomic oxygen densities in the range of 0.75±0.25 MSIS-86 [O] were derived from the optical comparisons for auroral latitudes in mid-winter for various levels of solar and magnetic activity.

  5. Effect of microstructure on the arsenic profile in implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Rhee, M.H.; Williams, J.M.; Streit, L.A.; Williams, P.

    1985-10-01

    According to an irradiation damage model, the profile of an implanted ion at temperature great enough for diffusion to occur will depend on the sink density in the material. To test this model, pure silicon wafers were prepared with high and low dislocation densities. These wafers were implanted with about 5 x 10 19 As +2 /m 2 at 77 0 K, 300 0 C, and 600 0 C. After implanting the profiles were measured using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The observed spreading of the As-profile contradicts initial theoretical predictions. Further speculation is presented to explain the differences

  6. Global hybrids from the semiclassical atom theory satisfying the local density linear response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Eduardo; Constantin, Lucian A; Cortona, Pietro; Della Sala, Fabio

    2015-01-13

    We propose global hybrid approximations of the exchange-correlation (XC) energy functional which reproduce well the modified fourth-order gradient expansion of the exchange energy in the semiclassical limit of many-electron neutral atoms and recover the full local density approximation (LDA) linear response. These XC functionals represent the hybrid versions of the APBE functional [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2011, 106, 186406] yet employing an additional correlation functional which uses the localization concept of the correlation energy density to improve the compatibility with the Hartree-Fock exchange as well as the coupling-constant-resolved XC potential energy. Broad energetic and structural testing, including thermochemistry and geometry, transition metal complexes, noncovalent interactions, gold clusters and small gold-molecule interfaces, as well as an analysis of the hybrid parameters, show that our construction is quite robust. In particular, our testing shows that the resulting hybrid, including 20% of Hartree-Fock exchange and named hAPBE, performs remarkably well for a broad palette of systems and properties, being generally better than popular hybrids (PBE0 and B3LYP). Semiempirical dispersion corrections are also provided.

  7. Experimental determination of the real elements of the density matrix of H(n=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV collisions of H+ on Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, N.; Gibson, N.D.; Risley, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    In continuation of our previous work, charge transfer processes occurring in protons on rare-gas-atom collisions have been investigated. Diagonal and real off-diagonal coherence elements of the density matrix for H(n=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV electron-capture collisions with Kr atoms are experimentally determined by analyzing the Balmer-α light from the decay of H atoms from the (n=3) state to the (n=2) state. The intensity and polarization of the emitted light are measured as functions of an axially symmetric electric field in the collision region. These data are fitted to a numerical model of the H atom in an electric field in order to extract density-matrix elements. The results are compared to previous studies of H + on He and Ar. The collisionally produced dipole moment of the H(n=3) atom decreases for increasing atomic number of the rare-gas target atoms, which indicates that the final phase of the collision process is not essential for the formation of the dipole moment. This physical picture is further supported by our alignment data. Absolute cross sections for charge transfer to the 3s, 3p, and 3d levels are presented as well

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH-DENSITY U/AL DISPERSION PLATES FOR MO-99 PRODUCTION USING ATOMIZED URANIUM POWDER

    OpenAIRE

    RYU, HO JIN; KIM, CHANG KYU; SIM, MOONSOO; PARK, JONG MAN; LEE, JONG HYUN

    2013-01-01

    Uranium metal particle dispersion plates have been proposed as targets for Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) production to improve the radioisotope production efficiency of conventional low enriched uranium targets. In this study, uranium powder was produced by centrifugal atomization, and miniature target plates containing uranium particles in an aluminum matrix with uranium densities up to 9 g-U/cm3 were fabricated. Additional heat treatment was applied to convert the uranium particles into UAlx compou...

  9. Structural and Magnetic Properties of Sm Implanted GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Juan, Jiang; Xiao-Liang, Wang; Hong-Ling, Xiao; Zhan-Guo, Wang; Chun, Feng; Ming-Lan, Zhang; Jian, Tang

    2009-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of Sm ion-implanted GaN with different Sm concentrations are investigated. XRD results do not show any peaks associated with second phase formation. Magnetic investigations performed by superconducting quantum interference device reveal ferromagnetic behavior with an ordering temperature above room temperature in all the implanted samples, while the effective magnetic moment per Sm obtained from saturation magnetization gives a much higher value than the atomic moment of Sm. These results could be explained by the phenomenological model proposed by Dhar et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94(2005)037205, Phys. Rev. B 72(2005)245203] in terms of a long-range spin polarization of the GaN matrix by the Sm atoms. (condensed matter: electronicstructure, electrical, magnetic, and opticalproperties)

  10. Local structure of 57Mn/57Fe implanted into lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Jun; Nagatomo, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    We report the in-beam Moessbauer Spectra of 57 Mn implanted into polycrystalline LiH at under room temperature. As compared with the result of DFT calculations, 57 Fe atoms were implanted into Li or H substitutional site in LiH crystal. With an increase the sample temperature, we could observe the decrease of lattice defects. (author)

  11. Peculiarities of the electrontransport properties of polyimide films implanted with copper and cobalt ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazhim, F.A.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Lukashevich, M.G.; Nuzhdin, V.I.; Khajbullin, R.I.

    2010-01-01

    Thin polyimide foils were implanted with 40 keV Co + and Cu + ions at fluencies of 2,5·1016-1,251017 cm 2 and at ion current densities of 4, 8 and 12 mA cm 2 . Surface dc electric resistance of the implanted polymer samples have been measured in the temperature range 40-300 K. Metal implantation results in decreasing polymer resistance with the dose and current density increasing for the both kinds of metal ions. The decrease of dc electric resistance is caused by radiation-induced carbonization and metal nanoparticle formation in the implanted region of polymer. The transition from the insulating to metallic regime of conductivity is observed in cobalt implanted samples for critical doses above Dc = 1,25?1017 cm 2 at an ion current density of 8 mA cm 2 . In the contrary, high-fluence implantation in the polymer with Cu + ions for the same regimes does not result in the transition. The dominating mechanisms of charge carrier transport and the origin of insulator-to-metal transition in the metal implanted polymer are discussed. (authors)

  12. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite reinforcement in mechanically alloyed NiTi composites for biomedical implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akmal, Muhammad; Raza, Ahmad; Khan, Muhammad Mudasser; Khan, M. Imran; Hussain, Muhammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Equi-atomic NiTi alloy composites reinforced with 0, 2, 4 and 6 vol.% nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) were successfully synthesized using pressureless sintering. Pure Ni and Ti elements were ball milled for 10 h in order to produce a mechanically alloyed equi-atomic NiTi alloy (MA-NiTi). Mechanically alloyed NiTi and HA powders were blended, compacted and then sintered for 3 h at 1325 K. The sintered density varied inversely with volume percent of HA reinforcement. The X-Ray diffraction spectra and SEM images showed the formation of multiple phases like NiTi, NiTi 2 , Ni 3 Ti, and Ni 4 Ti 3 . The back scattered-SEM image analysis confirmed the presence of Ni-rich and Ti-rich phases with increasing HA content. The 6 vol.% HA reinforced composite showed Ni 3 Ti as the major phase having the highest hardness value which can be attributed to the presence of relatively harder phases along with higher HA content as a reinforcement. The composite of MA-NiTi with 2 vol.% HA manifested the most desirable results in the form of better sintering density mainly due to the minute decomposition of NiTi into other phases. Therefore, the 2 vol.% reinforced MA-NiTi composite can be exploited as a novel material for manufacturing biomedical implants. - Highlights: • NiTi-HA composites were synthesized using powder metallurgy route. • New phases such as NiTi 2 , Ni 3 Ti and Ni 4 Ti 3 were observed for sintered composites. • Mechanical properties enhanced with the increasing content of HA and new phases. • No martensitic transformation was observed for all composites by DSC analysis. • 2 vol.% HA composite is a novel candidate for biomedical implants.

  13. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite reinforcement in mechanically alloyed NiTi composites for biomedical implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akmal, Muhammad, E-mail: muhammad.akmal@giki.edu.pk [Faculty of Materials and Chemical Engineering, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640 (Pakistan); Raza, Ahmad, E-mail: ahmadrazac@yahoo.com [Faculty of Materials and Chemical Engineering, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640 (Pakistan); Khan, Muhammad Mudasser; Khan, M. Imran [Faculty of Materials and Chemical Engineering, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640 (Pakistan); Hussain, Muhammad Asif [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kangwon National University, Samcheok, 25913 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Equi-atomic NiTi alloy composites reinforced with 0, 2, 4 and 6 vol.% nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) were successfully synthesized using pressureless sintering. Pure Ni and Ti elements were ball milled for 10 h in order to produce a mechanically alloyed equi-atomic NiTi alloy (MA-NiTi). Mechanically alloyed NiTi and HA powders were blended, compacted and then sintered for 3 h at 1325 K. The sintered density varied inversely with volume percent of HA reinforcement. The X-Ray diffraction spectra and SEM images showed the formation of multiple phases like NiTi, NiTi{sub 2}, Ni{sub 3}Ti, and Ni{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}. The back scattered-SEM image analysis confirmed the presence of Ni-rich and Ti-rich phases with increasing HA content. The 6 vol.% HA reinforced composite showed Ni{sub 3}Ti as the major phase having the highest hardness value which can be attributed to the presence of relatively harder phases along with higher HA content as a reinforcement. The composite of MA-NiTi with 2 vol.% HA manifested the most desirable results in the form of better sintering density mainly due to the minute decomposition of NiTi into other phases. Therefore, the 2 vol.% reinforced MA-NiTi composite can be exploited as a novel material for manufacturing biomedical implants. - Highlights: • NiTi-HA composites were synthesized using powder metallurgy route. • New phases such as NiTi{sub 2}, Ni{sub 3}Ti and Ni{sub 4}Ti{sub 3} were observed for sintered composites. • Mechanical properties enhanced with the increasing content of HA and new phases. • No martensitic transformation was observed for all composites by DSC analysis. • 2 vol.% HA composite is a novel candidate for biomedical implants.

  14. Spatially resolved photoionization of ultracold atoms on an atom chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    2007-01-01

    We report on photoionization of ultracold magnetically trapped Rb atoms on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at 5 μK in a strongly anisotropic trap. Through a hole in the chip with a diameter of 150 μm, two laser beams are focused onto a fraction of the atomic cloud. A first laser beam with a wavelength of 778 nm excites the atoms via a two-photon transition to the 5D level. With a fiber laser at 1080 nm the excited atoms are photoionized. Ionization leads to depletion of the atomic density distribution observed by absorption imaging. The resonant ionization spectrum is reported. The setup used in this experiment is suitable not only to investigate mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates and ions but also for single-atom detection on an atom chip

  15. Implantation measurements to determine tritium permeation in first wall structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Causey, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A principal safety concern for a D-T burning fusion reactor is release of tritium during routine operation. Tritium implantation into first wall structures, and subsequent permeation into coolants, is potentially an important source of tritium loss. This paper reports on an experiment in which an ion accelerator was used to implant deuterium atoms in a stainless steel disk to simulate tritium implantation in first wall structures. The permeation rate was measured under various operating conditions. These results were used in the TMAP computer code to determine potential tritium loss rates for fusion reactors

  16. Implantation measurements to determine tritium permeation in first-wall structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Causey, R.A.; Sattler, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    A principal safety concern for a D-T burning fusion reactor is release of tritium during routine operation. Tritium implantation into first-wall structures, and subsequent permeation into coolants, is potentially an important source of tritium loss. This paper reports on an experiment in which an ion accelerator was used to implant deuterium atoms in a stainless steel disk to simulate tritium implantation in first-wall structures. The permeation rate was measured under various operating conditions. These results were used in the TMAP computer code to determine potential tritium loss rates for fusion reactors

  17. Spatial mapping of humeral head bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidousti, Hamidreza; Giles, Joshua W; Emery, Roger J H; Jeffers, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Short-stem humeral replacements achieve fixation by anchoring to the metaphyseal trabecular bone. Fixing the implant in high-density bone can provide strong fixation and reduce the risk of loosening. However, there is a lack of data mapping the bone density distribution in the proximal humerus. The aim of the study was to investigate the bone density in proximal humerus. Eight computed tomography scans of healthy cadaveric humeri were used to map bone density distribution in the humeral head. The proximal humeral head was divided into 12 slices parallel to the humeral anatomic neck. Each slice was then divided into 4 concentric circles. The slices below the anatomic neck, where short-stem implants have their fixation features, were further divided into radial sectors. The average bone density for each of these regions was calculated, and regions of interest were compared using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance set at P density was found to decrease from proximal to distal regions, with the majority of higher bone density proximal to the anatomic neck of the humerus (P density increases from central to peripheral regions, where cortical bone eventually occupies the space (P density distribution in the medial calcar region was also observed. This study indicates that it is advantageous with respect to implant fixation to preserve some bone above the anatomic neck and epiphyseal plate and to use the denser bone at the periphery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of ion-implantation-induced defects in fused silica and crystalline quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    Defects produced by implantation of various atomic species in fused and crystalline SiO 2 were studied using infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS) with UV-visible spectroscopy. We observe a new vibrational band at 830 cm -1 which is tentatively associated with the creation of two nonbridging O atoms in SiO 4 units. Numerous chemical effects were also observed, including evidence for chemical incorporation of Li and anomalously large O-vacancy production for Al + , B + and Si + implantation

  19. Effect of radiation induced defects and incompatibility elastic stresses on the diffusion of ion implantated boron in silicon at the pulse annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stel'makh, V.F.; Suprun-Belevich, Yu.R.; Chelyadinskij, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    For determination of radiation defects effect on diffusion of the implanted boron in silicon at the pulse annealing, silicon crystals, implanted with boron, preliminary irradiated by silicon ions of different flows for checked defects implantation, were investigated. Silicon crystals additionally implanted by Ge + ions were investigated to research the effect of the incompatibility elastic stresses, emerging in implanted structures due to lattice periods noncoincidence in matrix and alloyed layers, on implanted boron diffusion. It is shown, that abnormally high values of boron diffusion coefficients in silicon at the pulse annealing are explained by silicon interstitial atom participation in redistribution of diffusing boron atoms by two diffusion channels - interstitial and vacation - and by incompatibility elastic stresses effect on diffusion

  20. The influence of dental implants in periapical and panoramic radiographs and cone beam computed tomography images: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Rafael Perdomo; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami Arai; Rockenbach, Maria Ivete Bolzan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of dental implants on the radiographic density of the peri-implant region in tomographic and radiographic examinations. A sample of 21 dental implants from 10 patients with Brånemark-protocol prostheses was evaluated based on postoperative control images, including periapical radiography (paralleling technique), panoramic radiography, and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The density means of 6 defined areas near dental implants were calculated and compared considering their locations and the different imaging examinations. The CBCT examinations showed significantly different densities among the measured areas (P implants in all the examinations: CBCT (127.88 and 120.71), panoramic (106.51 and 106.09), and periapical (120.32). The sagittal CBCT images were measured in 2 different sections, and in both sections those areas closer to implants showed mean densities that were significantly higher than means from more distant areas (P implant region confirmed the interference of dental implants in radiographic and tomographic images. CBCT images suffered the greatest interference from dental implants.

  1. Depth profiling of boron implanted silicon by positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oevuenc, S.

    2004-01-01

    Positron depth profiling analyses of low energy implants of silicon aim to observe tbe structure and density of the vacancies generating by implantation and the effect of annealing. This work present the results to several set of data starting S and W parameters. Boron implanted Silicon samples with different implantation energies,20,22,24,and 26 keV are analyzed by Slow positron beam (0-40 keV and 10 5 e + /s )(Variable Energy Positron) at the Positron Centre Delf-HOLLAND

  2. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; McCollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-11-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  3. Annealing behavior and selected applications of ion-implanted alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.M.

    Thermally activated processes cause ion-implanted metals to evolve from the initial state toward thermodynamic equilibrium. The degree of equilibration is strongly dependent upon temperature and is considered for three temperature regimes which are distinguished by the varying mobilities of interstitial and substitutional atoms. In addition, perturbations resulting from the irradiation environment are discussed. Examples are given of the use of implanted and annealed alloys in studies of diffusion, phase diagrams, and solute trapping

  4. Lithium ion implantation effects in MgO(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huis, M.A. van; Fedorov, A.V.; Veen, A. van; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P.E. [Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.T.M. de [Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Materials Science Centre

    2001-07-01

    Single crystals of MgO(100) were implanted with 10{sup 16} {sup 6}Li ions cm{sup -2} at an energy of 30 keV. After ion implantation the samples were annealed isochronally in air at temperatures up to 1200K. After implantation and after each annealing step, the defect evolution was monitored with optical absorption spectroscopy and depth-sensitive Doppler Broadening positron beam analysis (PBA). A strong increase in the S-parameter is observed in the implantation layer at a depth of approximately 100 nm. The high value of the S-parameter is ascribed to positron annihilation in small lithium precipitates. The results of 2D-ACAR and X-TEM analysis show evidence of the presence of lithium precipitates. The depth distribution of the implanted {sup 6}Li atoms was monitored with neutron depth profiling (NDP). It was observed that detrapping and diffusion of {sup 6}Li starts at an annealing temperature of 1200K. (orig.)

  5. Lithium ion implantation effects in MgO(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huis, M.A. van; Fedorov, A.V.; Veen, A. van; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P.E.; Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.T.M. de

    2001-01-01

    Single crystals of MgO(100) were implanted with 10 16 6 Li ions cm -2 at an energy of 30 keV. After ion implantation the samples were annealed isochronally in air at temperatures up to 1200K. After implantation and after each annealing step, the defect evolution was monitored with optical absorption spectroscopy and depth-sensitive Doppler Broadening positron beam analysis (PBA). A strong increase in the S-parameter is observed in the implantation layer at a depth of approximately 100 nm. The high value of the S-parameter is ascribed to positron annihilation in small lithium precipitates. The results of 2D-ACAR and X-TEM analysis show evidence of the presence of lithium precipitates. The depth distribution of the implanted 6 Li atoms was monitored with neutron depth profiling (NDP). It was observed that detrapping and diffusion of 6 Li starts at an annealing temperature of 1200K. (orig.)

  6. Optical bleaching of bismuth implanted silica glass: A threshold effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.Y.; Magruder, R.H. III; Weeks, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The near surface regions of high purity silica glass discs, Spectrosil A, were modified by implantation with bismuth ions at 160 key and room temperature. The glasses implanted with a nominal dose of 6x10 16 Bi/cm 2 at ∼5 μA/cm 2 were subsequently bleached with a 5.0 eV KrF pulsed excimer laser. The laser had an average pulse duration of ∼20 ns and repetition rate of 10 Hz. It was found that the bleaching was dependent upon the power density of the laser for a constant total integrated energy. Ion backscattering and optical absorption measurements were made before and after laser irradiation. Large changes in optical density and depth distribution of the implanted ions were observed at power densities of ≥45 mJ/cm 2 -pulse. Onset of threshold for bleaching of silica glass implanted with 6x10 16 Bi/cm 2 at 160 key and at room temperature is between 30 and 45 mJ/cm 2 -pulse

  7. Coupled cluster and density functional theory calculations of atomic hydrogen chemisorption on pyrene and coronene as model systems for graphene hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Qian, Hu-Jun; Morokuma, Keiji; Irle, Stephan

    2012-07-05

    Ab initio coupled cluster and density functional theory studies of atomic hydrogen addition to the central region of pyrene and coronene as molecular models for graphene hydrogenation were performed. Fully relaxed potential energy curves (PECs) were computed at the spin-unrestricted B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory for the atomic hydrogen attack of a center carbon atom (site A), the midpoint of a neighboring carbon bond (site B), and the center of a central hexagon (site C). Using the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ PEC geometries, we evaluated energies at the PBE density functional, as well as ab initio restricted open-shell ROMP2, ROCCSD, and ROCCSD(T) levels of theory, employing cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ basis sets, and performed a G2MS extrapolation to the ROCCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that only site A attack leads to chemisorption. The G2MS entrance channel barrier heights, binding energies, and PEC profiles are found to agree well with a recent ab initio multireference wave function theory study (Bonfanti et al. J. Chem. Phys.2011, 135, 164701), indicating that single-reference open-shell methods including B3LYP are sufficient for the theoretical treatment of the interaction of graphene with a single hydrogen atom.

  8. Experimental studies of N~+ implantation into CVD diamond thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛火平; 林成鲁; 王建新; 邹世昌; 石晓红; 林梓鑫; 周祖尧; 刘祖刚

    1997-01-01

    The effects of N+ implantation under various conditions on CVD diamond films were analyzed with Raman spectroscopy, four-point probe method, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backseattering spectroscopy (RBS), ultraviolet photoluminescence spectroscopy (UV-PL), Fourier transformation infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the N+ implantation doping without any graphitization has been successfully realized when 100 keV N+ ions at a dosage of 2 × 1016 cm-2 were implanted into diamond films at 550℃ . UV-PL spectra indicate that the implanted N+ ions formed an electrically inactive deep-level impurity in diamond films. So the sheet resistance of the sample after N+ implantation changed little. Carbon nitride containing C≡N covalent bond has been successfully synthesized by 100 keV, 1.2×1018 N/cm2 N+ implantation into diamond films. Most of the implanted N+ ions formed C≡N covalent bonds with C atoms. The others were free state nitroge

  9. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, Φ, from 1x10 20 D/m 2 to 1x10 21 D/m 2 proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at Φ ≥ 1.2x10 21 D/m 2 one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A 1 and A 2 at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A 1 is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak A 2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences

  10. Shallow doping of gallium arsenide by recoil implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.; Souza, J.P. de; Rutz, R.F.; Cardone, F.; Norcott, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    Si atoms were recoil-implanted into GaAs by bombarding neutral (As + ) or dopant (Si + ) ions through a thin Si cap. The bombarded samples were subsequently rapid thermally or furnace annealed at 815-1000 degree C in Ar or arsine ambient. The presence of the recoiled Si in GaAs and resulting n + -doping was confirmed by secondary ion mass spectrometry and Hall measurements. It was found that sheet resistance of 19 cm 3 and the annealing temperature was > 850 degree C. The present electrical data show that the recoil implant method is a viable alternative to direct shallow implant for n + doping of GaAs. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Microstructure and composition of 304 stainless steel implanted with Ti and C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Pope, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    The microstructure and composition of surface alloys formed by implanting Ti and C into 304 stainless steel are examined for a range of Ti fluences, both with and without additional implanted C. The resulting amorphous layers are found to contain TiC precipitates, apparently with some Cr on Ti lattice sites, when the metal-atom fraction of Ti+Cr exceeds 55%. The depth profiles of Ti and C are measured, and the amounts of C incorporated into the alloys during Ti implantation are determined. Small amounts of H are also incorporated during the high-fluence Ti implantations. Thicker amorphous layers than those resulting from Ti implantation alone can be formed when additional C is implanted either before or after the Ti. (orig.)

  12. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized deq in scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  13. Atom dynamics in laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Su; Mi, No Gin

    2004-12-01

    This book introduces coherent dynamics of internal state, spread of atoms wave speed, semiclassical atoms density matrix such as dynamics equation in both still and moving atoms, excitation of atoms in movement by light, dipole radiating power, quantum statistical mechanics by atoms in movement, semiclassical atoms in movement, atoms in movement in the uniform magnetic field including effects of uniform magnetic field, atom cooling using laser such as Doppler cooling, atom traps using laser and mirrors, radiant heat which particles receive, and near field interactions among atoms in laser light.

  14. Simulation study of a high power density rectenna array for biomedical implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John; Yoon, Hargsoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    2016-04-01

    The integration of wireless power transmission devices using microwaves into the biomedical field is close to a practical reality. Implanted biomedical devices need a long lasting power source or continuous power supply. Recent development of high efficiency rectenna technology enables continuous power supply to these implanted devices. Due to the size limit of most of medical devices, it is imperative to minimize the rectenna as well. The research reported in this paper reviews the effects of close packing the rectenna elements which show the potential of directly empowering the implanted devices, especially within a confined area. The rectenna array is tested in the X band frequency range.

  15. Combination of the ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios from two test elements for the diagnostic of plasma temperature and electron number density in Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognoni, E. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: tognoni@ipcf.cnr.it; Hidalgo, M.; Canals, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Salvetti, A.; Palleschi, V. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    In Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) spectrochemical analysis, the MgII(280.270 nm)/MgI(285.213 nm) ionic to atomic line intensity ratio is commonly used as a monitor of the robustness of operating conditions. This approach is based on the univocal relationship existing between intensity ratio and plasma temperature, for a pure argon atmospheric ICP in thermodynamic equilibrium. In a multi-elemental plasma in the lower temperature range, the measurement of the intensity ratio may not be sufficient to characterize temperature and electron density. In such a range, the correct relationship between intensity ratio and plasma temperature can be calculated only when the complete plasma composition is known. We propose the combination of the line intensity ratios of two test elements (double ratio) as an effective diagnostic tool for a multi-elemental low temperature LTE plasma of unknown composition. In particular, the variation of the double ratio allows us discriminating changes in the plasma temperature from changes in the electron density. Thus, the effects on plasma excitation and ionization possibly caused by introduction of different samples and matrices in non-robust conditions can be more accurately interpreted. The method is illustrated by the measurement of plasma temperature and electron density in a specific analytic case.

  16. Formation of oxygen-related defects enhanced by fluorine in BF{sub 2}{sup +}-implanted Si studied by a monoenergetic positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kawano, Takao; Nagai, Ryo; Umeda, Kazunori

    1995-12-01

    Defects in 25-keV BF{sub 2}{sup +}- or As{sup +}-implanted Si specimens were probed by a monoenergetic positron beam. For the As{sup +}-implanted specimen, the depth profile of defects was obtained from measurements of Doppler broadening profiles as a function of incident positron energy. The major species of the defects was identified as divacancies. For ion-implanted specimens after annealing treatment, oxygen-related defects were found to be formed. For the BF{sub 2}{sup +}-implanted specimen before annealing treatment, such defects were formed in the subsurface region, where oxygen atoms were implanted by recoil from oxide films. This was attributed to enhanced formation of oxygen-related defects by the presence of F atoms. (author)

  17. An in vitro atomic force microscopic study of commercially available dental luting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordje, Antonijevic; Denis, Brajkovic; Nenadovic, Milos; Petar, Milovanovic; Marija, Djuric; Zlatko, Rakocevic

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the surface roughness parameters of four different types of dental luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Five specimens (8 mm high and 1 mm thick) of each cement were made using metal ring steelless molds. Atomic Force Microscope was employed to analyze different surface texture parameters of the materials. Bearing ratio analysis was used to calculate the potential microgap size between the cement and implant material and to calculate the depth of the valleys on the cement surface, while power spectral density (PSD) measurements were performed to measure the percentage of the surface prone to bacterial adhesion. Glass ionomer cement showed significantly lower value of average surface roughness then the other groups of the materials (P cement experience the lowest percentage of the surface which promote bacterial colonization. Glas ionomer cements present the surface roughness parameters that are less favorable for bacterial adhesion than that of zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer and resin cements. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K, E-mail: sami@iitk.ac.i, E-mail: mkh@iitk.ac.i [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2010-11-14

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  19. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K

    2010-01-01

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  20. Optical to ultraviolet spectra of sandwiches of benzene and transition metal atoms: Time dependent density functional theory and many-body calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Lopez, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The optical spectra of sandwich clusters formed by transition metal atoms (titanium, vanadium, and chromium) intercalated between parallel benzene molecules have been studied by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and many-body perturbation theory. Sandwiches with different number...

  1. Methodology for attainment of density and effective atomic number through dual energy technique using microtomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, H.; Lima, I.; Lopes, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Dual energy technique for computerized microtomography shows itself as a promising method for identification of mineralogy on geological samples of heterogeneous composition. It can also assist with differentiating very similar objects regarding the attenuation coefficient, which are usually not separable during image processing and analysis of microtomographic data. Therefore, the development of a feasible and applicable methodology of dual energy in the analysis of microtomographic images was sought. - Highlights: • Dual energy technique is promising for identification of distribution of minerals. • A feasible methodology of dual energy in analysis of tomographic images was sought. • The dual energy technique is efficient for density and atomic number identification. • Simulation showed that the proposed methodology agrees with theoretical data. • Nondestructive characterization of distribution of density and chemical composition

  2. Empirical atom model of Vegard's law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei, E-mail: zhleile2002@163.com [Materials Department, College of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266555 (China); School of Electromechanical Automobile Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Li, Shichun [Materials Department, College of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266555 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Vegard's law seldom holds true for most binary continuous solid solutions. When two components form a solid solution, the atom radii of component elements will change to satisfy the continuity requirement of electron density at the interface between component atom A and atom B so that the atom with larger electron density will expand and the atom with the smaller one will contract. If the expansion and contraction of the atomic radii of A and B respectively are equal in magnitude, Vegard's law will hold true. However, the expansion and contraction of two component atoms are not equal in most situations. The magnitude of the variation will depend on the cohesive energy of corresponding element crystals. An empirical atom model of Vegard's law has been proposed to account for signs of deviations according to the electron density at Wigner–Seitz cell from Thomas–Fermi–Dirac–Cheng model.

  3. The local environment of cobalt in amorphous, polycrystalline and epitaxial anatase TiO{sub 2}:Co films produced by cobalt ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildirim, O. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Cornelius, S.; Hübner, R.; Potzger, K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Smekhova, A.; Zykov, G.; Gan' shina, E. A.; Granovsky, A. B. [Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU), Faculty of Physics, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bähtz, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2015-05-14

    Amorphous, polycrystalline anatase and epitaxial anatase TiO{sub 2} films have been implanted with 5 at. % Co{sup +}. The magnetic and structural properties of different microstructures of TiO{sub 2}:Co, along with the local coordination of the implanted Co atoms within the host lattice are investigated. In amorphous TiO{sub 2}:Co film, Co atoms are in the (II) oxidation state with a complex coordination and exhibit a paramagnetic response. However, for the TiO{sub 2}:Co epitaxial and polycrystalline anatase films, Co atoms have a distorted octahedral (II) oxygen coordination assigned to a substitutional environment with traces of metallic Co clusters, which gives a rise to a superparamagnetic behavior. Despite the incorporation of the implanted atoms into the host lattice, high temperature ferromagnetism is absent in the films. On the other hand, it is found that the concentration and size of the implantation-induced nanoclusters and the magnetic properties of TiO{sub 2}:Co films have a strong dependency on the initial microstructure of TiO{sub 2}. Consequently, metallic nanocluster formation within ion implantation prepared transition metal doped TiO{sub 2} can be suppressed by tuning the film microstructure.

  4. Hydroxyapatite ceramic implants for cranioplasty in children: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, Laura; Tharakan, Sasha Job; Altermatt, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The use of hydroxyapatite ceramic (HAC) implants for the treatment of skull defects in pediatric patients started 2010 at our institution. Ceramic implants facilitate osteoblast migration and therefore optimize osteointegration with the host bone. The purpose of this study is to report a single-center experience with this treatment modality. A retrospective review of all patients from July 2010 through June 2014 undergoing a cranioplasty using hydroxyapatite ceramic implant and managed at a single institution was performed. Indication for cranioplasty, the hospital course, and follow-up were reviewed. Bone density was measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) and osteointegration was calculated using Mimics Software® (Mimics Innovation Suite v17.0 Medical, Materialize, Leuven, Belgium). Over the 4-year period, six patients met criteria for the study. Five patients had an osteointegration of nearly 100%. One patient had an incomplete osteointegration with a total bone-implant contact area of 69%. The mean bone density was 2800 HU (2300-3000 HU). Bone density alone is estimated to have a Hounsfield value between 400 and 2000 HU depending on the body region and bone quality. There were no major complications, and the patients were highly satisfied with the esthetical result. Hydroxyapatite ceramic implants for cranioplasty in pediatric patients are a good choice for different indications. The implants show excellent osteointegration and esthetical results.

  5. Algorithm for statistical noise reduction in three-dimensional ion implant simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Arias, J.; Jaraiz, M.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.

    2001-01-01

    As integrated circuit devices scale into the deep sub-micron regime, ion implantation will continue to be the primary means of introducing dopant atoms into silicon. Different types of impurity profiles such as ultra-shallow profiles and retrograde profiles are necessary for deep submicron devices in order to realize the desired device performance. A new algorithm to reduce the statistical noise in three-dimensional ion implant simulations both in the lateral and shallow/deep regions of the profile is presented. The computational effort in BCA Monte Carlo ion implant simulation is also reduced

  6. Electron - atom bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, L.

    1986-01-01

    Features of bremsstrahlung radiation from neutral atoms and atoms in hot dense plasmas are studied. Predictions for the distributions of electron-atom bremsstrahlung radiation for both the point-Coulomb potential and screened potentials are obtained using a classical numerical method. Results agree with exact quantum-mechanical partial-wave results for low incident electron energies in both the point-Coulomb and screened potentials. In the screened potential, the asymmetry parameter of a spectrum is reduced from the Coulomb values. The difference increases with decreasing energy and begins to oscillate at very low energies. The scaling properties of bremsstrahlung spectra and energy losses were also studied. It was found that the ratio of the radiative energy loss for positrons to that for electrons obeys a simple scaling law, being expressible fairly accurately as a function only of the quantity T 1 /Z 2 . This scaling is exact in the case of the point-Coulomb potential, both for classical bremsstrahlung and for the nonrelativistic dipole Sommerfeld formula. Bremsstrahlung from atoms in hot dense plasmas were also studied describing the atomic potentials by the temperature-and-density dependent Thomas-Fermi mode. Gaunt factors were obtained with the relativistic partial-wave method for atoms in plasmas of various densities and temperatures

  7. Collision-produced atomic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.; Copenhagen Univ.

    1988-01-01

    The last 10-15 years have witnessed the development of a new, powerful class of experimental techniques for atomic collision studies, allowing partial or complete determination of the state of the atoms after a collision event, i.e. the full set of quantum-mechanical scattering amplitudes or - more generally - the density matrix describing the system. Evidently, such studies, involving determination of alignment and orientation parameters, provide much more severe tests of state-of-the-art scattering theories than do total or differential cross section measurements which depend on diagonal elements of the density matrix. The off-diagonal elements give us detailed information about the shape and dynamics of the atomic states. Therefore, close studies of collision-produced atomic states are currently leading to deeper insights into the fundamental physical mechanisms governing the dynamics of atomic collision events. The first part of the lectures deals with the language used to describe atomic states, while the second part presents a selection of recent results for model systems which display fundamental aspects of the collision physics in particularly instructive ways. I shall here restrict myself to atom-atom collisions. The discussion will be focused on states decaying by photon emission though most of the ideas can be easily modified to include electron emission as well. (orig./AH)

  8. High-fluence implantation of iron into polyimide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Anna; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Peřina, Vratislav; Popok, V. N.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Bazarov, V. V.; Odzhaev, V. B.

    158/159, - (2002), s. 395-398 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/1626; GA ČR GA102/01/1324 Keywords : polyimide * ion implantation * iron * Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.267, year: 2002

  9. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter....

  10. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is assumed that the dynamics of valence electrons of alkali-metal atoms can be well accounted for by a quantum-defect theoretic model while the core electrons may be supposed to move in a self-consistent field. This model is used to study the momentum properties of atoms from. 3Li to 37Rb. The numerical ...

  11. Scapular Free Vascularised Bone Flaps for Mandibular Reconstruction: Are Dental Implants Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lanzer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Free fibula flap remains the flap of choice for reconstruction of mandibular defects. If free fibula flap is not possible, the subscapular system of flaps is a valid option. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of dental implant placement in patients receiving a scapular free flap for oromandibular reconstruction. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients undergoing mandible reconstruction with a subscapular system free-tissue (lateral border of the scapula transfer at the University Hospital Zürich between January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2013. Bone density in cortical and cancellous bone was measured in Hounsfield units (HU. Changes of bone density, height and width were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22. Comparisons of bone dimensions as well as bone density were performed using a chi-square test. Results: Ten patients were included. Implantation was conducted in 50%. However, all patients could have received dental implants considering bone stock. Loss of bone height and width were significant (P < 0.001. There was a statistical significant increase in bone density in cortical (P < 0.001 and cancellous (P = 0.004 bone. Conclusions: Dental implants are possible after scapular free flap reconstruction of oromandibular defects. Bone height and width were reduced, while bone density increased with time.

  12. Atomic mirrors for a Λ-type three-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felemban, Nuha; Aldossary, Omar M; Lembessis, Vassilis E

    2014-01-01

    We propose atom mirror schemes for a three-level atom of Λ-type interacting with two evanescent fields, which are generated as a result of the total internal reflection of two coherent Gaussian laser beams at the interface of a dielectric prism with vacuum. The forces acting on the atom are derived by means of optical Bloch equations, based on the atomic density matrix elements. The theory is illustrated by setting up the equations of motion for 23 Na atom. Two types of excited schemes are examined, namely the cases in which the evanescent fields have polarization types of σ + −σ − and σ + −π. The equations are solved numerically and we get results for atomic trajectories for different parameters. The performance of the mirror for the two types of polarization schemes is quantified and discussed. The possibility of reflecting atoms at pre-determined directions is also discussed. (paper)

  13. Al atom on MoO3(010) surface: adsorption and penetration using density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong-Zhang; Bandaru, Sateesh; Wang, Da; Liu, Jin; Lau, Woon Ming; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Li-Li

    2016-03-14

    Interfacial issues, such as the interfacial structure and the interdiffusion of atoms at the interface, are fundamental to the understanding of the ignition and reaction mechanisms of nanothermites. This study employs first-principle density functional theory to model Al/MoO3 by placing an Al adatom onto a unit cell of a MoO3(010) slab, and to probe the initiation of interfacial interactions of Al/MoO3 nanothermite by tracking the adsorption and subsurface-penetration of the Al adatom. The calculations show that the Al adatom can spontaneously go through the topmost atomic plane (TAP) of MoO3(010) and reach the 4-fold hollow adsorption-site located below the TAP, with this subsurface adsorption configuration being the most preferred one among all plausible adsorption configurations. Two other plausible configurations place the Al adatom at two bridge sites located above the TAP of MoO3(010) but the Al adatom can easily penetrate below this TAP to a relatively more stable adsorption configuration, with a small energy barrier of merely 0.2 eV. The evidence of subsurface penetration of Al implies that Al/MoO3 likely has an interface with intermixing of Al, Mo and O atoms. These results provide new insights on the interfacial interactions of Al/MoO3 and the ignition/combustion mechanisms of Al/MoO3 nanothermites.

  14. Locality of correlation in density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Kieron [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Cancio, Antonio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306 (United States); Gould, Tim [Qld Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Qld 4111 (Australia); Pittalis, Stefano [CNR-Istituto di Nanoscienze, Via Campi 213A, I-41125 Modena (Italy)

    2016-08-07

    The Hohenberg-Kohn density functional was long ago shown to reduce to the Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation in the non-relativistic semiclassical (or large-Z) limit for all matter, i.e., the kinetic energy becomes local. Exchange also becomes local in this limit. Numerical data on the correlation energy of atoms support the conjecture that this is also true for correlation, but much less relevant to atoms. We illustrate how expansions around a large particle number are equivalent to local density approximations and their strong relevance to density functional approximations. Analyzing highly accurate atomic correlation energies, we show that E{sub C} → −A{sub C} ZlnZ + B{sub C}Z as Z → ∞, where Z is the atomic number, A{sub C} is known, and we estimate B{sub C} to be about 37 mhartree. The local density approximation yields A{sub C} exactly, but a very incorrect value for B{sub C}, showing that the local approximation is less relevant for the correlation alone. This limit is a benchmark for the non-empirical construction of density functional approximations. We conjecture that, beyond atoms, the leading correction to the local density approximation in the large-Z limit generally takes this form, but with B{sub C} a functional of the TF density for the system. The implications for the construction of approximate density functionals are discussed.

  15. Atomic density effects on temperature characteristics and thermal transport at grain boundaries through a proper bin size selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Kim, BoHung, E-mail: muratbarisik@iyte.edu.tr, E-mail: bohungk@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulsan, Daehak-ro 93, Namgu, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Barisik, Murat, E-mail: muratbarisik@iyte.edu.tr, E-mail: bohungk@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla, Izmir 35430 (Turkey)

    2016-05-21

    This study focuses on the proper characterization of temperature profiles across grain boundaries (GBs) in order to calculate the correct interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) and reveal the influence of GB geometries onto thermal transport. The solid-solid interfaces resulting from the orientation difference between the (001), (011), and (111) copper surfaces were investigated. Temperature discontinuities were observed at the boundary of grains due to the phonon mismatch, phonon backscattering, and atomic forces between dissimilar structures at the GBs. We observed that the temperature decreases gradually in the GB area rather than a sharp drop at the interface. As a result, three distinct temperature gradients developed at the GB which were different than the one observed in the bulk solid. This behavior extends a couple molecular diameters into both sides of the interface where we defined a thickness at GB based on the measured temperature profiles for characterization. Results showed dependence on the selection of the bin size used to average the temperature data from the molecular dynamics system. The bin size on the order of the crystal layer spacing was found to present an accurate temperature profile through the GB. We further calculated the GB thickness of various cases by using potential energy (PE) distributions which showed agreement with direct measurements from the temperature profile and validated the proper binning. The variation of grain crystal orientation developed different molecular densities which were characterized by the average atomic surface density (ASD) definition. Our results revealed that the ASD is the primary factor affecting the structural disorders and heat transfer at the solid-solid interfaces. Using a system in which the planes are highly close-packed can enhance the probability of interactions and the degree of overlap between vibrational density of states (VDOS) of atoms forming at interfaces, leading to a reduced ITR. Thus, an

  16. Effect of oxygen implantation on the electrochemical properties of palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihana, T.; Ueshima, M.; Takahashi, K.; Iwaki, M.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen presence in metals has significant effects on their properties. A stress caused by hydrogen migration leads to cracks in metals. The suppression of hydrogen incorporation for the protection of such hydrogen embrittlement is one of the most important subjects for industrial engineering. In contrast, the development of active materials for hydrogen absorption and desorption reactions is expected to make a potable storage of hydrogen which is clean and virtually inexhaustible fuel. The electrochemical properties of O + -implanted Pd measured by cyclic voltammetry in a 0.25 mol dm -3 H 2 SO 4 solution were investigated in relation to their composition and structure. Implantation of 16 O + was performed with doses between 10 17 and 10 18 ions cm -2 at 150 keV, and at nearly room temperature. SIMS, ERD combined with RBS, and XRD were used to analyze the composition depth profile and structure of O + -implanted Pd surface layers. The H atoms were accumulated with a gaussian distribution and carbon materials containing the solid solution of PdCx (x = 0.13--0.15) were also formed in the near surface layers during O + -implantation. The distribution of implanted oxygen changed from gaussian to trapezoidal as the dose increased, accompanied by the crystal growth of Pd(OH) 2 , and simultaneously, the amount of accumulated H atoms increased. The voltammetric measurements revealed that with an increase in the dose, the hydrogen absorption was suppressed at the early stage of sweep cycles, and at the final stage, the redox reaction of both hydrogen and Pd was activated. From these results, the authors propose that the carbon materials containing the PdCx formed during O + -implantation suppress the hydrogen absorption, and the metallic Pd like a Pd-black formed by the reduction of Pd(OH) 2 during voltammetric measurements causes the electrochemical activation of O + -implanted Pd

  17. Thermal behaviour of nitrogen implanted into zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, S.; Ikeyama, M.; Saitoh, K.; Nakao, S.; Niwa, H.; Tanemura, S.; Miyagawa, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Zirconium films were implanted with 15 N ions of energy 50keV to a total fluence of 1x10 18 ionscm -2 in an attempt to study the formation process and thermal stability of ZrN layers produced by high fluence implantation of nitrogen. Subsequent to the implantation at room temperature, samples were annealed at temperatures of 300 C-900 C. The depth profiles of the implanted nitrogen were measured by nuclear reaction analysis using the 15 N(p,αγ) 12 C at E R =429keV, and the surfaces were examined by thin film X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy. There were many blisters 0.2-0.4μm in diameter on the surface of the as-implanted samples and double peaks were observed in the nitrogen depth profiles; they were in both sides of the mean projected range. It was found that most of the blisters became extinct after annealing above 400 C, and the XRD peak (111) intensity was increased with the increase in the annealing temperature. Moreover, 14 N and 15 N implantations were superimposed on Zr samples in order to study the atomic migration of nitrogen at each stage of high fluence implantation. It was found that the decrease in the peak at the deeper layers was related to blister extinction and nitrogen diffusion into underling zirconium which could be correlated with radiation damage induced by post-implanted ions. ((orig.))

  18. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is assumed that the dynamics of valence electrons of alkali-metal atoms can be well accounted for by a quantum-defect theoretic model while the core electrons may be supposed to move in a self-consistent field. This model is used to study the momentum properties of atoms from 3Li to 37Rb. The numerical results ...

  19. Nanoscale Topographical Characterization of Orbital Implant Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salerno

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for an ideal orbital implant is still ongoing in the field of ocular biomaterials. Major limitations of currently-available porous implants include the high cost along with a non-negligible risk of exposure and postoperative infection due to conjunctival abrasion. In the effort to develop better alternatives to the existing devices, two types of new glass-ceramic porous implants were fabricated by sponge replication, which is a relatively inexpensive method. Then, they were characterized by direct three-dimensional (3D contact probe mapping in real space by means of atomic force microscopy in order to assess their surface micro- and nano-features, which were quantitatively compared to those of the most commonly-used orbital implants. These silicate glass-ceramic materials exhibit a surface roughness in the range of a few hundred nanometers (Sq within 500–700 nm and topographical features comparable to those of clinically-used “gold-standard” alumina and polyethylene porous orbital implants. However, it was noted that both experimental and commercial non-porous implants were significantly smoother than all the porous ones. The results achieved in this work reveal that these porous glass-ceramic materials show promise for the intended application and encourage further investigation of their clinical suitability.

  20. Atomic Reference Data for Electronic Structure Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, S; Shirley, E L

    We have generated data for atomic electronic structure calculations, to provide a standard reference for results of specified accuracy under commonly used approximations. Results are presented here for total energies and orbital energy eigenvalues for all atoms from H to U, at microHartree accuracy in the total energy, as computed in the local-density approximation (LDA) the local-spin-density approximation (LSD); the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA); and scalar-relativistic local-density approximation (ScRLDA).

  1. Observation of He bubbles in ion irradiated fusion materials by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Li, Ruihuan [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Deming [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Wu, Yunfeng; Niu, Jinhai; Yang, Qi [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Zhao, Jijun [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Dongping, E-mail: dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Electronic Science, Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Using a non-destructive conductive atomic force microscope combined with the Ar{sup +} etching technique, we demonstrate that nanoscale and conductive He bubbles are formed in the implanted layer of single-crystalline 6H-SiC irradiated with 100 keV He{sup +}. We find that the surface swelling of irradiated SiC samples is well correlated with the growth of elliptic He bubbles in the implanted layer. First-principle calculations are performed to estimate the internal pressure of the He bubble in the void of SiC. Analysis indicates that nanoscale He bubbles acting as a captor capture the He atoms diffusing along the implanted layer at an evaluated temperature and result in the surface swelling of irradiated SiC materials.

  2. Effect of Cs and Li atom adsorption on MgO: Secondary emission and work function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagraev, N.T.; Borisov, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    Adsorption of Cs and Li atoms on the surface of single crystal magnesium oxide films has been investigated using Auger, LEED and contact difference techniques. A decreased work function for a single crystal MgO film grown on the Mo (100) face was observed to be accompanied by an increased secondary electron emission yield shown to be due to a larger escape depth for secondary electrons. LEED showed well ordered layers of adsorbed Cs on the MgO film surface. A model to explain the behaviour of Cs atoms on the film surface is proposed. It is shown that the stability of the Cs coating is not dependent on a prolonged bombardment of the film by incident electron beams of high current density. Depositing and implanting of thin single crystal MgO films with Li were found to result in an increased secondary electron emission yield, with Li adsorption on the MgO film surface being disordered. (orig.)

  3. Solid-state microwave annealing of ion-implanted 4H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaresan, Siddarth G.; Tian, Yong-lai; Ridgway, Mark C.; Mahadik, Nadeemullah A.; Qadri, Syed B.; Rao, Mulpuri V.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state microwave annealing was performed at temperatures up to 2120 deg, C for 30 s on ion-implanted 4H-SiC in N 2 ambient. The surface roughness in the samples annealed without a surface cap at 1950 deg, C is 2.65 nm for 10 μm x 10 μm atomic force microscopy scans. The sheet resistances measured on Al + - and P + -implanted 4H-SiC, annealed by microwaves, are lower than the best conventional furnace annealing results reported in literature. X-ray diffraction spectra indicate alleviation of the lattice damage induced by the ion-implantation and also incorporation of most of the implanted species into substitutional lattice sites

  4. High-intensity low energy titanium ion implantation into zirconium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchikov, A. I.; Kashkarov, E. B.; Pushilina, N. S.; Syrtanov, M. S.; Shevelev, A. E.; Korneva, O. S.; Sutygina, A. N.; Lider, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    This research describes the possibility of ultra-high dose deep titanium ion implantation for surface modification of zirconium alloy Zr-1Nb. The developed method based on repetitively pulsed high intensity low energy titanium ion implantation was used to modify the surface layer. The DC vacuum arc source was used to produce metal plasma. Plasma immersion titanium ions extraction and their ballistic focusing in equipotential space of biased electrode were used to produce high intensity titanium ion beam with the amplitude of 0.5 A at the ion current density 120 and 170 mA/cm2. The solar eclipse effect was used to prevent vacuum arc titanium macroparticles from appearing in the implantation area of Zr sample. Titanium low energy (mean ion energy E = 3 keV) ions were implanted into zirconium alloy with the dose in the range of (5.4-9.56) × 1020 ion/cm2. The effect of ion current density, implantation dose on the phase composition, microstructure and distribution of elements was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, respectively. The results show the appearance of Zr-Ti intermetallic phases of different stoichiometry after Ti implantation. The intermetallic phases are transformed from both Zr0.7Ti0.3 and Zr0.5Ti0.5 to single Zr0.6Ti0.4 phase with the increase in the implantation dose. The changes in phase composition are attributed to Ti dissolution in zirconium lattice accompanied by the lattice distortions and appearance of macrostrains in intermetallic phases. The depth of Ti penetration into the bulk of Zr increases from 6 to 13 μm with the implantation dose. The hardness and wear resistance of the Ti-implanted zirconium alloy were increased by 1.5 and 1.4 times, respectively. The higher current density (170 mA/cm2) leads to the increase in the grain size and surface roughness negatively affecting the tribological properties of the alloy.

  5. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull; Avaliacao radiologica de implantes de carbono vitreo poroso ou silicone em cranio de ratos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari-Mazzetti, Marcelo Paulo; Kobata, Celio Toshiro [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Hospital Defeitos da Face. Dept. of Surgery]. E-mail: mmgvaccari@ig.com.br; Fabiani, Paulo [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Martins, Dulce Maria Fonseca Soares [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Plastic Surgery; Gomes, Paulo de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Operatory Technique and Experimental Surgery; Martins, Jose Luiz [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Pediatric Surgery

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC) and silicon (S) implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. Methods: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20) PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O) and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. Results: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo capsule), that do not appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (p{<=}0,05), in all implants. Conclusion: In CT evaluation the implants of CPV have greater deformation that the S, which makes them not suitable for replacement of membranous bone in the rat skull. (author)

  6. Analysis nuclear punctual method of the interface between an implanted bio coral and bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irigaray, J.L.; Oudadesse, H.; Braye, F.

    1994-01-01

    We adopted the Particles Induced X-ray Emission nuclear analysis, which allows to obtain informations on the atomic element distribution at level of bone surfaces and of the implanted biomaterial. It characterizes the consolidation between bone and bio material, a few weeks after its implant. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. The relationship between dental implant stability and trabecular bone structure using cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between primary implant stability as measured by impact response frequency and the structural parameters of trabecular bone using cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT), excluding the effect of cortical bone thickness. Methods We measured the impact response of a dental implant placed into swine bone specimens composed of only trabecular bone without the cortical bone layer using an inductive sensor. The peak frequency of the impact response spectrum was determined as an implant stability criterion (SPF). The 3D microstructural parameters were calculated from CT images of the bone specimens obtained using both micro-CT and CBCT. Results SPF had significant positive correlations with trabecular bone structural parameters (BV/TV, BV, BS, BSD, Tb.Th, Tb.N, FD, and BS/BV) (Pmicro-CT and CBCT (Pimplant stability prediction by combining BV/TV and SMI in the stepwise forward regression analysis. Bone with high volume density and low surface density shows high implant stability. Well-connected thick bone with small marrow spaces also shows high implant stability. The combination of bone density and architectural parameters measured using CBCT can predict the implant stability more accurately than the density alone in clinical diagnoses. PMID:27127692

  8. On I(5577 Å and I (7620 Å auroral emissions and atomic oxygen densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Gattinger

    Full Text Available A model of auroral electron deposition processes has been developed using Monte Carlo techniques to simulate electron transport and energy loss. The computed differential electron flux and pitch angle were compared with in situ auroral observations to provide a check on the accuracy of the model. As part of the energy loss process, a tally was kept of electronic excitation and ionization of the important atomic and molecular states. The optical emission rates from these excited states were computed and compared with auroral observations of η(3914 Å, η(5577 Å, η(7620 Å and η(N2VK. In particular, the roles played by energy transfer from N2(A3Σ+u and by other processes in the excitation of O(1S and O2(b1Σ+g were investigated in detail. It is concluded that the N2(A3Σ+u mechanism is dominant for the production of OI(5577 Å in the peak emission region of normal aurora, although the production efficiency is much smaller than the measured laboratory value; above 150 km electron impact on atomic oxygen is dominant. Atomic oxygen densities in the range of 0.75±0.25 MSIS-86 [O] were derived from the optical comparisons for auroral latitudes in mid-winter for various levels of solar and magnetic activity.

  9. In-situ deposition of sacrificial layers during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Brown, I.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1995-02-01

    The retained dose of implanted ions is limited by sputtering. It is known that a sacrificial layer deposited prior to ion implantation can lead to an enhanced retained dose. However, a higher ion energy is required to obtain a similar implantation depth due to the stopping of ions in the sacrificial layer. It is desirable to have a sacrificial layer of only a few monolayers thickness which can be renewed after it has been sputtered away. We explain the concept and describe two examples: (i) metal ion implantation using simultaneously a vacuum arc ion source and filtered vacuum arc plasma sources, and (ii) Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID). In MePIIID, the target is immersed in a metal or carbon plasma and a negative, repetitively pulsed bias voltage is applied. Ions are implanted when the bias is applied while the sacrificial layer suffers sputtering. Low-energy thin film deposition - repair of the sacrificial layer -- occurs between bias pulses. No foreign atoms are incorporated into the target since the sacrificial film is made of the same ion species as used in the implantation phase

  10. A Very High Uranium Density Fission Mo Target Suitable for LEU Using atomization Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. K.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Ryu, H. J.; Woo, Y. M.; Jang, S. J.; Park, J. M.; Choi, S. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Currently HEU minimization efforts in fission Mo production are underway in connection with the global threat reduction policy. In order to convert HEU to LEU for the fission Mo target, higher uranium density material could be applied. The uranium aluminide targets used world widely for commercial {sup 99}Mo production are limited to 3.0 g-U/cc in uranium density of the target meat. A consideration of high uranium density using the uranium metal particles dispersion plate target is taken into account. The irradiation burnup of the fission Mo target are as low as 8 at.% and the irradiation period is shorter than 7 days. Pure uranium material has higher thermal conductivity than uranium compounds or alloys. It is considered that the degradation by irradiation would be almost negligible. In this study, using the computer code of the PLATE developed by ANL the irradiation behavior was estimated. Some considerations were taken into account to improve the irradiation performance further. It has been known that some alloying elements of Si, Cr, Fe, and Mo are beneficial for reducing the swelling by grain refinement. In the RERTR program recently the interaction problem could be solved by adding a small amount of Si to the aluminum matrix phase. The fabrication process and the separation process for the proposed atomized uranium particles dispersion target were reviewed

  11. Ti nanorod arrays with a medium density significantly promote osteogenesis and osteointegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Chengyun; Wang, Shuangying; Zhu, Ye; Zhong, Meiling; Lin, Xi; Zhang, Yu; Tan, Guoxin; Li, Mei; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yu, Peng; Wang, Xiaolan; Li, Ying; He, Tianrui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Yingjun; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Ti implants are good candidates in bone repair. However, how to promote bone formation on their surface and their consequent perfect integration with the surrounding tissue is still a challenge. To overcome such challenge, we propose to form Ti nanorods on their surface to promote the new bone formation around the implants. Here Ti nanorod arrays (TNrs) with different densities were produced on pure Ti surfaces using an anodizing method. The influence of TNr density on the protein adsorption as well as on the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells were assessed. The TNrs were also implanted into the bone defects in rabbits to test their application in promoting bone formation and osteointegration at the implant-bone interface. TNrs with the medium density were found to show the best capability in promoting the protein adsorption from surrounding medium, which in turn efficiently enhanced osteogenic differentiation in vitro and osteointegration in vivo. Our work suggests that growing TNrs with a medium density on the surface of traditional Ti implants is an efficient and facile method for promoting bone formation and osteointegration in bone repair.

  12. Radiation effects in ion implanted β-Ga_2O_3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendler, E.; Treiber, E.; Baldauf, J.; Wolf, S.; Ronning, C.; Kuramata, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ion implantation induced effects are studied in β-Ga_2O_3 at room temperature. The main technique applied is Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channelling configuration (RBS) using He ions. Additionally, selected samples were investigated by optical spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For the implanted P, Ar or Sn ions clear damage peaks are visible in the RBS spectra. The concentration of displaced lattice atoms in the maximum of the distribution (as deduced from the channelling spectra) increases almost continuously up to a saturation value of about 90% with increasing ion fluence. Once this level is reached in the maximum of the distribution, during further implantation a broadening of the distribution occurs with the concentration remaining at this level. RBS measurements performed with different energy of the analysing He ions reveal that the damage produced is characterized by randomly distributed lattice atoms. This indicates point defects, point defect complexes or amorphous zones. As the channelling spectra of the implanted layers do not reach the random level, complete amorphisation can be excluded. Furthermore, the applied optical techniques do not exhibit significant changes in comparison to the signal measured for the unimplanted sample even though these studies were performed for the highest ion fluences implanted. Cross sectional TEM confirms this result. The diffraction pattern shows clear spots as for the unimplanted material and extended defects are almost not visible. The β-Ga_2O_3 layers ion implanted at room temperature contain mainly point defects the strong influence of which on the dechannelling of the He ions in the RBS analysis is not yet understood. (authors)

  13. Absolute measurement of alkaline atoms in low density jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, J.; Guernigou, J.

    1974-01-01

    In order to determine the neutral fraction of cesium vapor which is not ionized in the beam issuing from an ion thruster, a particular sensor was developed at ONERA. This probe, the sensibility of which is 6 10 7 atoms sec -1 was used in order to measure the variation of cesium atom flux ejected from a spherical isothermal cavity. Experiments were performed in three flow conditions caracterized by the ratio of the mean free path to the dimension of the orifice or to the diameter of the cavity. Results demonstrate that it is possible in this configuration to obtain an efflux of 5 10 13 atoms sec -1 in accordance to cosine law when the mean free path is about the diameter of the spherical cavity [fr

  14. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N 2 /O 2 (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 ± 0.7)×10 20 m −3 was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 ± 0.4)×10 19 m −3 at 0.1 vol. %

  15. Enhancement of surface properties of SAE 1020 by chromium plasma immersion recoil implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Mello, C.B.; Beloto, A.F.; Rossi, J.O.; Reuther, H.

    2007-01-01

    SAE 1020 steel is commonly used as concrete reinforcement and small machine parts, but despite its good mechanical properties, as ductility, hardness and wear resistance, it is susceptible to severe corrosion. It is well known that chromium content above 12% in Fe alloys increases their corrosion resistance. In order to obtain this improvement, we studied the introduction of chromium atoms into the matrix of SAE 1020 steel by recoil implantation process using a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system. Potentiodynamic scans showed that the presence of Cr film leads to a gain in the corrosion potential, from -650 mV to -400 mV. After PIII treatment, the corrosion potential increased further to -340 mV, but the corrosion current density presented no significant change. Vickers microhardness tests showed surface hardness increase of up to about 27% for the treated samples. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that, for a 30 nm film, Cr was introduced for about 20 nm into the steel matrix. Tribology tests, of pin-on-disk type, showed that friction coefficient of treated samples was reduced by about 50% and a change in wear mechanism, from adhesive to abrasive mode, occurred

  16. The topology of the Coulomb potential density. A comparison with the electron density, the virial energy density, and the Ehrenfest force density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lizé-Mari; Eaby, Alan; Dillen, Jan

    2017-12-15

    The topology of the Coulomb potential density has been studied within the context of the theory of Atoms in Molecules and has been compared with the topologies of the electron density, the virial energy density and the Ehrenfest force density. The Coulomb potential density is found to be mainly structurally homeomorphic with the electron density. The Coulomb potential density reproduces the non-nuclear attractor which is observed experimentally in the molecular graph of the electron density of a Mg dimer, thus, for the first time ever providing an alternative and energetic foundation for the existence of this critical point. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Lattice damage in ion-implanted silicon-germanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, T.E.; Holland, O.W.

    1992-08-01

    The damage produced in Si 1-x Ge x alloys (0≤x≤1) by implantation of 70--100 keV 30 Si + has been measured as a function of temperature and fluence by ion channeling. For all compositions, the damage efficiency decreased sharply as the implant temperature was increased between room temperature and 150 degrees C. Furthermore, the damage efficiency in alloys of intermediate compositions (0.34≤x≤0.5) exceeds that in Ge, especially at elevated temperatures, despite the larger cascade energy density in Ge. It is shown that this behavior can be described based on a model in which the point-defect mobility is the dominant factor controlling damage retention, rather than the cascade energy density. This approach provides a framework for understanding other temperature-dependent phenomena related to damage growth in Si-Ge alloys including dose-rate effects and damage saturation in MeV implantation

  18. Defect trapping of deuterium implanted in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Y.; Kakeno, M.; Yamada, K.; Hioki, T.; Kawamoto, J.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of deuterium implanted in Al was studied by the D( 3 He,p) 4 He and the D(d,p)T nuclear reactions. Changes of the depth profiles of the deuterium after heat treatments indicated that the implanted deuterium was trapped by the defect produced during the deuterium implantation and the release probability of the trapped deuterium increased as the specimen temperature was raised. Assuming a thermal equilibrium locally in the region of high defect concentration, the trapping energy of deuterium in Al was determined to be 0.12eV. Since the release probability for the single crystal was considerably larger than that for the polycrystal specimens, the deuterium was considered to be strongly trapped in the grain boundaries. Distributions of displaced Al atoms and the recovery of the lattice damage by annealing were measured by the channelling technique. (author)

  19. Characterization of ion implanted silicon by the electrolytic reverse current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueller, J.; Pham, M.T.

    1977-01-01

    The current voltage behaviour of ion implanted silicon electrodes in HF electrolyte is investigated. The electrolytic reverse current, i.e. the reaction rate of the minority carrier limited reactions is found to increase. The current increase depends on the implanted dose and layer stripping. Reason for the increased reverse current can be referred to radiation damage acting as generation centres for minority carriers. Measurement of the electrolytic reverse current can be used for determining damage profiles. Layer stripping is carried out by anodic dissolution in the same electrolyte. The sensitivity of this new method for characterizing ion implanted silicon layers lies at 10 11 to 10 12 atoms/cm 2 . (author)

  20. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao; Feng, Qiong; Cheng, Yingchun; Yao, Yingbang; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Kun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Zhang, Xixiang; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal

  1. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Yano, F.; Nishida, A.; Takamizawa, H.; Tsunomura, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  2. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Takamizawa, H; Tsunomura, T; Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2009-11-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  3. Focusing of atoms with spatially localized light pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helseth, Lars Egil

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically study the focusing of atoms using strongly localized light pulses. It is shown that when inhomogenously polarized light is focused at high angular apertures, one may obtain useful potentials for atom focusing. Here we analyze the case of pulsed light potentials for red- and blue-detuned focusings of atoms. In particular, we show that the atomic beam aperture must be stopped considerably down in order to reduce the sidelobes of the atomic density, which is similar to the situation often encountered in conventional optics. It is suggested that an annular aperture in front of the atomic beam could be useful for increasing the resolution, at the cost of a lower atomic density

  4. Influence of implantation energy on the electrical properties of ultrathin gate oxides grown on nitrogen implanted Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, E.; Skarlatos, D.; Tsamis, C.; Normand, P.; Tsoukalas, D.

    2003-01-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor tunnel diodes with gate oxides, in the range of 2.5-3.5 nm, grown either on 25 or 3 keV nitrogen-implanted Si substrates at (0.3 or 1) x10 15 cm -2 dose, respectively, are investigated. The dependence of N 2 + ion implant energy on the electrical quality of the growing oxide layers is studied through capacitance, equivalent parallel conductance, and gate current measurements. Superior electrical characteristics in terms of interface state trap density, leakage current, and breakdown fields are found for oxides obtained through 3 keV nitrogen implants. These findings together with the full absence of any extended defect in the silicon substrate make the low-energy nitrogen implantation technique an attractive option for reproducible low-cost growth of nanometer-thick gate oxides

  5. The effects of handling and storage on magnesium based implants — First results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, Berit, E-mail: berit.ullmann@tiho-hannover.de [University of Veterinary Medicine, Small Animal Clinic, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Angrisani, Nina, E-mail: nina.angrisani@tiho-hannover.de [University of Veterinary Medicine, Small Animal Clinic, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Reifenrath, Janin, E-mail: janin.reifenrath@tiho-hannover.de [University of Veterinary Medicine, Small Animal Clinic, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Seitz, Jan-M., E-mail: seitz@iw.uni-hannover.de [Leibniz University, Institute of Materials Science, An der Universität 2, 30823 Hannover (Germany); Bormann, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.bormann@trimet.de [Leibniz University, Institute of Materials Science, An der Universität 2, 30823 Hannover (Germany); Trimet Aluminium AG, Automotive, Recycling Harzgerode, Aluminiumallee 1, 06493 Harzgerode (Germany); Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm, E-mail: bach@iw.uni-hannover.de [Leibniz University, Institute of Materials Science, An der Universität 2, 30823 Hannover (Germany); Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea, E-mail: meyer-lindenberg@chir.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de [University of Veterinary Medicine, Small Animal Clinic, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Clinic for Small Animal Surgery and Reproduction, Centre of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Veterinärstraße 3, 80539 München (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the influence of acetone and formalin as well as the duration and type of storage on magnesium based implants by means of microscopic, μ-computed tomographic, scanning electron microscopic, EDX and metallographic investigations. In contrast to storing in acetone, storage in formalin led to an increase in surface to volume ratio, and a decrease of the volume and the density. The various types of storage exerted no differing effects on the implants but with increasing storage duration, a spreading of oxygen rich areas on the surface, increased precipitations and a decrease in grain size could be observed. - Highlights: • Acetone treatment had no detectable effect on magnesium based implants. • Formalin caused distinct changes of the implant's surface, volume and density. • Storage types had no differing effect on the implants. • Storage duration led to distinct changes of the implant's surface and structure.

  6. Correlations between histology and neuronal activity recorded by microelectrodes implanted chronically in the cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Douglas; Cogan, Stuart; Kane, Sheryl; Pikov, Victor

    2016-06-01

    Objective. To quantify relations between the neuronal activity recorded with chronically-implanted intracortical microelectrodes and the histology of the surrounding tissue, using radial distance from the tip sites and time after array implantation as parameters. Approach. ‘Utah’-type intracortical microelectrode arrays were implanted into cats’ sensorimotor cortex for 275-364 days. The brain tissue around the implants was immuno-stained for the neuronal marker NeuN and for the astrocyte marker GFAP. Pearson’s product-moment correlations were used to quantify the relations between these markers and the amplitudes of the recorded neuronal action potentials (APs) and their signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). Main results. S/N was more stable over post-implant time than was AP amplitude, but its increased correlation with neuronal density after many months indicates ongoing loss of neurons around the microelectrodes. S/N was correlated with neuron density out to at least 140 μm from the microelectrodes, while AP amplitude was correlated with neuron density and GFAP density within ˜80 μm. Correlations between AP amplitude and histology markers (GFAP and NeuN density) were strongest immediately after implantation, while correlation between the neuron density and S/N was strongest near the time the animals were sacrificed. Unlike AP amplitude, there was no significant correlation between S/N and density of GFAP around the tip sites. Significance. Our findings indicate an evolving interaction between changes in the tissue surrounding the microelectrodes and the microelectrode’s electrical properties. Ongoing loss of neurons around recording microelectrodes, and the interactions between their delayed electrical deterioration and early tissue scarring around the tips appear to pose the greatest threats to the microelectrodes’ long-term functionality.

  7. Density functional calculations of hypothetical neutral hollow octahedral molecules with a 48-atom framework: Hydrides and oxides of boron, carbon, nitrogen, aluminum, and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaViolette, Randall A.; Benson, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    We computed via first-principles density functional theory calculations (employing both the local density and generalized gradient approximations) the dimensions, bond lengths and angles, binding energy, and HOMO-LUMO gap of the following hypothetical neutral hollow octahedral molecules: B 48 H 24 , C 48 H 48 , C 96 H 80 (formed by bonding two C 48 H 48 molecules), N 48 H 24 , Al 48 H 24 , and Si 48 H 48 ; B 24 O 24 , C 24 O 24 , N 24 O 24 , Al 24 O 24 , and Si 24 O 24 . Each molecule consists of a large hollow framework of six puckered eight-membered rings whose planes are either mutually perpendicular or parallel, so that each molecule possesses only eight- and nine-membered rings. The hydrides have their hydrogen atoms attached only to the two-atom bridging sites on the framework. The oxides have their oxygen atoms occupying exclusively the two-atom bridging sites of the framework alternating with the (B, C, N, Al, Si) atoms exclusively occupying the three-atom bridging sites. We also calculated the infrared spectra of the C 48 H 48 and the C 24 O 24 molecules. For the sake of comparison, we also examined the hypothetical octahedral C 48 fullerene cuboctohedron (possessing four-, six-, and eight-membered rings) studied by Dunlap and Taylor. The molecules based on carbon would be the most stable; those based on nitrogen would be the least stable, if at all. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  8. On the effective atomic number and electron density: A comprehensive set of formulas for all types of materials and energies above 1 keV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Thind, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive and consistent set of formulas is given for calculating the effective atomic number and electron density for all types of materials and for all photon energies greater than 1 keV. The are derived from first principles using photon interaction cross sections of the constituent atom....... The theory is illustrated by calculations and experiments for molecules of medical and biological interest, glasses for radiation shielding, alloys, minerals and liquids....

  9. Strain driven fast osseointegration of implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesmann Hans-Peter

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the bone's capability of dental implant osseointegration has clinically been utilised as early as in the Gallo-Roman population, the specific mechanisms for the emergence and maintenance of peri-implant bone under functional load have not been identified. Here we show that under immediate loading of specially designed dental implants with masticatory loads, osseointegration is rapidly achieved. Methods We examined the bone reaction around non- and immediately loaded dental implants inserted in the mandible of mature minipigs during the presently assumed time for osseointegration. We used threaded conical titanium implants containing a titanium2+ oxide surface, allowing direct bone contact after insertion. The external geometry was designed according to finite element analysis: the calculation showed that physiological amplitudes of strain (500–3,000 ustrain generated through mastication were homogenously distributed in peri-implant bone. The strain-energy density (SED rate under assessment of a 1 Hz loading cycle was 150 Jm-3 s-1, peak dislocations were lower then nm. Results Bone was in direct contact to the implant surface (bone/implant contact rate 90% from day one of implant insertion, as quantified by undecalcified histological sections. This effect was substantiated by ultrastructural analysis of intimate osteoblast attachment and mature collagen mineralisation at the titanium surface. We detected no loss in the intimate bone/implant bond during the experimental period of either control or experimental animals, indicating that immediate load had no adverse effect on bone structure in peri-implant bone. Conclusion In terms of clinical relevance, the load related bone reaction at the implant interface may in combination with substrate effects be responsible for an immediate osseointegration state.

  10. Diffusion of Implanted Radioisotopes in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Implantation of radioisotopes into metal and semiconductor samples is performed. The implanted isotope or its decay-product should have a half-life long enough for radiotracer diffusion experiments. Such radioisotopes are utilized to investigate basic diffusion properties in semiconductors and metals and to improve our understanding of the atomic mechanisms of diffusion. For suitably chosen systems the combination of on-line production and clean implantation of radioisotopes at the ISOLDE facility opens new possibilities for diffusion studies in solids. \\\\ \\\\ The investigations are concentrated on diffusion studies of $^{195}$Au in amorphous materials. The isotope $^{195}$Au was obtained from the mass 195 of the mercury beam. $^{195}$Hg decays into $^{195}$Au which is a very convenient isotope for diffusion experiments. \\\\ \\\\ It was found that $^{195}$Au is a slow diffusor in amorphous Co-Zr alloys, whereas Co is a fast diffusor in the same matrix. The ``asymmetry'' in the diffusion behaviour is of considerab...

  11. Improvement of tribological properties by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerve, A.

    1993-01-01

    Many different measurements confirm that ion implantation changes the friction and wear behaviour, which are the most important properties of tribological systems. Unfortunately, these properties will not always be improved. In industrial application, very often different results of the effects of ion implantation into tools or machine components can be observed, even if the same materials are used. A very important reason for this is the different stresses on the tribological systems. The energy input caused by friction, which is a function of the stress and other parameters of the tribosystem, within a short time leads to the appearance of energy islands, which are statistically distributed over the surfaces. The density of energy within these tiny energy islands is very high. Results of these high energy densities is a mutation of the material's composition and structure within a very thin layer of less than 100 nm underneath the surface and wear. Ion implantation also changes the composition and structure of the bulk material close to the surface. Thus there is urgent need to understand tribo-induced mutations of ion-implanted materials and their influence on the tribological properties. For that reason surface analyses have to be carried out to determine the composition and structure of the materials and the mutation caused by friction and wear

  12. Hydrogen atom kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunomura, Shota; Katayama, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen (H) atom kinetics has been investigated in capacitively coupled very high frequency (VHF) discharges at powers of 16-780 mW cm-2 and H2 gas pressures of 0.1-2 Torr. The H atom density has been measured using vacuum ultra violet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a micro-discharge hollow cathode lamp as a VUV light source. The measurements have been performed in two different electrode configurations of discharges: conventional parallel-plate diode and triode with an intermediate mesh electrode. We find that in the triode configuration, the H atom density is strongly reduced across the mesh electrode. The H atom density varies from ˜1012 cm-3 to ˜1010 cm-3 by crossing the mesh with 0.2 mm in thickness and 36% in aperture ratio. The fluid model simulations for VHF discharge plasmas have been performed to study the H atom generation, diffusion and recombination kinetics. The simulations suggest that H atoms are generated in the bulk plasma, by the electron impact dissociation (e + H2 \\to e + 2H) and the ion-molecule reaction (H2 + + H2 \\to {{{H}}}3+ + H). The diffusion of H atoms is strongly limited by a mesh electrode, and thus the mesh geometry influences the spatial distribution of the H atoms. The loss of H atoms is dominated by the surface recombination.

  13. Effects of N2O and O2 addition to nitrogen Townsend dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure on the absolute ground-state atomic nitrogen density

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2012-11-27

    Absolute ground-state density of nitrogen atoms N (2p3 4S3/2) in non-equilibrium Townsend dielectric barrier discharges (TDBDs) at atmospheric pressure sustained in N2/N2O and N2/O2 gas mixtures has been measured using Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy. The quantitative measurements have been obtained by TALIF calibration using krypton as a reference gas. We previously reported that the maximum of N (2p3 4S3/2) atom density is around 3 × 1014 cm-3 in pure nitrogen TDBD, and that this maximum depends strongly on the mean energy dissipated in the gas. In the two gas mixtures studied here, results show that the absolute N (2p3 4S3/2) density is strongly affected by the N2O and O2 addition. Indeed, the density still increases exponentially with the energy dissipated in the gas but an increase in N2O and O2 amounts (a few hundreds of ppm) leads to a decrease in nitrogen atom density. No discrepancy in the order of magnitude of N (2p3 4S3/2) density is observed when comparing results obtained in N2/N2O and N2/O2 mixtures. Compared with pure nitrogen, for an energy of ∼90 mJ cm-3, the maximum of N (2p3 4S3/2) density drops by a factor of 3 when 100 ppm of N2O and O2 are added and it reduces by a factor of 5 for 200 ppm, to reach values close to our TALIF detection sensitivity for 400 ppm (1 × 1013 cm -3 at atmospheric pressure). © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Celha Borges Costa; Segurado, Márcio Nunes; Dorta, Miriam Cristina Leandro; Dias, Fátima Ribeiro; Lenza, Maurício Guilherme; Lenza, Marcos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate and compare in vitro cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of mini-implants from three different commercial brands used for orthodontic anchorage. Six mini-implants (Conexão(tm), Neodent(tm) and SIN(tm)) were separately immersed in artificial saliva (pH 6.76) for 30 and 60 days. The cytotoxicity of the corrosion extracts was assessed in L929 cell cultures using the violet crystal and MTT assays, as well as cell morphology under light microscopy. Metal surface characteristics before and after immersion in artificial saliva were assessed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The samples underwent atomic absorption spectrophotometry to determine the concentrations of aluminum and vanadium ions, constituent elements of the alloy that present potential toxicity. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA/Bonferroni tests were used for comparisons among groups with p < 0.05 considered significant. Statistical analysis was carried out with Graph Pad PRISM software Version 4.0. No changes in cell viability or morphology were observed. Mini-implants SEM images revealed smooth surfaces with no obvious traces of corrosion. The extracts assessed by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry presented concentrations of aluminum and vanadium ions below 1.0 µg/mL and 0.5 µg/mL, respectively. Orthodontic mini-implants manufactured by Conexão(tm), Neodent(tm) and SIN(tm) present high corrosion resistance and are not cytotoxic.

  15. Evaluation of an expence of materials during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, M.G.; Zlobin, N.; Zotov, A.V.; Vasilev, V.I.; Vasilev, I.P.

    2003-01-01

    Ion implantation is used for a surface modification. The implantation dose must be sufficient to obtain the required properties of a processed surface, but should not be exceeded to prevent over-expenditure of implanted materials. The latter is especially important when noble metals are used as an implanted material. The ion implanter includes a vacuum chamber, source of metal ions (target) and a vacuum pumping-out system. Ions of a plasma-forming gas sputter the target and ions of metal are then accelerated and implanted into surface treated. Ion implantation dose can be calculated from operation parameters such as ion beam current density and duration of implanting. The presence of the plasma-forming gas in the ion flow makes it difficult to determine the expenditure of an implanted metal itself. The objective of this paper is the more accurate definition of an expense of an implanted metal. Mass- spectrometric analysis of an ion beam together with the weighing of the target was used to determine the expense of an implanted metal. It was found that, depending on the implantation parameters, on average around 50% of a total ion flow are metal ions. Results obtained allow more precise definition of an implantation dose. Thus, over- expenditure of implanted metals can be eliminated. (author)

  16. Wear and corrosion behaviors of Ti6Al4V alloy biomedical materials by silver plasma immersion ion implantation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongxi, Liu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Qian, Xu, E-mail: vipliuhx@yahoo.com.cn [Faculty of Adult Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650051 (China); Xiaowei, Zhang; Chuanqi, Wang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Baoyin, Tang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-10-30

    In order to improve the wear resistance and anti-corrosion behaviors of Ti6Al4V (TC4) alloy, polished samples were implanted with silver (Ag) ions by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique. The phase composition and element concentration-depth distribution in modified layer were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger electron spectrum (AES). Corrosion resistance, microhardness, friction and wear behaviors of PIII-TC4 alloy changed with the Ag ion implantation dose. XRD analysis reveals that the surface modified layer consists of Ag and a small amount of TiAg phases. AES results show that Ag atomic peak concentration is 9.88%, about 14.4 nm from the surface. The maximum nanohardness and elastic modulus of PIII-TC4 alloy increases by 62.5% and 54.5%, respectively. The lowest friction coefficient reduces from 0.78 to 0.2. The test result of potentiodynamic polarization in 3.5% NaCl saturated solution indicates that the sample of Ag ion dose at 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} has the best corrosion resistance with the lowest corrosion current density and the least porosity.

  17. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: a theoretical analysis for simple liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρDS) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρDS. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  18. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ DS ) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ DS . The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule

  19. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccari-Mazzetti, Marcelo Paulo; Kobata, Celio Toshiro; Fabiani, Paulo; Martins, Dulce Maria Fonseca Soares; Gomes, Paulo de Oliveira; Martins, Jose Luiz

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC) and silicon (S) implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. Methods: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20) PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O) and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. Results: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo capsule), that do not appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (p≤0,05), in all implants. Conclusion: In CT evaluation the implants of CPV have greater deformation that the S, which makes them not suitable for replacement of membranous bone in the rat skull. (author)

  20. [Principles of bone tissue structures interaction with full removable dentures fixed on intraosseous implantates modelling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashmurina, V R; Chumachenko, E N; Olesova, V N; Volozhin, A I

    2008-01-01

    Math modelling "removable dentures-implantate-bone" with size and density of bone tissue as variables was created. It allowed to study biomechanical bases of mandibular bone tissue structures interaction with full removable dentures of different constructions and fixed on intraosseous implantates. Analysis of the received data showed that in the majority of cases it was expedient to recommend 3 bearing (abutments) system of denture making. Rest on 4 and more implantates was appropriate for patients with reduced density of spongy bone and significant mandibular bone atrophy. 2 abutment system can be used in patients with high density of spongy bone and absence of mandibular bone atrophy.

  1. Comparing two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing through an atomic electronic structure computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Man-Hong

    2016-01-01

    By performing the electronic structure computation of a Si atom, we compare two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing in the literature. One was proposed by Johnson and implemented in the well-known VASP code. The other was given by Eyert. We solve the Kohn-Sham equation by using a conventional outward/inward integration of the differential equation and then connect two parts of solutions at the classical turning points, which is different from the method of the matrix eigenvalue solution as used in the VASP code. Compared to Johnson’s algorithm, the one proposed by Eyert needs fewer total iteration numbers. (paper)

  2. 16. Hot dense plasma atomic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Dappen; Totsuji, H.; Nishii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers 13 articles whose common feature is to deal with atomic processes in hot plasmas. Density functional molecular dynamics method is applied to the hydrogen plasma in the domain of liquid metallic hydrogen. The effects of the density gradient are taken into account in both the electronic kinetic energy and the exchange energy and it is shown that they almost cancel with each other, extending the applicability of the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac approximation to the cases where the density gradient is not negligible. Another article reports about space and time resolved M-shell X-ray measurements of a laser-produced gas jet xenon plasma. Plasma parameters have been measured by ion acoustic and electron plasma waves Thomson scattering. Photo-ionization becomes a dominant atomic process when the density and the temperature of plasmas are relatively low and when the plasma is submitted to intense external radiation. It is shown that 2 plasmas which have a very different density but have the same ionization parameters, are found in a similar ionization state. Most radiation hydrodynamics codes use radiative opacity data from available libraries of atomic data. Several articles are focused on the determination of one group Rosseland and Planck mean analytical formulas for several single elements used in inertial fusion targets. In another paper the plasma density effect on population densities, effective ionization, recombination rate coefficients and on emission lines from carbon and Al ions in hot dense plasma, is studied. The last article is devoted to a new atomic model in plasmas that considers the occupation probability of the bound state and free state density in the presence of the plasma micro-field. (A.C.)

  3. Defect formation in oxygen- and boron- implanted MOS structures after gamma irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaschieva, S; Skorupa, W

    2003-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the interface states of ion-implanted MOS structures is studied by means of the thermally stimulated charge method. 10-keV oxygen- or boron- (O sup + or B sup +) implanted samples are gamma-irradiated with sup 6 sup 0 Co. Gamma irradiation creates electron levels at the SiSiO sub 2 interface of the samples in a different way depending on the type of the previously implanted atoms (O sup + or B sup +). The results demonstrate that the concentration of the shallower levels (in the silicon band gap) of oxygen-implanted samples increases more effectively after gamma irradiation. The same irradiation conditions increase more intensively the concentration of the deeper levels (in the silicon band gap) of boron-implanted samples. (orig.)

  4. Nano-patterning of perpendicular magnetic recording media by low-energy implantation of chemically reactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Gonzalez, M.S.; Briones, F.; Garcia-Martin, J.M.; Montserrat, J.; Vila, L.; Faini, G.; Testa, A.M.; Fiorani, D.; Rohrmann, H.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nano-patterning of perpendicular hard disk media with perpendicular anisotropy, but preserving disk surface planarity, is presented here. Reactive ion implantation is used to locally modify the chemical composition (hence the magnetization and magnetic anisotropy) of the Co/Pd multilayer in irradiated areas. The procedure involves low energy, chemically reactive ion irradiation through a resist mask. Among N, P and As ions, P are shown to be most adequate to obtain optimum bit density and topography flatness for industrial Co/Pd multilayer media. The effect of this ion contributes to isolate perpendicular bits by destroying both anisotropy and magnetic exchange in the irradiated areas. Low ion fluences are effective due to the stabilization of atomic displacement levels by the chemical effect of covalent impurities.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of high dose carbon-implanted steel and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviente, J. L.; García, A.; Alonso, F.; Braceras, I.; Oñate, J. I.

    1999-04-01

    A study has been made of the depth dependence of the atomic fraction and chemical bonding states of AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy implanted with 75 keV C + at very high doses (above 10 18 ions cm -2), by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with an Ar + sputtering. A Gaussian-like carbon distribution was observed on both materials at the lowest implanted dose. More trapezoidal carbon depth-profiles were found with increasing implanted doses, and a pure carbon layer was observed only on the titanium alloy implanted at the highest dose. The implanted carbon was combined with both base metal and carbon itself to form metallic carbides and graphitic carbon. Furthermore, carbon-enriched carbides were also found by curve fitting the C 1s spectra. The titanium alloy showed a higher carbidic contribution than the steel implanted at the same C + doses. A critical carbon concentrations of about 33 at.% and 23 at.% were measured for the formation of C-C bonds in Ti-6Al-4V and steel samples, respectively. The carbon atoms were bound with metal to form carbidic compounds until these critical concentrations were reached; when this C concentration was exceeded the proportion of C-C bonds increased and resulted in the growth of carbonaceous layers.

  6. Mechanical and Structural Properties of Fluorine-Ion-Implanted Boron Suboxide

    OpenAIRE

    Machaka, Ronald; Mwakikunga, Bonex W.; Manikandan, Elayaperumal; Derry, Trevor E.; Sigalas, Iakovos; Herrmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Results on a systematic study on the effects of ion implantation on the near-surface mechanical and structural properties of boron suboxide (B 6O) prepared by uniaxial hot pressing are reviewed. 150keV fluorine ions at fluences of up to 5.0 × 10 16ions/cm 2 were implanted into the ultrahard ceramic material at room temperature and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Evidence of ion-beam-as...

  7. Properties of excited xenon atoms in a plasma display panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Byoung H.; Oh, Phil Y.; Choi, Eun H.

    2009-01-01

    The luminance efficiency of a plasma display panel is directly related to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light that is emitted from excited xenon (Xe) atoms and molecules. It is therefore necessary to investigate the properties of excited xenon atoms. This study presents experimental data associated with the behavior of excited xenon atoms in a PDP discharge cell and compares the data with the theoretical results obtained using an analytical model. The properties of excited xenon atoms in the discharge cells of a plasma display panel are investigated by measuring the excited atom density through the use of laser absorption spectroscopy. The density of the excited xenon atoms increases from zero, reaches its peak, and decreases with time in the discharge cells. The profile of the excited xenon atoms is also studied in terms of the xenon mole fraction. The typical density of the excited xenon atoms in the metastable state is on the order of 10 13 atoms per cubic cm.

  8. Temperature and fluence effects in lead implanted cobalt single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Johnson, E.; Steenstrup, S.; Chernysh, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    The channeled sputtering yields of the hcp and fcc phases of cobalt depend on the crystal structure and the radiation induced damage. Earlier irradiations of cobalt with argon ions channeled in the hcp direction give sputtering yields higher than expected in the temperature range 100-350deg C. This effect was attributed to a combination of radiation induced damage and a possible implantation induced hcp --> fcc phase transition. Sputtering yields for cobalt single crystals irradiated with 150 keV Pb + ions along the direction of the hcp phase and the direction of the fcc phase have been measured using the weightloss method. The radiation damage and the amount of lead retained in the implanted surface has been investigated by 'in situ' RBS/channeling analysis. Measured partial sputtering yields of lead ≅ 1 atom/ion indicate preferential sputtering of lead atoms. (orig.)

  9. Structural changes and tribological behaviors of nitrogen ion-implanted tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.J.; Wang, T.M.; Wang, X.J.

    1996-01-01

    Single-crystal tantalum sheets were implanted by 110 keV nitrogen ions to a dose of 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at a temperature less than 100 C. The structural changes and the concentration depth profiles of the implanted layers were characterized by glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GXRD), selected area diffraction (SAD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), respectively. The microhardness, the friction coefficient and the wear rate of the specimens against hardened GCr15 steel balls were also determined before and after the implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) were used to analyze the wear tracks. The results showed that there exist deviations between the characterization results of AES and GXRD or SAD. The AES measurement suggests the formation of the tantalum nitrides with a maximum N/Ta ratio of 1/2, while the GXRD and SAD reveal the formation of bcc Ta(N), fcc TaN and a trace amount of hcp Ta 2 N. This can be explained by considering the inhomogeneous distribution of nitrogen atoms in micro-regions: the enrichment of nitrogen atoms in local micro-regions leads to the formation of fcc TaN; however, the unfavorable structural compatibility between bcc Ta and hcp Ta 2 N hinders the formation of hcp Ta 2 N in the regions where the N/Ta ratio reaches 1/2. The detected trace amount of the hcp Ta 2 N phase in the implanted layers can be considered as an after effect of nitrogen loss from the originally formed nitrides. The results also showed that the tribological properties of the Ta surfaces were improved due to the implantation. It is believed that the implantation-induced Ta(N), fcc TaN, and hcp Ta 2 N phases are responsible for this improvement. (orig.)

  10. Electromechanical impedance method to assess dental implant stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizi, Aydin; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Ochs, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    The stability of a dental implant is a prerequisite for supporting a load-bearing prosthesis and establishment of a functional bone–implant system. Reliable and noninvasive methods able to assess the bone interface of dental and orthopedic implants (osseointegration) are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. In this paper, we propose the electromechanical impedance method as a novel approach for the assessment of dental implant stability. Nobel Biocare ® implants with a size of 4.3 mm diameter ×13 mm length were placed inside bovine bones that were then immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation. The degradation simulated the inverse process of bone healing. The implant–bone systems were monitored by bonding a piezoceramic transducer (PZT) to the implants’ abutment and measuring the admittance of the PZT over time. It was found that the PZT’s admittance and the statistical features associated with its analysis are sensitive to the degradation of the bones and can be correlated to the loss of calcium measured by means of the atomic absorption spectroscopy method. The present study shows promising results and may pave the road towards an innovative approach for the noninvasive monitoring of dental implant stability and integrity. (paper)

  11. The effect of Ni pre-implantation on surface morphology and optical absorption properties of Ag nanoparticles embedded in SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yanyan; Qi, Ting; Qiao, Yu; Yu, Shengwang; Hei, Hongjun; He, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag concentration increased significantly due to the Ni pre-implantation. • Deposition and accumulation process of Ag atoms depends on Ni fluences. • The incorporation of Ni elements in Ag NPs can damp SPR absorption intensity. • AgNi alloy NPs embedded in SiO 2 have been created by sequentially implantation. • Unique SPR absorption with dual peaks centered at 406 nm and 563 nm was observed. - Abstract: The effect of Ni ion fluence on Ag nucleation and particle growth was investigated by sequentially implantation of 60 keV Ni ions at fluences of 1 × 10 16 , 5 × 10 16 , 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 and 70 keV Ag ions at a fluence of 5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Due to the modification of the deposition and accumulation process of Ag implants caused by Ni pre-implantation, the surface morphology, structures, and optical absorption properties of the Ag nanoparticles (NPs) depends strongly on the Ni fluences. UV–vis absorption spectroscopy study showed that the introducing of Ni atoms lead to intensity decrease in the Ag SPR band. Remarkable local concentration increase of Ag profiles appeared for the sample pre-implanted by Ni ions of 5.0 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 . In particular, the AgNi alloy NPs with dual absorption peaks centered at 406 nm and 563 nm have been formed after 600 °C annealing in Ar atmosphere. However, at a low fluence of 1.0 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 , only small increase of the local Ag concentration than the Ag ions singly implanted sample can be observed. At a high fluence of 1.0 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 , lots Ag atoms are trapped close to the surface, which result in heavy sputtering loss of Ag atoms and the sublimation of Ag atoms after 600 °C annealing.

  12. Analyticity of the density of electronic wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Maria; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei.......We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei....

  13. The RPA Atomization Energy Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P; Csonka, Gábor I

    2010-01-12

    There is current interest in the random phase approximation (RPA), a "fifth-rung" density functional for the exchange-correlation energy. RPA has full exact exchange and constructs the correlation with the help of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham orbitals. In many cases (uniform electron gas, jellium surface, and free atom), the correction to RPA is a short-ranged effect that is captured by a local spin density approximation (LSDA) or a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Nonempirical density functionals for the correction to RPA were constructed earlier at the LSDA and GGA levels (RPA+), but they are constructed here at the fully nonlocal level (RPA++), using the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) of Langreth, Lundqvist, and collaborators. While they make important and helpful corrections to RPA total and ionization energies of free atoms, they correct the RPA atomization energies of molecules by only about 1 kcal/mol. Thus, it is puzzling that RPA atomization energies are, on average, about 10 kcal/mol lower than those of accurate values from experiment. We find here that a hybrid of 50% Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA with 50% RPA+ yields atomization energies much more accurate than either one does alone. This suggests a solution to the puzzle: While the proper correction to RPA is short-ranged in some systems, its contribution to the correlation hole can spread out in a molecule with multiple atomic centers, canceling part of the spread of the exact exchange hole (more so than in RPA or RPA+), making the true exchange-correlation hole more localized than in RPA or RPA+. This effect is not captured even by the vdW-DF nonlocality, but it requires the different kind of full nonlocality present in a hybrid functional.

  14. TEM study of amorphous alloys produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Grant, W.A.; Wohlenberg, P.; Hansen, P.; Chadderton, L.T.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is a technique for introducing foreign elements into surface layers of solids. Ions, as a suitably accelerated beam, penetrate the surface, slow down by collisions with target atoms to produce a doped layer. This non-equilibrium technique can provide a wide range of alloys without the restrictions imposed by equilibrium phase diagrams. This paper reports on the production of some amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloys by implantation. Thinned foils of Ni, Fe and stainless steel were implanted at room temperature with Dy + and P + ions at doses between 10 13 - 10 17 ions/cm 2 at energies of 20 and 40 keV respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction analysis were used to investigate the implanted specimens. Radial diffracted intensity measurements confirmed the presence of an amorphous implanted layer. The peak positions of the maxima are in good agreement with data for similar alloys produced by conventional techniques. Only certain ion/target combinations produce these amorphous layers. Implantations at doses lower than those needed for amorphization often result in formation of new crystalline phases such as an h.c.p. phase in nickel and a b.c.c. phase in stainless steel. (Auth.)

  15. FY 1998 annual report on the development of novel, high-activity oxygen electrode by ion-implantation; 1998 nendo ion chunyuho ni yoru shinkina kokassei sanso denkyoku no kaihatsu chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    An attempt has been made to develop an electrode material having high activity for oxygen generating reactions by ion-implantation, which is used to form the bulk defects (fine gaps at the atomic level) on the electrode surface, considered to serve as the active sites. It is found that implantation of the Co{sup +} or Zn{sup +} ion into a compound oxide electrode of Ti and Ru is accompanied by decreased overvoltage for oxygen generation by 50 to 100 mV. The Co{sup +} and Zn{sup +} ions, when implanted, cause damage of similar density in the thin film, decreasing its overvoltage to a similar extent, in spite of their different chemical properties, from which it is considered that the effect of ion implantation is not to change chemical properties of the film but to form a structural defect therein. A thin-film electrode of ruthenium dioxide, which is considered to be the oxygen generating electrode of the highest activity at present, is prepared and implanted with the Ru{sup +} ion, to observe the effect. The ion implantation also decreases the overvoltage by 50 to 70 mV, demonstrating its effect. The same principle is expected to be applicable to development of high-activity oxygen reducing electrode (electrode for fuel cell). (NEDO)

  16. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of orthodontic mini-implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Celha Borges Costa; Segurado, Márcio Nunes; Dorta, Miriam Cristina Leandro; Dias, Fátima Ribeiro; Lenza, Maurício Guilherme; Lenza, Marcos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate and compare in vitro cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of mini-implants from three different commercial brands used for orthodontic anchorage. Methods: Six mini-implants (Conexão(tm), Neodent(tm) and SIN(tm)) were separately immersed in artificial saliva (pH 6.76) for 30 and 60 days. The cytotoxicity of the corrosion extracts was assessed in L929 cell cultures using the violet crystal and MTT assays, as well as cell morphology under light microscopy. Metal surface characteristics before and after immersion in artificial saliva were assessed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The samples underwent atomic absorption spectrophotometry to determine the concentrations of aluminum and vanadium ions, constituent elements of the alloy that present potential toxicity. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA/Bonferroni tests were used for comparisons among groups with p corrosion. The extracts assessed by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry presented concentrations of aluminum and vanadium ions below 1.0 µg/mL and 0.5 µg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: Orthodontic mini-implants manufactured by Conexão(tm), Neodent(tm) and SIN(tm) present high corrosion resistance and are not cytotoxic. PMID:27901227

  17. High-dose MeV electron irradiation of Si-SiO2 structures implanted with high doses Si+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschieva, S.; Angelov, Ch; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2018-03-01

    The influence was studied of 22-MeV electron irradiation on Si-SiO2 structures implanted with high-fluence Si+ ions. Our earlier works demonstrated that Si redistribution is observed in Si+-ion-implanted Si-SiO2 structures (after MeV electron irradiation) only in the case when ion implantation is carried out with a higher fluence (1016 cm-2). We focused our attention on the interaction of high-dose MeV electron irradiation (6.0×1016 cm-2) with n-Si-SiO2 structures implanted with Si+ ions (fluence 5.4×1016 cm-2 of the same order magnitude). The redistribution of both oxygen and silicon atoms in the implanted Si-SiO2 samples after MeV electron irradiation was studied by Rutherford back-scattering (RBS) spectroscopy in combination with a channeling technique (RBS/C). Our results demonstrated that the redistribution of oxygen and silicon atoms in the implanted samples reaches saturation after these high doses of MeV electron irradiation. The transformation of amorphous SiO2 surface into crystalline Si nanostructures (after MeV electron irradiation) was evidenced by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Silicon nanocrystals are formed on the SiO2 surface after MeV electron irradiation. The shape and number of the Si nanocrystals on the SiO2 surface depend on the MeV electron irradiation, while their size increases with the dose. The mean Si nanocrystals height is 16-20 nm after irradiation with MeV electrons at the dose of 6.0×1016 cm-2.

  18. Distribution of implanted hydrogen in amorphous silicon dioxide a-SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokrushin, A.D.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Zinenko, V.I.; Pustovit, A.N.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen SIMS distributions are measured in quartz glasses implanted by different doses of H 2 + ions with energy 40 keV. There are two features in distributions: the availability of intensive peak close to the surface and near-constant dependence at large depth up to ions range. These peculiarities are perhaps attributable to the radiation induced diffusion of hydrogen atoms back to the surface via which ions are implanted [ru

  19. Atom and carrier depth distributions for 300 keV arsenic channeled in the of silicon as a function of alignment angle and ion fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Depth distributions of As atoms measured by SIMS, and of associated carriers measured by differential C-V, both give a measured most probable channeling range Rsub(c) of 3.35 to 3.40 μm for 300 keV As ions implanted in the of Si, aligned within approximately 0.05 deg (proper or axial channeling). The As ion fluences used were 3.0 x 10 13 and 1.0 x 10 14 , and 1.5 x 10 12 cm -2 , for the SIMS and C-V, respectively, and the lowest atom and carrier densities measured in the profiles were 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 14 cm -3 , respectively. The maximum or saturated As density measured at Rsub(c) was approximately 1.5 x 10 16 cm -3 . The depth distribution for 0.50 deg misalignment from the differed only slightly, probably within the experimental measurement reproducibility, and the Rsub(c) was still approximately 3.4 μm. Atom and carrier depth distributions are also shown for misalignment angles of 1.0 and 2.0 deg from the of Si and are significantly degraded. Comparison of the SIMS profiles shows that channeling has saturated by the time an ion fluence of 3 x 10 13 cm -2 is reached. No significant redistribution of channeled As atoms occurs upon annealing at 800 0 C for 30 min. (author)

  20. Bone compaction enhances fixation of weightbearing titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Søren; Rahbek, Ole; Vestermark, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    are weightbearing, the effects of compaction on weightbearing implants were examined. The hypothesis was that compaction would increase implant fixation compared with conventional drilling. Porous-coated titanium implants were inserted bilaterally into the weightbearing portion of the femoral condyles of dogs....... In each dog, one knee had the implant cavity prepared with drilling, and the other knee was prepared with compaction. Eight dogs were euthanized after 2 weeks, and eight dogs were euthanized after 4 weeks. Femoral condyles from an additional eight dogs represented Time 0. Compacted specimens had higher...... bone-implant contact and periimplant bone density at 0 and 2 weeks, but not at 4 weeks. A biphasic response of compaction was found with a pushout test, as compaction increased ultimate shear strength and energy absorption at 0 and 4 weeks, but not at 2 weeks. This biphasic response indicates...

  1. Damage at a tungsten surface induced by impacts of self-atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yong [Data Center for High Energy Density Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and, Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Krstic, Predrag, E-mail: predrag.krstic@stonybrook.edu [Institute for Advanced Computational Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5250 (United States); Zhou, Fu Yang [College of Material Sciences and Optoelectronic Technology, University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 4588, Beijing 100049 (China); Meyer, Fred [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6372 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We study evolution of the surface defects of a 300 K tungsten surface due to the cumulative impact of 0.25–10 keV self-atoms. The simulation is performed by molecular dynamics with bond-order Tersoff-form potentials. At all studied impact energies the computation shows strong defect-recombination effect of both created Frenkel pairs as well as recombination of the implanted atoms with the vacancies created by the sputtering. This leads to a saturation of the cumulative count of vacancies, evident at energies below 2 keV, as long as the implantation per impact atom exceeds sputtering and to a saturation of the interstitial count when production of the sputtered particles per impact atom becomes larger than 1 (in the energy range 2-4 keV). The number of cumulative defects is fitted as functions of impact fluence and energy, enabling their analytical extrapolation outside the studied range of parameters. - Highlights: • We calculated cumulative creation of defects in tungsten by self-atom impact. • At some energies, the defect count saturate with increasing damage dose. • The defects are accumulated in the first few layers of the tungsten surface. • The interstitials are formed predominantly as adatoms.

  2. Anomalous atomic volume of alpha-Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollar, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We have performed full charge-density calculations for the equilibrium atomic volumes of the alpha-phase light actinide metals using the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The average deviation between the experimental and the GGA atomic radii is 1.......3%. The comparison between the LDA and GGA results show that the anomalously large atomic volume of alpha-Pu relative to alpha-Np can be ascribed to exchange-correlation effects connected with the presence of low coordinated sites in the structure where the f electrons are close to the onset of localization...

  3. Nano-SiC region formation in (100) Si-on-insulator substrate: Optimization of hot-C+-ion implantation process to improve photoluminescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tomohisa; Omata, Yuhsuke; Kanazawa, Rikito; Iguchi, Yusuke; Nakada, Shinji; Aoki, Takashi; Sasaki, Tomokazu

    2018-04-01

    We experimentally studied the optimization of the hot-C+-ion implantation process for forming nano-SiC (silicon carbide) regions in a (100) Si-on-insulator substrate at various hot-C+-ion implantation temperatures and C+ ion doses to improve photoluminescence (PL) intensity for future Si-based photonic devices. We successfully optimized the process by hot-C+-ion implantation at a temperature of about 700 °C and a C+ ion dose of approximately 4 × 1016 cm-2 to realize a high intensity of PL emitted from an approximately 1.5-nm-thick C atom segregation layer near the surface-oxide/Si interface. Moreover, atom probe tomography showed that implanted C atoms cluster in the Si layer and near the oxide/Si interface; thus, the C content locally condenses even in the C atom segregation layer, which leads to SiC formation. Corrector-spherical aberration transmission electron microscopy also showed that both 4H-SiC and 3C-SiC nanoareas near both the surface-oxide/Si and buried-oxide/Si interfaces partially grow into the oxide layer, and the observed PL photons are mainly emitted from the surface SiC nano areas.

  4. Mössbauer spectra obtained using β - γ coincidence method after 57Mn implantation into LiH and LiD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Kubo, M. K.; Mihara, M.; Nagatomo, T.; Sato, W.; Miyazaki, J.; Tanigawa, S.; Natori, D.; Sato, S.; Kitagawa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Highly energetic 57Mn ( T 1/2 = 1.45 m) was generated by nuclear projectile fragmentation in a heavy-ion accelerator, and implanted into lithium hydride (LiH) and lithium deuteride (LiD) at 578 K. Mössbauer spectroscopy with β - γ coincidence detection was then carried out on the 57Fe obtained from β -decay of the 57Mn to study the time dependence of the site distributions and coordination environments of dilute Fe atoms implanted in the LiH and LiD. The results suggest that the Fe atoms can substitute for either the Li and H or D atoms within 100 ns. Additionally, the displacement behavior of the substitutional 57Fe atoms on the lattice sites is discussed.

  5. Nitrogen implantation with a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, S; Raatz, N; Jankuhn, St; John, R; Meijer, J

    2018-01-08

    Established techniques for ion implantation rely on technically advanced and costly machines like particle accelerators that only few research groups possess. We report here about a new and surprisingly simple ion implantation method that is based upon a widespread laboratory instrument: The scanning electron microscope. We show that it can be utilized to ionize atoms and molecules from the restgas by collisions with electrons of the beam and subsequently accelerate and implant them into an insulating sample by the effect of a potential building up at the sample surface. Our method is demonstrated by the implantation of nitrogen ions into diamond and their subsequent conversion to nitrogen vacancy centres which can be easily measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy. To provide evidence that the observed centres are truly generated in the way we describe, we supplied a 98% isotopically enriched 15 N gas to the chamber, whose natural abundance is very low. By employing the method of optically detected magnetic resonance, we were thus able to verify that the investigated centres are actually created from the 15 N isotopes. We also show that this method is compatible with lithography techniques using e-beam resist, as demonstrated by the implantation of lines using PMMA.

  6. Microstructure evolution in carbon-ion implanted sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orwa, J. O.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Peng, J. L.; Rubanov, S.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon ions of MeV energy were implanted into sapphire to fluences of 1x10 17 or 2x10 17 cm -2 and thermally annealed in forming gas (4% H in Ar) for 1 h. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results obtained from the lower dose implant showed retention of implanted carbon and accumulation of H near the end of range in the C implanted and annealed sample. Three distinct regions were identified by transmission electron microscopy of the implanted region in the higher dose implant. First, in the near surface region, was a low damage region (L 1 ) composed of crystalline sapphire and a high density of plateletlike defects. Underneath this was a thin, highly damaged and amorphized region (L 2 ) near the end of range in which a mixture of i-carbon and nanodiamond phases are present. Finally, there was a pristine, undamaged sapphire region (L 3 ) beyond the end of range. In the annealed sample some evidence of the presence of diamond nanoclusters was found deep within the implanted layer near the projected range of the C ions. These results are compared with our previous work on carbon implanted quartz in which nanodiamond phases were formed only a few tens of nanometers from the surface, a considerable distance from the projected range of the ions, suggesting that significant out diffusion of the implanted carbon had occurred.

  7. Density functional calculations of hypothetical neutral hollow octahedral molecules with a 48-atom framework: Hydrides and oxides of boron, carbon, nitrogen, aluminum, and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaViolette, Randall A. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 (United States); Benson, Michael T. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 (United States)

    2000-06-01

    We computed via first-principles density functional theory calculations (employing both the local density and generalized gradient approximations) the dimensions, bond lengths and angles, binding energy, and HOMO-LUMO gap of the following hypothetical neutral hollow octahedral molecules: B{sub 48}H{sub 24}, C{sub 48}H{sub 48}, C{sub 96}H{sub 80} (formed by bonding two C{sub 48}H{sub 48} molecules), N{sub 48}H{sub 24}, Al{sub 48}H{sub 24}, and Si{sub 48}H{sub 48}; B{sub 24}O{sub 24}, C{sub 24}O{sub 24}, N{sub 24}O{sub 24}, Al{sub 24}O{sub 24}, and Si{sub 24}O{sub 24}. Each molecule consists of a large hollow framework of six puckered eight-membered rings whose planes are either mutually perpendicular or parallel, so that each molecule possesses only eight- and nine-membered rings. The hydrides have their hydrogen atoms attached only to the two-atom bridging sites on the framework. The oxides have their oxygen atoms occupying exclusively the two-atom bridging sites of the framework alternating with the (B, C, N, Al, Si) atoms exclusively occupying the three-atom bridging sites. We also calculated the infrared spectra of the C{sub 48}H{sub 48} and the C{sub 24}O{sub 24} molecules. For the sake of comparison, we also examined the hypothetical octahedral C{sub 48} fullerene cuboctohedron (possessing four-, six-, and eight-membered rings) studied by Dunlap and Taylor. The molecules based on carbon would be the most stable; those based on nitrogen would be the least stable, if at all. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. A three-dimensional relaxation model for calculation of atomic mixing and topography changes induces by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.; Perez-Martin, A.M.C.; Dominguez-Vazquez, J.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    A simple model for three-dimensional material relaxation associated with atomic mixing is presented. The relaxation of the solid to accommodate the extra effective displacement volume Ω of an implanted or relocated atom is modelled by treating the surrounding solid as an incompressible medium. This leads to a tractable general formalism which can be used to predict implant distribution and changes in surface topography induced by ion beams, both in monatomic and multicomponent targets. The two-component case is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  9. Electron correlation in the interacting quantum atoms partition via coupled-cluster lagrangian densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín-Gallego, Fernando José; Chávez-Calvillo, Rodrigo; García-Revilla, Marco; Francisco, Evelio; Pendás, Ángel Martín; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2016-07-15

    The electronic energy partition established by the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) approach is an important method of wavefunction analyses which has yielded valuable insights about different phenomena in physical chemistry. Most of the IQA applications have relied upon approximations, which do not include either dynamical correlation (DC) such as Hartree-Fock (HF) or external DC like CASSCF theory. Recently, DC was included in the IQA method by means of HF/Coupled-Cluster (CC) transition densities (Chávez-Calvillo et al., Comput. Theory Chem. 2015, 1053, 90). Despite the potential utility of this approach, it has a few drawbacks, for example, it is not consistent with the calculation of CC properties different from the total electronic energy. To improve this situation, we have implemented the IQA energy partition based on CC Lagrangian one- and two-electron orbital density matrices. The development presented in this article is tested and illustrated with the H2 , LiH, H2 O, H2 S, N2 , and CO molecules for which the IQA results obtained under the consideration of (i) the CC Lagrangian, (ii) HF/CC transition densities, and (iii) HF are critically analyzed and compared. Additionally, the effect of the DC in the different components of the electronic energy in the formation of the T-shaped (H2 )2 van der Waals cluster and the bimolecular nucleophilic substitution between F(-) and CH3 F is examined. We anticipate that the approach put forward in this article will provide new understandings on subjects in physical chemistry wherein DC plays a crucial role like molecular interactions along with chemical bonding and reactivity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Heavy doping of CdTe single crystals by Cr ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovych, Volodymyr D.; Böttger, Roman; Heller, Rene; Zhou, Shengqiang; Bester, Mariusz; Cieniek, Bogumil; Mroczka, Robert; Lopucki, Rafal; Sagan, Piotr; Kuzma, Marian

    2018-03-01

    Implantation of bulk CdTe single crystals with high fluences of 500 keV Cr+ ions was performed to achieve Cr concentration above the equilibrium solubility limit of this element in CdTe lattice. The structure and composition of the implanted samples were studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to characterize the incorporation of chromium into the host lattice and to investigate irradiation-induced damage build-up. It was found that out-diffusion of Cr atoms and sputtering of the targets alter the depth distribution and limit concentration of the projectile ions in the as-implanted samples. Appearance of crystallographically oriented, metallic α-Cr nanoparticles inside CdTe matrix was found after implantation, as well as a strong disorder at the depth far beyond the projected range of the implanted ions.

  11. Observation of the bone mineral density of newly formed bone using rabbits. Compared with newly formed bone around implants and cortical bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Hiroshi; Numata, Yasuko; Sakae, Toshiro; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takao

    2009-01-01

    There have been many studies reporting that newly formed bone around implants is spongy bone. However, although the morphology is reported as being like spongy bone, it is difficult to discriminate whether the bone quality of newly formed bone appears similar to osteoid or cortical bone; therefore, evaluation of bone quality is required. The aims of this study were to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) values of newly formed bone around implants after 4, 8, 16, 24 and 48 weeks, to represent these values on three-dimensional color mapping (3Dmap), and to evaluate the change in bone quality associated with newly formed bone around implants. The animal experimental protocol of this study was approved by the Ethics Committee for Animal Experiments of our University. This experiment used 20 surface treatment implants (Ti-6Al-4V alloy: 3.1 mm in diameter and 30.0 mm in length) by grit-blasting. They were embedded into surgically created flaws in femurs of 20 New Zealand white rabbits (16 weeks old, male). The rabbits were sacrificed with an ear intravenous overdose of pentobarbital sodium under general anesthesia each period, and the femurs were resected. We measured BMD of newly formed bone around implants and cortical bone using Micro-CT, and the BMD distribution map of 3Dmap (TRI/3D Bon BMD, Ratoc System Engineering). The BMD of cortical bone was 1,026.3±44.3 mg/cm 3 at 4 weeks, 1,023.8±40.9 mg/cm 3 at 8 weeks, 1,048.2±45.6 mg/cm 3 at 16 weeks, 1,067.2±60.2 mg/cm 3 at 24 weeks, and 1,069.3±50.7 mg/cm 3 at 48 weeks after implantation, showing a non-significant increase each period. The BMD of newly formed bone around implants was 296.8±25.6 mg/cm 3 at 4 weeks, 525.0±72.4 mg/cm 3 at 8 weeks, 691.2±26.0 mg/cm 3 at 16 weeks, 776.9±27.7 mg/cm 3 at 24 weeks, and 845.2±23.1 mg/cm 3 at 48 weeks after implantation, showing a significant increase after each period. It was revealed that the color scale of newly formed bone was Low level at 4 weeks, and then it

  12. On the nature of the disordered layer produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zellama, K.; Germain, P.; Squelard, S.; Bourgoin, J.C.; Piaguet, J.; Robic, J.Y.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of this communication is to compare some thermodynamic parameters measured in amorphous layers produced by evaporation and in disordered layers produced by ion implantation (which will be called implanted layers). The thermodynamics parameters studied are: the temperature of the annealing stages (reflecting the activation energies for atomic rearrangement) and the activation energy of the growth rate for crystallization. This investigation has been performed in germanium because the crystallization in this material has been extensively studied. (author)

  13. Investigation of germanium implanted with aluminum by multi-laser micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, A., E-mail: andrea.sanson@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Napolitani, E. [MATIS IMM-CNR at Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Impellizzeri, G. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Giarola, M. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy); De Salvador, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Privitera, V.; Priolo, F. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy); Carnera, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-08-31

    Germanium samples, implanted with aluminum and annealed, have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy using different excitation lines with the aim of gaining insights about the Al distribution at different depths beneath the sample surface and to correlate the Raman spectra with the electrical and chemical profiles, obtained by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP) and Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements, respectively. The intensity of the Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm{sup −1}, due to the local vibrational mode of the substitutional Al atoms in the Ge matrix, has been directly related to the SRP behavior, while no correlation has been observed with SIMS profiles. These findings show that the electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. Finally, a clear down shift is observed for the Ge–Ge Raman peak at ∼ 300 cm{sup −1}, which also seems to be directly related to the active content of Al dopant atoms. This work shows that micro-Raman spectroscopy can be a suitable tool for the study of doping profiles in Ge. - Highlights: ► Al-implanted Ge and annealed were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. ► Using different laser lines we have investigated the implants at different depths. ► The Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm{sup −1} is directly related to the SRP behavior. ► The electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. ► Carrier effects are observed on the Ge–Ge peak at ∼ 300 cm{sup −1}.

  14. Investigation of germanium implanted with aluminum by multi-laser micro-Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanson, A.; Napolitani, E.; Impellizzeri, G.; Giarola, M.; De Salvador, D.; Privitera, V.; Priolo, F.; Mariotto, G.; Carnera, A.

    2013-01-01

    Germanium samples, implanted with aluminum and annealed, have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy using different excitation lines with the aim of gaining insights about the Al distribution at different depths beneath the sample surface and to correlate the Raman spectra with the electrical and chemical profiles, obtained by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP) and Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements, respectively. The intensity of the Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm −1 , due to the local vibrational mode of the substitutional Al atoms in the Ge matrix, has been directly related to the SRP behavior, while no correlation has been observed with SIMS profiles. These findings show that the electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. Finally, a clear down shift is observed for the Ge–Ge Raman peak at ∼ 300 cm −1 , which also seems to be directly related to the active content of Al dopant atoms. This work shows that micro-Raman spectroscopy can be a suitable tool for the study of doping profiles in Ge. - Highlights: ► Al-implanted Ge and annealed were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. ► Using different laser lines we have investigated the implants at different depths. ► The Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm −1 is directly related to the SRP behavior. ► The electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. ► Carrier effects are observed on the Ge–Ge peak at ∼ 300 cm −1

  15. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Ken-ichi, E-mail: aman@tohoku-pharm.ac.jp; Takahashi, Ohgi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8558 (Japan); Suzuki, Kazuhiro [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Fukuma, Takeshi [Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ{sub DS}) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ{sub DS}. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  16. Surface diffusion and coverage effect of Li atom on graphene as studied by several density functional theory methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhi [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad 2001, Col. Chamilpa, 62210 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Contreras-Torres, Flavio F., E-mail: flavioc@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Jalbout, Abraham F.; Ramírez-Treviño, Alberto [Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Cajeme, Ciudad Obregon, Sonora (Mexico)

    2013-11-15

    The adsorption of Li atom on graphene is examined using density functional theory methods. Three different adsorption sites are considered, including the on top of a carbon atom (OT), on top of a C-C bond (Bri), and on top of a hexagon (Hol), as well as Li adsorbed at different coverage. The Hol site is found to be the most stable, followed by the Bri and OT sites. The order of stabilization is independent of coverage. The localization of Li–graphene interaction at all sites has reverse order with stabilization. The localization will cause different repulsive interaction between Li atoms which is believed to take responsibility for the difference between the charge transfer order and adsorption energy order of Li adsorption at all possible sites. Repulsive interaction also causes the decreasing of adsorption energies of Li at Hol site with increasing coverage, but the corresponding influence is bigger at low coverage range (0.020–0.056 monolayers) than that at high coverage range (0.056–0.250 monolayers). The trend of charge transfer and dipole moment with increasing coverage is also in agreement with that of adsorption energy. It is also found that the distance of Li above graphene will increase with increasing coverage, but a so-called “zigzag” curve appears, which exhibits an oscillatory behavior as a function of increasing coverage. The diffusion of Li atom on graphene is also studied. Li atom migrates from a Hol site to a neighboring Hol site through the Bri site between them is found to be the minimum energy path. Within the studied coverage range, the diffusion barrier decreases with increasing coverage which can be ascribed to the phenomenon of different repulsion interactions when Li atom adsorbs at different sites. The increasing coverage amplified the phenomenon.

  17. Au implantation into various types of silicate glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Bočan, Jiří; Švecová, B.; Nekvindová, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 267, - (2009), s. 1575-1578 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Au+ ion implantation * Glass es * RBS Depth profiling Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.156, year: 2009

  18. Structural and optical properties of vanadium ion-implanted GaN

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Jagerová, Adéla; Sofer, Z.; Klímová, K.; Sedmidubský, D.; Mikulics, M.; Lorinčík, Jan; Veselá, D.; Bottger, R.; Akhmadaliev, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 406, SEP (2017), s. 53-57 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20507S; GA ČR GA15-01602S; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : GaN implantation * RBS-channelling * optical properties of metal-implanted GaN Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering (URE-Y) OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics; Electrical and electronic engineering (URE-Y) Impact factor: 1.109, year: 2016

  19. Preservation and release dose of helium implanted in nanocrystal titanium film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Xinggui; Luo Shunzhong; Peng Shuming; Zheng Sixiao; Liu Zhongyang; Wang Peilu; Liao Xiaodong; Liu Ning

    2003-01-01

    Helium concentration profile, preservation dose and release rate from a nanocrystal titanium film implanted with helium at an energy of 100 keV and dose of 2.2 x 10 18 cm -2 are measured by proton Rutherford backscattering technique in a range from room temperature to 400 degree C. The implanted helium may be stably preserved up to the 68 percent after keeping a long time of 210 d in the nanocrystal titanium film at the room temperature environment, and the He-Ti atomic ratio reaches to 52.6%. When the temperature of specimen increases to 100 degree C, the helium concentration can be preserved to 89.6% of the keeping helium dose at room temperature and He-Ti atomic ratio reaches 44%. Even if the specimen temperature up to 400 degree C, the helium concentration still can be preserved to 32.6% of the keeping helium dose at room temperature and the He-Ti atomic ratio is 17.1%. Possible mechanism of helium effectively preserved in the nanocrystal titanium film is discussed based on the energy stability viewpoint

  20. Evaluation of interference fit and bone damage of an uncemented femoral knee implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berahmani, Sanaz; Hendriks, Maartje; de Jong, Joost J A; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Maal, Thomas; Janssen, Dennis; Verdonschot, Nico

    2018-01-01

    During implantation of an uncemented femoral knee implant, press-fit interference fit provides the primary stability. It is assumed that during implantation a combination of elastic and plastic deformation and abrasion of the bone will occur, but little is known about what happens at the bone-implant interface and how much press-fit interference fit is eventually achieved. Five cadaveric femora were prepared and implantation was performed by an experienced surgeon. Micro-CT- and conventional CT-scans were obtained pre- and post-implantation for geometrical measurements and to measure bone mineral density. Additionally, the position of the implant with respect to the bone was determined by optical scanning of the reconstructions. By measuring the differences in surface geometry, assessments were made of the cutting error, the actual interference fit, the amount of bone damage, and the effective interference fit. Our analysis showed an average cutting error of 0.67mm (SD 0.17mm), which pointed mostly towards bone under-resections. We found an average actual AP interference fit of 1.48mm (SD 0.27mm), which was close to the nominal value of 1.5mm. We observed combinations of bone damage and elastic deformation in all bone specimens, which showed a trend to be related with bone density. Higher bone density tended to lead to lower bone damage and higher elastic deformation. The results of the current study indicate different factors that interact while implanting an uncemented femoral knee component. This knowledge can be used to fine-tune design criteria of femoral components to achieve adequate primary stability for all patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Heavy ion time-of-flight ERDA of high dose metal implanted germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Evans, P.J.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Wielunski, L.S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics; Bunder, J. [New South Wales Univ., Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Wollongong Univ. Coll

    1996-12-31

    With the thick Ge substrates used in ion implantation, RBS can have difficulty in resolving the mass-depth ambiguities when analysing materials composed of mixtures of elements with nearly equal masses. Additional, and complimentary techniques are thus required. This paper reports the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF- ERDA), and conventional RBS in the analysis of Ge(100) implanted with high dose Ti and Cu ions from a MEWA ion source . Heavy ion ToF ERDA has been used to resolve, and profile the implanted transition metal species, and also to study any oxygen incorporation into the sample resulting from the implantation, or subsequential reactions with air or moisture. This work is part of a study on high dose metal ion implantation of medium atomic weight semiconductor materials. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Heavy ion time-of-flight ERDA of high dose metal implanted germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N; Evans, P J; Noorman, J T [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Wielunski, L S [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics; Bunder, J [New South Wales Univ., Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Wollongong Univ. Coll

    1997-12-31

    With the thick Ge substrates used in ion implantation, RBS can have difficulty in resolving the mass-depth ambiguities when analysing materials composed of mixtures of elements with nearly equal masses. Additional, and complimentary techniques are thus required. This paper reports the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF- ERDA), and conventional RBS in the analysis of Ge(100) implanted with high dose Ti and Cu ions from a MEWA ion source . Heavy ion ToF ERDA has been used to resolve, and profile the implanted transition metal species, and also to study any oxygen incorporation into the sample resulting from the implantation, or subsequential reactions with air or moisture. This work is part of a study on high dose metal ion implantation of medium atomic weight semiconductor materials. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Clarification of the interaction between Au atoms and the anatase TiO2 (112) surface using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kohei; Koga, Hiroaki; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Tanaka, Shingo

    2018-04-01

    A model (112) surface slab of anatase TiO2 (112) was optimized, and the adsorption of Au atoms onto the (112) surface was investigated by first-principles calculations based on DFT (density functional theory) with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Furthermore, the results were compared with those of Au/anatase TiO2 (101) system. The (112) surface has a ridge and a groove (zig-zag structure). The Au atoms were strongly adsorbed in the grooves but became unstable as they climbed toward the ridges, and the promotion of electrons in the 5d orbitals to the 6s and 6p orbitals in the absorbed Au atom occurred. At the Au/anatase TiO2 interface, the Au-Ti4+ coordinate bond in the (112) system is stronger than that in the (101) system because the promotion of electrons is greater in the former interaction than the latter. The results suggest that Au/anatase TiO2 catalysts with a higher dispersion of Au nanoparticles could be prepared when the (112) surface is preferentially exposed.

  4. Research on nitrogen implantation energy dependence of the properties of SIMON materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, E.X.; Sun, J.Y.; Chen, J.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Zh.X.; Li, N.; Zhang, G.Q.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    With different implantation energies, nitrogen ions were implanted into SIMOX wafers in our work. And then the wafers were subsequently annealed to form separated by implantation of oxygen and nitrogen (SIMON) wafers. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to observe the distribution of nitrogen and oxygen in the wafers. The result of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was suggested by the dandling bonds densities in the wafers changed with N ions implantation energies. SIMON-based SIS capacitors were made. The results of the C-V test confirmed that the energy of nitrogen implantation affects the properties of the wafers, and the optimum implantation energy was determined

  5. Pulsed electron-beam annealing of selenium-implanted gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, T.; Tokunaga, K.; Taka, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical properties of selenium-implanted gallium arsenide annealed by a single shot of high-power pulsed electron beams have been investigated by differential Hall-effect and sheet-resistivity measurements. It has been shown that higher electrical activation of implanted selenium can be obtained after electron-beam annealing at an incident energy density of 1.2 J/cm 2 , independent of heating of GaAs substrate during implantation. Measured carrier concentrations exhibit uniformly distributed profiles having carrier concentrations of 2--3 x 10 19 /cm 3 , which is difficult to realize by conventional thermal annealing

  6. Copper implantation defects in MgO observed by positron beam analysis, RBS and X-TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huis, M.A. van; Fedorov, A.V.; Veen, A. van; Smulders, P.J.M.; Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    2000-01-01

    In this work, effects of copper ion implantation in MgO were studied. (1 0 0) MgO samples were implanted with 50 keV Cu ions and thermally annealed stepwise in air for 30 minutes at 550, 750, 1000, 1250 and 1350 K. After ion implantation and after each annealing step, the samples were analysed with positron beam analysis (PBA). Use was also made of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry/channeling (RBS-C) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM). The combination of these techniques enabled to monitor the depth resolved evolution of both created defects and the copper atom depth distribution. PBA results show that copper implantation at a dose of 10 15 ions cm -2 yields a single layer of vacancy type defects after annealing. However a copper implantation at a dose of 10 16 ions cm -2 clearly yields two layers of defects in the material after annealing, separated by an intermediate layer. In both layers nanocavities have been identified. RBS experimental results show that the implanted copper atoms diffuse into the bulk material during annealing. X-TEM and channeling results show that after annealing, the lattice of the copper nanoprecipitates is epitaxial to the MgO host lattice. Under some circumstances, copper precipitates and small voids can co-exist. Furthermore, X-TEM measurements show that the nanocavities have rectangular shapes

  7. Amorphous GaP produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, T.; Kato, Y.; Shiraki, Y.; Komatsubara, K.F.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of non-crystalline states ('disordered' and 'amorphous') of GaP were produced by using ion implantation and post annealing. A structural-phase-transition-like annealing behaviour from the 'disordered' state to the 'amorphous' state was observed. The ion dose dependence and the annealing behaviour of the atomic structure of GaP implanted with 200 keV -N + ions were studied by using electron diffraction, backscattering and volume change measurements. The electronic structure was also investigated by measuring optical absorption and electrical conductivity. The implanted layer gradually loses the crystalline order with the increase of the nitrogen dose. The optical absorption coefficient α and electric conductivity sigma of GaP crystals implanted with 200 keV -N + ions of 1 x 10 16 cm -2 were expressed as αhν = C(hν - E 0 )sup(n) and log sigma = A -BTsup(-1/4), respectively. Moreover, the volume of the implanted layer increased about three percent and the electron diffraction pattern was diffused halo whose intensity monotonically decreases along the radial direction. These results indicate that the as-implanted layer has neither a long range order or short range order ('disordered state'). In the sample implanted at 1 x 10 16 cm -2 , a structural phase-transition-like annealing stage was observed at around 400 0 C. That is, the optical absorption coefficient abruptly fell off from 6 x 10 4 to 7 x 10 3 cm -1 and the volume of the implanted layer decreased about 2% within an increase of less than 10 degrees in the anneal temperature. Moreover, the short range order of the lattice structure appeared in the electron diffraction pattern. According to the backscattering experiment, the heavily implanted GaP was still in the non-crystalline state even after annealing. These facts suggest that heavily implanted GaP, followed by annealing at around 400 0 C, is in the 'amorphous' state, although as-implanted GaP is not in the 'amorphous' state but in the

  8. Atomization of thorium in a hollow-cathode type discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianarosa, P.; Demers, Y.; Gagne, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The atomization of thorium metal in a hollow-cathode electrical discharge has been investigated. Laser absorption spectroscopy with the laser tuned on the 5760.55 A (0-17355 1 cm -1 ) transition of Th I was used to evaluate the density of atoms in the 3 F 2 ground state. The results obtained (densities up to 10 13 atoms cm -3 ) show that our discharge tube is a suitable source of thorium metal atoms for laser assisted spectroscopic analysis of this element. (author)

  9. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakirev, N.; Zhikharev, V.; Gumarov, G.

    2014-05-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field.

  10. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakirev, N.; Zhikharev, V.; Gumarov, G.

    2014-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe 3 Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field

  11. Nanoscale characterization of bone-implant interface and biomechanical modulation of bone ingrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Paul A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: pclark4@gmail.com; Clark, Andrew M. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Rodriguez, Anthony [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Hussain, Mohammad A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Mao, Jeremy J. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: jmao2@uic.edu

    2007-04-15

    Bone-implant interface is characterized by an array of cells and macromolecules. This study investigated the nanomechancial properties of bone-implant interface using atomic force microscopy in vitro, and the mechanical modulation of implant bone ingrowth in vivo using bone histomorphometry. Upon harvest of screw-type titanium implants placed in vivo in the rabbit maxilla and proximal femur for 4 weeks, nanoindentation was performed in the bone-implant interface at 60-{mu}m intervals radially from the implant surface. The average Young's Moduli (E) of the maxillary bone-implant interface was 1.13 {+-} 0.27 MPa, lacking significant differences at all intervals. In contrast, an increasing gradient of E was observed radially from the femur bone-implant interface: 0.87 {+-} 0.25 MPa to 2.24 {+-} 0.69 MPa, representing significant differences among several 60-{mu}m intervals. In a separate experiment, bone healing was allowed for 6 weeks for proximal femur implants. The right femoral implant received axial cyclic loading at 200 mN and 1 Hz for 10 min/d over 12 days, whereas the left femoral implant served as control. Cyclic loading induced significantly higher bone volume, osteoblast numbers per endocortical bone surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate than controls. These data demonstrate nanoscale and microscale characterizations of bone-implant interface, and mechanical modulation of bone ingrowth surrounding titanium implants.

  12. Nanoscale characterization of bone-implant interface and biomechanical modulation of bone ingrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Paul A.; Clark, Andrew M.; Rodriguez, Anthony; Hussain, Mohammad A.; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2007-01-01

    Bone-implant interface is characterized by an array of cells and macromolecules. This study investigated the nanomechancial properties of bone-implant interface using atomic force microscopy in vitro, and the mechanical modulation of implant bone ingrowth in vivo using bone histomorphometry. Upon harvest of screw-type titanium implants placed in vivo in the rabbit maxilla and proximal femur for 4 weeks, nanoindentation was performed in the bone-implant interface at 60-μm intervals radially from the implant surface. The average Young's Moduli (E) of the maxillary bone-implant interface was 1.13 ± 0.27 MPa, lacking significant differences at all intervals. In contrast, an increasing gradient of E was observed radially from the femur bone-implant interface: 0.87 ± 0.25 MPa to 2.24 ± 0.69 MPa, representing significant differences among several 60-μm intervals. In a separate experiment, bone healing was allowed for 6 weeks for proximal femur implants. The right femoral implant received axial cyclic loading at 200 mN and 1 Hz for 10 min/d over 12 days, whereas the left femoral implant served as control. Cyclic loading induced significantly higher bone volume, osteoblast numbers per endocortical bone surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate than controls. These data demonstrate nanoscale and microscale characterizations of bone-implant interface, and mechanical modulation of bone ingrowth surrounding titanium implants

  13. Carbon nanotube growth from catalytic nano-clusters formed by hot-ion-implantation into the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Yasushi, E-mail: yhoshino@kanagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Arima, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Ai; Saito, Yasunao; Nakata, Jyoji [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have studied growth of chirality-controlled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from hot-implantation-formed catalytic nano-clusters in a thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. This procedure has the advantage of high controllability of the diameter and the number of clusters by optimizing the conditions of the ion implantation. In the present study, Co{sup +} ions with ion dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted in the vicinity of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface at 300 Degree-Sign C temperature. The implanted Co atoms located in the SiO{sub 2} layer has an amorphous-like structure with a cluster diameter of several nm. In contrast, implanted Co atoms in the Si substrate are found to take a cobalt silicide structure, confirmed by the high-resolution image of transmission electron microscope. CNTs are grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We have confirmed a large amount of vertically-aligned multi-walled CNTs from the Co nano-clusters formed by the hot-ion-implantation near the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  14. Versatile Density Functionals for Computational Surface Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorff, Jess

    Density functional theory (DFT) emerged almost 50 years ago. Since then DFT has established itself as the central electronic structure methodology for simulating atomicscale systems from a few atoms to a few hundred atoms. This success of DFT is due to a very favorable accuracy-to-computational c......Density functional theory (DFT) emerged almost 50 years ago. Since then DFT has established itself as the central electronic structure methodology for simulating atomicscale systems from a few atoms to a few hundred atoms. This success of DFT is due to a very favorable accuracy...... resampling techniques, thereby systematically avoiding problems with overfitting. The first ever density functional presenting both reliable accuracy and convincing error estimation is generated. The methodology is general enough to be applied to more complex functional forms with higher-dimensional fitting...

  15. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provine, J., E-mail: jprovine@stanford.edu; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kim, Ki-Hyun [Manufacturing Technology Center, Samsung Electronics, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Prinz, Fritz B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiN{sub x} films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiN{sub x} and evaluate the film’s WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H{sub 2}O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiN{sub x} film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiN{sub x} of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiN{sub x} from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  16. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of orthodontic mini-implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celha Borges Costa Alves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate and compare in vitro cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of mini-implants from three different commercial brands used for orthodontic anchorage. Methods: Six mini-implants (Conexão(tm, Neodent(tm and SIN(tm were separately immersed in artificial saliva (pH 6.76 for 30 and 60 days. The cytotoxicity of the corrosion extracts was assessed in L929 cell cultures using the violet crystal and MTT assays, as well as cell morphology under light microscopy. Metal surface characteristics before and after immersion in artificial saliva were assessed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The samples underwent atomic absorption spectrophotometry to determine the concentrations of aluminum and vanadium ions, constituent elements of the alloy that present potential toxicity. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA/Bonferroni tests were used for comparisons among groups with p < 0.05 considered significant. Statistical analysis was carried out with Graph Pad PRISM software Version 4.0. Results: No changes in cell viability or morphology were observed. Mini-implants SEM images revealed smooth surfaces with no obvious traces of corrosion. The extracts assessed by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry presented concentrations of aluminum and vanadium ions below 1.0 µg/mL and 0.5 µg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: Orthodontic mini-implants manufactured by Conexão(tm, Neodent(tm and SIN(tm present high corrosion resistance and are not cytotoxic.

  17. Surface and local electronic structure modification of MgO film using Zn and Fe ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jitendra Pal; Lim, Weon Cheol; Lee, Jihye; Song, Jonghan; Lee, Ik-Jae; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2018-02-01

    Present work is motivated to investigate the surface and local electronic structure modifications of MgO films implanted with Zn and Fe ions. MgO film was deposited using radio frequency sputtering method. Atomic force microscopy measurements exhibit morphological changes associated with implantation. Implantation of Fe and Zn ions leads to the reduction of co-ordination geometry of Mg2+ ions in host lattice. The effect is dominant at bulk of film rather than surface as the large concentration of implanted ions resides inside bulk. Moreover, the evidences of interaction among implanted ions and oxygen are not being observed using near edge fine structure measurements.

  18. Stanford polarized atomic beam target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavis, D.G.; Dunham, J.S.; Hugg, J.W.; Glavish, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    A polarized atomic beam source was used to produce an atomic hydrogen beam which was in turn used as a polarized proton target. A target density of 2 x 10'' atoms/cm 3 and a target polarization of 0.37 without the use of rf transitions were measured. These measurements indicate that a number of experiments are currently feasible with a variety of polarized target beams

  19. Surface engineering by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Bjarne Roger

    1995-01-01

    Awidespread commercial applica tion iof particle accelerators is for ion implantation. Accelerator beams are used for ion implantation into metals, alloying a thin surface layer with foreign atoms to concentrations impossible to achieve by thermal processes, making for dramatic improvements in hardness and in resistance to wear and corrosion. Traditional hardening processes require high temperatures causing deformation; ion implantation on the other hand is a ''cold process'', treating the finished product. The ionimplanted layer is integrated in the substrate, avoiding the risk of cracking and delamination from normal coating processes. Surface properties may be ''engineered&