WorldWideScience

Sample records for implantation induced defects

  1. Cellular structure formed by ion-implantation-induced point defect

    Nitta, N.; Taniwaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have found that a cellular defect structure is formed on the surface of Sn + ion implanted GaSb at a low temperature and proposed its formation mechanism based on the movement of the induced point defects. This research was carried out in order to examine the validity of the mechanism by clarifying the effect of the mobility of the point defects on the defect formation. The defect structure on the GaSb surfaces implanted at cryogenic temperature and room temperature was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. In the sample implanted at room temperature, the sponge-like structure (a pileup of voids) was formed and the cellular structure, as observed at a low temperature, did not develop. This behavior was explained by the high mobility of the vacancies during implantation at room temperature, and the proposed idea that the defect formation process is dominated by the induced point defects was confirmed

  2. Defects induced by helium implantation in SiC

    Oliviero, E.; Barbot, J.F.; Declemy, A.; Beaufort, M.F.; Oliviero, E.

    2008-01-01

    SiC is one of the considered materials for nuclear fuel conditioning and for the fabrication of some core structures in future nuclear generation reactors. For the development of this advance technology, a fundamental research on this material is of prime importance. In particular, the implantation/irradiation effects have to be understood and controlled. It is with this aim that the structural alterations induced by implantation/irradiation in SiC are studied by different experimental techniques as transmission electron microscopy, helium desorption, X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In this work, the different types of defects induced by helium implantation in SiC, point or primary defects (obtained at low energy (∼100 eV) until spread defects (obtained at higher energy (until ∼2 MeV)) are exposed. The amorphization/recrystallization and swelling phenomena are presented too. (O.M.)

  3. N+ ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    Chen, Z Q; Sekiguchi, T; Yuan, X L; Maekawa, M; Kawasuso, A

    2004-01-01

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N + ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10 12 to 10 14 cm -2 . Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N + implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity

  4. Implantation processing of Si: A unified approach to understanding ion-induced defects and their impact

    Holland, O.W.; Roth, E.G.

    1997-05-01

    A model is presented to account for the effects of ion-induced defects during implantation processing of Si. It will be shown that processing is quite generally affected by the presence of defect excesses rather than the total number of defects. a defect is considered excess if it represents a surplus locally of one defect type over its compliment. Processing spanning a wide range of implantation conditions will be presented to demonstrate that the majority of the total defects played little or no role in the process. This is a direct result of the ease with which the spatially correlated Frenkel pairs recombine either dynamically or during a post-implantation annealing. Based upon this model, a method will be demonstrated for manipulating or engineering the excess defects to modify their effects. In particular high-energy, self-ions are shown to inject vacancies into a boron implanted region resulting in suppression of transient enhanced diffusion of the dopant

  5. In-Situ Photoexcitation-Induced Suppression of Point Defect Generation in Ion Implanted Silicon

    Cho, C.R.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Yarykin, N.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of vacancy-related defects in n-type silicon has been studied immediately after implantation of He, Si, or Ge ions at 85 K using in-situ DLTS. A-center concentrations in He-implanted samples reach a maximum immediately after implantation, whereas, with Si or Ge ion implanted samples they continuously increase during subsequent anneals. It is proposed that defect clusters, which emit vacancies during anneals, are generated in the collision cascades of Si or Ge ions. An illumination-induced suppression of A-center formation is seen immediately after implantation of He ions at 85 K. This effect is also observed with Si or Ge ions, but only after annealing. The suppression of vacancy complex formation via photoexcitation is believed to occur due to an enhanced recombination of defects during ion implantation, and results in reduced number of vacancies remaining in the defect clusters. In p-type silicon, a reduction in K-center formation and an enhanced migration of defects are concurrently observed in the illuminated sample implanted with Si ions. These observations are consistent with a model where the injection of excess carriers modifies the defect charge state and impacts their diffusion

  6. Ion implantation-induced defects in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steel probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Anwand, Wolfgang; Butterling, Maik; Brauer, Gerhard; Wagner, Andreas [HZDR, Institut fuer Strahlenphysik (Germany); Richter, Astrid [Technische Hochschule Wildau (Germany); Koegler, Reinhard [HZDR, Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung (Germany); Chen, C.L. [I-Shou University, Kaohsiung (China)

    2012-07-01

    ODS steel is a promising candidate for an application in fission and fusion power plants of a new generation because of its advantageous properties as stability and temperature resistance. A microscopic understanding of the physical reasons of the mechanical and thermal properties as well as the behaviour of the material under irradiation is an important pre-condition for such applications. The investigated ODS FeCrAl alloy *PM2000* has been produced in a powder metallurgical way. Neutron-induced damage at ODS steel was simulated by He{sup +} and Fe{sup 2+} co-implantation with energies of 2.5 MeV and 400 keV, respectively, and different fluences. The implantation has been carried out with a dual ion beam which enables a simultaneous implantation of both ion types. Thereby the Fe{sup 2+} implantation was used for the creation of radiation defects, and He{sup +} was implanted in order to reproduce He bubbles as they are expected to appear by neutron irradiation. The implantation-induced damage was investigated by depth dependent Doppler broadening measurements using a variable energy slow positron beam.

  7. X-ray analysis of temperature induced defect structures in boron implanted silicon

    Sztucki, M.; Metzger, T. H.; Kegel, I.; Tilke, A.; Rouvière, J. L.; Lübbert, D.; Arthur, J.; Patel, J. R.

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate the application of surface sensitive diffuse x-ray scattering under the condition of grazing incidence and exit angles to investigate growth and dissolution of near-surface defects after boron implantation in silicon(001) and annealing. Silicon wafers were implanted with a boron dose of 6×1015 ions/cm2 at 32 keV and went through different annealing treatments. From the diffuse intensity close to the (220) surface Bragg peak we reveal the nature and kinetic behavior of the implantation induced defects. Analyzing the q dependence of the diffuse scattering, we are able to distinguish between point defect clusters and extrinsic stacking faults on {111} planes. Characteristic for stacking faults are diffuse x-ray intensity streaks along directions, which allow for the determination of their growth and dissolution kinetics. For the annealing conditions of our crystals, we conclude that the kinetics of growth can be described by an Ostwald ripening model in which smaller faults shrink at the expense of the larger stacking faults. The growth is found to be limited by the self-diffusion of silicon interstitials. After longer rapid thermal annealing the stacking faults disappear almost completely without shrinking, most likely by transformation into perfect loops via a dislocation reaction. This model is confirmed by complementary cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Comparison of naturally occurring and ligature-induced peri-implantitis bone defects in humans and dogs.

    Schwarz, F.; Herten, M. van; Sager, M.; Bieling, K.; Sculean, A.; Becker, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare naturally occuring and ligature-induced peri-implantitis bone defects in humans and dogs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four partially and fully edentulous patients undergoing peri-implant bone augmentation procedures due to

  9. N{sup +} ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    Chen, Z Q [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan); Sekiguchi, T [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Yuan, X L [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Maekawa, M [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan); Kawasuso, A [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan)

    2004-01-21

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N{sup +} ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N{sup +} implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity.

  10. Annealing temperature effects on the magnetic properties and induced defects in C/N/O implanted MgO

    Li, Qiang; Ye, Bonian; Hao, Yingping; Liu, Jiandang; Kong, Wei; Ye, Bangjiao

    2013-02-01

    Virgin MgO single crystals were implanted with 70 keV C/N/O ions at room temperature to a dose of 2 × 1017/cm2. After implantation the samples showed room temperature hysteresis in magnetization loops. The annealing effects on the magnetic properties and induced defects of these samples were determined by vibrating sample magnetometer and positron annihilation spectroscopy, respectively. The experimental results indicate that ferromagnetism can be introduced to MgO single crystals by doping with C, N or introduction of Mg related vacancy defects. However, the Mg vacancies coexistence with C or N ions in the C-/N-implanted samples may play a negative role in magnetic performance in these MgO samples. The rapid increase of magnetic moment in O-implanted sample is attributed to the formation of new type of vacancy defects.

  11. Ion-implantation induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Sekiguchi, T.; Suzuki, R.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction and annealing behavior of defects in Al + -implanted ZnO have been studied using an energy variable slow positron beam. Vacancy clusters are produced after Al + -implantation. With increasing ion dose above 10 14 Al + /cm 2 the implanted layer is amorphized. Heat treatment up to 600 C enhances the creation of large voids that allow the positronium formation. The large voids disappear accompanying the recrystallization process by further heat treatment above 600 C. Afterwards, implanted Al impurities are completely activated to contribute to the n-type conduction. The ZnO crystal quality is also improved after recrystallization. (orig.)

  12. Ion-implantation induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gunma (Japan); Sekiguchi, T. [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, R. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Introduction and annealing behavior of defects in Al{sup +}-implanted ZnO have been studied using an energy variable slow positron beam. Vacancy clusters are produced after Al{sup +}-implantation. With increasing ion dose above 10{sup 14} Al{sup +}/cm{sup 2} the implanted layer is amorphized. Heat treatment up to 600 C enhances the creation of large voids that allow the positronium formation. The large voids disappear accompanying the recrystallization process by further heat treatment above 600 C. Afterwards, implanted Al impurities are completely activated to contribute to the n-type conduction. The ZnO crystal quality is also improved after recrystallization. (orig.)

  13. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of ion-implantation-induced defects in fused silica and crystalline quartz

    Arnold, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    Defects produced by implantation of various atomic species in fused and crystalline SiO 2 were studied using infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS) with UV-visible spectroscopy. We observe a new vibrational band at 830 cm -1 which is tentatively associated with the creation of two nonbridging O atoms in SiO 4 units. Numerous chemical effects were also observed, including evidence for chemical incorporation of Li and anomalously large O-vacancy production for Al + , B + and Si + implantation

  14. Ion species dependence of the implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Naramoto, H.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we implanted B + , O + , Al + , and P + ions into ZnO with energy of 50-380 keV and total doses of 4 x 10 15 cm -2 for each ion. The implantation-induced defects and their thermal recovery were studied using a slow positron beam. Vacancy clusters are produced in all the implanted samples. It is found that the thermal recovery of these vacancies induced by different ions shows much difference. In case of B + and Al + -implantation, the vacancy clusters agglomerate to much larger size and might evolve to microvoids during annealing. However, for O + and P + ions, which are heavier than B + and Al + , the vacancies show a much weaker agglomeration process. The mechanism of such difference is discussed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants: 2. Defects on active MRI implants causing hot spots

    Grönemeyer Dietrich HW

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active magnetic resonance imaging implants, for example stents, stent grafts or vena cava filters, are constructed as wireless inductively coupled transmit and receive coils. They are built as a resonator tuned to the Larmor frequency of a magnetic resonance system. The resonator can be added to or incorporated within the implant. This technology can counteract the shielding caused by eddy currents inside the metallic implant structure. This may allow getting diagnostic information of the implant lumen (in stent stenosis or thrombosis for example. The electro magnetic rf-pulses during magnetic resonance imaging induce a current in the circuit path of the resonator. A by material fatigue provoked partial rupture of the circuit path or a broken wire with touching surfaces can set up a relatively high resistance on a very short distance, which may behave as a point-like power source, a hot spot, inside the body part the resonator is implanted to. This local power loss inside a small volume can reach ¼ of the total power loss of the intact resonating circuit, which itself is proportional to the product of the resonator volume and the quality factor and depends as well from the orientation of the resonator with respect to the main magnetic field and the imaging sequence the resonator is exposed to. Methods First an analytical solution of a hot spot for thermal equilibrium is described. This analytical solution with a definite hot spot power loss represents the worst case scenario for thermal equilibrium inside a homogeneous medium without cooling effects. Starting with this worst case assumptions additional conditions are considered in a numerical simulation, which are more realistic and may make the results less critical. The analytical solution as well as the numerical simulations use the experimental experience of the maximum hot spot power loss of implanted resonators with a definite volume during magnetic resonance imaging

  16. Formation of radiation-induced point defects in silicon doped thin films upon ion implantation and activating annealing

    Bublik, V.T.; Shcherbachev, K.D.; Komarnitskaya, E.A.; Parkhomenko, Yu.N.; Vygovskaya, E.A.; Evgen'ev, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    The formation and relaxation processes for radiation-induced defects in the implantation of 50 keV Si + ions into gallium arsenide and subsequent 10-min annealing in arsine at 850 deg. C have been studied by the triple-crystal X-ray diffractometry and secondary-ion mass spectroscopy techniques. It is shown that the existence of the vacancy-enriched layer stimulating diffusion of introduced dopants into the substrate surface can significantly affect the distribution profile of the dopant in the course of preparation of thin implanted layers

  17. Ion species dependence of the implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    Chen, Z.Q. [Department of Physics, Wuhan University (China); Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Naramoto, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    In this work, we implanted B{sup +}, O{sup +}, Al{sup +}, and P{sup +} ions into ZnO with energy of 50-380 keV and total doses of 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} for each ion. The implantation-induced defects and their thermal recovery were studied using a slow positron beam. Vacancy clusters are produced in all the implanted samples. It is found that the thermal recovery of these vacancies induced by different ions shows much difference. In case of B{sup +} and Al{sup +}-implantation, the vacancy clusters agglomerate to much larger size and might evolve to microvoids during annealing. However, for O{sup +} and P{sup +} ions, which are heavier than B{sup +} and Al{sup +}, the vacancies show a much weaker agglomeration process. The mechanism of such difference is discussed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Laser induced recrystallisation and defects in ion implanted hexagonal SiC

    Makarov, V.V.; Tuomi, T.; Naukkarinen, K.; Luomajaervi, M.; Riihonen, M.

    1979-10-01

    SiC(6H) crystals amorphized with 14 N + -ion implantation were annealed with CO 2 laser pulses at intensities of 20 to 100 MW/cm 2 . Laser produced crystallisation due to residual ray absorption was studied by means of optical spectroscopy, 4 He + -ion backscattering spectrometry and channeling as well as Cu Kα 1 and synchrotron x-ray diffraction topography. At low laser intensities topographs revealed linear and planar defects which contributed to increased dechanneling independent of analyzing beam energy. Minimum of lattice disorder, which was in some regions of the laser impact area smaller than that obtained in thermal annealing, was attained at the peak laser intensities of about 50 MW/cm 2 . (orig.)

  19. Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation for the treatment of chondral defects of the knees in Chinese patients

    Zhang ZW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhongwen Zhang,1 Xin Zhong,2 Huiru Ji,1 Zibin Tang,1 Jianpeng Bai,1 Minmin Yao,1 Jianlei Hou,1 Minghao Zheng,3 David J Wood,3 Jiazhi Sun,4 Shu-Feng Zhou,4,5 Aibing Liu6 1Department of Orthopedics, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces (CAPF, Beijing; 2Department of MRI Center, General Hospital of CAPF, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Center for Orthopedic Research, School of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 5Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino–US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou; 6Medical Research Center, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces (CAPF, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Articular cartilage injury is the most common type of damage seen in clinical orthopedic practice. The matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implant (MACI was developed to repair articular cartilage with an advance on the autologous chondrocyte implant procedure. This study aimed to evaluate whether MACI is a safe and efficacious cartilage repair treatment for patients with knee cartilage lesions. The primary outcomes were the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS domains and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results, compared between baseline and postoperative months 3, 6, 12, and 24. A total of 15 patients (20 knees, with an average age of 33.9 years, had a mean defect size of 4.01 cm2. By 6-month follow-up, KOOS results demonstrated significant improvements in symptoms and knee-related quality of life. MRI showed significant improvements in four individual graft scoring parameters at 24 months postoperatively. At 24 months, 90% of MACI grafts had filled completely and 10% had good

  20. Chemical effect of Si+ ions on the implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    Jiang, M.; Wang, D. D.; Chen, Z. Q.; Kimura, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Mori, A.; Uedono, A.

    2013-01-01

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with 300 keV Si+ ions to a dose of 6 × 1016 cm-2. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), positron annihilation, Raman scattering, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and photoluminescence (PL) was used to study the microstructure evolution after implantation and subsequent annealing. A very large increase of Doppler broadening S parameters in Si+-implanted region was detected by using a slow positron beam, indicating that vacancy clusters or microvoids are induced by implantation. The S parameters increase further after annealing up to 700 °C, suggesting agglomeration of these vacancies or microvoids to larger size. Most of these defects are removed after annealing up to 1100 °C. The other measurements such as XRD, Raman scattering, and PL all indicate severe damage and even disordered structure induced by Si+ implantation. The damage and disordered lattice shows recovery after annealing above 700 °C. Amorphous regions are observed by HRTEM measurement, directly testifies that amorphous phase is induced by Si+ implantation in ZnO. Analysis of the S - W correlation and the coincidence Doppler broadening spectra gives direct evidence of SiO2 precipitates in the sample annealed at 700 °C, which strongly supports the chemical effect of Si ions on the amorphization of ZnO lattice.

  1. Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation for a large chondral defect in a professional football player: a case report

    Beyzadeoglu Tahsin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation is a well-known procedure for the treatment of cartilage defects, which aims to establish a regenerative milieu and restore hyaline cartilage. However, much less is known about third-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation application in high-level athletes. We report on the two-year follow-up outcome after matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation to treat a large cartilage lesion of the lateral femoral condyle in a male Caucasian professional football player. Case presentation A 27-year-old male Caucasian professional football player was previously treated for cartilage problems of his left knee with two failed microfracture procedures resulting in a 9 cm2 Outerbridge Grade 4 chondral lesion at his lateral femoral condyle. Preoperative Tegner-Lysholm and Brittberg-Peterson scores were 64 and 58, and by the second year they were 91 and 6. An evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated filling of the defect with the signal intensity of the repair tissue resembling healthy cartilage. Second-look arthroscopy revealed robust, smooth cartilage covering his lateral femoral condyle. He returned to his former competitive level without restrictions or complaints one year after the procedure. Conclusions This case illustrates that robust cartilage tissue can be obtained with a matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure even after two failed microfracture procedures in a large (9 cm2 cartilage defect. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report on the application of the third-generation cell therapy treatment technique, matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation, in a professional football player.

  2. Mn fraction substitutional site and defects induced magnetism in Mn-implanted 6H-SiC

    Bouziane, K., E-mail: Khalid.bouziane@uir.ac.ma [Pôle Energies Renouvelables et Etudes Pétrolières, Université Internationale de Rabat, 11000 – Salé el Jadida, Technopolis (Morocco); Al Azri, M.; Elzain, M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123 (Oman); Chérif, S.M. [LSPM (CNRS-UPR 3407), Université Paris, 13-Nord, 99, Avenue Jean Baptiste Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Mamor, M. [Equipe MSISM, Faculté Poly-Disciplinaire, B.P. 4162 Safi, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Declémy, A. [Institut P’, CNRS – Université de Poitiers – ENSMA, UPR 3346, SP2MI – Téléport 2, 11 boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, F-86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Thomé, L. [CSNSM-Orsay, Bât. 108, Université d’Orsay, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • Shallow Mn-implanted 6H-SiC crystal. • Correlation between Mn-substitutional site concentration and magnetism. • Correlation between defects nature surrounding Mn site and magnetism. • Correlation of magnetism in Mn-doped SiC to Mn at Si sites and vacancy-related defect. - Abstract: n-type 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) single crystal substrates were implanted with three fluences of manganese (Mn{sup +}) ions: 5 × 10{sup 15}, 1 × 10{sup 16} and 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} with implantation energy of 80 keV at 365 °C to stimulate dynamic annealing. The samples were characterized using Rutherford backscattering channeling spectroscopy (RBS/C), high-resolution X-ray diffraction technique (HRXRD), and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) techniques. Two main defect regions have been identified using RBS/C spectra fitted with the McChasy code combined to SRIM simulations. Intermediate defects depth region is associated with vacancies (D{sub V}) and deeper defect (D{sub N}) essentially related to the Si and C interstitial defects. The defect concentration and the maximum perpendicular strain exhibit similar increasing trend with the Mn{sup +} fluence. Furthermore, the amount of Mn atoms at Si substitutional sites and the corresponding magnetic moment per Mn atom were found to increase with increasing Mn fluence from 0.7 μ{sub B} to 1.7 μ{sub B} and then collapsing to 0.2 μ{sub B}. Moreover, a strong correlation has been found between the magnetic moment and the combination of both large D{sub V}/D{sub N} ratio and high Mn at Si sites. These results are corroborated by our ab initio calculations considering the most stable configurations showing that besides the amount of Mn substituting Si sites, local vacancy-rich environment is playing a crucial role in enhancing the magnetism.

  3. A long-term in vivo investigation on the effects of xenogenous based, electrospun, collagen implants on the healing of experimentally-induced large tendon defects.

    Oryan, A; Moshiri, A; Parizi Meimandi, A; Silver, I A

    2013-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of novel 3-dimensional (3-D) collagen implants on the healing of large, experimentally-induced, tendon-defects in rabbits. Forty mature male white New Zealand rabbits were divided randomly into treated and control groups. Two cm of the left Achilles tendon was excised and the gap was spanned by Kessler suture. In the treated group, a novel 3-D collagen implant was inserted between the cut ends of the tendon. No implant was used in the control group. During the course of the experiment the bioelectrical characteristics of the healing and normal tendons of both groups were investigated weekly. At 120 days post injury (DPI), the tendons were dissected and inspected for gross pathology, examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and their biomechanical properties, percentage dry matter and hydroxyproline concentration assessed. The collagen implant significantly improved the bioelectrical characteristics, gross appearance and tissue alignment of the healed, treated tendons, compared to the healed, control scars. It also significantly increased fibrillogenesis, diameter and density of the collagen fibrils, dry matter content, hydroxyproline concentration, maximum load, stiffness, stress and modulus of elasticity of the treated tendons, as compared to the control tendons. Treatment also significantly decreased peri-tendinous adhesions, and improved the hierarchical organization of the tendon from the collagen fibril to fibre-bundle level. 3-D xenogeneic-based collagen implants induced newly regenerated tissue that was ultrastructurally and biomechanically superior to tissue that was regenerated by natural unassisted healing. This type of bioimplant was biocompatible, biodegradable and appeared suitable for clinical use.

  4. Effect of radiation induced defects and incompatibility elastic stresses on the diffusion of ion implantated boron in silicon at the pulse annealing

    Stel'makh, V.F.; Suprun-Belevich, Yu.R.; Chelyadinskij, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    For determination of radiation defects effect on diffusion of the implanted boron in silicon at the pulse annealing, silicon crystals, implanted with boron, preliminary irradiated by silicon ions of different flows for checked defects implantation, were investigated. Silicon crystals additionally implanted by Ge + ions were investigated to research the effect of the incompatibility elastic stresses, emerging in implanted structures due to lattice periods noncoincidence in matrix and alloyed layers, on implanted boron diffusion. It is shown, that abnormally high values of boron diffusion coefficients in silicon at the pulse annealing are explained by silicon interstitial atom participation in redistribution of diffusing boron atoms by two diffusion channels - interstitial and vacation - and by incompatibility elastic stresses effect on diffusion

  5. Defect trapping of deuterium implanted in aluminium

    Kido, Y.; Kakeno, M.; Yamada, K.; Hioki, T.; Kawamoto, J.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of deuterium implanted in Al was studied by the D( 3 He,p) 4 He and the D(d,p)T nuclear reactions. Changes of the depth profiles of the deuterium after heat treatments indicated that the implanted deuterium was trapped by the defect produced during the deuterium implantation and the release probability of the trapped deuterium increased as the specimen temperature was raised. Assuming a thermal equilibrium locally in the region of high defect concentration, the trapping energy of deuterium in Al was determined to be 0.12eV. Since the release probability for the single crystal was considerably larger than that for the polycrystal specimens, the deuterium was considered to be strongly trapped in the grain boundaries. Distributions of displaced Al atoms and the recovery of the lattice damage by annealing were measured by the channelling technique. (author)

  6. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology

    Bilteanu, L.

    2010-12-01

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCut TM technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  7. Effect of disorder and defects in ion-implanted semiconductors optical and photothermal characterization

    Willardson, R K; Christofides, Constantinos; Ghibaudo, Gerard

    1997-01-01

    Defects in ion-implanted semiconductors are important and will likely gain increased importance as annealing temperatures are reduced with successive IC generations. Novel implant approaches, such as MdV implantation, create new types of defects whose origin and annealing characteristics will need to be addressed. Publications in this field mainly focus on the effects of ion implantation on the material and the modification in the implanted layer after high temperature annealing. The editors of this volume and Volume 45 focus on the physics of the annealing kinetics of the damaged layer. An overview of characterization tehniques and a critical comparison of the information on annealing kinetics is also presented. Key Features * Provides basic knowledge of ion implantation-induced defects * Focuses on physical mechanisms of defect annealing * Utilizes electrical, physical, and optical characterization tools for processed semiconductors * Provides the basis for understanding the problems caused by the defects g...

  8. Defects in boron ion implanted silicon

    Wu, W.K.

    1975-05-01

    The crystal defects formed after post-implantation annealing of B-ion-implanted Si irradiated at 100 keV to a moderate dose (2 x 10 14 /cm 2 ) were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Contrast analysis and annealing kinetics show at least two different kinds of linear rod-like defects along broken bracket 110 broken bracket directions. One kind either shrinks steadily remaining on broken bracket 110 broken bracket at high temperatures (greater than 850 0 C), or transforms into a perfect dislocation loop which rotates toward broken bracket 112 broken bracket perpendicular to its Burgers vector. The other kind shrinks steadily at moderate temperatures (approximately 800 0 C). The activation energy for shrinkage of the latter (3.5 +- 0.1 eV) is the same as that for B diffusion in Si, suggesting that this linear defect is a boron precipitate. There also exist a large number of perfect dislocation loops with Burgers vector a/2broken bracket 110 broken bracket. The depth distribution of all these defects was determined by stereomicroscopy. The B precipitates lying parallel to the foil surfaces are shown to be at a depth of about 3500 +- 600 A. The loops are also at the same depth, but with a broader spread, +-1100 A. Si samples containing B and samples containing no B (P-doped) were irradiated in the 650-kV electron microscope. Irradiation at 620 0 C resulted in the growth of very long linear defects in the B-doped samples but not in the others, suggesting that at 620 0 C Si interstitials produced by the electron beam replace substitutional B some of which precipitates in the form of long rods along broken bracket 110 broken bracket. (DLC)

  9. Defects in Cu(InGa)Se2/CdS heterostructure films induced by hydrogen ion implantation

    Yakushev, M.V.; Tomlinson, R.D.; Hill, A.E.; Pilkington, R.D.; Mudryi, A.V.; Bondar, I.V.; Victorov, I.A.; Gremenok, V.F.; Shakin, I.A.; Patuk, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of H + ion implantation on the photoluminescence properties of Cu(InGa)Se 2 /CdS heterostructures has been studied. This treatment was found to increase the photoluminescence intensity of donor-acceptor band at 1.13 eV because of the passivation by hydrogen atoms of the non-radiative recombination centers on the boundary of Cu(InGa)Se 2 and CdS layers. Two broad bands peaks at 0.96 eV and at 0.82 eV in photoluminescence spectra of ion-implanted Cu(InGa)Se 2 films have been found. The tentative model to explain the origin of the broad photoluminescence bands has been discussed

  10. Vacancy defect and defect cluster energetics in ion-implanted ZnO

    Dong, Yufeng; Tuomisto, F.; Svensson, B. G.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Brillson, Leonard J.

    2010-02-01

    We have used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence, positron annihilation, and surface photovoltage spectroscopies to determine the energy levels of Zn vacancies and vacancy clusters in bulk ZnO crystals. Doppler broadening-measured transformation of Zn vacancies to vacancy clusters with annealing shifts defect energies significantly lower in the ZnO band gap. Zn and corresponding O vacancy-related depth distributions provide a consistent explanation of depth-dependent resistivity and carrier-concentration changes induced by ion implantation.

  11. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    Manojkumar, P.A., E-mail: manoj@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Chirayath, V.A.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Low energy nitrogen ion implantation in titanium was studied. • Chemical and defect states were analyzed using SIMS, XPS and PAS. • SIMS and depth resolved XPS data showed good agreement. • Depth resolved defect and chemical states information were revealed. • Formation of 3 layers of defect states proposed to fit PAS results. - Abstract: Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  12. Characterisation of Ion Implantation-induced Defects in Certain Technologically Important Materials by Positron Annihilation (Review Paper)

    P.M.G. Nambissan

    2009-01-01

    The application of positron annihilation spectroscopy for the studies of defects produced by different types of charged particles and ions in a variety of materials is discussed with specific examples. The ability to detect and quantify the information through the characteristic parameters of the annihilation radiation in a totally non-destructive method has made the fundamental process of electron-positron annihilation a powerful spectroscopic probe for investigating the structure and proper...

  13. Defect-impurity interactions in ion-implanted metals

    Turos, A.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of defect-impurity interactions in metals is presented. When point defects become mobile they migrate towards the sinks and on the way can be captured by impurity atoms forming stable associations so-called complexes. In some metallic systems complexes can also be formed athermally during ion implantation by trapping point defects already in the collision cascade. An association of a point defect with an impurity atom leads to its displacement from the lattice site. The structure and stability of complexes are strongly temperature dependent. With increasing temperature they dissociate or grow by multiple defect trapping. The appearance of freely migrating point defects at elevated temperatures, due to ion bombardment or thermal annealing, causes via coupling with defect fluxes, important impurity redistribution. Because of the sensitivity of many metal-in-metal implanted systems to radiation damage the understanding of this processes is essential for a proper interpretation of the lattice occupancy measurements and the optimization of implantation conditions. (author)

  14. Electric field dependent paramagnetic defect creation in single step implanted Simox films

    Leray, J.L.; Margail, J.

    1991-01-01

    X irradiation induced oxygen-vacancy defect creation has been studied in SIMOX produced by single step implantation and annealing. It is shown that SIMOX is substantially more radiation sensitive (for these defects) than thermal or bulk oxide. Irradiation in the presence of an electric field 0.5 -1 MV cm -1 is found to enhance the rate of defect creation by ≥ 2 times. Further enhanced defect creation is observed in SIMOX samples whose substrate has been chemically thinned prior to irradiation. This enhancement is attributed to modification of the network induced by hydrogen introduced during the thinning process

  15. Determining the internal quantum efficiency of shallow-implanted nitrogen-vacancy defects in bulk diamond

    Radko, Ilya; Boll, Mads; Israelsen, Niels Møller

    2016-01-01

    -implanted NV defects in a single-crystal bulk diamond. Using a spherical metallic mirror with a large radius of curvature compared to the optical spot size, we perform calibrated modifications of the local density of states around NV defects and observe the change of their total decay rate, which is further...... used for IQE quantification. We also show that at the excitation wavelength of 532 nm, photo-induced relaxation cannot be neglected even at moderate excitation powers well below the saturation level. For NV defects shallow implanted 4.5 ± 1 and 8 ± 2 nm below the diamond surface, we determine...

  16. Solutions to defect-related problems in implanted silicon by controlled injection of vacancies by high-energy ion irradiation

    Roth, E.G.; Holland, O.W.; Duggan, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Amorphization and a dual implant technique have been used to manipulate residual defects that persist following implantation and post-implant thermal treatments. Residual defects can often be attributed to ion-induced defect excesses. A defect is considered to be excess when it occurs in a localized region at a concentration greater than its complement. Sources of excess defects include spatially separated Frenkel pairs, excess interstitials resulting from the implanted atoms, and sputtering. Preamorphizing prior to dopant implantation has been proposed to eliminate dopant broadening due to ion channeling as well as dopant diffusion during subsequent annealing. However, transient-enhanced diffusion (TED) of implanted boron has been observed in pre-amorphized Si. The defects driving this enhanced boron diffusion are thought to be the extended interstitial-type defects that form below the amorphous-crystalline interface during implantation. A dual implantation process was applied in an attempt to reduce or eliminate this interfacial defect band. High-energy, ion implantation is known to inject a vacancy excess in this region. Vacancies were implanted at a concentration coincident with the excess interstitials below the a-c interface to promote recombination between the two defect species. Preliminary results indicate that a critical fluence, i.e., a sufficient vacancy concentration, will eliminate the interstitial defects. The effect of the reduction or elimination of these interfacial defects upon TED of boron will be discussed. Rutherford backscattering/channeling and cross section transmission electron microscopy analyses were used to characterize the defect structure within the implanted layer. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to profile the dopant distributions. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. Influence of the gel thickness on in vivo hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by double-network gel implanted at the bottom of a large osteochondral defect: Short-term results

    Matsuda Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A double-network (DN gel, which is composed of poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly(N,N’-dimethyl acrylamide, can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in vivo in a large osteochondral defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of the thickness of the implanted DN gel on the induction ability of hyaline cartilage regeneration. Methods Thirty-eight mature rabbits were used in this study. We created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 4.3-mm in the patellofemoral joint. The knees were randomly divided into 4 groups (Group I: 0.5-mm thick gel, Group II: 1.0-mm thick gel, Group III: 5.0-mm thick gel, and Group IV: untreated control. Animals in each group were further divided into 3 sub-groups depending on the gel implant position (2.0-, 3.0-, or 4.0-mm depth from the articular surface in the defect. The regenerated tissues were evaluated with the Wayne’s gross and histological grading scales and real time PCR analysis of the cartilage marker genes at 4 weeks. Results According to the total Wayne’s score, when the depth of the final vacant space was set at 2.0 mm, the scores in Groups I, II, and III were significantly greater than that Group IV (p  Conclusions The 1.0-mm thick DN gel sheet had the same ability to induce hyaline cartilage regeneration as the 5.0-mm thick DN gel plug. However, the induction ability of the 0.5-mm thick sheet was significantly lower when compared with the 1.0-mm thick gel sheet. The 1.0-mm DN gel sheet is a promising device to establish a cell-free cartilage regeneration strategy that minimizes bone loss from the gel implantation.

  18. Extended defects and hydrogen interactions in ion implanted silicon

    Rangan, Sanjay

    The structural and electrical properties of extended defects generated because of ion implantation and the interaction of hydrogen with these defects have been studied in this work. Two distinct themes have been studied, the first where defects are a detrimental and the second where they are useful. In the first scenario, transient enhanced diffusion of boron has been studied and correlated with defect evolution studies due to silicon and argon ion implants. Spreading resistance profiles (SRP) correlated with deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements, reveal that a low anneal temperatures (TED at low anneal temperatures (550°C, the effect of hydrogen is lost, due to its out-diffusion. Moreover, due to catastrophic out-diffusion of hydrogen, additional damage is created resulting in deeper junctions in hydrogenated samples, compared to the non-hydrogenated ones. Comparing defect evolution due to Si and Ar ion implants at different anneal temperatures, while the type of defects is the same in the two cases, their (defect) dissolution occurs at lower anneal temperatures (˜850°C) for Si implants. Dissolution for Ar implants seems to occur at higher anneal temperatures. The difference has been attributed to the increased number of vacancies created by Ar to that of silicon implant. In second aspect, nano-cavity formation due to vacancy agglomeration has been studied by helium ion implantation and furnace anneal, where the effect of He dose, implant energy and anneal time have been processing parameters that have been varied. Cavities are formed only when the localized concentration of He is greater than 3 x 1020 cm-3. While at high implant doses, a continuous cavity layer is formed, at low implant doses a discontinuous layer is observed. The formation of cavities at low doses has been observed for the first time. Variation of anneal times reveal that cavities are initially facetted (for short anneal times) and tend to become spherical when annealed for

  19. Influence of the gel thickness on in vivo hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by double-network gel implanted at the bottom of a large osteochondral defect: short-term results.

    Matsuda, Hidetoshi; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Gong, Jian Ping; Kanaya, Fuminori; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2013-01-31

    A double-network (DN) gel, which is composed of poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) and poly(N,N'-dimethyl acrylamide), can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in vivo in a large osteochondral defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of the thickness of the implanted DN gel on the induction ability of hyaline cartilage regeneration. Thirty-eight mature rabbits were used in this study. We created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 4.3-mm in the patellofemoral joint. The knees were randomly divided into 4 groups (Group I: 0.5-mm thick gel, Group II: 1.0-mm thick gel, Group III: 5.0-mm thick gel, and Group IV: untreated control). Animals in each group were further divided into 3 sub-groups depending on the gel implant position (2.0-, 3.0-, or 4.0-mm depth from the articular surface) in the defect. The regenerated tissues were evaluated with the Wayne's gross and histological grading scales and real time PCR analysis of the cartilage marker genes at 4 weeks. According to the total Wayne's score, when the depth of the final vacant space was set at 2.0 mm, the scores in Groups I, II, and III were significantly greater than that Group IV (phyaline cartilage regeneration as the 5.0-mm thick DN gel plug. However, the induction ability of the 0.5-mm thick sheet was significantly lower when compared with the 1.0-mm thick gel sheet. The 1.0-mm DN gel sheet is a promising device to establish a cell-free cartilage regeneration strategy that minimizes bone loss from the gel implantation.

  20. Endochondral vs. intramembranous demineralized bone matrices as implants for osseous defects.

    Nidoli, M C; Nielsen, F F; Melsen, B

    1999-05-01

    This study focuses on the difference in regenerative capacity between endochondral and intramembranous demineralized bone matrices (DBMs) when implanted into bony defects. It also focuses on the possible influence of the type of skeletal recipient site (orthotopic or heterotopic). Of 34 Wistar rats, 10 served as a source of DBM, and 24 were divided into two groups of 12 animals. In group A identical defects were produced in the parietal bones, whereas in group B the defects were produced in each radius. The right defects were implanted with endochondral DBM and the left defects were implanted with intramembranous DBM. Descriptive and/or histomorphometric analyses were performed by means of light and polarized microscopy, and radiography (group B). Right and left data were compared to disclose differences in bone-healing capacity. The quantitative results demonstrated that endochondral DBM displays a greater regenerative capacity than intramembranous DBM when implanted heterotopically. The different clinical performances of endochondral and intramembranous bone grafts might be explained on the basis of the mechanical rather than the osteoinductive principle. The qualitative results suggest that the type of bone deposition induced by the DBMs is not related to the type of implanted DBM. Recipient site characteristics and/or environmental factors seem decisive in the occurrence of either types of ossification.

  1. Defects related room temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-implanted ZnO nanorod arrays

    Li, D.; Li, D.K.; Wu, H.Z.; Liang, F.; Xie, W.; Zou, C.W.; Shao, L.X.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in Cu-implanted ZnO nanorod arrays. • Cu-implanted ZnO nanorods show a saturation magnetization value of 1.82 μ B /Cu. • The origin of ferromagnetism can be explained by the defects related bound magnetic polarons. -- Abstract: Room temperature ferromagnetism (FM) was observed in Cu-implanted ZnO nanorod arrays. The implantation dose for Cu ions was 1 × 10 16 cm −2 and the implantation energy was 100 keV. The ion implantation induced defects and disorder has been observed by the XRD, PL and TEM experiments. The PL spectrum revealed a dominant luminescence peaks at 390 nm and a broad and strong green emission at 500–700 nm, which is considered to be related to the ionized oxygen vacancy. Cu-implanted ZnO nanorods annealed at 500 °C show a saturation magnetization value of 1.82 μ B /Cu and a positive coercive field of 68 Oe. The carrier concentration is not much improved after annealing and in the order of 10 16 cm −3 , which suggests that FM does not depend upon the presence of a significant carrier concentration. The origin of ferromagnetism behavior can be explained on the basis of electrons and defects that form bound magnetic polarons, which overlap to create a spin-split impurity band

  2. Defect studies of H+ implanted niobium

    Prochazka, I.; Čížek, J.; Havránek, Vladimír; Anwand, W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 645, SI1 (2015), s. 69-71 ISSN 0925-8388. [14th International Symposium on Metal-Hydrogen Systems (MH). Salford, 20.07.2014-25.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Niobium * Hydrogen * defects * Positron annihilation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  3. Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering

    Oliviero, E.; David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F.; Fichtner, P. F. P.

    2013-01-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 °C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 °C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {311} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

  4. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  5. Study of irradiation induced defects in silicon

    Pal, Gayatri; Sebastian, K.C.; Somayajulu, D.R.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    Pure high resistivity (6000 ohm-cm) silicon wafers were recoil implanted with 1.8 MeV 111 In ions. As-irradiated wafers showed a 13 MHz quadrupole interaction frequency, which was not observed earlier. The annealing behaviour of these defects in the implanted wafers was studied between room temperature and 1073 K. At different annealing temperatures two more interaction frequencies corresponding to defect complexes D2 and D3 are observed. Even though the experimental conditions were different, these are identical to the earlier reported ones. Based on an empirical point charge model calculation, an attempt is made to identify the configuration of these defect complexes. (author)

  6. Silicon exfoliation by hydrogen implantation: Actual nature of precursor defects

    Kuisseu, Pauline Sylvia Pokam, E-mail: pauline-sylvia.pokam-kuisseu@cnrs-orleans.fr [CEMHTI-CNRS, 3A, rue de la férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France); Pingault, Timothée; Ntsoenzok, Esidor [CEMHTI-CNRS, 3A, rue de la férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France); Regula, Gabrielle [IM2NP-CNRS-Université d’Aix-Marseille, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille (France); Mazen, Frédéric [CEA-Leti, MINATEC campus, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Sauldubois, Audrey [Université d’Orléans, rue de Chartres – Collegium ST, 45067 Orléans (France); Andreazza, Caroline [ICMN-CNRS-Université d’Orléans, 1b rue de la férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France)

    2017-06-15

    MeV energy hydrogen implantation in silicon followed by a thermal annealing is a very smart way to produce high crystalline quality silicon substrates, much thinner than what can be obtained by diamond disk or wire sawing. Using this kerf-less approach, ultra-thin substrates with thicknesses between 15 µm and 100 µm, compatible with microelectronic and photovoltaic applications are reported. But, despite the benefits of this approach, there is still a lack of fundamental studies at this implantation energy range. However, if very few papers have addressed the MeV energy range, a lot of works have been carried out in the keV implantation energy range, which is the one used in the smart-cut® technology. In order to check if the nature and the growth mechanism of extended defects reported in the widely studied keV implantation energy range could be extrapolated in the MeV range, the thermal evolution of extended defects formed after MeV hydrogen implantation in (100) Si was investigated in this study. Samples were implanted at 1 MeV with different fluences ranging from 6 × 10{sup 16} H/cm{sup 2} to 2 × 10{sup 17} H/cm{sup 2} and annealed at temperatures up to 873 K. By cross-section transmission electron microscopy, we found that the nature of extended defects in the MeV range is quite different of what is observed in the keV range. In fact, in our implantation conditions, the generated extended defects are some kinds of planar clusters of gas-filled lenses, instead of platelets as commonly reported in the keV energy range. This result underlines that hydrogen behaves differently when it is introduced in silicon at high or low implantation energy. The activation energy of the growth of these extended defects is independent of the chosen fluence and is between (0.5–0.6) eV, which is very close to the activation energy reported for atomic hydrogen diffusion in a perfect silicon crystal.

  7. Natural defects and defects created by ionic implantation in zinc tellurium

    Roche, J.P.; Dupuy, M.; Pfister, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Various defects have been studied in ZnTe crystals by transmission electron microscope and by scanning electron microscope in cathodo-luminescence mode: grain boundaries, sub-grain boundaries, twins. Ionic implants of boron (100 keV - 2x10 14 and 10 15 ions cm -2 ) were made on these crystals followed by isochrone annealing (30 minutes) of zinc under partial pressure at 550, 650 and 750 0 C. The nature of the defects was determined by transmission electron microscope: these are interstitial loops (b=1/3 ) the size of which varies between 20 A (non-annealed sample) and 180A (annealed at 750 0 C). The transmission electron microscope was also used to make concentration profiles of defects depending on depth. It is found that for the same implant (2x10 14 ions.cm -2 ), the defect peak moves towards the exterior of the crystal as the annealing temperature rises (400 - 1000 and 7000 A for the three annealings). These results are explained from a model which allows for the coalescence of defects and considers the surface of the sample as being the principal source of vacancies. During the annealings, the migration of vacancies brings about the gradual annihilation of the implant defects. The adjustment of certain calculation parameters on the computer result in giving 2 eV as energy value for the formation of vacancies [fr

  8. Low-dose rhBMP2/7 heterodimer to reconstruct peri-implant bone defects: a micro-CT evaluation

    Wang, J.; Zheng, Y.; Zhao, J.; Liu, T.; Gao, L.; Gu, Z.; Wu, G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To delineate the dynamic micro-architectures of bone induced by low-dose bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/7 heterodimer in peri-implant bone defects compared to BMP2 and BMP7 homodimer. Material and Methods Peri-implant bone defects (8 mm in diameter, 4 mm in depth) were created

  9. Characterization of vacancy-type defects induced by the implantation of Se and Si ions into GaAs by a slow positron beam

    Fujii, Satoshi; Shikata, Shinichi; Wei Long; Tanigawa, Shoichiro.

    1992-01-01

    Variable-energy (0-30keV) positron beam studies have been carried out on 200 keV Se-implanted and 70 keV Si-implanted GaAs specimens before and after annealing for electrical activation. From the measurements of Doppler broadened profiles as a function of incident positron energy, it was found that vacancy clusters with high concentration were introduced in the annealed specimen after Se implantation. From the parallel measurement of electrical characteristics, a higher activation efficiency was found for the higher concentration of vacancy clusters. That fact implies that electrons supplied by the activation of Se also convert the charge state of As vacancies from positive to negative. In contrast, no vacancy clusters were introduced in the Si-implanted GaAs. (author)

  10. Processed bovine cartilage: an improved biosynthetic implant for contour defects

    Ersek, R.A.; Hart, W.G. Jr.; Greer, D.; Beisang, A.A.; Flynn, P.J.; Denton, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Irradiated human cartilage has been found to be a superior implant material for correction of contour defects; however, availability problems have prevented this material from gaining wide acceptance. Implantation of processed irradiated bovine cartilage in primates and rabbits, as described here, provides strong evidence that this material performs like irradiated allograft cartilage antigenically and has certain cosmetic advantages over allograft cartilage. Our studies in primates have shown that there is no systemically measurable antibody-antigen reaction, either cellular or noncellular, to irradiated processed bovine cartilage. Neither primary nor second-set provocative implantations produced any measurable rejection. In rabbits, composite grafts of two pieces of irradiated bovine cartilage adjacent to each other were also well tolerated, with no measurable absorption and with capsule formation typical of a foreign body reaction to an inert object

  11. Effect of dose and size on defect engineering in carbon cluster implanted silicon wafers

    Okuyama, Ryosuke; Masada, Ayumi; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Kadono, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryo; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko; Kurita, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-cluster-ion-implanted defects were investigated by high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy toward achieving high-performance CMOS image sensors. We revealed that implantation damage formation in the silicon wafer bulk significantly differs between carbon-cluster and monomer ions after implantation. After epitaxial growth, small and large defects were observed in the implanted region of carbon clusters. The electron diffraction pattern of both small and large defects exhibits that from bulk crystalline silicon in the implanted region. On the one hand, we assumed that the silicon carbide structure was not formed in the implanted region, and small defects formed because of the complex of carbon and interstitial silicon. On the other hand, large defects were hypothesized to originate from the recrystallization of the amorphous layer formed by high-dose carbon-cluster implantation. These defects are considered to contribute to the powerful gettering capability required for high-performance CMOS image sensors.

  12. Extended deep level defects in Ge-condensed SiGe-on-Insulator structures fabricated using proton and helium implantations

    Kwak, D.W.; Lee, D.W.; Oh, J.S.; Lee, Y.H.; Cho, H.Y.

    2012-01-01

    SiGe-on-Insulator (SGOI) structures were created using the Ge condensation method, where an oxidation process is performed on the SiGe/Si structure. This method involves rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition and H + /He + ion-implantations. Deep level defects in these structures were investigated using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) by varying the pulse injection time. According to the DLTS measurements, a deep level defect induced during the Ge condensation process was found at 0.28 eV above the valence band with a capture cross section of 2.67 × 10 −17 cm 2 , two extended deep levels were also found at 0.54 eV and 0.42 eV above the valence band with capture cross sections of 3.17 × 10 −14 cm 2 and 0.96 × 10 −15 cm 2 , respectively. In the SGOI samples with ion-implantation, the densities of the newly generated defects as well as the existing defects were decreased effectively. Furthermore, the Coulomb barrier heights of the extended deep level defects were drastically reduced. Thus, we suggest that the Ge condensation method with H + ion implantation could reduce deep level defects generated from the condensation and control the electrical properties of the condensed SiGe layers. - Highlights: ► We have fabricated low-defective SiGe-on-Insulator (SGOI) with implantation method. ► H + and He + -ions are used for ion-implantation method. ► We have investigated the deep level defects of SGOI layers. ► Ge condensation method using H + ion implantation could reduce extended defects. ► They could enhance electrical properties.

  13. Effect of surface contamination on osseointegration of dental implants surrounded by circumferential bone defects.

    Mohamed, Seif

    2010-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of surface contamination on osseointegration of dental implants surrounded by a circumferential bone defect and to compare osseointegration around Osseotite with that around Nanotite implants.

  14. Effect of disorder and defects in ion-implanted semiconductors electrical and physiochemical characterization

    Willardson, Robert K; Christofides, Constantinos; Ghibaudo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Defects in ion-implanted semiconductors are important and will likely gain increased importance in the future as annealing temperatures are reduced with successive IC generations. Novel implant approaches, such as MdV implantation, create new types of defects whose origin and annealing characteristics will need to be addressed. Publications in this field mainly focus on the effects of ion implantation on the material and the modification in the implanted layer afterhigh temperature annealing.Electrical and Physicochemical Characterization focuses on the physics of the annealing kine

  15. Role of tissue engineered collagen based tridimensional implant on the healing response of the experimentally induced large Achilles tendon defect model in rabbits: a long term study with high clinical relevance.

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-05-14

    Tendon injury is one of the orthopedic conditions poses with a significant clinical challenge to both the surgeons and patients. The major limitations to manage these injuries are poor healing response and development of peritendinous adhesions in the injured area. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel collagen implant on tendon healing in rabbits. Seventy five mature White New-Zealand rabbits were divided into treated (n = 55) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. The defects of the treated animals were filled with collagen implants and repaired with sutures, but in control rabbits the defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in the injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by measuring the diameter, temperature and bioelectrical characteristics of the injured area. Clinical examination was done and scored. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 60 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) and the control animals at 120 days post injury (DPI). The lesions of all animals were examined at macroscopic and microscopic levels and the dry matter content, water delivery and water uptake characteristics of the lesions and normal contralateral tendons of both groups were analyzed at 120 DPI. This novel collagen implant was biodegradable, biocompatible and possibly could be considered as a substitute for auto and allografts in clinical practice in near future.

  16. The use of Raman scattering for studying the defects created by implantation in semiconductors

    Morhange, J.F.; Beserman, R.; Bourgoin, J.

    1974-01-01

    The evolution of Raman scattering with the dose of implanted ions and annealing temperature in silicon and diamond was studied. The variation in the concentration of the defects introduced by implantation, with the dose and annealing temperature were deduced. These results were compared with results obtained using electron paramagnetic resonance. The comparison shows that Raman scattering is a good technique to study the behavior of the defects in ion implanted semiconductors [fr

  17. Effects of high-dose hydrogen implantation on defect formation and dopant diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals

    Yaqoob, Faisal [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Huang, Mengbing, E-mail: mhuang@sunypoly.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    This work reports on the effects of a deep high-dose hydrogen ion implant on damage accumulation, defect retention, and silver diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals. Single-crystal ZnO samples were implanted with Ag ions in a region ∼150 nm within the surface, and some of these samples were additionally implanted with hydrogen ions to a dose of 2 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, close to the depth ∼250 nm. Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling measurements show that crystal damage caused by Ag ion implantation and the amount of defects retained in the near surface region following post-implantation annealing were found to diminish in the case with the H implantation. On the other hand, the additional H ion implantation resulted in a reduction of substitutional Ag atoms upon post-implantation annealing. Furthermore, the presence of H also modified the diffusion properties of Ag atoms in ZnO. We discuss these findings in the context of the effects of nano-cavities on formation and annihilation of point defects as well as on impurity diffusion and trapping in ZnO crystals.

  18. Reversible defects on myocardial perfusion imaging early after coronary stent implantation: a predictor of late restenosis

    Kim, D. E.; Park, S. A.; Kim, C. K.; Chang, J. A.; Jeong, J. W.; Oh, S. G.; Lee, C.

    2007-01-01

    It appears logical that myocardial perfusion should be fixed and not reversible, in the territory supplied by a dilated coronary artery. However, several studies have demonstrated reversible perfusion in the territory supplied by a coronary artery with an optimally implanted stent. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of reversible defects detected by M-SPECT early after optimal PTCA with stent implantation. Its second objective was to determine the predictive value of detecting reversible defects after stent implantation for late restenosis. Sixty-six patients that underwent M-SPECT within 24 hours of successful PTCA with stent implantation were included. All patients were followed up clinically and angiographically. The incidence of reversible perfusion defects on M-SPECT and the rate of late restenosis in target coronary arteries were evaluated retrospectively. Reversible perfusion defects on M-SPECT were observed in 26% of the patients and in 36% of lesions following successful PTCA with stent implantation. The incidence of late restenosis was significantly higher in patients and lesions with reversible perfusion defects (47% vs. 18%). According to binary logistic regression analysis, the presence of a reversible perfusion defects was the only independent predictor of late restenosis. This study shows that the predictive value of reversible perfusion defects on M-SPECT early after stent implantation with respect to the incidence of late restenosis was 47% in patients with a reversible defect, and 18% in those without it

  19. Vacancy-type defects and their annealing processes in ion-implanted Si studied by a variable-energy positron beam

    Uedono, A.; Wei, L.; Tanigawa, S.; Sugiura, J.; Ogasawara, M.

    1992-01-01

    Vacancy-type defects in B + -, P + - and Si + -ion implanted SiO 2 (43 nm)/Si(100) and Si(100) were studied by a variable-energy positron beam. Depth distributions of vacancy-type defects were obtained from measurements of Doppler broadening profiles of the positron annihilation as a function of incident positron energy. For 200-keV P + -implanted specimen with a dose of 5 x 10 13 P/cm 2 , the damaged layers induced by ion-implantation were found to extend far beyond the stopping range of P-atoms. For 80-keV B + -implanted SiO 2 (43 nm)/Si(100) specimens with different ion-currents, an increase of the ion-current introduced a homogeneous amorphous layer in the subsurface region. Dominant defect species in B + - and P + -implanted specimen were identified as vacancy clusters from their annealing behavior. (author)

  20. Use of platelet rich fibrin in a fenestration defect around an implant

    R Vijayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Guided bone regeneration (GBR in implant therapy is especially useful for implant placement with dehiscence defects or fenestration defects. In alveolar ridges with marked facial/buccal depressions or in knifeedge alveolar crests, the position and direction of fixture placement is restricted. Improvement of alveolar ridge morphology becomes possible with GBR. This article describes a case in which the fenestration defect around an implant was treated by the application of platelet rich fibrin, a second generation platelet concentrate along with bone graft, and guided tissue regeneration membrane.

  1. Study by nuclear techniques of the impurity-defect interaction in implanted metals

    Thome, Lionel.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of out equilibrium alloys formed by impurity implantation are strongly influenced by radiation damage created during implantation. This work presents a study, via hyperfine interaction and lattice location experiments, of the impurity-defect interaction in ion implanted metals. When the impurity and defect concentrations in the implanted layer are small, i.e. when impurities are uniformly recoil implanted in the whole crystal volume following a nuclear reaction (Aq In experiments), the impurity interacts with its own damage cascade. In this case, a vacancy is found to be trapped by a fraction of impurities during an athermal process. The value of this fraction does not seem to depend critically on impurity and host. When the impurity and defect concentrations are such that defect cascades interact, i.e. when impurities are implanted with an isotope separator (Fe Yb experiments), the observed impurity-vacancy (or vacancy cluster) interactions depend then strongly on the nature of impurity and host. An empirical relation, which indicates the importance of elastic effects, has been found between the proportion of impurities interacting with defects and the difference between impurity and host atom radii. At implantation temperature such that vacancies are mobile, the impurity-defect interaction depends essentially on vacancy migration. A model based on chemical kinetics has been developed to account for the variation with temperature of measured quantities [fr

  2. Defect generation/passivation by low energy hydrogen implant for silicon solar cells

    Sopori, B.L.; Zhou, T.Q.; Rozgonyi, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Low energy ion implant is shown to produce defects in silicon. These defects include surface damage, hydrogen agglomeration, formation of platelets with (111) habit plane and decoration of dislocations. Hydrogen also produces an inversion type of surface on boron doped silicon. These effects indicate that a preferred approach for passivation is to incorporate hydrogen from the back side of the cell. A backside H + implant technique is described. The results show that degree of passivation differs for various devices. A comparison of the defect structures of hydrogenated devices indicates that the structure and the distribution of defects in the bulk of the material plays a significant role in determining the degree of passivation

  3. Comparison of proton and phosphorous ion implantation-induced intermixing of InAs/InP quantum dots

    Barik, S; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2007-05-02

    We report and compare proton and phosphorous ion implantation-induced intermixing of InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs). After ion implantation at 20-300 deg. C, the QDs are rapid thermally annealed at 850 deg. C for 30 s. Proton implantation induces less energy shift than P ion implantation for a given concentration of atomic displacements due to the more efficient dynamic annealing of the defects created by protons. The implantation-induced energy shift reaches a maximum value of about 260 meV for a dose of 5 x 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup -2} in the P ion implanted QDs, which also show narrower PL linewidths compared to the proton implanted QDs. We also report the effects of an InGaAs top cap layer on the ion implantation-induced QD intermixing and show that defect production and annihilation processes evolve differently in InGaAs and InP layers and vary with the implantation temperature. When the implantation is performed at higher temperatures, the energy shift of the P ion implanted QDs capped with an InP layer increases due to the reduction in larger defect cluster formation at higher temperatures, while the energy shift of the proton implanted QDs decreases due to increased dynamic annealing irrespective of their cap layers.

  4. Nonlinear effects in defect production by atomic and molecular ion implantation

    David, C.; Dholakia, Manan; Chandra, Sharat; Nair, K. G. M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Amirthapandian, S.; Amarendra, G.; Varghese Anto, C.; Santhana Raman, P.; Kennedy, John

    2015-01-01

    This report deals with studies concerning vacancy related defects created in silicon due to implantation of 200 keV per atom aluminium and its molecular ions up to a plurality of 4. The depth profiles of vacancy defects in samples in their as implanted condition are carried out by Doppler broadening spectroscopy using low energy positron beams. In contrast to studies in the literature reporting a progressive increase in damage with plurality, implantation of aluminium atomic and molecular ions up to Al 3 , resulted in production of similar concentration of vacancy defects. However, a drastic increase in vacancy defects is observed due to Al 4 implantation. The observed behavioural trend with respect to plurality has even translated to the number of vacancies locked in vacancy clusters, as determined through gold labelling experiments. The impact of aluminium atomic and molecular ions simulated using MD showed a monotonic increase in production of vacancy defects for cluster sizes up to 4. The trend in damage production with plurality has been explained on the basis of a defect evolution scheme in which for medium defect concentrations, there is a saturation of the as-implanted damage and an increase for higher defect concentrations

  5. Placement of endosseous implant in infected alveolar socket with large fenestration defect: A comparative case report

    Balaji Anitha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Placement of endosseous implants into infected bone is often deferred or avoided due to fear of failure. However, with the development of guided bone regeneration [GBR], some implantologists have reported successful implant placement in infected sockets, even those with fenestration defects. We had the opportunity to compare the osseointegration of an immediate implant placed in an infected site associated with a large buccal fenestration created by the removal of a root stump with that of a delayed implant placed 5 years after extraction. Both implants were placed in the same patient, in the same dental quadrant by the same implantologist. GBR was used with the fenestration defect being filled with demineralized bone graftFNx01 and covered with collagen membraneFNx08. Both implants were osseointegrated and functional when followed up after 12 months.

  6. A hot implantation study on the evolution of defects in He ion implanted MgO(1 0 0)

    Fedorov, A.V.; Huis, M.A. van; Veen, A. van

    2002-01-01

    Ion implantation at elevated temperature, so-called hot implantation, was used to study nucleation and thermal stability of the defects. In this work, MgO(1 0 0) single crystal samples were implanted with 30 keV He ions at various implantation temperatures. The implantation doses ranged from 10 14 to 10 16 cm -2 . The implantation introduced defects were subsequently studied by thermal helium desorption spectroscopy (THDS) and Doppler broadening positron beam analysis (PBA). The THDS study provides vital information on the kinetics of He release from the sample. PBA technique, being sensitive to the open volume defects, provides complementary information on cavity evolution. The THD study has shown that in most cases helium release is characterised by the activation energy of Q=4.7±0.5 eV with the maximum release temperature of T max =1830 K. By applying first order desorption model the pre-exponent factor is estimated as ν=4.3x10 11 s -1

  7. High resolution deep level transient spectroscopy and process-induced defects in silicon

    Evans-Freeman, J.H.; Emiroglu, D.; Vernon-Parry, K.D.

    2004-01-01

    High resolution, or Laplace, deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) enables the identification of very closely spaced energetic levels in a semiconductor bandgap. DLTS may resolve peaks with a separation of tens of electron volts, but LDLTS can resolve defect energy separations as low as a few MeV. In this paper, we present results from LDLTS applied to ion implantation-induced defects in silicon, with particular emphasis on characterisation of end-of-range interstitial type defects. Silicon was implanted with a variety of ions from mass 28 to 166. A combination of LDLTS and direct capture cross-section measurements was employed to show that electrically active small extended defects were present in the as-implanted samples. Larger dislocations were then generated in Si by oxygenation to act as a control sample. These stacking faults had typical lengths of microns, and their electrical activity was subsequently characterised by LDLTS. This was to establish the sensitivity of LDLTS to defects whose carrier capture is characterised by a non-exponential filling process and an evolving band structure as carrier capture proceeds. The LDLTS spectra show several components in capacitance transients originating from both the end-of-range defects, and the stacking faults, and also clearly show that the carrier emission rates reduce as these extended defects fill with carriers. The end-of-range defects and the stacking faults are shown to have the same electrical behaviour

  8. Metastable light induced defects in pentacene

    Liguori, R.; Aprano, S.; Rubino, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering (DIIn), University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    In this study we analyzed one of the environmental factors that could affect organic materials. Pentacene thin film samples were fabricated and the degradation of their electrical characteristics was measured when the devices were exposed to ultraviolet light irradiation. The results have been reported in terms of a trap density model, which provides a description of the dynamics of light induced electrically active defects in an organic semiconductor.

  9. Osseointegrated implants and auricular defects: a case series study.

    Wright, Robert F; Zemnick, Candice; Wazen, Jack J; Asher, Eric

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to report on the survival rate of 16 patients treated with extraoral implants in the auricular region, analyze treatment outcomes, and discuss important clinical variables encountered during treatment. Sixteen patients who received extraoral dental implants to retain auricular prostheses between 1987 and 2003 were followed retrospectively. The variables recorded were gender, initial diagnosis, number and size of implants, implant placement date, age at implant placement, history of radiation to the treated field, abutment size, design of initial prosthesis, age of initial prosthesis (when a remake was indicated), date of prosthesis delivery, soft tissue response, grafting procedure, date of last follow-up, and complications. All patients were thoroughly evaluated presurgically by the reconstruction team, which consisted of prosthodontists, a facial prosthetist, and an otolaryngologist. Surgical templates were used for all patients. The criteria for success of the prostheses included marginal accuracy, overall stability and function, symmetry/position, texture, color stability, and patient acceptance. Thirty-nine implants were placed in 16 patients. All 16 patients were completely satisfied with their reconstructions. No surgical complications, implant failures, or prosthetic failures were encountered. Therefore, the survival rate was 100%. Three patients (18.75%) had grade 0, seven (43.75%) had grade 1, five (31.25%) had grade 2, and one (6.25%) had grade 3 soft tissue inflammation. The inflammation completely resolved in 7 of the 13 patients (54%) with hygiene reinforcement or soft tissue reduction. The survival rate for bone-anchored titanium implants and prostheses was 100%. Bone-anchored titanium implants provided the 16 patients in this study with a safe, reliable, adhesive-free method to anchor auricular prostheses with recovery of normal appearance. Under the guidance of an appropriate implant team, proper positioning of

  10. Joint immobilization inhibits spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by a novel double-network gel implantation.

    Arakaki, Kazunobu; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Onodera, Shin; Kanaya, Fuminori; Gong, Jian-Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2011-02-01

    We have recently discovered that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect in the rabbit, when we implant a novel double-network (DN) gel plug at the bottom of the defect. To clarify whether joint immobilization inhibits the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration, we conducted this study with 20 rabbits. At 4 or 12 weeks after surgery, the defect in the mobile knees was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen, while no cartilage tissues were observed in the defect in the immobilized knees. Type-2 collagen, Aggrecan, and SOX9 mRNAs were expressed only in the mobile knees at each period. This study demonstrated that joint immobilization significantly inhibits the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by the DN gel implantation. This fact suggested that the mechanical environment is one of the significant factors to induce this phenomenon.

  11. Graphene defects induced by ion beam

    Gawlik, Grzegorz; Ciepielewski, Paweł; Baranowski, Jacek; Jagielski, Jacek

    2017-10-01

    The CVD graphene deposited on the glass substrate was bombarded by molecular carbon ions C3+ C6+ hydrocarbon ions C3H4+ and atomic ions He+, C+, N+, Ar+, Kr+ Yb+. Size and density of ion induced defects were estimated from evolution of relative intensities of Raman lines D (∼1350 1/cm), G (∼1600 1/cm), and D‧ (∼1620 1/cm) with ion fluence. The efficiency of defect generation by atomic ions depend on ion mass and energy similarly as vacancy generation directly by ion predicted by SRIM simulations. However, efficiency of defect generation in graphene by molecular carbon ions is essentially higher than summarized efficiency of similar group of separate atomic carbon ions of the same energy that each carbon ion in a cluster. The evolution of the D/D‧ ratio of Raman lines intensities with ion fluence was observed. This effect may indicate evolution of defect nature from sp3-like at low fluence to a vacancy-like at high fluence. Observed ion graphene interactions suggest that the molecular ion interacts with graphene as single integrated object and should not be considered as a group of atomic ions with partial energy.

  12. Lattice defects in ion-implanted aluminium studied by means of perturbed angular correlations. Pt. 1

    Pleiter, F.; Prasad, K.G.

    1984-01-01

    Migration and clustering of lattice defects after implantation of 111 In in Al and subsequent annealing at temperatures in the range from 80 to 800 K were investigated applying the DPAC technique. The effects of implantation dose, implantation temperature, laser irradiation, and plastic deformation were studied. The measurements on plastically deformed Al were complemented by positron lifetime measurements. Four In-defect clusters were observed that can be flagged by well-defined hyperfine interaction parameters, and their symmetry properties were determined by using single-crystal samples. Important conclusions are: (i) monovacancies are not trapped by In-atoms, (ii) small In-defect clusters are formed by direct trapping of divacancies and/or trivacancies, and (iii) extended In-defect clusters are very stable and anneal in the temperature range 600-700 K. Consequences for the interpretation of other measurements on dilute Al(In) alloys are discussed. (Auth.)

  13. Radiation defects in Te-implanted germanium. Electron microscopy and computer simulation studies

    Kalitzova, M.G.; Karpuzov, D.S.; Pashov, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    Direct observation of radiation damage induced by heavy ion implantation in crystalline germanium by means of high-resolution electron microscopy is reported. The dark-field lattice imaging mode is used, under conditions suitable for object-like imaging. Conventional TEM is used for estimating the efficiency of creating visibly damaged regions. Heavy ion damage clusters with three types of inner structure are observed: with near-perfect crystalline cores, and with metastable and stable amorphous cores. The MARLOWE computer code is used to simulate the atomic collision cascades and to obtain the lateral spread distributions of point defects created. A comparison of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) with computer simulation results shows encouraging agreement for the average cluster dimensions and for the lateral spread of vacancies and interstitials. (author)

  14. Anomalous defect processes in Si implanted amorphous SiO2, II

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Fukui, Minoru; Okada, Syunji; Shimizu-Iwayama, Tsutomu; Hioki, Tatsumi; Itoh, Noriaki

    1994-01-01

    Aanomalous features of the defects in Si implanted amorphous SiO 2 are reported. The numbers of E 1 prime centers and B 2 centers are found to increase monotonically with implanted Si dose, in contrast to the saturating feature of these numbers in Ar implanted samples. Moreover, when H ions are implanted in amorphous SiO 2 predamaged by Si implantation, both of the density and the number of E 1 prime centers increase and they reach a constant value at a small H dose. We point out that these anomalies can be explained in terms of the difference in the cross-section for defect annihilation in the specimens implanted with Si ions and other ions, in accordance with the homogeneous model proposed by Devine and Golanski. We consider that the main mechanism of defect annihilation is the recombination of an E 1 prime center and an interstitial O, which is stabilized by an implanted Si, reducing the cross-section in Si-implanted specimens. ((orig.))

  15. Nucleation, growth and dissolution of extended defects in implanted Si: impact on dopant diffusion

    Claverie, A.; Giles, L.F.; Omri, M.; Mauduit, B. de; Ben Assayag, G.; Mathiot, D.

    1999-01-01

    Transient Enhanced Diffusion (TED) of boron in silicon is driven by the large supersaturations of self-interstitial silicon atoms left after implantation which also often lead to the nucleation and subsequent growth, upon annealing, of extended defects. In this paper we review selected experimental results and concepts concerning boron diffusion and/or defect behavior which have recently emerged with the ion implantation community and briefly indicate how they are, or will be, currently used to improve 'predictive simulations' softwares aimed at predicting TED. In a first part, we focus our attention on TED and on the formation of defects in the case of 'direct' implantation of boron in silicon. In a second part, we review our current knowledge of the defects and of the diffusion behavior of boron when annealing preamorphised Si. In a last part, we try to compare these two cases and to find out what are the reasons for some similarities and many differences in defect types and thermal evolution depending on whether boron is implanted in crystalline or amorphous silicon. While rising many more questions, we propose a 'thermodynamical' vision of the nucleation and growth of clusters and extended defects and stress the interactions between these defects and the free Si self-interstitial atoms which surround them and are the source for TED in all cases. A pragmatic approach to the simulation of TED for various experimental conditions is proposed

  16. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants improve hyaline cartilage repair in ovine microfracture defects.

    Hoemann, Caroline D; Hurtig, Mark; Rossomacha, Evgeny; Sun, Jun; Chevrier, Anik; Shive, Matthew S; Buschmann, Michael D

    2005-12-01

    Microfracture is a surgical procedure that is used to treat focal articular cartilage defects. Although joint function improves following microfracture, the procedure elicits incomplete repair. As blood clot formation in the microfracture defect is an essential initiating event in microfracture therapy, we hypothesized that the repair would be improved if the microfracture defect were filled with a blood clot that was stabilized by the incorporation of a thrombogenic and adhesive polymer, specifically, chitosan. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate (1) blood clot adhesion in fresh microfracture defects and (2) the quality of the repair, at six months postoperatively, of microfracture defects that had been treated with or without chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood clot implants, using a sheep model. In eighteen sheep, two 1-cm2 full-thickness chondral defects were created in the distal part of the femur and treated with microfracture; one defect was made in the medial femoral condyle, and the other defect was made in the trochlea. In four sheep, microfracture defects were created bilaterally; the microfracture defects in one knee received no further treatment, and the microfracture defects in the contralateral knee were filled with chitosan-glycerol phosphate/autologous whole blood and the implants were allowed to solidify. Fresh defects in these four sheep were collected at one hour postoperatively to compare the retention of the chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood clot with that of the normal clot and to define the histologic characteristics of these fresh defects. In the other fourteen sheep, microfracture defects were made in only one knee and either were left untreated (control group; six sheep) or were treated with chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implant (treatment group; eight sheep), and the quality of repair was assessed histologically, histomorphometrically, and biochemically at six months postoperatively. In the defects that were examined

  17. A novel approach to secondary defect reduction in separation by implantation of oxygen (SIMOX) material

    Ellingboe, S L; Ridgway, M C [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    The formation of a buried SiO{sub 2} layer in Si for increased radiation hardness, dielectric isolation, and/or higher operating speeds in Si devices has been studied extensively. In the present report, a novel method for improving the final defect structure of SIMOX material is demonstrated for the first time. The concept of ion-beam defect-engineering (IBDE) introduced by Wang et al has been utilised. If defects are introduced at a depth R{sub 1} by irradiation with energetic ions into samples which were previously damaged at a depth R{sub 2}, it is possible to alter the properties of the defects at R{sub 2}, reduce or eliminate damage at R{sub 2}, and/or create gettering sites for defects at R{sub 1} . To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the secondary defect reduction in annealed SIMOX material, unannealed samples were implanted with Si ions at various energies, while keeping the nuclear energy deposition constant at two depths. It was observed that after annealing, even greater changes in the defect structure are evident. It has been demonstrated that pre-anneal Si irradiation in O-implanted Si can reduce secondary defect formation. Both the depth and amount of damage created are crucial to the success of the Si implantation. 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  18. A novel approach to secondary defect reduction in separation by implantation of oxygen (SIMOX) material

    Ellingboe, S.L.; Ridgway, M.C. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    The formation of a buried SiO{sub 2} layer in Si for increased radiation hardness, dielectric isolation, and/or higher operating speeds in Si devices has been studied extensively. In the present report, a novel method for improving the final defect structure of SIMOX material is demonstrated for the first time. The concept of ion-beam defect-engineering (IBDE) introduced by Wang et al has been utilised. If defects are introduced at a depth R{sub 1} by irradiation with energetic ions into samples which were previously damaged at a depth R{sub 2}, it is possible to alter the properties of the defects at R{sub 2}, reduce or eliminate damage at R{sub 2}, and/or create gettering sites for defects at R{sub 1} . To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the secondary defect reduction in annealed SIMOX material, unannealed samples were implanted with Si ions at various energies, while keeping the nuclear energy deposition constant at two depths. It was observed that after annealing, even greater changes in the defect structure are evident. It has been demonstrated that pre-anneal Si irradiation in O-implanted Si can reduce secondary defect formation. Both the depth and amount of damage created are crucial to the success of the Si implantation. 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  19. The investigation of radiation induced defects in MgO

    Puetz, M.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper Frenkel defects were induced in MgO by 3 MeV electrons at low temperature. These defects were investigated by measurements of the optical absorption, by investigating the lattice parameters and Huang diffuse scattering. (WL)

  20. Application of triple-crystal diffractometry for study of ion implanted layer defects

    Shcherbachev, K.D.; Bublik, V.T.

    2000-01-01

    Application of a triple-crystal arrangement, unlike traditionally used double-crystal one, allowed one to separate coherent and incoherent scattering components and to improve a resolution significantly. Advantages of the triple-crystal X-ray diffractometry to study defects in ion-implanted layers are demonstrated by example of characterisation of Si-GaAs(100) wafers doped by Si + with energy of 50 keV and does of 1x10 15 and 1x10 14 cm -2 . To explain a behaviour of point defects after implantation and annealing the analysis of strain depth profile was used. Two processes are shown to play a key role in formation of the distorted layer during implantation. The first one is an annihilation of Frenkel pairs components that decreases the total point defects concentration. Another one is a sink of more mobile interstitials to the surface that leads to formation of the thin subsurface layer enriched by vacancies [ru

  1. B implanted at room temperature in crystalline Si: B defect formation and dissolution

    Romano, L.; Piro, A.M.; Mirabella, S.; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    The B lattice location of B implanted into crystalline Si at room temperature has been investigated using the nuclear reaction 11 B(p,α) 8 Be induced by 650 keV proton beam and channelling analyses. The angular scans along the and axes indicate the formation of a particular B complex with B atoms non-randomly located. The same defect has been observed also for B doped Si where the B atoms, initially substitutional and electrically active, have been displaced as consequence of the interaction with the point defects generated by proton irradiation. The angular scans were compatible with the B-B pairs aligned along the axis predicted by theoretical calculations. The thermal evolution in the 400-950 deg. C range of the B complexes has been inferred both by B lattice location measurements and electrical activation. At low temperature (<700 deg. C) only 10% of the total B dose is active and a significant increase of randomly located B occurs. A significant electrical activation consistent with the concentration of substitutional B occurs at temperature higher than 800 deg. C. The data are interpreted in terms of a formation and dissolution of the B complexes

  2. Reconstruction of the maxilla following hemimaxillectomy defects with scapular tip grafts and dental implants.

    Mertens, Christian; Freudlsperger, Christian; Bodem, Jens; Engel, Michael; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Freier, Kolja

    2016-11-01

    Treatment of post-resective defects of the maxilla can be challenging and usually requires dental obturation or microvascular reconstruction. As compared to soft-tissue microvascular grafts, bone reconstruction can additionally allow for facial support and retention of dental implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate scapular tip grafts with respect to their applicability for maxillary reconstruction and their potential to retain dental implants for later dental rehabilitation. In this retrospective study, 14 patients with hemimaxillectomy defects were reconstructed with free scapular tip grafts, oriented horizontally, to rebuild the palate and alveolar ridge. After bone healing, three-dimensional virtual implant planning was performed, and a radiographic guide was fabricated to enable implant placement in the optimal anatomic and prosthetic position. All patients' mastication and speech were evaluated, along with the extent of defect closure, suitability of the graft sites for implant placement, and soft-tissue stability. Pre- and postsurgical radiographs were also evaluated. A good postoperative outcome was achieved in all patients, with complete closure of maxillary defects that were class II, according to the system of Brown and Shaw. Additional bone augmentation was necessary in two patients in order to increase vertical bone height. Patients were subsequently treated with 50 dental implants to retain dental prostheses. In all cases, additional soft-tissue surgery was necessary to achieve a long-term stable periimplant situation. No implants were lost during the mean observation period of 34 months. Due to its specific form, the scapular tip graft is well suited to reconstruct the palate and maxillary alveolar ridge and to enable subsequent implant-retained rehabilitation. Due to the limited bone volume, an accurate three-dimensional graft orientation is essential. Furthermore, most cases require additional soft-tissue surgery to achieve a long

  3. Defects characterization of arsenic implanted silicon by AC Hall effect measurements

    Jaouen, H.; Ghibaudo, G.; Christofides, C.

    1986-01-01

    AC and DC Hall effects measurements as a function of temperature (77 - 300K) and frequency (1Hz - 100KHz) have been performed to characterize implanted Silicon films. This technique enables the determination of the annihilation processes of defects in such layers as a function of temperature of isochronal annealings (300/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C during 1 hour). The experimental results are discussed with respect to proper transport models based on short and long range disorder considerations in order to find out the features of defects and inhomogeneities arising from implantation and their thermal annihilation after isochronal annealing

  4. Electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC

    Oshima, Ryuichiro [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Reseach Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology

    1996-04-01

    To add information of point defects in cubic crystal SiC, polycrystal {beta}-SiC on the market was used as sample and irradiated by neutron and electron. In situ observation of neutron and electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC were carried out by ultra high-voltage electronic microscope (UHVEM) and ordinary electronic microscope. The obtained results show that the electron irradiation-induced secondary defects are micro defects less than 20 nm at about 1273K, the density of defects is from 2x10{sup 17} to 1x10{sup 18}/cc, the secondary defects may be hole type at high temperature and the preexistant defects control nuclear formation of irradiation-induced defects, effective sink. (S.Y.)

  5. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    Comins, J.D.; Amolo, G.O.; Derry, T.E.; Connell, S.H.; Erasmus, R.M.; Witcomb, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with a fluence of 1 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I 3 - structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I 3 - and I 5 - aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 x 10 15 to 250 x 10 15 ions/cm -2 induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and also high fluence optical absorption studies. X-ray diffraction studies show

  6. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    Comins, J. D.; Amolo, G. O.; Derry, T. E.; Connell, S. H.; Erasmus, R. M.; Witcomb, M. J.

    2009-08-01

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with a fluence of 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I3- structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I3- and I5- aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 × 10 15 to 250 × 10 15 ions/cm -2 induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and also high fluence optical absorption studies. X-ray diffraction studies show

  7. Intrinsic point-defect balance in self-ion-implanted ZnO.

    Neuvonen, Pekka T; Vines, Lasse; Svensson, Bengt G; Kuznetsov, Andrej Yu

    2013-01-04

    The role of excess intrinsic atoms for residual point defect balance has been discriminated by implanting Zn or O ions into Li-containing ZnO and monitoring Li redistribution and electrical resistivity after postimplant anneals. Strongly Li-depleted regions were detected in the Zn-implanted samples at depths beyond the projected range (R(p)) upon annealing ≥ 600 °C, correlating with a resistivity decrease. In contrast, similar anneals of the O-implanted samples resulted in Li accumulation at R(p) and an increased resistivity. Control samples implanted with Ar or Ne ions, yielding similar defect production as for the Zn or O implants but with no surplus of intrinsic atoms, revealed no Li depletion. Thus, the depletion of Li shows evidence of excess Zn interstitials (Zn(I)) being released during annealing of the Zn-implanted samples. These Zn(I)'s convert substitutional Li atoms (Li(Zn)) into highly mobile interstitial ones leading to the strongly Li-depleted regions. In the O-implanted samples, the high resistivity provides evidence of stable O(I)-related acceptors.

  8. Study of EUV induced defects on few-layer graphene

    Gao, An; Rizo, P.J.; Zoethout, E.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Lee, Christopher James; Banine, V.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Defects in graphene greatly affect its properties1-3. Radiation induced-defects may reduce the long-term survivability of graphene-based nano-devices. Here, we expose few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5nm) radiation and show there is a power-dependent increase in defect density. We

  9. Defect diffusion during annealing of low-energy ion-implanted silicon

    Bedrossian, P.J.; Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a new approach for investigating the kinetics of defect migration during annealing of low-energy, ion-implanted silicon, employing a combination of computer simulations and atomic-resolution tunneling microscopy. Using atomically-clean Si(111)-7 x 7 as a sink for bulk point defects created by 5 keV Xe and Ar irradiation, they observe distinct, temperature-dependent surface arrival rates for vacancies and interstitials. A combination of simulation tools provides a detailed description of the processes that underlie the observed temperature-dependence of defect segregation, and the predictions of the simulations agree closely with the experimental observations

  10. Effects of recoil-implanted oxygen on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si studied using monoenergetic positron beams

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kitano, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Masahito; Kawano, Takao; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Mikado, Tomohisa

    1996-04-01

    Effects of oxygen atoms recoiled from SiO{sub 2} films on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. For an epitaxial Si specimen, the depth profile of defects was found to be shifted toward the surface by recoil implantation of oxygen atoms. This was attributed to the formation of vacancy-oxygen complexes and a resultant decrease in the diffusion length of vacancy-type defects. The recoiled oxygen atoms stabilized amorphous regions introduced by P{sup +}-implantation, and the annealing of these regions was observed after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 700degC. For a Czochralski-grown Si specimen fabricated by through-oxide implantation, the recoiled oxygen atoms introduced interstitial-type defects upon RTA below the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, and such defects were dissociated by annealing at 1000degC. (author)

  11. Customized Polymethyl Methacrylate Implants for the Reconstruction of Craniofacial Osseous Defects

    André Luis Fernandes da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial defects represent alterations in the anatomy and morphology of the cranial vault and the facial bones that potentially affect an individual’s psychological and social well-being. Although a variety of techniques and restorative procedures have been described for the reconstruction of the affected area, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, a biocompatible and nondegradable acrylic resin-based implant, is the most widely used alloplastic material for such craniomaxillofacial reconstruction. The aim of this study was to describe a technique for aesthetic and functional preoperative customized reconstruction of craniofacial bone defects from a small series of patients offered by the Brazilian public health system. Three adult male patients attended consultation with chief complaints directly related to their individual craniofacial bone defects. With the aid of multislice computed tomography scans and subsequent fabrication of the three-dimensional craniofacial prototype, custom-made PMMA implants were fabricated preoperatively. Under general anesthesia, with access to the craniofacial defects with a coronal approach, the PMMA implants were adapted and fixated to the facial skeleton with titanium plates and screws. Postoperative evaluation demonstrated uneventful recovery and an excellent aesthetic result. Customized prefabricated PMMA implants manufactured over the rapid prototyping models proved to be effective and feasible.

  12. Characteristic complications after autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects of the knee joint

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Pestka, Jan M; Kreuz, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a well-established therapy for the treatment of isolated cartilage defects of the knee joint, little is known about typical complications and their treatment after ACI. HYPOTHESIS: Unsatisfactory outcome after ACI is associated...

  13. Immediate Implant Placement into Extraction Sockets with Labial Plate Dehiscence Defects: A Clinical Case Series.

    Sarnachiaro, Guido O; Chu, Stephen J; Sarnachiaro, Evangelina; Gotta, Sergio Luis; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2016-08-01

    To measure the buccal plate reconstruction of extraction sockets with labial plate dehiscence defects using a bone allograft in combination with an absorbable collagen membrane and a custom-healing abutment at the time of tooth removal. Ten patients underwent immediate implant placement and reconstruction of the buccal plate. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed preextraction, immediately after bone grafting and implant placement (day 0), and between 6 and 9 months following implant surgery. Measurements were taken at three levels: coronal (L1), middle (L2), and apical (L3) level. Implants placed into sockets with labial plate dehiscence defects demonstrated radiographic reformation of the labial plate dehiscence defect at 6 to 9 months posttreatment. The net gain in labial plate on cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) in L1 and L2 was 3.0 mm, where 0 mm existed at pretreatment. The minimum amount of labial plate thickness of 2.0 mm was achieved in all treated sites, evaluated radiographically at 6 to 9 months postoperatively, in a single procedure, without flap elevation and maintaining the gingival architecture and satisfactory esthetics. Placing an absorbable membrane, bone graft, and custom-healing abutment at the time of flapless anterior tooth extraction and immediate implant placement into a socket with a labial osseous dehiscence is a viable clinical technique to reconstitute the absence of the labial bone plate. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. In vitro chondrogenesis and in vivo repair of osteochondral defect with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Ko, Ji-Yun; Kim, Kyung-Il; Park, Siyeon; Im, Gun-Il

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic features of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and examine the differences in the chondrogenesis between hiPSCs and human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBMMSCs). Embryoid bodies (EBs) were formed from undifferentiated hiPSCs. After EBs were dissociated into single cells, chondrogenic culture was performed in pellets and alginate hydrogel. Chondro-induced hiPSCs were implanted in osteochondral defects created on the patellar groove of immunosuppressed rats and evaluated after 12 weeks. The ESC markers NANOG, SSEA4 and OCT3/4 disappeared while the mesodermal marker BMP-4 appeared in chondro-induced hiPSCs. After 21 days of culture, greater glycosaminoglycan contents and better chondrocytic features including lacuna and abundant matrix formation were observed from chondro-induced hiPSCs compared to chondro-induced hBMMSCs. The expression of chondrogenic markers including SOX-9, type II collagen, and aggrecan in chondro-induced hiPSCs was comparable to or greater than chondro-induced hBMMSCs. A remarkably low level of hypertrophic and osteogenic markers including type X collagen, type I collagen and Runx-2 was noted in chondro-induced hiPSCs compared to chondro-induced hBMMSCs. hiPSCs had significantly greater methylation of several CpG sites in COL10A1 promoter than hBMMSCs in either undifferentiated or chondro-induced state, suggesting an epigenetic cause of the difference in hypertrophy. The defects implanted with chondro-induced hiPSCs showed a significantly better quality of cartilage repair than the control defects, and the majority of cells in the regenerated cartilage consisted of implanted hiPSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of customized polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants in the reconstruction of complex maxillofacial defects.

    Kim, Michael M; Boahene, Kofi D O; Byrne, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    Extensive maxillofacial defects resulting from trauma or oncologic resection present reconstructive challenges. Various autografts and alloplastic materials in conjunction with standard soft-tissue techniques have been used in the reconstruction of these types of defects. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a semicrystalline polyaromatic linear polymer exhibiting an excellent combination of strength, stiffness, durability, and environmental resistance. Recent investigations of PEEK as a biomaterial resulted in the successful treatment of cervical disk disease. We describe a series of 4 patients whose defects were reconstructed using customized PEEK implants. All had excellent postoperative aesthetic and functional results without complications such as infections or extrusions. Because PEEK implants are customizable, easily workable, inert, and nonporous, they represent an ideal alloplastic material for maxillofacial reconstruction.

  16. Exploring of defects in He+ implanted Si(100) by slow positron beam

    Zhang Tianhao; Weng Huimin; Fan Yangmei; Du Jiangfeng; Zhou Xianyi; Han Rongdian; Zhang Miao; Lin Chenglu

    2001-01-01

    Si(100) crystal implanted by 5 x 10 16 cm -2 , 140 keV He + was probed by slow positron beam, and defect distribution along depth was obtained from the relation between S parameter and positron incidence energy. The near surface region of implanted sample was only slightly damaged. Small vacancies and vacancy clusters less than 1 nm in diameter were the dominant defects, while the deeper region around the He + projected range was heavily damaged and had dense larger helium micro-bubbles and microvoids. Thermal anneal study at different temperatures showed that low temperature annealing could remove most vacancy-type defects effectively. However, annealing at high temperature enlarged the diameters of micro-bubbles and microvoids

  17. Correlation between defect and magnetism of low energy Ar+9 implanted and un-implanted Zn0.95Mn0.05O thin films suitable for electronic application

    Neogi, S.K.; Midya, N.; Pramanik, P.; Banerjee, A.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Taki, G.S.; Krishna, J.B.M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2016-01-01

    The structural, morphological, optical and magnetic properties of Ar +9 implanted 5 at% Mn doped ZnO films have been investigated to detect the correlation between ferromagnetism (FM) and defect. Sol–gel derived films were implanted with fluences 0 (un-implanted), 5×10 14 (low), 10 15 (intermediate) and 10 16 (high) ions/cm 2 . Rutherford back scattering (RBS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM) and magnetic force microscope (MFM), UV–visible, photoluminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and superconducting quantum interference device vibrating sample magnetometer (SQUID VSM) were employed for investigation. XRD indicated single phase nature of the films. Absence of impurity phase has been confirmed from several other measurements also. Ion implantation induces a large concentration of point defects into the films as identified from optical study. All films exhibit intrinsic FM at room temperature (RT). The magnetization attains the maximum for the film implanted with fluence 10 16 ions/cm 2 with saturation magnetization (M S ) value 0.69 emu/gm at RT. Magnetic properties of the films were interpreted using bound magnetic polaron (BMP). BMP generated from the intrinsic exchange interaction of Mn 2+ ions and V Zn related defects actually controls the FM. The practical utility of these films in transparent spin electronic device has also been exhibited. - Highlights: • Synthesis of transparent 5 at% Mn doped ZnO films was done by sol-gel technique. • Defect induced intrinsic ferromagnetism was observed for Ar 9+ ion implanted films. • The maximum magnetization was attained for highest dose of Ar 9+ implantation. • Zn vacancy may favors intrinsic ferromagnetic ordering. • Intrinsic ferromagnetism was interpreted in terms of bound magnetic polaron model.

  18. Correlation between defect and magnetism of low energy Ar{sup +9} implanted and un-implanted Zn{sub 0.95}Mn{sub 0.05}O thin films suitable for electronic application

    Neogi, S.K.; Midya, N. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Pramanik, P. [Institute of RadioPhysics and Electronics, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); CRNN, University of Calcutta, JB Block, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Banerjee, A. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); CRNN, University of Calcutta, JB Block, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Bhattacharyya, A. [Institute of RadioPhysics and Electronics, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Taki, G.S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700064 (India); Krishna, J.B.M. [UGC DAE CSR, Kolkata Centre, LB 8, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Bandyopadhyay, S., E-mail: sbaphy@caluniv.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); CRNN, University of Calcutta, JB Block, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2016-06-15

    The structural, morphological, optical and magnetic properties of Ar{sup +9} implanted 5 at% Mn doped ZnO films have been investigated to detect the correlation between ferromagnetism (FM) and defect. Sol–gel derived films were implanted with fluences 0 (un-implanted), 5×10{sup 14} (low), 10{sup 15} (intermediate) and 10{sup 16} (high) ions/cm{sup 2}. Rutherford back scattering (RBS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM) and magnetic force microscope (MFM), UV–visible, photoluminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and superconducting quantum interference device vibrating sample magnetometer (SQUID VSM) were employed for investigation. XRD indicated single phase nature of the films. Absence of impurity phase has been confirmed from several other measurements also. Ion implantation induces a large concentration of point defects into the films as identified from optical study. All films exhibit intrinsic FM at room temperature (RT). The magnetization attains the maximum for the film implanted with fluence 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} with saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) value 0.69 emu/gm at RT. Magnetic properties of the films were interpreted using bound magnetic polaron (BMP). BMP generated from the intrinsic exchange interaction of Mn{sup 2+} ions and V{sub Zn} related defects actually controls the FM. The practical utility of these films in transparent spin electronic device has also been exhibited. - Highlights: • Synthesis of transparent 5 at% Mn doped ZnO films was done by sol-gel technique. • Defect induced intrinsic ferromagnetism was observed for Ar{sup 9+} ion implanted films. • The maximum magnetization was attained for highest dose of Ar{sup 9+} implantation. • Zn vacancy may favors intrinsic ferromagnetic ordering. • Intrinsic ferromagnetism was interpreted in terms of bound magnetic polaron model.

  19. The fabrication of bioresorbable implants for bone defects replacement using computer tomogram and 3D printing

    Kuznetsov, P. G.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Goreninskii, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Popkov, A. V.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Grigoryev, E. G.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2017-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the possibility of production of personalized implants from bioresorbable polymers designed for replacement of bone defects. The stages of creating a personalized implant are described, which include the obtaining of 3D model from a computer tomogram, development of the model with respect to shape of bone fitment bore using Autodesk Meshmixer software, and 3D printing process from bioresorbable polymers. The results of bioresorbable polymer scaffolds implantation in pre-clinical tests on laboratory animals are shown. The biological properties of new bioresorbable polymers based on poly(lactic acid) were studied during their subcutaneous, intramuscular, bone and intraosseous implantation in laboratory animals. In all cases, there was a lack of a fibrous capsule formation around the bioresorbable polymer over time. Also, during the performed study, conclusions were made on osteogenesis intensity depending on the initial state of bone tissue.

  20. Defect-induced mix experiment for NIF

    Schmitt M.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME-II will measure the implosion and mix characteristics of CH capsules filled with 5 atmospheres of DT by incorporating mid-Z dopant layers of Ge and Ga. This polar direct drive (PDD experiment also will demonstrate the filling of a CH capsule at target chamber center using a fill tube. Diagnostics for these experiments include areal x-ray backlighting to obtain early time images of the implosion trajectory and a multiple-monochromatic imager (MMI to collect spectrally-resolved images of the capsule dopant line emission near bangtime. The inclusion of two (or more thin dopant layers at separate depths within the capsule shell facilitates spatial correlation of mix between the layers and the hot gas core on a single shot. The dopant layers are typically 2 μm thick and contain dopant concentrations of 1.5%. Three dimensional Hydra simulations have been performed to assess the effects of PDD asymmetry on capsule performance.

  1. Hydrogen effects on deep level defects in proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} based thin films

    Lee, D.W.; Seol, M.S.; Kwak, D.W.; Oh, J.S. [Department of Physics, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Photo-electronic Hybrids Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen effects on deep level defects and a defect generation in proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) based thin films for solar cell were investigated. CIGS films with a thickness of 3 {mu}m were grown on a soda-lime glass substrate by a co-evaporation method, and then were implanted with protons. To study deep level defects in the proton implanted CIGS films, deep level transient spectroscopy measurements on the CIGS-based solar cells were carried out, these measurements found 6 traps (including 3 hole traps and 3 electron traps). In the proton implanted CIGS films, the deep level defects, which are attributed to the recombination centers of the CIGS solar cell, were significantly reduced in intensity, while a deep level defect was generated around 0.28 eV above the valence band maximum. Therefore, we suggest that most deep level defects in CIGS films can be controlled by hydrogen effects. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film and solar cell are prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep level defects of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film and solar cell are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation using proton implantation and H{sub 2} annealing reduces deep level defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation could enhance electrical properties and efficiency of solar cells.

  2. Biomechanical Evaluation of Rat Skull Defects, 1, 3, and 6 Months after Implantation with Osteopromotive Substances

    Jones, Leigh Robert; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Mosekilde, Lis

    2007-01-01

    as unfilled controls. The repaired defects were evaluated biomechanically using a modified punch out test 1, 3, or 6 months postoperatively. Results: The maximum load carried in the DBM group was significantly higher than in the bone chips, hydroxyapatite, and control groups after one month of healing......Purpose: To compare the mechanical strength of surgically created and healed rat calvarial defects having been filled with three different osteopromotive substances: hydroxyapatite, intramembraneous demineralised bone matrix (DBM), and autogenous bone chips. Material: Sixty adult male Wistar rats...... were divided into three groups of 20 animals, each group representing healing times of one, three, or six months. Methods: Identical 5 mm bilateral critical size defects were trephined into the parietal bones and hydroxyapatite, DBM, or autogenous bone chips were implanted into the defects, or left...

  3. Radiation damage and defect behavior in ion-implanted, lithium counterdoped silicon solar cells

    Weinberg, I.; Mehta, S.; Swartz, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    Boron doped silicon n+p solar cells were counterdoped with lithium by ion implantation and the resuitant n+p cells irradiated by 1 MeV electrons. The function of fluence and a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) was studied to correlate defect behavior with cell performance. It was found that the lithium counterdoped cells exhibited significantly increased radiation resistance when compared to boron doped control cells. It is concluded that the annealing behavior is controlled by dissociation and recombination of defects. The DLTS studies show that counterdoping with lithium eliminates at least three deep level defects and results in three new defects. It is speculated that the increased radiation resistance of the counterdoped cells is due primarily to the interaction of lithium with oxygen, single vacanies and divacancies and that the lithium-oxygen interaction is the most effective in contributing to the increased radiation resistance.

  4. Healing of experimental femoral defects in rats after implantation of collagen-calcium phosphate biocomposites

    O. V. Korenkov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the healing process of experimental defects of the femoral shaft diaphysis of rats after implantation of osteoplastic material Collapan into its cavity. In experi-mental animals, a perforated defect with diameter of 2.5 mm was created in the medullary canal of the femoral shaft and filled with osteoplastic material Collapan. In control rats, the defect was left un-filled. The bone fragments were examined on the 15th and 30th day by light microscopy morphometry and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that application of osteoplastic material Collapan in the femoral diaphysis defect optimised reparative osteogenesis, showed high biocompatibility, osteo-conductive properties, resorption ability and good integration with tissue-specific structures of the regenerate

  5. Impurity Role In Mechanically Induced Defects

    Howell, R.H.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.

    2000-01-01

    An improved understanding of dislocation dynamics and interactions is an outstanding problem in the multi scale modeling of materials properties, and is the current focus of major theoretical efforts world wide. We have developed experimental and theoretical tools that will enable us to measure and calculate quantities defined by the defect structure. Unique to the measurements is a new spectroscopy that determines the detailed elemental composition at the defect site. The measurements are based on positron annihilation spectroscopy performed with a 3 MeV positron beam [1]. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is highly sensitive to dislocations and associated defects and can provide unique elements of the defect size and structure. Performing this spectroscopy with a highly penetrating positron beam enables flexibility in sample handling. Experiments on fatigued and stressed samples have been done and in situ measurement capabilities have been developed. We have recently performed significant upgrades to the accelerator operation and novel new experiments have been performed [2-4] To relate the spectrographic results and the detailed structure of a defect requires detailed calculations. Measurements are coupled with calculated results based on a description of positions of atoms at the defect. This gives an atomistic view of dislocations and associated defects including impurity interactions. Our ability to probe impurity interactions is a unique contribution to defect understanding not easily addressed by other atomistic spectroscopies

  6. Digital volume tomography in the diagnosis of peri-implant defects: an in vitro study on native pig mandibles.

    Mengel, Reiner; Kruse, Björn; Flores-de-Jacoby, Lavin

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study of native pig mandibles was to investigate the accuracy and quality of the representation of peri-implant defects by intraoral radiography (IR), panoramic radiography (PR), computer tomography (CT), and digital volume tomography (DVT). The examination was carried out on 19 native pig mandibles. In the toothless sections of the mandibles, one or two implants were inserted. Following the standardized preparation of peri-implant defects (11 each of dehiscences, fenestrations, and 2- to 3-walled intrabony defects), IR, PR, CT, and DVT were performed. The peri-implant defects were measured using appropriate software on the digitized IR and PR image programs. As a control method, the peri-implant bone defects were measured directly using a reflecting stereomicroscope with measuring ocular. The statistical comparison between the measurements of the radiographic scans and those of the direct readings of the peri-implant defects was performed with Pearson's correlation coefficient. The quality of the radiographic scans was determined through the subjective perception and detectability of the peri-implant defects by five independent observers. In the DVT and CT scans, it was possible to measure all the bone defects in three planes. Comparison with the direct peri-implant defect measurements yielded a mean deviation of 0.17+/-0.11 mm for the DVT scans and 0.18+/-0.12 mm for the CT scans. On the IR and PR images, the defects could be detected only in the mesio-distal and cranio-caudal planes. In comparison with the direct measurements of the peri-implant defects, the IR images revealed a mean deviation of 0.34+/-0.30 mm, and the PR images revealed a mean deviation of 0.41+/-0.35 mm. The quality rating of the radiographic images was highest for the DVT scans. Overall, the CT and DVT scans displayed only a slight deviation in the extent of the peri-implant defects. Both radiographic imaging techniques permitted imaging of peri-implant defects in three

  7. Defect evolution and impurity migration in Na-implanted ZnO

    Neuvonen, Pekka T.; Vines, Lasse; Venkatachalapathy, Vishnukanthan; Zubiaga, Asier; Tuomisto, Filip; Hallén, Anders; Svensson, Bengt G.; Kuznetsov, Andrej Yu.

    2011-11-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) have been applied to study impurity migration and open volume defect evolution in Na+ implanted hydrothermally grown ZnO samples. In contrast to most other elements, the presence of Na tends to decrease the concentration of open volume defects upon annealing and for temperatures above 600∘C, Na exhibits trap-limited diffusion correlating with the concentration of Li. A dominating trap for the migrating Na atoms is most likely Li residing on Zn site, but a systematic analysis of the data suggests that zinc vacancies also play an important role in the trapping process.

  8. Induced Magnetic Moment in Defected Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Liu Hong

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a large induced magnetic moment in defect single-walled carbon nanotube(SWNT) is predicted using the Green's function method. Specific to this magnetic moment of defect SWNT is its magnitude which is several orders of magnitude larger than that of perfect SWNT. The induced magnetic moment also shows certain remarkable features. Therefore, we suggest that two pair-defect orientations in SWNT can be distinguished in experiment through the direction of the induced magnetic moment at some Specific energy points

  9. Fast thermal annealing of implantation defects in silicon. Solid phase epitaxy and residual imperfection recovery

    Adekoya, O.A.

    1987-06-01

    Basic processes ruling the crystal reconstitution in solid phase during fast thermal annealing are studied; the role of electronic and thermodynamic effects at the interface is precised, following the implantations of a donor element (p + ), an acceptor element (B + ) and an intrinsic element (Ge + ). Then, after recrystallization, the electric role of residual point defects is shown together with the possibility of total recovery and an important electric activation of the doping [fr

  10. Light-induced defect creation in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon

    Morigaki, K.; Takeda, K.; Hikita, H.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2005-01-01

    Light-induced defect creation in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is investigated from electron spin resonance measurements and is compared with that in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Light-induced defect creation occurs at room temperature similarly for both types of films prepared at 250 deg. C. Thermal annealing of light-induced defects is also investigated as a function of temperature. Different behaviours of annealing characteristics for pm-Si:H from those for a-Si:H are observed and discussed. In particular, we observed a decrease of the light-induced defect creation efficiency with repeated light-soaking-annealing cycles and discuss it with respect to the hydrogen bonding in pm-Si:H films

  11. Alkaline biodegradable implants for osteoporotic bone defects--importance of microenvironment pH.

    Liu, W; Wang, T; Yang, C; Darvell, B W; Wu, J; Lin, K; Chang, J; Pan, H; Lu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Change of microenvironment pH by biodegradable implants may ameliorate unbalanced osteoporotic bone remodeling. The present work demonstrated that a weak alkaline condition stimulated osteoblasts differentiation while suppressed osteoclast generation. In vivo, implants with an alkaline microenvironment pH (monitored by a pH microelectrode) exhibited a promising healing effect for the repair of osteoporotic bone defects. Under osteoporotic conditions, the response of the bone microenvironment to an endosseous implant is significantly impaired, and this substantially increases the risk of fracture, non-union and aseptic implant loosening. Acid-base equilibrium is an important factor influencing bone cell behaviour. The present purpose was to study the effect of a series of alkaline biodegradable implant materials on regeneration of osteoporotic bone defect, monitoring the microenvironment pH (μe-pH) over time. The proliferation and differentiation potential of osteoporotic rat bone marrow stromal cells and RAW 264.7 cells were examined under various pH conditions. Ovariectomized rat bone defects were filled with specific biodegradable materials, and μe-pH was measured by pH microelectrode. New osteoid and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclast-like cells were examined by Goldner's trichrome and TRAP staining, respectively. The intermediate layer between implants and new bone were studied using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) linear scanning. In vitro, weak alkaline conditions stimulated osteoporotic rat bone marrow stromal cells (oBMSC) differentiation, while inhibiting the formation of osteoclasts. In vivo, μe-pH differs from that of the homogeneous peripheral blood and exhibits variations over time particular to each material. Higher initial μe-pH was associated with more new bone formation, late response of TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells and the development of an intermediate 'apatitic' layer in vivo. EDX suggested that

  12. Healing parameters in a rabbit partial tendon defect following tenocyte/biomaterial implantation.

    Stoll, Christiane; John, Thilo; Conrad, Claudia; Lohan, Anke; Hondke, Sylvia; Ertel, Wolfgang; Kaps, Christian; Endres, Michaela; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2011-07-01

    Although rabbits are commonly used as tendon repair model, interpretative tools are divergent and comprehensive scoring systems are lacking. Hence, the aim was to develop a multifaceted scoring system to characterize healing in a partial Achilles tendon defect model. A 3 mm diameter defect was created in the midsubstance of the medial M. gastrocnemius tendon, which remained untreated or was filled with a polyglycolic-acid (PGA) scaffold + fibrin and either left cell-free or seeded with Achilles tenocytes. After 6 and 12 weeks, tendon repair was assessed macroscopically and histologically using self-constructed scores. Macroscopical scoring revealed superior results in the tenocyte seeded PGA + fibrin group compared with the controls at both time points. Histology of all operated tendons after 6 weeks proved extracellular matrix (ECM) disorganization, hypercellularity and occurrence of irregular running elastic fibres with no significance between the groups. Some inflammation was associated with PGA implantation and increased sulphated proteoglycan deposition predominantly with the empty defects. After 12 weeks defect areas became hard to recognize and differences between groups, except for the increased sulphated proteoglycans content in the empty defects, were almost nullified. We describe a partial Achilles tendon defect model and versatile scoring tools applicable for characterizing biomaterial-supported tendon healing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phosphorus-defect interactions during thermal annealing of ion implanted silicon

    Keys, Patrick Henry

    Ion implantation of dopant atoms into silicon generates nonequilibrium levels of crystal defects that can lead to the detrimental effects of transient enhanced diffusion (TED), incomplete dopant activation, and p-n junction leakage. In order to control these effects, it is vital to have a clear understanding of dopant-defect interactions and develop models that account for these interactions. This research focuses on experimentally investigating and modeling the clustering of phosphorus dopant atoms with silicon interstitials. Damage recovery of 40keV Si+ implants in phosphorus doped wells is experimentally analyzed. The effects of background phosphorus concentration, self implant dose, and anneal temperature are investigated. Phosphorus concentrations ranging from 2.0 x 1017 to 4.0 x 1019 cm-3 and Si+ doses ranging from 5.0 x 1013 cm-2 to 2.0 x 1014 cm-2 are studied during 650-800°C anneals. A dramatic reduction in the number of interstitials bound in {311} defects with increasing phosphorus background concentration is observed. It is suggested that the reduction of interstitials in {311} defects at high phosphorus concentrations is due to the formation of phosphorus-interstitial clusters (PICs). The critical concentration for clustering (approximately 1.0 x 1019 cm-3 at 750°C) is strongly temperature dependent and in close agreement with the kink concentration of phosphorus diffusion. Information gained from these "well experiments" is applied to the study of direct phosphorus implantation. An experimental study is conducted on 40keV phosphorus implanted to a dose of 1.0 x 1014 cm-2 during 650-800°C anneals. Electrically inactive PICs are shown to form at concentrations below the solid solubility limit due to high interstitial supersaturations. Data useful for developing a model to accurately predict phosphorus diffusion under nonequilibrium conditions are extracted from the experimental results. A cluster-mediated diffusion model is developed using the

  14. Fatigue induced changes in conical implant-abutment connections.

    Blum, Kai; Wiest, Wolfram; Fella, Christian; Balles, Andreas; Dittmann, Jonas; Rack, Alexander; Maier, Dominik; Thomann, Ralf; Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Kohal, Ralf Joachim; Zabler, Simon; Nelson, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Based on the current lack of data and understanding of the wear behavior of dental two-piece implants, this study aims for evaluating the microgap formation and wear pattern of different implants in the course of cyclic loading. Several implant systems with different conical implant-abutment interfaces were purchased. The implants were first evaluated using synchrotron X-ray high-resolution radiography (SRX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The implant-abutment assemblies were then subjected to cyclic loading at 98N and their microgap was evaluated after 100,000, 200,000 and 1 million cycles using SRX, synchrotron micro-tomography (μCT). Wear mechanisms of the implant-abutment connection (IAC) after 200,000 cycles and 1 million cycles were further characterized using SEM. All implants exhibit a microgap between the implant and abutment prior to loading. The gap size increased with cyclic loading with its changes being significantly higher within the first 200,000 cycles. Wear was seen in all implants regardless of their interface design. The wear pattern comprised adhesive wear and fretting. Wear behavior changed when a different mounting medium was used (brass vs. polymer). A micromotion of the abutment during cyclic loading can induce wear and wear particles in conical dental implant systems. This feature accompanied with the formation of a microgap at the IAC is highly relevant for the longevity of the implants. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immediate Single-Tooth Implant Placement in Bony Defects in the Esthetic Zone : A 1-Year Randomized Controlled Trial

    Slagter, Kirsten W.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    Background: This study aims to assess, with regard to marginal bone level (MBL), whether the outcome of immediate implant placement in bony defects in the esthetic zone was non-inferior to delayed implant placement after 1 year. Methods: Forty patients with a failing tooth in the esthetic zone and a

  16. [Percutaneous catheter-based implantation of artificial pulmonary valves in patients with congenital heart defects].

    Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Aaberge, Lars; Thaulow, Erik; Døhlen, Gaute

    2011-07-01

    Percutaneous catheter-based implantation of artificial heart valves is a new technique that may supplement surgery and which may be used more in the future. We here report our first experience with implantation of artificial pulmonary valves in children with congenital heart defects. Eligible patients were those with symptoms of heart failure combined with stenosis and/or insufficiency in an established artificial right ventricular outflow tract. The valve was inserted through a catheter from a vein in the groin or neck. Symptoms, echocardiography, invasive measurements and angiography were assessed for evaluation of treatment effect. Our treatment results are reported for the period April 2007-September 2009. Ten patients (seven men and three women, median age 17 years) were assessed. The procedure reduced pressure in the right ventricle (p = 0.008) and resolved the pulmonary insufficiency in all patients. The median time in hospital was two days. No patients had complications that were directly associated with the implantation procedure. One patient developed a pseudoaneurysm in the femoral artery, another had a short-lasting fever two days after the procedure and one patient experienced a stent fracture that required surgery 9 months after the implantation. After 6 months all patients had a reduced pressure gradient in the right ventricular outflow tract (p = 0.008), the pulmonary insufficiency had improved (p = 0.006) and they all reported improval of symptoms. These results persisted for at least 24 months for the four patients who were monitored until then. Percutaneous catheter-based implantation of artificial pulmonary valves improves hemodynamics in the right ventricle of selected patients with congenital heart defects. A randomized controlled study should be undertaken to provide a stronger evidence-base for usefulness of this procedure.

  17. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  18. Deep levels induced by low energy B+ implantation into Ge-preamorphised silicon in correlation with end of range formation

    Benzohra, Mohamed; Olivie, Francois; Idrissi-Benzohra, Malika; Ketata, Kaouther; Ketata, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that low energy B + ion implantation into Ge- (or Si) implantation pre-amorphised silicon allows ultra-shallow p + n junctions formation. However, this process is known to generate defects such as dislocation loops, vacancies and interstitials which can act as vehicles to different mechanisms inducing electrically active levels into the silicon bulk. The junctions studied have been obtained using 3 keV/10 15 cm -2 B + implantation into Ge-implantation pre-amorphised substrates and into a reference crystalline substrate. Accurate measurements using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and isothermal transient capacitance ΔC(t,T) were performed to characterise these levels. Such knowledge is crucial to improve the device characteristics. In order to sweep the silicon band gap, various experimental conditions were considered. The analysis of DLTS spectra have first showed three deep levels associated to secondary induced defects. Their concentration profiles were derived from isothermal transient capacitance at depths up to 3.5 μm into the silicon bulk and allowed us to detect a new deep level. The evolution of such defect distribution in correlation with the technological steps is discussed. The end of range (EOR) defect influence on electrical activity of secondary induced defects in ultra-shallow p + n diodes is clearly demonstrated

  19. Cranioplasty Enhanced by Three-Dimensional Printing: Custom-Made Three-Dimensional-Printed Titanium Implants for Skull Defects.

    Park, Eun-Kyung; Lim, Jun-Young; Yun, In-Sik; Kim, Ju-Seong; Woo, Su-Heon; Kim, Dong-Seok; Shim, Kyu-Won

    2016-06-01

    The authors studied to demonstrate the efficacy of custom-made three-dimensional (3D)-printed titanium implants for reconstructing skull defects. From 2013 to 2015, 21 patients (8-62 years old, mean = 28.6-year old; 11 females and 10 males) with skull defects were treated. Total disease duration ranged from 6 to 168 months (mean = 33.6 months). The size of skull defects ranged from 84 × 104 to 154 × 193 mm. Custom-made implants were manufactured by Medyssey Co, Ltd (Jecheon, South Korea) using 3D computed tomography data, Mimics software, and an electron beam melting machine. The team reviewed several different designs and simulated surgery using a 3D skull model. During the operation, the implant was fit to the defect without dead space. Operation times ranged from 85 to 180 minutes (mean = 115.7 minutes). Operative sites healed without any complications except for 1 patient who had red swelling with exudation at the skin defect, which was a skin infection and defect at the center of the scalp flap reoccurring since the initial head injury. This patient underwent reoperation for skin defect revision and replacement of the implant. Twenty-one patients were followed for 6 to 24 months (mean = 14.1 months). The patients were satisfied and had no recurrent wound problems. Head computed tomography after operation showed good fixation of titanium implants and satisfactory skull-shape symmetry. For the reconstruction of skull defects, the use of autologous bone grafts has been the treatment of choice. However, bone use depends on availability, defect size, and donor morbidity. As 3D printing techniques are further advanced, it is becoming possible to manufacture custom-made 3D titanium implants for skull reconstruction.

  20. Restoring speech perception with cochlear implants by spanning defective electrode contacts.

    Frijns, Johan H M; Snel-Bongers, Jorien; Vellinga, Dirk; Schrage, Erik; Vanpoucke, Filiep J; Briaire, Jeroen J

    2013-04-01

    Even with six defective contacts, spanning can largely restore speech perception with the HiRes 120 speech processing strategy to the level supported by an intact electrode array. Moreover, the sound quality is not degraded. Previous studies have demonstrated reduced speech perception scores (SPS) with defective contacts in HiRes 120. This study investigated whether replacing defective contacts by spanning, i.e. current steering on non-adjacent contacts, is able to restore speech recognition to the level supported by an intact electrode array. Ten adult cochlear implant recipients (HiRes90K, HiFocus1J) with experience with HiRes 120 participated in this study. Three different defective electrode arrays were simulated (six separate defective contacts, three pairs or two triplets). The participants received three take-home strategies and were asked to evaluate the sound quality in five predefined listening conditions. After 3 weeks, SPS were evaluated with monosyllabic words in quiet and in speech-shaped background noise. The participants rated the sound quality equal for all take-home strategies. SPS with background noise were equal for all conditions tested. However, SPS in quiet (85% phonemes correct on average with the full array) decreased significantly with increasing spanning distance, with a 3% decrease for each spanned contact.

  1. Study of a radiation point defects ensemble in thin GaAs layers implanted by Be+ and Se+ ions

    Shcherbachev, K.D.; Bublik, V.T.; Kuripyatnik, A.V.; Yurchuk, S.Yu.

    2001-01-01

    The behaviour of a radiation point defects ensemble in SI-GaAs(100) wafers implanted by Be + (a dose of 1x10 14 at/cm 2 , an energy of 50 and 150 keV) and Se + (a dose of 5x10 14 at/cm 2 , an energy of 150, 180 and 240 keV) ions are studied by a triple-crystal diffractometry method. The strain profile and a number of residual radiation point defects are shown to be determined by defects annihilation, their sink to the surface and rechanneling during the implantation [ru

  2. He implantation induced nanovoids in crystalline Si

    Kilpelaeinen, S.; Kuitunen, K.; Slotte, J.; Tuomisto, F.; Bruno, E.; Mirabella, S.; Priolo, F.

    2009-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) in Doppler broadening mode was used to study the vacancy profile of crystalline Si after He and B implantation and subsequent annealing. In the He-implanted samples two different void layers were observed, one consisting of large voids at the projected range of He and another containing 'nanovoids' slightly larger than divacancies at roughly halfway between R p of He and the surface. The nanovoid layer was shown to be absent from samples co-implanted with B, implying that interstitials created during B implantation get trapped in the nanovoids and fill them, thus hindering interstitial-mediated B diffusion.

  3. {311} Defects in ion-implanted silicon: The cause of transient diffusion, and a mechanism for dislocation formation

    Eaglesham, D.J.; Stolk, P.A.; Cheng, J.Y.; Gossmann, H.J.; Poate, J.M.; Haynes, T.E.

    1995-04-01

    Ion implantation is used at several critical stages of Si integrated circuit manufacturing. The authors show how {311} defects arising after implantation are responsible for both enhanced dopant diffusion during annealing, and stable dislocations post-anneal. They observe {311} defects in the earliest stages of an anneal. They subsequently undergo rapid Ostwald ripening and evaporation. At low implant doses evaporation dominates, and they can quantitatively relate the interstitials emitted from these defects to the transient enhancement in diffusivity of dopants such as B and P. At higher doses Ostwald ripening is significant, and they observe the defects to undergo a series of unfaulting reactions to form both Frank loops and perfect dislocations. They demonstrate the ability to control both diffusion and dislocations by the addition of small amounts of carbon impurities

  4. Temperature dependence of helium-implantation-induced lattice swelling in polycrystalline tungsten: X-ray micro-diffraction and Eigenstrain modelling

    Broglie, I. de; Beck, C.E.; Liu, W.; Hofmann, F.

    2015-01-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction and Eigenstrain analysis the distribution of lattice swelling near grain boundaries in helium-implanted polycrystalline tungsten is quantified. Samples heat-treated at up to 1473 K after implantation show less uniform lattice swelling that varies significantly from grain to grain compared to as-implanted samples. An increase in lattice swelling is found in the vicinity of some grain boundaries, even at depths beyond the implanted layer. These findings are discussed in terms of the evolution of helium-ion-implantation-induced defects

  5. Modeling of extrinsic extended defect evolution in ion-implanted silicon upon thermal annealing

    Ortiz, C.J.; Cristiano, F.; Colombeau, B.; Claverie, A.; Cowern, N.E.B.

    2004-01-01

    A physically motivated model that accounts for the spatial and temporal evolution of extended defect distribution in ion-implanted Si is presented. Free physical parameters are extracted from experimental data and by means of a genetic algorithm (GA). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data and self-interstitial oversaturation measurements are combined in the same fitting procedure to eliminate unphysical solutions and find the optimum set of parameters. The calibration of parameters shows that binding energies of small self-interstitial clusters exhibit strong minima, as reported in other investigations. It is demonstrated that the calibrated model we propose is able to predict a wide variety of physical phenomena, from the oversaturation of self-interstitials via the mean-size distribution of {1 1 3} defects to the depth distribution of the density of the latter

  6. [Effect of simvastatin on inducing endothelial progenitor cells homing and promoting bone defect repair].

    Song, Quansheng; Wang, Lingying; Zhu, Jinglin; Han, Xiaoguang; Li, Xu; Yang, Yanlin; Sun, Yan; Song, Chunli

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effect of simvastatin on inducing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) homing and promoting bone defect repair, and to explore the mechanism of local implanting simvastatin in promoting bone formation. Simvastatin (50 mg) compounded with polylactic acid (PLA, 200 mg) or only PLA (200 mg) was dissolved in acetone (1 mL) to prepare implanted materials (Simvastatin-PLA material, PLA material). EPCs were harvested from bone marrow of 2 male rabbits and cultured with M199; after identified by immunohistochemistry, the cell suspension of EPCs at the 3rd generation (2 x 10(6) cells/mL) was prepared and transplanted into 12 female rabbits through auricular veins (2 mL). After 3 days, the models of cranial defect with 15 cm diameter were made in the 12 female rabbits. And the defects were repaired with Simvastatin-PLA materials (experimental group, n=6) and PLA materials (control group, n=6), respectively. The bone repair was observed after 8 weeks of operation by gross appearance, X-ray film, and histology; gelatin-ink perfusion and HE staining were used to show the new vessels formation in the defect. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to show the EPCs homing at the defect site. All experimental animals of 2 groups survived to the end of the experiment. After 8 weeks in experimental group, new bone formation was observed in the bone defect by gross and histology, and an irregular, hyperdense shadow by X-ray film; no similar changes were observed in control group. FISH showed that the male EPC containing Y chromosome was found in the wall of new vessels in the defect of experimental group, while no male EPC containing Y chromosome was found in control group. The percentage of new bone formation in defect area was 91.63% +/- 4.07% in experimental group and 59.45% +/- 5.43% in control group, showing significant difference (P < 0.05). Simvastatin can promote bone defect repair, and its mechanism is probably associated with inducing EPCs

  7. Implantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Tracheal Epithelial Cells.

    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Omori, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Compared with using autologous tissue, the use of artificial materials in the regeneration of tracheal defects is minimally invasive. However, this technique requires early epithelialization on the inner side of the artificial trachea. After differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), tracheal epithelial tissues may be used to produce artificial tracheas. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate that after differentiation from fluorescent protein-labeled iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in nude rats with tracheal defects. Red fluorescent tdTomato protein was electroporated into mouse iPSCs to produce tdTomato-labeled iPSCs. Embryoid bodies derived from these iPSCs were then cultured in differentiation medium supplemented with growth factors, followed by culture on air-liquid interfaces for further differentiation into tracheal epithelium. The cells were implanted with artificial tracheas into nude rats with tracheal defects on day 26 of cultivation. On day 7 after implantation, the tracheas were exposed and examined histologically. Tracheal epithelial tissue derived from tdTomato-labeled iPSCs survived in the tracheal defects. Moreover, immunochemical analyses showed that differentiated tissues had epithelial structures similar to those of proximal tracheal tissues. After differentiation from iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in rat bodies, warranting the use of iPSCs for epithelial regeneration in tracheal defects.

  8. Poly-ε-caprolactone Coated and Functionalized Porous Titanium and Magnesium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Critically Sized Bone Defects.

    Roland, Laura; Grau, Michael; Matena, Julia; Teske, Michael; Gieseke, Matthias; Kampmann, Andreas; Beyerbach, Martin; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Haferkamp, Heinz; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-12-22

    For healing of critically sized bone defects, biocompatible and angiogenesis supporting implants are favorable. Murine osteoblasts showed equal proliferation behavior on the polymers poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) and poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly-(4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)/P(4HB)). As vitality was significantly better for PCL, it was chosen as a suitable coating material for further experiments. Titanium implants with 600 µm pore size were evaluated and found to be a good implant material for bone, as primary osteoblasts showed a vitality and proliferation onto the implants comparable to well bottom (WB). Pure porous titanium implants and PCL coated porous titanium implants were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI) with Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-osteoblasts. Cell count and cell covered area did not differ between the implants after seven days. To improve ingrowth of blood vessels into porous implants, proangiogenic factors like Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) were incorporated into PCL coated, porous titanium and magnesium implants. An angiogenesis assay was performed to establish an in vitro method for evaluating the impact of metallic implants on angiogenesis to reduce and refine animal experiments in future. Incorporated concentrations of proangiogenic factors were probably too low, as they did not lead to any effect. Magnesium implants did not yield evaluable results, as they led to pH increase and subsequent cell death.

  9. Poly-ε-caprolactone Coated and Functionalized Porous Titanium and Magnesium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Critically Sized Bone Defects

    Laura Roland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For healing of critically sized bone defects, biocompatible and angiogenesis supporting implants are favorable. Murine osteoblasts showed equal proliferation behavior on the polymers poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL and poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate/poly-(4-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB/P(4HB. As vitality was significantly better for PCL, it was chosen as a suitable coating material for further experiments. Titanium implants with 600 µm pore size were evaluated and found to be a good implant material for bone, as primary osteoblasts showed a vitality and proliferation onto the implants comparable to well bottom (WB. Pure porous titanium implants and PCL coated porous titanium implants were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI with Green fluorescent protein (GFP-osteoblasts. Cell count and cell covered area did not differ between the implants after seven days. To improve ingrowth of blood vessels into porous implants, proangiogenic factors like Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 were incorporated into PCL coated, porous titanium and magnesium implants. An angiogenesis assay was performed to establish an in vitro method for evaluating the impact of metallic implants on angiogenesis to reduce and refine animal experiments in future. Incorporated concentrations of proangiogenic factors were probably too low, as they did not lead to any effect. Magnesium implants did not yield evaluable results, as they led to pH increase and subsequent cell death.

  10. A study of process-related electrical defects in SOI lateral bipolar transistors fabricated by ion implantation

    Yau, J.-B.; Cai, J.; Hashemi, P.; Balakrishnan, K.; D'Emic, C.; Ning, T. H.

    2018-04-01

    We report a systematic study of process-related electrical defects in symmetric lateral NPN transistors on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) fabricated using ion implantation for all the doped regions. A primary objective of this study is to see if pipe defects (emitter-collector shorts caused by locally enhanced dopant diffusion) are a show stopper for such bipolar technology. Measurements of IC-VCE and Gummel currents in parallel-connected transistor chains as a function of post-fabrication rapid thermal anneal cycles allow several process-related electrical defects to be identified. They include defective emitter-base and collector-base diodes, pipe defects, and defects associated with a dopant-deficient region in an extrinsic base adjacent its intrinsic base. There is no evidence of pipe defects being a major concern in SOI lateral bipolar transistors.

  11. Light-induced defects in hybrid lead halide perovskite

    Sharia, Onise; Schneider, William

    One of the main challenges facing organohalide perovskites for solar application is stability. Solar cells must last decades to be economically viable alternatives to traditional energy sources. While some causes of instability can be avoided through engineering, light-induced defects can be fundamentally limiting factor for practical application of the material. Light creates large numbers of electron and hole pairs that can contribute to degradation processes. Using ab initio theoretical methods, we systematically explore first steps of light induced defect formation in methyl ammonium lead iodide, MAPbI3. In particular, we study charged and neutral Frenkel pair formation involving Pb and I atoms. We find that most of the defects, except negatively charged Pb Frenkel pairs, are reversible, and thus most do not lead to degradation. Negative Pb defects create a mid-gap state and localize the conduction band electron. A minimum energy path study shows that, once the first defect is created, Pb atoms migrate relatively fast. The defects have two detrimental effects on the material. First, they create charge traps below the conduction band. Second, they can lead to degradation of the material by forming Pb clusters.

  12. Biocompatibility and osteoconduction of macroporous silk fibroin implants in cortical defects in sheep.

    Uebersax, Lorenz; Apfel, Tanja; Nuss, Katja M R; Vogt, Rainer; Kim, Hyoen Yoo; Meinel, Lorenz; Kaplan, David L; Auer, Joerg A; Merkle, Hans P; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2013-09-01

    The goal of the presented study was to compare the biocompatibility and cellular responses to porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds produced in a water-based (UPW) or a solvent based process (HFIP) using two different SF sources. For that reason, four different SF scaffolds were implanted (n=6) into drill hole defects in the cancellous bone of the sheep tibia and humerus. The scaffolds were evaluated histologically for biocompatibility, cell-material interaction, and cellular ingrowth. New bone formation was observed macroscopically and histologically at 8 weeks after implantation. For semiquantitative evaluation, the investigated parameters were scored and statistically analyzed (factorial ANOVA). All implants showed good biocompatibility as evident by low infiltration of inflammatory cells and the absent encapsulation of the scaffolds in connective tissue. Multinuclear foreign body giant cells (MFGCs) and macrophages were present in all parts of the scaffold at the material surface and actively degrading the SF material. Cell ingrowth and vascularization were uniform across the scaffold. However, in HFIP scaffolds, local regions of void pores were present throughout the scaffold, probably due to the low pore interconnectivity in this scaffold type in contrast to UPW scaffolds. The amount of newly formed bone was very low in both scaffold types but was more abundant in the periphery than in the center of the scaffolds and for HFIP scaffolds mainly restricted to single pores. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gel-type autologous chondrocyte (Chondron™ implantation for treatment of articular cartilage defects of the knee

    Chun Chung-Woo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gel-type autologous chondrocyte (Chondron™ implantations have been used for several years without using periosteum or membrane. This study involves evaluations of the clinical results of Chondron™ at many clinical centers at various time points during the postoperative patient follow-up. Methods Data from 98 patients with articular cartilage injury of the knee joint and who underwent Chondron™ implantation at ten Korean hospitals between January 2005 and November 2008, were included and were divided into two groups based on the patient follow-up period, i.e. 13~24-month follow-up and greater than 25-month follow-up. The telephone Knee Society Score obtained during telephone interviews with patients, was used as the evaluation tool. Results On the tKSS-A (telephone Knee Society Score-A, the score improved from 43.52 ± 20.20 to 89.71 ± 13.69 (P Conclusion Gel-type autologous chondrocyte implantation for chondral knee defects appears to be a safe and effective method for both decreasing pain and improving knee function.

  14. Advances in the Surgical Management of Articular Cartilage Defects: Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques in the Pipeline.

    Stein, Spencer; Strauss, Eric; Bosco, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to gain insight into the latest methods of articular cartilage implantation (ACI) and to detail where they are in the Food and Drug Administration approval and regulatory process. A PubMed search was performed using the phrase "Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation" alone and with the words second generation and third generation. Additionally, clinicaltrials.gov was searched for the names of the seven specific procedures and the parent company websites were referenced. Two-Stage Techniques: BioCart II uses a FGF2v1 culture and a fibrinogen, thrombin matrix, whereas Hyalograft-C uses a Hyaff 11 matrix. MACI uses a collagen I/III matrix. Cartipatch consists of an agarose-alginate hydrogel. Neocart uses a high-pressure bioreactor for culturing with a type I collagen matrix. ChondroCelect makes use of a gene expression analysis to predict chondrocyte proliferation and has demonstrated significant clinical improvement, but failed to show superiority to microfracture in a phase III trial. One Step Technique: CAIS is an ACI procedure where harvested cartilage is minced and implanted into a matrix for defect filling. As full thickness defects in articular cartilage continue to pose a challenge to treat, new methods of repair are being researched. Later generation ACI has been developed to address the prevalence of fibrocartilage with microfracture and the complications associated with the periosteal flap of first generation ACI such as periosteal hypertrophy. The procedures and products reviewed here represent advances in tissue engineering, scaffolds and autologous chondrocyte culturing that may hold promise in our quest to alter the natural history of symptomatic chondral disease.

  15. Neutron-induced helium implantation in GCFR cladding

    Yamada, H.; Poeppel, R.B.; Sevy, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    The neutron-induced implantation of helium atoms on the exterior surfaces of the cladding of a prototypic gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) has been investigated analytically. A flux of recoil helium particles as high as 4.2 x 10 10 He/cm 2 .s at the cladding surface has been calculated at the peak power location in the core of a 300-MWe GCFR. The calculated profile of the helium implantation rates indicates that although some helium is implanted as deep as 20 μm, more than 99% of helium particles are implanted in the first 2-μm-deep layer below the cladding surface. Therefore, the implanted helium particles should mainly affect surface properties of the GCFR cladding

  16. Formation of oxygen-related defects enhanced by fluorine in BF{sub 2}{sup +}-implanted Si studied by a monoenergetic positron beam

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kawano, Takao; Nagai, Ryo; Umeda, Kazunori

    1995-12-01

    Defects in 25-keV BF{sub 2}{sup +}- or As{sup +}-implanted Si specimens were probed by a monoenergetic positron beam. For the As{sup +}-implanted specimen, the depth profile of defects was obtained from measurements of Doppler broadening profiles as a function of incident positron energy. The major species of the defects was identified as divacancies. For ion-implanted specimens after annealing treatment, oxygen-related defects were found to be formed. For the BF{sub 2}{sup +}-implanted specimen before annealing treatment, such defects were formed in the subsurface region, where oxygen atoms were implanted by recoil from oxide films. This was attributed to enhanced formation of oxygen-related defects by the presence of F atoms. (author)

  17. [Complex skull defects reconstruction with САD/САМ titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants].

    Eolchiyan, S A

    2014-01-01

    Predictable and stable functional and aesthetic result is the aim of priority for the neurosurgeon dealing with the reconstruction of large cranial bone defects and complex-formed skull defects involving cranio-orbital region. the paper presents the experience with САD/САМ titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants for complex-formed and large skull bone defects reconstruction. Between 2005 and 2013 nine patients (5 females and 4 males) underwent cranioplasty and cranio-facial reconstruction with insertion of the customized САD/САМ titanium and PEEK implants. Computer-assisted preoperative planning was undertaken by the surgeon and the engineer together in 3 cases to provide accurate implant design. Eight patients had complex-formed and large posttraumatic defects of fronto-orbital (7 cases) and parietal (one case) regions. In two of these cases one-step reconstruction surgery for posttraumatic fronto-orbital defects combined with adjacent orbital roof (one case) and orbito-zygomatic (one case) deformities was performed. One patient underwent one-step primary cranioplasty after cranio-orbital fibrous dysplasia focus resection. Titanium implants were used in 4 cases while PEEK implants - in 5 ones. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months till 8,5 years (median 4,4 years). The accuracy of the implant intraoperative fit was perfect in all cases. Postoperative wounds healed primary and there were no any complications in the series presented. Post-op clinical assessment and CT data testified to high implants precision, good functional and aesthetic outcomes in all patients. САD/САМ titanium and PEEK implants application should allow for optimal reconstruction in the challenging patients with complex-formed and large skull bone defects providing predictable good functional and aesthetic result together with surgery morbidity and duration reduction. Computer-assisted preoperative planning should be undertaken for САD/САМ implants creation in

  18. Copper implantation defects in MgO observed by positron beam analysis, RBS and X-TEM

    Huis, M.A. van; Fedorov, A.V.; Veen, A. van; Smulders, P.J.M.; Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    2000-01-01

    In this work, effects of copper ion implantation in MgO were studied. (1 0 0) MgO samples were implanted with 50 keV Cu ions and thermally annealed stepwise in air for 30 minutes at 550, 750, 1000, 1250 and 1350 K. After ion implantation and after each annealing step, the samples were analysed with positron beam analysis (PBA). Use was also made of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry/channeling (RBS-C) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM). The combination of these techniques enabled to monitor the depth resolved evolution of both created defects and the copper atom depth distribution. PBA results show that copper implantation at a dose of 10 15 ions cm -2 yields a single layer of vacancy type defects after annealing. However a copper implantation at a dose of 10 16 ions cm -2 clearly yields two layers of defects in the material after annealing, separated by an intermediate layer. In both layers nanocavities have been identified. RBS experimental results show that the implanted copper atoms diffuse into the bulk material during annealing. X-TEM and channeling results show that after annealing, the lattice of the copper nanoprecipitates is epitaxial to the MgO host lattice. Under some circumstances, copper precipitates and small voids can co-exist. Furthermore, X-TEM measurements show that the nanocavities have rectangular shapes

  19. Interaction of alpha radiation with thermally-induced defects in silicon

    Ali, Akbar; Majid, Abdul

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of radiation-induced defects created by energetic alpha particles and thermally-induced defects in silicon has been studied using a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. Two thermally-induced defects at energy positions E c -0.48 eV and E c -0.25 eV and three radiation-induced defects E2, E3 and E5 have been observed. The concentration of both of the thermally-induced defects has been observed to increase on irradiation. It has been noted that production rates of the radiation-induced defects are suppressed in the presence of thermally-induced defects. A significant difference in annealing characteristics of thermally-induced defects in the presence of radiation-induced defects has been observed compared to the characteristics measured in pre-irradiated samples

  20. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  1. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10 35 cm -2 s -1 . In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E C -0.460 eV and E205a at E C -0.395 eV where E C is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V 3 ) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V 3 defect exhibits a bistability, as does the leakage current. In oxygen

  2. External fixation of femoral defects in athymic rats: Applications for human stem cell implantation and bone regeneration

    Terasa Foo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate animal model is critical for the research of stem/progenitor cell therapy and tissue engineering for bone regeneration in vivo. This study reports the design of an external fixator and its application to critical-sized femoral defects in athymic rats. The external fixator consists of clamps and screws that are readily available from hardware stores as well as Kirschner wires. A total of 35 rats underwent application of the external fixator with creation of a 6-mm bone defect in one femur of each animal. This model had been used in several separate studies, including implantation of collagen gel, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or bone morphogenetic protein-2. One rat developed fracture at the proximal pin site and two rats developed deep tissue infection. Pin loosening was found in nine rats, but it only led to the failure of external fixation in two animals. In 8 to 10 weeks, various degrees of bone growth in the femoral defects were observed in different study groups, from full repair of the bone defect with bone morphogenetic protein-2 implantation to fibrous nonunion with collagen gel implantation. The external fixator used in these studies provided sufficient mechanical stability to the bone defects and had a comparable complication rate in athymic rats as in immunocompetent rats. The external fixator does not interfere with the natural environment of a bone defect. This model is particularly valuable for investigation of osteogenesis of human stem/progenitor cells in vivo.

  3. Influence of titanium implant surface characteristics on bone regeneration in dehiscence-type defects: an experimental study in dogs.

    Schwarz, Frank; Sager, Martin; Kadelka, Ines; Ferrari, Daniel; Becker, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare bone regeneration in dehiscence-type defects at titanium implants with chemically modified sandblasted/acid-etched (modSLA) or dual acid-etched surfaces with a calcium phosphate nanometre particle modification (DCD/CaP). Buccal dehiscence-type defects were surgically created following implant site preparation in both the upper and the lower jaws of 12 fox hounds. Both types of implants were randomly allocated in a split-mouth design and left to heal in a submerged position for 2 and 8 weeks. Dissected blocks were processed for histomorphometrical analysis [e.g. new bone height (NBH), percentage of bone-to-implant contact (BIC), area of new bone fill (BF), and area of mineralized tissue (MT) within BF]. At 2 and 8 weeks, both groups revealed comparable mean BF (2.3+/-0.6 to 2.5+/-0.6 mm(2)versus 2.0+/-0.6 to 1.4+/-0.5 mm(2)) and MT (31.1+/-14.3-83.2+/-8.2%versus 38.9+/-15.9-84.4+/-6.3%) values. However, modSLA implants revealed significantly higher mean NBH (2.4+/-0.8 to 3.6+/-0.3 mm versus 0.9+/-0.8 to 1.8+/-1.4 mm) and BIC (53.3+/-11.3-79.5+/-6.6%versus 19.3+/-16.4-47.2+/-30.7%) values than DCD/CaP implants. ModSLA implants may have a higher potential to support osseointegration in dehiscence-type defects than DCD/CaP implants.

  4. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  5. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Braceras, Iñigo; Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana; Muñoz, Roberto; Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia; Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm 2 ) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  6. Low-dose rhBMP2/7 heterodimer to reconstruct peri-implant bone defects: a micro-CT evaluation.

    Wang, Jingxiao; Zheng, Yuanna; Zhao, Juan; Liu, Tie; Gao, Lixia; Gu, Zhiyuan; Wu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    To delineate the dynamic micro-architectures of bone induced by low-dose bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/7 heterodimer in peri-implant bone defects compared to BMP2 and BMP7 homodimer. Peri-implant bone defects (8 mm in diameter, 4 mm in depth) were created surrounding SLA-treated titanium implants (3.1 mm in diameter, 10 mm in length) in minipig's calvaria. We administrated collagen sponges with adsorbed low-dose (30 ng/mm(3) ) BMP2/7 to treat the defects using BMP2, BMP7 or no BMP as controls.2, 3 and 6 weeks after implantation, we adopted micro-computer tomography to evaluate the micro-architectures of new bone using the following parameters: relative bone volume (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), connectivity density, and structure mode index (SMI). Bone implant contact (BIC) was also revealed histologically. Consistent with 2 and 3 weeks, after 6 weeks post-operation, BMP2/7 resulted in significantly higher BV/TV (63.033 ± 2.055%) and significantly lower SMI (-4.405 ± 0.500) than BMP2 (BV/TV: 43.133 ± 2.001%; SMI: -0.086 ± 0.041) and BMP7 (BV/TV: 41.467 ± 1.850%; SMI: -0.044 ± 0.016) respectively. Significant differences were also found in Tb.N, Tb.Th and Tb.Sp at all time points. At 2 weeks, BMP2/7 resulted in significantly higher BIC than the controls. Low-dose BMP2/7 heterodimer facilitated more rapid bone regeneration in better quality in peri-implant bone defects than BMP2 and BMP7 homodimers. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Effect of membranes and porous hydroxyapatite on healing in bone defects around titanium dental implants. An experimental study in monkeys

    Gotfredsen, K; Warrer, K; Hjørting-Hansen

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of treating bony craters around titanium dental implant with polytetrafluoroethylene membranes (PTFE), with and without grafting of hydroxyapatite (HA), and with HA alone. 4 standardized bone defects were prepared in the alveolar ridge...

  8. POROUS POLYMER IMPLANTS FOR REPAIR OF FULL-THICKNESS DEFECTS OF ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE - AN EXPERIMENTAL-STUDY IN RABBIT AND DOG

    JANSEN, HWB; VETH, RPH; NIELSEN, HKL; DEGROOT, JH; PENNINGS, AJ

    1992-01-01

    Full-thickness defects of articular cartilage were repaired by implantation of porous polymer implants in rabbits and dogs. The quality of the repair tissue was determined by collagen typing with antibodies. Implants with varying pore sizes and chemical composition were used. The effect of loading

  9. Radiation defects in lithium fluoride induced by heavy ions

    Trautmann, C.; Schwartz, K.; Steckenreiter, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Costantini, J.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DPTA/SPMC; Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches avec les Ions Lourds (CIRIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1998-07-01

    Single crystals of lithium fluoride were irradiated with various species of heavy ions in the energy regime between 1 and 30 MeV/u. The induced radiation damage was studied with techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, chemical etching and profilometry, complemented by annealing experiments. Clear evidence is given for a complex track structure and defect morphology. Single defects such as F-centers are produced in a large halo of several tens of nanometers around the ion trajectory. The defect creation in this zone is similar to that under conventional radiation. For heavy ions above a critical energy loss of 10 keV/nm, new effects occur within a very small core region of 2-4 nm in diameter. The damage in this zone is responsible for chemical etching and for a characteristic anisotropic x-ray scattering. It is assumed that in this core, complex defect aggregates (e.g., cluster of color centers, molecular anions and vacancies) are created. Their formation is only slightly influenced by the irradiation temperature and takes place even at 15 K where diffusion processes of primary defects are frozen. Furthermore, irradiation with heavy ions leads to pronounced swelling effects which can be related to an intermediate zone of around 10 nm around the ion path. (orig.) 40 refs.

  10. Use of a Three-Dimensional Model to Optimize a MEDPOR Implant for Delayed Reconstruction of a Suprastructure Maxillectomy Defect

    Echo, Anthony; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William; McKnight, Aisha; Izaddoost, Shayan

    2013-01-01

    The use of a three-dimensional (3-D) model has been well described for craniomaxillofacial reconstruction, especially with the preoperative planning of free fibula flaps. This article reports the application of an innovative 3-D model approach for the calculation of the exact contours, angles, length, and general morphology of a prefabricated MEDPOR 2/3 orbital implant for reconstruction of a suprastructure maxillectomy defect. The 3-D model allowed intraoperative modification of the MEDPOR implant which decreased the risk of iatrogenic harm, contamination while also improving aesthetic results and function. With the aid of preoperative 3-D models, porous polypropylene facial implants can be contoured efficiently intraoperatively to precisely reconstruct complex craniomaxillofacial defects. PMID:24436774

  11. Ion implantation induced martensite nucleation in SUS301 steel

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Gustiono, Dwi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Phase transformation behaviors of the austenitic 301 stainless steel was studied under Fe + , Ti + and Ar + ions implantation at room temperature with 100, 200 and 300 keV up to fluence of 1x10 21 ions/m 2 and the microstructures were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plane and cross-sectional observations of the implanted specimen showed that the induced-phases due to implantation from the γ matrix phase were identified as α' martensite phases with the orientation relationship of (11-bar0) α parallel (111-bar) γ and [111] α parallel [011] γ close to the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S). The ion implantation induced phases nucleated near the surface region and the depth position of the nucleation changed depending on the ion accelerating energy and ion species. It was also found that the induced marten sites phases nucleate under the influence of the stress distribution, which is introduced due to the concentration of implanted ions, especially due to the stress gradient caused by the corresponding concentration gradient. (author)

  12. Immediate implant placement into posterior sockets with or without buccal bone dehiscence defects: A retrospective cohort study.

    Hu, Chen; Gong, Ting; Lin, Weimin; Yuan, Quan; Man, Yi

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate bone reconstruction and soft tissue reactions at immediate implants placed into intact sockets and those with buccal bone dehiscence defects. Fifty-nine internal connection implants from four different manufacturers were immediately placed in intact sockets(non-dehiscence group, n=40), and in alveoli with buccal bone dehiscence defects: 1) Group 1(n= N10), the defect depth measured 3-5 mm from the gingival margin. 2) Group 2(n=9), the depth ranged from 5mm to 7mm. The surrounding bony voids were grafted with deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) particles. Cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) was performed immediately after surgery (T1), and at 6 months later(T2). Radiographs were taken at prosthesis placement and one year postloading(T3). Soft tissue parameters were measured at baseline (T0), prosthesis placement and T3. No implants were lost during the observation period. For the dehiscence groups, the buccal bone plates were radiographically reconstructed to comparable horizontal and vertical bone volumes compared with the non-dehiscence group. Marginal bone loss occurred between the time of final restoration and 1-year postloading was not statistically different(P=0.732) between groups. Soft tissue parameters did not reveal inferior results for the dehiscence groups. Within the limitations of this study, flapless implant placement into compromised sockets in combination with DBBM grafting may be a viable technique to reconstitute the defected buccal bone plates due to space maintenance and primary socket closure provided by healing abutments and bone grafts. Immediate implants and DBBM grafting without using membranes may be indicated for sockets with buccal bone defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Surface damage versus defect microstructures in He and H ion co-implanted Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si

    Zhu, F. [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, C.L., E-mail: liuchanglong@tju.edu.cn [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, Institute of Advanced Materials Physics Faculty of Science, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gao, Y.J.; Wang, Z.; Wang, J. [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Cz n-type Si (1 0 0) wafers with a top Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer of about 170 nm in thickness were sequentially implanted with 40 keV He ions at a fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} and 35 keV H ions at fluences of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15}, 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Creation and evolution of surface damage as well as micro-defects have been studied. Our results clearly show that production of surface damage depends strongly on both the H implant fluence and annealing temperature. Only blistering or localized exfoliation of the top Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer has been observed for post H implantation at fluences of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} and 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2} upon 800 Degree-Sign C annealing. However, serious surface exfoliation has been found for the 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} H co-implanted samples after annealing at 450 Degree-Sign C and above. The exfoliation occurs at a depth of about 360 nm from the surface, which is obviously larger than the He or H ion range. Moreover, the exfoliated craters show clear two-step structures. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) observations reveal formation of micro-cracks in Si bulk and along the original interface, which is mainly responsible for the observed surface phenomena. The formation mechanism of micro-cracks has been discussed in combination of He and H implant-induced defects, impurities as well as their interactions upon annealing.

  14. Mobility of point defects induced by subthreshold collisions

    Tenenbaum, A.; Nguyen Van Doan

    1976-01-01

    The effect of thermal vibrations on atomic collision focusing was studied with the view to demonstrate that such collisions may induce point defect migration through the crystal. The persistence of the phenomenon of focused atomic collisions in a crystal at thermal equilibrium was studied, using a computer simulation by the Molecular Dynamics Technique. In the temperature range (0 to 500K) matter and momentum transfers in c.f.c. crystals proceed mainly by focused collisions along and directions. Their contribution to the induced migration of radiation defects was determined from the threshold energy of every primary able to be involved in the process. As an example, the quantitative model is applied to electron irradiation along the crystallographic directions [fr

  15. Micro- and macro-structure of implantation-induced disorder in Ge

    Glover, C J; Byrne, A P; Yu, K M; Foran, G J; Clerc, C; Hansen, J L; Nylandsted-Larsen, A

    2000-01-01

    The structure of ion implantation-induced damage in Ge substrates has been investigated with a combination of ion- and photon-based techniques including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), perturbed angular correlation (PAC) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. For MeV Ge ion implantation at -196 degrees C, the dose dependence of the decrease in local atomic order, determined from EXAFS and PAC, was compared to the number of displaced atoms determined from RBS measurements. An EXAFS determined damage fraction was shown to be a better estimate of amorphous fraction than the number of displaced atoms. PAC was used to elucidate the evolution of defective configurations, and was compared to the RBS and EXAFS results. A fit to the overlap model with the overlap of two ion cascades for complete amorphization best described the experimental results. (16 refs).

  16. Acute pericarditis with cardiac tamponade induced by pacemaker implantation.

    Shingaki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-11-01

    An 87-year-old woman was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular block and underwent pacemaker implantation. On postoperative day 12, she experienced cardiac tamponade that was suspected on computed tomography to be caused by lead perforation; therefore, we performed open-heart surgery. However, we could not identify a perforation site on the heart, and drained a 400-mL exudative pericardial effusion. Subsequently, we diagnosed the pericardial effusion as due to pericarditis induced by pacemaker implantation. It is sometimes difficult to distinguish pericarditis from pacemaker lead perforation, so both should be included in the differential diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Defect-Induced Hedgehog Polarization States in Multiferroics

    Li, Linze; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Jokisaari, Jacob R.; Gao, Peng; Britson, Jason; Adamo, Carolina; Heikes, Colin; Schlom, Darrell G.; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2018-03-01

    Continuous developments in nanotechnology require new approaches to materials synthesis that can produce novel functional structures. Here, we show that nanoscale defects, such as nonstoichiometric nanoregions (NSNRs), can act as nano-building blocks for creating complex electrical polarization structures in the prototypical multiferroic BiFeO3 . An array of charged NSNRs are produced in BiFeO3 thin films by tuning the substrate temperature during film growth. Atomic-scale scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging reveals exotic polarization rotation patterns around these NSNRs. These polarization patterns resemble hedgehog or vortex topologies and can cause local changes in lattice symmetries leading to mixed-phase structures resembling the morphotropic phase boundary with high piezoelectricity. Phase-field simulations indicate that the observed polarization configurations are mainly induced by charged states at the NSNRs. Engineering defects thus may provide a new route for developing ferroelectric- or multiferroic-based nanodevices.

  18. Effect of irradiation-induced defects on fusion reactor ceramics

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Structural, thermal, and electrical properties critical to performance of ceramics in a fusion environment can be profoundly altered by irradiation effects. Neutron damage may cause swelling, reduction of thermal conductivity, increase in dielectric loss, and either reduction or enhancement of strength depending on the crystal structure and defect content of the material. Absorption of ionizing energy inevitably leads to degradation of insulating properties, but these changes can be reduced by alterations in structural or compositional makeup. Assessment of the irradiation response of candidate ceramics Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 shows that each may find use in advanced fusion devices. The present understanding of irradiation-induced defects in ceramics, while far from complete, nevertheless points the way to methods for developing improved materials for fusion applications

  19. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel.

    Yokota, Masashi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Nobuto; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2011-02-22

    Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral condyle.

  20. Prosthesis-guided implant restoration of an auricular defect using computed tomography and 3-dimensional photographic imaging technologies: a clinical report.

    Wang, Shuming; Leng, Xu; Zheng, Yaqi; Zhang, Dapeng; Wu, Guofeng

    2015-02-01

    The concept of prosthesis-guided implantation has been widely accepted for intraoral implant placement, although clinicians do not fully appreciate its use for facial defect restoration. In this clinical report, multiple digital technologies were used to restore a facial defect with prosthesis-guided implantation. A simulation surgery was performed to remove the residual auricular tissue and to ensure the correct position of the mirrored contralateral ear model. The combined application of computed tomography and 3-dimensional photography preserved the position of the mirrored model and facilitated the definitive implant-retained auricular prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparision of two types of decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft in treatment of dehiscence defects around implants in dogs

    Ahmad Moghareh Abed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA may have the potential to enhance bone formation around dental implants. Our aim in this study was the evaluation and comparison of two types of DFDBA in treatment of dehiscence defects around Euroteknika® implants in dogs. Methods : In this prospective clinical trial animal study, all mandibular premolars of three Iranian dogs were extracted. After 3 months of healing, fifteen SLA type Euroteknika® dental implants (Natea with 4.1mm diameter and 10mm length were placed in osteotomy sites with dehiscence defects of 5mm length, 4 mm width, and 3mm depth. Guided bone regeneration (GBR procedures were performed using Cenobone and collagen membrane for six implants, the other six implants received Dembone and collagen membrane and the final three implants received only collagen membrane. All implants were submerged. After 4 months of healing, implants were uncovered and stability (Implant Stability Quotient of all implants was measured. Then, block biopsies of each implant site were taken and processed for ground sectioning and histomorphometric analysis. The data was analyzed by ANOVA and Pearson tests. P value less than 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All implants osseointegrated after 4 months. The mean values of bone to implant contact for histomorphometric measurements of Cenobone, Denobone, and control groups were 77.36 ± 9.96%, 78.91 ± 11.9% and 71.56 ± 5.61% respectively, with no significant differences among the various treatment groups. The correlation of Implant Stability Quotient and histomorphometric techniques was 0.692. Conclusion: In treating of dehiscence defects with GBR technique in this study, adding DFDBA did not significantly enhance the percentages of bone-to-implant contact measurements; and Implant Stability Quotient Resonance Frequency Analysis appeared to be a precise technique.

  2. Stability of Collagen Scaffold Implants for Animals with Iatrogenic Articular Cartilage Defects

    Josef Jančář

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable hydrogels based on collagen modified by addition of synthetic biodegradable copolymer intended for preparation of porous scaffolds for mesenchymal stem cells used for possible implantation to animals with articular surface defects was investigated. The synthetic biodegradable tri-block copolymer used was the block copolymer of polyethylene glycol (PEG, polylactic acid (PLA, polyglycolic acid (PGA (PEG-PLGA endcapped with itaconic acid (ITA. The water-soluble carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccimide system (EDC-NHS was chosen as the cross-linking agent used to control the rate of hydrogel resorption. Dependence of the physical properties of the prepared hydrogels on the concentration of the EDC-NHS cross-linker, reaction time and concentration of PEG-PLGA-ITA copolymer was examined. Swelling behaviour, thermal stability, surface morphology and degradation rate were also characterized. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that increase in concentration of the cross-linking agent, as well as prolonged cross-linking time and increased amount of synthetic copolymer lead to enhanced thermal stability of the gels together with a reduced swelling ratio and degradation rate in saline. The resorption rate of these gels used in preparation of cartilage scaffolds can be controlled over a wide time interval by varying the collagen/(PEG-PLGA-ITA blend composition or the conditions of the cross-linking reaction.

  3. Toward Patient Specific Long Lasting Metallic Implants for Mandibular Segmental Defects

    Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges

    Mandibular defects may result from tumor resection, trauma, or inflammation. The goals of mandibular reconstruction surgeries are to restore mandible function and aesthetics. To this end, surgeons use a combination of bone grafts and metallic implants. These implants have drastically different mechanical properties than the surrounding bone. As a result, the stress distribution in the mandible changes after surgery. The long-term abnormal stress/strain distribution may lead to either graft failure due to bone resorption as a result of stress shielding, or hardware failure due to stress concentrations. During the healing period of six to nine months it is important that complete immobilization, bringing mandibular micro-motion down to the level of 200-500 mum during chewing, is achieved. After this period it is desired that bone undergo normal stress for long-term success of the treatment. Although current high stiffness fixation hardware accomplishes this immobilization during the healing period, the hardware continues to alter the normal stress-strain trajectory seen during chewing once the engrafted bone heals. Over the long-term, the immobilized and stress-shielded engrafted bone tends to resorb. On the other hand, hardware fracturing or/and screw loosening is observed as the stress is concentrated at certain locations on the hardware. Equally as important is the permanent loss of chewing power due to the altered stress-strain relationships. The first stage of this research is to study the problems encountered following a mandibular segmental defect reconstructive surgery. To this end, we constructed a finite element model of a healthy mandible, which includes cortical and cancellous bone, teeth (enamel and dentin components), and the periodontal ligament. Using this model, we studied a healthy adult mandible under maximum molar bite force for stress, strain, displacement, and reaction force distribution. For mandibular segmental defect reconstruction the

  4. Study of defects, radiation damage and implanted gases in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    Seidman, D.N.; Amano, J.; Wagner, A.

    1980-10-01

    The ability of the field-ion microscope to image individual atoms has been applied, at Cornell University, to the study of fundamental properties of point defects in irradiated or quenched metals. The capability of the atom probe field-ion microscope to determine the chemistry - that is, the mass-to-charge ratio - of a single ion has been used to investigate the behavior of different implanted species in metals. A brief review is presented of: (1) the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; (2) the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and (3) the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He atoms in tungsten. The paper is heavily referenced so that the reader can pursue his specific research interests in detail

  5. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    Prochazka, I; Cizek, J; Lukac, F; Melikhova, O; Valenta, J; Havranek, V; Anwand, W; Skuratov, V A; Strukova, T S

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe 26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×10 12 to 1×10 14 cm -2 . The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments. (paper)

  6. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    Prochazka, I.; Cizek, J.; Lukac, F.; Melikhova, O.; Valenta, J.; Havranek, V.; Anwand, W.; Skuratov, V. A.; Strukova, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×1012 to 1×1014 cm-2. The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments.

  7. Defects induced ferromagnetism in Mn doped ZnO

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Neogi, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92A P C Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Sarkar, A. [Department of Physics, Bangabasi Morning College, Kolkata 700009 (India); Mukadam, M.D.; Yusuf, S.M. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhaba Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Banerjee, A. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92A P C Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Bandyopadhyay, S., E-mail: sbaphy@caluniv.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92A P C Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Single phase Mn doped (2 at%) ZnO samples have been synthesized by the solid-state reaction technique. Before the final sintering at 500 {sup o}C, the mixed powders have been milled for different milling periods (6, 24, 48 and 96 h). The grain sizes of the samples are very close to each other ({approx}32{+-}4 nm). However, the defective state of the samples is different from each other as manifested from the variation of magnetic properties and electrical resistivity with milling time. All the samples have been found to be ferromagnetic with clear hysteresis loops at room temperature. The maximum value for saturation magnetization (0.11 {mu}{sub B}/Mn atom) was achieved for 96 h milled sample. Electrical resistivity has been found to increase with increase in milling time. The most resistive sample bears the largest saturation magnetization. Variation of average positron lifetime with milling time bears a close similarity with that of the saturation magnetization. This indicates the key role played by open volume vacancy defects, presumably zinc vacancies near grain surfaces, in inducing ferromagnetic order in Mn doped ZnO. To attain optimum defect configuration favorable for ferromagnetism in this kind of samples proper choice of milling period and annealing conditions is required. - Research highlights: 2 at% Mn doped ZnO samples are single phase. All the samples exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. Correlation between saturation magnetization and positron annihilation lifetime established.

  8. Defects induced ferromagnetism in Mn doped ZnO

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Neogi, S.K.; Sarkar, A.; Mukadam, M.D.; Yusuf, S.M.; Banerjee, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2011-01-01

    Single phase Mn doped (2 at%) ZnO samples have been synthesized by the solid-state reaction technique. Before the final sintering at 500 o C, the mixed powders have been milled for different milling periods (6, 24, 48 and 96 h). The grain sizes of the samples are very close to each other (∼32±4 nm). However, the defective state of the samples is different from each other as manifested from the variation of magnetic properties and electrical resistivity with milling time. All the samples have been found to be ferromagnetic with clear hysteresis loops at room temperature. The maximum value for saturation magnetization (0.11 μ B /Mn atom) was achieved for 96 h milled sample. Electrical resistivity has been found to increase with increase in milling time. The most resistive sample bears the largest saturation magnetization. Variation of average positron lifetime with milling time bears a close similarity with that of the saturation magnetization. This indicates the key role played by open volume vacancy defects, presumably zinc vacancies near grain surfaces, in inducing ferromagnetic order in Mn doped ZnO. To attain optimum defect configuration favorable for ferromagnetism in this kind of samples proper choice of milling period and annealing conditions is required. - Research highlights: → 2 at% Mn doped ZnO samples are single phase. → All the samples exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. → Correlation between saturation magnetization and positron annihilation lifetime established.

  9. Bimaxillary protrusion with an atrophic alveolar defect: orthodontics, autogenous chin-block graft, soft tissue augmentation, and an implant.

    Chiu, Grace S C; Chang, Chris H N; Roberts, W Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Bimaxillary protrusion in a 28-year-old woman was complicated by multiple missing, restoratively compromised, or hopeless teeth. The maxillary right central incisor had a history of avulsion and replantation that subsequently evolved into generalized external root resorption with Class III mobility and severe loss of the supporting periodontium. This complex malocclusion had a discrepancy index of 21, and 8 additional points were scored for the atrophic dental implant site (maxillary right central incisor). The comprehensive treatment plan included extraction of 4 teeth (both maxillary first premolars, the maxillary right central incisor, and the mandibular right first molar), orthodontic closure of all spaces except for the future implant site (maxillary right central incisor), augmentation of the alveolar defect with an autogenous chin-block graft, enhancement of the gingival biotype with a connective tissue graft, and an implant-supported prosthesis. Orthodontists must understand the limitations of bone grafts. Augmented alveolar defects are slow to completely turn over to living bone, so they are usually good sites for implants but respond poorly to orthodontic space closure. However, postsurgical orthodontic treatment is often indicated to optimally finish the esthetic zone before placing the final prosthesis. The latter was effectively performed for this patient, resulting in a total treatment time of about 36 months for comprehensive interdisciplinary care. An excellent functional and esthetic result was achieved. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants elicit hyaline cartilage repair integrated with porous subchondral bone in microdrilled rabbit defects.

    Hoemann, C D; Sun, J; McKee, M D; Chevrier, A; Rossomacha, E; Rivard, G-E; Hurtig, M; Buschmann, M D

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that microfractured ovine defects are repaired with more hyaline cartilage when the defect is treated with in situ-solidified implants of chitosan-glycerol phosphate (chitosan-GP) mixed with autologous whole blood. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize chitosan-GP/blood clots in vitro, and (2) to develop a rabbit marrow stimulation model in order to determine the effects of the chitosan-GP/blood implant and of debridement on the formation of incipient cartilage repair tissue. Blood clots were characterized by histology and in vitro clot retraction tests. Bilateral 3.5 x 4 mm trochlear defects debrided into the calcified layer were pierced with four microdrill holes and filled with a chitosan-GP/blood implant or allowed to bleed freely as a control. At 1 day post-surgery, initial defects were characterized by histomorphometry (n=3). After 8 weeks of repair, osteochondral repair tissues between or through the drill holes were evaluated by histology, histomorphometry, collagen type II expression, and stereology (n=16). Chitosan-GP solutions structurally stabilized the blood clots by inhibiting clot retraction. Treatment of drilled defects with chitosan-GP/blood clots led to the formation of a more integrated and hyaline repair tissue above a more porous and vascularized subchondral bone plate compared to drilling alone. Correlation analysis of repair tissue between the drill holes revealed that the absence of calcified cartilage and the presence of a porous subchondral bone plate were predictors of greater repair tissue integration with subchondral bone (Phyaline and integrated repair tissue associated with a porous subchondral bone replete with blood vessels. Concomitant regeneration of a vascularized bone plate during cartilage repair could provide progenitors, anabolic factors and nutrients that aid in the formation of hyaline cartilage.

  11. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  12. Micro CT and human histological analysis of a peri-implant osseous defect grafted with porous titanium granules: a case report.

    Wohlfahrt, Johan Caspar; Aass, Anne Merete; Ronold, Hans Jacob; Lyngstadaas, Stale Petter

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of peri-implant osseous defects represents a significant challenge for clinicians, and the need to evolve within predictable surgical procedures is important. This case report describes the surgical treatment and grafting with porous titanium granules (PTG) of one patient with a peri-implant osseous defect. The suggested thrombogenic properties of titanium are intriguing from the perspective of osseous reconstructive surgery. In an ongoing randomized clinical trial using PTG for treatment of peri-implant osseous defects, one patient with one test implant was excluded and scheduled for implant removal. The surgical therapy included open flap debridement with surface decontamination with 24% EDTA gel, grafting with PTG, and resubmersion of the implant. After 12 months of healing, the implant with surrounding tissues was excised en bloc and micro CT and histological analyses were performed. Analyses showed PTG in close contact with new bone and with bone growing both into the porosities of the graft material and onto the adjacent implant surface. Element analysis demonstrated calcium and phosphorus in the new tissue embedding the PTG and the implant. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2011;26:e9-e14.

  13. Radiation induced segregation and point defects in binary copper alloys

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Considerable progress, both theoretical and experimental, has been made in establishing and understanding the influence of factors such as temperature, time, displacement rate dependence and the effect of initial solute misfit on radiation induced solute diffusion and segregation. During irradiation, the composition of the alloy changes locally, due to defect flux driven non-equilibrium segregation near sinks such as voids, external surfaces and grain boundaries. This change in composition could influence properties and phenomena such as ductility, corrosion resistance, stress corrosion cracking, sputtering and blistering of materials used in thermo-nuclear reactors. In this work, the effect of 1 MeV electron irradiation on the initiation and development of segregation and defect diffusion in binary copper alloys has been studied in situ, with the aid of a high voltage electron microscope. The binary copper alloys had Be, Pt and Sn as alloying elements which had atomic radii less than, similar and greater than that of copper, respectively. It has been observed that in a wide irradiation temperature range, stabilization and growth of dislocation loops took place in Cu-Sn and Cu-Pt alloys. Whereas in the Cu-Be alloy, radiation induced precipitates formed and transformed to the stable γ phase. (Author) [pt

  14. Nucleation of point defects in low-fluence ion-implanted GaAs and GaP

    Wesch, W.; Wendler, E.; Gaertner, K.

    1992-01-01

    The defect production due to low-fluence medium-mass ion implantation into GaAs and GaP at room temperature is investigated. In the parameter region analysed weakly damaged layers are created containing point defects and point defects complexes. Temperature dependent channeling measurements show different structures of the damage produced in the two materials. The depth profiles of the near-edge optical absorption coefficient K sufficiently correspond to the profiles of the primarily produced vacancy concentration N vac . The absorption coefficient K(N vac ) determined from the depth profiles of the two magnitudes shows a square root dependence for GaAs, whereas for GaP a linear dependence is found. The differences observed are discussed in the frame of different nucleation mechanisms. (orig.)

  15. Osteointegration of Porous Poly-ε-Caprolactone-Coated and Previtalised Magnesium Implants in Critically Sized Calvarial Bone Defects in the Mouse Model

    Michael Grau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials are widely used in maxillofacial surgery. While titanium is presumed to be the gold standard, magnesium-based implants are a current topic of interest and investigation due to their biocompatible, osteoconductive and degradable properties. This study investigates the effects of poly-ε-caprolactone-coated and previtalised magnesium implants on osteointegration within murine calvarial bone defects: After setting a 3 mm × 3 mm defect into the calvaria of 40 BALB/c mice the animals were treated with poly-ε-caprolactone-coated porous magnesium implants (without previtalisation or previtalised with either osteoblasts or adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells, porous Ti6Al4V implants or without any implant. To evaluate bone formation and implant degradation, micro-computertomographic scans were performed at day 0, 28, 56 and 84 after surgery. Additionally, histological thin sections were prepared and evaluated histomorphometrically. The outcomes revealed no significant differences within the differently treated groups regarding bone formation and the amount of osteoid. While the implant degradation resulted in implant shifting, both implant geometry and previtalisation appeared to have positive effects on vascularisation. Although adjustments in degradation behaviour and implant fixation are indicated, this study still considers magnesium as a promising alternative to titanium-based implants in maxillofacial surgery in future.

  16. Spontaneous progression of ligature induced peri-implantitis at implants with different surface roughness: an experimental study in dogs

    Berglundh, T; Gotfredsen, K; Zitzmann, N U

    2007-01-01

    : The aim of the current experiment was to study the progression of peri-implantitis around implants with different surface roughness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In five beagle dogs, three implants with either a sandblasted acid-etched surface (SLA) or a polished surface (P) were installed bilaterally......BACKGROUND: Peri-implantitis is associated with the presence of submarginal plaque, soft-tissue inflammation and advanced breakdown of the supporting bone. The progression of peri-implantitis following varying periods of continuing plaque accumulation has been studied in animal models. OBJECTIVE...... in the edentulous premolar regions. After 3 months on a plaque control regimen, experimental peri-implantitis was induced by ligature placement and plaque accumulation was allowed to progress until about 40% of the height of the supporting bone had been lost. After this 4-month period, ligatures were removed...

  17. Cathodoluminescence studies of anomalous ion implantation defect introduction in lightly and heavily doped liquid phase epitaxial GaAs:Sn

    Norris, C.B.; Barnes, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    The anomalous postrange defect introduction produced by shallow ion implantation in GaAs has been investigated in Sn-doped liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) material using depth-resolved cathodoluminescence in conjunction with layer removal by chemical etching. 100-keV Ne + or 200-keV Zn + ions were implanted into lightly or heavily Sn-doped LPE layers at temperatures between 80 and 300 K. All implantations were subsequently annealed at 300 K. Although the projected ion ranges for the implants were on the order of 1000 A, significant postrange damage was observed at far greater depths. At depths up to several microns, the damage introduction produced severe nonradiative recombination but simultaneously caused an apparent increase in the concentration of incumbent luminescence centers responsible for an extrinsic band near 1.39 eV. A weak damage-related band near 1.2 eV could also be seen in one instance. At depths of 5--30 μm, the postrange damage had the opposite effect of annihilating incumbent 1.39-eV luminescence centers. The efficiency of the damage introduction has a complicated temperature dependence which is significantly different for the ion/substrate combinations investigated. However, no conditions were found for which the damage introduction could be inhibited. While our measurements are the most extensive to date concerning the anomalous ion implant damage introduction in GaAs, the detailed mechanisms responsible for this effect still remain obscure owing in part to the limited understanding of defects in GaAs

  18. Intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid increases the volume of the hyaline cartilage regenerated in a large osteochondral defect by implantation of a double-network gel.

    Fukui, Takaaki; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Yokota, Masashi; Kondo, Eiji; Gong, Jian Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2014-04-01

    Implantation of PAMPS/PDMAAm double-network (DN) gel can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in the osteochondral defect. However, it is a problem that the volume of the regenerated cartilage tissue is gradually reduced at 12 weeks. This study investigated whether intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid (HA) increases the volume of the cartilage regenerated with the DN gel at 12 weeks. A total of 48 rabbits were used in this study. A cylindrical osteochondral defect created in the bilateral femoral trochlea was treated with DN gel (Group DN) or left without any implantation (Group C). In both Groups, we injected 1.0 mL of HA in the left knee, and 1.0 mL of saline solution in the right knee. Quantitative histological evaluations were performed at 2, 4, and 12 weeks, and PCR analysis was performed at 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. In Group DN, the proteoglycan-rich area was significantly greater in the HA-injected knees than in the saline-injected knees at 12 weeks (P = 0.0247), and expression of type 2 collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 mRNAs was significantly greater in the HA-injected knees than in the saline-injected knees at 2 weeks (P = 0.0475, P = 0.0257, P = 0.0222, respectively). The intra-articular administration of HA significantly enhanced these gene expression at 2 weeks and significantly increased the volume of the hyaline cartilage regenerated by implantation of a DN gel at 12 weeks. This information is important to develop an additional method to increase the volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue in a potential cartilage regeneration strategy using the DN gel.

  19. Implantation of a novel biologic and hybridized tissue engineered bioimplant in large tendon defect: an in vivo investigation.

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  20. Annealing of hydrogen-induced defects in RF-plasma-treated Si wafers: ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    Ghica, C; Nistor, L C; Vizireanu, S; Dinescu, G

    2011-01-01

    The smart-cut(TM) process is based on inducing and processing structural defects below the free surface of semiconductor wafers. The necessary defects are currently induced by implantation of light elements such as hydrogen or helium. An alternative softer way to induce shallow subsurface defects is by RF-plasma hydrogenation. To facilitate the smart-cut process, the wafers containing the induced defects need to be subjected to an appropriate thermal treatment. In our experiments, (0 0 1) Si wafers are submitted to 200 and 50 W hydrogen RF-plasma and are subsequently annealed. The samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), before and after annealing. The plasma-introduced defects are {1 1 1} and {1 0 0} planar-like defects and nanocavities, all of them involving hydrogen. Many nanocavities are aligned into strings almost parallel to the wafer surface. The annealing is performed either by furnace thermal treatment at 550 deg. C, or by in situ heating in the electron microscope at 450, 650 and 800 deg. C during the TEM observations. The TEM microstructural studies indicate a partial healing of the planar defects and a size increase of the nanometric cavities by a coalescence process of the small neighbouring nanocavities. By annealing, the lined up nanometric voids forming chains in the as-hydrogenated sample coalesced into well-defined cracks, mostly parallel to the wafer surface.

  1. Vacancy-related defect distributions in 11B-, 14N-, and 27Al-implanted 4H-SiC: Role of channeling

    Janson, M.S.; Slotte, J.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Saarinen, K.; Hallen, A.

    2004-01-01

    The defect distributions in 11 B-, 14 N-, and 27 Al-implanted epitaxial 4H-SiC are studied using monoenergetic positron beams. At least three types of defects are needed to account for the Doppler broadening annihilation spectra and two of the defects are tentatively identified as V Si , and V Si V C . By comparing the defect profiles extracted from the annihilation spectra to the chemical profiles determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and to the primary defect profiles obtained from binary collision approximation simulations, it is concluded that the defects found at depths considerably deeper than the projected range of the implanted ions mainly originate from deeply channeled ions

  2. Defect-induced conductance oscillations in short atomic chains

    Wawrzyniak-Adamczewska, M; Kostyrko, T

    2012-01-01

    Electronic transport through a junction made of two gold electrodes connected with a gold chain containing a silver impurity is analyzed with a tight binding model and the density-functional theory. It is shown that the conductance depends in a simple way on the position of the impurity in the chain and the parity of the total number of atoms of the chain. For an odd chain the conductance takes on a higher value when the Ag impurity substitutes an even Au atom in the chain, and a lower one for an odd position of the Ag atom. In the case of an even chain the conductance hardly depends on the position of the Ag atom. This new kind of a defect-induced parity oscillation of the conductance is significantly more prominent than the well-known even-odd effect related to the dependence of the conductance on the parity of number of atoms in perfect chains. (paper)

  3. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients with skull defects or metallic implants: a review of the literature and case report.

    Amanullah, Shabbir; Delva, Nicholas; McRae, Harold; Campbell, Laura A; Cole, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Head injury is often associated with psychiatric morbidity. While it is well understood that the loss of critical areas of the brain may play a role in cognitive dysfunction and change in personality, head injury can also have profound effects on mood and cognition. The role of medications in the treatment of mood disorders associated with brain injury is well documented, and there is also evidence favoring the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in this context. However, data are limited on the use of ECT in patients with skull defects or metallic head implants. First, a review of the literature on use of ECT in patients with metallic head implants is provided. Electronic databases and online sites, including PubMed, Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews, and UpToDate, were used to search for relevant articles and case reports on the use of ECT in patients with and without metallic implants in the head (1964 to 2009). The search terms electroconvulsive, electroconvulsive therapy, ECT, electroshock therapy, EST, head injury, brain injury, metallic plates, metallic implants, skull prosthesis, and depression were used interchangeably. The search produced 7 articles discussing exclusively the use of ECT in patients with a metallic skull plate. Second, the case of the successful and safe use of ECT in an individual with a previous history of brain trauma and metallic plate implantation is described. Most cases of head injury are managed by neurologists and rehabilitation consultants; the more severe cases of depression and other mood disorders tend to be referred for specialist psychiatric care. With greater degrees of deficit following head injury, management becomes more complicated. Our patient showed positive results with ECT, including improvement in depressive features and resolution of suicidal ideas/plans. ECT is an effective and safe alternative in patients with a history of brain trauma and metallic plate implantation who subsequently develop treatment

  5. Developmental defects and genomic instability after x-irradiation of wild-type and genetically modified mouse pre-implantation and early post-implantation embryos

    Jacquet, P

    2012-01-01

    Results obtained from the end of the 1950s suggested that ionizing radiation could induce foetal malformations in some mouse strains when administered during early pre-implantation stages. Starting in 1989, data obtained in Germany also showed that radiation exposure during that period could lead to a genomic instability in the surviving foetuses. Furthermore, the same group reported that both malformations and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation foetuses after exposure of zygotes to relatively high doses of radiation. As such results were of concern for radiation protection, we investigated this in more detail during recent years, using mice with varying genetic backgrounds including mice heterozygous for mutations involved in important cellular processes like DNA repair, cell cycle regulation or apoptosis. The main parameters which were investigated included morphological development, genomic instability and gene expression in the irradiated embryos or their own progeny. The aim of this review is to critically reassess the results obtained in that field in the different laboratories and to try to draw general conclusions on the risks of developmental defects and genomic instability from an exposure of early embryos to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. Altogether and in the range of doses normally used in diagnostic radiology, the risk of induction of embryonic death and of congenital malformation following the irradiation of a newly fertilised egg is certainly very low when compared to the ‘spontaneous’ risks for such effects. Similarly, the risk of radiation induction of a genomic instability under such circumstances seems to be very small. However, this is not a reason to not apply some precaution principles when possible. One way of doing this is to restrict the use of higher dose examinations on all potentially pregnant women to the first ten days of their menstrual cycle when conception is very unlikely to have occurred

  6. Electrically active point defects in Mg implanted n-type GaN grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Alfieri, G.; Sundaramoorthy, V. K.; Micheletto, R.

    2018-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is the p-type doping of choice for GaN, and selective area doping by ion implantation is a routine technique employed during device processing. While electrically active defects have been thoroughly studied in as-grown GaN, not much is known about defects generated by ion implantation. This is especially true for the case of Mg. In this study, we carried out an electrical characterization investigation of point defects generated by Mg implantation in GaN. We have found at least nine electrically active levels in the 0.2-1.2 eV energy range, below the conduction band. The isochronal annealing behavior of these levels showed that most of them are thermally stable up to 1000 °C. The nature of the detected defects is then discussed in the light of the results found in the literature.

  7. Pterygoid implants for maxillofacial rehabilitation of a patient with a bilateral maxillectomy defect.

    Bidra, Avinash S; May, George W; Tharp, Greggory E; Chambers, Mark S

    2013-02-01

    Bilateral maxillectomy is known to have serious esthetic and functional consequences. The retention and support of a maxillary obturator prosthesis in these patients is particularly challenging. Surgical placement of implants is also challenging because of the lack of available bone. Therefore, implant placement into remote sites such as zygoma has been advocated. Very few articles in the literature have discussed the use of pterygoid/pterygomaxillary implants in patients undergoing maxillectomy. This case report describes the maxillofacial rehabilitation of an elderly man who underwent a bilateral subtotal maxillectomy due to basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate. After initial healing, the patient had a pterygoid implant placed on each side of the oral cavity. Zygomatic implants were also attempted, but they failed to osseointegrate. Both pterygoid implants showed successful osseointegration. These 2 implants significantly helped to retain a hollow maxillary obturator prosthesis that aided in improved swallowing, speech, and esthetics. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that describes usage of pterygoid implants for rehabilitation of a patient undergoing bilateral maxillectomy.

  8. Defect formation in oxygen- and boron- implanted MOS structures after gamma irradiation

    Kaschieva, S; Skorupa, W

    2003-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the interface states of ion-implanted MOS structures is studied by means of the thermally stimulated charge method. 10-keV oxygen- or boron- (O sup + or B sup +) implanted samples are gamma-irradiated with sup 6 sup 0 Co. Gamma irradiation creates electron levels at the SiSiO sub 2 interface of the samples in a different way depending on the type of the previously implanted atoms (O sup + or B sup +). The results demonstrate that the concentration of the shallower levels (in the silicon band gap) of oxygen-implanted samples increases more effectively after gamma irradiation. The same irradiation conditions increase more intensively the concentration of the deeper levels (in the silicon band gap) of boron-implanted samples. (orig.)

  9. Emission Channeling Investigation of Implantation Defects and Impurities in II-VI-Semiconductors

    Trojahn, I; Malamud, G; Straver, J; Ronnqvist, C; Jahn, S-G; Restle, M

    2002-01-01

    Detailed knowledge on the behaviour of implantation damage and its influence on the lattice position and environment of implanted dopants in II-VI-compound semiconductors is necessary for a clear interpretation of results from other investigation methods and finally for technical utilization. Besides, a precise localization of impurities could help to clarify the discussion about the instability of the electrical properties of some dopants, called " aging ".\\\\ \\\\We intend to use the emission channeling method to investigate: \\\\ \\\\i) The behaviour of implantation damage which shall be probed by the lattice location of isoelectronic isotopes (Zn,Cd,Hg,Se,Te) directly after implantation at different temperatures, doses and vacancy densities and after annealing treatments, and ii) the precise lattice sites of the acceptor Ag and donor In under different conditions by implanting precursors Cd and In isotopes. \\\\ \\\\Further on we would like to test the application of a two-dimensional position and energy sensitive e...

  10. Ion implantation induced structural changes in reactively sputtered Cr-N layers on Si substrates

    Novakovic, M.; Popovic, M.; Perusko, D.; Milinovic, V.; Radovic, I.; Bibic, N.; Mitric, M.; Milosavljevic, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the structure and composition of reactively sputtered Cr-N layers as a function of deposition parameters, and the effects of ion implantation on these structures. The layers were deposited on (1 0 0) Si substrates to a thickness of 240-280 nm, at different nitrogen partial pressure, and subsequently irradiated with 120 keV Ar ions. Structural characterisation of the samples was performed with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. We also measured their electrical resistivity with a four point probe. It was found that the layers grow in form of columnar structures, and their composition, Cr 2 N or CrN, strongly depends on the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition. Ion irradiation induces local micro-structural changes, formation of nano-particles and defects, which can be nicely correlated to the measured electrical resistivity

  11. Effects of Cl+ and F+ implantation of oxidation-induced stacking faults in silicon

    Xu, J.Y.; Bronsveld, P.M.; Boom, G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1984-01-01

    Three implantation effects were investigated in floating-zone-grown silicon: (a) the effect of Cl+ implantation resulting in the shrinkage of oxidation-induced stacking faults; (b) the effect of F+ implantation giving rise to defaulting of the 1/3 [111] Frank dislocations into 1/2[110] perfect

  12. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-09-03

    Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntington’s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  13. Mechanical analysis of a heat-shock induced developmental defect

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-03-01

    Embryonic development in Drosophila is a complex process involving coordinated movements of mechanically interacting tissues. Perturbing this system with a transient heat shock can result in a number of developmental defects. In particular, a heat shock applied during the earliest morphogenetic movements of gastrulation can lead to apparent recovery, but then subsequent morphogenetic failure 5-6 hours later during germ band retraction. The process of germ band retraction requires an intact amnioserosa - a single layered extra-embryonic epithelial tissue - and heat shock at gastrulation can induce the later opening of holes in the amnioserosa. These holes are highly correlated with failures of germ band retraction. These holes could be caused by a combination of mechanical weakness in the amnioserosa or local increases in mechanical stress. Here, we assess the role of mechanical stress using confocal imaging to compare cell and tissue morphology in the amnioserosa of normal and heat-shocked embryos and laser hole drilling to map the stress field around the times and locations at which heat-shock induced holes open.

  14. Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO -- a phenomenon related to defects?

    Arenholz, Elke; Zhou, S.; Potzger, K.; Talut, G.; Reuther, H.; Kuepper, K.; Grenzer, J.; Xu, Q.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated ZnO(0001) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction

  15. Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO: a phenomenon related to defects?

    Zhou Shengqiang; Potzger, K; Talut, G; Reuther, H; Kuepper, K; Grenzer, J; Xu Qingyu; Muecklich, A; Helm, M; Fassbender, J; Arenholz, E

    2008-01-01

    We investigated ZnO(0 0 0 1) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction

  16. Impacts of reactor. Induced cladding defects on spent fuel storage

    Johnson, A.B.

    1978-01-01

    Defects arise in the fuel cladding on a small fraction of fuel rods during irradiation in water-cooled power reactors. Defects from mechanical damage in fuel handling and shipping have been almost negligible. No commercial water reactor fuel has yet been observed to develop defects while stored in spent fuel pools. In some pools, defective fuel is placed in closed canisters as it is removed from the reactor. However, hundreds of defective fuel bundles are stored in numerous pools on the same basis as intact fuel. Radioactive species carried into the pool from the reactor coolant must be dealt with by the pool purification system. However, additional radiation releases from the defective fuel during storage appear tu be minimal, with the possible exception of fuel discharged while the reactor is operating (CANDU fuel). Over approximately two decades, defective commercial fuel has been handled, stored, shipped and reprocessed. (author)

  17. High yield antibiotic producing mutants of Streptomyces erythreus induced by low energy ion implantation

    Yu, Chen; Zhixin, Lin; Zuyao, Zou; Feng, Zhang; Duo, Liu; Xianghuai, Liu; Jianzhong, Tang; Weimin, Zhu; Bo, Huang

    1998-05-01

    Conidia of Streptomyces erythreus, an industrial microbe, were implanted by nitrogen ions with energy of 40-60 keV and fluence from 1 × 10 11 to 5 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. The logarithm value of survival fraction had good linear relationship with the logarithm value of fluence. Some mutants with a high yield of erythromycin were induced by ion implantation. The yield increment was correlated with the implantation fluence. Compared with the mutation results induced by ultraviolet rays, mutation effects of ion implantation were obvious having higher increasing erythromycin potency and wider mutation spectrum. The spores of Bacillus subtilis were implanted by arsenic ions with energy of 100 keV. The distribution of implanted ions was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and calculated in theory. The mechanism of mutation induced by ion implantation was discussed.

  18. Electrospun biodegradable microfibers induce new collagen formation in a rat abdominal wall defect model

    Tarpø, Cecilie Lærke Glindtvad; Chen, Menglin; Nygaard, Jens Vinge

    2018-01-01

    and effect on collagen and elastin production of a degradable mesh releasing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Implantation of biodegradable mesh with or without bFGF in their core has been conducted in 40 rats in an abdominal wall defect model. Samples were explanted after 4, 8, and 24 weeks...

  19. Luminescence Properties of Surface Radiation-Induced Defects in Lithium Fluoride

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Martynovich, E. F.; Novikov, A. N.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Luminescence and luminescence excitation spectra are recorded for surface radiation-induced defects in lithium fluoride at temperatures of 77 and 293 K. The presence of three bands with relatively small intensity differences is a distinctive feature of the excitation spectrum. These bands are found to belong to the same type of defects. The positions of the peaks and the widths of the absorption and luminescence bands for these defects are determined. The luminescence decay time is measured. All the measured characteristics of these surface defects differ from those of previously known defects induced by radiation in the bulk of the crystals. It is found that the luminescence of surface defects in an ensemble of nanocrystals with different orientations is not polarized. The number of anion vacancies in the surface defects is estimated using the polarization measurements. It is shown that radiative scattering distorts the intensity ratios of the luminescence excitation bands located in different spectral regions.

  20. A detailed physical model for ion implant induced damage in silicon

    Tian, S.; Morris, M.F.; Morris, S.J.; Obradovic, B.; Wang, G.; Tasch, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    A unified physically based ion implantation damage model has been developed which successfully predicts both the impurity profiles and the damage profiles for a wide range of implant conditions for arsenic, phosphorus, BF 2 , and boron implants into single-crystal silicon. In addition, the amorphous layer thicknesses predicted by this new damage model are also in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. This damage model is based on the physics of point defects in silicon, and explicitly simulates the defect production, diffusion, and their interactions which include interstitial-vacancy recombination, clustering of same type of defects, defect-impurity complex formation, emission of mobile defects from clusters, and surface effects for the first time. New computationally efficient algorithms have been developed to overcome the barrier of the excessive computational requirements. In addition, the new model has been incorporated in the UT-MARLOWE ion implantation simulator, and has been developed primarily for use in engineering workstations. This damage model is the most physical model in the literature to date within the framework of the binary collision approximation (BCA), and provides the required, accurate as-implanted impurity profiles and damage profiles for transient enhanced diffusion (TED) simulation

  1. Impact of residual defects caused by extension ion implantation in FinFETs on parasitic resistance and its fluctuation

    Matsukawa, Takashi; Liu, Yongxun; Mori, Takahiro; Morita, Yukinori; Otsuka, Shintaro; O'uchi, Shin-ichi; Fuketa, Hiroshi; Migita, Shinji; Masahara, Meishoku

    2017-06-01

    The influence of extension doping on parasitic resistance and its variability has been investigated for FinFETs. Electrical characterization of FinFETs and crystallinity evaluation of the doped fin structure are carried out for different fin thicknesses and different donor species for ion implantation, i.e., As and P. Reducing the fin thickness and the use of donor species with a larger mass cause serious degradation in the variability and median value of the parasitic resistance. Crystallinity evaluation by transmission electron microscope reveals that significant crystal defects remain after dopant activation annealing for the cases of smaller fin thickness and the implanted dopant with a larger mass. The unrecovered defects cause serious degradation in the parasitic resistance and its variability. In 1998, he joined the Electrotechnical Laboratory, which is former organization of National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). He has been working on development of front-end process technology, variability issues of the FinFETs and technologies for suppressing the variability. He is now a group leader of the AIST and leads the research on the silicon-based CMOS devices. He is a member of the IEEE Electron Devices Society, and the Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  2. Radiation induced defect flux behaviors at zirconium based component

    Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kwon, Jun Hyun; Lee, Gyeong Geun

    2013-01-01

    In commercial reactor core, structure materials are located in high temperature and high pressure environment. Therefore, main concern of structure materials is corrosion and mechanical properties change than radiation effects on materials. However, radiation effects on materials become more important phenomena because research reactor condition is different from commercial reactor. The temperature is lower than 100 .deg. C and radiation dose is much higher than that of commercial reactor. Among the radiation effect on zirconium based metal, radiation induced growth (RIG), known as volume conservative distortion, is one of the most important phenomena. Recently, theoretical RIG modeling based on radiation damage theory (RDT) and balance equation are developed. However, these growth modeling have limited framework of single crystal and high temperature. To model theoretical RIG in research reactor, qualitative mechanism must be set up. Therefore, this paper intent is establishing defect flux mechanism of zirconium base metal in research reactor for RIG modeling. After than theoretical RIG work will be expanded to research reactor condition

  3. Defect engineering via ion implantation to control B diffusion in Si

    Canino, M.; Regula, G.; Xu, M.; Ntzoenzok, E.; Pichaud, B.

    2009-01-01

    The processes which are currently studied in the fabrication of B-doped ultra shallow junctions (USJ) usually involve a preamorphization step to reduce B channelling effect during implantation and to improve B electrical activation. At this stage a high amount of Si interstitial atoms (Is), which dramatically increases the B diffusivity, is introduced. The introduction of voids in Si is a promising tool to control B transient enhanced diffusion (TED), because of their ability to capture Is. In this work the efficiency of a cavity band to reduce B TED is checked in silicon interstitial supersaturation conditions, obtained by high dose Si implantation. He is implanted either at 10 keV or at 50 keV with a fluence of 5 x 10 16 cm -2 . Conventional techniques to introduce and activate the B (conventional ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing (RTA)) are applied in order to have a better control of the technological process to focus on the benefit of the cavity layer. The samples were characterized by cross section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Hall Effect (HE). The latter shows that good activation of the B is achieved only after 1000 deg. C RTA, though a 900 deg. C RTA is sufficient for implantation-damage recovery, as it is confirmed by XTEM observations. B SIMS profiles show that the band of cavities plays its best effect in reducing B TED when it is located near the surface.

  4. Gamma-induced defect production in ZrO2-Y2O3 crystals with different defectiveness

    Ashurov, M.Kh.; Amonov, M.Z.; Rakov, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The defectiveness degree of ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 crystals depends on stabilizer concentration. The work is aimed at study gamma-induced defect production in crystals with different concentration of stabilizer and defects generated by neutron irradiation. Absorption spectra were measured with Specord M-40. It was found, that after gamma-irradiation of as-grown crystals up to some dose the intensity of absorption band at 420 nm reaches the maximum level of saturation. The dose of saturation depends of the concentration of stabilizer. It means that gamma-radiation does not produce any additional defects of structure. The oxygen vacancies existing in as-grown crystals are filled by the radiation induced electrons. Since the number of oxygen vacancies depends on the stabilizer concentration, then all these vacancies can be occupied by electrons at different gamma-doses. In crystals pre-irradiated with different neutron fluences followed by gamma-irradiation, the intensity of absorption bands at 420 and 530 nm increases in two stages. The gamma-dose of the second stage beginning decreases as the neutron fluence grows. The first stage of the absorption increase is due to developing of vacancies existing in as-grown crystals. The second stage is caused by generation of additional vacancies as the result of non-radiative exciton decay near the existing structure damages. The decrease of the gamma-dose, when the second stage of vacancy accumulation begins, results from the neutron induced structure damage degree

  5. Atomistic modeling of defect evolution in Si for amorphizing and subamorphizing implants

    Lopez, Pedro; Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Solid phase epitaxial regrowth of pre-amorphizing implants has received significant attention as a method to achieve high dopant activation with minimal diffusion at low implant temperatures and suppress channelling. Therefore, a good understanding of the amorphization and regrowth mechanisms is required in process simulators. We present an atomistic amorphization and recrystallization model that uses the interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pair as a building block to describe the amorphous phase. I-V pairs are locally characterized by the number of neighbouring I-V pairs. This feature captures the damage generation and the dynamical annealing during ion implantation, and also explains the annealing behaviour of amorphous layers and amorphous pockets

  6. Impact of Bruxism on Ceramic Defects in Implant-Borne Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Retrospective Study.

    Mikeli, Aikaterini; Walter, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic veneer fracture is a frequent complication in implant-borne fixed restorations. The retrospective clinical study assesses the effect of bruxism on this complication. A sample of 507 implant-borne fixed units inserted between 1995 and 2011 in 144 patients were examined. Any detected veneer fractures were assigned to one of four groups according to extent and position. A hypothetical correlation between bruxism and ceramic veneer fractures was examined. Of 34 patients (23.6%) with at least one ceramic veneer fracture, 24 were bruxers (70%) and 10 were nonbruxers (30%) (P = .002). Bruxism may pose a risk for ceramic fractures.

  7. Defect reactions of implanted Li in ZnSe observed by $\\beta$-NMR

    Kroll, F; Füllgrabe, M; Mai, F; Marbach, K; Peters, D; Geithner, W; Kappertz, S; Keim, M; Kloos, S; Wilbert, S; Neugart, R; Lievens, P; Georg, U

    2001-01-01

    Using $\\beta$-radiation-detected nuclear magnetic resonance ($\\beta$-NMR), we investigated the microscopic behavior of implanted $^{8}$Li in nominally undoped ZnSe crystals. From the temperature-dependent amplitudes of high-resolution NMR spectra we conclude a gradual interstitial-to-substitutional site change between 200 and 350 K. This is in accordance with earlier emission channeling results. We argue that this conversion proceeds via Li$_{i}^+$ + V$_{\\textrm{Zn}}^{2-}$ to ${\\textrm{Li}}_{\\textrm{Zn}}^{-}$ and involves implantation-related Zn vacancies. (13 refs).

  8. Implantation of tetrapod-shaped granular artificial bones or β-tricalcium phosphate granules in a canine large bone-defect model.

    Choi, Sungjin; Liu, I-Li; Yamamoto, Kenichi; Honnami, Muneki; Sakai, Takamasa; Ohba, Shinsuke; Echigo, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Shigeki; Nishimura, Ryouhei; Chung, Ung-Il; Sasaki, Nobuo; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2014-03-01

    We investigated biodegradability and new bone formation after implantation of tetrapod-shaped granular artificial bone (Tetrabone®) or β-tricalcium phosphate granules (β-TCP) in experimental critical-size defects in dogs, which were created through medial and lateral femoral condyles. The defect was packed with Tetrabone® (Tetrabone group) or β-TCP (β-TCP group) or received no implant (control group). Computed tomography (CT) was performed at 0, 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. Micro-CT and histological analysis were conducted to measure the non-osseous tissue rate and the area and distribution of new bone tissue in the defect at 8 weeks after implantation. On CT, β-TCP was gradually resorbed, while Tetrabone® showed minimal resorption at 8 weeks after implantation. On micro-CT, non-osseous tissue rate of the control group was significantly higher compared with the β-TCP and Tetrabone groups (Pbone tissue of the β-TCP group was significantly greater than those of the Tetrabone and control groups (Pbone distribution of the Tetrabone group was significantly greater than those of the β-TCP and control groups (Pbone defects in dogs.

  9. A study of vacancy-type defects in B+-implanted SiO2/Si by a slow positron beam

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Sugiura, Jun; Ogasawara, Makoto.

    1989-01-01

    Variable-energy (0∼30 keV) positron beam studies have been carried out on 80 keV B + -implanted SiO 2 (43 nm)/Si specimens. Doppler broadening profiles of the positron annihilation as a function of the incident positron energy were shown to be quite sensitive for the detection of vacancy-type defects introduced by B + -implantation. The average depth of the defected regions was found to shift towards the surface of the specimen with increasing the dose of B + ions. This effect is attributed to the accumulation of vacancy-type defects at the SiO 2 /Si interface. Dominant defect species were identified as vacancy clusters by their annealing stage. (author)

  10. Electrical Characterisation of electron beam exposure induced Defects in silicon

    Danga, Helga T., E-mail: helga.danga@up.ac.za; Auret, Francois D.; Coelho, Sergio M.M.; Diale, Mmantsae

    2016-01-01

    The defects introduced in epitaxially grown p-type silicon (Si) during electron beam exposure were electrically characterised using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high resolution Laplace-DLTS. In this process, Si samples were first exposed to the conditions of electron beam deposition (EBD) without metal deposition. This is called electron beam exposure (EBE) herein. After 50 minutes of EBE, nickel (Ni) Schottky contacts were fabricated using the resistive deposition method. The defect level observed using the Ni contacts had an activation energy of H(0.55). This defect has an activation energy similar to that of the I-defect. The defect level is similar to that of the HB4, a boron related defect. DLTS depth profiling revealed that H(0.55) could be detected up to a depth of 0.8 μm below the junction. We found that exposing the samples to EBD conditions without metal deposition introduced a defect which was not introduced by the EBD method. We also observed that the damage caused by EBE extended deeper into the material compared to that caused by EBD.

  11. Spark erosion implant prosthetics in the management of an acquired maxillofacial defect.

    Bloem, T J; Baxter, W D; Vivas, J

    1996-03-01

    The concept and use of spark erosion (EDM) prosthetics in implant prosthodontics has been described and demonstrated in its application to a patient suffering maxillofacial trauma. The advantages and disadvantages of this technology have been discussed for the edification of the restorative and surgical provider.

  12. Induced membrane technique combined with two-stage internal fixation for the treatment of tibial osteomyelitis defects.

    Luo, Fei; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Shulin; Fu, Jingshu; Xie, Zhao

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of induced membrane technique combined with two-stage internal fixation in the treatment of tibial osteomyelitis defects. A retrospective analyses for 67 cases of tibialosteomyelitis defects were admitted to our department between September 2012 to February 2015, which were treated with induced membrane technique. At the first stage, implanted with a PMMA cement spacer in the defects after radical debridement and fixed with reconstructive locked plate. Bone grafting and exchanged the plate with intramedullary nail at the second stage. In current study, all patients were followed up for 18-35 months. Sixty-six patients achieved bone union with the average radiographic and clinical healing times of 5.55±2.19 and 7.45±1.69months, respectively. Seven patients required a second debridement before grafting, while four patients experienced a recurrence of infection or a relapse following second stage treatment. Twelve patients experienced either knee or ankle dysfunctions and 2 patients faced delayed wound healing. Donor site complications includes pain and infection were found in 7 and 3 patients, respectively with delayed stress fracture in 1 patient only. Induced membrane technique for the treatment of tibial osteomyelitis defects, seems a reliable method. The use of reconstructive locked plate as a temporary internal fixation at the first stage and exchanged with intramedullary nail at the second stage, potentially achieves good clinical efficacy. Care should be taken to restore the joint function especially in distal tibia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Temperature dependence of radiation induced defect creation in a-SiO2

    Devine, R.A.B.; Grouillet, A.; Berlivet, J.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of oxygen vacancy defect creation in samples of amorphous SiO 2 subjected to ultraviolet laser or ionizing particle radiation (energetic H + ions) has been measured as a function of sample temperature during irradiation. For the case of laser radiation (E photon ≅ 5 eV) we find that vacancy centers are only created when the irradiation temperature is above 150 K. The efficiency of peroxy radical defect creation observed after post irradiation annealing is consistent with the behaviour of the oxygen vacancy creation efficiency. In samples with energetic protons, the opposite behaviour is observed and one finds that defect creation is enhanced as the implantation temperature is lowered. Possible physical mechanisms controlling the defect creation efficiency as a function of sample temperature and radiation are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    Salonen, E.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.; Nordlund, K.

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions

  15. Defect-induced ferromagnetism in semiconductors: A controllable approach by particle irradiation

    Zhou, Shengqiang

    2014-01-01

    Making semiconductors ferromagnetic has been a long dream. One approach is to dope semiconductors with transition metals (TM). TM ions act as local moments and they couple with free carriers to develop collective magnetism. However, there are no fundamental reasons against the possibility of local moment formation from localized sp states. Recently, ferromagnetism was observed in nonmagnetically doped, but defective semiconductors or insulators including ZnO and TiO 2 . This kind of observation challenges the conventional understanding of ferromagnetism. Often the defect-induced ferromagnetism has been observed in samples prepared under non-optimized condition, i.e. by accident or by mistake. Therefore, in this field theory goes much ahead of experimental investigation. To understand the mechanism of the defect-induced ferromagnetism, one needs a better controlled method to create defects in the crystalline materials. As a nonequilibrium and reproducible approach of inducing defects, ion irradiation provides such a possibility. Energetic ions displace atoms from their equilibrium lattice sites, thus creating mainly vacancies, interstitials or antisites. The amount and the distribution of defects can be controlled by the ion fluence and energy. By ion irradiation, we have generated defect-induced ferromagnetism in ZnO, TiO 2 and SiC. In this short review, we also summarize some results by other groups using energetic ions to introduce defects, and thereby magnetism in various materials. Ion irradiation combined with proper characterizations of defects could allow us to clarify the local magnetic moments and the coupling mechanism in defective semiconductors. Otherwise we may have to build a new paradigm to understand the defect-induced ferromagnetism

  16. In Vivo Evaluation of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffold Implantation Combined with β-TCP Powder for Alveolar Bone Augmentation in a Beagle Defect Model

    Su A. Park

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient bone volume is one of the major challenges encountered by dentists after dental implant placement. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a customized three-dimensional polycaprolactone (3D PCL scaffold implant fabricated with a 3D bio-printing system to facilitate rapid alveolar bone regeneration. Saddle-type bone defects were surgically created on the healed site after extracting premolars from the mandibles of four beagle dogs. The defects were radiologically examined using computed tomography for designing a customized 3D PCL scaffold block to fit the defect site. After fabricating 3D PCL scaffolds using rapid prototyping, the scaffolds were implanted into the alveolar bone defects along with β-tricalcium phosphate powder. In vivo analysis showed that the PCL blocks maintained the physical space and bone conductivity around the defects. In addition, no inflammatory infiltrates were observed around the scaffolds. However, new bone formation occurred adjacent to the scaffolds, rather than directly in contact with them. More new bone was observed around PCL blocks with 400/1200 lattices than around blocks with 400/400 lattices, but the difference was not significant. These results indicated the potential of 3D-printed porous PCL scaffolds to promote alveolar bone regeneration for defect healing in dentistry.

  17. Diode characteristics and residual deep-level defects of p+n abrupt junctions fabricated by rapid thermal annealing of boron implanted silicon

    Usami, A.; Katayama, M.; Wada, T.; Tokuda, Y.

    1987-01-01

    p + n diodes were fabricated by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of boron implanted silicon in the annealing temperature range 700-1100 0 C for around 7 s, and the RTA temperature dependence of electrical characteristics of these diodes was studied. Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements were made to evaluate residual deep-level defects in the n-type bulk. Three electron traps were observed in p + n diodes fabricated by RTA at 700 0 C. It was considered that these three traps were residual point defects near the tail of the implantation damage after RTA. Residual defect concentrations increased in the range 700-900 0 C and decreased in the range 1000-1100 0 C. The growth of defects in the bulk was ascribed to the diffusion of defects from the implanted layer during RTA. Concentrations of electron traps observed in p + n diodes fabricated by RTA at 1100 0 C were approx. 10 12 cm -3 . It was found that these residual deep-level defects observed by DLTS were inefficient generation-recombination centres since the reverse current was independent of the RTA temperatures. (author)

  18. Hardening in AlN induced by point defects

    Suematsu, H.; Mitchell, T.E.; Iseki, T.; Yano, T.

    1991-01-01

    Pressureless-sintered AIN was neutron irradiated and the hardness change was examined by Vickers indentation. The hardness was increased by irradiation. When the samples were annealed at high temperature, the hardness gradually decreased. Length was also found to increase and to change in the same way as the hardness. A considerable density of dislocation loops still remained, even after the hardness completely recovered to the value of the unirradiated sample. Thus, it is concluded that the hardening in AIN is caused by isolated point defects and small clusters of point defects, rather than by dislocation loops. Hardness was found to increase in proportion to the length change. If the length change is assumed to be proportional to the point defect density, then the curve could be fitted qualitatively to that predicted by models of solution hardening in metals. Furthermore, the curves for three samples irradiated at different temperatures and fluences are identical. There should be different kinds of defect clusters in samples irradiated at different conditions, e.g., the fraction of single point defects is the highest in the sample irradiated at the lowest temperature. Thus, hardening is insensitive to the kind of defects remaining in the sample and is influenced only by those which contribute to length change

  19. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  20. Self-fitting shape memory polymer foam inducing bone regeneration: A rabbit femoral defect study.

    Xie, Ruiqi; Hu, Jinlian; Hoffmann, Oskar; Zhang, Yuanchi; Ng, Frankie; Qin, Tingwu; Guo, Xia

    2018-04-01

    Although tissue engineering has been attracted greatly for healing of critical-sized bone defects, great efforts for improvement are still being made in scaffold design. In particular, bone regeneration would be enhanced if a scaffold precisely matches the contour of bone defects, especially if it could be implanted into the human body conveniently and safely. In this study, polyurethane/hydroxyapatite-based shape memory polymer (SMP) foam was fabricated as a scaffold substrate to facilitate bone regeneration. The minimally invasive delivery and the self-fitting behavior of the SMP foam were systematically evaluated to demonstrate its feasibility in the treatment of bone defects in vivo. Results showed that the SMP foam could be conveniently implanted into bone defects with a compact shape. Subsequently, it self-matched the boundary of bone defects upon shape-recovery activation in vivo. Micro-computed tomography determined that bone ingrowth initiated at the periphery of the SMP foam with a constant decrease towards the inside. Successful vascularization and bone remodeling were also demonstrated by histological analysis. Thus, our results indicate that the SMP foam demonstrated great potential for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of defects on the diffusion of As implanted in Si

    Brelot, A.

    1974-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find out whether the redistribution of arsenic atoms is affected by the manner of introduction (implantation or prediffusion) of this element. The redistribution equation can be resolved by taking a model which gives the value of the necessary parameters. The choice of this model is relatively arbitrary as knowledge stands at present. Ionic probe profiles reveal the presence of a profile end not hitherto observed, superimposed on the well-known profile tails. In addition the concentration of electrically active ions measured directly by successive peeling differs from that obtained by the Fair diffusion formula by more than 15%. It thus seems that implantation plays a part in the redistribution of arsenic [fr

  2. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath enhances fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in a large harvest site defect.

    Kobayashi, Yasukazu; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kondo, Eiji; Katsura, Taro; Tanabe, Yoshie; Kimura, Masashi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2010-04-01

    Concerning meniscal tissue regeneration, many investigators have studied the development of a tissue-engineered meniscus. However, the utility still remains unknown. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect may significantly enhance fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect. Controlled laboratory study. Seventy-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In each animal, an anterior one-third of the right medial meniscus was resected. Then, the animals were divided into the following 3 groups of 25 rabbits each: In group 1, no treatment was applied to the meniscal defect. In group 2, the defect was covered with a fascia sheath. In group 3, after the resected meniscus was fragmented into small pieces, the fragments were grafted into the defect. Then, the defect with the meniscal fragments was covered with a fascia sheath. In each group, 5 rabbits were used for histological evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, and 5 rabbits were used for biomechanical evaluation at 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Histologically, large round cells in group 3 were scattered in the core portion of the meniscus-shaped tissue, and the matrix around these cells was positively stained by safranin O and toluisin blue at 12 weeks. The histological score of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 and group 2. Biomechanically, the maximal load and stiffness of group 3 were significantly greater than those of groups 1 and 2. This study clearly demonstrated that implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect significantly enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect at 12 weeks after implantation in the rabbit. This study proposed a novel strategy to treat a large defect after a meniscectomy.

  3. Electrical and electron microscopy observations on defects in ion implanted silicon

    Ling, H.

    1978-01-01

    Silicon single crystals were implanted with 100 keV phosphorus ions to a dose of 2 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 at both room-temperature and 600 0 C. They were isochronally annealed at temperatures ranging from 400 0 C to 900 0 C. Sheet resistivity measurements of the specimens were taken after each anneal, together with corresponding transmission electron micrographs

  4. Fe and Cu in Si: Lattice sites and trapping at implantation-related defects

    Wahl, U.; Correia, J.G.; Rita, E.; Araujo, J.P.; Soares, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    We have used the emission channeling technique in order to study the lattice sites of radioactive 59 Fe and 67 Cu following 60 keV ion implantation into Si single crystals at fluences around 10 12 -10 14 cm -2 . We find that in the room temperature as-implanted state in high-resistivity Si both Fe and Cu occupy mainly lattice sites displaced around 0.05 nm (0.5 A) from substitutional positions. Both are released from these positions during annealing at temperatures between 300 deg. C and 600 deg. C. Fe is then found mainly on near-tetrahedral interstitial sites and further annealing causes it to be increasingly incorporated on ideal substitutional sites, on which it is stable to around 800 deg. C. We have strong indications that during annealing around 600 deg. C, along with the dominance of interstitial Fe, a redistribution towards the surface takes place, suggesting that the subsequent formation of ideal substitutional Fe may be related to the trapping of Fe at R p /2, half of its implanted depth. Possible R p /2 trapping might also have taken place in our Cu experiments but appears to be less efficient since Cu tended to escape to the bulk of the samples

  5. Contrast induced nephropathy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    D. L. Kranin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic stenosis ranks the third in the structure of all cardiovascular diseases, conceding only to arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is a promising area of interventional endovascular surgery that enables to provide surgical care to a significant group of the patients with severe aortal stenosis.Aim: To assess the efficacy of prevention of the contrast induced nephropathy (CIN in patients who underwent TAVI under general anesthesia.Materials and methods: We evaluated incidence of CIN in 19 patients who underwent surgery for aortic valve stenosis under general anesthesia with hemodilution and intravenous magnesium sulfate 1 g before administration of the contrast.Results: Laboratory signs of nephropathy within the first 72 hours after the intervention were found in 8/19 (42.1% of patients. In 4 (50% of patients with CIN, its risk had been very high, in 3 (38%, high, and in 1 (12%, moderate. The results obtained are compatible with the contrast-induced acute kidney injury risk estimated from the Mehran-Barrett-Parfrey scale.Conclusion: The used technique of hemodilution and magnesium-based prevention can be considered a safe method of CIN prophylaxis in TAVI patients.

  6. Change of elastic constants induced by point defects in hop crystals

    Tome, C.

    1979-10-01

    An approximate model is developed to calculate the change of elastic constants induced by point defects in hcp metals, supposed the defect configuration is known. General expressions relating the change of elastic moduli to the final atomic coordinates and to the defect force field are derived using the specific symmetry of the defect. Explicit calculations are done for Mg. The predicted change of elastic moduli turns out to be negative for vacancies and trigonal interstitials while for hexagonal interstitials a positive change is predicted. Compatibility with experimental data would suggest that the trigonal configuration is the stable one. (author)

  7. Defect-induced transitions in synchronous asymmetric exclusion processes

    Liu Mingzhe; Wang Ruili; Jiang Rui; Hu Maobin; Gao Yang

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a single local defect in synchronous asymmetric exclusion processes are investigated via theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations. Our theoretical analysis shows that there are four possible stationary phases, i.e., the (low density, low density), (low density, high density), (high density, low density) and (high density, high density) in the system. In the (high density, low density) phase, the system can reach a maximal current which is determined by the local defect, but independent of boundary conditions. A phenomenological domain wall approach is developed to predict dynamic behavior at phase boundaries. The effects of defective hopping probability p on density profiles and currents are investigated. Our investigation shows that the value of p determines phase transitions when entrance rate α and exit rate β are fixed. Density profiles and currents obtained from theoretical calculations are in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations

  8. Insulating Behavior in Graphene with Irradiation-induced Lattice Defects

    Chen, Jian-Hao; Williams, Ellen; Fuhrer, Michael

    2010-03-01

    We irradiated cleaned graphene on silicon dioxide in ultra-high vacuum with low energy inert gas ions to produce lattice defects [1], and investigated in detail the transition from metallic to insulating temperature dependence of the conductivity as a function of defect density. We measured the low field magnetoresistance and temperature-dependent resistivity in situ and find that weak localization can only account for a small correction of the resistivity increase with decreasing temperature. We will discuss possible origins of the insulating temperature dependent resistivity in defected graphene in light of our recent experiments. [4pt] [1] Jian-Hao Chen, W. G. Cullen, C. Jang, M. S. Fuhrer, E. D. Williams, PRL 102, 236805 (2009)

  9. Ionization-induced rearrangement of defects in silicon

    Vinetskij, V.L.; Manojlo, M.A.; Matvijchuk, A.S.; Strikha, V.I.; Kholodar', G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing factor effect on defect rearrangement in silicon including centers with deep local electron levels in the p-n-transition region is considered. Deep center parameters were determined using non-steady-state capacity spectroscopy of deep levels (NCDLS) method. NCDLS spectrum measurement was performed using source p + -n - diodes and after their irradiation with 15 keV energy electrons or laser pulses. It is ascertained that in silicon samples containing point defect clusters defect rearrangement under ionizing factor effect takes place, i.e. deep level spectra are changed. This mechanism is efficient in case of silicon irradiation with subthreshold energy photons and electrons and can cause degradation of silicon semiconducting structures

  10. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants with cylindrical symmetry: 1. Properly working devices

    Schnorr Jörg

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active Magnetic Resonance Imaging implants are constructed as resonators tuned to the Larmor frequency of a magnetic resonance system with a specific field strength. The resonating circuit may be embedded into or added to the normal metallic implant structure. The resonators build inductively coupled wireless transmit and receive coils and can amplify the signal, normally decreased by eddy currents, inside metallic structures without affecting the rest of the spin ensemble. During magnetic resonance imaging the resonators generate heat, which is additional to the usual one described by the specific absorption rate. This induces temperature increases of the tissue around the circuit paths and inside the lumen of an active implant and may negatively influence patient safety. Methods This investigation provides an overview of the supplementary power absorbed by active implants with a cylindrical geometry, corresponding to vessel implants such as stents, stent grafts or vena cava filters. The knowledge of the overall absorbed power is used in a finite volume analysis to estimate temperature maps around different implant structures inside homogeneous tissue under worst-case assumptions. The "worst-case scenario" assumes thermal heat conduction without blood perfusion inside the tissue around the implant and mostly without any cooling due to blood flow inside vessels. Results The additional power loss of a resonator is proportional to the volume and the quality factor, as well as the field strength of the MRI system and the specific absorption rate of the applied sequence. For properly working devices the finite volume analysis showed only tolerable heating during MRI investigations in most cases. Only resonators transforming a few hundred mW into heat may reach temperature increases over 5 K. This requires resonators with volumes of several ten cubic centimeters, short inductor circuit paths with only a few 10 cm and a quality

  11. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants with cylindrical symmetry: 1. Properly working devices.

    Busch, Martin H J; Vollmann, Wolfgang; Schnorr, Jörg; Grönemeyer, Dietrich H W

    2005-04-08

    Active Magnetic Resonance Imaging implants are constructed as resonators tuned to the Larmor frequency of a magnetic resonance system with a specific field strength. The resonating circuit may be embedded into or added to the normal metallic implant structure. The resonators build inductively coupled wireless transmit and receive coils and can amplify the signal, normally decreased by eddy currents, inside metallic structures without affecting the rest of the spin ensemble. During magnetic resonance imaging the resonators generate heat, which is additional to the usual one described by the specific absorption rate. This induces temperature increases of the tissue around the circuit paths and inside the lumen of an active implant and may negatively influence patient safety. This investigation provides an overview of the supplementary power absorbed by active implants with a cylindrical geometry, corresponding to vessel implants such as stents, stent grafts or vena cava filters. The knowledge of the overall absorbed power is used in a finite volume analysis to estimate temperature maps around different implant structures inside homogeneous tissue under worst-case assumptions. The "worst-case scenario" assumes thermal heat conduction without blood perfusion inside the tissue around the implant and mostly without any cooling due to blood flow inside vessels. The additional power loss of a resonator is proportional to the volume and the quality factor, as well as the field strength of the MRI system and the specific absorption rate of the applied sequence. For properly working devices the finite volume analysis showed only tolerable heating during MRI investigations in most cases. Only resonators transforming a few hundred mW into heat may reach temperature increases over 5 K. This requires resonators with volumes of several ten cubic centimeters, short inductor circuit paths with only a few 10 cm and a quality factor above ten. Using MR sequences, for which the MRI

  12. Remodeling of the Mandibular Bone Induced by Overdentures Supported by Different Numbers of Implants.

    Li, Kai; Xin, Haitao; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Yulu

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the process of mandibular bone remodeling induced by implant-supported overdentures. computed tomography (CT) images were collected from edentulous patients to reconstruct the geometry of the mandibular bone and overdentures supported by implants. Based on the theory of strain energy density (SED), bone remodeling models were established using the user material subroutine (UMAT) in abaqus. The stress distribution in the mandible and bone density change was investigated to determine the effect of implant number on the remodeling of the mandibular bone. The results indicated that the areas where high Mises stress values were observed were mainly situated around the implants. The stress was concentrated in the distal neck region of the distal-most implants. With an increased number of implants, the biting force applied on the dentures was almost all taken up by implants. The stress and bone density in peri-implant bone increased. When the stress reached the threshold of remodeling, the bone density began to decrease. In the posterior mandible area, the stress was well distributed but increased with decreased implant numbers. Changes in bone density were not observed in this area. The computational results were consistent with the clinical data. The results demonstrate that the risk of bone resorption around the distal-most implants increases with increased numbers of implants and that the occlusal force applied to overdentures should be adjusted to be distributed more in the distal areas of the mandible.

  13. Implant-Supported Telescopic Crown-Retained Overdentures for Oral Rehabilitation of Patients with Severe Bony Defects: A 5-Year Retrospective Study.

    Zou, Duohong; Wang, Feng; Wu, Yiqun; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Chenping; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of dental implant-supported telescopic crown (TC)-retained overdentures to restore the oral function of patients who have insufficient jawbone volume resulting from tumor resection or trauma. From January 2004 to December 2008, implant-supported TC-retained overdentures were used to restore the oral function of patients with severe bony defects resulting from tumor resection or trauma. Clinical data, including implant success and survival rates, biologic and mechanical complications, prosthodontic maintenance efforts, and patient satisfaction, were analyzed annually after delivery of the final prostheses. Twenty-four patients were treated, and a total of 88 implants were inserted to support TC-retained overdentures. The mean modified plaque index of implants remained low (76.3%) in the study showed the absence of bleeding on probing at follow-up visits. Peri-implant marginal bone loss (MBL) ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 mm. There was no statistically significant difference in the MBL between maxillary and mandibular implants (P = .43). The implant success rate was 100% after 5 years, and the prosthodontic maintenance and complication rate was 0.22 times per year. More than 90% of patients were satisfied with the restoration of their oral function using TCs. Based on our study of 24 patients treated with TC-retained overdentures, it appears that this treatment may be a viable option for patients with insufficient jawbone volume.

  14. NH2+ implantations induced superior hemocompatibility of carbon nanotubes.

    Guo, Meixian; Li, Dejun; Zhao, Mengli; Zhang, Yiteng; Deng, Xiangyun; Geng, Dongsheng; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang; Gu, Hanqing; Wan, Rongxin

    2013-05-01

    NH2+ implantation was performed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The hemocompatibility of MWCNTs and NH2+-implanted MWCNTs was evaluated based on in vitro hemolysis, platelet adhesion, and kinetic-clotting tests. Compared with MWCNTs, NH2+-implanted MWCNTs displayed more perfect platelets and red blood cells in morphology, lower platelet adhesion rate, lower hemolytic rate, and longer kinetic blood-clotting time. NH2+-implanted MWCNTs with higher fluency of 1 × 1016 ions/cm2 led to the best thromboresistance, hence desired hemocompatibility. Fourier transfer infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed that NH2+ implantation caused the cleavage of some pendants and the formation of some new N-containing functional groups. These results were responsible for the enhanced hemocompatibility of NH2+-implanted MWCNTs.

  15. Surface modifications induced by yttrium implantation on low manganese-carbon steel

    Caudron, E.; Buscail, H. [Univ. Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd II, Le Puy en Velay (France). Lab. Vellave d' Elaboration et d' Etude des Materiaux; Haanapel, V.A.C.; Jacob, Y.P.; Stroosnijder, M.F. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Center, The European Commission, 21020, Ispra (Italy)

    1999-12-15

    Low manganese-carbon steel samples were ion implanted with yttrium. Sample compositions and structures were investigated before and after yttrium implantations to determine the yttrium distribution in the sample. Yttrium implantation effects were characterized using several analytical and structural techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, glancing angle X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In this paper it is shown that correlation between composition and structural analyses provides an understanding of the main compounds induced by yttrium implantation in low manganese-carbon steel. (orig.)

  16. Noncrucial role of the defects in the splitting for hydrogen implanted silicon with high boron concentration

    Popov, V.P.; Stas, V.F.; Antonova, I.V.

    1999-01-01

    The present work deals with the investigation of the electrical and structural properties of heavily boron-doped silicon irradiated by hydrogen. Blistering and splitting processes are enhanced with an increase in boron concentration in the crystal. The measured values of perpendicular strain are over 0.7% which corresponds to a gas overpressure of 0.5 GPa. Processes which lead to blistering and splitting is better described in the frame of a gas pressure model than a model of local stress caused by the defects

  17. Amorphous clusters in Co implanted ZnO induced by boron pre-implantation

    Potzger, K.; Shalimov, A.; Zhou, S.; Schmidt, H.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Liberati, M.; Arenholz, E.

    2009-02-09

    We demonstrate the formation of superparamagnetic/ferromagnetic regions within ZnO(0001) single crystals sequently implanted with B and Co. While the pre-implantation with B plays a minor role for the electrical transport properties, its presence leads to the formation of amorphous phases. Moreover, B acts strongly reducing on the implanted Co. Thus, the origin of the ferromagnetic ordering in local clusters with large Co concentration is itinerant d-electrons as in the case of metallic Co. The metallic amorphous phases are non-detectable by common X-ray diffraction.

  18. Microdrilled cartilage defects treated with thrombin-solidified chitosan/blood implant regenerate a more hyaline, stable, and structurally integrated osteochondral unit compared to drilled controls.

    Marchand, Catherine; Chen, Gaoping; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Sun, Jun; Chen, Hongmei; Buschmann, Michael D; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2012-03-01

    This study analyzed the long-term cartilage and subchondral bone repair of microdrilled defects treated with chitosan glycerol-phosphate/blood implant, using thrombin (Factor IIa) to accelerate in situ solidification. We also evaluated the cartilage repair response to six smaller microdrill holes compared with two larger holes. Bilateral knee trochlear cartilage defects were created in n=8 skeletally mature rabbits, drilled with six proximal 0.5 mm and two distal 0.9 mm holes, then covered with in situ-solidified IIa-implants (treated) or with IIa-alone (control). After 6.5 months of repair, cartilage repair tissues were analyzed by histological scoring and histomorphometry for hyaline matrix characteristics and osseous integration. Subchondral repair bone was analyzed by 3D microcomputed tomography and compared to acute defects (n=6) and intact trochlea (n=8). Implant-treated cartilage repair tissues had higher structural integrity through the entire defect (p=0.02), twofold higher percent staining for glycosaminoglycan (p=0.0004), and ~24% more collagen type II staining over the smaller drill holes (p=0.008) compared with controls. Otherwise, hole diameter had no specific effect on cartilage repair. The subchondral bone plate was partially restored in treated and control defects but less dense than intact trochlea, with evidence of incomplete regeneration of the calcified cartilage layer. More residual drill holes (p=0.054) were detected in control versus treated defects, and control defects with more than 40% residual holes presented abnormally thicker trabeculae compared with treated defects. Low osteoclast numbers after 6.5 months repair suggested that bone was no longer remodeling. The subchondral bone plate surrounding the defects exhibited a significant thickening compared with age-matched intact trochlea. These data suggest that debridement and drilling can lead to long-term subchondral bone changes outside the cartilage defect. Compared with drilled

  19. Effects on cuytoskeleton system in pollen tube of pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation

    Huang Qunce; Liang Qiuxia; Li Guopin

    2008-01-01

    The damage of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen and the pollen tube of Pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation were researched. The results showed that the disorganization of the micro-tubules in the pollen tube was produced by N + implantation. The abnormal states of the pollen tube in morphology were very correlative with the abnormality of the cytoskeleton system. N + implantation was responsible for morphological abnormalities in the pollen tubes. There was a distinct correlation between the damage effects and the ion implantation dose. The add of dose caused more obvious damage effects. Furthermore, the state of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen tube was influenced by the ion implantation. The impact grade depended also on the ion implantation dose. (authors)

  20. Induced defects in neutron irradiated GaN single crystals

    Park, I. W.; Koh, E. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Choh, S. H.; Park, S. S.; Kim, B. G.; Sohn, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The local structure of defects in undoped, Si-doped, and neutron irradiated free standing GaN bulk crystals, grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy, has been investigated by employing Raman scattering and cathodoluminescence. The GaN samples were irradiated to a dose of 2 x 10 17 neutrons in an atomic reactor at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. There was no appreciable change in the Raman spectra for undoped GaN samples before and after neutron irradiation. However, a forbidden transition, A 1 (TO) mode, appeared for a neutron irradiated Si-doped GaN crystal. Cathodoluminescence spectrum for the neutron irradiated Si-doped GaN crystal became much more broadened than that for the unirradiated one. The experimental results reveal the generation of defects with locally deformed structure in the wurtzite Si-doped GaN single crystal

  1. Segregation of Spontaneous and Training Induced Recovery from Visual Field Defects in Subacute Stroke Patients

    Douwe P. Bergsma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether rehabilitation after stroke profits from an early start is difficult to establish as the contributions of spontaneous recovery and treatment are difficult to tease apart. Here, we use a novel training design to dissociate these components for visual rehabilitation of subacute stroke patients with visual field defects such as hemianopia. Visual discrimination training was started within 6 weeks after stroke in 17 patients. Spontaneous and training-induced recoveries were distinguished by training one-half of the defect for 8 weeks, while monitoring spontaneous recovery in the other (control half of the defect. Next, trained and control regions were swapped, and training continued for another 8 weeks. The same paradigm was also applied to seven chronic patients for whom spontaneous recovery can be excluded and changes in the control half of the defect point to a spillover effect of training. In both groups, field stability was assessed during a no-intervention period. Defect reduction was significantly greater in the trained part of the defect than in the simultaneously untrained part of the defect irrespective of training onset (p = 0.001. In subacute patients, training contributed about twice as much to their defect reduction as the spontaneous recovery. Goal Attainment Scores were significantly and positively correlated with the total defect reduction (p = 0.01, percentage increase reading speed was significantly and positively correlated with the defect reduction induced by training (epoch 1: p = 0.0044; epoch 2: p = 0.023. Visual training adds significantly to the spontaneous recovery of visual field defects, both during training in the early and the chronic stroke phase. However, field recovery as a result of training in this subacute phase was as large as in the chronic phase. This suggests that patients benefited primarily of early onset training by gaining access to a larger visual field sooner.

  2. Defect-induced magnetic structure of CuMnSb

    Máca, František; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Turek, I.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Beran, Přemysl; Llobet, A.; Martí, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 9 (2016), 1-9, č. článku 094407. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : CuMnSb * electronic structure * defects * magnetic order * ab initio calculations * neutron diffraction analysis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  3. Effect of He+ fluence on surface morphology and ion-irradiation induced defect evolution in 7075 aluminum alloys

    Ni, Kai; Ma, Qian; Wan, Hao; Yang, Bin; Ge, Junjie; Zhang, Lingyu; Si, Naichao

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of microstructure for 7075 aluminum alloys with 50 Kev helium ions irradiation were studied by using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 were selected, and irradiation experiments were conducted at room temperatures. The transmission process of He+ ions was simulated by using SRIM software, including distribution of ion ranges, energy losses and atomic displacements. Experimental results show that irradiated pits and micro-cracks were observed on irradiation sample surface, and the size of constituent particles (not including Mg2Si) decreased with the increasing dose. The x-ray diffraction results of the pair of peaks is better resolved in irradiated samples might indicate that the stressed structure consequence due to crystal defects (vacancies and interstitials) after He+ implantation. TEM observation indicated that the density of MgZn2 phase was significantly reduced after helium ion irradiation which is harmful to strength. Besides, the development of compressive stress produced a large amount of dislocation defects in the 1015 ions cm-2 sample. Moreover, higher fluence irradiation produced more dislocations in sample. At fluence of 1016 ions cm-2, dislocation wall formed by dislocation slip and aggregation in the interior of grains, leading to the refinement of these grains. As fluence increased to 1017 ions cm-2, dislocation loops were observed in pinned dislocation. Moreover, dislocation as effective defect sink, irradiation-induced vacancy defects aggregated to these sinks, and resulted in the formation of helium bubbles in dislocation.

  4. A Case of Cochlear Implantation in Bromate-Induced Bilateral Sudden Deafness.

    Eom, Tae-Ho; Lee, Sungsu; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Cho, Yong-Beom

    2015-04-01

    Despite the well-established nature of bromate-induced ototoxicity, cochlear implantation after bromate intoxication has been rarely documented. We hereby present a case of a 51-year-old female deafened completely after bromate ingestion. Her hearing was not restored by systemic steroid treatment and hearing aids were of no use. A cochlear implantation was performed on her right ear 3 months after the bromate ingestion. In bromate intoxication cases, early monitoring of hearing level is necessary and other drugs with potential ototoxicity should be avoided. The outcome of cochlear implantation was excellent in this case of bromate-induced deafness.

  5. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed

  6. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-08-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed.

  7. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H.; Fontaine, J.C.; Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.)

  8. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  9. Proton irradiation induced defects in Cd and Zn doped InP

    Rybicki, G.C.; Williams, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Proton irradiation induced defects in Zn and Cd doped InP have been studied by deep level transient spectroscopy, (DLTS). After 2 MeV proton irradiation the defects H4 and H5 were observed in lightly Zn doped InP, while the defects H3 and H5 were observed in more heavily Zn and Cd doped InP. The defect properties were not affected by the substitution of Cd for Zn, but the introduction rate of H5 was lower in Cd doped InP. The annealing rate of defects was also higher in Cd doped InP. The use of Cd doped InP may thus result in an InP solar cell with even greater radiation resistance

  10. Carbon redistribution and precipitation in high temperature ion-implanted strained Si/SiGe/Si multi-layered structures

    Gaiduk, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract Carbon depth profiles after high temperature implantation in strained Si/SiGe/Si multilayered system and induced structural defects.......Graphical abstract Carbon depth profiles after high temperature implantation in strained Si/SiGe/Si multilayered system and induced structural defects....

  11. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Bj?rklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grand?r, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencin...

  12. Ion implantation induced conducting nano-cluster formation in PPO

    Das, A.; Patnaik, A.; Ghosh, G.; Dhara, S.

    1997-01-01

    Conversion of polymers and non-polymeric organic molecules from insulating to semiconducting materials as an effect of energetic ion implantation is an established fact. Formation of nano-clusters enriched with carbonaceous materials are made responsible for the insulator-semiconductor transition. Conduction in these implanted materials is observed to follow variable range hopping (VRH) mechanism. Poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide) [PPO] compatible in various proportion with polystyrene is used as a high thermal resistant insulating polymer. PPO has been used for the first time in the ion implantation study

  13. Radiation-induced defects in As-Sb-S glass

    Balitska, V; Shpotyuk, Ya; Filipecki, J; Shpotyuk, O

    2010-01-01

    Defect-related instability was studied in γ-irradiated (As 2 S 3 ) 1-x (Sb 2 S 3 ) x glasses (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy treated within high-measurement statistics. The observed decrease in average positron lifetime in the studied glasses is explained as a renovation of destroyed covalent chemical bonds after irradiation. This process is governed by monomolecular relaxation kinetics, being described in the framework of universal configuration-coordinate model.

  14. Radiation-induced defects in As-Sb-S glass

    Balitska, V; Shpotyuk, Ya; Filipecki, J; Shpotyuk, O, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2010-11-15

    Defect-related instability was studied in {gamma}-irradiated (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 1-x}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub x} glasses (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy treated within high-measurement statistics. The observed decrease in average positron lifetime in the studied glasses is explained as a renovation of destroyed covalent chemical bonds after irradiation. This process is governed by monomolecular relaxation kinetics, being described in the framework of universal configuration-coordinate model.

  15. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in silicon in a simplified phenomenological model

    Lazanu, S.; Lazanu, I.

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of primary radiation-induced defects has been previously estimated considering both the explicit mechanisms of the primary interaction between the incoming particle and the nuclei of the semiconductor lattice, and the recoil energy partition between ionisation and displacements, in the frame of the Lindhard theory. The primary displacement defects are vacancies and interstitials that are essentially unstable in silicon. They interact via migration, recombination, annihilation or produce other defects. In the present work, the time evolution of the concentration of defects induced by pions in medium and high resistivity silicon for detectors is modelled, after irradiation. In some approximations, the differential equations representing the time evolution processes could be decoupled. The theoretical equations so obtained are solved analytically in some particular cases, with one free parameter, for a wide range of particle fluences and/or for a wide energy range of incident particles, for different temperatures; the corresponding stationary solutions are also presented

  16. Implant-retained skull prosthesis to cover a large defect of the hairy skull resulting from treatment of a basal cell carcinoma: A clinical report.

    Hoekstra, Jitske; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Visser, Anita

    2017-05-01

    Skin carcinoma, particularly basal cell carcinoma, and its treatment can result in large defects of the hairy skull. A 53-year-old man is described who was surgically treated for a large basal cell carcinoma invading the skin and underlying tissue at the top of the hairy skull. Treatment consisted of resecting the tumor and external part of the skull bone. To protect the brain and to cover the defect of the hairy skull, an acrylic resin skull prosthesis with hair was designed to mask the defect. The skull prosthesis was retained on 8 extraoral implants placed at the margins of the defect in the skull bone. The patient was satisfied with the treatment outcome. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of He implantation on radiation induced segregation in Cu-Au and Ni-Si alloys

    Iwase, A.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Funk, L.

    Effects of He implantation on radiation induced segregation (RIS) in Cu-Au and Ni-Si alloys were investigated using in situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry during simultaneous irradiation with 1.5-MeV He and low-energy (100 or 400-keV) He ions at elevated temperatures. RIS during single He ion irradiation, and the effects of pre-implantation with low-energy He ions, were also studied. RIS near the specimen surface, which was pronounced during 1.5-MeV He single-ion irradiation, was strongly reduced under low-energy He single-ion irradiation, and during simultaneous irradiation with 1.5-MeV He and low-energy He ions. A similar RIS reduction was also observed in the specimens pre-implanted with low-energy He ions. The experimental results indicate that the accumulated He atoms cause the formation of small bubbles, which provide additional recombination sites for freely migrating defects.

  18. Biostable scaffolds of polyacrylate polymers implanted in the articular cartilage induce hyaline-like cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

    Sancho-Tello, María; Forriol, Francisco; Martín de Llano, José J; Antolinos-Turpin, Carmen; Gómez-Tejedor, José A; Gómez Ribelles, José L; Carda, Carmen

    2017-07-05

    To study the influence of scaffold properties on the organization of in vivo cartilage regeneration. Our hypothesis was that stress transmission to the cells seeded inside the pores of the scaffold or surrounding it, which is highly dependent on the scaffold properties, determines the differentiation of both mesenchymal cells and dedifferentiated autologous chondrocytes. 4 series of porous scaffolds made of different polyacrylate polymers, previously seeded with cultured rabbit chondrocytes or without cells, were implanted in cartilage defects in rabbits. Subchondral bone was injured during the surgery to allow blood to reach the implantation site and fill the scaffold pores. At 3 months after implantation, excellent tissue regeneration was obtained, with a well-organized layer of hyaline-like cartilage at the condylar surface in most cases of the hydrophobic or slightly hydrophilic series. The most hydrophilic material induced the poorest regeneration. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds. All of the materials used were biocompatible, biostable polymers, so, in contrast to some other studies, our results were not perturbed by possible effects attributable to material degradation products or to the loss of scaffold mechanical properties over time due to degradation. Cartilage regeneration depends mainly on the properties of the scaffold, such as stiffness and hydrophilicity, whereas little difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds.

  19. A Comparison of the Outcomes for Cartilage Defects of the Knee Treated With Biologic Resurfacing Versus Focal Metallic Implants.

    Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Daley, Erika; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    To compare the results of focal metallic resurfacing with biologic procedures in patients more than 35 years of age with isolated, full thickness defects of the femoral condyle. A total of 61 patients met the selection criteria resulting in 30 patients treated with biological procedures, including debridement, microfracture, osteochondral autograft transplantation, osteochondral allograft, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (BIO group), and 32 patients treated with focal metallic resurfacing (CAP group). The BIO and CAP groups were matched according to treatment location, defect grade and size, and age profile. Outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Short Form-12, and satisfaction. The primary combination endpoint was determined as a 20% improvement (minimum clinically important difference-20) on WOMAC pain and function at 2 years and no additional index lesion-related surgical intervention. Safety and effectiveness were also reported. Thirty patients in the BIO group (mean age of 44.6, range 35-64) had an average follow-up of 2.6 years and 32 patients in the CAP group (mean age 47.9, range 37-68) were followed for 2.0 years. Fifty-three percent in the BIO group and 75% in the CAP group achieved success per the endpoint definition. The mean total WOMAC score improved significantly for both groups (BIO: 57-78; P metal resurfacing procedures for the treatment of isolated focal chondral lesions of the femoral condyle in the knee. Focal metallic resurfacing results in similar clinical outcomes and provides excellent success rates at short-term follow-up. Level III comparative study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Shp2 knockdown and Noonan/LEOPARD mutant Shp2-induced gastrulation defects.

    Chris Jopling

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shp2 is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine phosphatase that is essential for normal development. Activating and inactivating mutations have been identified in humans to cause the related Noonan and LEOPARD syndromes, respectively. The cell biological cause of these syndromes remains to be determined. We have used the zebrafish to assess the role of Shp2 in early development. Here, we report that morpholino-mediated knockdown of Shp2 in zebrafish resulted in defects during gastrulation. Cell tracing experiments demonstrated that Shp2 knockdown induced defects in convergence and extension cell movements. In situ hybridization using a panel of markers indicated that cell fate was not affected by Shp2 knock down. The Shp2 knockdown-induced defects were rescued by active Fyn and Yes and by active RhoA. We generated mutants of Shp2 with mutations that were identified in human patients with Noonan or LEOPARD Syndrome and established that Noonan Shp2 was activated and LEOPARD Shp2 lacked catalytic protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. Expression of Noonan or LEOPARD mutant Shp2 in zebrafish embryos induced convergence and extension cell movement defects without affecting cell fate. Moreover, these embryos displayed craniofacial and cardiac defects, reminiscent of human symptoms. Noonan and LEOPARD mutant Shp2s were not additive nor synergistic, consistent with the mutant Shp2s having activating and inactivating roles in the same signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that Shp2 is required for normal convergence and extension cell movements during gastrulation and that Src family kinases and RhoA were downstream of Shp2. Expression of Noonan or LEOPARD Shp2 phenocopied the craniofacial and cardiac defects of human patients. The finding that defective Shp2 signaling induced cell movement defects as early as gastrulation may have implications for the monitoring and diagnosis of Noonan and LEOPARD syndrome.

  1. Shock-induced spall in copper: the effects of anisotropy, temperature, loading pulse and defect

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; An, Qi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Li - Bo [USTC

    2009-07-28

    Shock-induced spall in Cu is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. We examine spallation in initially perfect crystals and defective solids with grain boundaries (columnar bicrystals), stacking faults or vacancies, as well as the effect of temperature and loading pulses. Spall in single crystal Cu is anisotropic, and defects and high temperature may reduce the spall strength. Taylor-wave (triangular shock-release wave) loading is explored in comparison with square wave shock loading.

  2. Origin of the defects-induced ferromagnetism in un-doped ZnO single crystals

    Zhan, Peng; Xie, Zheng; Li, Zhengcao; Wang, Weipeng; Zhang, Zhengjun; Li, Zhuoxin; Cheng, Guodong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Baoyi; Cao, Xingzhong

    2013-02-01

    We clarified, in this Letter, that in un-doped ZnO single crystals after thermal annealing in flowing argon, the defects-induced room-temperature ferromagnetism was originated from the surface defects and specifically, from singly occupied oxygen vacancies denoted as F+, by the optical and electrical properties measurements as well as positron annihilation analysis. In addition, a positive linear relationship was observed between the ferromagnetism and the F+ concentration, which is in support with the above clarification.

  3. What can we learn from Raman Spectroscopy on irradiation-induced defects in UO2?

    Desgranges, L.; Martin, Ph.; Simon, P.; Guimbretiere, G.; Baldinozzi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results on irradiated UO 2 by Raman spectroscopy evidenced Raman lines that are characteristic of irradiation-induced defects. Three main mechanisms are identified to explain their origin: resonant Raman, formation of new molecular entities, or breakdown in symmetry. Arguments are given to consider breakdown in symmetry as the predominant mechanism. A tentative description of the defects at the origin of this symmetry breakdown is proposed in terms of coordination polyhedrons of uranium. This discussion led us to consider that the Raman defect modes could be related to area with different stoichiometry. (authors)

  4. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-07-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  5. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO 2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  6. Simulation of ion-beam induced defects in cuprate superconductors

    Dineva, M.; Marksteiner, M.; Lang, W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Heavy-ion irradiation of cuprate superconductors is well known to produce columnar defect tracks along which magnetic vortices can be pinned. Hence, this effect has a large potential for practical applications and can enhance the critical current of the high-temperature superconducting materials. On the other hand, little work has been devoted to light-ion irradiation of the new superconductors. Our previous experimental results have indicated a systematic change of electric transport properties when irradiating YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) with 75 KEXV He + ions. The purpose of the present study is the investigation of the ion-target interactions with computer simulation programs based on the binary collision approximation. The program package SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) is widely used to simulate the impact of energetic ions (10 eV to 2 GeV) on a solid target using a quantum mechanical treatment of ion-atom collisions under the assumption of an unstructured target material. A similar program, MARLOWE, includes the exact crystalline structure of the target and, thus, is able to calculate ion channeling effects and angle dependences. Detailed results of the penetration range of ions into YBCO, scattering cascades, creation of vacancies and interstitials, are reported for various kinds of ions. One of the central results is that light ions with energy of about 80 KEXV can penetrate through thin films of the cuprate superconductors and create point defects, mainly by oxygen displacement. (author)

  7. Exercise-induced thallium-201 myocardial perfusion defects in angina pectoris without significant coronary artery stenosis

    Nakazato, Masayasu; Maruoka, Yuji; Sunagawa, Osahiko; Kinjo, Kunihiko; Tomori, Masayuki; Fukiyama, Koshiro

    1990-01-01

    We performed exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in 32 patients with angina pectoris to study the incidence of perfusion defects, who had no significant organic stenosis on coronary angiography. None of them had myocardial infarction or cardiomyopathy. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy and 12-lead ECG recording were performed during supine bicycle ergometer exercise. Perfusion defects in thallium-201 scintigrams in SPECT images were assessed during visual analysis by two observers. In the coronary angiograms obtained during intravenous infusion of nitroglycerin, the luminal diameter of 75% stenosis or less in the AHA classification was regarded as an insignificant organic stenosis. Myocardial perfusion defects in the thallium-201 scintigrams were detected in eight (25%) of the 32 patients. Six of these eight patients had variant angina documented during spontaneous attacks with ST elevations in standard 12-lead ECGs. Perfusion defects were demonstrated at the inferior or infero-posterior regions in six patients, one of whom had concomitant anteroseptal defect. The defects were not always accompanied by chest pain. All but one patient demonstrating inferior or inferoposterior defects showed ST depression in leads II, III and aV F on their ECGs, corresponding to inferior wall ischemia. The exception was a case with right bundle branch block. Thus, 25% of the patients with angina pectoris, who had no evidence of significant organic stenosis on their coronary angiograms, exhibited exercise-induced perfusion defects in their thallium-201 scintigrams. Coronary spasms might have caused myocardial ischemia in these patients. (author)

  8. Edge dislocations as sinks for sub-nanometric radiation induced defects in α-iron

    Anento, N.; Malerba, L.; Serra, A.

    2018-01-01

    The role of edge dislocations as sinks for small radiation induced defects in bcc-Fe is investigated by means of atomistic computer simulation. In this work we investigate by Molecular Statics (T = 0K) the interaction between an immobile dislocation line and defect clusters of small sizes invisible experimentally. The study highlights in particular the anisotropy of the interaction and distinguishes between absorbed and trapped defects. When the considered defect intersects the dislocation glide plane and the distance from the dislocation line to the defect is on the range between 2 nm and 4 nm, either total or partial absorption of the cluster takes place leading to the formation of jogs. Residual defects produced during partial absorption pin the dislocation. By the calculation of stress-strain curves we have assessed the strength of those residues as obstacles for the motion of the dislocation, which is reflected on the unpinning stresses and the binding energies obtained. When the defect is outside this range, but on planes close to the dislocation glide plane, instead of absorption we have observed a capture process. Finally, with a view to introducing explicitly in kinetic Monte Carlo models a sink with the shape of a dislocation line, we have summarized our findings on a table presenting the most relevant parameters, which define the interaction of the dislocation with the defects considered.

  9. Anisotropy of electrical conductivity in dc due to intrinsic defect formation in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal implanted with Mg ions

    Tardío, M., E-mail: mtardio@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Física, Escuela Politécnica Superior, Universidad Carlos III, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés (Madrid) (Spain); Egaña, A.; Ramírez, R.; Muñoz-Santiuste, J.E. [Departamento de Física, Escuela Politécnica Superior, Universidad Carlos III, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés (Madrid) (Spain); Alves, E. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 2695-066 Bobadela (Portugal)

    2016-07-15

    The electrical conductivity in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals implanted with Mg ions in two different crystalline orientations, parallel and perpendicular to c axis, was investigated. The samples were implanted at room temperature with energies of 50 and 100 keV and fluences of 1 × 10{sup 15}, 5 × 10{sup 15} and 5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Optical characterization reveals slight differences in the absorption bands at 6.0 and 4.2 eV, attributed to F type centers and Mie scattering from Mg precipitates, respectively. DC electrical measurements using the four and two-point probe methods, between 295 and 490 K, were used to characterize the electrical conductivity of the implanted area (Meshakim and Tanabe, 2001). Measurements in this temperature range indicate that: (1) the electrical conductivity is thermally activated independently of crystallographic orientation, (2) resistance values in the implanted region decrease with fluence levels, and (3) the I–V characteristic of electrical contacts in samples with perpendicular c axis orientation is clearly ohmic, whereas contacts are blocking in samples with parallel c axis. When thin layers are sequentially removed from the implanted region by immersing the sample in a hot solution of nitric and fluorhydric acids the electrical resistance increases until reaching the values of non-implanted crystal (Jheeta et al., 2006). We conclude that the enhancement in conductivity observed in the implanted regions is related to the intrinsic defects created by the implantation rather than to the implanted Mg ions (da Silva et al., 2002; Tardío et al., 2001; Tardío et al., 2008).

  10. Defect annealing in Mn/Fe-implanted TiO2 (rutile)

    Gunnlaugsson, H P; Svane, A; Weyer, G; Mantovan, R; Masenda, H; Naidoo, D; Mølholt, T E; Gislason, H; Ólafsson, S; Johnston, K; Bharuth-Ram, K; Langouche, G

    2014-01-01

    A study of the annealing processes and charge state of dilute Fe in rutile TiO 2 single crystals was performed in the temperature range 143–662 K, utilizing online 57 Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following low concentrations (<10 −3  at%) implantation of 57 Mn (T 1/2  = 1.5 min). Both Fe 3+ and Fe 2+ were detected throughout the temperature range. Three annealing stages were distinguished: (i) a broad annealing stage below room temperature leading to an increased Fe 3+ fraction; (ii) a sharp annealing stage at ∼330 K characterized by conversion of Fe 3+ to Fe 2+ and changes in the hyperfine parameters of Fe 2+ , attributed to the annealing of Ti vacancies in the vicinity of the probe atoms; and (iii) an annealing stage in the temperature range from 550 to 600 K, where all Fe ions are transformed to Fe 3+ , attributed to the annealing of the nearby O vacancies. The dissociation energy of Mn Ti –V O pairs was estimated to be 1.60(15) eV. Fe 2+ is found in an environment where it can probe the lattice structure through the nuclear quadrupole interaction evidencing the extreme radiation hardness of rutile TiO 2 . Fe 3+ is found in a paramagnetic state with slow spin–lattice relaxation which follows a ∼T n temperature dependence with 4.1 < n < 6.3 at T > 350 K. (paper)

  11. Point defects migration induced by subthreshold focused collisions

    Tenenbaum, A.; Doan, N.V.

    1976-01-01

    The persistence of the phenomenon of focused atomic collisions in a large range of temperature up to 0.3 Tf in copper have been shown using computer simulation by the Molecular Dynamics Technique. On the other hand, different processes by which the subthreshold collisions can induce a vacancy migration have been investigated. A quantitative model relating the induced vacancy migration to the flux density, direction and energy of incident particles has been developed. For example in an electron irradiation, it is found that the induced vacancy jump frequency depends notably on the incident direction and exhibits a maximum value in the range of electron energy between 60 and 100keV

  12. Effectiveness of xenogenous-based bovine-derived platelet gel embedded within a three-dimensional collagen implant on the healing and regeneration of the Achilles tendon defect in rabbits.

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineering is an option in reconstructing large tendon defects and managing their healing and regeneration. We designed and produced a novel xenogeneic-based bovine platelet, embedded it within a tissue-engineered collagen implant (CI) and applied it in an experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits to test whether bovine platelets could stimulate tendon healing and regeneration in vivo. One hundred twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental and pilot groups. In all the animals, the left Achilles tendon was surgically excised and the tendon edges were aligned by Kessler suture. Each group was then divided into three groups of control (no implant), treated with CI and treated with collagen-platelet implant. The pilot groups were euthanized at 10, 15, 30 and 40 days post-injury (DPI), and their gross and histologic characteristics were evaluated to study host-graft interaction mechanism. To study the tendon healing and its outcome, the experimental animals were tested during the experiment using hematologic, ultrasonographic and various methods of clinical examinations and then euthanized at 60 DPI and their tendons were evaluated by gross pathologic, histopathologic, scanning electron microscopic, biophysical and biochemical methods. Bovine platelets embedded within a CI increased inflammation at short term while it increased the rate of implant absorption and matrix replacement compared with the controls and CI alone. Treatment also significantly increased diameter, density, amount, alignment and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers and approximated the water uptake and delivery behavior of the healing tendons to normal contralaterals (p tendons and reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and therefore, it improved the clinical scores and physical activity related to the injured limb when compared with the controls (p Achilles tendon in rabbit. This strategy may be a valuable option in the

  13. Diffuse x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy study of defects in antimony-implanted silicon

    Takamura, Y.; Marshall, A. F.; Mehta, A.; Arthur, J.; Griffin, P. B.; Plummer, J. D.; Patel, J. R.

    2004-04-01

    Ion implantation followed by laser annealing has been used to create supersaturated and electrically active concentrations of antimony in silicon. Upon subsequent thermal annealing, however, these metastable dopants deactivate towards the equilibrium solubility limit. In this work, the formation of inactive antimony structures has been studied with grazing incidence diffuse x-ray scattering, and transmission electron microscopy, and the results are correlated to previous high-resolution x-ray diffraction data. We find that at a concentration of 6.0×1020 cm-3, small, incoherent clusters of radius 3-4 Å form during annealing at 900 °C. At a higher concentration of 2.2×1021 cm-3, deactivation at 600 °C occurs through the formation of small, antimony aggregates and antimony precipitates. The size of these precipitates from diffuse x-ray scattering is roughly 15 Å in radius for anneal times from 15 to 180 seconds. This value is consistent with the features observed in high-resolution and mass contrast transmission electron microscopy images. The coherent nature of the aggregates and precipitates causes the expansion of the surrounding silicon matrix as the deactivation progresses. In addition, the sensitivity of the diffuse x-ray scattering technique has allowed us to detect the presence of small clusters of radius ˜2 Å in unprocessed Czochralski silicon wafers. These defects are not observed in floating zone silicon wafers, and are tentatively attributed to thermal donors.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of procedures for treatment of ostium secundum atrial septal defects occlusion comparing conventional surgery and septal percutaneous implant.

    da Costa, Márcia Gisele Santos; Santos, Marisa da Silva; Sarti, Flávia Mori; Simões e Senna, Kátia Marie; Tura, Bernardo Rangel; Correia, Marcelo Goulart; Goulart, Marcelo Correia

    2014-01-01

    The study performs a cost-effectiveness analysis of procedures for atrial septal defects occlusion, comparing conventional surgery to septal percutaneous implant. A model of analytical decision was structured with symmetric branches to estimate cost-effectiveness ratio between the procedures. The decision tree model was based on evidences gathered through meta-analysis of literature, and validated by a panel of specialists. The lower number of surgical procedures performed for atrial septal defects occlusion at each branch was considered as the effectiveness outcome. Direct medical costs and probabilities for each event were inserted in the model using data available from Brazilian public sector database system and information extracted from the literature review, using micro-costing technique. Sensitivity analysis included price variations of percutaneous implant. The results obtained from the decision model demonstrated that the percutaneous implant was more cost effective in cost-effectiveness analysis at a cost of US$8,936.34 with a reduction in the probability of surgery occurrence in 93% of the cases. Probability of atrial septal communication occlusion and cost of the implant are the determinant factors of cost-effectiveness ratio. The proposal of a decision model seeks to fill a void in the academic literature. The decision model proposed includes the outcomes that present major impact in relation to the overall costs of the procedure. The atrial septal defects occlusion using percutaneous implant reduces the physical and psychological distress to the patients in relation to the conventional surgery, which represent intangible costs in the context of economic evaluation.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of procedures for treatment of ostium secundum atrial septal defects occlusion comparing conventional surgery and septal percutaneous implant.

    Márcia Gisele Santos da Costa

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The study performs a cost-effectiveness analysis of procedures for atrial septal defects occlusion, comparing conventional surgery to septal percutaneous implant. METHODS: A model of analytical decision was structured with symmetric branches to estimate cost-effectiveness ratio between the procedures. The decision tree model was based on evidences gathered through meta-analysis of literature, and validated by a panel of specialists. The lower number of surgical procedures performed for atrial septal defects occlusion at each branch was considered as the effectiveness outcome. Direct medical costs and probabilities for each event were inserted in the model using data available from Brazilian public sector database system and information extracted from the literature review, using micro-costing technique. Sensitivity analysis included price variations of percutaneous implant. RESULTS: The results obtained from the decision model demonstrated that the percutaneous implant was more cost effective in cost-effectiveness analysis at a cost of US$8,936.34 with a reduction in the probability of surgery occurrence in 93% of the cases. Probability of atrial septal communication occlusion and cost of the implant are the determinant factors of cost-effectiveness ratio. CONCLUSIONS: The proposal of a decision model seeks to fill a void in the academic literature. The decision model proposed includes the outcomes that present major impact in relation to the overall costs of the procedure. The atrial septal defects occlusion using percutaneous implant reduces the physical and psychological distress to the patients in relation to the conventional surgery, which represent intangible costs in the context of economic evaluation.

  16. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A.

    1997-01-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As 2 Se 3 Bi y and (As 2 Se 3 )(Bi 2 Se 3 ) y amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co 60 gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As 2 Se 3 Bi y glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs

  17. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A. [Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} and (As{sub 2}Se{sub 3})(Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}){sub y} amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co{sup 60} gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs.

  18. Effects of point defect trapping and solute segregation on irradiation-induced swelling and creep

    Mansur, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of irradiation swelling and creep, generalized to include impurity trapping of point defects and impurity-induced changes in sink efficiencies for point defects, is reviewed. The mathematical framework is developed and significant results are described. These include the relation between vacancy and interstitial trapping and the effectiveness of trapping as compared to segregation-induced changes in sink efficiencies in modifying void nucleation, void growth, and creep. Current understanding is critically assessed. Several areas requiring further development are identified. In particular those given special attention are the treatment of nondilute solutions and the consequences of current uncertainties in fundamental materials properties whose importance has been identified using the theory

  19. Universal Effectiveness of Inducing Magnetic Moments in Graphene by Amino-Type sp3-Defects

    Tao Tang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Inducing magnetic moments in graphene is very important for its potential application in spintronics. Introducing sp3-defects on the graphene basal plane is deemed as the most promising approach to produce magnetic graphene. However, its universal validity has not been very well verified experimentally. By functionalization of approximately pure amino groups on graphene basal plane, a spin-generalization efficiency of ~1 μB/100 NH2 was obtained for the first time, thus providing substantial evidence for the validity of inducing magnetic moments by sp3-defects. As well, amino groups provide another potential sp3-type candidate to prepare magnetic graphene.

  20. Helium implanted AlHf as studied by 181 Ta TDPAC

    Measurements on helium implanted sample indicate the binding of helium associated defects by Hf solute clusters. Isochronal annealing measurements indicate the dissociation of the helium implantation induced defects from Hf solute clusters for annealing treatments beyond 650 K. On comparison of the present results ...

  1. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis.

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-11-10

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5-/- cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis.

  2. Analysis of induced electrical currents from magnetic field coupling inside implantable neurostimulator leads

    Seidman Seth J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, the number of neurostimulator systems implanted in patients has been rapidly growing. Nearly 50, 000 neurostimulators are implanted worldwide annually. The most common type of implantable neurostimulators is indicated for pain relief. At the same time, commercial use of other electromagnetic technologies is expanding, making electromagnetic interference (EMI of neurostimulator function an issue of concern. Typically reported sources of neurostimulator EMI include security systems, metal detectors and wireless equipment. When near such sources, patients with implanted neurostimulators have reported adverse events such as shock, pain, and increased stimulation. In recent in vitro studies, radio frequency identification (RFID technology has been shown to inhibit the stimulation pulse of an implantable neurostimulator system during low frequency exposure at close distances. This could potentially be due to induced electrical currents inside the implantable neurostimulator leads that are caused by magnetic field coupling from the low frequency identification system. Methods To systematically address the concerns posed by EMI, we developed a test platform to assess the interference from coupled magnetic fields on implantable neurostimulator systems. To measure interference, we recorded the output of one implantable neurostimulator, programmed for best therapy threshold settings, when in close proximity to an operating low frequency RFID emitter. The output contained electrical potentials from the neurostimulator system and those induced by EMI from the RFID emitter. We also recorded the output of the same neurostimulator system programmed for best therapy threshold settings without RFID interference. Using the Spatially Extended Nonlinear Node (SENN model, we compared threshold factors of spinal cord fiber excitation for both recorded outputs. Results The electric current induced by low frequency RFID emitter

  3. The effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of induced pluripotent stem cells and their application in restoration of cartilage defects.

    Liu, Ji; Nie, Huarong; Xu, Zhengliang; Niu, Xin; Guo, Shangchun; Yin, Junhui; Guo, Fei; Li, Gang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) rendered the reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells to primary stem cells with pluripotency possible and provided potential for the regeneration and restoration of cartilage defect. Chondrogenic differentiation of iPSCs is crucial for their application in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study we investigated the effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and articular cartilage defect restoration. Super-hydrophilic and durable mechanic polycaprolactone (PCL)/gelatin scaffolds were fabricated using two separate electrospinning processes. The morphological structure and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. The chondrogenesis of the iPSCs in vitro and the restoration of the cartilage defect was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), histological observation, RT-qPCR, and western blot analysis. iPSCs on the scaffolds expressed higher levels of chondrogenic markers than the control group. In an animal model, cartilage defects implanted with the scaffold-cell complex exhibited an enhanced gross appearance and histological improvements, higher cartilage-specific gene expression and protein levels, as well as subchondral bone regeneration. Therefore, we showed scaffolds with a 3D nanofibrous structure enhanced the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and that iPSC-containing scaffolds improved the restoration of cartilage defects to a greater degree than did scaffolds alone in vivo.

  4. The effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of induced pluripotent stem cells and their application in restoration of cartilage defects.

    Ji Liu

    Full Text Available The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs rendered the reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells to primary stem cells with pluripotency possible and provided potential for the regeneration and restoration of cartilage defect. Chondrogenic differentiation of iPSCs is crucial for their application in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study we investigated the effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and articular cartilage defect restoration. Super-hydrophilic and durable mechanic polycaprolactone (PCL/gelatin scaffolds were fabricated using two separate electrospinning processes. The morphological structure and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. The chondrogenesis of the iPSCs in vitro and the restoration of the cartilage defect was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8, histological observation, RT-qPCR, and western blot analysis. iPSCs on the scaffolds expressed higher levels of chondrogenic markers than the control group. In an animal model, cartilage defects implanted with the scaffold-cell complex exhibited an enhanced gross appearance and histological improvements, higher cartilage-specific gene expression and protein levels, as well as subchondral bone regeneration. Therefore, we showed scaffolds with a 3D nanofibrous structure enhanced the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and that iPSC-containing scaffolds improved the restoration of cartilage defects to a greater degree than did scaffolds alone in vivo.

  5. High-temperature superconductors induced by ion implantation. Final report

    Greenwald, A.C.; Johnson, E.

    1988-08-01

    High dose oxygen ion implantation (10 to the 17th power ions per sq. cm.) at elevated temperatures (300 C) has been shown to adjust the critical temperature of gamma-Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O materials. These results are in marked contrast to earlier work which showed complete destruction of superconducting properties for similar radiation doses, and marked reduction in superconducting properties at one-tenth this dose in the 1-2-3- compound only. Experiments also showed that the superconducting materials can be patterned into conducting and nonconducting areas without etching by ion implantation, allowing maintenance of planar geometries required for microcircuit fabrication. Experiments on deposition of thin films of high temperature superconductors for use with the ion implantation experiments showed that ion beam sputtering from a single target could achieve the correct stoichiometry. Variations of composition with ion beam energy and angle of sputtered ions were studied

  6. [Visual rehabilitation of patients with large post-traumatic defects of the anterior eye segment through iris-lens diaphragm implantation].

    Khodzhaev, N S; Sobolev, N P; Mushkova, I A; Izmaylova, S B; Karimova, A N

    The diversity of methodological approaches and lack of pathogenetically reasonable tactics for patients with combined ocular injuries became the basis for the development and systematization of surgical rehabilitation stages of patients, in whom post-traumatic cataract is combined with post-traumatic aniridia and corneal scarring. to construct a visual rehabilitation approach to patients with post-traumatic defects of the anterior eye segment following optical-reconstructive surgery that involved implantation of an iris-lens diaphragm (ILD). We have analyzed 80 reconstructive cases with ILD implantation in patients with post-traumatic aniridia and corneal damage. These patients constituted the first study group (Group 1). We have also investigated 58 eyes with residual ametropy and stable visual function 1 year after ILD implantation before and after conducting a laser keratorefractive surgery. These patients were assigned to the second study group (Group 2). Rehabilitation approach to patients after anterior segment injuries that has been proposed allows to achieve high clinical and functional results and reduce the risk of intra- and postoperative complications. The proposed approach to patients after optical-reconstructive surgery with iris-lens diaphragm implantation followed by keratorefractive surgery is an effective method of visual rehabilitation of anterior eye segment post-traumatic defects.

  7. Electric field deformation in diamond sensors induced by radiation defects

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Boegelspacher, Felix; Dierlamm, Alexander; Mueller, Thomas; Steck, Pia [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz [CERN (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors 32 poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are positioned in a ring around the beam pipe at a distance of ±1.8 m and ±14.4 m from the interaction point. The radiation hardness of the diamond sensors in terms of measured signal during operation was significantly lower than expected from laboratory measurements. At high particle rates, such as those occurring during the operation of the LHC, a significant fraction of the defects act as traps for charge carriers. This space charge modifies the electrical field in the sensor bulk leading to a reduction of the charge collection efficiency (CCE). A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the Transient Current Technique, the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model the rate dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software ''SILVACO TCAD''. This talk compares the experimental measurement results with the simulations.

  8. Insufficient irrigation induces peri-implant bone resorption: an in vivo histologic analysis in sheep.

    Trisi, Paolo; Berardini, Marco; Falco, Antonello; Podaliri Vulpiani, Michele; Perfetti, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    To measure in vivo impact of dense bone overheating on implant osseointegration and peri-implant bone resorption comparing different bur irrigation methods vs. no irrigation. Twenty TI-bone implants were inserted in the inferior edge of mandibles of sheep. Different cooling procedures were used in each group: no irrigation (group A), only internal bur irrigation (group B), both internal and external irrigation (group C), and external irrigation (group D). The histomorphometric parameters calculated for each implant were as follows: %cortical bone-implant contact (%CBIC) and %cortical bone volume (%CBV). Friedman's test was applied to test the statistical differences. In group A, we found a huge resorption of cortical bone with %CBIC and %CBV values extremely low. Groups B and C showed mean %CBIC and %BV values higher than other groups The mean %CBV value was significantly different when comparing group B and group C vs. group A (P bone caused massive resorption of the cortical bone and implant failure. Drilling procedures on hard bone need an adequate cooling supply because the bone matrix overheating may induce complete resorption of dense bone around implants. Internal-external irrigation and only internal irrigation showed to be more efficient than other types of cooling methods in preventing bone resorption around implants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Thermal conductivity of graphene with defects induced by electron beam irradiation

    Malekpour, Hoda; Ramnani, Pankaj; Srinivasan, Srilok; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Nika, Denis L.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Lake, Roger K.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation and molecular dynamics simulations. The results are important for understanding phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional systems and for practical applications of graphene in thermal management.We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is

  10. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Hee Jin Shim

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  11. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  12. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of dentinal defects induced by new rotary system: "ProTaper NEXT".

    Shori, Deepa Deepak; Shenoi, Pratima Ramakrishna; Baig, Arshia R; Kubde, Rajesh; Makade, Chetana; Pandey, Swapnil

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate dentinal defects formed by new rotary system - Protaper next™ (PTN). Sixty single-rooted premolars were selected. All specimens were decoronated and divided into four groups, each group having 15 specimens. Group I specimens were prepared by Hand K-files (Mani), Group II with ProTaper Universal (PT; Dentsply Maillefer), Group III with Hero Shaper (HS; Micro-Mega, Besancon, France), and Group IV with PTN (Dentsply Maillefer). Roots of each specimen were sectioned at 3, 6, and 9mm from the apex and were then viewed under a stereomicroscope to evaluate presence or absence of dentinal defects. In roots prepared with hand files (HFs) showed lowest percentage of dentinal defects (6.7%); whereas in roots prepared with PT, HS, and PTN it was 40, 66.7, and 26.7%, respectively. There was significant difference between the HS group and the PTN group (P hand instruments induced minimal defects.

  13. Defect-impurity complex induced long-range ferromagnetism in GaN nanowires

    Assa Aravindh, S

    2015-12-14

    Present work investigates the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Gd doped wurtzite GaN nanowires (NWs) oriented along the [0001] direction in presence of intrinsic defects by employing the GGA + U approximation. We find that Ga vacancy (VGa) exhibits lower formation energy compared to N vacancy. Further stabilization of point defects occurs due to the presence of Gd. The strength of ferromagnetism (FM) increases by additional positive charge induced by the VGa. Electronic structure analysis shows that VGa introduces defect levels in the band gap leading to ferromagnetic coupling due to the hybridization of the p states of the Ga and N atoms with the Gd d and f states. Ferromagnetic exchange coupling energy of 76.4 meV is obtained in presence of Gd-VGa complex; hence, the FM is largely determined by the cation vacancy-rare earth complex defects in GaN NWs.

  14. Defect-impurity complex induced long-range ferromagnetism in GaN nanowires

    Assa Aravindh, S; Roqan, Iman S.

    2015-01-01

    Present work investigates the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Gd doped wurtzite GaN nanowires (NWs) oriented along the [0001] direction in presence of intrinsic defects by employing the GGA + U approximation. We find that Ga vacancy (VGa) exhibits lower formation energy compared to N vacancy. Further stabilization of point defects occurs due to the presence of Gd. The strength of ferromagnetism (FM) increases by additional positive charge induced by the VGa. Electronic structure analysis shows that VGa introduces defect levels in the band gap leading to ferromagnetic coupling due to the hybridization of the p states of the Ga and N atoms with the Gd d and f states. Ferromagnetic exchange coupling energy of 76.4 meV is obtained in presence of Gd-VGa complex; hence, the FM is largely determined by the cation vacancy-rare earth complex defects in GaN NWs.

  15. Transformation between divacancy defects induced by an energy pulse in graphene.

    Xia, Jun; Liu, XiaoYi; Zhou, Wei; Wang, FengChao; Wu, HengAn

    2016-07-08

    The mutual transformations among the four typical divacancy defects induced by a high-energy pulse were studied via molecular dynamics simulation. Our study revealed all six possible mutual transformations and found that defects transformed by absorbing energy to overcome the energy barrier with bonding, debonding, and bond rotations. The reversibility of defect transformations was also investigated by potential energy analysis. The energy difference was found to greatly influence the transformation reversibility. The direct transformation path was irreversible if the energy difference was too large. We also studied the correlation between the transformation probability and the input energy. It was found that the transformation probability had a local maxima at an optimal input energy. The introduction of defects and their structural evolutions are important for tailoring the exceptional properties and thereby performances of graphene-based devices, such as nanoporous membranes for the filtration and desalination of water.

  16. Growth of surface structures correlated with structural and mechanical modifications of brass by laser-induced Si plasma ions implantation

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, M. Shahid; Yousaf, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Laser-produced Si plasma is employed as an ion source for implantation on the brass substrate for its surface, structural, and mechanical modifications. Thomson parabola technique is employed for the measurement of energy and flux of Si ions using CR-39. In response to stepwise increase in number of laser pulses from 3000 to 12000, four brass substrates were implanted by laser-induced Si plasma ions of energy 290 keV at different fluxes ranging from 45 × 1012 to 75 × 1015 ions/cm2. SEM analysis reveals the formation of nano/micro-sized irregular shaped cavities and pores for the various ion fluxes for varying numbers of laser pulses from 3000 to 9000. At the maximum ion flux for 12,000 pulses, distinct and organized grains with hexagonal and irregular shaped morphology are revealed. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis exhibits that a new phase of CuSi (311) is identified which confirms the implantation of Si ions in brass substrate. A significant decrease in mechanical properties of implanted brass, such as Yield Stress (YS), Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS), and hardness, with increasing laser pulses from 3000 to 6000 is observed. However, with increasing laser pulses from 9000 to a maximum value of 12,000, an increase in mechanical properties like hardness, YS, and UTS is observed. The generation as well as annihilation of defects, recrystallization, and intermixing of Si precipitates with brass matrix is considered to be responsible for variations in surface, structural, and mechanical modifications of brass.

  17. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: Is it likely to become a saviour of large-sized and full-thickness cartilage defect in young adult knee?

    Zhang, Chi; Cai, You-Zhi; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-05-01

    A literature review of the first-, second- and third-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique for the treatment of large-sized (>4 cm(2)) and full-thickness knee cartilage defects in young adults was conducted, examining the current literature on features, clinical scores, complications, magnetic resonance image (MRI) and histological outcomes, rehabilitation and cost-effectiveness. A literature review was carried out in the main medical databases to evaluate the several studies concerning ACI treatment of large-sized and full-thickness knee cartilage defects in young adults. ACI technique has been shown to relieve symptoms and improve functional assessment in large-sized (>4 cm(2)) and full-thickness knee articular cartilage defect of young adults in short- and medium-term follow-up. Besides, low level of evidence demonstrated its efficiency and durability at long-term follow-up after implantation. Furthermore, MRI and histological evaluations provided the evidence that graft can return back to the previous nearly normal cartilage via ACI techniques. Clinical outcomes tend to be similar in different ACI techniques, but with simplified procedure, low complication rate and better graft quality in the third-generation ACI technique. ACI based on the experience of cell-based therapy, with the high potential to regenerate hyaline-like tissue, represents clinical development in treatment of large-sized and full-thickness knee cartilage defects. IV.

  18. Response of induced bone defects in horses to collagen matrix containing the human parathyroid hormone gene.

    Backstrom, Kristin C; Bertone, Alicia L; Wisner, Erik R; Weisbrode, Stephen E

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) gene in collagen matrix could safely promote bone formation in diaphyseal or subchondral bones of horses. 8 clinically normal adult horses. Amount, rate, and quality of bone healing for 13 weeks were determined by use of radiography, quantitative computed tomography, and histomorphometric analysis. Diaphyseal cortex and subchondral bone defects of metacarpi were filled with hPTH(1-34) gene-activated matrix (GAM) or remained untreated. Joints were assessed on the basis of circumference, synovial fluid analysis, pain on flexion, lameness, and gross and histologic examination. Bone volume index was greater for cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM, compared with untreated defects. Bone production in cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM positively correlated with native bone formation in untreated defects. In contrast, less bone was detected in hPTH(1-34) GAM-treated subchondral bone defects, compared with untreated defects, and histology confirmed poorer healing and residual collagen sponge. Use of hPTH(1-34) GAM induced greater total bone, specifically periosteal bone, after 13 weeks of healing in cortical defects of horses. The hPTH(1-34) GAM impeded healing of subchondral bone but was biocompatible with joint tissues. Promotion of periosteal bone formation may be beneficial for healing of cortical fractures in horses, but the delay in onset of bone formation may negate benefits. The hPTH(1-34) GAM used in this study should not be placed in articular subchondral bone defects, but contact with articular surfaces is unlikely to cause short-term adverse effects.

  19. Circular patterns of calcium oxalate monohydrate induced by defective Langmuir-Blodgett film on quartz substrates

    He Jieyu [Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ouyang Jianming [Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)], E-mail: toyjm@jnu.edu.cn

    2009-01-01

    The defective Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on quartz injured by potassium oxalate (K{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was used as a model system to induce growth of calcium oxalate crystals. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that circular defective domains with a diameter of 1-200 {mu}m existed in the LB film. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed circular patterns of aggregated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallites were induced by these defective domains. It was ascribed to that the interaction between the negatively-charged oxalate ions and the phosphatidyl groups in DPPC headgroups makes the phospholipid molecules rearranged and exist in an out-of-order state in the LB film, especially at the boundaries of liquid-condensed (LC)/liquid-expanded (LE) phases, which provide much more nucleating sites for COM crystals.

  20. [Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for cartilage defects of the knee: a guideline by the working group "Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology (DGOU)].

    Niemeyer, P; Andereya, S; Angele, P; Ateschrang, A; Aurich, M; Baumann, M; Behrens, P; Bosch, U; Erggelet, C; Fickert, S; Fritz, J; Gebhard, H; Gelse, K; Günther, D; Hoburg, A; Kasten, P; Kolombe, T; Madry, H; Marlovits, S; Meenen, N M; Müller, P E; Nöth, U; Petersen, J P; Pietschmann, M; Richter, W; Rolauffs, B; Rhunau, K; Schewe, B; Steinert, A; Steinwachs, M R; Welsch, G H; Zinser, W; Albrecht, D

    2013-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation (ACT/ACI) is an established and recognised procedure for the treatment of localised full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee. The present review of the working group "Clinical Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (DGOU) describes the biology and function of healthy articular cartilage, the present state of knowledge concerning potential consequences of primary cartilage lesions and the suitable indication for ACI. Based on current evidence, an indication for ACI is given for symptomatic cartilage defects starting from defect sizes of more than 3-4 cm2; in the case of young and active sports patients at 2.5 cm2. Advanced degenerative joint disease is the single most important contraindication. The review gives a concise overview on important scientific background, the results of clinical studies and discusses advantages and disadvantages of ACI. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Interaction of nitrogen with vacancy defects in N+-implanted ZnO studied using a slow positron beam

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2005-01-01

    ZnO crystals were implanted with N + , O + , and Al + , and co-implanted with O + /N + and Al + /N + ions. Positron annihilation measurements indicate introduction of vacancy clusters upon implantation. In the N + -implanted and Al + /N + co-implanted samples, these vacancy clusters are only partially annealed at 800 deg. C, as compared with their entire recovery in the O + - and Al + -implanted samples at 800-900 deg. C, suggesting a strong interaction between nitrogen and vacancy clusters. However, in the O + /N + co-implanted sample, most vacancy clusters disappear at 800 deg. C. Probably oxygen scavenges nitrogen to enhance the annealing of the vacancy clusters. Upon further annealing at 1000-1100 deg. C, nitrogen also forms stable complexes with thermally generated vacancies. These nitrogen-related vacancy complexes need high-temperature annealing at 1200-1250 deg. C to be fully removed

  2. Coordination defects in vitreous As2S3 induced by γ-irradiation

    Shpotyuk, O.; Balitska, V.

    1997-01-01

    Destruction-polymerization transformations in vitreous As 2 S 3 , associated with coordination defects formation process induced by γ-irradiation, were studied by the IR Fourier Spectroscopy method in the region of 400-100 cm -1 . All topological variants of these processes, statistically possible in the investigated samples, were taken into account for physical consideration of the real structural changes. (author)

  3. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented

  4. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented. 6 references, 4 figures

  5. Effects of annulus defects and implantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/fibrin gel scaffolds on nerves ingrowth in a rabbit model of annular injury disc degeneration.

    Xin, Long; Xu, Weixing; Yu, Leijun; Fan, Shunwu; Wang, Wei; Yu, Fang; Wang, Zhenbin

    2017-05-12

    Growth of nerve fibers has been shown to occur in a rabbit model of intravertebral disc degeneration (IVD) induced by needle puncture. As nerve growth may underlie the process of chronic pain in humans affected by disc degeneration, we sought to investigate the factors underlying nerve ingrowth in a minimally invasive annulotomy rabbit model of IVD by comparing the effects of empty disc defects with those of defects filled with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/fibrin gel (PLGA) plugs. New Zealand white rabbits (n = 24) received annular injuries at three lumbar levels (L3/4, L4/5, and L5/6). The discs were randomly assigned to four groups: (a) annular defect (1.8-mm diameter; 4-mm depth) by mini-trephine, (b) annular defect implanted with a PLGA scaffold containing a fibrin gel, (c) annular puncture by a 16G needle (5-mm depth), and (d) uninjured L2/3 disc (control). Disc degeneration was evaluated by radiography, MRI, histology, real-time PCR, and analysis of proteoglycan (PG) content. Nerve ingrowth into the discs was assessed by immunostaining with the nerve marker protein gene product 9.5. Injured discs showed a progressive disc space narrowing with significant disc degeneration and proteoglycan loss, as confirmed by imaging results, molecular and compositional analysis, and histological examinations. In 16G punctured discs, nerve ingrowth was observed on the surface of scar tissue. In annular defects, nerve fibers were found to be distributed along small fissures within the fibrocartilaginous-like tissue that filled the AF. In discs filled with PLGA/ fibrin gel, more nerve fibers were observed growing deeper into the inner AF along the open annular track.  In addition, innervations scores showed significantly higher than those of punctured discs and empty defects. A limited vascular proliferation was found in the injured sites and regenerated tissues. Nerve ingrowth was significantly higher in PLGA/fibrin-filled discs than in empty defects. Possible

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance study on the ionizing radiation induced defects of the tooth enamel hydroxyapatite

    Oliveira, Liana Macedo de

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is the main constituent of calcified tissues. Defects induced by ionizing radiations in this biomineral can present high stability and then, these are used as biological markers in radiological accidents, irradiated food identifying and geological and archaeological dating. In this work, paramagnetic centers induced on the enamel of the teeth by environmental ionizing radiation, are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Decay thermal kinetic presents high complexity and shows the formation of different electron ligation energy centers and structures

  7. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.; Golovchak, R.; Zurawska, A.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of γ-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge 23.5 Sb 11.8 S 64.7 glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. POLY(96L/4D-LACTIDE) IMPLANTS FOR REPAIR OF ORBITAL FLOOR DEFECTS - AN IN-VITRO STUDY OF THE MATERIAL PROPERTIES IN A SIMULATION OF THE HUMAN ORBIT

    CORDEWENER, FW; ROZEMA, FR; JOZIASSE, CAP; BOS, RRM; BOERING, G; PENNINGS, AJ

    1995-01-01

    To test the mechanical and physical properties of two types of poly(96L/4D-lactide) (PLA96) implants and to evaluate their suitability for repair of large orbital floor defects, a study using an in vitro set-up was performed. Implants, 0.2 mm thick and 28 mm in diameter, were produced by either an

  9. Polymers under ionizing radiation: the study of energy transfers to radiation induced defects

    Ventura, A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced defects created in polymers submitted to ionizing radiations, under inert atmosphere, present the same trend as a function of the dose. When the absorbed dose increases, their concentrations increase then level off. This behavior can be assigned to energy transfers from the polymer to the previously created macromolecular defects; the latter acting as energy sinks. During this thesis, we aimed to specify the influence of a given defect, namely the trans-vinylene, in the behavior of polyethylene under ionizing radiations. For this purpose, we proposed a new methodology based on the specific insertion, at various concentrations, of trans-vinylene groups in the polyethylene backbone through chemical synthesis. This enables to get rid of the variety of created defects on one hand and on the simultaneity of their creation on the other hand. Modified polyethylenes, containing solely trans-vinylene as odd groups, were irradiated under inert atmosphere, using either low LET beams (gamma, beta) or high LET beams (swift heavy ions). During irradiations, both macromolecular defects and H 2 emission were quantified. According to experimental results, among all defects, the influence of the trans-vinylene on the behavior of polyethylene is predominant. (author) [fr

  10. Irradiation induced defects containing oxygen atoms in germanium crystal as studied by deep level transient spectroscopy

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Kambe, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Haruo; Matsuda, Koji.

    1984-05-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was applied to the electron trapping levels which are associated with the irradiation induced lattice defects in germanium crystals. The germanium crystals used in the study were doped with oxygen, antimony or arsenic and the defects were formed by electron irradiation of 1.5MeV or 10MeV. The nature of so called ''thermal defect'' formed by heat treatment at about 670K was also studied. The trapping levels at Esub(c)-0.13eV, Esub(c)-0.25eV and Esub(c)-0.29eV were found to be associated with defects containing oxygen atoms. From the experimental results the Esub(c)-0.25eV level was attributed to the germanium A-center (interstitial oxygen atom-vacancy pair). Another defect associated with the 715cm -1 infrared absorption band was found to have a trapping level at the same position at Esub(c)-0.25eV. The Esub(c)-0.23eV and Esub(c)-0.1eV levels were revealed to be associated with thermal donors formed by heat treatment at about 670K. Additional two peaks (levels) were observed in the DLTS spectrum. The annealing behavior of the levels suggests that the thermal donors originate from not a single type but several types of defects. (author)

  11. Chemical effects induced by ion implantation in molecular solids

    Foti, G.; Calcagno, L.; Puglisi, O.

    1983-01-01

    Ion implantation in molecular solids as ice, frozen noble gases, benzene and polymers produces a large amount of new molecules compared to the starting materials. Mass and energy analysis of ejected molecules together with the erosion yield, are discussed for several ion-target combinations at low temperature. The observed phenomena are analyzed in terms of deposited ennergy in electronic and nuclear collisions, for incoming beams, as helium or argon, in the range 10-2000 keV. (orig.)

  12. Suppression of nanoindentation-induced phase transformation in crystalline silicon implanted with hydrogen

    Jelenković, Emil V.; To, Suet

    2017-09-01

    In this paper the effect of hydrogen implantation in silicon on nanoindentation-induced phase transformation is investigated. Hydrogen ions were implanted in silicon through 300 nm thick oxide with double energy implantation (75 and 40 keV). For both energies implantation dose was 4 × 1016 cm-2. Some samples were thermally annealed at 400 °C. The micro-Raman spectroscopy was applied on nanoindentation imprints and the obtained results were related to the pop out/elbow appearances in nanoindentatioin unloading-displacement curves. The Raman spectroscopy revealed a suppression of Si-XII and Si-III phases and formation of a-Si in the indents of hydrogen implanted Si. The high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements were taken to support the analysis of silicon phase formation during nanoindentation. Implantation induced strain, high hydrogen concentration, and platelets generation were found to be the factors that control suppression of c-Si phases Si-XII and Si-III, as well as a-Si phase enhancement during nanoindentation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. NDT detection and quantification of induced defects on composite helicopter rotor blade and UAV wing sections

    Findeis, Dirk; Gryzagoridis, Jasson; Musonda, Vincent

    2008-09-01

    Digital Shearography and Infrared Thermography (IRT) techniques were employed to test non-destructively samples from aircraft structures of composite material nature. Background information on the techniques is presented and it is noted that much of the inspection work reviewed in the literature has focused on qualitative evaluation of the defects rather than quantitative. There is however, need to quantify the defects if the threshold rejection criterion of whether the component inspected is fit for service has to be established. In this paper an attempt to quantify induced defects on a helicopter main rotor blade and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) composite material is presented. The fringe patterns exhibited by Digital Shearography were used to quantify the defects by relating the number of fringes created to the depth of the defect or flaw. Qualitative evaluation of defects with IRT was achieved through a hot spot temperature indication above the flaw on the surface of the material. The results of the work indicate that the Shearographic technique proved to be more sensitive than the IRT technique. It should be mentioned that there is "no set standard procedure" tailored for testing of composites. Each composite material tested is more likely to respond differently to defect detection and this depends generally on the component geometry and a suitable selection of the loading system to suit a particular test. The experimental procedure that is reported in this paper can be used as a basis for designing a testing or calibration procedure for defects detection on any particular composite material component or structure.

  14. Positron and positronium studies of irradiation-induced defects and microvoids in vitreous metamict silica

    Hasegawa, M.; Saneyasu, M.; Tabata, M.; Tang, Z.; Nagai, Y.; Chiba, T.; Ito, Y.

    2000-01-01

    To study irradiation-induced defects and structural microvoids in vitreous silica (v-SiO 2 ), positron lifetime, angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR), and electron spin resonance (ESR) were measured on v-SiO 2 and quartz (c-SiO 2 ) samples irradiated with fast neutrons up to a dose of 4.1x10 20 n/cm 2 . Two kinds of positron-trapping defects have been found to form in v-SiO 2 by fast neutron irradiation: type-I and type-II defects. Similar defects also appear in the irradiated c-SiO 2 , indicating that both the defects are common in v-SiO 2 and c-SiO 2 . The detailed annealing and photo-illumination studies of positron annihilation and ESR for these two defects suggest that the type-I defects are non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), while the type-II defects are oxygen molecules which cannot be detected by ESR. Higher dose irradiation than 1.0x10 20 n/cm 2 causes c-SiO 2 to change to metamict (amorphous) phase (m-SiO 2 ). Positronium (Ps) atoms are found to form in microvoids with an average radius of about 0.3 nm in the v-SiO 2 and m-SiO 2 . This suggests that microvoids proved by Ps are structurally intrinsic open spaces and reflect the topologically disordered structure of these phases in the subnanometer scale

  15. Gibberellin-induced flowering in sexually defective Remusatia vivipara (Araceae

    Chi-Tung Huang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Remusatia vivipara is an epiphyte of possibly ornamentally and medically important plant, but flowering is rare in fields. The present experiments were conducted to study the influences of different concentrations of gibberellic acid (GA3 and tuber sizes on the flower initiation, inflorescence characteristics and vegetative growth in R. vivipara. GA3 concentration as low as 25 mg L-1 could induce flowering. The results of a binary logistic regression analysis indicated that the flowering was significantly associated both with GA3 concentration and tuber size. However, comparing with the non-GA3 treated tubers, different GA3 concentrations did not significantly affect flowering. The result also showed no significant effect induced by GA3 treatments on the number of days to flower. In contrast, the Wald statistic revealed that both tuber size (2.51–3.00 cm and tuber size (3.01–3.50 cm made more significant contributions to the prediction of flowering. Tuber diameters above 3.01 cm with 100 mg L-1 GA3 treatment could bring all plants to flower. Results of canonical discriminant analysis and ANOVA tests indicated that there were no differences for all inflorescence characters (inflorescence length, male zone length, sterile zone length and female zone length among different concentrations of GA3 tested. On the contrary, significant differences among the tuber diameter classes for all inflorescence characteristics measured were markedly evident. Generally, sizes of almost all inflorescence characteristics increased with increasing tuber sizes. When considering vegetative characters, significant differences in the fresh and dry weights of bulbil stolon were found between treated and untreated tubers. Although there was a trend of increase in weights with increasing GA3 concentrations, but this was not statistically significant. Our results for R. vivipara showed the induction of flowering by GA3 only influence of flower initiation, but no effects

  16. TEM study of the ion beam induced damage during 14 kev P+ implantation in silicon

    Rubanov, S.; Tamanyan, G.; Hudson, F.; Jamieson, D.N.; McCallum, J.C.; Prawer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed silicon-based quantum computer architecture comprises an array of phosphorus donor atoms (qubits) positioned with nanometre accuracy beneath the surface of a semiconductor host, using a single ion implantation technique. The average depth of the implanted ions (the projected range R p ), lateral range R p 1, and the distribution of ions about that depth can be approximated as two-dimensional Gaussian with standard deviation ΔR p and ΔR p 1 (lateral straggle). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we studied ion beam induced damage after 14 keV P + implantation in Si. The TEM images allowed us to compare the depth of the amorphous cluster formation to R p , R p 1, ΔR p 1 calculated from SRIM and hence determine evidence for the limitation on the accuracy of the position of the implanted ions imposed by straggling. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  17. Application of ENDOR-induced electron spin resonance to the study of point defects in solids

    Niklas, J.R.; Spaeth, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of ENDOR-induced ESR (EI-ESR) is applied to the investigation of several point defects in insulating crystals. It is shown that the lineshape of the EI-ESR spectrum depends on the ENDOR line used for the experiment. The EI-ESR technique allows the separation of overlapping ESR spectra in the presence of several defects. New applications are the selection of spin states and the determination of relative signs of spin-Hamiltonian parameters, the selection of centre orientations and the assignment of nuclei in complex ENDOR spectra, and the determination of quadrupole interactions which are not resolved in the ENDOR spectrum. (author)

  18. Investigation of defect-induced abnormal body current in fin field-effect-transistors

    Liu, Kuan-Ju; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Yang, Ren-Ya; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung

    2015-01-01

    This letter investigates the mechanism of abnormal body current at the linear region in n-channel high-k/metal gate stack fin field effect transistors. Unlike body current, which is generated by impact ionization at high drain voltages, abnormal body current was found to increase with decreasing drain voltages. Notably, the unusual body leakage only occurs in three-dimensional structure devices. Based on measurements under different operation conditions, the abnormal body current can be attributed to fin surface defect-induced leakage current, and the mechanism is electron tunneling to the fin via the defects, resulting in holes left at the body terminal

  19. Evolution of Radiation Induced Defects in SiC: A Multiscale Simulation Approach

    Jiang, Hao

    temperatures beyond that. Even though clusters cannot diffuse by thermal vibrations, we found they can migrate at room temperature under the influence of electron radiation. This is the first direct observation of radiation-induced diffusion of defect clusters in bulk materials. We show that the underlying mechanism of this athermal diffusion is elastic collision between incoming electrons and cluster atoms. Our findings suggest that defect clusters may be mobile under certain irradiation conditions, changing current understanding of cluster annealing process in irradiated SiC. With the knowledge of cluster diffusion in SiC demonstrated in this thesis, we now become able to predict cluster evolution in SiC with good agreement with experimental measurements. This ability can enable us to estimate changes in many properties of irradiated SiC relevant for its applications in reactors. Internal interfaces such as grain boundaries can behave as sinks to radiation induced defects. The ability of GBs to absorb, transport, and annihilate radiation-induced defects (sink strength) is important to understand radiation response of polycrystalline materials and to better design interfaces for improved resistance to radiation damage. Nowadays, it is established GBs' sink strength is not a static property but rather evolves with many factors, including radiation environments, grain size, and GB microstructure. In this thesis, I investigated the response of small-angle tilt and twist GBs to point defects fluxes in SiC. First of all, I found the pipe diffusion of interstitials in tilt GBs is slower than bulk diffusion. This is because the increased interatomic distance at dislocation cores raises the migration barrier of interstitial dumbbells. Furthermore, I show that both the annihilation of interstitials at jogs and jog nucleation from clusters are diffusion-controlled and can occur under off-stoichiometric interstitial fluxes. Finally, a dislocation line model is developed to predict the

  20. Characterisation of Cs ion implanted GaN by DLTS

    Ngoepe, P. N. M.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Omotoso, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Diale, M.

    2018-04-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) was used to characterise Cs implanted GaN grown by hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE). This implantation was done at room temperature using energy of 360 keV to a fluence of 10-11 cm-2. A defect with activation energy of 0.19 eV below the conduction band and an apparent capture cross section of 1.1 × 10-15 cm2 was induced. This defect has previously been observed after rare earth element (Eu, Er and Pr) implantation. It has also been reported after electron, proton and He ion implantation.

  1. Treatment of a Focal Articular Cartilage Defect of the Talus with Polymer-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation: A 12-Year Follow-Up Period.

    Kreuz, Peter Cornelius; Kalkreuth, Richard Horst; Niemeyer, Philipp; Uhl, Markus; Erggelet, Christoph

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a first-line treatment option for large articular cartilage defects. Although well-established for cartilage defects in the knee, studies of the long-term outcomes of matrix-assisted ACI to treat cartilage defects in the ankle are rare. In the present report, we describe for the first time the long-term clinical and radiologic results 12 years after polymer-based matrix-assisted ACI treat a full-thickness talar cartilage defect in a 25-year-old male patient. The clinical outcome was assessed using the visual analog scale and Freiburg ankle score, magnetic resonance imaging evaluation using the Henderson-Kreuz scoring system and T2 mapping. Clinical assessment revealed improved visual analog scale and Freiburg ankle scores. The radiologic analysis and T2 relaxation time values indicated the formation of hyaline-like repair tissue. Polymer-based autologous chondrocytes has been shown to be a safe and clinically effective long-term treatment of articular cartilage defects in the talus. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Electron-spin-resonance study of radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in oxides grown on (100) silicon substrates

    Kim, Y.Y.; Lenahan, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    We have used electron-spin resonance to investigate radiation-induced point defects in Si/SiO 2 structures with (100) silicon substrates. We find that the radiation-induced point defects are quite similar to defects generated in Si/SiO 2 structures grown on (111) silicon substrates. In both cases, an oxygen-deficient silicon center, the E' defect, appears to be responsible for trapped positive charge. In both cases trivalent silicon (P/sub b/ centers) defects are primarily responsible for radiation-induced interface states. In earlier electron-spin-resonance studies of unirradiated (100) substrate capacitors two types of P/sub b/ centers were observed; in oxides prepared in three different ways only one of these centers, the P/sub b/ 0 defect, is generated in large numbers by ionizing radiation

  3. Using titanium LPW-TI64-GD23-TYPE5 in the individual contour grafting of bone defects with 3D implants

    Bazlov, V. A.; Mamuladze, T. Z.; Pavlov, V. V.; Prohorenko, V. M.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Fomichev, N. G.; Efimenko, M. V.; Mamonova, E. V.; Aronov, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper proposed a method of replacement of bone defects of a basin with individual 3D-printed implants of medical titanium LPW-TI64-GD23-TYPE5 ASTM F136. The design of the implant was carried out in view of determining the density of the surrounding bone tissue by Hounsfield's scale. We used the method of volume printing by type multiselecting laser sintering. A clinical example of using the method of individual contouring of the defect of bones of a basin with the assessment of bone density by Hounsfield's scale was given. The method of individual contouring of the defect of the basin bones with the assessment of bone density by Hounsfield's scale enables the surgeon to more accurately determine the tactics of surgical intervention: opting for bone grafting or the use of augmented. In the case of manufacturing an individual 3D augment, this method gives the possibility to adjust its geometry taking into account the density of the bone tissue, thereby giving it additional stability. If there is a need for screws—we can preadjust the length and direction of stroke so that the main part of the screw might pass in the support ability area of the bone tissue. We believe that the software and the approach to preoperative planning we have used can make surgery more convenient for the surgeon and personnel of the medical institution.

  4. Transmission electron microscope study of neutron irradiation-induced defects in silicon

    Oshima, Ryuichiro; Kawano, Tetsuya; Fujimoto, Ryoji

    1994-01-01

    Commercial Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si) and float-zone silicon (Fz-Si) wafers were irradiated with fission neutrons at various fluences from 10 19 to 10 22 n/cm 2 at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 1043 K. The irradiation induced defect structures were examined by transmission electron microscopy and ultra high voltage electron microscopy, which were compared with Marlowe code computer simulation results. It was concluded that the vacancy-type damage structure formed at 473 K were initiated from collapse of vacancy-rich regions of cascades, while interstitial type defect clusters formed by irradiation above 673 K were associated with interstitial oxygen atoms and free interstitials which diffused out of the cascades. Complex defect structures were identified to consist of {113} and {111} planar faults by the parallel beam illumination diffraction analysis. (author)

  5. Contribution of Metal Defects in the Assembly Induced Emission of Cu Nanoclusters

    Wu, Zhennan

    2017-03-20

    Aggregation/assembly induced emission (AIE) has been observed for metal nanoclusters (NCs), but the origin of the enhanced emission is not fully understood, yet. In this work, the significant contribution of metal defects on AIE is revealed by engineering the self-assembly process of Cu NCs using ethanol. The presence of ethanol leads to a rapid assembly of NCs into ultrathin nanosheets, promoting the formation of metal defects-rich surface. Detailed studies and computer simulation confirm that the metal defects-rich nanosheets possess increased Cu(I)-to-Cu(0) ratio, which greatly influences ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer and therewith facilitates the radiative relaxation of excitons. Consequently, the Cu NCs self-assembly nanosheets exhibit obvious emission enhancement.

  6. TEM study of radiation induced defects in baffle-former-barrel assembly from decommissioned NPP Greifswald

    Srba, O.; Michalicka, J.; Keilova, E.; Kocik, K.

    2013-06-01

    A complex transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of reactor vessel internal (RVI) materials from the baffle-former-barrel assembly from NPP Greifswald (VVER 440), Unit 1 decommissioned after 15 service cycles has been undertaken. All parts of the baffle-former-barrel assembly are made from Ti-stabilized austenitic stainless steel 08Ch18N10T. The materials were exposed to different dose of neutron radiation (2.4 - 11.4 dpa) at temperatures 267 - 398 deg. C depending on position in the core. Three types of radiation induced defects were identified and quantified, namely: dislocations, cavities (voids) and fine-scaled precipitated particles of Ni-Si rich phases. Black-dot type defects were observed too. Operation conditions are around ≅ 300 deg. C that is why we have observed defect typical for both low and high regions of irradiation temperatures. (authors)

  7. Behavior of deep level defects on voltage-induced stress of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Lee, D.W.; Cho, S.E. [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Solar Cell Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    The behavior of deep level defects by a voltage-induced stress for CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells has been investigated. CIGS solar cells were used with standard structures which are Al-doped ZnO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGSe{sub 2}/Mo on soda lime glass, and that resulted in conversion efficiencies as high as 16%. The samples with the same structure were isothermally stressed at 100 °C under the reverse voltages. The voltage-induced stressing in CIGS samples causes a decrease in the carrier density and conversion efficiency. To investigate the behavior of deep level defects in the stressed CIGS cells, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy was utilized, and normally 3 deep level defects (including 2 hole traps and 1 electron trap) were found to be located at 0.18 eV and 0.29 eV above the valence band maximum (and 0.36 eV below the conduction band). In voltage-induced cells, especially, it was found that the decrease of the hole carrier density could be responsible for the increase of the 0.29 eV defect, which is known to be observed in less efficient CIGS solar cells. And the carrier density and the defects are reversible at least to a large extent by resting at room-temperature without the bias voltage. From optical capture kinetics in photo-induced current transient spectroscopy measurement, the types of defects could be distinguished into the isolated point defect and the extended defect. In this work, it is suggested that the increase of the 0.29 eV defect by voltage-induced stress could be due to electrical activation accompanied by a loss of positive ion species and the activated defect gives rise to reduction of the carrier density. - Highlights: • We investigated behavior of deep level defects by voltage-induced stress. • Defect generation could affect the decrease of the conversion efficiency of cells. • Defect generation could be electrically activated by a loss of positive ion species. • Type of defects could be studied with models of point defects

  8. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  9. Evaluation of autogenous PRGF+β-TCP with or without a collagen membrane on bone formation and implant osseointegration in large size bone defects. A preclinical in vivo study.

    Batas, Leonidas; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Papadimitriou, Serafim; Nyengaard, Jens R; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the adjunctive use of a collagen membrane enhances bone formation and implant osseointegration in non-contained defects grafted with chair-side prepared autologous platelet-rich growth factor (PRGF) adsorbed on a β-TCP particulate carrier. Large box-type defects (10 × 6 mm; W × D) were prepared in the edentulated and completely healed mandibles of six Beagles dogs. An implant with moderately rough surface was placed in the center of each defect leaving the coronal 6 mm of the implant not covered with bone. The remaining defect space was then filled out with chair-side prepared autologous PRGF adsorbed on β-TCP particles and either covered with a collagen membrane (PRGF/β-TCP+CM) (6 defects) or left without a membrane (PRGF/β-TCP) (5 defects). Histology 4 months post-op showed new lamellar and woven bone formation encompassing almost entirely the defect and limited residual β-TCP particles. Extent of osseointegration of the previously exposed portion of the implants varied, but in general was limited. Within the defect, new mineralized bone (%) averaged 43.2 ± 9.86 vs. 39.9 ± 13.7 in the PRGF/β-TCP+CM and PRGF/β-TCP group (P = 0.22) and relative mineralized bone-to-implant contact (%) averaged 26.2 ± 16.45 vs. 35.91 ± 24.45, respectively (P = 0.5). First, bone-to-implant contact from the implant top was 4.1 ± 1.5 and 3.2 ± 2.3 (P = 0.9), in the PRGF/β-TCP+CM and PRGF/β-TCP group, respectively. Implantation of chair-side prepared autologous PRGF adsorbed on a β-TCP carrier in non-contained peri-implant defects resulted in large amounts of bone regeneration, but osseointegration was limited. Provisions for GBR with a collagen membrane did not significantly enhance bone regeneration or implant osseointegration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A molecular dynamics simulation study of irradiation induced defects in gold nanowire

    Liu, Wenqiang; Chen, Piheng; Qiu, Ruizhi; Khan, Maaz; Liu, Jie; Hou, Mingdong; Duan, Jinglai

    2017-08-01

    Displacement cascade in gold nanowires was studied using molecular dynamics computer simulations. Primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with different kinetic energies were initiated either at the surface or at the center of the nanowires. We found three kinds of defects that were induced by the cascade, including point defects, stacking faults and crater at the surface. The starting points of PKAs influence the number of residual point defects, and this consequently affect the boundary of anti-radiation window which was proposed by calculation of diffusion of point defects to the free surface of nanowires. Formation of stacking faults that expanded the whole cross-section of gold nanowires was observed when the PKA's kinetic energy was higher than 5 keV. Increasing the PKA's kinetic energy up to more than 10 keV may lead to the formation of crater at the surface of nanowires due to microexplosion of hot atoms. At this energy, PKAs started from the center of nanowires can also result in the creation of crater because length of cascade region is comparable to diameter of nanowires. Both the two factors, namely initial positions of PKAs as well as the craters induced by higher energy irradiation, would influence the ability of radiation resistance of metal nanowires.

  11. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  12. Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in lithium orthosilicate

    Tiliks, J.E.; Kizane, G.K.; Supe, A.A.; Abramenkovs, A.A.; Tiliks, J.J. (Latvian Univ., Riga (Latvia)); Vasiljev, V.G. (Acad. A.A. Bochvar Inst. of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-12-01

    Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in polycrystalline powders and ceramic pellets of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} were studied under the effect of various types of ionizing irradiation ({gamma} quants, accelerated electrons, reactor irradiation), humidity, temperature, impurities in the samples, etc. The content of radiation defects and radiolysis products poorly depends on irradiation type, dose rate, admixture elements. The concentration of defects highly depends on the temperature of irradiation, humidity, granural size. Empirical dependence of radiolysis degree {alpha} on the dose was found: {alpha}=5x10{sup -2}xD{sup 0.5} for {gamma} and electron irradiation (T{sub rad}=300-350 K) and {alpha}=5x10{sup -3}xD{sup 0.5} for reactor radiation (T{sub rad}=700-800 K); {alpha} - matrix dissociation degree (in %); D - dose (in MGy). Colloidal lithium and silicon, lithium and silicon oxides, and O{sub 2} are the final products of radiolysis. Radiation-induced defects change tritium thermo-extraction parameters, deteriorate mechanical, thermo-physical and electric properties of ceramics. (orig.).

  13. A polarity-induced defect mechanism for conductivity and magnetism at polar-nonpolar oxide interfaces.

    Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2014-10-13

    The discovery of conductivity and magnetism at the polar-nonpolar interfaces of insulating nonmagnetic oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 has raised prospects for attaining interfacial functionalities absent in the component materials. Yet, the microscopic origin of such emergent phenomena remains unclear, posing obstacles to design of improved functionalities. Here we present first principles calculations of electronic and defect properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces and reveal a unifying mechanism for the origins of both conductivity and magnetism. We demonstrate that the polar discontinuity across the interface triggers thermodynamically the spontaneous formation of certain defects that in turn cancel the polar field induced by the polar discontinuity. The ionization of the spontaneously formed surface oxygen vacancy defects leads to interface conductivity, whereas the unionized Ti-on-Al antisite defects lead to interface magnetism. The proposed mechanism suggests practical design principles for inducing and controlling both conductivity and magnetism at general polar-nonpolar interfaces.

  14. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan

    2012-07-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O(2)) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O(2)-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O(2) pressure (pO(2)) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO(2) to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases.

  15. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan; Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O(2)) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O(2)-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O(2) pressure (pO(2)) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO(2) to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases.

  16. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O2) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O2-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O2 pressure (pO2) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO2 to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases. PMID:22224628

  17. Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral or Autologous Bone at Dehiscence Type Defects at Implants Installed Immediately into Extraction Sockets: An Experimental Study in Dogs.

    Pereira, Flavia Priscila; De Santis, Enzo; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo; de Souza Faco, Eduardo F; Pantani, Fabio; Salata, Luiz A; Botticelli, Daniele

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate bone regeneration at surgically created dehiscence buccal defects at implants placed immediately into extraction sockets (IPIES) of small dimensions filled with autogenous bone or deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) associated with a collagen membrane. Eight Labrador dogs were used and implants were placed immediately into the extraction sockets of the second premolar. The buccal wall was subsequently removed to create a standardized defect, 4 mm wide coronally, 2 mm wide apically, and 6 mm high. Autogenous bone particles (AB) or DBBM granules were used to fill the defects. All surgical sites were subsequently covered by a resorbable collagen membrane and a non-submerged healing was allowed. After 4 months, the animals were euthanized and bone blocks harvested and processed for histomorphometric analysis. The bony crest at the buccal aspect (C) was located 2.3 ± 0.8 mm and 1.7 ± 0.7 mm apically to the implant shoulder (IS) at the AB and DBBM sites, respectively. The coronal levels of osseointegration at the buccal aspect (B) were located 2.7 ± 0.7 mm and 2.2 ± 1.0 mm apically to IS at the AB and DBBM sites, respectively. At the AB sites, the peri-implant mucosa was located 4.3 ± 0.9 mm, 4.7 ± 0.9 mm, and 2.0 ± 1.6 mm coronally to C, B, and IS, respectively. The corresponding values at the DBBM sites were 4.3 ± 0.6 mm, 4.8 ± 0.6 mm, and 2.5 ± 0.8 mm, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found. The treatment of surgically created buccal defects at IPIES sites using Bio-Oss® (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhusen, LU, Switzerland) or autogenous bone, concomitantly with a collagen membrane, engenders bone regeneration to a similar extent after 4 months of healing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Histogenesis of mouse sarcomas induced by implantation of polyvinyl chloride film in radiation chimeras

    Mojzhess, T.G.; Prigozhina, E.L.

    1976-01-01

    Sarcomas were induced in CBA/CBA-T6T6 mouse radiation chimeras by implantation of polyvinyl chloride film subcutaneously 13 months after irradiation and injection of donor's bone marrow. Of the 12 tumors studied 11 had the recipient's karyotype and one the donor's. The formation of connective-tissue cells from bone-marrow precursors thus, evidently does not play an essential role in the histogenesis of sarcomas induced by plastics

  19. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  20. Structural and defects induced phenomena in γ-rays irradiated 6H-SiC

    Sibuyi, P.; Ngom, B.D.; Kotsedi, L.

    2016-01-01

    Damages and/or defects induced by γ-rays irradiation on 6H-SiC single crystals in channeled configuration towards 〈006〉/〈0012〉 crystallographic directions are reported in the range of 0–1200 kGy. Atomic force microscopy, X-rays diffraction, Raman and photoluminescence investigations were used to obtain a comprehensive set of informations on the nature and population distribution of the induced defects. Primarily, there was no carbon clusterization upon γ-rays irradiation and hence no formation of others SiC polytypes. In contrast, the γ-rays irradiation has induced an increase of the surface roughness at higher doses, which indicates a structural degradation. Larger doses induced an emergence of deeper shallow traps at energies greater than 350 meV below the bandgap. - Highlights: • No formation of others SiC polytypes. • The gamma rays irradiation has induced a slight surface amorphization. • A re-crystallization at lower and higher doses is noticed. • Larger doses induced a substantial internal stress.

  1. 100 MeV silver ions induced defects and modifications in silica glass

    Jadhav, Vijay S.; Deore, Avinash V.; Dahiwale, S.S. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: •Study of silver ion induced defects and modifications in silica glass. •Variation in oxygen deficiency centres (ODA-II) and nonbridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC). •Study of structural damage in terms of Urbach energy. -- Abstract: A few silica glass samples having 1 cm{sup 2} area and 0.1 cm thickness were irradiated with 100 MeV energy Ag{sup 7+} ions for the fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} to 5 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The optical properties and the corresponding induced defects were characterised by the techniques such as UV–Visible, Photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The UV–Visible absorption spectra show two peaks, one at 5 eV and another weak peak at 5.8 eV. A peak observed at 5.0 eV corresponds to B{sub 2} band (oxygen deficiency in SiO{sub 2} network) and the peak at 5.8 eV is due to the paramagnetic defects like E′ centre. The intensities of these peaks found to be increased with increase in ion fluence. It attributes to the increase in the concentration of E′ centres and B{sub 2} band respectively. In addition, the optical band gap energy, Urbach energy and the defects concentration have been calculated using Urbach plot. The optical band gap found to be decreased from 4.65 eV to 4.39 eV and the Urbach energy found to be increased from 60 meV to 162 meV. The defect concentration of nonbridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC) and E′ centres are found to be increased to 1.69 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and 3.134 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} respectively. In PL spectra, the peak appeared at 1.92 eV and 2.7 eV envisage the defects of nonbridging oxygen hole centres and B{sub 2α} oxygen deficient centres respectively. ESR spectra also confirms the existence of E′ and NBOHC centres. FTIR spectra shows scissioning of Si-O-Si bonds and the formation of Si-H and Si-OH bonds, which supports to the co-existence of the defects induced by Ag

  2. Characterization of radiation-induced defects in ZnO probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Balogh, A.G.; Mascher, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing of single crystals irradiated either with 3 MeV protons or with 1 or 2 MeV electrons, respectively. The investigations were performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements. The differently grown ZnO single crystals show positron bulk lifetimes in the range of 159-173 ps. (orig.)

  3. Defect production and subsequent effects induced by electronic energy loss of swift heavy ion

    Hou Mingdong; Liu Jie; Sun Youmei; Yin Jingmin; Yao Huijun; Duan Jinglai; Mo Dan; Zhang Ling; Chen Yanfeng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2008-01-01

    Swift heavy ion in matter is one of forfront fields of nuclear physics in the world. A series of new phenomena were discovered in recent years. The history and sta- tus on the development of this field were reviewed. Electronic energy loss effects induced by swift heavy ion irradiation, such as defect production and evolution, ion latent track formation, phase transformation and anisotropy plastic deformation were introduced emphatically. A trend of future investigation was explored. (authors)

  4. Characterization of radiation-induced defects in ZnO probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W. [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Technische Physik; Balogh, A.G. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). FB Materialwissenschaft; Mascher, P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    2001-07-01

    In this study we discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing of single crystals irradiated either with 3 MeV protons or with 1 or 2 MeV electrons, respectively. The investigations were performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements. The differently grown ZnO single crystals show positron bulk lifetimes in the range of 159-173 ps. (orig.)

  5. Optical manipulation of photonic defect-modes in cholesteric liquid crystals induced by direct laser-lithography

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Lee, Chee Heng; Miura, Yusuke; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Manipulation of photonic defect-modes in cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs), which are one-dimensional pseudo photonic band-gap materials have been demonstrated by an external optical field. A structural defect in which the pitch length of the ChLC in the bulk and the defect are different was introduced by inducing local polymerization in a photo-polymerizable ChLC material by a direct laser-lithography process, and infiltrating a different ChLC material as the defect medium. When an azobenzene dye-doped ChLC was infiltrated in the defect, the trans-cis isomerization of the dye upon ultraviolet (UV) exposure caused the pitch to shorten, changing the contrast in the pitch lengths at the bulk and the defect, leading to a consequent shifting of the defect-mode. The all-optical manipulation was reversible and had high reproducibility

  6. Evaluation of induced color changes in chicken breast meat during simulation of pink color defect.

    Holownia, K; Chinnan, M S; Reynolds, A E; Koehler, P E

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the study was to establish a pink threshold and simulate the pink defect in cooked chicken breast meat with treatment combinations that would induce significant changes in the color of raw and cooked meat. The subjective pink threshold used in judging pink discoloration was established at a* = 3.8. Samples of three color groups (normal, lighter than normal, and darker than normal) of boneless, skinless chicken breast muscles were selected based on instrumental color values. The in situ changes were induced using sodium chloride, sodium tripolyphosphate, sodium erythorbate, and sodium nitrite at two levels: present and not present. Fillets in all treatments were subjected to individual injections, followed by tumbling, cooking, and chilling. Samples were analyzed for color [lightness (L*), red/green axis (a*), yellow/blue axis (b*)] and reflectance spectra. Simulation of the pink defect was achieved in eight of the 16 treatment combinations when sodium nitrite was present and in an additional two treatment combinations when it was absent. Pinking in cooked samples was affected (P meat color. Results confirmed that it was possible to simulate the undesired pinking in cooked chicken white meat when in situ conditions were induced by sodium chloride, sodium tripolyphosphate, and sodium nitrite. The continuation of the simulation study can aid in developing alternative processing methods to eliminate potential pink defects.

  7. Surface-defect induced modifications in the optical properties of α-MnO_2 nanorods

    John, Reenu Elizabeth; Chandran, Anoop; Thomas, Marykutty; Jose, Joshy; George, K.C.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alpha-MnO_2 nanorods are prepared by chemical method. • Difference in surface defect density is achieved. • Characterized using XRD, Rietveld, XPS, EDS, HR-TEM, BET, UV–vis absorption spectroscopy and PL spectroscopy. • Explains the bandstructure modification due to Jahn–Teller distortions using crystal field theory. • Modification in the intensity of optical emissions related to defect levels validates the concept of surface defect induced tuning of optical properties. - Abstract: The science of defect engineering via surface tuning opens a new route to modify the inherent properties of nanomaterials for advanced functional and practical applications. In this work, two independent synthesis methods (hydrothermal and co-precipitation) are adopted to fabricate α-MnO_2 nanorods with different defect structures so as to understand the effect of surface modifications on their optical properties. The crystal structure and morphology of samples are investigated with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Atomic composition calculated from energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) confirms non-stoichiometry of the samples. The surface properties and chemical environment are thoroughly studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis. Bond angle variance and bond valence sum are determined to validate distortions in the basic MnO_6 octahedron. The surface studies indicate that the concentration of Jahn–Teller manganese (III) (Mn"3"+) ion in the samples differ from each other which results in their distinct properties. Band structure modifications due to Jahn–Teller distortion are examined with the aid of ultraviolet–visible (UV) reflectance and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The dual peaks obtained in derivative spectrum conflict the current concept on the bandgap energy of MnO_2. These studies suggest that

  8. Periodontal wound healing/regeneration following implantation of recombinant human growth/differentiation factor-5 (rhGDF-5) in an absorbable collagen sponge carrier into one-wall intrabony defects in dogs: a dose-range study.

    Kim, Tae-Gyun; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Chai, Jung-Kiu; Pippig, Susanne D; Siedler, Michael; Kim, Chong-Kwan

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant human growth/differentiation factor-5 (rhGDF-5) is being evaluated as a candidate therapy in support of periodontal regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate cementum and alveolar bone formation, and aberrant healing events following surgical implantation of rhGDF-5 in an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) carrier using an established periodontal defect model. Bilateral 4 x 5 mm (width x depth), one-wall, critical-size, intrabony periodontal defects were surgically created at the mandibular second and fourth pre-molar teeth in 15 Beagle dogs. Five animals received 1 microg/defect and five animals 20 microg/defect rhGDF-5 in unilateral defect sites. Contralateral sites received treatments reported elsewhere. Five animals received rhGDF-5/ACS with 0 (buffer control) and 100 microg/defect rhGDF-5 in contralateral defect sites. The animals were euthanized at 8 weeks post-surgery for histologic and histometric evaluation. Surgical implantation of rhGDF-5 stimulated significant periodontal regeneration. Cementum formation was significantly enhanced in sites implanted with rhGDF-5 (1 and 100 microg) compared with control (phealing/regeneration in intrabony periodontal defects without complications.

  9. Study of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in indium phosphide

    Shaban, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    This research is focused on (1) conducting detailed theoretical and experimental study of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in liquid encapsulated Czohralski (LEC) grown, Zn-doped P-type indium phosphide (InP), (2) identifying the physical origin of the defects detected using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) method, and (3) and developing a second-order model to interpret the presence of nonexponential capacitance transients in DLTS method. Analysis of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in P-type InP is undertaken. The main research results are summarized as follows: (1) DLTS analysis of grown-in defects in liquid LEC-grown, Zn-doped, P-type InP is made in this study. A single-hole trap of E/sub v/ + 0.52 eV is detected with a trap density of 1.8 x 10 15 cm -3 . The physical origin of this hole trap is attributed to a phosphorus vacancy or phosphorus interstitial-related defect. (2) One-MeV electron-irradiated P-type InP introduced two new hole traps, namely E/sub v/ + 0.34 and E/sub v/ + 0.58 eV with introduction rates (dN/sub T/d phi) of 0.4 and 1.2 per electron-cm, respectively. (3) A theoretical model is developed to interpret nonexponential capacitance transients in a deep-level transient spectroscopy method when the capture process competes with the dominant thermal-emission process

  10. Investigation of defect structures in solids

    Dienel, G; Hubrig, W H; Schenk, M; Syhre, H [Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic)

    1976-01-01

    Some central points of interest of research in the field of defect structures in solids dealt with at the Central Institute of Nuclear Research at Rossendorf in the last years are presented. Studies on f.c.c. and b.c.c. metals, radiation-induced phase transitions in perovskites and ion-implanted silicon are described in some detail.

  11. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Golovchak, R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Zurawska, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of {gamma}-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge{sub 23.5}Sb{sub 11.8}S{sub 64.7} glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Adaptive repair induced by small doses of γ radiation in repair-defective human cells

    Zasukhina, G.D.; L'vova, G.N.; Vasil'eva, I.M.; Sinel'shchikova, T.A.; Semyachkina, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive repair induced by small doses of gamma radiation was studied in repair-defective xeroderma pigmentosum, gout, and homocystinuria cells. The adaptation of cells induced by small doses of radiation was estimated after subsequent exposure to gamma radiation, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine by three methods: (1) by the reduction in DNA breaks; (2) by induction of resistant DNA synthesis; and (3) by increased reactivation of vaccinia virus. The three cell types in response to the three different mutagens revealed differences in the mechanism of cell defense in excision repair, in the adaptive response, and in Weigl reactivation

  13. Evaluation of Three Bone Substitute Materials in the Treatment of Experimentally Induced Defects in Rabbit Calvaria

    M. Paknejad

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of present study was to evaluate the quality, density and thickness of newly formed bone in experimental defects treated with Combi-Pack®, Bio-Oss® and Biostite®.Materials and Methods: Eight New Zealand white rabbits were included in this randomized,blinded study. Four equal 3×6 mm bone defects were created on the frontal and parietal bones of each animal and three were immediately grafted with Bio-Oss®, Combi-Pack® and Biostite® while one was left untreated, serving as negative control. Histologic and histomorphometric analysis was performed four weeks after surgery.Results: Histomorphometric bone area and trabecular maturity was significantly higher in the Bio-Oss® and Combi-Pack® samples as compared to the Biostite® and control cases.The amount of remaining biomaterial was almost equal in the three experimental groups at the end of the study period. Neither foreign body reaction nor severe inflammation was seen in any of the specimens except for the Biostite® samples.Conclusion: It may be suggested that implantation of Bio-Oss® particles and Combi-Pack® blocks can promote bone regeneration more effectively than Biostite®.

  14. On the influence of extrinsic point defects on irradiation-induced point-defect distributions in silicon

    Vanhellemont, J.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.

    1994-01-01

    A semi-quantitative model describing the influence of interfaces and stress fields on {113}-defect generation in silicon during 1-MeV electron irradiation, is further developed to take into account also the role of extrinsic point defects. It is shown that the observed distribution of {113}-defects in high-flux electron-irradiated silicon and its dependence on irradiation temperature and dopant concentration can be understood by taking into account not only the influence of the surfaces and interfaces as sinks for intrinsic point defects but also the thermal stability of the bulk sinks for intrinsic point defects. In heavily doped silicon the bulk sinks are related with pairing reactions of the dopant atoms with the generated intrinsic point defects or related with enhanced recombination of vacancies and self-interstitials at extrinsic point defects. The obtained theoretical results are correlated with published experimental data on boron-and phosphorus-doped silicon and are illustrated with observations obtained by irradiating cross-section transmission electron microscopy samples of wafer with highly doped surface layers. (orig.)

  15. Study on character variation induced by introducing exogenous DNA into upland cotton with ion implantation

    Cheng Beijiu; Tian Qiuyuan; Li Zhan; Zhou Liren

    1996-01-01

    The exogenous DNAs of G. Bickll P. and H. Cannabinus were introduced into the upland cotton Si 2 by Ar + implantation and DNA solution trickling method. The results showed that the exogenous DNA introduction was promoted significantly and the types and frequencies of character variation in progeny were increased by Ar + implantation. Furthermore, most of the variation tend to be stable. Among the Ar + implantation doses tested, 2 x 10 15 Ar + /cm 2 was the best for introducing exogenous DNA and inducing character variation, the variation rate reached to 16.2%. Some new lines with character of resistance to wilt disease, early maturity, few gland in seed and fine fiber quality have been obtained

  16. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of dentinal defects induced by new rotary system: “ProTaper NEXT”

    Shori, Deepa Deepak; Shenoi, Pratima Ramakrishna; Baig, Arshia R; Kubde, Rajesh; Makade, Chetana; Pandey, Swapnil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate dentinal defects formed by new rotary system — Protaper next™ (PTN). Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted premolars were selected. All specimens were decoronated and divided into four groups, each group having 15 specimens. Group I specimens were prepared by Hand K-files (Mani), Group II with ProTaper Universal (PT; Dentsply Maillefer), Group III with Hero Shaper (HS; Micro-Mega, Besancon, France), and Group IV with PTN (Dentsply Maillefer). Roots of each specimen were sectioned at 3, 6, and 9mm from the apex and were then viewed under a stereomicroscope to evaluate presence or absence of dentinal defects. Results: In roots prepared with hand files (HFs) showed lowest percentage of dentinal defects (6.7%); whereas in roots prepared with PT, HS, and PTN it was 40, 66.7, and 26.7%, respectively. There was significant difference between the HS group and the PTN group (P hand instruments induced minimal defects. PMID:26069406

  17. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-01-01

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm 2 and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO 2 lasers

  18. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-10-18

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm{sup 2} and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO{sub 2} lasers.

  19. High-fluence implantation in insulators. 1

    Mazzoldi, P.

    1989-01-01

    The defects which can be formed by ion implantation depend upon the insulator structure and composition. Thus, for glasses and ceramics, different changes are expected in mechanical and tribological properties, network dilatation, induced optical absorption and luminescence, compositional changes and modifications in the chemical behaviour. The modifications induced by ion implantation in the composition of glasses, with particular reference to alkali silicate glasses, the mechanical and tribological properties of ion implanted insulators, in particular glasses and ceramics, and the optical properties are discussed. 56 refs.; 20 figs

  20. Quantifying He-point defect interactions in Fe through coordinated experimental and modeling studies of He-ion implanted single-crystal Fe

    Hu, Xunxiang, E-mail: xunxianghu@berkeley.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Xu, Donghua; Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Understanding the effects of helium on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of structural materials are among the most challenging issues in fusion materials research. In this work, we combine thermal helium desorption spectroscopy (THDS) with positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and a spatially dependent cluster dynamics model to investigate the energetics of helium-point defect interactions in helium-implanted single-crystal iron. The combination of modeling and thermal desorption measurements allows identification of the binding energies of small He–V clusters, the migration energy of single vacancy and possible mechanisms (e.g., shrinkage of He{sub 3}V{sub 2} clusters) responsible for measured Helium desorption peaks, and the effect of impurities (e.g., carbon) on these values. Furthermore, the model predicts the depth dependence of the helium and helium–vacancy clusters as a function of time and temperature during the thermal desorption measurement. Here, we report the THDS measurement results as a function of He implantation energy from 10 to 40 keV at a fluence level of 1 × 10{sup 15} He/cm{sup 2}, along with selected PAS measurements. The experimental results are compared to the modeling predictions to evaluate the extent to which self-consistent values of the He-point defect binding and interaction energies and diffusivities can explain the data.

  1. Fractal analysis of the surgical treatment of ligature-induced peri-implantitis in dogs

    Kim, Hak Kun; Kim, Jin Soo

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of surgical treatment of ligature-induced peri-implantitis in dogs using fractal analysis. Also, the capabilities of fractal analysis as bone analysis techniques were compared with those of histomorphometric analysis. A total of 24 implants were inserted in 6 dogs. After a 3-months, experimental periimplantitis characterized by a bone loss of about 3 mm was established by inducing with wires. Surgical treatment involving flap procedure, debridement of implants surface with chlorhexidine and saline (group 1), guided bone regeneration (GBR) with absorbable collagen membrane and mineralized bone graft (group 2), and CO2 laser application with GBR (group 3) were performed. After animals were sacrificed in 8 and 16 weeks respectively, bone sections including implants were made. Fractal dimensions were calculated by box-counting method on the skeletonized images, made from each region of interest, including five screws at medial and distal aspects of implant, were selected. Statistically significant differences in the fractal dimensions between the group 1 (0.9340 ± 0.0126) and group 3 (0.9783 ± 0.0118) at 16 weeks were found (P<0.05). The fractal dimension was statistically significant different between 8 (0.9395 ± 0.0283) and 16 weeks in group 3 (P<0.05). These results were similar with the result of the evaluation of new bone formation in histomorphometric analysis. Treatment of experimental peri-implantitis by using CO2 laser with GBR is more useful than other treatments in the formation of new bone and also the tendency of fractal dimension to increase relative to healing time may be a useful means of evaluating.

  2. Fractal analysis of the surgical treatment of ligature-induced peri-implantitis in dogs

    Kim, Hak Kun; Kim, Jin Soo [School of Dentisity, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    To evaluate the effect of surgical treatment of ligature-induced peri-implantitis in dogs using fractal analysis. Also, the capabilities of fractal analysis as bone analysis techniques were compared with those of histomorphometric analysis. A total of 24 implants were inserted in 6 dogs. After a 3-months, experimental periimplantitis characterized by a bone loss of about 3 mm was established by inducing with wires. Surgical treatment involving flap procedure, debridement of implants surface with chlorhexidine and saline (group 1), guided bone regeneration (GBR) with absorbable collagen membrane and mineralized bone graft (group 2), and CO2 laser application with GBR (group 3) were performed. After animals were sacrificed in 8 and 16 weeks respectively, bone sections including implants were made. Fractal dimensions were calculated by box-counting method on the skeletonized images, made from each region of interest, including five screws at medial and distal aspects of implant, were selected. Statistically significant differences in the fractal dimensions between the group 1 (0.9340 {+-} 0.0126) and group 3 (0.9783 {+-} 0.0118) at 16 weeks were found (P<0.05). The fractal dimension was statistically significant different between 8 (0.9395 {+-} 0.0283) and 16 weeks in group 3 (P<0.05). These results were similar with the result of the evaluation of new bone formation in histomorphometric analysis. Treatment of experimental peri-implantitis by using CO2 laser with GBR is more useful than other treatments in the formation of new bone and also the tendency of fractal dimension to increase relative to healing time may be a useful means of evaluating.

  3. Implantes de hidroxiapatita em falhas ósseas produzidas no fêmur de ratos submetidos ao tabagismo passivo Hydroxyapatite implants in bone defects produced in rat femurs submitted to passive tobacco exposure

    Thiago Cerizza Pinheiro

    2008-10-01

    menores quando comparados com os do grupo controle. CONCLUSÃO: A neoformação óssea em defeitos do esqueleto pode ocorrer naturalmente em animais submetidos ao tabagismo passivo, no entanto, de forma mais lenta e em menor proporção.INTRODUCTION: Defects with bone mass loss are frequently treated with bone autografts. Endografts of bones using biomaterials, such as hydroxyapatite (HA also have been used for the same purpose, replacing autografts. However, bone tissue health conditions are basic for osteointegration of the implant. Thus, excessive tobacco consumption, either as an active or as a passive smoker, may harm the process of bone neoformation with a hydroxyapatite implant due to its deleterious effects to bone tissue. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the nutritional status of the animals and the process of bone neoformation when porous hydroxyapatite granules are implanted in bone defects of the femur of rats submitted to passive tobacco exposure. METHOD: Porous hydroxyapatite granules were implanted in bone defects produced in the left distal femoral epiphysis of rats subjected to prolonged passive tobacco exposure. The animals were followed along the treatment of tobacco exposure during six months, to evaluate their physical conditions. After eight weeks of the bone implant with the biomaterial, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens of the implant region were submitted to routine histological testing, and maintained in paraffin blocks for morphometric histological and radiological analysis. RESULTS: The mass variation of the experimental group was found to be more intense than that of the control group. As to radiological findings, the control group had an apparent more radio lucent and organized image. In the morphological analysis, there was a better closing of the bone defect and osteointegration of hydroxyapatite in the control group. Upon comparing the volume of bone formed in the receiving area of the femur between the control and the experimental group

  4. Bremsstrahlung-induced highly penetrating probes for nondestructive assay and defect analysis

    Selim, F A; Harmon, J F; Kwofie, J; Spaulding, R; Erickson, G; Roney, T

    2002-01-01

    Nondestructive assay and defect analysis probes based on bremsstrahlung-induced processes have been developed to identify elements and probe defects in large volume samples. Bremsstrahlung beams from (electron accelerators) with end-point energies both above and below neutron emission threshold have been used. Below neutron emission threshold these beams (from 6 MeV small pulsed linacs), which exhibit high penetration, create positrons via pair production inside the material and produce X-ray fluorescence (XRF) radiation. Chemical assays of heavy elements in thick samples up to 10 g/cm sup 2 thick are provided by energy dispersive XRF measurements. The pair-produced positrons annihilate within the material, thereby emitting 511 keV gamma radiation. Doppler broadening spectroscopy of the 511 keV radiation can be performed to characterize the material and measure defects in samples of any desired thickness. This technique has successfully measured induced strain due to tensile stress in steel samples of 0.64 cm...

  5. Ribosomal and hematopoietic defects in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from Diamond Blackfan anemia patients.

    Garçon, Loïc; Ge, Jingping; Manjunath, Shwetha H; Mills, Jason A; Apicella, Marisa; Parikh, Shefali; Sullivan, Lisa M; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Gadue, Paul; French, Deborah L; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2013-08-08

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital disorder with erythroid (Ery) hypoplasia and tissue morphogenic abnormalities. Most DBA cases are caused by heterozygous null mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Understanding how haploinsufficiency of these ubiquitous proteins causes DBA is hampered by limited availability of tissues from affected patients. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of DBA patients carrying mutations in RPS19 and RPL5. Compared with controls, DBA fibroblasts formed iPSCs inefficiently, although we obtained 1 stable clone from each fibroblast line. RPS19-mutated iPSCs exhibited defects in 40S (small) ribosomal subunit assembly and production of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Upon induced differentiation, the mutant clone exhibited globally impaired hematopoiesis, with the Ery lineage affected most profoundly. RPL5-mutated iPSCs exhibited defective 60S (large) ribosomal subunit assembly, accumulation of 12S pre-rRNA, and impaired erythropoiesis. In both mutant iPSC lines, genetic correction of ribosomal protein deficiency via complementary DNA transfer into the "safe harbor" AAVS1 locus alleviated abnormalities in ribosome biogenesis and hematopoiesis. Our studies show that pathological features of DBA are recapitulated by iPSCs, provide a renewable source of cells to model various tissue defects, and demonstrate proof of principle for genetic correction strategies in patient stem cells.

  6. Electrical properties of the regrown implantation-induced amorphous layer on (1 1-bar 0 0)- and (1 1 2-bar 0)-oriented 6H-SiC

    Nakamura, Tomonori; Tanabe, Hitoshi; Hitomi, Takeshi; Satoh, Masataka

    2003-01-01

    In the (1 1-bar 0 0) and (1 1 2-bar 0)-oriented 6H-SiC, the electrical properties and activation process of the implanted phosphorus in the layer regrown from the implantation-induced amorphous layer are investigated by means of Hall effect measurement and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The samples are implanted by 60 keV phosphorus ions at room temperature with doses of 3 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 15 cm -2 to form implantation-induced amorphous layer and the partially disordered implant-layer, respectively. The implanted phosphorus in the implantation-induced amorphous layer can be electrically activated by annealing at 1000 deg. C. The electrical activity for the case of the implantation-induced amorphous layer (ratio of sheet carrier concentration to ion dose) is 2-3 times larger than that for the case of the partially disordered implant-layer for the annealing temperature of 1500 deg. C

  7. Developmental programming: postnatal estradiol amplifies ovarian follicular defects induced by fetal exposure to excess testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in sheep.

    Veiga-Lopez, A; Wurst, A K; Steckler, T L; Ye, W; Padmanabhan, V

    2014-04-01

    Excess of prenatal testosterone (T) induces reproductive defects including follicular persistence. Comparative studies with T and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) have suggested that follicular persistence is programmed via estrogenic actions of T. This study addresses the androgenic and estrogenic contributions in programming follicular persistence. Because humans are exposed to estrogenic environmental steroids from various sources throughout their life span and postnatal insults may also induce organizational and/or activational changes, we tested whether continuous postnatal exposure to estradiol (E) will amplify effects of prenatal steroids on ovarian function. Pregnant sheep were treated with T, DHT, E, or ED (E and DHT) from days 30 to 90 of gestation. Postnatally, a subset of the vehicle (C), T, and DHT females received an E implant. Transrectal ultrasonography was performed in the first breeding season during a synchronized cycle to monitor ovarian follicular dynamics. As expected, number of ≥8 mm follicles was higher in the T versus C group. Postnatal E reduced the number of 4 to 8 mm follicles in the DHT group. Percentage of females bearing luteinized follicles and the number of luteinized follicles differed among prenatal groups. Postnatal E increased the incidence of subluteal cycles in the prenatal T-treated females. Findings from this study confirm previous findings of divergences in programming effects of prenatal androgens and estrogens. They also indicate that some aspects of follicular dynamics are subject to postnatal modulation as well as support the existence of an extended organizational period or the need for a second insult to uncover the previously programmed event.

  8. Micro-cutting of silicon implanted with hydrogen and post-implantation thermal treatment

    Jelenković, Emil V.; To, Suet; Sundaravel, B.; Xiao, Gaobo; Huang, Hu

    2016-07-01

    It was reported that non-amorphizing implantation by hydrogen has a potential in improving silicon machining. Post-implantation high-temperature treatment will affect implantation-induced damage, which can have impact on silicon machining. In this article, a relation of a thermal annealing of hydrogen implanted in silicon to micro-cutting experiment is investigated. Hydrogen ions were implanted into 4″ silicon wafers with 175 keV, 150 keV, 125 keV and doses of 2 × 1016 cm-2, 2 × 1016 cm-2 and 3 × 1016 cm-2, respectively. In this way, low hydrogen atom-low defect concentration was created in the region less than ~0.8 μm deep and high hydrogen atom-high defect concentration was obtained at silicon depth of ~0.8-1.5 μm. The post-implantation annealing was carried out at 300 and 400 °C in nitrogen for 1 h. Physical and electrical properties of implanted and annealed samples were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nanoindentation. Plunge cutting experiment was carried out in and silicon crystal direction. The critical depth of cut and cutting force were monitored and found to be influenced by the annealing. The limits of hydrogen implantation annealing contribution to the cutting characteristics of silicon are discussed in light of implantation process and redistribution of hydrogen and defects generation during annealing process.

  9. Irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Tuomisto, F.; Saarinen, K.; Look, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We have used positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the point defects induced by 2 MeV electron irradiation (fluence 6 x 10 17 cm -2 ) in single crystal n-type ZnO samples. The positron lifetime measurements have shown that the zinc vacancies in their doubly negative charge state, which act as dominant compensating centers in the as-grown material, are produced in the irradiation and their contribution to the electrical compensation is important. The lifetime measurements reveal also the presence of competing positron traps with low binding energy and lifetime close to that of the bulk lattice. The analysis of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation line indicates that these defects can be identified as neutral oxygen vacancies. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Confocal fluorescence microscopy investigation of visible emitting defects induced by electron beam lithography in LIF films

    Montereali, R. M.; Bigotta, S.; Pace, A.; Piccinini, M.; Burattini, E.; Grilli, A.; Raco, A.; Giammatteo, M.; L'Aquila Univ., L'Aquila; Picozzi, P.; Santucci, S.; L'Aquila Univ., L'Aquila

    2000-01-01

    Low energy electron irradiation of lithium fluoride (LiF), in the form of bulk crystals and films, gives rise to the stable formation of primary F defects and aggregated color centers in a thin layer located at the surface of the investigated material. For the first time a confocal light scanning microscope (CLSM) in fluorescence mode was used to reconstruct the depth distribution of efficiently emitting laser active color centers in a stripe-like region induced by 12 and 16 keV electrons on LiF films thermally evaporated on glass. The formation of the F3+ and F2 aggregated defects appears restricted to the electron penetration and proportional to their energy depth profile, as obtained from Monte Carlo simulations [it

  11. Effect of thermal-convection-induced defects on the performance of perovskite solar cells

    Ye, Fei; Xie, Fengxian; Yin, Maoshu; He, Jinjin; Wang, Yanbo; Tang, Wentao; Chen, Han; Yang, Xudong; Han, Liyuan

    2017-07-01

    Thermal-convection-induced defects can cause huge loss in the power conversion efficiency of solution-processed perovskite solar cells. We investigated two types of convection in perovskite solution during the formation of perovskite films. By balancing the convection via special configurations of surface tension and boiling point in mixed γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), we removed microscopic defects such as rings, bumps, and crevices. The deposited perovskite films were smooth and dense, which enabled a high power conversion efficiency of 17.7% in a 1 cm2 cell area. We believe that the present strategy for controlling the convection can be helpful in improving the perovskite film quality for solvent-rich scalable solution processes of solar cells such as doctor blading, soft-cover deposition, printing, and slot-die coating.

  12. Channeling study of laser-induced defect generation in InP and InAs

    Burdel', K.K.; Kashkarov, P.K.; Timoshenko, V.Yu.; Chechenin, N.G.

    1992-01-01

    Damage production in InP and InAs single crystals induced by a ruby-laser pulse irradiation with τ p =20 ms in the energy density region W=0.05-1.0 J/cm 2 is studied by the channeling and Rutherford backscattering techniques. The defect generation threshold was determined to be equal to 0.2 J/cm 2 and 0.55 J/cm 2 for InP and InAs crystals, respectively. Stoichiometric defects in InP crystals were observed at W>=0.5 J/cm 2 . The temperature fields in InP and InAs under laser irradiation were calculated. The experimental observations are considered as a result of a selective evaporation of the components from the melt

  13. Irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Tuomisto, F.; Saarinen, K. [Laboratory of Physics, Helsinki University of Technology (Finland); Look, D.C. [Semiconductor Research Center, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio (United States)

    2004-08-01

    We have used positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the point defects induced by 2 MeV electron irradiation (fluence 6 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}) in single crystal n-type ZnO samples. The positron lifetime measurements have shown that the zinc vacancies in their doubly negative charge state, which act as dominant compensating centers in the as-grown material, are produced in the irradiation and their contribution to the electrical compensation is important. The lifetime measurements reveal also the presence of competing positron traps with low binding energy and lifetime close to that of the bulk lattice. The analysis of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation line indicates that these defects can be identified as neutral oxygen vacancies. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Radiation-induced segregation: A microchemical gauge to quantify fundamental defect parameters

    Simonen, E.P.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1994-12-01

    Defect Kinetic are evaluated for austenitic stainless alloys by comparing model predictions to measured responses for radiation-induced grain boundary segregation. Heavy-ions, neutrons and proton irradiations having substantial statistical bases are examined. The combined modeling and measurement approach is shown to be useful for quantifying fundamental defect parameters. The mechanism evaluation indicates vacancy, migration energies of 1.15 eV or less and a vacancy formation energy at grain boundaries of 1.5 eV. Damage efficiencies of about 0.03 were established for heavy-ions and for light-water reactor neutrons. Inferred proton damage efficiencies were about 0.15. Segregation measured in an advanced gas-cooled reactor component was much greater than expected using the above parameters

  15. Radiation induced deep level defects in bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions

    Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi; Bollmann, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is sensitive to ionization and displacement radiation effects in space. In this paper, 35 MeV Si ions were used as irradiation source to research the radiation damage on NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. The changing of electrical parameters of transistors was in situ measured with increasing irradiation fluence of 35 MeV Si ions. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), defects in the bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions can affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the radiation damage induced by heavy ions.

  16. Cobalt-alloy implant debris induce HIF-1α hypoxia associated responses: a mechanism for metal-specific orthopedic implant failure.

    Lauryn Samelko

    Full Text Available The historical success of orthopedic implants has been recently tempered by unexpected pathologies and early failures of some types of Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum alloy containing artificial hip implants. Hypoxia-associated responses to Cobalt-alloy metal debris were suspected as mediating this untoward reactivity at least in part. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α is a major transcription factor involved in hypoxia, and is a potent coping mechanism for cells to rapidly respond to changing metabolic demands. We measured signature hypoxia associated responses (i.e. HIF-1α, VEGF and TNF-α to Cobalt-alloy implant debris both in vitro (using a human THP-1 macrophage cell line and primary human monocytes/macrophages and in vivo. HIF-1α in peri-implant tissues of failed metal-on-metal implants were compared to similar tissues from people with metal-on-polymer hip arthroplasties, immunohistochemically. Increasing concentrations of cobalt ions significantly up-regulated HIF-1α with a maximal response at 0.3 mM. Cobalt-alloy particles (1 um-diameter, 10 particles/cell induced significantly elevated HIF-1α, VEGF, TNF-α and ROS expression in human primary macrophages whereas Titanium-alloy particles did not. Elevated expression of HIF-1α was found in peri-implant tissues and synovial fluid of people with failing Metal-on-Metal hips (n = 5 compared to failed Metal-on-Polymer articulating hip arthroplasties (n = 10. This evidence suggests that Cobalt-alloy, more than other metal implant debris (e.g. Titanium alloy, can elicit hypoxia-like responses that if unchecked can lead to unusual peri-implant pathologies, such as lymphocyte infiltration, necrosis and excessive fibrous tissue growths.

  17. Defects in N{sup +} ion-implanted ZnO single crystals studied by positron annihilation and Hall effect

    Brauer, G.; Anwand, W.; Skorupa, W. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kuriplach, J.; Melikhova, O.; Cizek, J.; Prochazka, I. [Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Wenckstern, H. von; Brandt, M.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik II, Universitaet Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    High quality ZnO single crystals of dimensions 10 x 10 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}, grown by a hydrothermal approach, have been implanted by 40 keV N{sup +} ions to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} at room temperature. Their properties revealed by positron annihilation and Hall effect measurements are given in the as-grown and as-irradiated states, and after post-implantation annealing in an oxygen ambient at 200 C and 500 C. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Rehabilitation of an edentulous cleft lip and palate patient with a soft palate defect using a bar-retained, implant-supported speech-aid prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Hakan Tuna, S; Pekkan, Gurel; Buyukgural, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of an edentulous cleft lip and palate patient with a combined hard and soft palate defect is a great challenge, due to the lack of retention of the obturator prosthesis as a result of its weight and the inability to obtain a border seal. Dental implants improve the retention, stability, and occlusal function of prostheses when used in carefully selected cleft lip and palate cases. This clinical report presents an edentulous unilateral cleft lip and palate patient who has hard and soft palate defects and an atrophied maxilla, treated with an implant-supported speech-aid prosthesis.

  19. Comparative study of the effects of photodynamic therapy and conventional therapy on ligature induced peri-implantitis in dogs

    Hayek, Ricardo Rada Ahmad

    2004-01-01

    Progressive peri-implanter bone losses, which are accompanied by inflammatory process in the soft tissues is referred to as peri-implantitis. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of lethal photosensitisation with the conventional technique on bacterial reduction in ligature induced peri-implantitis in dogs. Seventeen third pre-molars of Labrador dogs were extracted and, immediately after, the implants were submerged. After osteointegration, peri-implantitis was induced. After 4 months, ligature were removed and the same period was waited for natural induction of bacterial plaque. The dogs were randomly divided into two groups. In the conventional group, they were treated with the conventional techniques of mucoperiosteal flaps for scaling the implant surface and irrigate it. In the laser group, only mucoperiosteal scaling was carried out before photodynamic therapy. On the peri-implanter pocket an azulene paste was injected and a GaAlAs low-power laser (λ= 660 nm, P= 30 mW, E= 5,4 J and Δt= 3 min.). Microbiological samples were obtained before and immediately after treatment. One implant was removed to be analyzed by scan electron microscopy to verify contamination on the implant surface. The results of this study showed that Prevotella sp., Fusobacterium e S. Beta-haemolyticus were significantly reduced for the conventional and laser groups. (author)

  20. Ventricular fibrillation induced by coagulating mode bipolar electrocautery during pacemaker implantation in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 patient.

    Russo, Vincenzo; Rago, Anna; DI Meo, Federica; Cioppa, Nadia Della; Papa, Andrea Antonio; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Nigro, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of ventricular fibrillation, induced by bipolar electrocautery during elective dual chamber pacemaker implantation, is reported in a patient affected by Myotonic Distrophy type 1 with normal left ventricular ejection fraction.

  1. Recharging processes, radiation induced strain and changes of OH - bands under H + ion implantation in Ti doped lithium niobate

    Kumar, P.; Moorthy Babu, S.; Bhaumik, I.; Ganesamoorthy, S.; Karnal, A. K.; Kumar, Praveen; Rodrigues, G. O.; Sulania, I.; Kanjilal, D.; Pandey, A. K.; Raman, R.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic analysis of variations in structural and optical characteristics of Z-cut plates of titanium doped congruent lithium niobate single crystals implanted with 120 keV proton beam at various fluences of 10 15, 10 16 and 10 17 protons/cm 2 is presented. Through, high resolution X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared and UV-visible-NIR analysis of congruent lithium niobate, the correlation of properties before and after implantation are discussed. HRXRD (0 0 6) reflection by Triple Crystal Mode shows that both tensile and compressive strain peak are produced by the high fluence implantation. A distinct tensile peak was observed from implanted region for a fluence of 10 16 protons/cm 2. AFM micrographs indicate mountain ridges, bumps and protrusions on target surface on implantation. UV-visible-NIR spectra reveal an increase in charge transfer between Ti 3+/Ti 4+ and ligand oxygen for implantation with 10 15 protons/cm 2, while spectra for higher fluence implanted samples show complex absorption band in the region from 380-1100 nm. Variations of OH - stretching vibration mode were observed for cLN Pure, cLNT2% virgin, and implanted samples with FTIR spectra. The concentration of OH - ion before and after implantation was calculated from integral absorption intensity. The effect of 120 keV proton implantation induced structural, surface and optical studies were correlated.

  2. Identification of equilibrium and irradiation-induced defects in nuclear ceramics: electronic structure calculations of defect properties and positron annihilation characteristics

    Wiktor, Julia

    2015-01-01

    During in-pile irradiation the fission of actinide nuclei causes the creation of large amounts of defects, which affect the physical and chemical properties of materials inside the reactor, in particular the fuel and structural materials. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) can be used to characterize irradiation induced defects, empty or containing fission products. This non-destructive experimental technique involves detecting the radiation generated during electron-positron annihilation in a sample and deducing the properties of the material studied. As positrons get trapped in open volume defects in solids, by measuring their lifetime and momentum distributions of the annihilation radiation, one can obtain information on the open and the chemical environments of the defects. In this work electronic structure calculations of positron annihilation characteristics were performed using two-component density functional theory (TCDFT). To calculate the momentum distributions of the annihilation radiation, we implemented the necessary methods in the open-source ABINIT program. The theoretical results have been used to contribute to the identification of the vacancy defects in two nuclear ceramics, silicon carbide (SiC) and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). (author) [fr

  3. Microstructural evolution of radiation induced defects in ZnO during isochronal annealing

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Balogh, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this study the authors discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing. The nominally undoped samples were irradiated either with 3 MeV protons to a fluence of 1.2 x 10 18 p/cm 2 or with 1 MeV electrons to a fluence of 1 x 10 18 e/cm 2 . The investigation was performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-Broadening measurements. The measurements were done at room temperature and in some cases down to 10 K to investigate the thermal dependence of the trapping characteristics of the positrons

  4. DLTS and capacitance transients study of defects induced by neutron irradiation in MOS structures CCD process

    Ahaitouf, A.; Losson, E.; Charles, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study neutron irradiation effects on PMOS capacitors and NMOSFETs transistors. The characterization of induced defects was made by capacitance transients C(t) measurements, DLTS spectroscopy, and optical DLTS (ODLTS). DLTS spectra present three peaks due to deep levels created in the semiconductor and two peaks due to minority carrier generation. Two levels are reported in the literature. Two other minority carrier traps have been observed on ODLTS spectra after irradiation. This can explain the decrease of the minority carrier generation lifetime observed by capacitance transients measurements. (authors)

  5. Laser radiation effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectrics

    Egorov, A.N.; Zhiryakov, B.M.; Kushin, V.V.; Lyapidevskij, V.K.; Khokhlov, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Possibility of laser radiation resonance effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectric materials is investigated. Absorption spectra in infrared, visible and ultraviolet ranges for cellulose nitrate samples irradiated by 6 MeV/nucleon 58 Ni ions and reactor gamma radiation are measured. Absorption spectra for irradiated and reference samples are presented. Two absorption bands λ 1 =0.33 μm (E 1 =3.9 eV) and λ 2 =0.72 μm (E 2 =1.7 eV) are detected. Etching rate decrease in a track under laser radiation effect is noticed. 3 refs.; 1 fig

  6. Dependence of the saturated light-induced defect density on macroscopic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Park, H. R.; Liu, J. Z.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Maruyama, A.; Isomura, M.; Wagner, S.; Abelson, J. R.; Finger, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report a study of the saturated light-induced defect density Ns,sat in 37 hydrogenated (and in part fluorinated) amorphous silicon [a-Si:H(F)] films grown in six different reactors under widely different conditions. Ns,sat was attained by exposing the films to light from a krypton ion laser (λ=647.1 nm). Ns,sat is determined by the constant photocurrent method and lies between 5×1016 and 2×1017 cm−3. Ns,sat drops with decreasing optical gap Eopt and hydrogen content cH, but is not correlat...

  7. Defects in CdSe thin films, induced by high energy electron irradiation

    Ion, L.; Antohe, S.; Tutuc, D.; Antohe, V.A.; Tazlaoanu, C.

    2004-01-01

    Defects induced in CdSe thin films by high energy electron irradiation are investigated by means of thermally stimulated currents (TSC) spectroscopy. Films were obtained by vacuum deposition from a single source and irradiated with a 5 x 10 13 electrons/cm 2 s -1 beam of 6-MeV energy. It was found that electrical properties of the films are controlled by a deep donor state, located at 0.38 eV below the bottom edge of the conduction band. Parameters of the traps responsible for the recorded TSC peaks were determined. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of defects induced by neutron radiation in reactor pressure vessels steels

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    1978-01-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the production of neutron induced defects (depleted zone and crowdions) in ferritic pressure vessel steels for different neutron spectra. They have been analysed both the recoil primary atoms produced by elastic and inelastic collisions with fast neutrons and the ones produced by gamma-ray emission by thermal neutron absorption. Theoretical modelling of increasing in the ductile-brittle transition temperature of ferritic steels has been correlated with experimental data at irradiation temperature up to 400 degree centigree (Author) 15 refs

  9. Defect induced d{sup 0} ferromagnetism in a ZnO grain boundary

    Assa Aravindh, Sasikala Devi; Schwingenschloegl, Udo; Roqan, Iman S, E-mail: iman.roqan@kaust.edu.sa [Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 2955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-12-14

    Several experimental studies have referred to the grain boundary (GB) defect as the origin of ferromagnetism in zinc oxide (ZnO). However, the mechanism of this hypothesis has never been confirmed. Present study investigates the atomic structure and the effect of point defects in a ZnO GB using the generalized gradient approximation+U approximation. The relaxed GB possesses large periodicity and channels with 8 and 10 numbered atoms having 4 and 3 fold coordination. The Zn vacancy (V{sub Zn}) shows a tendency to be attracted to the GB, relative to the bulk-like region. Although no magnetization is obtained from point defect-free GB, V{sub Zn} induces spin polarization as large as 0.68 μ{sub B}/atom to the O sites at the GB. Ferromagnetic exchange energy >150 eV is obtained by increasing the concentration of V{sub Zn} and by the injection of holes into the system. Electronic structure analysis indicates that the spin polarization without external dopants originates from the O 2p orbitals, a common feature of d{sup 0} semiconductors.

  10. Defect induced d0 ferromagnetism in a ZnO grain boundary

    Devi, Assa Aravindh Sasikala

    2015-12-08

    Several experimental studies have referred to the grain boundary(GB) defect as the origin of ferromagnetism in zinc oxide (ZnO). However, the mechanism of this hypothesis has never been confirmed. Present study investigates the atomic structure and the effect of point defects in a ZnOGB using the generalized gradient approximation+U approximation. The relaxed GB possesses large periodicity and channels with 8 and 10 numbered atoms having 4 and 3 fold coordination. The Znvacancy (VZn) shows a tendency to be attracted to the GB, relative to the bulk-like region. Although no magnetization is obtained from point defect-free GB, VZn induces spin polarization as large as 0.68 μB/atom to the O sites at the GB.Ferromagnetic exchange energy >150 eV is obtained by increasing the concentration of VZn and by the injection of holes into the system. Electronic structure analysis indicates that the spin polarization without external dopants originates from the O 2p orbitals, a common feature of d0semiconductors.

  11. Defect properties of ZnO nanopowders and their modifications induced by remote plasma treatments

    Paramo, J A; Peters, R M; Quarles, C A; Strzhemechny, Y M [Physics Department, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Vallejo, H [North Side High School, Fort Worth, TX 79129 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) and positron lifetime (LT) measurements were used on several commercial ZnO nanopowders. We observed that sample-to-sample differences in the quality of the powders overshadow any observation of probable size effects. However, the average LT for all nanocrystals is longer than in a bulk sample, consistent with the hypothesis of crystals with surface and subsurface layers rich in defects. Temperature-dependent PL spectra from the ZnO nanopowders were analyzed in detail for the bound-exciton (BEx) range and the numerical fits of the peak positions yielded activation energies that suggested different channels of recombination for the BEx. Also, fits for the full width at half maximum (FWHM) show nonlinear behavior, indicating contribution from surface phonons. We, also, used remote nitrogen and hydrogen plasma treatment on the ZnO nanosystems to manipulate their surface and subsurface defect states. We demonstrated that those plasma species induce a variety of changes in the deep defect visible emission as well as in the BEx luminescence, most likely associated with the surface/subsurface states.

  12. Defect properties of ZnO nanopowders and their modifications induced by remote plasma treatments

    Paramo, J A; Peters, R M; Quarles, C A; Strzhemechny, Y M; Vallejo, H

    2009-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) and positron lifetime (LT) measurements were used on several commercial ZnO nanopowders. We observed that sample-to-sample differences in the quality of the powders overshadow any observation of probable size effects. However, the average LT for all nanocrystals is longer than in a bulk sample, consistent with the hypothesis of crystals with surface and subsurface layers rich in defects. Temperature-dependent PL spectra from the ZnO nanopowders were analyzed in detail for the bound-exciton (BEx) range and the numerical fits of the peak positions yielded activation energies that suggested different channels of recombination for the BEx. Also, fits for the full width at half maximum (FWHM) show nonlinear behavior, indicating contribution from surface phonons. We, also, used remote nitrogen and hydrogen plasma treatment on the ZnO nanosystems to manipulate their surface and subsurface defect states. We demonstrated that those plasma species induce a variety of changes in the deep defect visible emission as well as in the BEx luminescence, most likely associated with the surface/subsurface states.

  13. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in vanadium and vanadium-titanium alloys

    Leguey, T.

    1996-01-01

    The annealing of defects induced by electron irradiation up to a dose of 6.10 21 m -2 at T<293 K has been investigated in single-crystals of pure vanadium and in vanadium-titanium alloys with compositions 0.3, 1 and 5 at.% Ti using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The recovery of the positron annihilation parameters in V single-crystals indicates that the defect annealing takes place in the temperature range 410-470 K without formation of microvoids for the present irradiation conditions. For the alloys the recovery onset is shifted to 460 K, the width of the annealing stage is gradually broadened with increasing Ti content, and microvoids are formed for annealing temperatures at the end of the recovery stage. The results show that the vacancy release from vacancy-interstitial impurity pairs and subsequent recombination with interstitial loops is the mechanism of the recovery in pure V. For V-Ti alloys, vacancy-Ti-interstitial impurity complexes and vacancy-Ti pairs appear to be the defects responsible for the positron trapping. The broadening of the recovery stage with increasing Ti content indicates that solute Ti is a very effective trap for vacancies in V. (orig.)

  14. Annealing study on radiation-induced defects in 6H-SiC

    Pinheiro, M.V.B.; Lingner, T.; Caudepon, F.; Greulich-Weber, S.; Spaeth, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic isochronal annealing investigation of vacancy-related defects in electron-irradiated n-type 6H-SiC:N. A series of 10 samples cut from a commercial wafer and annealed up to 1200 C after electron-irradiation (1.5 x 10 18 cm -3 ) was characterized with photoluminescence (PL), Magnetic circular dichroism of the absorption (MCDA) and conventional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Apart from less stable triplet-related defects which vanished between 150 C and 300 C, the thermal behavior of three radiation-induced defects was studied: the silicon vacancy (V Si ), the carbon-antisite-carbon-vacancy pair (C Si -V C ) and the D1 center. Their annealing behavior showed that the destruction of the isolated V Si between 750 C and 900 C is followed by the formation of thermally more stable C Si -V C pairs, a result that has been theoretically predicted recently. By further heating the samples the C Si -V C pairs are annealed out between 900 C and 1050 C and were followed by an increase in the D1 center concentration. (orig.)

  15. Defect induced d0 ferromagnetism in a ZnO grain boundary

    Devi, Assa Aravindh Sasikala; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Roqan, Iman S.

    2015-01-01

    Several experimental studies have referred to the grain boundary(GB) defect as the origin of ferromagnetism in zinc oxide (ZnO). However, the mechanism of this hypothesis has never been confirmed. Present study investigates the atomic structure and the effect of point defects in a ZnOGB using the generalized gradient approximation+U approximation. The relaxed GB possesses large periodicity and channels with 8 and 10 numbered atoms having 4 and 3 fold coordination. The Znvacancy (VZn) shows a tendency to be attracted to the GB, relative to the bulk-like region. Although no magnetization is obtained from point defect-free GB, VZn induces spin polarization as large as 0.68 μB/atom to the O sites at the GB.Ferromagnetic exchange energy >150 eV is obtained by increasing the concentration of VZn and by the injection of holes into the system. Electronic structure analysis indicates that the spin polarization without external dopants originates from the O 2p orbitals, a common feature of d0semiconductors.

  16. Warfarin affects acute inflammatory response induced by subcutaneous polyvinyl sponge implantation in rats.

    Mirkov, Ivana; Popov Aleksandrov, Aleksandra; Demenesku, Jelena; Ninkov, Marina; Mileusnic, Dina; Kataranovski, Dragan; Kataranovski, Milena

    2017-09-01

    Warfarin (WF) is an anticoagulant which also affects physiological processes other than hemostasis. Our previous investigations showed the effect of WF which gained access to the organism via skin on resting peripheral blood granulocytes. Based on these data, the aim of the present study was to examine whether WF could modulate the inflammatory processes as well. To this aim the effect of WF on the inflammatory response induced by subcutaneous sponge implantation in rats was examined. Warfarin-soaked polyvinyl sponges (WF-sponges) were implanted subcutaneously and cell infiltration into sponges, the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by sponge cells were measured as parameters of inflammation. T cell infiltration and cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-17 (IL-17) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were measured at day 7 post implantation. Warfarin exerted both stimulatory and suppressive effects depending on the parameter examined. Flow cytometry of cells recovered from sponges showed higher numbers of granulocytes (HIS48 + cells) at days 1 and 3 post implantation and CD11b + cells at day 1 compared to control sponges. Cells from WF-sponges had an increased NO production (Griess reaction) at days 1 and 7. In contrast, lower levels of TNF (measured by ELISA) production by cells recovered from WF-soaked sponges were found in the early (day one) phase of reaction with unchanged levels at other time points. While IL-6 production by cells recovered from WF-soaked sponges was decreased at day 1, it was increased at day 7. Higher T cell numbers were noted in WF sponges at day 7 post implantation, and recovered cells produced more IFN-γ and IL-17, while IL-10 production remained unchanged. Warfarin affects some of the parameters of inflammatory reaction induced by subcutaneous polyvinyl sponge implantation. Differential (both stimulatory as well as inhibitory) effects of WF on

  17. Negative charge induced degradation of PMOSFETs with BF2-implanted p+-poly gate

    Lu, C.Y.; Sung, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A new degradation phenomenon on thin gate oxide PMOS-FETs with BF 2 implanted p + -poly gate has been demonstrated and investigated. The cause of this type of degradation is a combination of the boron penetration through the gate oxide and charge trap generation due to the presence of fluorine in the gate oxide and some other processing-induced effects. The negative charge-induced degradation other than enhanced boron diffusion has been studied in detail here. The impact of this process-sensitive p + -poly gate structure on deep submicron CMOS process integration has been discussed. (author)

  18. Techniques for the research on mass deposition effects in the bio-materials induced by heavy ion implantation

    Yuan Shibin; Wei Zengquan; Li Qiang

    2002-01-01

    Researchers have used heavy ion beams to implant small biomolecules, followed by advanced instrumental analysis to make preliminary studies on mass deposition induced by ion implantation. But research reports on the biological effects, i.e. mass deposition effects induced by mass deposition in living tissues, cells and macro-biomolecules have not been delivered hitherto. In the near future radioactive heavy ion beams will be possible to implant living cells and biomolecules, and auto-radiography, radioactive measurements and molecular biological techniques will be employed to further studies on the effects

  19. Proinsulin atypical maturation and disposal induces extensive defects in mouse Ins2+/Akita β-cells.

    Qingxin Yuan

    Full Text Available Because of its low relative folding rate and plentiful manufacture in β-cells, proinsulin maintains a homeostatic balance of natively and plentiful non-natively folded states (i.e., proinsulin homeostasis, PIHO through the integration of maturation and disposal processes. PIHO is susceptible to genetic and environmental influences, and its disorder has been critically linked to defects in β-cells in diabetes. To explore this hypothesis, we performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR, metabolic-labeling, immunoblotting, and histological studies to clarify what defects result from primary disorder of PIHO in model Ins2(+/Akita β-cells. We used T antigen-transformed Ins2(+/Akita and control Ins2(+/+ β-cells established from Akita and wild-type littermate mice. In Ins2(+/Akita β-cells, we found no apparent defect at the transcriptional and translational levels to contribute to reduced cellular content of insulin and its precursor and secreted insulin. Glucose response remained normal in proinsulin biosynthesis but was impaired for insulin secretion. The size and number of mature insulin granules were reduced, but the size/number of endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, mitochondrion, and lysosome organelles and vacuoles were expanded/increased. Moreover, cell death increased, and severe oxidative stress, which manifested as increased reactive oxygen species, thioredoxin-interacting protein, and protein tyrosine nitration, occurred in Ins2(+/Akita β-cells and/or islets. These data show the first clear evidence that primary PIHO imbalance induces severe oxidative stress and impairs glucose-stimulated insulin release and β-cell survival as well as producing other toxic consequences. The defects disclosed/clarified in model Ins2(+/Akita β-cells further support a role of the genetic and stress-susceptible PIHO disorder in β-cell failure and diabetes.

  20. Characterization of Transformation-Induced Defects in Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    Bowers, Matthew L.

    Shape memory alloys have remarkable strain recovery properties that make them ideal candidates for many applications that include devices in the automotive, aerospace, medical, and MEMS industries. Although these materials are widely used today, their performance is hindered by poor dimensional stability resulting from cyclic degradation of the martensitic transformation behavior. This functional fatigue results in decreased work output and cyclic accumulation of permanent strain. To date, few studies have taken a fundamental approach to investigating the interaction between plasticity and martensite growth and propagation, which is vitally important to mitigating functional fatigue in future alloy development. The current work focuses on understanding the interplay of these deformation mechanisms in NiTi-based shape memory alloys under a variety of different thermomechanical test conditions. Micron-scale compression testing of NiTi shape memory alloy single crystals is undertaken in an effort to probe the mechanism of austenite dislocation generation. Mechanical testing is paired with post mortem defect analysis via diffraction contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Accompanied by micromechanics-based modeling of local stresses surrounding a martensite plate, these results demonstrate that the previously existing martensite and resulting austenite dislocation substructure are intimately related. A mechanism of transformation-induced dislocation generation is described in detail. A study of pure and load-biased thermal cycling of bulk polycrystalline NiTi is done for comparison of the transformation behavior and resultant defects to the stress-induced case. Post mortem and in situ STEM characterization demonstrate unique defect configurations in this test mode and STEM-based orientation mapping reveals local crystal rotation with increasing thermal cycles. Changes in both martensite and austenite microstructures are explored. The results for

  1. Defect and dopant depth profiles in boron-implanted silicon studied with channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    Vos, M.; Boerma, D.O.; Smulders, P.J.M.; Oosterhoff, S.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystals of silicon were implanted at RT with 1 MeV boron ions to a dose of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The depth profile of the boron was measured using the 2060-keV resonance of the 11B(α, n)14N nuclear reaction. The distribution of the lattice disorder as a function of depth was determined from

  2. In Vitro Measurement Of Insertion Torque, Removal Torque And Resonance Frequency Analysis Of Implants Placed Into Simulated Bony Defects

    2014-05-14

    for the teeth), Charles Allen suggested using teeth from dogs , sheep, and baboons for implantation. However, infection and disease transmission was a...47     6.1 REFERENCES Ablandar, J. B., JA.; Klingman, A. (1988). "Destructive periodontal disease in adults 30 years of age and older in the...Clin Periodontol18(6): 474-481. Armitage, G. C. (1999). "Development of a classification system for periodontal diseases and conditions." Ann

  3. Deciphering chondrocyte behaviour in matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation to undergo accurate cartilage repair with hyaline matrix.

    Demoor, M; Maneix, L; Ollitrault, D; Legendre, F; Duval, E; Claus, S; Mallein-Gerin, F; Moslemi, S; Boumediene, K; Galera, P

    2012-06-01

    Since the emergence in the 1990s of the autologous chondrocytes transplantation (ACT) in the treatment of cartilage defects, the technique, corresponding initially to implantation of chondrocytes, previously isolated and amplified in vitro, under a periosteal membrane, has greatly evolved. Indeed, the first generations of ACT showed their limits, with in particular the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the monolayer culture, inducing the synthesis of fibroblastic collagens, notably type I collagen to the detriment of type II collagen. Beyond the clinical aspect with its encouraging results, new biological substitutes must be tested to obtain a hyaline neocartilage. Therefore, the use of differentiated chondrocytes phenotypically stabilized is essential for the success of ACT at medium and long-term. That is why researchers try now to develop more reliable culture techniques, using among others, new types of biomaterials and molecules known for their chondrogenic activity, giving rise to the 4th generation of ACT. Other sources of cells, being able to follow chondrogenesis program, are also studied. The success of the cartilage regenerative medicine is based on the phenotypic status of the chondrocyte and on one of its essential component of the cartilage, type II collagen, the expression of which should be supported without induction of type I collagen. The knowledge accumulated by the scientific community and the experience of the clinicians will certainly allow to relief this technological challenge, which influence besides, the validation of such biological substitutes by the sanitary authorities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Minocycline treatment ameliorates interferon-alpha-induced neurogenic defects and depression-like behaviors in mice

    Lian-Shun eZheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-alpha (IFN-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that is widely used for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis and malignancy, because of its immune-activating, antiviral, and antiproliferative properties. However, long-term IFN-α treatment frequently causes depression, which limits its clinical utility. The precise molecular and cellular mechanisms of IFN-α-induced depression are not currently understood. Neural stem cells (NSCs in the hippocampus continuously generate new neurons, and some evidence suggests that decreased neurogenesis plays a role in the neuropathology of depression. We previously reported that IFN-α treatment suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis and induced depression-like behaviors via its receptors in the brain in adult mice. However, it is unclear how systemic IFN-α administration induces IFN-α signaling in the hippocampus. In this study, we analyzed the role of microglia, immune cells in the brain, in mediating the IFN-α-induced neurogenic defects and depressive behaviors. In vitro studies demonstrated that IFN-α treatment induced the secretion of endogenous IFN-α from microglia, which suppressed NSC proliferation. In vivo treatment of adult mice with IFN-α for five weeks increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including IFN-α, and reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Both effects were prevented by simultaneous treatment with minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation. Furthermore, minocycline treatment significantly suppressed IFN-α-induced depressive behaviors in mice. These results suggest that microglial activation plays a critical role in the development of IFN-α-induced depression, and that minocycline is a promising drug for the treatment of IFN-α-induced depression in patients, especially those who are low responders to conventional antidepressant treatments.

  5. Taurine protects methamphetamine-induced developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism

    Shao, Xue; Hu, Zhengtao; Hu, Chunyan; Bu, Qian; Yan, Guangyan; Deng, Pengchi; Lv, Lei; Wu, Dan; Deng, Yi; Zhao, Jinxuan; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Li, Hongyu; Xu, Youzhi; Yang, Hanshuo; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    Investigations have characterized addictive drug-induced developmental cardiovascular malformation in human, non-human primate and rodent. However, the underlying mechanism of malformation caused by drugs during pregnancy is still largely unknown, and preventive and therapeutic measures have been lacking. Using 1 H NMR spectroscopy, we profiled the metabolites from human embryo endothelial cells exposed to methamphetamine (METH) and quantified a total of 226 peaks. We identified 11 metabolites modified robustly and found that taurine markedly increased. We then validated the hypothesis that this dramatic increase in taurine could attribute to its effect in inhibiting METH-induced developmental angiogenesis defect. Taurine supplement showed a more significant potential than other metabolites in protecting against METH-induced injury in endothelial cells. Taurine strongly attenuated METH-induced inhibition of proliferation and migration in endothelial cells. Furthermore, death rate and vessel abnormality of zebrafish embryos treated with METH were greatly reversed by taurine. In addition, taurine supplement caused a rapid decrease in reactive oxygen species generation and strongly attenuated the excitable arise of antioxidase activities in the beginning of METH exposure prophase. Dysregulations of NF-κB, p-ERK as well as Bax, which reflect apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium, were blocked by taurine. Our results provide the first evidence that taurine prevents METH-caused developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism. Taurine could serve as a potential therapeutic or preventive intervention of developmental vascular malformation for the pregnant women with drug use. Highlights: ► Metabonomics findings. ► Abnormal development. ► Dysregulations of key proteins.

  6. Taurine protects methamphetamine-induced developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism

    Shao, Xue; Hu, Zhengtao; Hu, Chunyan; Bu, Qian; Yan, Guangyan [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Deng, Pengchi [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Lv, Lei [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, Dan [College of Basic and Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Deng, Yi; Zhao, Jinxuan; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Li, Hongyu; Xu, Youzhi; Yang, Hanshuo; Zhao, Yinglan [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Cen, Xiaobo, E-mail: xbcenalan@vip.sina.com [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-05-01

    Investigations have characterized addictive drug-induced developmental cardiovascular malformation in human, non-human primate and rodent. However, the underlying mechanism of malformation caused by drugs during pregnancy is still largely unknown, and preventive and therapeutic measures have been lacking. Using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, we profiled the metabolites from human embryo endothelial cells exposed to methamphetamine (METH) and quantified a total of 226 peaks. We identified 11 metabolites modified robustly and found that taurine markedly increased. We then validated the hypothesis that this dramatic increase in taurine could attribute to its effect in inhibiting METH-induced developmental angiogenesis defect. Taurine supplement showed a more significant potential than other metabolites in protecting against METH-induced injury in endothelial cells. Taurine strongly attenuated METH-induced inhibition of proliferation and migration in endothelial cells. Furthermore, death rate and vessel abnormality of zebrafish embryos treated with METH were greatly reversed by taurine. In addition, taurine supplement caused a rapid decrease in reactive oxygen species generation and strongly attenuated the excitable arise of antioxidase activities in the beginning of METH exposure prophase. Dysregulations of NF-κB, p-ERK as well as Bax, which reflect apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium, were blocked by taurine. Our results provide the first evidence that taurine prevents METH-caused developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism. Taurine could serve as a potential therapeutic or preventive intervention of developmental vascular malformation for the pregnant women with drug use. Highlights: ► Metabonomics findings. ► Abnormal development. ► Dysregulations of key proteins.

  7. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  8. Oxygen ion implantation induced microstructural changes and electrical conductivity in Bakelite RPC detector material

    Kumar, K. V. Aneesh, E-mail: aneesh1098@gmail.com; Ravikumar, H. B., E-mail: hbr@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore-570006 (India); Ranganathaiah, C., E-mail: cr@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Govt. Research Centre, Sahyadri Educational Institutions, Mangalore-575007 (India); Kumarswamy, G. N., E-mail: kumy79@gmail.com [Department of Studies in Physics, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Bangalore-560035 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In order to explore the structural modification induced electrical conductivity, samples of Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector materials were exposed to 100 keV Oxygen ion in the fluences of 10{sup 12}, 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Ion implantation induced microstructural changes have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime and its intensity shows the deposition of high energy interior track and chain scission leads to the formation of radicals, secondary ions and electrons at lower ion implantation fluences (10{sup 12} to10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) followed by cross-linking at 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence due to the radical reactions. The reduction in electrical conductivity of Bakelite detector material is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate implantation energy and fluence of Oxygen ion on polymer based Bakelite RPC detector material may reduce the leakage current, improves the efficiency, time resolution and thereby rectify the aging crisis of the RPC detectors.

  9. Investigation of Near-Surface Defects Induced by Spike Rapid Thermal Annealing in c-SILICON Solar Cells

    Liu, Guodong; Ren, Pan; Zhang, Dayong; Wang, Weiping; Li, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    The defects induced by a spike rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process in crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells were investigated by the photoluminescence (PL) technique and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. Dislocation defects were found to form in the near-surface junction region of the monocrystalline Si solar cell after a spike RTA process was performed at 1100∘C. Photo J-V characteristics were measured on the Si solar cell before and after the spike RTA treatments to reveal the effects of defects on the Si cell performances. In addition, the Silvaco device simulation program was used to study the effects of defects density on the cell performances by fitting the experimental data of RTA-treated cells. The results demonstrate that there was an obvious degradation in the Si solar cell performances when the defect density after the spike RTA treatment was above 1×1013cm-3.

  10. Characterization of deep level defects in Tl6I4S single crystals by photo-induced current transient spectroscopy

    Peters, J A; Liu, Z; Sebastian, M; Wessels, B W; Im, J; Freeman, A J; Nguyen, S; Kanatzidis, M G

    2015-01-01

    Defect levels in semi-insulating Tl 6 I 4 S single crystals grown by the horizontal Bridgman technique have been characterized using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS). These measurements revealed six electron traps located at (0.059  ±  0.007), (0.13  ±  0.012), (0.31  ±  0.074), (0.39  ±  0.019), (0.62  ±  0.110), and (0.597  ±  0.105). These defect levels are attributed to vacancies (V I , V S ) and antisite defects (I S , Tl S , Tl I ) upon comparison to calculations of native defect energy levels using density functional theory and defects recently reported from photoluminescence and photoconductivity measurements. (paper)

  11. High complication rate in reconstruction of Paprosky type IIIa acetabular defects using an oblong implant with modular side plates and a hook.

    Babis, G C; Sakellariou, V I; Chatziantoniou, A N; Soucacos, P N; Megas, P

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of 62 hips in 62 patients (17 males, 45 females) with mean age of 62.4 years (37 to 81), who underwent revision of the acetabular component of a total hip replacement due to aseptic loosening between May 2003 and November 2007. All hips had a Paprosky type IIIa acetabular defect. Acetabular revision was undertaken using a Procotyl E cementless oblong implant with modular side plates and a hook combined with impaction allografting. At a mean follow-up of 60.5 months (36 to 94) with no patients lost to follow-up and one died due to unrelated illness, the complication rate was 38.7%. Complications included aseptic loosening (19 hips), deep infection (3 hips), broken hook and side plate (one hip) and a femoral nerve palsy (one hip). Further revision of the acetabular component was required in 18 hips (29.0%) and a further four hips (6.4%) are currently loose and awaiting revision. We observed unacceptably high rates of complication and failure in our group of patients and cannot recommend this implant or technique.

  12. Flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in YBa2Cu3O7 epitaxial films

    Budhani, R.C.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report some transport measurements carried out to study flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 films. Our results show that in these in situ deposited films containing a large concentration of defects frozen-in at the time of film growth, a marginal enhancement in critical current density occurs when the density of linear defects 10 /cm 2 , and their diameter of the order of coherence length. This criterion is satisfied by Ag +21 ions. The damage due to Au +24 ions is much too severe to improve the J c

  13. Individual titanium zygomatic implant

    Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Ryabov, K. N.; Avdeev, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    Custom individual implants for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects have gained importance due to better qualitative characteristics over their generic counterparts – plates, which should be bent according to patient needs. The Additive Manufacturing of individual implants allows reducing cost and improving quality of implants. In this paper, the authors describe design of zygomatic implant models based on computed tomography (CT) data. The fabrication of the implants will be carried out with 3D printing by selective laser melting machine SLM 280HL.

  14. The effects of implant topography on osseointegration under estrogen deficiency induced osteoporotic conditions: Histomorphometric, transcriptional and ultrastructural analysis.

    Du, Zhibin; Xiao, Yin; Hashimi, Saeed; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2016-09-15

    Compromised bone quality and/or healing in osteoporosis are recognised risk factors for impaired dental implant osseointegration. This study examined the effects of (1) experimentally induced osteoporosis on titanium implant osseointegration and (2) the effect of modified implant surface topography on osseointegration under osteoporosis-like conditions. Machined and micro-roughened surface implants were placed into the maxillary first molar root socket of 64 ovariectomised and sham-operated Sprague-Dawley rats. Subsequent histological and SEM observations showed tissue maturation on the micro-rough surfaced implants in ovariectomised animals as early as 3days post-implantation. The degree of osseointegration was also significantly higher around the micro-rough implants in ovariectomised animals after 14days of healing although by day 28, similar levels of osseointegration were found for all test groups. The micro-rough implants significantly increased the early (day 3) gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and dentin matrix protein 1 in implant adherent cells. By day 7, the expression of inflammatory genes decreased while the expression of the osteogenic markers increased further although there were few statistically significant differences between the micro-rough and machined surfaces. Osteocyte morphology was also affected by estrogen deficiency with the size of the cells being reduced in trabecular bone. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency induced osteoporotic conditions negatively influenced the early osseointegration of machined implants while micro-rough implants compensated for these deleterious effects by enhancing osteogenic cell differentiation on the implant surface. Lower bone density, poor bone quality and osseous microstructural changes are all features characteristic of osteoporosis that may impair the osseointegration of dental implants. Using a clinically relevant trabecular bone

  15. Preparation of 1-pyrenebutyric acid and pyrene submicron dots by laser-induced molecular micro-jet implantation

    Pihosh, Y.; Goto, M.; Kasahara, A.; Tosa, M.

    2009-01-01

    Pyrene and 1-pyrenebuturic acid molecules were deposited on glass and copper substrates with the formation of submicron dots by laser-induced molecular micro-jet implantation through polar and non-polar liquid layers. The size of the smallest 1-pyrenebuturic acid molecules dots prepared on a glass substrate by implantation through water and diiodomethane was estimated to be about 400 nm and 300 nm at laser fluences of 235 J/cm 2 and 326 J/cm 2 , respectively. The fluorescence and the Raman spectra showed that the implanted 1-pyrenebutyric acid molecules did not decompose during the implantation process. The smallest size of a pyrene dot was 700 nm at the laser fluence of 378 J/cm 2 . However, the pyrene dots could be formed only by implantation through a water layer.

  16. Computer experiment studies on mechanisms for irradiation induced defect production and annealing processes. Final report

    Beeler, J.R. Jr.; Beeler, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    This research is based on pair potentials used in the Brookhaven work. It extends their use in defect production simulations to the 5 MeV range and characterizes the short term annealing of the primary defect states. Defect properties and interactions are studied. Defect interactions include carbon, helium, and misfit metallic substitutional impurity interactions with vacancy and interstitial defects as well as vacancy-vacancy, interstitial-interstitial and vacancy-interstitial interactions

  17. Computer experiment studies on mechanisms for irradiation induced defect production and annealing processes. Final report

    Beeler, J.R. Jr.; Beeler, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    This research is based on pair potentials used in the Brookhaven work. It extends their use in defect production simulations to the 5 MeV range and characterizes the short term annealing of the primary defect states. Defect properties and interactions are studied. Defect interactions include carbon, helium, and misfit metallic substitutional impurity interactions with vacancy and interstitial defects as well as vacancy-vacancy, interstitial-interstitial and vacancy-interstitial interactions. (FS)

  18. Radiation-induced segregation on defect clusters in single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys

    Lu, Chenyang; Yang, Taini; Jin, Ke; Gao, Ning; Xiu, Pengyuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Gao, Fei; Bei, Hongbin; Weber, William J.; Sun, Kai; Dong, Yan; Wang, Lumin

    2017-01-01

    A group of single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys (SP-CSAs), including NiFe, NiCoFe, NiCoFeCr, as well as a high entropy alloy NiCoFeCrMn, was irradiated with 3 MeV Ni"2"+ ions at 773 K to a fluence of 5 × 10"1"6 ions/cm"2 for the study of radiation response with increasing compositional complexity. Advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to characterize the dislocation loop distribution and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) on defect clusters in the SP-CSAs. The results show that a higher fraction of faulted loops exists in the more compositionally complex alloys, which indicate that increasing compositional complexity can extend the incubation period and delay loop growth. The RIS behaviors of each element in the SP-CSAs were observed as follows: Ni and Co tend to enrich, but Cr, Fe and Mn prefer to deplete near the defect clusters. RIS level can be significantly suppressed by increasing compositional complexity due to the sluggish atom diffusion. According to molecular static (MS) simulations, “disk” like segregations may form near the faulted dislocation loops in the SP-CSAs. Segregated elements tend to distribute around the whole faulted loop as a disk rather than only around the edge of the loop.

  19. Ectopic expression of Ptf1a induces spinal defects, urogenital defects, and anorectal malformations in Danforth's short tail mice.

    Kei Semba

    Full Text Available Danforth's short tail (Sd is a semidominant mutation on mouse chromosome 2, characterized by spinal defects, urogenital defects, and anorectal malformations. However, the gene responsible for the Sd phenotype was unknown. In this study, we identified the molecular basis of the Sd mutation. By positional cloning, we identified the insertion of an early transposon in the Sd candidate locus approximately 12-kb upstream of Ptf1a. We found that insertion of the transposon caused overexpression of three neighboring genes, Gm13344, Gm13336, and Ptf1a, in Sd mutant embryos and that the Sd phenotype was not caused by disruption of an as-yet-unknown gene in the candidate locus. Using multiple knockout and knock-in mouse models, we demonstrated that misexpression of Ptf1a, but not of Gm13344 or Gm13336, in the notochord, hindgut, cloaca, and mesonephros was sufficient to replicate the Sd phenotype. The ectopic expression of Ptf1a in the caudal embryo resulted in attenuated expression of Cdx2 and its downstream target genes T, Wnt3a, and Cyp26a1; we conclude that this is the molecular basis of the Sd phenotype. Analysis of Sd mutant mice will provide insight into the development of the spinal column, anus, and kidney.

  20. Proteome Changes in Maize Embryo (Zea mays L) Induced by Ion Beam Implantation Treatment

    Li Yongliang; Qin Guangyong; Huo Yuping; Tian Shuangqi; Tang Jihua

    2009-01-01

    Low energy ion beam implantation was applied to the maize (Zea mays L) embryo proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profile analysis detected more than 1100 protein spots, 72 of which were determined to be expressed differently in the treated and control (not exposed to ion beam implantation) embryos. Of the 72 protein spots, 53 were up-regulated in the control and 19 were more abundantly expressed in the ion beam-treated embryos. The spots of up- or down-regulated proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Among the identified proteins, 11 were up-regulated in the treated embryos. Four of these up-regulated proteins were antioxidant molecules, three were related to stress response, two to sugar metabolism and two were associated with heat shock response. Of the five proteins up-regulated in the control embryos, three were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism; the functions of the remaining two proteins were unknown. The data collected during this study indicate that treatment of maize embryos with low energy ion beam implantation induces changes in stress tolerance enzymes/proteins, possibly as a result of alterations in metabolism. (ion beam bioengineering)

  1. Murine liver implantation of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma: characterization with MR imaging, microangiography and histopathology

    Wang, Huaijun; Keyzer, Frederik de; Jin, Lixin; Yu, Jie; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng [Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Putte, Marie van de; Witte, Peter de [K.U. Leuven, Laboratory for Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leuven (Belgium); Chen, Feng [Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Zhong Da Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2008-07-15

    We sought to establish and characterize a mouse liver tumor model as a platform for preclinical assessment of new diagnostics and therapeutics. Radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) was intrahepatically implanted in 27 C3H/Km mice. Serial in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a clinical 1.5-T-magnet was performed using T1- (T1WI), T2- (T2WI), and diffusion-weighted sequences (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and contrast-enhanced T1WI, and validated with postmortem microangiography and histopathology. Implantation procedure succeeded in 25 mice with 2 deaths from overdosed anesthesia or hypothermia. RIF-1 grew in 21 mice with volume doubling time of 2.55{+-}0.88 days and final size of 216.2{+-}150.4 mm{sup 3} at day 14. Three mice were found without tumor growth and one only with abdominal seeding. The intrahepatic RIF-1 was hypervascularized with negligible necrosis as shown on MRI, microangiography and histology. On DCE-MRI, maximal initial slope of contrast-time curve and volume transfer constant per unit volume of tissue, K, differed between the tumor and liver with only the former significantly lower in the tumor than in the liver (P<0.05). Liver implantation of RIF-1 in mice proves a feasible and reproducible model and appears promising for use to screen new diagnostics and therapeutics under noninvasive monitoring even with a clinical MRI system. (orig.)

  2. Proteome Changes in Maize Embryo (Zea mays L) Induced by Ion Beam Implantation Treatment

    Li, Yongliang; Tang, Jihua; Qin, Guangyong; Huo, Yuping; Tian, Shuangqi

    2009-08-01

    Low energy ion beam implantation was applied to the maize (Zea mays L) embryo proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profile analysis detected more than 1100 protein spots, 72 of which were determined to be expressed differently in the treated and control (not exposed to ion beam implantation) embryos. Of the 72 protein spots, 53 were up-regulated in the control and 19 were more abundantly expressed in the ion beam-treated embryos. The spots of up- or down-regulated proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Among the identified proteins, 11 were up-regulated in the treated embryos. Four of these up-regulated proteins were antioxidant molecules, three were related to stress response, two to sugar metabolism and two were associated with heat shock response. Of the five proteins up-regulated in the control embryos, three were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism; the functions of the remaining two proteins were unknown. The data collected during this study indicate that treatment of maize embryos with low energy ion beam implantation induces changes in stress tolerance enzymes/proteins, possibly as a result of alterations in metabolism.

  3. Lattice damage induced by Tb-implanted AlN crystalline films

    Lu Fei; Hu Hui; Rizzi, A.

    2002-01-01

    AlN films with thickness from 100 to 1000 nm were grown on SiC substrate by MBE. AlN crystalline films were doped by implantation with 160 keV Tb ions to fluences of 5x10 14 , 1.5x10 15 , 3x10 15 and 6x10 15 ions/cm 2 , respectively. The damage profiles in AlN films induced by Tb implantation were investigated using RBS/channeling technique. A procedure developed by Feldman and Rodgers was used to extract damage profile by considering the dechanneling mechanism of multiple. The comparison of the extracted profile with TRIM prediction shows a significant difference in the shape and in the position of damage profile. The damage profile in AlN film is similar as Tb distribution. The RBS/channeling of Tb-implanted AlN film before and after 950 deg. C annealing treatments show a good consistency, which indicate that high temperature annealing cannot result in a significant change in both crystal damage and in Tb distribution

  4. Murine liver implantation of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma: characterization with MR imaging, microangiography and histopathology

    Wang, Huaijun; Keyzer, Frederik de; Jin, Lixin; Yu, Jie; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng; Putte, Marie van de; Witte, Peter de; Chen, Feng

    2008-01-01

    We sought to establish and characterize a mouse liver tumor model as a platform for preclinical assessment of new diagnostics and therapeutics. Radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) was intrahepatically implanted in 27 C3H/Km mice. Serial in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a clinical 1.5-T-magnet was performed using T1- (T1WI), T2- (T2WI), and diffusion-weighted sequences (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and contrast-enhanced T1WI, and validated with postmortem microangiography and histopathology. Implantation procedure succeeded in 25 mice with 2 deaths from overdosed anesthesia or hypothermia. RIF-1 grew in 21 mice with volume doubling time of 2.55±0.88 days and final size of 216.2±150.4 mm 3 at day 14. Three mice were found without tumor growth and one only with abdominal seeding. The intrahepatic RIF-1 was hypervascularized with negligible necrosis as shown on MRI, microangiography and histology. On DCE-MRI, maximal initial slope of contrast-time curve and volume transfer constant per unit volume of tissue, K, differed between the tumor and liver with only the former significantly lower in the tumor than in the liver (P<0.05). Liver implantation of RIF-1 in mice proves a feasible and reproducible model and appears promising for use to screen new diagnostics and therapeutics under noninvasive monitoring even with a clinical MRI system. (orig.)

  5. Effect of fluence on the lattice site of implanted Er and implantation induced strain in GaN

    Wahl, U; Decoster, S; Vantomme, A; Correi, J G

    2009-01-01

    A GaN thin film was implanted with 5 × 1014 cm−2 of 60 keV stable 166Er, followed by the implantation of 2 × 1013 cm−2 radioactive 167Tm (t1/2 = 9.3 d) and an annealing sequence up to 900 °C. The emission channeling (EC) technique was applied to assess the lattice location of Er following the Tm decay from the conversion electrons emitted by 167mEr, which showed that more than 50% of 167mEr occupies substitutional Ga sites. The results are briefly compared to a 167mEr lattice location experiment in a GaN sample not pre-implanted with 166Er. In addition, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was used to characterize the perpendicular strain in the high-fluence implanted film. The HRXRD experiments showed that the Er implantation resulted in an increase of the c-axis lattice constant of the GaN film around 0.5–0.7%. The presence of significant disorder within the implanted region was corroborated by the fact that the EC patterns for off-normal directions exhibit a pronounced angular broadening of t...

  6. Energy and orientation dependence of electron-irradiation-induced defects in InP

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.; LeRoux, G.

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of several electron-irradiation-induced deep defect levels in InP has been measured by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) as a function of electron energy. The dominant centers exhibit a threshold at about 100 keV, which clearly points to a primary production event by electron--phosphorus-atom collision. This unambiguous determination allowed a test of the recently proposed orientation dependence technique to find the nature of the sublattice involved in the collision process for III-V compounds. A good quantitative agreement is obtained with a hard-sphere model for secondary collisions if disorientation of the beam in the sample is taken into account. Other traps exhibit higher thresholds which correspond either to indium-atom displacements or to the involvement of secondary collisions in the production event

  7. Inhomogeneous ozone doping and heat induced defects in graphene studied by infrared near-field microscopy

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Jiawei; Deng, Haiming; Liu, Megnkun; Xu, Du

    With the potential use of surface plasmon such as transfer data many orders faster than traditional wires, it has been very popular in research. The fact is that the wavelength of of plasmon is much shorter than the one of free space radiation. The UV ozone doping level can be fine controlled in room temperature creating selected plasmon circuit. We study inhomogeneous graphene plasmonics in ozone doped graphene using scattering-type scanning near-field infrared microscopy and spectroscopy. The single layer and bilayer graphene are doped with different dosage of ozone under UV exposure, which lead to surface inhomogeneity and inhomogeneous graphene plasmon polarition excitation under tip. After annealing the ozone doped graphene in air, the inhomogeneous doping induced plasmons disappear, together with the occurrence of local defects after high temperature annealing.

  8. Study of plasma charging-induced white pixel defect increase in CMOS active pixel sensor

    Tokashiki, Ken; Bai, KeunHee; Baek, KyeHyun; Kim, Yongjin; Min, Gyungjin; Kang, Changjin; Cho, Hanku; Moon, Jootae

    2007-01-01

    Plasma process-induced 'white pixel defect' (WPD) of CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) is studied for Si3N4 spacer etch back process by using a magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE) system. WPD preferably takes place at the wafer edge region when the magnetized plasma is applied to Si3N4 etch. Plasma charging analysis reveals that the plasma charge-up characteristic is well matching the edge-intensive WPD generation, rather than the UV radiation. Plasma charging on APS transfer gate might lead to a gate leakage, which could play a role in generation of signal noise or WPD. In this article the WPD generation mechanism will be discussed from plasma charging point of view

  9. Magnetic circular dichroism study of electron-irradiation induced defects in InP

    Gislason, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    A strong magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) absorption band centered at 1.07 eV in electron irradiated InP is reported. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the signal reveal that the centre giving rise to this band is a spin triplet. By simulating neutral and reverse bias conditions of junction measurements through a careful choice of irradiation dose and starting material, the MCD band is shown to have an annealing behaviour closely resembling that of the majority carrier traps which control the Fermi level position in n- and p-type InP. The 1.07 eV MCD band represents the first magneto-optical signal connected with this family of complex irradiation-induced defects in InP. (author) 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  10. Dynamics of defect-induced dark solitons in an exciton-polariton condensate

    Opala, Andrzej; Pieczarka, Maciej; Bobrovska, Nataliya; Matuszewski, Michał

    2018-04-01

    We study theoretically the emission of dark solitons induced by a moving defect in a nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensate. The number of created dark solitons per unit of time is found to be strongly dependent on the pump power. We relate the observed dynamics of this process to the oscillations of the drag force experienced by the condensate. We investigate the stability of the polariton quantum fluid and present various types of dynamics depending on the condensate and moving obstacle parameters. Furthermore, we provide analytical expressions for dark soliton dynamics using the variational method adapted to the nonequilibrium polariton system. The determined dynamical equations are found to be in excellent agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  11. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Sandra Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel heterozygous GRN mutation (progranulin [PGRN] S116X. In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X induced pluripotent stem cells, the levels of intracellular and secreted PGRN were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of PGRN haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by PGRN expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with PGRN deficiency, and provide a compelling model for studying PGRN-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies.

  12. Confocal fluorescence microscopy investigation of visible emitting defects induced by electron beam lithography in LIF films

    Montereali, R.M.; Bigotta, S.; Pace, A.; Piccinini, M. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Burattini, E.; Grilli, A.; Raco, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Fisica, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Giammatteo, M. [Unita' Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy)]|[L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Centro di Microscopia Elettronica; Picozzi, P.; Santucci, S. [Unita' Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy)]|[L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2000-07-01

    Low energy electron irradiation of lithium fluoride (LiF), in the form of bulk crystals and films, gives rise to the stable formation of primary F defects and aggregated color centers in a thin layer located at the surface of the investigated material. For the first time a confocal light scanning microscope (CLSM) in fluorescence mode was used to reconstruct the depth distribution of efficiently emitting laser active color centers in a stripe-like region induced by 12 and 16 keV electrons on LiF films thermally evaporated on glass. The formation of the F{sub 3}{sup +} and F{sub 2} aggregated defects appears restricted to the electron penetration and proportional to their energy depth profile, as obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. [Italian] L'irraggiamento con elettroni di bassa energia del fluoruro di litio (LiF), in forma di cristalli e film, induce la formazione di difetti primari F e centri di colore aggregati stabili in un sottile strato localizzato alla superficie del materiale investigato. Per la prima volta un microscopio confocale a scansione (CLSM) in modalita' fluorescenza e' stato usato per ricostruire la distribuzione di centri di colore laser attivi ad alta efficienza di emissione nel visibile, in strisce colorate ottenute con elettroni da 12 e 16 keV su film di LiF evaporati termicamente su vetro. La formazione dei difetti aggregati F2 e F3+ risulta ristretta spazialmente nella regione di penetrazione degli elettroni e proporzionale al profilo della distribuzione dell'energia da essi depositata, ricavata tramite simulazioni Monte Carlo.

  13. α-Synuclein fibril-induced paradoxical structural and functional defects in hippocampal neurons.

    Froula, Jessica M; Henderson, Benjamin W; Gonzalez, Jose Carlos; Vaden, Jada H; Mclean, John W; Wu, Yumei; Banumurthy, Gokulakrishna; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A

    2018-05-01

    Neuronal inclusions composed of α-synuclein (α-syn) characterize Parkinson's Disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Cognitive dysfunction defines DLB, and up to 80% of PD patients develop dementia. α-Syn inclusions are abundant in the hippocampus, yet functional consequences are unclear. To determine if pathologic α-syn causes neuronal defects, we induced endogenous α-syn to form inclusions resembling those found in diseased brains by treating hippocampal neurons with α-syn fibrils. At seven days after adding fibrils, α-syn inclusions are abundant in axons, but there is no cell death at this time point, allowing us to assess for potential alterations in neuronal function that are not caused by neuron death. We found that exposure of neurons to fibrils caused a significant reduction in mushroom spine densities, adding to the growing body of literature showing that altered spine morphology is a major pathologic phenotype in synucleinopathies. The reduction in spine densities occurred only in wild type neurons and not in neurons from α-syn knockout mice, suggesting that the changes in spine morphology result from fibril-induced corruption of endogenously expressed α-syn. Paradoxically, reduced postsynaptic spine density was accompanied by increased frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and presynaptic docked vesicles, suggesting enhanced presynaptic function. Action-potential dependent activity was unchanged, suggesting compensatory mechanisms responding to synaptic defects. Although activity at the level of the synapse was unchanged, neurons exposed to α-syn fibrils, showed reduced frequency and amplitudes of spontaneous Ca 2+ transients. These findings open areas of research to determine the mechanisms that alter neuronal function in brain regions critical for cognition at time points before neuron death.

  14. Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    Laura Roland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Implant constructs supporting angiogenesis are favorable for treating critically-sized bone defects, as ingrowth of capillaries towards the center of large defects is often insufficient. Consequently, the insufficient nutritional supply of these regions leads to impaired bone healing. Implants with specially designed angiogenic supporting geometry and functionalized with proangiogenic cytokines can enhance angiogenesis. In this study, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 were used for incorporation into poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL-coated porous titanium implants. Bioactivity of released factors and influence on angiogenesis of functionalized implants were evaluated using a migration assay and angiogenesis assays. Both implants released angiogenic factors, inducing migration of endothelial cells. Also, VEGF-functionalized PCL-coated titanium implants enhanced angiogenesis in vitro. Both factors were rapidly released in high doses from the implant coating during the first 72 h.

  15. Excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy contribute to developmental testicular toxicity induced by fluoride

    Zhang, Shun; Niu, Qiang; Gao, Hui; Ma, Rulin; Lei, Rongrong; Zhang, Cheng; Xia, Tao; Li, Pei; Xu, Chunyan; Wang, Chao; Chen, Jingwen; Dong, Lixing; Zhao, Qian; Wang, Aiguo

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to impair testicular functions and fertility; however the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this study, we used a rat model to mimic human exposure and sought to investigate the roles of apoptosis and autophagy in testicular toxicity of fluoride. Sprague–Dawley rats were developmentally exposed to 25, 50, or 100 mg/L sodium fluoride (NaF) via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to post-puberty, and then the testes of offspring were excised on postnatal day 56. Our results demonstrated that developmental NaF exposure induced an enhanced testicular apoptosis, as manifested by a series of hallmarks such as caspase-3 activation, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Further study revealed that fluoride exposure elicited significant elevations in the levels of cell surface death receptor Fas with a parallel increase in cytoplasmic cytochrome c, indicating the involvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Intriguingly, fluoride treatment also simultaneously increased the number of autophagosomes and the levels of autophagy marker LC3-II but not Beclin1. Unexpectedly, the expression of p62, a substrate that is degraded by autophagy, was also significantly elevated, suggesting that the accumulated autophagosomes resulted from impaired autophagy degradation rather than increased formation. Importantly, these were associated with marked histopathological lesions including spermatogenic failure and germ cell loss, along with severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our findings provide deeper insights into roles of excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy in the aggravation of testicular damage, which could contribute to a better understanding of fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity. - Highlights: • Rats were developmentally exposed to fluoride from pre-pregnancy to post-puberty. • Both excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy are involved in

  16. Wolbachia-induced paternal defect in Drosophila is likely by interaction with the juvenile hormone pathway.

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zheng, Ya; Xiong, En-Juan; Li, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Lin-Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2014-06-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbionts that infect many insect species. They can manipulate the host's reproduction to increase their own maternal transmission. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is one such manipulation, which is expressed as embryonic lethality when Wolbachia-infected males mate with uninfected females. However, matings between males and females carrying the same Wolbachia strain result in viable progeny. The molecular mechanisms of CI are currently not clear. We have previously reported that the gene Juvenile hormone-inducible protein 26 (JhI-26) exhibited the highest upregulation in the 3rd instar larval testes of Drosophila melanogaster when infected by Wolbachia. This is reminiscent of an interaction between Wolbachia and juvenile hormone (JH) pathway in flies. Considering that Jhamt gene encodes JH acid methyltransferase, a key regulatory enzyme of JH biosynthesis, and that methoprene-tolerant (Met) has been regarded as the best JH receptor candidate, we first compared the expression of Jhamt and Met between Wolbachia-infected and uninfected fly testes to investigate whether Wolbachia infection influence the JH signaling pathway. We found that the expressions of Jhamt and Met were significantly increased in the presence of Wolbachia, suggesting an interaction of Wolbachia with the JH signaling pathway. Then, we found that overexpression of JhI-26 in Wolbachia-free transgenic male flies caused paternal-effect lethality that mimics the defects associated with CI. JhI-26 overexpressing males resulted in significantly decrease in hatch rate. Surprisingly, Wolbachia-infected females could rescue the egg hatch. In addition, we showed that overexpression of JhI-26 caused upregulation of the male accessory gland protein (Acp) gene CG10433, but not vice versa. This result suggests that JhI-26 may function at the upstream of CG10433. Likewise, overexpression of CG10433 also resulted in paternal-effect lethality. Both JhI-26 and CG10433 overexpressing males

  17. Implantation damage in heavy gas implanted 4H-SiC

    Jiang, C. [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, UPR 3346, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Nicolaï, J., E-mail: julien.nicolai@univ-poitiers.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, UPR 3346, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Declémy, A. [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, UPR 3346, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Gilabert, E. [Centre d’Etude Nucléaire de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Beaufort, M.-F.; Barbot, J.-F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, UPR 3346, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France)

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of SiC were implanted with heavy inert gases (Xe, Ar) at elevated temperatures (300–800 °C) and for a large range of fluence (1 × 10{sup 12}–1 × 10{sup 15} ions cm{sup −2}). Thermodesorption measurements suggest that gas is trapped by implantation-induced vacancy-type defects impeding any gas diffusion. The damage accumulation versus dose was studied through the tensile elastic strain determined by using X-ray diffraction. Results show that at low dose the strain is predictable via a thermally activated direct impact model. The low thermal activation energy at saturation suggests a dynamic recovery process dominated by the migration of interstitial-type defects as its relaxation during post thermal annealing. As compared with light-gas implantation the heavy-gas to defect ratio is low enhancing the formation of strongly perturbed zones rather than the formation of bubble precursors.

  18. Optical spectroscopy and microscopy of radiation-induced light-emitting point defects in lithium fluoride crystals and films

    Montereali, R. M.; Bonfigli, F.; Menchini, F.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Broad-band light-emitting radiation-induced F2 and F3+ electronic point defects, which are stable and laser-active at room temperature in lithium fluoride crystals and films, are used in dosimeters, tuneable color-center lasers, broad-band miniaturized light sources and novel radiation imaging detectors. A brief review of their photoemission properties is presented, and their behavior at liquid nitrogen temperatures is discussed. Some experimental data from optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy of these radiation-induced point defects in LiF crystals and thin films are used to obtain information about the coloration curves, the efficiency of point defect formation, the effects of photo-bleaching processes, etc. Control of the local formation, stabilization, and transformation of radiation-induced light-emitting defect centers is crucial for the development of optically active micro-components and nanostructures. Some of the advantages of low temperature measurements for novel confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, widely used for spatial mapping of these point defects through the optical reading of their visible photoluminescence, are highlighted.

  19. Tendon tissue engineering and its role on healing of the experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits: a comprehensive in vivo study.

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS) sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological analysis and determination of serum PDGF level, at 60 days post injury (DPI). The animals were then euthanized and their lesions were assessed for gross and histopathology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanical testing, dry matter and hydroxyproline content. Another 65 pilot animals were also studied grossly and histopathologically to define the host implant interaction and graft incorporation at serial time points. The treated animals gained significantly better clinical scoring compared to the controls. Treatment with collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly increased the biomechanical properties of the lesions compared to the control tendons at 60DPI (Ptendon. Implantation of the bioimplants had a significant role in initiating tendon healing and the implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and safe for application in tendon reconstructive surgery. The results of the present study may be valuable in clinical practice.

  20. Birth Defects Associated with Perturbations in Pre-implantation, Gastrulation & Axis Extension: from Conjoined Twinning to Caudal Dysgenesis

    Ferrer-Vaquer, Anna; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Congenital malformations represent approximately 3 in 100 live births within the human population. Understanding their pathogenesis and ultimately formulating effective treatments is underpinned by knowledge of the events and factors that regulate normal embryonic development. Studies in model organisms, primarily in the mouse, the most prominent genetically tractable mammalian model, have equipped us with a rudimentary understanding of mammalian development from early lineage commitment to morphogenetic processes. In this way information provided by studies in the mouse can, in some cases, be used to draw parallels with other mammals, including human. Here we provide an overview of our current understanding of the general sequence of developmental events from early cell cleavages to gastrulation and axis extension occurring in human embryos. We will also review some of the rare birth defects occurring at these stages, in particular those resulting in conjoined twinning or caudal dysgenesis. PMID:24014416

  1. SRAP analysis of M3 lotus mutants induced by Fe+ ion implantation

    Jia Yanyan; Deng Chuanliang; Gao Jun; Ren Yingxue; Wang Ningna; Gao Wujun; Lu Longdou; Zhang Tao; Li Pengfei

    2011-01-01

    To examine and determine the lotus mutants induced by the same Fe + ion implantation at the molecular level, the SRAP technique was used, and the non denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was undertaken to analyze the PCR products. At the optimized SRAP reaction condition, of the 121 primer pairs tested, 10 primer pairs could amplify stable and remarkable specific bands, with primer polymorphism of 8.26%. This 10 primer pairs amplified a total of 215 bands, 83 of which were polymorphic, and the percent of polymorphic bands was 38.6%. A total of 141 bands were amplified for the mutant 1, 22 of which were different from the control with the variation ratio of 15.6%. However, the variation ratios of mutant 2 to 6 were 16.4%, 17.1%, 16.9%, 18.2% and 20.5% respectively. The results indicated that Fe + ion implantation into the seeds of Baiyangdian red lotus could induce random genetic DNA variations. (authors)

  2. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Almeida, Sandra; Zhang, Zhijun; Coppola, Giovanni; Mao, Wenjie; Futai, Kensuke; Karydas, Anna; Geschwind, Michael D.; Tartaglia, M. Carmela; Gao, Fuying; Gianni, Davide; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Farese, Robert V.; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel GRN mutation (PGRN S116X). In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X iPSCs, the levels of intracellular and secreted progranulin were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of progranulin haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the PI3K and MAPK pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by progranulin expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with progranulin deficiency and provide a new model for studying progranulin-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies. PMID:23063362

  3. Supplementary Material for: Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntingtonâ s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  4. Effect of stacking fault energy on the neutron radiation induced defect accumulation in stainless steels

    Li Xiaoqiang; Al Mazouzi Abderrahim

    2009-01-01

    Current knowledge highlights the radiation induced segregation (RIS) and the radiation hardening as the two main effects on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Stacking fault energy is considered as a key parameter of materials, which can influence IASCC of stainless steels in nuclear light water reactor (LWR), because it plays an important role in every process of plastic deformation, work hardening and creep behaviour. The study of the impact of SFE variations on the plastic deformation and SCC behaviour of irradiated and unirradiated austenitic steels will contribute to the understanding of IASCC mechanism. The objectives of this work, as a task within the FP6-European Project PERFECT, are to investigate the influence of the SFE on IASCC susceptibility of stainless steels, to correlation n-irradiation induced defect production, accumulation and mechanical deformation behaviour with SFE by using the state of the art experimental tools such as transmission electron microscope (TEM), positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in simulated LWR conditions

  5. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    Sangwijit, K. [Biotechnology Unit, University of Phayao, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Sarapirom, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Bang Khen, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Pitakrattananukool, S. [School of Science, University of Phayao, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Biotechnology Unit, University of Phayao, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 12} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  6. Parenteral monofluorophosphate (MFP) is a more potent inducer of enamel fluorotic defects in neonatal hamster molars than sodium fluoride

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Schoonderwoerd, M.; Tio, D.; Tse, C.; Bervoets, T.J.; Denbesten, P.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Supra-optimal intake of sodium fluoride (NaF) during early childhood results in formation of irreversible enamel defects. Monofluorophosphate (MFP) was considered as less toxic than NaF but equally cariostatic. We compared the potency of MFP and NaF to induce pre-eruptive sub-ameloblastic cysts and

  7. Study of surface exfoliation on 6H-SiC induced by H{sub 2}{sup +} implantation

    Zhang, L. [Department of Physics, School of Science, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Li, B.S., E-mail: b.s.li@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-03-01

    The effect of lattice damage generated by the H{sub 2}{sup +}-implantation on exfoliation efficiency in 6H-SiC wafers is investigated. <0001> 6H-SiC wafers were implanted with 134 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions to ion fluences from 1.5×10{sup 16} to 5×10{sup 16} H{sub 2}{sup +} cm{sup −2} and subsequently annealed at temperatures from 973 K to 1373 K. The samples were studied by a combination of optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Only after 1373 K annealing for 15 min, blisters and exfoliation occur on the H{sub 2}{sup +}-implanted sample surface. With increasing the implantation fluences from 1.5×10{sup 16} to 3.75×10{sup 16} H{sub 2}{sup +} cm{sup −2}, the exfoliation mean size decreases, while the exfoliation density increases. For the highest fluence of 5×10{sup 16} H{sub 2}{sup +} cm{sup −2}, seldom exfoliations occur on the sample surface. Microstructure analysis shows that exfoliation efficiency is largely controlled by the H{sub 2}{sup +}-implantation-induced lattice damage. The depth of the microcrack is related to the implantation fluence. The effect of implantation fluence on dislocation loops, platelet nucleation and growth is investigated.

  8. Dysregulated LIF-STAT3 pathway is responsible for impaired embryo implantation in a Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model

    Tong-Song Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide with the trend of patients being young and creating a significant burden on health systems, including reproductive problems, but the effects of diabetes on embryo implantation are still poorly understood. Our study was to examine effects of diabetes on mouse embryo implantation, providing experimental basis for treating diabetes and its complications. Streptozotocin (STZ was applied to induce type 1 diabetes from day 2 of pregnancy or pseudopregnancy in mice. Embryo transfer was used to analyze effects of uterine environment on embryo implantation. Our results revealed that the implantation rate is significantly reduced in diabetic mice compared to controls, and the change of uterine environment is the main reason leading to the decreased implantation rate. Compared to control, the levels of LIF and p-STAT3 are significantly decreased in diabetic mice on day 4 of pregnancy, and serum estrogen level is significantly higher. Estrogen stimulates LIF expression under physiological level, but the excessive estrogen inhibits LIF expression. LIF, progesterone or insulin supplement can rescue embryo implantation in diabetic mice. Our data indicated that the dysregulated LIF-STAT3 pathway caused by the high level of estrogen results in the impaired implantation in diabetic mice, which can be rescued by LIF, progesterone or insulin supplement.

  9. Bond formation in hafnium atom implantation into SiC induced by high-energy electron irradiation

    Yasuda, H.; Mori, H.; Sakata, T.; Naka, M.; Fujita, H.

    1992-01-01

    Bilayer films of Hf (target atoms)/α-SiC (substrate) were irradiated with 2 MeV electrons in an ultra-high voltage electron microscope (UHVEM), with the electron beam incident on the hafnium layer. As a result of the irradiation, hafnium atoms were implanted into the SiC substrate. Changes in the microstructure and valence electronic states associated with the implantation were studied by a combination of UHVEM and Auger valence electron spectroscopy. The implantation process is summarized as follows. (1) Irradiation with 2 MeV electrons first induces a crystalline-to-amorphous transition in α-SiC. (2) Hafnium atoms which have been knocked-off from the hafnium layer by collision with the 2 MeV electrons are implanted into the resultant amorphous SiC. (3) The implanted hafnium atoms make preferential bonding to carbon atoms. (4) With continued irradiation, the hafnium atoms repeat the displacement along the beam direction and the subsequent bonding with the dangling hybrids of carbon and silicon. The repetition of the displacement and subsequent bonding lead to the deep implantation of hafnium atoms into the SiC substrate. It is concluded that implantation successfully occurs when the bond strength between a constituent atom of a substrate and an injected atom is stronger than that between constituent atoms of a substrate. (Author)

  10. Combined computational and experimental study of Ar beam induced defect formation in graphite

    Pregler, Sharon K.; Hayakawa, Tetsuichiro; Yasumatsu, Hisato; Kondow, Tamotsu; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite, commonly used in nuclear power plants, is known to produce structural damage. Here, experimental and computational methods are used to study defect formation in graphite during Ar irradiation at incident energies of 50 eV. The experimental samples are analyzed with scanning tunneling microscopy to quantify the size distribution of the defects that form. The computational approach is classical molecular dynamic simulations that illustrate the mechanisms by which the defects are produced. The results indicate that defects in graphite grow in concentrated areas and are nucleated by the presence of existing defects

  11. Zirconium, calcium, and strontium contents in magnesium based biodegradable alloys modulate the efficiency of implant-induced osseointegration

    Mushahary, Dolly; Sravanthi, Ragamouni; Li, Yuncang; Kumar, Mahesh J; Harishankar, Nemani; Hodgson, Peter D; Wen, Cuie; Pande, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Development of new biodegradable implants and devices is necessary to meet the increasing needs of regenerative orthopedic procedures. An important consideration while formulating new implant materials is that they should physicochemically and biologically mimic bone-like properties. In earlier studies, we have developed and characterized magnesium based biodegradable alloys, in particular magnesium-zirconium (Mg-Zr) alloys. Here we have reported the biological properties of four Mg-Zr alloys containing different quantities of strontium or calcium. The alloys were implanted in small cavities made in femur bones of New Zealand White rabbits, and the quantitative and qualitative assessments of newly induced bone tissue were carried out. A total of 30 experimental animals, three for each implant type, were studied, and bone induction was assessed by histological, immunohistochemical and radiological methods; cavities in the femurs with no implants and observed for the same period of time were kept as controls. Our results showed that Mg-Zr alloys containing appropriate quantities of strontium were more efficient in inducing good quality mineralized bone than other alloys. Our results have been discussed in the context of physicochemical and biological properties of the alloys, and they could be very useful in determining the nature of future generations of biodegradable orthopedic implants. PMID:23976848

  12. Cobalt Alloy Implant Debris Induces Inflammation and Bone Loss Primarily through Danger Signaling, Not TLR4 Activation: Implications for DAMP-ening Implant Related Inflammation.

    Lauryn Samelko

    Full Text Available Cobalt alloy debris has been implicated as causative in the early failure of some designs of current total joint implants. The ability of implant debris to cause excessive inflammation via danger signaling (NLRP3 inflammasome vs. pathogen associated pattern recognition receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors; TLRs remains controversial. Recently, specific non-conserved histidines on human TLR4 have been shown activated by cobalt and nickel ions in solution. However, whether this TLR activation is directly or indirectly an effect of metals or secondary endogenous alarmins (danger-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs elicited by danger signaling, remains unknown and contentious. Our study indicates that in both a human macrophage cell line (THP-1 and primary human macrophages, as well as an in vivo murine model of inflammatory osteolysis, that Cobalt-alloy particle induced NLRP3 inflammasome danger signaling inflammatory responses were highly dominant relative to TLR4 activation, as measured respectively by IL-1β or TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, tissue histology and quantitative bone loss measurement. Despite the lack of metal binding histidines H456 and H458 in murine TLR4, murine calvaria challenge with Cobalt alloy particles induced significant macrophage driven in vivo inflammation and bone loss inflammatory osteolysis, whereas LPS calvaria challenge alone did not. Additionally, no significant increase (p500pg/mL. Therefore, not only do the results of this investigation support Cobalt alloy danger signaling induced inflammation, but under normal homeostasis low levels of hematogenous PAMPs (<2pg/mL from Gram-negative bacteria, seem to have negligible contribution to the danger signaling responses elicited by Cobalt alloy metal implant debris. This suggests the unique nature of Cobalt alloy particle bioreactivity is strong enough to illicit danger signaling that secondarily activate concomitant TLR activation, and may in part explain Cobalt particulate

  13. Cobalt Alloy Implant Debris Induces Inflammation and Bone Loss Primarily through Danger Signaling, Not TLR4 Activation: Implications for DAMP-ening Implant Related Inflammation

    Samelko, Lauryn; Landgraeber, Stefan; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua; Hallab, Nadim James

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt alloy debris has been implicated as causative in the early failure of some designs of current total joint implants. The ability of implant debris to cause excessive inflammation via danger signaling (NLRP3 inflammasome) vs. pathogen associated pattern recognition receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors; TLRs) remains controversial. Recently, specific non-conserved histidines on human TLR4 have been shown activated by cobalt and nickel ions in solution. However, whether this TLR activation is directly or indirectly an effect of metals or secondary endogenous alarmins (danger-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) elicited by danger signaling, remains unknown and contentious. Our study indicates that in both a human macrophage cell line (THP-1) and primary human macrophages, as well as an in vivo murine model of inflammatory osteolysis, that Cobalt-alloy particle induced NLRP3 inflammasome danger signaling inflammatory responses were highly dominant relative to TLR4 activation, as measured respectively by IL-1β or TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, tissue histology and quantitative bone loss measurement. Despite the lack of metal binding histidines H456 and H458 in murine TLR4, murine calvaria challenge with Cobalt alloy particles induced significant macrophage driven in vivo inflammation and bone loss inflammatory osteolysis, whereas LPS calvaria challenge alone did not. Additionally, no significant increase (p500pg/mL). Therefore, not only do the results of this investigation support Cobalt alloy danger signaling induced inflammation, but under normal homeostasis low levels of hematogenous PAMPs (<2pg/mL) from Gram-negative bacteria, seem to have negligible contribution to the danger signaling responses elicited by Cobalt alloy metal implant debris. This suggests the unique nature of Cobalt alloy particle bioreactivity is strong enough to illicit danger signaling that secondarily activate concomitant TLR activation, and may in part explain Cobalt particulate associated

  14. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al_2O_3:C

    Nyirenda, A.N.; Chithambo, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    It is known that when α-Al_2O_3:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix. We report the influence of radiation-induced defects on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measured from α-Al_2O_3:C after irradiation to 1000 Gy. These radiation-induced defects are thermally unstable in the region 450–650 °C and result in TL peaks in this range when the TL is measured at 1 °C/s. Heating a sample to 700 °C obliterates the radiation-induced defects, that is, the TL peaks corresponding to the radiation induced defects are no longer observed in the subsequent TL measurements when moderate irradiation doses below 10 Gy are used. The charge traps associated with these radiation-induced defects are more stable than the dosimetric trap when the sample is exposed to either sunlight or 470-nm blue light from LEDs. TL glow curves measured following the defect-inducing irradiation produce a dosimetric peak that is broader and positioned at a higher temperature than observed in glow curves obtained before the heavy irradiation. In addition, sample sensitization/desensitization occurs due to the presence of these radiation-induced defects. Furthermore, both the activation energy and the kinetic order of the dosimetric peak evaluated when the radiation-induced defects are present in the sample are significantly lower in value than those obtained when these defects are absent. The radiation-induced defects also affect the shape and total light sum of the OSL signal as well as the position and width of the resultant residual phototransferred thermoluminescence main peak.

  15. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C

    Nyirenda, A.N., E-mail: anyirenda@gmail.com; Chithambo, M.L.

    2017-04-15

    It is known that when α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix. We report the influence of radiation-induced defects on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measured from α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C after irradiation to 1000 Gy. These radiation-induced defects are thermally unstable in the region 450–650 °C and result in TL peaks in this range when the TL is measured at 1 °C/s. Heating a sample to 700 °C obliterates the radiation-induced defects, that is, the TL peaks corresponding to the radiation induced defects are no longer observed in the subsequent TL measurements when moderate irradiation doses below 10 Gy are used. The charge traps associated with these radiation-induced defects are more stable than the dosimetric trap when the sample is exposed to either sunlight or 470-nm blue light from LEDs. TL glow curves measured following the defect-inducing irradiation produce a dosimetric peak that is broader and positioned at a higher temperature than observed in glow curves obtained before the heavy irradiation. In addition, sample sensitization/desensitization occurs due to the presence of these radiation-induced defects. Furthermore, both the activation energy and the kinetic order of the dosimetric peak evaluated when the radiation-induced defects are present in the sample are significantly lower in value than those obtained when these defects are absent. The radiation-induced defects also affect the shape and total light sum of the OSL signal as well as the position and width of the resultant residual phototransferred thermoluminescence main peak.

  16. Decompression Retinopathy after ExPRESS Shunt Implantation for Steroid-Induced Ocular Hypertension: A Case Report

    Khawla Abu Samra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present a unique case of decompression retinopathy after the implantation of ExPRESS drainage device. Method. A 25-year-old female patient underwent implantation of ExPRESS drainage device in the left eye for the management of steroid-induced ocular hypertension. Results. On the postoperative day one, best-corrected visual acuity in the left eye was 20/50. Fundus examination revealed diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, some white-centered, throughout the retina. There was also marked tortuosity to the retinal vasculature and no evidence of choroidal effusion. Intravenous fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green did not contribute to the aetiopathogenesis. Conclusion. Decompression retinopathy can occur following the implantation of ExPRESS drainage device. It is very important to be aware of this complication in patients with relatively high intraocular pressure who is planned for filtration surgery, including the ExPRESS implant.

  17. Ion implantation

    Johnson, E.

    1986-01-01

    It is the purpose of the present paper to give a review of surface alloy processing by ion implantation. However, rather than covering this vast subject as a whole, the survey is confined to a presentation of the microstructures that can be found in metal surfaces after ion implantation. The presentation is limited to alloys processed by ion implantation proper, that is to processes in which the alloy compositions are altered significantly by direct injection of the implanted ions. The review is introduced by a presentation of the processes taking place during development of the fundamental event in ion implantation - the collision cascade, followed by a summary of the various microstructures which can be formed after ion implantation into metals. This is compared with the variability of microstructures that can be achieved by rapid solidification processing. The microstructures are subsequently discussed in the light of the processes which, as the implantations proceed, take place during and immediately after formation of the individual collision cascades. These collision cascades define the volumes inside which individual ions are slowed down in the implanted targets. They are not only centres for vigorous agitation but also the sources for formation of excess concentrations of point defects, which will influence development of particular microstructures. A final section presents a selection of specific structures which have been observed in different alloy systems. (orig./GSCH)

  18. MD simulations to evaluate effects of applied tensile strain on irradiation-induced defect production at various PKA energies

    Miyashiro, S.; Fujita, S.; Okita, T.; Okuda, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Strain effects on defect formation were evaluated at various PKA energies by MD. ► Radiation-induced defects were increased numerically by external strain. ► Enhanced formation of larger clusters causes the numerical increase of defects. ► Strain influence on the number of defects was greatest at about 20 keV PKA. ► Cluster size, which is mostly affected by strain, was greater with higher PKA energy. - Abstract: Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of applied tensile strain on defect production during cascade damages at various Primary Knock-on Atom (PKA) energies of 1–30 keV. When 1% strain was applied, the number of surviving defects increased at PKA energies higher than 5 keV, although they did not increase at 1 keV. The rate of increase by strain application was higher with higher PKA energy, and attained the maximum at 20 keV PKA energy with a subsequent gradual decrease at 30 keV PKA energy The cluster size, mostly affected by strain, was larger with higher PKA energy, although clusters with fewer than seven interstitials did not increase in number at any PKA energy.

  19. Destruction-polymerization transformations as a source of radiation-induced extended defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    Shpotyuk, Oleh; Filipecki, Jacek; Shpotyuk, Mykhaylo

    2013-01-01

    Long-wave shift of the optical transmission spectrum in the region of fundamental optical absorption edge is registered for As 2 S 3 chalcogenide glassy semiconductors after γ-irradiation. This effect is explained in the frameworks of the destruction-polymerization transformations concept by accepting the switching of the heteropolar As-S covalent bonds into homopolar As-As ones. It is assumed that (As 4 + ; S 1 - ) defect pairs are created under such switching. Formula to calculate content of the induced defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors is proposed. It is assumed that defects concentration depends on energy of broken covalent bond, bond-switching energy balance, correlation energy, optical band-gap and energy of excitation light. It is shown that theoretically calculated maximally possible content of radiation-induced defects in As 2 S 3 is about 1.6% while concentration of native defects is negligible. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Correlation Between Clinical and Radiological Outcomes After Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Femoral Condyles.

    Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Fallon, Michael; Wood, David J; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-08-01

    Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) is an established technique for the repair of knee chondral defects, although the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes after surgery is poorly understood. To determine the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes throughout the postoperative timeline to 5 years after MACI. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. This retrospective study was undertaken in 83 patients (53 male, 30 female) with complete clinical and radiological follow-up at 1, 2, and 5 years after MACI. The mean age of patients was 38.9 years (range, 13-62 years), with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.6 kg/m(2) (range, 16.8-34.8 kg/m(2)), mean defect size of 3.3 cm(2) (range, 1-9 cm(2)), and mean preoperative duration of symptoms of 9.2 years (range, 1-46 years). Patients indicated for MACI in this follow-up were 13 to 65 years of age, although they were excluded if they had a BMI >35 kg/m(2), had undergone prior extensive meniscectomy, or had ongoing progressive inflammatory arthritis. Patients were assessed clinically using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the graft using a 1.5-T or 3-T clinical scanner; the MRI assessment included 8 parameters of graft repair (infill, signal intensity, border integration, surface contour, structure, subchondral lamina, subchondral bone, and effusion) based on the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score as well as an MRI composite score. The degree of an association between the MRI parameters and the KOOS subscales at each postoperative time point was assessed with the Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC), and significance was determined at P correlations over time and statistically significant associations at 5 years with KOOS-Pain (SCC, 0.25; P = .020), KOOS-Activities of Daily Living (SCC, 0.26; P = .018), and KOOS-Sport (SCC, 0.32; P = .003). Apart

  1. Pulse height defect in ion implanted silicon detector for heavy ions with Z=6-28 in the energy range ∼ 0.25-2.5 MeV/u

    Diwan, P.K.; Sharma, V.; Shyam Kumar; Avasthi, D.K.

    2005-01-01

    The response of ion implanted silicon detector has been studied for heavy ions with Z= 6-28 in the energy range ∼ 0.25-2.5 MeV/u utilizing the 15UD Pelletron Accelerator facility at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India. The variation of pulse height in ion implanted silicon detector with projectile's atomic number and its energy have been investigated. It has been observed that pulse height-energy calibration for a given projectile is described well by a linear relationship indicating no pulse height defect with the variation in energy for specific Z projectile. Pulse height defect has been found to increase with increasing projectile atomic number. The mean slope of the collected charge signal versus projectile energy depends significantly on the atomic number of the projectile. (author)

  2. Influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures and lattice defects accumulation

    Sedao, Xxx; Garrelie, Florence, E-mail: florence.garrelie@univ-st-etienne.fr; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Pigeon, Florent [Université de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université de Saint Etienne, Jean Monnet, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire; Quey, Romain [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, CNRS, UMR5307, Laboratoire Georges Friedel, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2014-04-28

    The influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) has been investigated on a polycrystalline nickel sample. Electron Backscatter Diffraction characterization has been exploited to provide structural information within the laser spot on irradiated samples to determine the dependence of LIPSS formation and lattice defects (stacking faults, twins, dislocations) upon the crystal orientation. Significant differences are observed at low-to-medium number of laser pulses, outstandingly for (111)-oriented surface which favors lattice defects formation rather than LIPSS formation.

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces congenital heart defects in murine embryos by increasing oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis.

    Wu, Yanqing; Reece, E Albert; Zhong, Jianxiang; Dong, Daoyin; Shen, Wei-Bin; Harman, Christopher R; Yang, Peixin

    2016-09-01

    Maternal type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are strongly associated with high rates of severe structural birth defects, including congenital heart defects. Studies in type 1 diabetic embryopathy animal models have demonstrated that cellular stress-induced apoptosis mediates the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes leading to congenital heart defect formation. However, the mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus-induced congenital heart defects remain largely unknown. We aim to determine whether oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and excessive apoptosis are the intracellular molecular mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus-induced congenital heart defects. A mouse model of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by feeding female mice a high-fat diet (60% fat). After 15 weeks on the high-fat diet, the mice showed characteristics of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus. Control dams were either fed a normal diet (10% fat) or the high-fat diet during pregnancy only. Female mice from the high-fat diet group and the 2 control groups were mated with male mice that were fed a normal diet. At E12.5, embryonic hearts were harvested to determine the levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide, endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8, and apoptosis. E17.5 embryonic hearts were harvested for the detection of congenital heart defect formation using India ink vessel patterning and histological examination. Maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus significantly induced ventricular septal defects and persistent truncus arteriosus in the developing heart, along with increasing oxidative stress markers, including superoxide and lipid peroxidation; endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including protein levels of phosphorylated-protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, phosphorylated-IRE1α, phosphorylated-eIF2α, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin protein; endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gene

  4. Study on radiation-induced defects in germanium monocrystals by the X-ray diffusive scattering method

    Malinenko, I.A.; Perelygina, E.A.; Chudinova, S.A.; Shivrin, O.N.

    1979-01-01

    The method of X-ray diffusion scattering was used to study the defective structure of germanium monocrystals exposed to 750 keV proton irradiation with 3.8x10 16 -4.6x10 17 cm -2 doses and subjected to the subsequent annealing at temperatures up to 450 deg C. Detected in the crystals were the complex radiation induced structure characterized with oriented vacancy complexes and results from the both effects: irradiation and annealing. Radiation defect sizes in the section (hhO) have been determined. With increasing the annealing temperature the structure reconstruction resulting in the complex dissociation is observed

  5. Extreme implanting in Si: A study of ion-induced damage at high temperature and high dose

    Holland, O.W.

    1994-01-01

    Ion-solid interactions near room temperature and below have been well studied in single-crystal Si. While this has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for nucleation and growth of lattice damage during irradiation, these studies have not, in general, been extended to high temperatures (e.g., >200 degrees C). This is the case despite the commercialization of ion beam technologies which utilize high-temperature processing, such as separation by implantation of oxygen (SIMOX). In this process, a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) material is produced by implanting a high dose of oxygen ions into a Si wafer to form a buried, stoichiometric oxide layer. Results will be presented of a study of damage accumulation during high-dose implantation of Si at elevated temperatures. In particular, O + -ions were used because of the potential impact of the results on the SIMOX technology. It will be shown that the nature of the damage accumulation at elevated temperatures is quite distinctive and portends the presence of a new mechanism, one which is only dominant under the extreme conditions encountered during ion beam synthesis (i.e., high temperature and high dose). This mechanism is discussed and shown to be quite general and not dependent on the chemical identity of the ions. Also, techniques for suppressing this mechanism by open-quotes defect engineeringclose quotes are discussed. Such techniques are technologically relevant because they offer the possibility of reducing the defect density of the SOI produced by SIMOX

  6. [Progress of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect].

    Yin, Qudong; Sun, Zhenzhong; Gu, Sanjun

    2013-10-01

    To summarize the progress of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect. The recent literature concerning the application of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect was extensively reviewed and summarized. Masquelet technique involves a two-step procedure. First, bone cement is used to fill the bone defect after a thorough debridement, and an induced membrane structure surrounding the spacer formed; then the bone cement is removed after 6-8 weeks, and rich cancellous bone is implanted into the induced membrane. Massive cortical bone defect is repaired by new bone forming and consolidation. Experiments show that the induced membrane has vascular system and is also rich in vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta1, bone morphogenetic protein 2, and bone progenitor cells, so it has osteoinductive property; satisfactory results have been achieved in clinical application of almost all parts of defects, various types of bone defect and massive defect up to 25 cm long. Compared with other repair methods, Masquelet technique has the advantages of reliable effect, easy to operate, few complications, low requirements for recipient site, and wide application. Masquelet technique is an effective method to repair bone defect and is suitable for various types of bone defect, especially for bone defects caused by infection and tumor resection.

  7. Defects induced by swift heavy ions in the 18R martensite of Cu-Zn-Al alloy

    Zelaya, Eugenia; Tolley, Alfredo; Condo, Adriana; Lovey, Francisco; Schumacher, G

    2003-01-01

    The swift heavy ion incidence over the surface of a given material produces a strong energy deposition in a nanometric scale.Swift heavy ions, of the order of one thousand of MeV, deposit their energy as electronic excitations.This highly localized deposition can induce metastable transformations within the material. For example, in martensitic NiTi alloys irradiated with swift heavy ions, it has been observed changes on the martensitic transformation temperature and amorphous areas induced by the irradiation.In this work, the effects produced by swift heavy ions on the martensitic 18R structure of Cu-Zn-Al alloy (Cu - 12.17 Zn - 17.92 Al, in %at) were analyzed.Crystalline samples were irradiated in a direction close to the [2 1 0] of 18R with Xe + 230 MeV, Au + of 350 MeV and Kr + of 200 MeV ion beams.Defects of the order of nanometers induced by the irradiation were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM).It was also observed, that the average size of the irradiation defects induced by Au + ion is larger than those induced by Xe + and Kr + ions.In this case, no relationship between the observed defects and the energy deposition was found in the 23 keV/nn to 48 keV/nn range

  8. On the diffusion process of irradiation-induced point defects in the stress field of a moving dislocation

    Steinbach, E.

    1987-01-01

    The cellular model of a dislocation is used for an investigation of the time-dependent diffusion process of irradiation-induced point defects interacting with the stress field of a moving dislocation. An analytic solution is given taking into account the elastic interaction due to the first-order size effect and the stress-induced interaction, the kinematic interaction due to the dislocation motion as well as the presence of secondary neutral sinks. The results for the space and time-dependent point defect concentration, represented in terms of Mathieu-Bessel and Mathieu-Hankel functions, emphasize the influence of the parameters which have been taken into consideration. Proceeding from these solutions, formulae for the diffusion flux reaching unit length of the dislocation, which plays an important role with regard to void swelling and irradiation-induced creep, are derived

  9. Piezoelectricity induced defect modes for shear waves in a periodically stratified supperlattice

    Piliposyan, Davit

    2018-01-01

    Properties of shear waves in a piezoelectric stratified periodic structure with a defect layer are studied for a superlattice with identical piezoelectric materials in a unit cell. Due to the electro-mechanical coupling in piezoelectric materials the structure exhibits defect modes in the superlattice with full transmission peaks both for full contact and electrically shorted interfaces. The results show an existence of one or two transmission peaks depending on the interfacial conditions. In the long wavelength region where coupling between electro-magnetic and elastic waves creates frequency band gaps the defect layer introduces one or two defect modes transmitting both electro-magnetic and elastic energies. Other parameters affecting the defect modes are the thickness of the defect layer, differences in refractive indexes and the magnitude of the angle of the incident wave. The results of the paper may be useful in the design of narrow band filters or multi-channel piezoelectric filters.

  10. Toward a comprehensive theory of radiation-induced swelling and creep - the point defect concentrations

    Mansur, L.K.; Yoo, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of void swelling and irradiation creep is now fairly comprehensive. A unifying concept on which most of this understanding rests is that of the rate theory point defect concentrations. Several basic aspects of this unifying conept are reviewed. These relate to local fluctuations in point defect concentrations produced by cascades, the effects of thermal and radiation-produced divacancies, and the effects of point defect trapping

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibition reduces hypothyroidism-induced neurodevelopmental defects in rats.

    Kumar, Praveen; Mohan, Vishwa; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Chagtoo, Megha; Godbole, Madan M

    2015-11-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) through its receptor (TRα/β) influences spatio-temporal regulation of its target gene repertoire during brain development. Though hypothyroidism in WT rodent models of perinatal hypothyroidism severely impairs neurodevelopment, its effect on TRα/β knockout mice is less severe. An explanation to this paradox is attributed to a possible repressive action of unliganded TRs during development. Since unliganded TRs suppress gene expression through the recruitment of histone deacetylase (HDACs) via co-repressor complexes, we tested whether pharmacological inhibition of HDACs may prevent the effects of hypothyroidism on brain development. Using valproate, an HDAC inhibitor, we show that HDAC inhibition significantly blocks the deleterious effects of hypothyroidism on rat cerebellum, evident by recovery of TH target genes like Bdnf, Pcp2 and Mbp as well as improved dendritic structure of cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Together with this, HDAC inhibition also rescues hypothyroidism-induced motor and cognitive defects. This study therefore provides an insight into the role of HDACs in TH insufficiency during neurodevelopment and their inhibition as a possible therapeutics for treatment. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Green tea polyphenols rescue of brain defects induced by overexpression of DYRK1A.

    Fayçal Guedj

    Full Text Available Individuals with partial HSA21 trisomies and mice with partial MMU16 trisomies containing an extra copy of the DYRK1A gene present various alterations in brain morphogenesis. They present also learning impairments modeling those encountered in Down syndrome. Previous MRI and histological analyses of a transgenic mice generated using a human YAC construct that contains five genes including DYRK1A reveal that DYRK1A is involved, during development, in the control of brain volume and cell density of specific brain regions. Gene dosage correction induces a rescue of the brain volume alterations. DYRK1A is also involved in the control of synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. Increased gene dosage results in brain morphogenesis defects, low BDNF levels and mnemonic deficits in these mice. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG - a member of a natural polyphenols family, found in great amount in green tea leaves - is a specific and safe DYRK1A inhibitor. We maintained control and transgenic mice overexpressing DYRK1A on two different polyphenol-based diets, from gestation to adulthood. The major features of the transgenic phenotype were rescued in these mice.

  13. Irradiation-induced defects in graphite and glassy carbon studied by positron annihilation

    Hasegawa, M.; Kajino, M.; Kuwahara, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kuramoto, E.; Takenaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    ACAR and positron lifetime measurements have been made on, HOPG, isotropic fine-grained graphites, glassy carbons and C 60 /C 70 . HOPG showed a marked bimodal ACAR distribution along the c-axis. By irradiation of 1.0 X 10 19 fast neutrons/cm 2 remarkable narrowing in the ACAR curves and disappearance of the bimodal distribution were observed. Lifetime in HOPG increased from 225 psec to 289 psec (positron-lifetime in vacancies and their small clusters) by the irradiation. The irradiation on isotropic graphites and glassy carbons, however, gave slight narrowing in ACAR curves and decrease in lifetimes (360 psec → 300psec). This suggests irradiation-induced vacancy trapping in crystallites. In C 60 /C 70 powder two lifetime components were detected: τ 1 =177psec, τ 2 =403psec (I 2 =58%). The former is less than the bulk lifetime of HOPG, while the latter being very close to lifetimes in the isotropic graphites and glassy carbons. This and recent 2D-ACAR study of HOPG surface [15] strongly suggest free and defect surface states around ''soccer ball'' cages

  14. Simulation of surface crack initiation induced by slip localization and point defects kinetics

    Sauzay, Maxime; Liu, Jia; Rachdi, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Crack initiation along surface persistent slip bands (PSBs) has been widely observed and modelled. Nevertheless, from our knowledge, no physically-based fracture modelling has been proposed and validated with respect to the numerous recent experimental data showing the strong relationship between extrusion and microcrack initiation. The whole FE modelling accounts for: - localized plastic slip in PSBs; - production and annihilation of vacancies induced by cyclic slip. If temperature is high enough, point defects may diffuse in the surrounding matrix due to large concentration gradients, allowing continuous extrusion growth in agreement with Polak's model. At each cycle, the additional atoms diffusing from the matrix are taken into account by imposing an incremental free dilatation; - brittle fracture at the interfaces between PSBs and their surrounding matrix which is simulated using cohesive zone modelling. Any inverse fitting of parameter is avoided. Only experimental single crystal data are used such as hysteresis loops and resistivity values. Two fracture parameters are required: the {111} surface energy which depends on environment and the cleavage stress which is predicted by the universal binding energy relationship. The predicted extrusion growth curves agree rather well with the experimental data published for copper and the 316L steel. A linear dependence with respect to PSB length, thickness and slip plane angle is predicted in agreement with recent AFM measurement results. Crack initiation simulations predict fairly well the effects of PSB length and environment for copper single and poly-crystals. (authors)

  15. Modeling of excimer laser radiation induced defect generation in fluoride phosphate glasses

    Natura, U.; Ehrt, D.

    2001-01-01

    Fluoride phosphate (FP) glasses with low phosphate content are high-transparent in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range and attractive candidates for UV-optics. Their optical properties are complementary to fluoride crystals. The anomalous partial dispersion makes them desirable for optical lens designs to reduce the secondary spectrum. Their UV transmission is limited by trace impurities introduced by raw materials and decreases when exposed to UV-radiation (lamps, lasers). The experiments of the paper published previously in this journal were used in order to separate radiation induced absorption bands in the fluoride phosphate glass FP10. In this paper the generation mechanism of the phosphorus-oxygen related hole center POHC 2 is investigated in detail in glasses of various compositions (various phosphate and impurity contents) in order to predict the transmission loss in case of long-time irradiation. Experiments were carried out using ArF- and KrF-excimer lasers (ns-pulses). POHC 2 generation strongly depends on the phosphate content and on the content of Pb 2+ . A model was developed on these terms. Rate equations are formulated, incorporating the influence of the Pb 2+ -content on the defect generation, a two-step creation term including an energy transfer process and a one-photon bleaching term. This results in a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Absorption coefficients and lifetimes of the excited states were calculated as well. Experimental results compared well with the numerical analysis of the theoretical rate equations

  16. Detection of Defect-Induced Magnetism in Low-Dimensional ZnO Structures by Magnetophotocurrent.

    Lorite, Israel; Kumar, Yogesh; Esquinazi, Pablo; Zandalazini, Carlos; de Heluani, Silvia Perez

    2015-09-09

    The detection of defect-induced magnetic order in single low-dimensional oxide structures is in general difficult because of the relatively small yield of magnetically ordered regions. In this work, the effect of an external magnetic field on the transient photocurrent measured after light irradiation on different ZnO samples at room temperature is studied. It has been found that a magnetic field produces a change in the relaxation rate of the transient photocurrent only in magnetically ordered ZnO samples. This rate can decrease or increase with field, depending on whether the magnetically ordered region is in the bulk or only at the surface of the ZnO sample. The phenomenon reported here is of importance for the development of magneto-optical low-dimensional oxides devices and provides a new guideline for the detection of magnetic order in low-dimensional magnetic semiconductors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy contribute to developmental testicular toxicity induced by fluoride.

    Zhang, Shun; Niu, Qiang; Gao, Hui; Ma, Rulin; Lei, Rongrong; Zhang, Cheng; Xia, Tao; Li, Pei; Xu, Chunyan; Wang, Chao; Chen, Jingwen; Dong, Lixing; Zhao, Qian; Wang, Aiguo

    2016-05-01

    Fluoride, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to impair testicular functions and fertility; however the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this study, we used a rat model to mimic human exposure and sought to investigate the roles of apoptosis and autophagy in testicular toxicity of fluoride. Sprague-Dawley rats were developmentally exposed to 25, 50, or 100 mg/L sodium fluoride (NaF) via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to post-puberty, and then the testes of offspring were excised on postnatal day 56. Our results demonstrated that developmental NaF exposure induced an enhanced testicular apoptosis, as manifested by a series of hallmarks such as caspase-3 activation, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Further study revealed that fluoride exposure elicited significant elevations in the levels of cell surface death receptor Fas with a parallel increase in cytoplasmic cytochrome c, indicating the involvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Intriguingly, fluoride treatment also simultaneously increased the number of autophagosomes and the levels of autophagy marker LC3-II but not Beclin1. Unexpectedly, the expression of p62, a substrate that is degraded by autophagy, was also significantly elevated, suggesting that the accumulated autophagosomes resulted from impaired autophagy degradation rather than increased formation. Importantly, these were associated with marked histopathological lesions including spermatogenic failure and germ cell loss, along with severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our findings provide deeper insights into roles of excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy in the aggravation of testicular damage, which could contribute to a better understanding of fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electron irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Sakai, S.; Naramoto, H.

    2006-01-01

    ZnO crystals were subjected to 3 MeV electron irradiation up to a high dose of 5.5x10 18 cm -2 . The production and recovery of vacancy defects were studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The increase of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening S parameter after irradiation indicates introduction of V Zn related defects. Most of these vacancies are annealed at temperatures below 200 o C. However, after annealing at around 400 o C, secondary defects are produced. All the vacancy defects are annealed out at around 700 o C

  19. Electron irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation

    Chen, Z.Q. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)]. E-mail: zhiquanchen@hotmail.com; Maekawa, M. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kawasuso, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakai, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Naramoto, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    ZnO crystals were subjected to 3 MeV electron irradiation up to a high dose of 5.5x10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. The production and recovery of vacancy defects were studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The increase of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening S parameter after irradiation indicates introduction of V {sub Zn} related defects. Most of these vacancies are annealed at temperatures below 200 {sup o}C. However, after annealing at around 400 {sup o}C, secondary defects are produced. All the vacancy defects are annealed out at around 700 {sup o}C.

  20. Implantation of organic matter through water onto solid substrates by a laser induced molecular jet

    Pihosh, Y.; Goto, M.; Kasahara, A.; Tosa, M.

    2008-01-01

    Organic molecular dots were successfully produced by means of a nano second pulsed dye laser on glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates, with sizes of several hundred nanometres. The method involves the transfer of organic molecules from the source Coumarin 6 (C6) and poly [2-methoxy, 5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylene-venylene] (MEH-PPV) films onto a target material through a water filled space-gap using a laser induced molecular jet (LIMJ). In this way, the organic dots of Coumarin 6 and MEH-PPV molecules were successfully implanted onto the glass and ITO targets. The present results demonstrate the possibility to significantly improve photo electronic or photoelectric devices such as novel photonic crystal and molecular device sensors, and so on

  1. Impact of helium implantation and ion-induced damage on reflectivity of molybdenum mirrors

    Garcia-Carrasco, A., E-mail: alvarogc@kth.se [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Petersson, P.; Hallén, A. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Grzonka, J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska Str., 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Gilbert, M.R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fortuna-Zalesna, E. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Rubel, M. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-09-01

    Molybdenum mirrors were irradiated with Mo and He ions to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on diagnostic first mirrors in next-generation fusion devices. Up to 30 dpa were produced under molybdenum irradiation leading to a slight decrease of reflectivity in the near infrared range. After 3 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} of helium irradiation, reflectivity decreased by up to 20%. Combined irradiation by helium and molybdenum led to similar effects on reflectivity as irradiation with helium alone. Ion beam analysis showed that only 7% of the implanted helium was retained in the first 40 nm layer of the mirror. The structure of the near-surface layer after irradiation was studied with scanning transmission electron microscopy and the extent and size distribution of helium bubbles was documented. The consequences of ion-induced damage on the performance of diagnostic components are discussed.

  2. The Role of Hydrogen-Enhanced Strain-Induced Lattice Defects on Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of X80 Pipeline Steel

    Hattori, M.; Suzuki, H.; Seko, Y.; Takai, K.

    2017-08-01

    Studies to date have not completely determined the factors influencing hydrogen embrittlement of ferrite/bainite X80 pipeline steel. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was evaluated based on fracture strain in tensile testing. We conducted a thermal desorption analysis to measure the amount of tracer hydrogen corresponding to that of lattice defects. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and the amount of tracer hydrogen significantly increased with decreasing crosshead speed. Additionally, a significant increase in the formation of hydrogen-enhanced strain-induced lattice defects was observed immediately before the final fracture. In contrast to hydrogen-free specimens, the fracture surface of the hydrogen-charged specimens exhibited shallower dimples without nuclei, such as secondary phase particles. These findings indicate that the presence of hydrogen enhanced the formation of lattice defects, particularly just prior to the occurrence of final fracture. This in turn enhanced the formation of shallower dimples, thereby potentially causing premature fracture of X80 pipeline steel at lower crosshead speeds.

  3. Enhanced angiogenesis and osteogenesis in critical bone defects by the controlled release of BMP-2 and VEGF: implantation of electron beam melting-fabricated porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds incorporating growth factor-doped fibrin glue

    Lv, Jia; Xiu, Peng; Tan, Jie; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun; Jia, Zhaojun

    2015-01-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM)-fabricated porous titanium implants possessing low elastic moduli and tailored structures are promising biomaterials for orthopedic applications. However, the bio-inert nature of porous titanium makes reinforcement with growth factors (GFs) a promising method to enhance implant in vivo performance. Bone-morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are key factors of angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Therefore, the present study is aimed at evaluating EBM-fabricated porous titanium implants incorporating GF-doped fibrin glue (FG) as composite scaffolds providing GFs for improvement of angiogenesis and osteogenesis in rabbit femoral condyle defects. BMP-2 and VEGF were added into the constituent compounds of FG, and then this GF-doped FG was subsequently injected into the porous scaffolds. In five groups of implants, angiogenesis and osteogenesis were evaluated at 4 weeks post-implantation using Microfil perfusion and histological analysis: eTi (empty scaffolds), cTi (containing undoped FG), BMP/cTi (containing 50 μg rhBMP-2), VEGF/cTi (containing 0.5 μg VEGF) and Dual/cTi (containing 50 μg rhBMP-2 and 0.5 μg VEGF). The results demonstrate that these composite implants are biocompatible and provide the desired gradual release of the bioactive growth factors. Incorporation of GF delivery, whether a single factor or dual factors, significantly enhanced both angiogenesis and osteogenesis inside the porous scaffolds. However, the synergistic effect of the dual factors combination was observable on angiogenesis but absent on osteogenesis. In conclusion, fibrin glue is a biocompatible material that could be employed as a delivery vehicle in EBM-fabricated porous titanium for controlled release of BMP-2 and VEGF. Application of this method for loading a porous titanium scaffold to incorporate growth factors is a convenient and promising strategy for improving osteogenesis of critical-sized bone defects

  4. Abnormal bone formation induced by implantation of osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance in the X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse

    Yoshikawa, H.; Masuhara, K.; Takaoka, K.; Ono, K.; Tanaka, H.; Seino, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse (Hyp) has been proposed as a model for the human familial hypophosphatemia (the most common form of vitamin D-resistant rickets). An osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance was subcutaneously implanted into the Hyp mouse. The implant was consistently replaced by cartilage tissue at 2 weeks after implantation. The cartilage matrix seemed to be normal, according to the histological examination, and 35sulphur ( 35 S) uptake was also normal. Up to 4 weeks after implantation the cartilage matrix was completely replaced by unmineralized bone matrix and hematopoietic bone marrow. Osteoid tissue arising from the implantation of bone inducing substance in the Hyp mouse showed no radiologic or histologic sign of calcification. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of endochondral ossification in the Hyp mouse might be characterized by the failure of mineralization in cartilage and bone matrix. Analysis of the effects of bone-inducing substance on the Hyp mouse may help to give greater insight into the mechanism and treatment of human familial hypophosphatemia

  5. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    The implantation and sputtering mechanisms which are relevant to ion bombardment of surfaces are described. These are: collision, thermal, electronic and photon-induced sputtering. 135 refs.; 36 figs.; 9 tabs

  6. NMDA Receptor Signaling Is Important for Neural Tube Formation and for Preventing Antiepileptic Drug-Induced Neural Tube Defects.

    Sequerra, Eduardo B; Goyal, Raman; Castro, Patricio A; Levin, Jacqueline B; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2018-05-16

    Failure of neural tube closure leads to neural tube defects (NTDs), which can have serious neurological consequences or be lethal. Use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy increases the incidence of NTDs in offspring by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that during Xenopus laevis neural tube formation, neural plate cells exhibit spontaneous calcium dynamics that are partially mediated by glutamate signaling. We demonstrate that NMDA receptors are important for the formation of the neural tube and that the loss of their function induces an increase in neural plate cell proliferation and impairs neural cell migration, which result in NTDs. We present evidence that the AED valproic acid perturbs glutamate signaling, leading to NTDs that are rescued with varied efficacy by preventing DNA synthesis, activating NMDA receptors, or recruiting the NMDA receptor target ERK1/2. These findings may prompt mechanistic identification of AEDs that do not interfere with neural tube formation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural tube defects are one of the most common birth defects. Clinical investigations have determined that the use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy increases the incidence of these defects in the offspring by unknown mechanisms. This study discovers that glutamate signaling regulates neural plate cell proliferation and oriented migration and is necessary for neural tube formation. We demonstrate that the widely used antiepileptic drug valproic acid interferes with glutamate signaling and consequently induces neural tube defects, challenging the current hypotheses arguing that they are side effects of this antiepileptic drug that cause the increased incidence of these defects. Understanding the mechanisms of neurotransmitter signaling during neural tube formation may contribute to the identification and development of antiepileptic drugs that are safer during pregnancy. Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/384762-12$15.00/0.

  7. Zirconium, calcium, and strontium contents in magnesium based biodegradable alloys modulate the efficiency of implant-induced osseointegration

    Mushahary D

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dolly Mushahary,1,2 Ragamouni Sravanthi,2 Yuncang Li,2 Mahesh J Kumar,1 Nemani Harishankar,4 Peter D Hodgson,1 Cuie Wen,3 Gopal Pande2 1Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia; 2CSIR- Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India; 3Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia; 4National Institute of Nutrition (ICMR, Tarnaka, Hyderabad, India Abstract: Development of new biodegradable implants and devices is necessary to meet the increasing needs of regenerative orthopedic procedures. An important consideration while formulating new implant materials is that they should physicochemically and biologically mimic bone-like properties. In earlier studies, we have developed and characterized magnesium based biodegradable alloys, in particular magnesium-zirconium (Mg-Zr alloys. Here we have reported the biological properties of four Mg-Zr alloys containing different quantities of strontium or calcium. The alloys were implanted in small cavities made in femur bones of New Zealand White rabbits, and the quantitative and qualitative assessments of newly induced bone tissue were carried out. A total of 30 experimental animals, three for each implant type, were studied, and bone induction was assessed by histological, immunohistochemical and radiological methods; cavities in the femurs with no implants and observed for the same period of time were kept as controls. Our results showed that Mg-Zr alloys containing appropriate quantities of strontium were more efficient in inducing good quality mineralized bone than other alloys. Our results have been discussed in the context of physicochemical and biological properties of the alloys, and they could be very useful in determining the nature of future generations of biodegradable orthopedic implants. Keywords: osteoblasts, bone mineralization, corrosion, osseointegration, surface energy, peri-implant

  8. A novel kerf-free wafering process combining stress-induced spalling and low energy hydrogen implantation

    Pingault, Timothee; Pokam-Kuisseu, Pauline Sylvia; Ntsoenzok, Esidor [CEMTHI - CNRS, Site Cyclotron, 3 A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans (France); Blondeau, Jean-Philippe [CEMTHI - CNRS, Site Cyclotron, 3 A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans (France); Universite d' Orleans, Chateau de la Source, 45100 Orleans (France); Ulyashin, Alexander [SINTEF, Forskningsveien 1, 0314 Oslo (Norway); Labrim, Hicham; Belhorma, Bouchra [CNESTEN, B.P. 1382 R.P., 10001 Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, we studied the potential use of low-energy hydrogen implantation as a guide for the stress-induced cleavage. Low-energy, high fluence hydrogen implantation in silicon leads, in the right stiffening conditions, to the detachment of a thin layer, around a few hundreds nm thick, of monocrystalline silicon. We implanted monocrystalline silicon wafers with low-energy hydrogen, and then glued them on a cheap metal layer. Upon cooling down, the stress induced by the stressor layers (hardened glue and metal) leads to the detachment of a thin silicon layer, which thickness is determined by the implantation energy. We were then able to clearly demonstrate that, as expected, hydrogen oversaturation layer is very efficient to guide the stress. Using such process, thin silicon layers of around 710 nm-thick were successfully detached from low-energy implanted silicon wafers. Such layers can be used for the growth of very good quality monocrystalline silicon of around 50 μm-thick or less. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Annealing of the Sb-vacancy and a closely related radiation induced defect in n-type germanium

    Barnard, Abraham W.; Auret, F. D.; Meyer, W. E.

    2018-04-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was used to study the defects induced by alpha-particle irradiation from an Am241 source in antimony doped n-type germanium. Previous investigations of the well know Sb-vacancy defect have led to the discovery of a second defect with very similar emission properties, referred to as the E‧. Although both defects have similar emission rates, they have very different annealing properties. In this study we further investigated these properties of the E‧ in Sb doped samples irradiated at 270 K with alpha particles from an Am241 source. Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of each defect. An isothermal annealing study of the E‧ was carried out in the temperature range 300 K to 325 K in 5 K increments, while the Sb-vacancy was annealed out completely at 410 K onwards, long after the E‧ was completely annealed out. The annealing activation energy was determined through isothermal annealing profiles for both the Sb-Vacancy and the E‧ as 1.05 eV and 0.73 eV respectively with a prefactor of 2.05 × 109 s-1 and 2.7 × 108 s-1.

  10. Vacancy-type defects induced by grinding of Si wafers studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    Uedono, Akira; Yoshihara, Nakaaki [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Mizushima, Yoriko [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kim, Youngsuk [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Disco Corporation, Ota, Tokyo 143-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Tomoji [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); Ohba, Takayuki [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-10-07

    Vacancy-type defects introduced by the grinding of Czochralski-grown Si wafers were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and the lifetime spectra of positrons showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced in the surface region (<98 nm), and the major defect species were identified as (i) relatively small vacancies incorporated in dislocations and (ii) large vacancy clusters. Annealing experiments showed that the defect concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the range between 100 and 500°C. After 600–700°C annealing, the defect-rich region expanded up to about 170 nm, which was attributed to rearrangements of dislocation networks, and a resultant emission of point defects toward the inside of the sample. Above 800°C, the stability limit of those vacancies was reached and they started to disappear. After the vacancies were annealed out (900°C), oxygen-related defects were the major point defects and they were located at <25 nm.

  11. Prevention of congenital defects induced by prenatal alcohol exposure (Conference Presentation)

    Sheehan, Megan M.; Karunamuni, Ganga; Pedersen, Cameron J.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2017-02-01

    Nearly 2 million women in the United States alone are at risk for an alcohol-exposed pregnancy, including more than 600,000 who binge drink. Even low levels of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) can lead to a variety of birth defects, including craniofacial and neurodevelopmental defects, as well as increased risk of miscarriages and stillbirths. Studies have also shown an interaction between drinking while pregnant and an increase in congenital heart defects (CHD), including atrioventricular septal defects and other malformations. We have previously established a quail model of PAE, modeling a single binge drinking episode in the third week of a woman's pregnancy. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), we quantified intraventricular septum thickness, great vessel diameters, and atrioventricular valve volumes. Early-stage ethanol-exposed embryos had smaller cardiac cushions (valve precursors) and increased retrograde flow, while late-stage embryos presented with gross head/body defects, and exhibited smaller atrio-ventricular (AV) valves, interventricular septum, and aortic vessels. We previously showed that supplementation with the methyl donor betaine reduced gross defects, improved survival rates, and prevented cardiac defects. Here we show that these preventative effects are also observed with folate (another methyl donor) supplementation. Folate also appears to normalize retrograde flow levels which are elevated by ethanol exposure. Finally, preliminary findings have shown that glutathione, a crucial antioxidant, is noticeably effective at improving survival rates and minimizing gross defects in ethanol-exposed embryos. Current investigations will examine the impact of glutathione supplementation on PAE-related CHDs.

  12. Ion-Beam-Induced Defects in CMOS Technology: Methods of Study

    Fedorenko, Yanina G.

    2017-01-01

    Ion implantation is a non-equilibrium doping technique which introduces impurity atoms into a solid regardless of thermodynamic considerations. The formation of metastable alloys above the solubility limit, minimized contribution of lateral diffusion processes in device fabrication, and possibility to reach high concentrations of doping impurities can be considered as distinct advantages of ion implantation. Owing to excellent controllability, uniformity, and the dose insensitive relative acc...

  13. In situ probing of the evolution of irradiation-induced defects in copper

    Li, N.; Hattar, K.; Misra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Through in situ Cu 3+ ion irradiation at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), we have investigated the evolution of defect clusters as a function of the radiation dose at different distances from the 3 {1 1 2} incoherent twin boundary (ITB) in Cu. Post in situ ion irradiation, high resolution TEM was used to explore the types of defects, which are composed of a high-density of vacancy stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and sparsely distributed interstitial Frank loops. During irradiation, defect clusters evolve through four stages: (i) incubation, (ii) non-interaction, (iii) interaction and (iv) saturation; and the corresponding density was observed to initially increase with irradiation dose and then approach saturation. No obvious denuded zone is observed along the 3 {1 1 2} ITB and the configuration of defects at the boundary displays as truncated SFTs. Several defect evolution models have been proposed to explain the observed phenomena

  14. Echo detected EPR as a tool for detecting radiation-induced defect signals in pottery

    Zoleo, Alfonso; Bortolussi, Claudia; Brustolon, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Archaeological fragments of pottery have been investigated by using CW-EPR and Echo Detected EPR (EDEPR). EDEPR allows to remove the CW-EPR dominant Fe(III) background spectrum, hiding much weaker signals potentially useful for dating purpose. EDEPR spectra attributed to a methyl radical and to feldspar defects have been recorded at room and low temperature for an Iron Age cooking ware (700 B.C.). A study on the dependence of EDEPR intensity over absorbed dose on a series of γ-irradiated brick samples (estimated age of 562 ± 140 B.C.) has confirmed the potential efficacy of the proposed method for spotting defect signals out of the strong iron background. - Highlights: → Fe(III) CW-EPR signals cover CW-EPR-detectable defects in ceramics. → Echo detected EPR gets rid of Fe(III) signals, disclosing defect signals. → Echo detected EPR detects defect signals even at relatively low doses.

  15. Curvature-induced defect unbinding and dynamics in active nematic toroids

    Ellis, Perry W.; Pearce, Daniel J. G.; Chang, Ya-Wen; Goldsztein, Guillermo; Giomi, Luca; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Nematic order on curved surfaces is often disrupted by the presence of topological defects, which are singular regions in which the orientational order is undefined. In the presence of force-generating active materials, these defects are able to migrate through space like swimming microorganisms. We use toroidal surfaces to show that despite their highly chaotic and non-equilibrium dynamics, pairs of defects unbind and segregate in regions of opposite Gaussian curvature. Using numerical simulations, we find that the degree of defect unbinding can be controlled by tuning the system activity, and even suppressed in strongly active systems. Furthermore, by using the defects as active microrheological tracers and quantitatively comparing our experimental and theoretical results, we are able to determine material properties of the active nematic. Our results illustrate how topology and geometry can be used to control the behaviour of active materials, and introduce a new avenue for the quantitative mechanical characterization of active fluids.

  16. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  17. Use of porous silicon to minimize oxidation induced stacking fault defects in silicon

    Shieh, S.Y.; Evans, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents methods for minimizing stacking fault defects, generated during oxidation of silicon, include damaging the back of the wafer or depositing poly-silicon on the back. In either case a highly defective structure is created and this is capable of gettering either self-interstitials or impurities which promote nucleation of stacking fault defects. A novel method of minimizing these defects is to form a patch of porous silicon on the back of the wafer by electrochemical etching. Annealing under inert gas prior to oxidation may then result in the necessary gettering. Experiments were carried out in which wafers were subjected to this treatment. Subsequent to oxidation, the wafers were etched to remove oxide and reveal defects. The regions of the wafer adjacent to the porous silicon patch were defect-free, whereas remote regions had defects. Deep level transient spectroscopy has been used to examine the gettering capability of porous silicon, and the paper discusses the mechanism by which the porous silicon getters

  18. Alcohol-induced defects in hepatic transcytosis may be explained by impaired dynein function.

    Groebner, Jennifer L; Fernandez, David J; Tuma, Dean J; Tuma, Pamela L

    2014-12-01

    Alcoholic liver disease has been clinically well described, but the molecular mechanisms leading to hepatotoxicity have not been fully elucidated. Previously, we determined that microtubules are hyperacetylated and more stable in ethanol-treated WIF-B cells, VL-17A cells, liver slices, and in livers from ethanol-fed rats. From our recent studies, we believe that these modifications can explain alcohol-induced defects in microtubule motor-dependent protein trafficking including nuclear translocation of a subset of transcription factors. Since cytoplasmic dynein/dynactin is known to mediate both microtubule-dependent translocation and basolateral to apical/canalicular transcytosis, we predicted that transcytosis is impaired in ethanol-treated hepatic cells. We monitored transcytosis of three classes of newly synthesized canalicular proteins in polarized, hepatic WIF-B cells, an emerging model system for the study of liver disease. As predicted, canalicular delivery of all proteins tested was impaired in ethanol-treated cells. Unlike in control cells, transcytosing proteins were observed in discrete sub-canalicular puncta en route to the canalicular surface that aligned along acetylated microtubules. We further determined that the stalled transcytosing proteins colocalized with dynein/dynactin in treated cells. No changes in vesicle association were observed for either dynein or dynactin in ethanol-treated cells, but significantly enhanced dynein binding to microtubules was observed. From these results, we propose that enhanced dynein binding to microtubules in ethanol-treated cells leads to decreased motor processivity resulting in vesicle stalling and in impaired canalicular delivery. Our studies also importantly indicate that modulating cellular acetylation levels with clinically tolerated deacetylase agonists may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treating alcoholic liver disease.

  19. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    Hallam, Brett; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation

  20. Observation of zone folding induced acoustic topological insulators and the role of spin-mixing defects

    Deng, Yuanchen; Ge, Hao; Tian, Yuan; Lu, Minghui; Jing, Yun

    2017-11-01

    This article reports on the experimental realization of a flow-free, pseudospin-based acoustic topological insulator designed using the strategy of zone folding. Robust sound one-way propagation is demonstrated with the presence of non-spin-mixing defects. On the other hand, it is shown that spin-mixing defects, which break the geometric symmetry and therefore the pseudo-time-reversal symmetry, can open up nontrivial band gaps withi