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Sample records for impedes human pancreatic

  1. Aminoguanidine impedes human pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis development in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nora A Mohamad; Graciela P Cricco; Lorena A Sambuco; Máximo Croci; Vanina A Medina; Alicia S Gutiérrez; Rosa M Bergoc; Elena S Rivera; Gabriela A Martín

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the action of aminoguanidine on pancreatic cancer xenografts in relation to cell proliferation, apoptosis, redox status and vascularization.METHODS: Xenografts of PANC-1 cells were developed in nude mice. The animals were separated into two groups: control and aminoguanidine treated. Tumor growth, survival and appearance of metastases were determined in v/vo in both groups. Tumors were excised and ex v/vo histochemical studies were performed. Cell growth was assessed by Ki-67 expression. Apoptosis was studied by intratumoral expression of B cell lymphoma-2 protein (Bcl-2) family proteins and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (Tunel). Redox status was evaluated by the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS),catalase, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD),manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Finally, vascularization was determined by Massons trichromic staining, and by VEGF and CD34 expression.RESULTS: Tumor volumes after 32 d of treatment by aminoguanidine (AG) were significantly lower than in control mice (P < 0.01). Median survival of AG mice was significantly greater than control animals (P < 0.01). The appearance of both homolateral and contralateral palpable metastases was significantly delayed in AG group. Apoptotic cells, intratumoral vascularization (trichromic stain) and the expression of Ki-67, Bax, eNOS, CD34, VEGF, catalase, CuZnSOD and MnSOD were diminished in AG treated mice (P < 0.01),while the expression of Bcl-2 and GPx did not change.CONCLUSION: The antitumoral action of aminoguanidine is associated with decreased cell proliferation, reduced angiogenesis, and reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes.

  2. Therapeutic designed poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) cylindrical oseltamivir phosphate-loaded implants impede tumor neovascularization, growth and metastasis in mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynyk, Michael; Ellis, Jordon P; Haxho, Fiona; Allison, Stephanie; Steele, Joseph AM; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2015-01-01

    Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) copolymers have been extensively used in cancer research. PLGA can be chemically engineered for conjugation or encapsulation of drugs in a particle formulation. We reported that oseltamivir phosphate (OP) treatment of human pancreatic tumor-bearing mice disrupted the tumor vasculature with daily injections. Here, the controlled release of OP from a biodegradable PLGA cylinder (PLGA-OP) implanted at tumor site was investigated for its role in limiting tumor neovascularization, growth, and metastasis. PLGA-OP cylinders over 30 days in vitro indicated 20%–25% release profiles within 48 hours followed by a continuous metronomic low dose release of 30%–50% OP for an additional 16 days. All OP was released by day 30. Surgically implanted PLGA-OP containing 20 mg OP and blank PLGA cylinders at the tumor site of heterotopic xenografts of human pancreatic PANC1 tumors in RAGxCγ double mutant mice impeded tumor neovascularization, growth rate, and spread to the liver and lungs compared with the untreated cohort. Xenograft tumors from PLGA and PLGA-OP-treated cohorts expressed significant higher levels of human E-cadherin with concomitant reduced N-cadherin and host CD31+ endothelial cells compared with the untreated cohort. These results clearly indicate that OP delivered from PLGA cylinders surgically implanted at the site of the solid tumor show promise as an effective treatment therapy for cancer. PMID:26309402

  3. Impedance Spectroscopy of Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Francisco; Bernal, José J.; Sosa, Modesto A.; Villagómez, Julio C.; Palomares, Pascual

    2004-09-01

    The blood is one of the corporal fluids more used with analytical purposes. When the blood is extracted, immediately it is affected by agents that act on it, producing transformations in its elements. Among the effects of these transformations the hemolysis phenomenon stands out, which consists of the membrane rupture and possible death of the red blood cells. The main purpose of this investigation was the quantification of this phenomenon. A Solartron SI-1260 Impedance Spectrometer was used, which covers a frequency range of work from 1 μHz to 10 MHz, and its accuracy has been tested in the accomplishment of several applications. Measurements were performed on 3 mL human blood samples, from healthy donors. Reactive strips for sugar test of 2 μL, from Bayer, were used as electrodes, which allow gathering a portion of the sample, to be analyzed by the spectrometer. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  4. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; Whitcomb, David C.; Gleeson, Ferga C; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice : Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, ZhaoHui; Yang, AiMing; Deng, RuiXue; Mai, CanRong; Sang, XinTing; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, XingHua

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice: Methodological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Lu; Lu, Z.H.; Yang, A.M.; Deng, R.X.; Mai, C.R.; Sang, X.T.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, X.H.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal of all the common malignancies. Markers for early detection of this disease are urgently needed. Here, we optimized and applied a proteome analysis of human pancreatic juice to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic juice samples, devoid of blood o

  9. Progression of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is significantly impeded with a combination of vaccine and COX-2 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pinku; Basu, Gargi D; Tinder, Teresa L; Subramani, Durai B; Bradley, Judy M; Arefayene, Million; Skaar, Todd; De Petris, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    With a 5-year survival rate of <5%, pancreatic cancer is one of the most rapidly fatal malignancies. Current protocols for the treatment of pancreas cancer are not as effective as we desire. In this study, we show that a novel Mucin-1 (MUC1)-based vaccine in combination with a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib), and low-dose chemotherapy (gemcitabine) was effective in preventing the progression of preneoplastic intraepithelial lesions to invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The study was conducted in an appropriate triple transgenic model of spontaneous pancreatic cancer induced by the KRAS(G12D) mutation and that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule. The combination treatment elicited robust antitumor cellular and humoral immune responses and was associated with increased apoptosis in the tumor. The mechanism for the increased immune response was attributed to the down-regulation of circulating prostaglandin E(2) and indoleamine 2, 3,-dioxygenase enzymatic activity, as well as decreased levels of T regulatory and myeloid suppressor cells within the tumor microenvironment. The preclinical data provide the rationale to design clinical trials with a combination of MUC1-based vaccine, celecoxib, and gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Hydrolysis of human milk fat globules by pancreatic lipase: role of colipase, phospholipase A2, and bile salts.

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, L; Hernell, O; Olivecrona, T

    1981-01-01

    Human milk fat globules were used to explore how dietary triglycerides are hydrolyzed by pancreatic lipase. These triglycerides were hydrolyzed very slowly by lipase alone as if the surface layer of proteins and phospholipids impeded the action of the enzyme. The inhibition of lipase activity could be overcome by addition either of colipase or of pancreatic phospholipase A2. Colipase enhanced triglyceride hydrolysis in a dose-dependent manner whether bile salts were present or not. Bile salts...

  11. Mechanical impedance of the human body in vertical direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, P; Lundström, R; Lindberg, L

    2000-08-01

    The mechanical impedance of the human body in sitting posture and vertical direction was measured during different experimental conditions, such as vibration level (0.5-1.4 m/s2), frequency (2-100 Hz), body weight (57-92 kg), relaxed and erect upper body posture. The outcome shows that impedance increases with frequency up to a peak at about 5 Hz after which it decreases in a complex manner which includes two additional peaks. The frequency at which the first and second impedance peak occurs decreases with higher vibration level. Erect, compared with relaxed body posture resulted in higher impedance magnitudes and with peaks located at somewhat higher frequencies. Heavy persons show higher impedance magnitudes and peaks at lower frequencies.

  12. Transferring human impedance regulation skills to robots

    CERN Document Server

    Ajoudani, Arash

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces novel thinking and techniques to the control of robotic manipulation. In particular, the concept of teleimpedance control as an alternative method to bilateral force-reflecting teleoperation control for robotic manipulation is introduced. In teleimpedance control, a compound reference command is sent to the slave robot including both the desired motion trajectory and impedance profile, which are then realized by the remote controller. This concept forms a basis for the development of the controllers for a robotic arm, a dual-arm setup, a synergy-driven robotic hand, and a compliant exoskeleton for improved interaction performance.

  13. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Hamster and Human Pancreatic Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L. Crowell

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 has been implicated in the development of gastrointestinal malignancies. The aim of the present study was to determine COX-2 expression/activity throughout stages of experimental and human pancreatic neoplasia. COX-2 immunohistochemistry was performed in pancreata of hamsters subjected to the carcinogen N-nitrosobis-(2-oxopropylamine (BOP and in human pancreatic tumors. COX-2 activity was determined by prostaglandin E2 assay in tumor versus matched normal pancreatic tissues. The activity of the COX inhibitor sulindac was tested in the PC-1 hamster pancreatic cancer model. COX-2 expression was elevated in all pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs and adenocarcinomas. In BOP-treated hamsters, there were significant progressive elevations in COX-2 expression throughout pancreatic tumorigenesis. In human samples, peak COX-2 expression occurred in PanIN2 lesions and remained moderately elevated in PanIN3 and adenocarcinoma tissues. COX-2 activity was significantly elevated in hamster and human pancreatic cancers compared to pair-matched normal pancreas. Furthermore, hamster pancreatic tumor engraftment/formation in the PC-1 hamster pancreatic cancer model was reduced 4.9-fold by oral administration of sulindac. Increased COX-2 expression is an early event in pancreatic carcinogeneses. The BOP-induced hamster carcinogenesis model is a representative model used to study the role of COX-2 in well-differentiated pancreatic tumorigenesis. COX inhibitors may have a role in preventing tumor engraftment/formation.

  14. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  15. Human pancreatic cell autotransplantation following total pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, L W; Abou-Zamzam, A M; Longmire, W P

    1981-01-01

    During total pancreaticoduodenectomy for chronic pancreatitis, four patients received an intraportal pancreatic mixed-cell autograft prepared by collagenase digestion. The technique of this autotransplantation procedure was successfully developed using a normal canine pancreas, but has proved difficult to apply in the human chronic pancreatitis model. Our four patients became insulin-dependent, with proof of intrahepatic insulin production in only one patient. Three factors have contributed to the lack of graft success: 1) the preoperative endocrine status, 2) systemic hypotension and portal hypertension secondary to graft infusion, and 3) difficulty applying the successful technique in a normal dog pancreas to an extensively scarred human pancreas. The preoperative insulin response during a glucose tolerance test was blunted or delayed in the three patients tested. An immediate decrease in blood pressure and rise in portal pressure occurred in every patient and prevented infusion of the entire graft (30-50%) in three patients. Unfortunately, the patient with the most compromised insulin status was the only patient able to receive the entire graft. Our experience would indicate that further refinements in technique are necessary to prevent the vascular reaction and allow infusion of the entire graft. Furthermore, normal islet cell function is necessary before a successful graft can be expected. PMID:6781424

  16. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    models that recapitulate the human disease . Therefore, we introduced mutations in the endogenous mouse T7 cationic trypsinogen gene and obtained several...ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project? Our original proposal had three specific aims. Aim 1. Identify and biochemically characterize...pancreatitis in mutant mice which do not develop spontaneous disease (strains T7-D23del-Cre, T7-D23del-Neo, T7-K24R-Cre and T7- K24R-Neo), will be

  17. Apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells induced by Triptolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Xiao-Ling Ding; Jie-Fei Huang; Hong Zhang; Sheng-Bao Wu; Jian-Ping Cheng; Qun Wei

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer ceils induced by Triptolide (TL),and the relationship between this apoptosis and expression of caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.METHODS:Human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was cultured in DIEM media for this study.MTT assay was used to determine the cell growth inhibitory rate in vitro.Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to detect the apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells before and after TL treatment.RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of apoptosis-associated gene caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.RESULTS:TL inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner.TL induced human pancreatic cancer cells to undergo apoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics.TUNEL assay showed that after the treatment of human pancreatic cancer cells with 40 ng/mL TL for 12 h and 24 h,the apoptotic rates of human pancreatic cancer cells increased significantly.RT-PCR demonstrated that caspase-3 and bax were significantly up-regulated in SW1990 cells treated with TL while bcl-2 mRNA was not.CONCLUSION:TL is able to induce the apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.This apoptosis may be mediated by up-regulating the expression of apoptosisassociated caspase-3 and bax gene.

  18. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-06-15

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans.

  19. Translating discovery in zebrafish pancreatic development to human pancreatic cancer: biomarkers, targets, pathogenesis, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Nelson S; Kazi, Abid A; Yee, Rosemary K

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

  20. Gene profile identifies zinc transporters differentially expressed in normal human organs and human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Zhang, Y; Cui, X; Yao, W; Yu, X; Cen, P; Hodges, S E; Fisher, W E; Brunicardi, F C; Chen, C; Yao, Q; Li, M

    2013-03-01

    Deregulated expression of zinc transporters was linked to several cancers. However, the detailed expression profile of all human zinc transporters in normal human organs and in human cancer, especially in pancreatic cancer is not available. The objectives of this study are to investigate the complete expression patterns of 14 ZIP and 10 ZnT transporters in a large number of normal human organs and in human pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We examined the expression patterns of ZIP and ZnT transporters in 22 different human organs and tissues, 11 pairs of clinical human pancreatic cancer specimens and surrounding normal/benign tissues, as well as 10 established human pancreatic cancer cell lines plus normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells, using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that human zinc transporters have tissue specific expression patterns, and may play different roles in different organs or tissues. Almost all the ZIPs except for ZIP4, and most ZnTs were down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer tissues compared to the surrounding benign tissues. The expression patterns of individual ZIPs and ZnTs are similar among different pancreatic cancer lines. Those results and our previous studies suggest that ZIP4 is the only zinc transporter that is significantly up-regulated in human pancreatic cancer and might be the major zinc transporter that plays an important role in pancreatic cancer growth. ZIP4 might serve as a novel molecular target for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Progression of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Is Significantly Impeded with a Combination of Vaccine and COX-2 Inhibition1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pinku; Basu, Gargi D.; Tinder, Teresa L.; Subramani, Durai B.; Bradley, Judy M.; Arefayene, Million; Skaar, Todd; De Petris, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    With a 5-year survival rate of <5%, pancreatic cancer is one of the most rapidly fatal malignancies. Current protocols for the treatment of pancreas cancer are not as effective as we desire. In this study, we show that a novel Mucin-1 (MUC1)-based vaccine in combination with a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib), and low-dose chemotherapy (gemcitabine) was effective in preventing the progression of preneoplastic intraepithelial lesions to invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The study was conducted in an appropriate triple transgenic model of spontaneous pancreatic cancer induced by the KRASG12D mutation and that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule. The combination treatment elicited robust antitumor cellular and humoral immune responses and was associated with increased apoptosis in the tumor. The mechanism for the increased immune response was attributed to the down-regulation of circulating prostaglandin E2 and indoleamine 2, 3,-dioxygenase enzymatic activity, as well as decreased levels of T regulatory and myeloid suppressor cells within the tumor microenvironment. The preclinical data provide the rationale to design clinical trials with a combination of MUC1-based vaccine, celecoxib, and gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19109152

  2. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias

    2004-01-01

    ). In addition, we identified a number of proteins that have not been previously described in pancreatic juice (e.g., tumor rejection antigen (pg96) and azurocidin). Interestingly, a novel protein that is 85% identical to HIP/PAP was identified, which we have designated as PAP-2. The proteins identified...... in this study could be directly assessed for their potential as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer by quantitative proteomics methods or immunoassays....

  3. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic plasticity in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maithili P Dalvi; Malati R Umrani; Mugdha V Joglekar; Anandwardhan A Hardikar

    2009-10-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. The phenotypic plasticity exhibited by pancreatic progenitors during reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and possible role of microRNAs in regulation of this process is also presented herein.

  4. Activation of Raf-1 in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, D H; Jardines, L A; Chang, H; Ruggeri, B

    1997-04-01

    Point mutations in the Ras oncogene cause Ras to remain in its active GTP-bound state sending signals downstream continuously. Since 75 to 90% of all human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas harbor activating mutations at codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene it was our belief that Raf-1-MEK-MAPK will be activated in the majority of human pancreatic cancers. The aim of this study was to confirm activation of Raf-1 in K-ras mutant human pancreatic cancer. Additionally, we sought to determine if Raf-1 activation differed in K-ras mutant and nonmutant pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, we were interested in determining if Raf-1 activation in pancreatic cancer led to subsequent activation of downstream effectors such as MAP kinase. The presence of mutations in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene in 14 human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines was determined by use of mutant allele-specific PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Raf-1 expression of quiescent cells was determined by immunoblotting using a rabbit anti-human polyclonal antibody and enhanced chemiluminescence. MAP kinase activity was determined by measuring the incorporation of phosphate into Myelin Basic Protein. Seven cell lines were noted to have mutations in codon 12 of K-ras while seven cell lines did not. There was no difference in expression of the 74 kDa-activated form of Raf-1 in K-ras mutant vs K-ras nonmutant cell lines. However, there was a significant increase in MAP kinase activity in the nonmutant cell lines compared to the cell lines with Ras mutations (P = 0.026). We conclude that Raf-1 is expressed in its active form in human pancreatic cancer regardless of K-ras status. However, signalling downstream of Raf-1 differs in cell lines with K-ras mutations compared to those cell lines without K-ras mutations.

  5. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  6. Quantitative evaluation of impedance perception characteristics of humans in the man-machine interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onish, Keiichi [Yamaha Motor Co., Shizuoka (Japan); Kim, Young Woo [Daegu Techno Park R and D Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Obinata, Goro [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Hase, Kazunori [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-05-15

    We investigated impedance perception characteristics of humans in the man-machine interface. Sensibility or operational feel about physical properties of machine dynamics is obtained through perception process. We evaluated the impedance perception characteristics of humans who are operating a mechanical system, based on extended Scheffe's subjective evaluation method in full consideration of the influence of impedance level, impedance difference, experiment order, individual difference and so on. Constant method based quantitative evaluation was adopted to investigate the influence of motion frequency and change of the impedance on human impedance perception characteristics. Experimental results indicate that humans perceive impedance of mechanical systems based on comparison process of the dynamical characteristics of the systems. The proposed method can be applied to quantify the design requirement of man-machine interface. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through experimental results.

  7. Inhibitory effect of calcitonin on pure human pancreatic secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka,Juntaro

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effect of calcitonin on human pancreatic secretion was evaluated to examine whether the different results reported earlier between humans, cats and dogs can be ascribed to the different sensitivity of these species to calcitonin, as suggested by some investigators. Pancreatic juice was obtained by endoscopic cannulation of the pancreatic duct from 11 patients with relapsing pancreatitis during intravenous infusion of secretin (1 U/kg/h plus caerulein (0.04 microgram/kg/h. After steady secretion was attained 20 min after the beginning of collection, five 2-min fractions were obtained before, and ten 2-min fractions were obtained after intravenous infusion of calcitonin (1 IU/kg/h. The pre- and post-calcitonin fractions from each patient were compared by Student's t-test. Calcitonin inhibited the secretory volume (26.8 to 65.6% and bicarbonate secretion (21.4 to 62.0% in 8 patients, and amylase (48.4 to 89.5% and lipase secretion (47.4 to 90.5% in all patients. The present studies reconfirmed that prominent inhibition of enzyme secretion occurs in humans. A new finding was that significant inhibition of the secretory volume and bicarbonate secretion occurs in humans. The inhibitory effects of calcitonin in humans did not appear to differ from those in cats and dogs, when evaluated similarly with the use of pure pancreatic juice.

  8. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970359 CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma andchronic pancreatitis. LUAN Baoqing(栾宝庆), et al,Dept Radiol, Beijing Friendship Hosp, Capital Med U-niv, Beijing, 100050. Chin J Radiol 1997; 31(2): 114-118. Objective: To improve the diagnostic accuracy ofpancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materi-

  9. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950347 Pancreatic endorcine response to parenteralnutrition in experimental acute pancreatitis.SUN Xi-aoguang(孙晓光),et al.Dept Nucl Med,ZhongshanHosp,Shanghai Med Univ,Shanghai.Shanghai Med J1995;18(2),74-70.In order to study the pancreatic endocrine responseto parenteral nutrition (PN) in acute pancreatitis,thedisease was induced in dogs by injecting 4% tauro-cholate sodium 0.5ml/kg plus trypsin 0.5mg/kg into the pancreatic duct.Intravenous infusion of PN wasinitiated one hour after the establishment of the dis-

  10. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); New Drug Development Center, Osong Medical Innovation Foundation, Cheongwon, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Suhwan [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa [BK21-plus, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok, E-mail: sskoh@dau.ac.kr [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  11. Generation of pancreatic islet cells from human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Efficiently obtaining functional pancreatic islet cells derived from human embryonic stem(hES) cells not only provides great potential to solve the shortage of islets sources for type I diabetes cell therapy,but also benefits the study of the development of the human pancreas and diabetes pathology.In 2001,hES cells were reported to have the capacity to generate insulin-producing cells by spontaneous differentiation in vitro.Since then,many strategies(such as overexpression of key transcription factors,delivery of key proteins for pancreatic development,co-transplantation of differentiated hES cells along with fetal pancreas,stepwise differentiation by mimicking in vivo pancreatic development) have been employed in order to induce the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells from hES cells.Moreover,patient-specific induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells.iPS cells have characteristics similar to those of ES cells and offer a new cell source for type I diabetes cell therapy that reduces the risk of immunologic rejection.In this review,we summarize the recent progress made in the differentiation of hES and iPS cells into functional pancreatic islet cells and discuss the challenges for their future study.

  12. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi Yoshiya; Masui Toshihiko; Koizumi Masayuki; Kida Atsushi; Ito Tatsuo; Katagiri Fumihiko; Doi Ryuichiro; Nagai Kazuyuki; Tomita Kenji; Oishi Shinya; Fujii Nobutaka; Uemoto Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcino...

  13. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Kazuyuki; Doi, Ryuichiro; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Ito, Tatsuo; Kida, Atsushi; Koizumi, Masayuki; Masui, Toshihiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Uemoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissue...

  14. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Kazuyuki; Doi, Ryuichiro; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Ito, Tatsuo; Kida, Atsushi; Koizumi, Masayuki; Masui, Toshihiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Uemoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    [Background]KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin) was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. [Methods]We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tiss...

  15. [A portable impedance meter for monitoring liquid compartments of human body under space flight conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, V B; Nikolaev, D V; Tuĭkin, S A; Kozharinov, V I; Grachev, V A

    2007-01-01

    A portable two-frequency tetrapolar impedance meter was developed to study the state of liquid compartments of human body under zero-gravity conditions. The portable impedance meter makes it possible to monitor the hydration state of human body under conditions of long-term space flight on board international space station.

  16. Identification of insulin in the human pancreatic juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, H; Sato, K; Murozono, S

    1986-12-01

    In this study, we purified insulin-like substance (ILS) in the human pancreatic juice by the combined use of affinity chromatography and radioimmunoassay (RIA). The amino acid sequence of ILS in the N-terminal region is the same as that of human insulin. The influence of the enzymes present in the pancreatic juice on the RIA procedure, was examined. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and amylase showed steep influences on radioactivity. The addition of enzyme inhibitors could not reduce pseudo-activity, but the elimination of enzymes in the pancreatic juice by ultrafiltration with the Mole-Cut (Millipore, Japan) resulted in a lowering of the pseudo-insulin activity. Affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B coupled with anti-porcine insulin was used to capture ILS. ILS was eluted by 1 M acetic acid from the affinity column monitoring pH and the insulin activity by RIA. The amino acid sequences of two components of ILS in amino terminal region were Phe-Val and Gly-Ile-Val. This indicates that ILS obtained from human pancreatic juice was the insulin derived from endocrine secretion of pancreas.

  17. Impact of global Fxr deficiency on experimental acute pancreatitis and genetic variation in the FXR locus in human acute pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian M Nijmeijer

    Full Text Available Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR, which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis.Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs.In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology.We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a secondary phenomenon.

  18. Generation of pancreatic islet cells from human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG DongHui; JIANG Wei; SHI Yan; DENG HongKui

    2009-01-01

    Efficiently obtaining functional pancreaUc islet cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells not only provides great potential to solve the shortage of islets sources for type I diabetes cell therapy,but also benefits the study of the development of the human pancreas and diabetes pathology. In 2001,hES cells were reported to have the capacity to generate insulin-producing cells by spontaneous differentiation in vitro. Since then, many strategies (such as overexpression of key transcription factors,delivery of key proteins for pancreatic development, co-transplantation of differentiated hES cells along with fetal pancreas, stepwise differentiation by mimicking in vivo pancreatic development) have been employed in order to induce the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells from hES cells. Moreover, patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells.iPS cells have characteristics similar to those of ES cells and offer a new cell source for type I diabetes cell therapy that reduces the risk of immunologic rejection. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in the differentiation of hES and iPS cells into functional pancreatic islet cells and discuss the challenges for their future study.

  19. Prognostic value of metastin expression in human pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KiSS-1 was identified as a metastasis-suppressing gene in melanoma cells. The KiSS-1 gene product (metastin was isolated from human placenta as the ligand of GPR54, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The role of metastin and GPR54 in tumor progression is not fully understood. Methods We investigated the clinical significance of metastin and GPR54 expression in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of metastin and GPR54 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues obtained from 53 consecutive patients who underwent resection between July 2003 and May 2007 at Kyoto University Hospital. In 23 consecutive patients, the plasma metastin level was measured before surgery by enzyme immunoassay. Results Strong immunohistochemical expression of metastin was detected in 13 tumors (24.5%, while strong expression of GPR54 was detected in 30 tumors (56.6%. Tumors that were negative for both metastin and GPR54 expression were significantly larger than tumors that were positive for either metastin or GPR54 (p = 0.047. Recurrence was less frequent in patients who had metastin-positive tumors compared with those who had metastin-negative tumors (38.5% versus 70.0%, p = 0.04. Strong expression of metastin and GPR54 was significantly correlated with longer survival (p = 0.02. Metastin expression by pancreatic cancer was an independent prognostic factor for longer survival (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–4.7; p = 0.03, and the patients with a high plasma metastin level (n = 6 did not die after surgical resection. Conclusion Strong expression of metastin and GPR54 by pancreatic cancer is associated with longer survival. Metastin expression is an independent prognostic factor for the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. The plasma metastin level could become a noninvasive prognostic factor for the assessment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Investigation of the Impedance Characteristic of Human Arm for Development of Robots to Cooperate with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mozasser; Ikeura, Ryojun; Mizutani, Kazuki

    In the near future many aspects of our lives will be encompassed by tasks performed in cooperation with robots. The application of robots in home automation, agricultural production and medical operations etc. will be indispensable. As a result robots need to be made human-friendly and to execute tasks in cooperation with humans. Control systems for such robots should be designed to work imitating human characteristics. In this study, we have tried to achieve these goals by means of controlling a simple one degree-of-freedom cooperative robot. Firstly, the impedance characteristic of the human arm in a cooperative task is investigated. Then, this characteristic is implemented to control a robot in order to perform cooperative task with humans. A human followed the motion of an object, which is moved through desired trajectories. The motion is actuated by the linear motor of the one degree-of-freedom robot system. Trajectories used in the experiments of this method were minimum jerk (the rate of change of acceleration) trajectory, which was found during human and human cooperative task and optimum for muscle movement. As the muscle is mechanically analogous to a spring-damper system, a simple second-order equation is used as models for the arm dynamics. In the model, we considered mass, stiffness and damping factor. Impedance parameter is calculated from the position and force data obtained from the experiments and based on the “Estimation of Parametric Model”. Investigated impedance characteristic of human arm is then implemented to control a robot, which performed cooperative task with human. It is observed that the proposed control methodology has given human like movements to the robot for cooperating with human.

  1. Fuzzy variable impedance control based on stiffness identification for human-robot cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dachao; Yang, Wenlong; Du, Zhijiang

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a dynamic fuzzy variable impedance control algorithm for human-robot cooperation. In order to estimate the intention of human for co-manipulation, a fuzzy inference system is set up to adjust the impedance parameter. Aiming at regulating the output fuzzy universe based on the human arm’s stiffness, an online stiffness identification method is developed. A drag interaction task is conducted on a 5-DOF robot with variable impedance control. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is superior.

  2. Isolation, Culture, and Imaging of Human Fetal Pancreatic Cell Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ana D.; Kayali, Ayse G.; Hayek, Alberto; King, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    For almost 30 years, scientists have demonstrated that human fetal ICCs transplanted under the kidney capsule of nude mice matured into functioning endocrine cells, as evidenced by a significant increase in circulating human C-peptide following glucose stimulation1-9. However in vitro, genesis of insulin producing cells from human fetal ICCs is low10; results reminiscent of recent experiments performed with human embryonic stem cells (hESC), a renewable source of cells that hold great promise as a potential therapeutic treatment for type 1 diabetes. Like ICCs, transplantation of partially differentiated hESC generate glucose responsive, insulin producing cells, but in vitro genesis of insulin producing cells from hESC is much less robust11-17. A complete understanding of the factors that influence the growth and differentiation of endocrine precursor cells will likely require data generated from both ICCs and hESC. While a number of protocols exist to generate insulin producing cells from hESC in vitro11-22, far fewer exist for ICCs10,23,24. Part of that discrepancy likely comes from the difficulty of working with human fetal pancreas. Towards that end, we have continued to build upon existing methods to isolate fetal islets from human pancreases with gestational ages ranging from 12 to 23 weeks, grow the cells as a monolayer or in suspension, and image for cell proliferation, pancreatic markers and human hormones including glucagon and C-peptide. ICCs generated by the protocol described below result in C-peptide release after transplantation under the kidney capsule of nude mice that are similar to C-peptide levels obtained by transplantation of fresh tissue6. Although the examples presented here focus upon the pancreatic endoderm proliferation and β cell genesis, the protocol can be employed to study other aspects of pancreatic development, including exocrine, ductal, and other hormone producing cells. PMID:24895054

  3. Isolation, culture, and imaging of human fetal pancreatic cell clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ana D; Kayali, Ayse G; Hayek, Alberto; King, Charles C

    2014-05-18

    For almost 30 years, scientists have demonstrated that human fetal ICCs transplanted under the kidney capsule of nude mice matured into functioning endocrine cells, as evidenced by a significant increase in circulating human C-peptide following glucose stimulation(1-9). However in vitro, genesis of insulin producing cells from human fetal ICCs is low(10); results reminiscent of recent experiments performed with human embryonic stem cells (hESC), a renewable source of cells that hold great promise as a potential therapeutic treatment for type 1 diabetes. Like ICCs, transplantation of partially differentiated hESC generate glucose responsive, insulin producing cells, but in vitro genesis of insulin producing cells from hESC is much less robust(11-17). A complete understanding of the factors that influence the growth and differentiation of endocrine precursor cells will likely require data generated from both ICCs and hESC. While a number of protocols exist to generate insulin producing cells from hESC in vitro(11-22), far fewer exist for ICCs(10,23,24). Part of that discrepancy likely comes from the difficulty of working with human fetal pancreas. Towards that end, we have continued to build upon existing methods to isolate fetal islets from human pancreases with gestational ages ranging from 12 to 23 weeks, grow the cells as a monolayer or in suspension, and image for cell proliferation, pancreatic markers and human hormones including glucagon and C-peptide. ICCs generated by the protocol described below result in C-peptide release after transplantation under the kidney capsule of nude mice that are similar to C-peptide levels obtained by transplantation of fresh tissue(6). Although the examples presented here focus upon the pancreatic endoderm proliferation and β cell genesis, the protocol can be employed to study other aspects of pancreatic development, including exocrine, ductal, and other hormone producing cells.

  4. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008318 Proteomics of hyperlipidemia-associated pancreatitis using differential gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry: experiment with rats. ZHANG Wei(张伟), et al. Dept Gastroenterol, Shanghai 1st Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200080. Natl Med J China 2008;88(16):1132-1131.Objective To analyze the injury mechanismof hyperlipidemia-associated acute pancreatitis utilizing pro-teomics.Methods Ten SD rats were fed with high fat feed to establish hyperlipidemic models,and 10 SD rats were fed with normal feed to be used as control group.

  5. Crystalline structures in human pancreatic beta cell adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Kawai, T; Tanaka, T; Fujii, M; Takahashi, M; Miyashita, T

    1978-05-01

    An electron microscopic observation on a pancreatic tumor removed from a 34-year-old woman revealed the fine structural morphology of a functional beta cell adenoma. Characteristic PAS positive crystalline structures were frequently observed in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. They were not bounded by a membrane and had a rectangular or irregular hexagonal shape. Highly regular patterns were seen as such as lattice or honeycomb and parallel ripple structures. They are similar to the Reinke's crystal or crystalline structures reported in human hepatocytes suffering from several different diseases and considered as a protein-carbohydrate complex. Occasionally, small paracrystalline structures appeared to indicate an immature type of these structures in the opaque fine fibrillar mass. Crystalline or paracrystalline structures were not detected in the normal pancreatic tissue removed with the tumor from the patient.

  6. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009216 Relation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate with calcium metabolism in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.SHI Chengxian(石承先),et al.Dept Live Bili Pancre Surg,Guizhou Prov Hosp,Guiyang 550002.World Chin J Digestol,2009;17(6):598-601.

  7. An Insight into the Role of Human Pancreatic Lithostathine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patard L

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Human lithostathine was initially isolated from pancreatic stones in patients with alcoholic calcifying chronic pancreatitis. It is secreted into the pancreatic juice where it was believed to inhibit stone formation. The N-terminal undecapeptide was assumed to play an important role in the mechanism, by adsorption to the crystal surface. Later, the role of lithostathine in calcite formation and growth was questioned, together with the associated mechanism of action. In particular, although lithostathine adsorbs on calcite crystal, this property does not now seem to be specific. Moreover, the N-terminal undecapeptide is not likely to have, by itself, the function of the entire protein. The different aspects of this controversy are reviewed and discussed, particularly in the light of recent structural biology. Comparative biological data now available allow us to draw an interesting parallel between lithostathine and other related proteins. Finally, lithostathine might affect stone formation and may also have another function which could be investigated in the other proteins belonging to the same structural family.

  8. Extracellular calcium sensing receptor in human pancreatic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, G Z; Kittel, Á; Riccardi, D; Case, R M; Elliott, A C; Varga, G

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: The extracellular calcium sensing receptor (CaR) plays a key role in the calcium homeostatic system and is therefore widely expressed in tissues involved in calcium metabolism. However, the CaR has also been identified in other tissues where its role is less clear. We have investigated the presence of the CaR in the human pancreas. Methods: Messenger RNA for the CaR was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the protein was localised by immunostaining. CaR function was assayed in Capan-1 cells by measuring intracellular calcium and [3H] thymidine incorporation. Results: The receptor was highly expressed in human pancreatic ducts. It was also expressed in exocrine acinar cells, in islets of Langerhans, and in intrapancreatic nerves and blood vessels. The CaR was expressed in both normal and neoplastic human tissue samples but was detected in only one of five ductal adenocarcinoma cells lines examined. Experiments on the CaR expressing adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 showed that the CaR was functional and was linked to mobilisation of intracellular calcium. Stimulation of the CaR reduced Capan-1 cell proliferation. Conclusions: We propose that the CaR may play multiple functional roles in the human pancreas. In particular, the CaR on the duct luminal membrane may monitor and regulate the Ca2+ concentration in pancreatic juice by triggering ductal electrolyte and fluid secretion. This could help to prevent precipitation of calcium salts in the duct lumen. The CaR may also help to regulate the proliferation of pancreatic ductal cells. PMID:12377811

  9. Characterization of primary cilia and Hedgehog signaling during development of the human pancreas and in human pancreatic duct cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sonja K; Møllgård, Kjeld; Clement, Christian A

    2008-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls pancreatic development and homeostasis; aberrant Hh signaling is associated with several pancreatic diseases. Here we investigated the link between Hh signaling and primary cilia in the human developing pancreatic ducts and in cultures of human pancreatic duct...

  10. TEAD and YAP regulate the enhancer network of human embryonic pancreatic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebola, Inês; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Cho, Candy H-H; Bessa, José; Rovira, Meritxell; Luengo, Mario; Chhatriwala, Mariya; Berry, Andrew; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Jennings, Rachel E; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Morán, Ignasi; Castro, Natalia; Hanley, Neil A; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Vallier, Ludovic; Ferrer, Jorge

    2015-05-01

    The genomic regulatory programmes that underlie human organogenesis are poorly understood. Pancreas development, in particular, has pivotal implications for pancreatic regeneration, cancer and diabetes. We have now characterized the regulatory landscape of embryonic multipotent progenitor cells that give rise to all pancreatic epithelial lineages. Using human embryonic pancreas and embryonic-stem-cell-derived progenitors we identify stage-specific transcripts and associated enhancers, many of which are co-occupied by transcription factors that are essential for pancreas development. We further show that TEAD1, a Hippo signalling effector, is an integral component of the transcription factor combinatorial code of pancreatic progenitor enhancers. TEAD and its coactivator YAP activate key pancreatic signalling mediators and transcription factors, and regulate the expansion of pancreatic progenitors. This work therefore uncovers a central role for TEAD and YAP as signal-responsive regulators of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, and provides a resource for the study of embryonic development of the human pancreas.

  11. Clonal preservation of human pancreatic cell line derived from primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, R M; Li, Y; Mohamed, A N; Pettit, G R; Adsay, V; Vaitkevicius, V K; Al-Katib, A M; Sarkar, F H

    1999-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas generally remains an incurable disease by available treatment modalities, demanding the development of a suitable cell-culture/animal model and the discovery and evaluation of novel therapeutic agents. We report the clonal preservation of a human pancreatic cell line (KCI-MOH1) established from a 74-year-old African-American man diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Initially the human primary tumor was grown as a xenograft in SCID mice and, subsequently, a cell line was established from tumors grown as a xenograft as reported in our earlier publication. The molecular characterization of the primary tumor, the tumors grown as xenograft, and the cell line all revealed similar genotypic properties. By using an automated DNA sequencer, a K-ras mutation (codon 12, GGT to CGT, Gly to Arg) was detected in the pancreatic tumor tissue taken from the patient, whereas no p53 mutation was detected. The same K-ras mutation and unaltered p53 was also found in the xenograft tumor and in the KCI-MOH1 cell line. Chromosome analysis of the cultured cells revealed: 42,XY,add(3)(p11.2),der(7)t(7;12) (p22;q12),-10,-12,add (14)(p11),-18,add (20)(q13),-22/84, idemx2, which is the same chromosome complement found in xenograft tumors. The KCI-MOH1 cell line grows well in tissue culture and forms tumors in the SCID mice when implanted subcutaneously, as well as in orthotopic sites. The KCI-MOH1 cell line-derived SCID mouse xenograft model was used for efficacy evaluation of bryostatin 1, auristatin-PE, spongistatin 1, and gemcitabine alone and in combination. Tumor growth inhibition (T/C expressed as percentage), tumor growth delay (T - C), and log 10 kill for these agents were 38%, 22 days, and 0.53; 15%, 30 days, and 0.80; 24%, 25 days, and 0.66; and 10%, 33 days, and 0.90, respectively. When given in combination, two of seven gemcitabine + auristatin-PE-treated animals were free of tumors for 150 days and were considered cured. Animals treated with a

  12. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geer, M.A.; Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Bakker, C.T.; ten Kate, F.J.W.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bosma, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions. METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices. Tissue slic

  13. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geer, M.A.; Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Bakker, C.T.; ten Kate, F.J.W.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bosma, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions. METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices. Tissue slic

  14. Microelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Human Urothelial Cell Lines: Real-Time Electrical Impedance Measurement at an Optimal Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangkyu Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To distinguish between normal (SV-HUC-1 and cancerous (TCCSUP human urothelial cell lines using microelectrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS. Materials and Methods. Two types of μEIS devices were designed and used in combination to measure the impedance of SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells flowing through the channels of the devices. The first device (μEIS-OF was designed to determine the optimal frequency at which the impedance of two cell lines is most distinguishable. The μEIS-OF trapped the flowing cells and measured their impedance at a frequency ranging from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The second device (μEIS-RT was designed for real-time impedance measurement of the cells at the optimal frequency. The impedance was measured instantaneously as the cells passed the sensing electrodes of μEIS-RT. Results. The optimal frequency, which maximized the average difference of the amplitude and phase angle between the two cell lines (p<0.001, was determined to be 119 kHz. The real-time impedance of the cell lines was measured at 119 kHz; the two cell lines differed significantly in terms of amplitude and phase angle (p<0.001. Conclusion. The μEIS-RT can discriminate SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells by measuring the impedance at the optimal frequency determined by the μEIS-OF.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease.

  16. Human pancreatic triglyceride lipase expressed in yeast cells: purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Lowe, M E

    1998-06-01

    A cDNA clone encoding human pancreatic triglyceride lipase was cloned into a yeast expression vector so that the yeast PHO1 signal peptide replaced the native signal peptide. Pichia pastoris cells were transfected with the vector, and clones expressing human pancreatic triglyceride lipase were isolated. Recombinant human pancreatic lipase was expressed in broth cultures and was purified from the medium by DEAE blue Sepharose and hydroxyapatite chromatography. The highly purified lipase had specific activities for various triglyceride substrates identical to those of tissue-purified human pancreatic triglyceride lipase; it was inhibited by bile salts, required colipase for activity, and demonstrated interfacial activation. This expression system is suitable for the rapid, efficient production of human pancreatic triglyceride lipase in amounts adequate for biophysical studies.

  17. Pancreatic duct replication is increased with obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A E; Galasso, R; Matveyenko, A; Rizza, R A; Dry, S; Butler, P C

    2010-01-01

    In a high-fat-fed rat model of type 2 diabetes we noted increased exocrine duct replication. This is a predisposing factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both of which are more common in type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study reported here was to establish if obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication in humans. We obtained pancreas at autopsy from 45 humans, divided into four groups: lean (BMI obese (BMI >27 kg/m(2)); non-diabetic; and with type 2 diabetes. Pancreases were evaluated after immunostaining for the duct cell marker cytokeratin and Ki67 for replication. We show for the first time that both obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication. Specifically, we report that (1) replication of pancreatic duct cells is increased tenfold by obesity, and (2) lean subjects with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a fourfold increase in replication of pancreatic duct cells compared with their lean non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic duct cell replication is increased in humans in response to both obesity and type 2 diabetes, potentially providing a mechanism for the increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in those with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes.

  18. New equivalent-electrical circuit model and a practical measurement method for human body impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Koyu; Kinjo, Ichiko; Zamami, Aki; Irei, Kotoyo; Nagayama, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Human body impedance analysis is an effective tool to extract electrical information from tissues in the human body. This paper presents a new measurement method of impedance using armpit electrode and a new equivalent circuit model for the human body. The lowest impedance was measured by using an LCR meter and six electrodes including armpit electrodes. The electrical equivalent circuit model for the cell consists of resistance R and capacitance C. The R represents electrical resistance of the liquid of the inside and outside of the cell, and the C represents high frequency conductance of the cell membrane. We propose an equivalent circuit model which consists of five parallel high frequency-passing CR circuits. The proposed equivalent circuit represents alpha distribution in the impedance measured at a lower frequency range due to ion current of the outside of the cell, and beta distribution at a high frequency range due to the cell membrane and the liquid inside cell. The calculated values by using the proposed equivalent circuit model were consistent with the measured values for the human body impedance.

  19. Electrical impedance characterization of normal and cancerous human hepatic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Shlomi; Ivorra, Antoni; Reuter, Victor E; Rubinsky, Boris; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-07-01

    The four-electrode method was used to measure the ex vivo complex electrical impedance of tissues from 14 hepatic tumors and the surrounding normal liver from six patients. Measurements were done in the frequency range 1-400 kHz. It was found that the conductivity of the tumor tissue was much higher than that of the normal liver tissue in this frequency range (from 0.14 +/- 0.06 S m(-1) versus 0.03 +/- 0.01 S m(-1) at 1 kHz to 0.25 +/- 0.06 S m(-1) versus 0.15 +/- 0.03 S m(-1) at 400 kHz). The Cole-Cole models were estimated from the experimental data and the four parameters (rho(0), rho(infinity), alpha, f(c)) were obtained using a least-squares fit algorithm. The Cole-Cole parameters for the cancerous and normal liver are 9 +/- 4 Omega m(-1), 2.2 +/- 0.7 Omega m(-1), 0.5 +/- 0.2, 140 +/- 103 kHz and 50 +/- 28 Omega m(-1), 3.2 +/- 0.6 Omega m(-1), 0.64 +/- 0.04, 10 +/- 7 kHz, respectively. These data can contribute to developing bioelectric applications for tissue diagnostics and in tissue treatment planning with electrical fields such as radiofrequency tissue ablation, electrochemotherapy and gene therapy with reversible electroporation, nanoscale pulsing and irreversible electroporation.

  20. Differential role of Hedgehog signaling in human pancreatic (patho-) physiology: An up to date review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieser, Eckhard; Swierczynski, Stefan; Mayr, Christian; Jäger, Tarkan; Schmidt, Johanna; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias; Illig, Romana

    2016-05-15

    Since the discovery of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in drosophila melanogaster, our knowledge of the role of Hh in embryonic development, inflammation, and cancerogenesis in humans has dramatically increased over the last decades. This is the case especially concerning the pancreas, however, real therapeutic breakthroughs are missing until now. In general, Hh signaling is essential for pancreatic organogenesis, development, and tissue maturation. In the case of acute pancreatitis, Hh has a protective role, whereas in chronic pancreatitis, Hh interacts with pancreatic stellate cells, leading to destructive parenchym fibrosis and atrophy, as well as to irregular tissue remodeling with potency of initiating cancerogenesis. In vitro and in situ analysis of Hh in pancreatic cancer revealed that the Hh pathway participates in the development of pancreatic precursor lesions and ductal adenocarcinoma including critical interactions with the tumor microenvironment. The application of specific inhibitors of components of the Hh pathway is currently subject of ongoing clinical trials (phases 1 and 2). Furthermore, a combination of Hh pathway inhibitors and established chemotherapeutic drugs could also represent a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we give a structured survey of the role of the Hh pathway in pancreatic development, pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinogenesis and pancreatic cancer as well as an overview of current clinical trials concerning Hh pathway inhibitors and pancreas cancer.

  1. Design of a wearable perturbator for human knee impedance estimation during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Michael R; Moser, Adrian; Lambercy, Olivier; Sulzer, James; Gassert, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Mechanical impedance modulation is the key to natural, stable and efficient human locomotion. An improved understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of the next generation of intelligent prosthetic and orthotic devices. This paper documents the design methodologies that were employed to realize a knee perturbator that can experimentally estimate human knee impedance during gait through the application of angular velocity perturbations. The proposed experiment requires a light, transparent, wearable, and remotely actuated device that closely follows the movement of the biological joint. A genetic algorithm was used to design a polycentric hinge whose instantaneous center of rotation is optimized to be kinematically compatible with the human knee. A wafer disc clutch was designed to switch between a high transparency passive mode and a high impedance actuated mode. A remote actuation and transmission scheme was designed to enable high power output perturbations while minimizing the device's mass. Position and torque sensors were designed for device control and to provide data for post-processing and joint impedance estimation. Pending the fabrication and mechanical testing of the device, we expect this knee perturbator to be a valuable tool for experimental investigation of locomotive joint impedance modulation.

  2. Single-Cell Sequencing of Human Pancreatic Islets-New Kids on the Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rashmi B; Groop, Leif

    2016-10-11

    RNA sequencing of human pancreatic islets has provided important insights into the islet transcriptome but little information on the specific cells. In this issue, Segerstolpe et al. (2016) and Xin et al. (2016b) report on the transcriptome of single pancreatic cells from non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic donors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Effects of insulin on human pancreatic cancer progression modeled in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michelle T; Lim, Gareth E; Skovsø, Søs; Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Albrecht, Tobias; Alejandro, Emilyn U; Hoesli, Corinne A; Piret, James M; Warnock, Garth L; Johnson, James D

    2014-11-06

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most lethal cancers, yet it remains understudied and poorly understood. Hyperinsulinemia has been reported to be a risk factor of pancreatic cancer, and the rapid rise of hyperinsulinemia associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes foreshadows a rise in cancer incidence. However, the actions of insulin at the various stages of pancreatic cancer progression remain poorly defined. Here, we examined the effects of a range of insulin doses on signalling, proliferation and survival in three human cell models meant to represent three stages in pancreatic cancer progression: primary pancreatic duct cells, the HPDE immortalized pancreatic ductal cell line, and the PANC1 metastatic pancreatic cancer cell line. Cells were treated with a range of insulin doses, and their proliferation/viability were tracked via live cell imaging and XTT assays. Signal transduction was assessed through the AKT and ERK signalling pathways via immunoblotting. Inhibitors of AKT and ERK signalling were used to determine the relative contribution of these pathways to the survival of each cell model. While all three cell types responded to insulin, as indicated by phosphorylation of AKT and ERK, we found that there were stark differences in insulin-dependent proliferation, cell viability and cell survival among the cell types. High concentrations of insulin increased PANC1 and HPDE cell number, but did not alter primary duct cell proliferation in vitro. Cell survival was enhanced by insulin in both primary duct cells and HPDE cells. Moreover, we found that primary cells were more dependent on AKT signalling, while HPDE cells and PANC1 cells were more dependent on RAF/ERK signalling. Our data suggest that excessive insulin signalling may contribute to proliferation and survival in human immortalized pancreatic ductal cells and metastatic pancreatic cancer cells, but not in normal adult human pancreatic ductal cells. These data suggest that signalling pathways

  4. Establishing a human pancreatic stem cell line and transplanting induced pancreatic islets to reverse experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Mei; DOU ZhongYing; AN LiLong; YANG XueYi; GE Xin; QIAO Hai; ZHAO Ting; MA XiaoFei; FAN JingZhua; ZHU MengYang

    2008-01-01

    The major obstacle in using pancreatic islet transplantation to cure type Ⅰ and some type Ⅱ diabetes is the shortage of the donors. One of ways to overcome such obstacle is to isolate and clone pancreatic stem cells as "seed cells" and induce their differentiation into functional islets as an abundant trans-plantation source. In this study, a monoclonal human pancreatic stem cell (mhPSC) line was obtained from abortive fetal pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic tissues were taken from abortive fetus by sterile procedures, and digested into single cells and cell clusters with 0.1% type Ⅳ collagenase. Cultured in modified glucose-low DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), these single cells and cell clusters adhered to culture dishes, and then primary epidermal-like pancreatic stem ceils started to clone. After digesting with 0.25% trypsin and 0.04% EDTA, fibroblasts and other cells were gradually eliminated and epithelioid pancreatic stem cells were gradually purified during generations. Using clone-ring selection, the mhPSCs were obtained. After addition of 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cell culture medium, the mhPSCs quickly grew and formed a gravelstone-like monolayer. Continuously proliferated, a mhPSC line, which was derived from a male abortive fetus of 4 months old, has been passed through 50 generations. More than 1×109 mhPSCs were cryo-preserved in liquid nitrogen. Karyotype analysis showed that the chromosome set of the mhPSC line was normal diploid. Immunocytochemistry results demonstrated that the mhPSC line was positive for the pdxl, glucagon, nestin and CK19, and negative for the insulin, CD34, CD44 and CD45 protein expression. RT-PCR revealed further that the mhPSCs expressed transcription factors of the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19. Also, in vitro induced with β-mercaptoethanol, the mhPSCs differentiated into nerve cells that expressed the NF protein. Induced with nicotinamide, the mhPSCs differentiated into functional islet

  5. Establishing a human pancreatic stem cell line and transplanting induced pancreatic islets to reverse experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The major obstacle in using pancreatic islet transplantation to cure type I and some type II diabetes is the shortage of the donors. One of ways to overcome such obstacle is to isolate and clone pancreatic stem cells as "seed cells" and induce their differentiation into functional islets as an abundant trans-plantation source. In this study, a monoclonal human pancreatic stem cell (mhPSC) line was obtained from abortive fetal pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic tissues were taken from abortive fetus by sterile procedures, and digested into single cells and cell clusters with 0.1% type IV collagenase. Cultured in modified glucose-low DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), these single cells and cell clusters adhered to culture dishes, and then primary epidermal-like pancreatic stem cells started to clone. After digesting with 0.25% trypsin and 0.04% EDTA, fibroblasts and other cells were gradually eliminated and epithelioid pancreatic stem cells were gradually purified during generations. Using clone-ring selection, the mhPSCs were obtained. After addition of 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cell culture medium, the mhPSCs quickly grew and formed a gravelstone-like monolayer. Continuously proliferated, a mhPSC line, which was derived from a male abortive fetus of 4 months old, has been passed through 50 generations. More than 1×109 mhPSCs were cryo-preserved in liquid nitrogen. Karyotype analysis showed that the chromosome set of the mhPSC line was normal diploid. Immunocytochemistry results demonstrated that the mhPSC line was positive for the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19, and negative for the insulin, CD34, CD44 and CD45 protein expression. RT-PCR revealed further that the mhPSCs expressed transcription factors of the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19. Also, in vitro induced with β-mercaptoethanol, the mhPSCs differentiated into nerve cells that expressed the NF protein. Induced with nicotinamide, the mhPSCs differentiated into functional islet

  6. ROLE OF PANCREATIC STELLATE CELLS AND GALECTIN-3 ON PROLIFERATION AND INFILTRATION OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER CELL LINE SW1990

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hai-biao; XU Ming; WANG Xing-peng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and galectin-3 (GAL-3)on the proliferation and infiltration of pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Methods Human pancreatic cancercell line SW1990 and PSCs were cultured in vitro. Supernatant of cultured PSCs and SW1990 cells was collected.Expressions of GAL-3 in SW1990 cells and PSCs were detected by ELISA, RT-PCR and Western blot. Theproliferation of those cultured PSCs and SW1990 cells were measured by MTT assay and flowcytometry. Infiltrationof SW1990 cells was detected by cell infiltration kit. Results SW1990 cells expressed GAL-3 and the expressionwas up-regulated by the supernatant fluid of cultured PSCs. PSCs did not express GAL-3. SW1990 cells couldstimulate the proliferation of PSCs via GAL-3. GAL-3 antibody could inhibit SW1990 cells proliferation andinfiltration, which indicated that supernatant of PSCs might stimulate the proliferation of SW1990 cells through theinteraction with GAL-3 protein. The supernatant fluid of PSCs could enhance the invasiveness of SW1990 cellsthrough the interaction with GAL-3. Conclusion GAL-3 and PSCs was involved in the proliferation andinfiltration process of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant enzyme activity regulates radioresistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Carolyn J.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, cellular redox environment gained significant attention as a critical regulator of cellular responses to oxidative stress. Cellular redox environment is a balance between production of reactive oxygen species and their removal by antioxidant enzymes. We investigated the hypothesis that mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme activity regulates radioresistance in human pancreatic cancer cells. Vector-control and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpressing human pancreatic c...

  8. Inhibition of human pancreatic and biliary output but not intestinal motility by physiological intraileal lipid loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Holst, Jens Juul; Layer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . Physiological postprandial ileal lipid concentrations dose dependently inhibited human digestive pancreatic protease and bile acid output, but not intestinal motor activity. Thus physiological postprandial ileal nutrient exposure may be of importance for the termination of digestive secretory responses......Lipid perfusion into the distal ileal lumen at supraphysiological loads inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion and gastrointestinal motility in humans. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of physiological postprandial intraileal lipid concentrations on endogenously stimulated...

  9. Pancreatic Steatosis and Its Relationship to β-Cell Dysfunction in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepaniak, Lidia S.; Victor, Ronald G.; Mathur, Ruchi; Nelson, Michael D.; Szczepaniak, Edward W.; Tyer, Nicole; Chen, Ida; Unger, Roger H.; Bergman, Richard N.; Lingvay, Ildiko

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate racial/ethnic differences in pancreatic triglyceride (TG) levels and their relationship to β-cell dysfunction in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied black, Hispanic, and white adults who completed three research visits: screening and an oral glucose tolerance test; frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests for evaluation of β-cell function and insulin resistance; and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for evaluation of pancreatic and hepatic TG levels. RESULTS Pancreatic TG levels were higher in Hispanics and whites than in blacks (P = 0.006). Hepatic TG levels were highest in Hispanics (P = 0.004). Compensatory insulin secretion and disposition index were higher in blacks (P = 0.003 and P = 0.024, respectively). Insulin sensitivity was comparable between Hispanics and blacks and was lower than in whites (P = 0.005). In blacks, compensatory insulin secretion increased steeply with small increments in pancreatic TG levels (R2 = 0.45, slope = 247). In whites, the range of pancreatic TG levels was higher, and the slope was less steep than in blacks (R2 = 0.27, slope = 27). In Hispanics, pancreatic TG levels were similar to those of whites, but compensatory insulin secretion was described by a combination of pancreatic and hepatic TG levels and visceral fat mass ( R2 = 0.32). CONCLUSIONS In a multiethnic sample of adults with mild obesity and without diabetes, we found striking ethnic differences in the levels of pancreatic TGs and in the relationship between pancreatic TGs and β-cell dysfunction. Our data implicate pancreatic TG content measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a noninvasive novel biomarker for pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, especially in the Hispanic population. PMID:22968187

  10. Model reference adaptive impedance control for physical human-robot interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bakur ALQAUDI; Hamidreza MODARES; Isura RANATUNGA; Shaikh M TOUSIF; Frank L LEWIS; Dan O POPA

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel enhanced human-robot interaction system based on model reference adaptive control. The presented method delivers guaranteed stability and task performance and has two control loops. A robot-specific inner loop, which is a neuroadaptive controller, learns the robot dynamics online and makes the robot respond like a prescribed impedance model. This loop uses no task information, including no prescribed trajectory. A task-specific outer loop takes into account the human operator dynamics and adapts the prescribed robot impedance model so that the combined human-robot system has desirable characteristics for task performance. This design is based on model reference adaptive control, but of a nonstandard form. The net result is a controller with both adaptive impedance characteristics and assistive inputs that augment the human operator to provide improved task performance of the human-robot team. Simulations verify the performance of the proposed controller in a repetitive point-to-point motion task. Actual experimental implementations on a PR2 robot further corroborate the effectiveness of the approach.

  11. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Herve; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Oehlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Molenaar, IQ; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G. J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  12. Organoid models of human and mouse ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D; Wilson, John P; Feigin, Michael E; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H M; Molenaar, I Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D; Pappin, Darryl J; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G J; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  13. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Herve; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Oehlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Molenaar, IQ; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G. J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  14. Organoid models of human and mouse ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D; Wilson, John P; Feigin, Michael E; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H M; Molenaar, I Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D; Pappin, Darryl J; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G J; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  15. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008459 Screening of proteins binding to hepatitis B core antigen from human pancreas cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system. Zhang Weiyan(张维燕), et al.Instit Infect Dis, Beijiug Ditan Hosp, Beijing 100011. World Chin J Digestol 2008;16(16):1746-1750. Objective To screen proteins in human pancreas cDNA library interacting with hepatitis B core antigen (HbcAg) by yeast two-hybrid system.

  16. CCDC88A, a prognostic factor for human pancreatic cancers, promotes the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tanouchi, Aki; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Furihata, Mutsuo; NAGANUMA, Seiji; Dabanaka, Ken; Kimura, Masashi; Watanabe, Ryohei; Kohsaki, Takuhiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Saito, Motoaki; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Saibara, Toshiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 88A (CCDC88A) was identified as a substrate of the serine/threonine kinase Akt that is capable of binding to the actin cytoskeleton. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of CCDC88A in the migration and invasiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine whether high CCDC88A expression in human PDAC tissues is correlated with poor prognosis. Immunoprecipitation, im...

  17. Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased expression of resistin in human pancreatic islet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salam, Suhail; Rashed, Hameed; Adeghate, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of distribution of resistin in the pancreas of diabetic patients was investigated to determine whether diabetes mellitus influences the expression of resistin. Pancreatic tissue samples retrieved, during pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer, from cancer patients with and without type 2 diabetes were processed for immunohistochemistry. The pancreatic tissue samples were retrieved from non-cancerous and clear margins. An immunofluorescence technique was used to examine the expression of resistin and its co-localization with insulin and glucagon in pancreatic islet cells. Resistin was observed in many cells located in the central region of pancreatic islet. The expression of resistin increased significantly (p diabetic patients compared to control. Resistin co-localized with insulin but not glucagon in pancreatic islet cells of both normal and diabetic patients. However, the degree of co-localization was higher in pancreata of diabetic patients compared to normal. The number of human pancreatic islet cells expressing resistin increased significantly after the onset of type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, resistin may play a role in the regulation of pancreatic β-cell function.

  18. SIRT1 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jianguang; Chu, Zhijie; Ma, Pengfei; Meng, Yuanpu; Yang, Yanhui

    2017-03-01

    SIRT1 plays an important role in human malignant progression, inducing cancer cell proliferation and metastasis by regulating downstream gene expressions. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms in which SIRT1 promotes pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the SIRT1 expression levels and biological functions in promoting pancreatic cancer progression. We first investigated the expression of SIRT1 in a series of pancreatic cancer tissues as well as in a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The effect of SIRT1 on cell activity was explored by knockdown experiments. Cell growth was measured using the MTT assay and colony-formation assay. Migration and invasion were tested using transwell assay. Our results showed that the expression of SIRT1 was significantly up-regulated both in pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. Knockdown of SIRT1 suppressed cell proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. This is the first report to disclose the role of SIRT1 in regulation of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration, which may provide a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer patients.

  19. Adenosine receptors in rat and human pancreatic ducts stimulate chloride transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Hede, Susanne; Hansen, Mette

    2007-01-01

    these could be involved in secretory processes, which involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels or Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and [Formula: see text] transporters. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis on rat pancreatic ducts and human duct cell......, plasma membrane of many PANC-1 cells, but only a few CFPAC-1 cells. Taken together, our data indicate that A(2A) receptors open Cl(-) channels in pancreatic ducts cells with functional CFTR. We propose that adenosine can stimulate pancreatic secretion and, thereby, is an active player in the acini...

  20. Adenoviral transfer of human interleukin-10 gene in lethal pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Qian Chen; Yao-Qing Tang; Yi Zhang; Zhi-Hong Jiang; En-Qiang Mao; Wei-Guo Zou; Ruo-Qing Lei; Tian-Quan Han; Sheng-Dao Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of adenoviral-vectordelivered human interleukin-10 (hIL-10) gene on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats.METHODS: Healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were intraperitoneally injected with adenoviral IL-10 gene (AdvhIL-10), empty vector (Adv0) or PBS solution. Blood,liver, pancreas and lung were harvested on the second day to examine hIL-10 level by ELISA and serum amylase by enzymatic assay. A SAP model was induced by retrograde injection of sodium taurocholate through pancreatic duct.SAP rats were then administered with AdvhIL-10, Adv0 and PBS solution by a single intraperitoneal injection 20 min after SAP induction. In addition to serum amylase assay,levels of hIL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were detected by RT-PCR, ELISA and histological study. The mortality rate was studied and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and log rank analysis.RESULTS: The levels of hIL-10 in the pancreas, liver and lung of healthy rats increased significantly after AdvhIL-10injection (1.42 ng/g in liver, 0.91 ng/g in pancreas); while there was no significant change of hIL-10 in the other two control groups. The concentration of hIL-10 was increased significantly in the SAP rats after AdvhIL-10 injection (1.68 ng/g in liver, 1.12 ng/g in pancreas) compared to the other two SAP groups with blank vector or PBS treatment (P<0.05). The serum amylase levels remained normal in the AdvhIL-10 transfected healthy rats. However,the serum amylase level was significantly elevated in the other two control SAP rats. In contrast, serum amylase was down-regulated in the AdvhIL-10 treated SAP groups.The TNF-α expression in the AdvhIL-10 treated SAP rats was significantly lower compared to the other two control SAP groups. The pathohistological changes in the AdvhIL-10 treated group were better than those in the other two control groups. Furthermore, the mortality of the AdvhIL-10 treated group was significantly reduced compared to the other two control groups (P

  1. Differential role of Hedgehog signaling in human pancreatic (patho-) physiology: An up to date review

    OpenAIRE

    Klieser, Eckhard; SWIERCZYNSKI, STEFAN; Mayr, Christian; Jäger, Tarkan; Schmidt, Johanna; Neureiter, Daniel; KIESSLICH, TOBIAS; Illig, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in drosophila melanogaster, our knowledge of the role of Hh in embryonic development, inflammation, and cancerogenesis in humans has dramatically increased over the last decades. This is the case especially concerning the pancreas, however, real therapeutic breakthroughs are missing until now. In general, Hh signaling is essential for pancreatic organogenesis, development, and tissue maturation. In the case of acute pancreatitis, Hh has a prote...

  2. Pancreatic Steatosis and Its Relationship to β-Cell Dysfunction in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepaniak, Lidia S.; Victor, Ronald G.; Mathur, Ruchi; Nelson, Michael D; Edward W Szczepaniak; Tyer, Nicole; Chen, Ida; Unger, Roger H.; Bergman, Richard N.; Lingvay, Ildiko

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate racial/ethnic differences in pancreatic triglyceride (TG) levels and their relationship to β-cell dysfunction in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied black, Hispanic, and white adults who completed three research visits: screening and an oral glucose tolerance test; frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests for evaluation of β-cell function and insulin resistance; and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for evaluation of pancreatic and hepatic T...

  3. Clinicopathological significance of p53 and mdm2 protein expression in human pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Dong; Gang Ma; Wei Tu; Ke-Jian Guo; Yu-Lin Tian; Yu-Ting Dong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinicopathological significance of p53 and mdm2 protein expression in human pancreatic cancer. METHODS: To investigate the expression of p53 and mdm2 in pancreatic cancer by immunohistochemistry, and the relationships between the p53 and mdm2 protein expression and clinicopathological parameters in pancreatic cancer.RESULTS: The positive expression of p53 protein was found in 40 of 59 patients (67.8%) and that of mdm2 protein in 17 of 59 patients (28.8%). No obvious relationships were found between p53 as well as mdm2 expression and sex, tumor site, TNM staging and histological differentiation. p53 expression was increased in patients younger than 65 years old, while mdm2 had no relationship with age. The survival time of the patients with the positive expression of p53 and mdm2 proteins was obviously shorter than the other groups. CONCLUSION: Both p53 and mdm2 presented relatively high expression in human pancreatic cancer. The overexpression of p53 and mdm2 might reflect the malignant proliferation of pancreatic cancer and their co-expression might be helpful to evaluate the prognosis of the patients with pancreatic cancer.

  4. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Koert FD Kuhlmann; Conny T Bakker; Fibo JW ten Kate; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions.METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices.Tissue slices were cultured ex vivo for 1-6 d in an incubator using 95% O2. Slices were subsequently analyzed for viability and morphology. In addition the slices were incubated with different viral vectors expressing the repor ter genes GFP or DsRed.Expression of these reporter genes was measured at 72 h after infection.RESULTS: With the Krumdieck tissue slicer, uniform slices could be generated from pancreatic tissue but only upon embedding the tissue in 3% low melting agarose. Immunohistological examination showed the presence of all pancreatic cell types. Pancreatic normal and cancer tissue slices could be cultured for up to 6 d, while retaining viability and a moderate to good morphology. Reporter gene expression indicated that the slices could be infected and transduced efficiently by adenoviral vectors and by adeno associated viral vectors, whereas transduction with lentiviral vectors was limited. For the adenoviral vector, the transduction seemed limited to the peripheral layers of the explants.CONCLUSION: The presented sys tem al lows reproducible processing of minimal amounts of pancreatic tissue into slices uniform in size, suitable for pre-clinical evaluation of gene therapy vectors.

  5. Anisotropy of human muscle via non invasive impedance measurements. Frequency dependence of the impedance changes during isometric contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashuri, Hektor

    In this thesis we present non invasive muscle impedance measurements using rotatable probes extending the work done by Aaron et al. (1997) by measuring not only the real part of the impedance but the imaginary part as well. The results reveal orientations of underlying muscle fibers via minima in resistance and reactance versus angle curves, suggesting this method as potentially useful for studying muscle properties in clinical and physiological research. Calculations of the current distribution for a slab of material with anisotropic conductivity show that the current distribution depends strongly on the separation of two current electrodes and as well as on its conducting anisotropy. Forearm muscle impedance measurements at 50 kHz done by Shiffman et al. (2003) had shown that both resistance (R) and reactance (X) increase during isometric contraction. We have extended these measurements in the 3 to 100 kHz range and we found that resistance (R) and reactance (X) both increase and their changes increased or decreased at frequency dependent rates. Analysis based on circuit models of changes in R and X during the short contraction pulses showed that the extra cellular fluid resistance increased by 3.9 +/- 1.4 %, while the capacitance increased by 5.6 +/- 2 %. For long contraction pulses at very low frequencies: (1) there was practically no change in R during contraction, which implies that these changes are due to cellular membrane or intracellular effects with the extra cellular water component not participating, and (2) in post contraction stage there were no morphological changes which means that drifts in R can only be due to physiological changes. Following Shiffman et al. (2003) we measured impedance changes of R and X during a triangular shaped pulse of force generated via isometric forearm muscle contraction at 50 kHz. We measured these changes in 3-100 kHz frequency range for a stair case pulse of forces and the results showed that they are frequency

  6. A targeting ligand enhances infectivity and cytotoxicity of an oncolytic adenovirus in human pancreatic cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Goto, Naoko; Rin, Yosei; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-10-28

    The addition of a targeting strategy is necessary to enhance oncolysis and secure safety of a conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd). We have constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber, and have successfully identified a pancreatic cancer-targeting ligand (SYENFSA). Here, the usefulness of cancer-targeted CRAd for pancreatic cancer was examined as a preclinical study. First, we constructed a survivin promoter-regulated CRAd expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (EGFP), which displayed the identified targeting ligand (AdSur-SYE). The AdSur-SYE resulted in higher gene transduction efficiency and oncolytic potency than the untargeted CRAd (AdSur) in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. An intratumoral injection of AdSur-SYE significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors, in which AdSur-SYE effectively proliferated and spread. An ectopic infection in adjacent tissues and organs of intratumorally injected AdSur-SYE was decreased compared with AdSur. Then, to examine whether the targeting ligand actually enhanced the infectivity of CRAd in human pancreatic cancer tissues, tumor cells prepared from surgical specimens were infected with viruses. The AdSur-SYE increased gene transduction efficiency 6.4-fold higher than did AdSur in single cells derived from human pancreatic cancer, whereas the infectivity of both vectors was almost the same in the pancreas and other cancers. Immunostaining showed that most EGFP(+) cells were cytokeratin-positive in the sliced tissues, indicating that pancreatic cancer cells but not stromal cells were injected with AdSur-SYE. AdSur-SYE resulted in a stronger oncolysis in the primary pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblasts than AdSur did. CRAd in combination with a tumor-targeting ligand is promising as a next-generation of oncolytic virotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

  7. Improved Sensing Pulses for Increased Human Head Depth Measurement Sensitivity With Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an improved electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) stimulus paradigm, based on dual-energy pulses using the stochastic Gabor function (SGF) that may more sensitively assess deep brain tissue impedance than current single-pulse paradigms. The SGF is a uniformly distributed noise, modulated by a Gaussian envelope, with a wide-frequency spectrum representation regardless of the stimuli energy, and is least compact in the sample frequency phase plane. Numerical results obtained using a realistic human head model confirm that two sequential SGF pulses at different energies can improve EIS depth sensitivity when used in a dual-energy subtraction scheme. Specifically, although the two SGF pulses exhibit different tissue current distributions, they maintain the broadband sensing pulse characteristics needed to generate all the frequencies of interest. Moreover, finite-difference time domain simulations show that this dual-energy excitation scheme is capable of reducing the amplitude of weighted current densities surface directly underneath the electrodes by approximately 3 million times versus single stimulation pulses, while maintaining an acceptable tissue conductivity distribution at depth. This increased sensitivity for the detection of small, deep impedance changes might be of value in potential future EIS applications, such as the portable, point-of-care detection of deep brain hemorrhage or infarction. PMID:24043365

  8. Demonstration of pepsinogen C in human pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1987-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue from 16 post mortem kidney donors have been examined for the content of pepsinogens. A zymogen with electrophoretic mobility, isoelectric point and molecular weight equal to that of pepsinogen C of gastric origin was found in all specimens. A comparison between pepsinogen C extr...

  9. A Novel Ras Inhibitor (MDC-1016 Reduces Human Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo G Mackenzie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers partly because of its persistent resistance to chemotherapy. The currently limited treatment options for pancreatic cancer underscore the need for more efficient agents. Because activating Kras mutations initiate and maintain pancreatic cancer, inhibition of this pathway should have a major therapeutic impact. We synthesized phospho-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (PFTS; MDC-1016 and evaluated its efficacy, safety, and metabolism in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. PFTS inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in culture in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In an MIA PaCa-2 xenograft mouse model, PFTS at a dose of 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced tumor growth by 62% and 65% (P < .05 vs vehicle control. Furthermore, PFTS prevented pancreatitis-accelerated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in mice with activated Kras. PFTS appeared to be safe, with the animals showing no signs of toxicity during treatment. Following oral administration, PFTS was rapidly absorbed, metabolized to FTS and FTS glucuronide, and distributed through the blood to body organs. Mechanistically, PFTS inhibited Ras-GTP, the active form of Ras, both in vitro and in vivo, leading to the inhibition of downstream effector pathways c-RAF/mitogen-activated protein-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK/ERK1/2 kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT. In addition, PFTS proved to be a strong combination partner with phospho-valproic acid, a novel signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 inhibitor, displaying synergy in the inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth. In conclusion, PFTS, a direct Ras inhibitor, is an efficacious agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models, deserving further evaluation.

  10. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakagama

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylamine (BOP into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5’ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  11. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mami, E-mail: mtakahas@ncc.go.jp; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Keiji [Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada 52-1, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  12. Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and ganciclovir suicide gene therapy for human pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Xiao-Xuan Lu; Dao-Zhen Chen; Shu-Feng Li; Li-Shan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vitro effects of suicide gene therepy system of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-TK) in combination with the treatment of nucleotide analog-ganciclovir (GCV) on human pancreatic cancer, and to provide a novel clinical therapeutic method for human pancreatic cancer.METHODS: We used a replication defective recombinant retrovirus vector GINaTK (bearing HSV-TK gene) to make packaging cell PA317 produce progeny virions. We then transferred the HSV-TK gene to target cells SW1990 using these progeny virions, and treated these gene-modified tumor cells with GCV to study the sensitivity of the cells to GCV and their bystander effects by routine MTT-method.RESULTS: Packaging cell PA317/TK was successfully constructed, and we acquired SW1990/TK through virus progeny infection. These gene-modified pancreatic cancer cells were sensitive to the treatment of GCV compared with unmodified tumor cells (t=4.15, n=10, P<0.0025). We also observed a remarkable bystander effect by mixing two kinds of cells at different ratio.CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system is effective for treating experimental human pancreatic cancer, which is largely resistant to the common therapies, so the suicide gene therapy system may be a potential treatment approach for pancreatic cancer.

  13. p-[{sup 123}I]iodo-l-phenylalanine for detection of pancreatic cancer: basic investigations of the uptake characteristics in primary human pancreatic tumour cells and evaluation in in vivo models of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samnick, Samuel; Hellwig, Dirk; Kirsch, Carl-Martin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, 66421, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Romeike, Bernd F.M.; Feiden, Wolfgang [Department of Neuropathology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Kubuschok, Boris [Department of Internal Medicine I, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Amon, Michaela; Menger, Michael D. [Department of Clinical Experimental Surgery, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is associated with the worst 5-year survival rate of any human cancer. This high mortality is due, in part, to difficulties in establishing early and accurate diagnosis. Because most tumours share the ability to accumulate amino acids more effectively than normal tissues and any other pathology, assessment of amino acid transport in tumour cells using radiolabelled amino acids has become one of the most promising tools for tumour imaging. This study investigated the potential of p-[{sup 123}I]iodo-l-phenylalanine (IPA) for detection of pancreatic cancer by single-photon emission tomography. IPA affinity for pancreatic tumour was investigated in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma PaCa44 and PanC1 cells, followed by analysis of the underlying mechanisms of tracer accumulation in neoplastic cells. Thereafter, IPA was evaluated for targeting of pancreatic tumours using SCID mice engrafted with primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells, as well as in acute inflammation models in immunocompetent mice and rats. IPA accumulated intensively in human pancreatic tumour cells. Radioactivity accumulation in tumour cells following a 30-min incubation at 37 C/pH 7.4 varied from 41% to 58% of the total loaded activity per 10{sup 6} cells. The cellular uptake was temperature and pH dependent and predominantly mediated by specific carriers for neutral amino acids, namely the sodium-independent and l-leucine-preferring (L-system) transporter and the alanine-, serine- and cysteine-preferring (ASC-system) transporter. Protein incorporation was less than 8%. Biodistribution studies showed rapid localization of the tracer to tumours, reaching 10%{+-}2.5% to 15%{+-}3% of the injected dose per gram (I.D./g) in heterotopic tumours compared with 17%{+-}3.5% to 22%{+-}4.3% I.D./g in the orthotopic tumours, at 60 and 240 min post injection of IPA, respectively. In contrast, IPA uptake in the gastrointestinal tract and areas of inflammation remained moderate and decreased

  14. Reconstituting development of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia from primary human pancreas duct cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghyeob; Snyder, Emily R.; Liu, Yinghua; Gu, Xueying; Wang, Jing; Flowers, Brittany M.; Kim, Yoo Jung; Park, Sangbin; Szot, Gregory L.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Longacre, Teri A.; Kim, Seung K.

    2017-01-01

    Development of systems that reconstitute hallmark features of human pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), the precursor to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, could generate new strategies for early diagnosis and intervention. However, human cell-based PanIN models with defined mutations are unavailable. Here, we report that genetic modification of primary human pancreatic cells leads to development of lesions resembling native human PanINs. Primary human pancreas duct cells harbouring oncogenic KRAS and induced mutations in CDKN2A, SMAD4 and TP53 expand in vitro as epithelial spheres. After pancreatic transplantation, mutant clones form lesions histologically similar to native PanINs, including prominent stromal responses. Gene expression profiling reveals molecular similarities of mutant clones with native PanINs, and identifies potential PanIN biomarker candidates including Neuromedin U, a circulating peptide hormone. Prospective reconstitution of human PanIN development from primary cells provides experimental opportunities to investigate pancreas cancer development, progression and early-stage detection. PMID:28272465

  15. Guidelines to electrode positioning for human and animal electrical impedance myography research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Benjamin; Pacheck, Adam; Rutkove, Seward B.

    2016-09-01

    The positioning of electrodes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) is critical for accurately assessing disease progression and effectiveness of treatment. In human and animal trials for neuromuscular disorders, inconsistent electrode positioning adds errors to the muscle impedance. Despite its importance, how the reproducibility of resistance and reactance, the two parameters that define EIM, are affected by changes in electrode positioning remains unknown. In this paper, we present a novel approach founded on biophysical principles to study the reproducibility of resistance and reactance to electrode misplacements. The analytical framework presented allows the user to quantify a priori the effect on the muscle resistance and reactance using only one parameter: the uncertainty placing the electrodes. We also provide quantitative data on the precision needed to position the electrodes and the minimum muscle length needed to achieve a pre-specified EIM reproducibility. The results reported here are confirmed with finite element model simulations and measurements on five healthy subjects. Ultimately, our data can serve as normative values to enhance the reliability of EIM as a biomarker and facilitate comparability of future human and animal studies.

  16. Guidelines to electrode positioning for human and animal electrical impedance myography research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Benjamin; Pacheck, Adam; Rutkove, Seward B.

    2016-09-01

    The positioning of electrodes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) is critical for accurately assessing disease progression and effectiveness of treatment. In human and animal trials for neuromuscular disorders, inconsistent electrode positioning adds errors to the muscle impedance. Despite its importance, how the reproducibility of resistance and reactance, the two parameters that define EIM, are affected by changes in electrode positioning remains unknown. In this paper, we present a novel approach founded on biophysical principles to study the reproducibility of resistance and reactance to electrode misplacements. The analytical framework presented allows the user to quantify a priori the effect on the muscle resistance and reactance using only one parameter: the uncertainty placing the electrodes. We also provide quantitative data on the precision needed to position the electrodes and the minimum muscle length needed to achieve a pre-specified EIM reproducibility. The results reported here are confirmed with finite element model simulations and measurements on five healthy subjects. Ultimately, our data can serve as normative values to enhance the reliability of EIM as a biomarker and facilitate comparability of future human and animal studies.

  17. Ectopic PDX-1 Expression Directly Reprograms Human Keratinocytes along Pancreatic Insulin-Producing Cells Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernichovski, Ellad; Nakar, Odelia; Winkler, Eyal; Mazkereth, Ram; Orenstein, Arie; Bar-Meir, Eran; Ravassard, Philippe; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Ferber, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Cellular differentiation and lineage commitment have previously been considered irreversible processes. However, recent studies have indicated that differentiated adult cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotency and, in some cases, directly into alternate committed lineages. However, although pluripotent cells can be induced in numerous somatic cell sources, it was thought that inducing alternate committed lineages is primarily only possible in cells of developmentally related tissues. Here, we challenge this view and analyze whether direct adult cell reprogramming to alternate committed lineages can cross the boundaries of distinct developmental germ layers. Methodology/Principal Findings We ectopically expressed non-integrating pancreatic differentiation factors in ectoderm-derived human keratinocytes to determine whether these factors could directly induce endoderm-derived pancreatic lineage and β-cell-like function. We found that PDX-1 and to a lesser extent other pancreatic transcription factors, could rapidly and specifically activate pancreatic lineage and β-cell-like functional characteristics in ectoderm-derived human keratinocytes. Human keratinocytes transdifferentiated along the β cell lineage produced processed and secreted insulin in response to elevated glucose concentrations. Using irreversible lineage tracing for KRT-5 promoter activity, we present supporting evidence that insulin-positive cells induced by ectopic PDX-1 expression are generated in ectoderm derived keratinocytes. Conclusions/Significance These findings constitute the first demonstration of human ectoderm cells to endoderm derived pancreatic cells transdifferentiation. The study represents a proof of concept which suggests that transcription factors induced reprogramming is wider and more general developmental process than initially considered. These results expanded the arsenal of adult cells that can be used as a cell source for generating functional endocrine

  18. Nucleotide sequence of cloned cDNA for human pancreatic kallikrein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, D; Kitamura, N; Nakanishi, S

    1985-12-31

    Cloned cDNA sequences for human pancreatic kallikrein have been isolated and determined by molecular cloning and sequence analysis. The identity between human pancreatic and urinary kallikreins is indicated by the complete coincidence between the amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned cDNA sequence and that reported partially for urinary kallikrein. The active enzyme form of the human pancreatic kallikrein consists of 238 amino acids and is preceded by a signal peptide and a profragment of 24 amino acids. A sequence comparison of this with other mammalian kallikreins indicates that key amino acid residues required for both serine protease activity and kallikrein-like cleavage specificity are retained in the human sequence, and residues corresponding to some external loops of the kallikrein diverge from other kallikreins. Analyses by RNA blot hybridization, primer extension, and S1 nuclease mapping indicate that the pancreatic kallikrein mRNA is also expressed in the kidney and sublingual gland, suggesting the active synthesis of urinary kallikrein in these tissues. Furthermore, the tissue-specific regulation of the expression of the members of the human kallikrein gene family has been discussed.

  19. Differential role of Hedgehog signaling in human pancreatic(patho-) physiology:An up to date review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eckhard Klieser; Stefan Swierczynski; Christian Mayr; Tarkan J?ger; Johanna Schmidt; Daniel Neureiter; Tobias Kiesslich; Romana Illig

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Hedgehog(Hh)pathway in drosophila melanogaster,our knowledge of the role of Hh in embryonic development,inflammation,and cancerogenesis in humans has dramatically increased over the last decades.This is the case especially concerning the pancreas,however,real therapeutic breakthroughs are missing until now.In general,Hh signaling is essential for pancreatic organogenesis,development,and tissue maturation.In the case of acute pancreatitis,Hh has a protective role,whereas in chronic pancreatitis,Hh interacts with pancreatic stellate cells,leading to destructive parenchym fibrosis and atrophy,as well as to irregular tissue remodeling with potency of initiating cancerogenesis.In vitro and in situ analysis of Hh in pancreatic cancer revealed that the Hh pathway participates in the development of pancreatic precursor lesions and ductal adenocarcinoma including critical interactions with the tumor microenvironment.The application of specific inhibitors of components of the Hh pathway is currently subject of ongoing clinical trials(phases 1 and 2).Furthermore,a combination of Hh pathway inhibitors and established chemotherapeutic drugs could also represent a promising therapeutic approach.In this review,we give a structured survey of the role of the Hh pathway in pancreatic development,pancreatitis,pancreatic carcinogenesis and pancreatic cancer as well as an overview of current clinical trials concerning Hh pathway inhibitors and pancreas cancer.

  20. Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine inhibits growth of nude mouse subcutaneous transplantation tumor of human PC-3 pancreatic cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; JIN Jian-guang; QIN Zhao-yin

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To study the mechanisms of pancreatic cancer treatment with Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine by investigating the relationship between the apoptosis and the expression of bcl-2, Bax and VEGF in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods:Nude mouse subcutaneous transplantation tumor model of Human PC-3 pancreatic cancer was established; the expressions of bcl-2, Bax and VEGF of transplantation tumor cell were determined; the earlier apoptosis rate of pancreatic cancer cell and the gross tumor volume were determined. Results:Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine remarkably decreased the protein expression of bcl-2,raised the expression of Bax,increased the apoptosis rate of the pancreatic cancer and contract the gross tumor volume. Kanglaite greatly decreased the protein expression of VEGF of the tumor cell. Conclusion:Therapeutic efficacy of Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine is far better than separate use of the two medicines in the pancreatic cancer transplantation tumor treatment.

  1. Reactivity of Human Preformed Natural Antibodies with Various Porcine Pancreatic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟杰; 熊沛; 刘绍春

    2001-01-01

    The reactivity of human preformed natural antibodies (PNAbs) with various porcine pancreatic cells and its isotypes was investigated. Eighteen serum samples from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and 20 serum samples from healthy human subjects were collected. The frozen sections of the pig pancreas were incubated with these sera, and subsequently incubated with FITC-conjugated goat antihuman IgG and IgM monoclonal antibodies. The reactivity of human PNAbs with various porcine pancreatic cells was determined by indirect immunofluorescence staining technique. The results showed that 55.6 % of IDDM patients and 55.0 % of healthy human individuals contained PNAbs against porcine endocrine cells. However, the percentage of strongly reacting sera in the patient group was significantly increased as compared with that in the control group. All used sera from IDDM patients and 95 % of sera from healthy controls could react to one or more of the various pancreatic cell types, including: endocrine cells, exocrine cells, vascular endothelial cells, ductal epithelial cells and macrophages. The isotypes of PNAbs contained both IgG and IgM. In view of strongly positive reactivity of PNAbs with various porcine pancreatic cells, pretransplantly cross-matching test and graft pretreatment may be necessary for survival of islet transplants.

  2. Relationship between pancreatic vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and insulin expression in human pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Saisho, Yoshifumi; Harris, Paul E.; Butler, Alexandra E.; Galasso, Ryan; GURLO, TATYANA; Rizza, Robert A.; Butler, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is expressed in pancreatic beta cells and has recently been proposed as a target for measurement of beta cell mass in vivo. We questioned, (1) What proportion of beta cells express VMAT2? (2) Is VMAT2 expressed by other pancreatic endocrine or non-endocrine cells? (3) Is the relationship between VMAT2 and insulin expression disturbed in type 1 (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM)? Human pancreas (7 non-diabetics, 5 T2DM, 10 T1DM) was immunostained for ins...

  3. Interleukin-8 increases vascular endothelial growth factor and neuropilin expression and stimulates ERK activation in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Yuqing; Feurino, Louis W; Wang, Hao; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2008-04-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is associated with tumorigenesis by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Although up-regulation of IL-8 is indicated in many cancers, its function in pancreatic cancer has not been well characterized. In this study we examined the expression of IL-8 on pancreatic cancer cells and clinical tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of exogenous IL-8 on gene expression, and signaling in human pancreatic cancer cells. We found that pancreatic cancer cells expressed higher amount of IL-8 mRNA than normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium cells. IL-8 mRNA was also substantially overexpressed in 11 of 14 (79%) clinical pancreatic-adenocarcinoma samples compared with that in their surrounding normal tissues. Exogenous IL-8 up-regulated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor(165), and neuropilin (NRP)-2 in BxPC-3 cells, one of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. IL-8 expression was inducible by hypoxia mimicking reagent cobalt chloride. In addition, IL-8 activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling pathway in BxPC-3 cells. Our studies suggest that IL-8 might be a malignant factor in human pancreatic cancer by induction of vascular endothelial growth factor and NRP-2 expression and ERK activation. Targeting IL-8 along with other antiangiogenesis therapy could be an effective treatment for this malignancy.

  4. Pancreatic tuberculosis in a human immunodeficiency virus positive patient:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Despite the increased incidence of tuberculosis related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in recent decades,pancreatic tuberculosis has rarely been described.We report a case of pancreatic tuberculosis in a 39-yearold African man who presented with progressive dysphagia,vomiting,weight loss and productive cough,accompanied by localized epigastric pain and one episode of melena.HIV-1 testing was positive and lymphocyte subset profile showed CD4 count of 9/mm3.Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan with contrast revealed a cystic mass in the body of the pancreas,significant portal and retroperitoneal cystic adenopathy,and multiple cystic lesions in the spleen and liver.CT guided cyst aspiration and node biopsy detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis.The patient responded well on antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy.Tuberculosis rarely involves the pancreas,probably due to the presence of pancreatic enzymes which interfere with the seeding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Pancreatic tuberculosis is considered to be the result of dissemination of the infection from nearby lymphatic nodes.Endoscopic ultrasound or CT guided fine needle aspiration for cytology is the recommended diagnostic technique.Although the prognosis is good with antituberculosis treatment,it could be fatal without correct diagnosis and treatment.The clinician's high index of suspicion of pancreatic tuberculosis and application of FNAB to obtain pathological evidence are extremely important to a correct diagnosis,especially in young HIV positive patients.

  5. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  6. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

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    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  7. Targeting developmental regulators of zebrafish exocrine pancreas as a therapeutic approach in human pancreatic cancer

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    Nelson S. Yee

    2012-02-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs and RNA polymerase III (POLR3 play vital roles in fundamental cellular processes, and deregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in malignant transformation. Hdacs and Polr3 are required for exocrine pancreatic epithelial proliferation during morphogenesis in zebrafish. We aim to test the hypothesis that Hdacs and Polr3 cooperatively control exocrine pancreatic growth, and combined inhibition of HDACs and POLR3 produces enhanced growth suppression in pancreatic cancer. In zebrafish larvae, combination of a Hdac inhibitor (Trichostatin A and an inhibitor of Polr3 (ML-60218 synergistically prohibited the expansion of exocrine pancreas. In human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells, combination of the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA and ML-60218 produced augmented suppression of colony formation and proliferation, and induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. The enhanced cytotoxicity was associated with supra-additive upregulation of the pro-apoptotic regulator BAX and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21CDKN1A. tRNAs have been shown to have pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic roles, and SAHA-stimulated expression of tRNAs was reversed by ML-60218. These findings demonstrate that chemically targeting developmental regulators of exocrine pancreas can be translated into an approach with potential impact on therapeutic response in pancreatic cancer, and suggest that counteracting the pro-malignant side effect of HDAC inhibitors can enhance their anti-tumor activity.

  8. MUC1 selectively targets human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Youp Park

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine whether MUC1 antibody conjugated with a fluorophore could be used to visualize pancreatic cancer. Anti-MUC1 (CT2 antibody was conjugated with 550 nm or 650 nm fluorophores. Nude mouse were used to make subcutaneous and orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. Western blot and flow cytometric analysis confirmed the expression of MUC1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines including BxPC-3 and Panc-1. Immunocytochemistry with fluorophore conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody demonstrated fluorescent areas on the membrane of Panc-1 cancer cells. After injecting the conjugated anti-MUC1 antibodies via the tail vein, subcutaneously transplanted Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumors emitted strong fluorescent signals. In the subcutaneous tumor models, the fluorescent signal from the conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody was noted around the margin of the tumor and space between the cells. The conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody bound the tumor in orthotopically-transplanted Panc-1 and BxPC-3 models enabling the tumors to be imaged. This study showed that fluorophore conjugated anti-MUC1 antibodies could visualize pancreatic tumors in vitro and in vivo and may help to improve the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Circadian pancreatic enzyme pattern and relationship between secretory and motor activity in fasting humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jutta; Layer, Peter

    2002-08-01

    It is unknown whether nonparallel pancreatic enzyme output occurs under basal conditions in humans. We aimed to determine whether the circadian or wake-sleep cycle influences the relationship among pancreatic enzymes or between pancreatic secretory and jejunal motor activity. Using orojejunal multilumen intubation, we measured enzyme outputs and proximal jejunal motility index during consecutive daytime and nighttime periods in each of seven fasting, healthy volunteers. Enzyme outputs were correlated tightly during daytime phases of wakefulness and nighttime phases of sleep (r > 0.72, P activity was directly correlated with jejunal motility index (r > 0.50, P enzymes dominates throughout the circadian cycle. Nonparallel secretion during nocturnal phases of wakefulness may be due to merely circadian effects or to the coupling of the wake-sleep and the circadian cycle. The association between fluctuations of secretory and motor activity appears to be particularly tight during the night.

  10. Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 (hENT1 in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Towards Individualized Treatment Decisions

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    Jennifer L. Spratlin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers, where curative surgical resections are rare and less than 5% of patients experience long-term survival. Despite numerous clinical trials, improvements in the systemic treatment of this disease have been limited. Gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue, is still considered the standard of care chemotherapy for most patients in the advanced disease setting. To exert its cytotoxic effects, gemcitabine must enter cells via nucleoside transporters, most notably human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1. Increasingly strong evidence suggests hENT1 is a prognostic biomarker in gemcitabine-treated pancreatic cancer, and may well be a predictive biomarker of gemcitabine efficacy. In this review, we synthesize the literature surrounding hENT1 in pancreatic cancer, identify the key outstanding questions, and suggest strategies to prospectively evaluate the clinical utility of hENT1 in future clinical studies.

  11. MicroRNA miR-34 inhibits human pancreatic cancer tumor-initiating cells.

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    Qing Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in cancer initiation and progression via their ability to affect expression of genes and proteins that regulate cell proliferation and/or cell death. Transcription of the three miRNA miR-34 family members was recently found to be directly regulated by p53. Among the target proteins regulated by miR-34 are Notch pathway proteins and Bcl-2, suggesting the possibility of a role for miR-34 in the maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the roles of miR-34 in p53-mutant human pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa2 and BxPC3, and the potential link to pancreatic cancer stem cells. Restoration of miR-34 expression in the pancreatic cancer cells by either transfection of miR-34 mimics or infection with lentiviral miR-34-MIF downregulated Bcl-2 and Notch1/2. miR-34 restoration significantly inhibited clonogenic cell growth and invasion, induced apoptosis and G1 and G2/M arrest in cell cycle, and sensitized the cells to chemotherapy and radiation. We identified that CD44+/CD133+ MiaPaCa2 cells are enriched with tumorsphere-forming and tumor-initiating cells or cancer stem/progenitor cells with high levels of Notch/Bcl-2 and loss of miR-34. More significantly, miR-34 restoration led to an 87% reduction of the tumor-initiating cell population, accompanied by significant inhibition of tumorsphere growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that miR-34 may restore, at least in part, the tumor suppressing function of the p53 in p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer cells. Our data support the view that miR-34 may be involved in pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal, potentially via the direct modulation of downstream targets Bcl-2 and Notch, implying that miR-34 may play an important role in pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal and/or cell fate determination. Restoration of miR-34 may hold significant

  12. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

  13. l-Methionine inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    BENAVIDES, MAXIMO A.; BOSLAND, MAARTEN C.; da Silva, Cássio P.; Sares, Claudia T. Gomes; de Oliveira, Alana M. Cerqueira; Kemp,Rafael; dos Reis, Rodolfo B.; Martins,Vilma R.; Sampaio,Suely V.; Bland, Kirby I.; Grizzle, William E.; José S. dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that l-methionine inhibits proliferation of breast, prostate, and colon cancer cells. This study extends these findings to BXPC-3 (mutated p53) and HPAC (wild-type p53) pancreatic cancer cells and explores the reversibility of these effects. Cells were exposed to l-methionine (5 mg/ml) for 7 days or for 3 days, followed by 4 days of culture without l-methionine (recovery). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle effects were assessed by flow cytometry after stai...

  14. Protein-G-based human immunoglobulin G biosensing by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugimura, Kaiki; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Endo, Hideaki; Tsuya, Daijyu; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    A highly sensitive biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was developed for the determination of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Protein G, which specifically binds to IgG, was employed as the molecular receptor. Protein G was covalently immobilized on interdigitated electrodes through a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) composed of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and 6-mercaptohexanol. It was found that the mixing ratio of the SAM markedly affected the sensor performance. The sample prepared on 25% MUA SAM exhibited a linear behavior in the concentration range of 0.01-10 ng/mL, which is a record low detection for EIS-based IgG sensors. On the other hand, the sample on 100% MUA SAM showed no IgG-sensing action. A possible mechanism of the mixing ratio that affects the sensing performance was proposed.

  15. Cephalic Phase Pancreatic Polypeptide Responses to Liquid and Solid Stimuli in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    TEFF, KAREN L.

    2009-01-01

    The hormone, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is postulated to be involved in body weight regulation. PP release is dependent on vagal activation and is a marker of vagal efferent activity. Because vagal activity plays a role in glucose homeostasis, elucidating the conditions of activation has important implications for nutrient metabolism. In humans, modified sham-feeding is known to elicit vagally-mediated hormonal responses. We present results of 3 studies in which healthy human subjects tasted...

  16. Primary outgrowth cultures are a reliable source of human pancreatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Song; Delitto, Daniel; Zhang, Dongyu; Sorenson, Heather L; Sarosi, George A; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; Wallet, Shannon M; Trevino, Jose G; Hughes, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances demonstrate a critical yet poorly understood role for the pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic cancer (PC). Progress in this area has been hampered by the availability, fidelity, and/or reliability of in vitro models of PSCs. We examined whether outgrowth cultures from human surgical specimens exhibited reproducible phenotypic and functional characteristics of PSCs. PSCs were cultured from surgical specimens of healthy pancreas, CP and PC. Growth dynamics, phenotypic characteristics, soluble mediator secretion profiles and co-culture with PC cells both in vitro and in vivo were assessed. Forty-seven primary cultures were established from 52 attempts, demonstrating universal α-smooth muscle actin and glial fibrillary acidic protein but negligible epithelial surface antigen expression. Modification of culture conditions consistently led to cytoplasmic lipid accumulation, suggesting induction of a quiescent phenotype. Secretion of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines did not significantly differ between donor pathologies, but did evolve over time in culture. Co-culture of PSCs with established PC cell lines resulted in significant changes in levels of multiple secreted mediators. Primary PSCs co-inoculated with PC cells in a xenograft model led to augmented tumor growth and metastasis. Therefore, regardless of donor pathology, outgrowth cultures produce PSCs that demonstrate consistent growth and protein secretion properties. Primary cultures from pancreatic surgical specimens, including malignancies, may represent a reliable source of human PSCs.

  17. Compound MMH01 possesses toxicity against human leukemia and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Chou, Cheng-Jen; Chang, Tun-Tschu

    2009-04-01

    MMH01 is a compound isolated from Antrodia cinnamomea. MMH01 markedly inhibited growth of human leukemia U937 and pancreatic cancer BxPC3 cells. It resulted in distinct patterns of cell cycle distribution in U937 (G2/M, sub-G1 and polyploidy) and BxPC3 cells (G0/G1 and sub-G1). The modes of cell death in U937 cells include apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe, whereas apoptosis-associated events or necrosis in BxPC3 cells. Neither mitochondrial membrane permeabilization nor caspase dependence was noted. Proteins involving mitotic catastrophe-associated cell death such as cyclin B1 and checkpoint kinase 2 were activated in U937 cells. Only slight to moderate viability inhibition was noted to human monocytes, the normal counterpart of these myeloid leukemic cells. In conclusion, MMH01 possesses cytotoxicity against human leukemia and pancreatic cancer cells.

  18. Profile of MMP and TIMP Expression in Human Pancreatic Stellate Cells: Regulation by IL-1α and TGFβ and Implications for Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

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    Vegard Tjomsland

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by a prominent fibroinflammatory stroma with both tumor-promoting and tumor-suppressive functions. The pancreatic stellate cell (PSC is the major cellular stromal component and the main producer of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagens, which are degraded by metalloproteinases (MMPs. PSCs interact with cancer cells through various factors, including transforming growth factor (TGFβ and interleukin (IL-1α. The role of TGFβ in the dual nature of tumor stroma, i.e., protumorigenic or tumor suppressive, is not clear. We aimed to investigate the roles of TGFβ and IL-1α in the regulation of MMP profiles in PSCs and the subsequent effects on cancer cell migration. Human PSCs isolated from surgically resected specimens were cultured in the presence of pancreatic cancer cell lines, as well as IL-1α or TGFβ. MMP production and activities in PSCs were quantified by gene array transcripts, mRNA measurements, fluorescence resonance energy transfer–based activity assay, and zymography. PSC-conditioned media and pancreatic cancer cells were included in a collagen matrix cell migration model. We found that production of IL-1α by pancreatic cancer cells induced alterations in MMP and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP profiles and activities in PSCs, upregulated expression and activation of MMP1 and MMP3, and enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells in the collagen matrix model. TGFβ counteracted the effects of IL-1α on PSCs, reestablished PSC MMP and TIMP profiles and activities, and inhibited migration of cancer cells. This suggests that tumor TGFβ has a role as a suppressor of stromal promotion of tumor progression through alterations in PSC MMP profiles with subsequent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell migration.

  19. Preparation of pancreatic β-cells from human iPS cells with small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained from patients are expected to be a useful source for cell transplantation therapy, because many patients (including those with type 1 diabetes and severe type 2 diabetes) are on waiting lists for transplantation for a long time due to the shortage of donors. At present, many concerns related to clinical application of human iPS cells have been raised, but rapid development of methods for the establishment, culture, and standardization of iPS cells will lead autologous cell therapy to be realistic sooner or later. However, establishment of a method for preparing some of desired cell types is still challenging. Regarding pancreatic β-cells, there have been many reports about differentiation of these cells from human embryonic stem (ES)/iPS cells, but a protocol for clinical application has still not been established. Since there is clear proof that cell transplantation therapy is effective for diabetes based on the results of clinical islet transplantation, pancreatic β-cells prepared from human iPS cells are considered likely to be effective for reducing the burden on patients. In this article, the current status of procedures for preparing pancreatic β-cells from human ES/iPS cells, including effective use of small molecules, is summarized, and some of the problems that still need to be overcome are discussed.

  20. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A; Washburn, William K; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-08-03

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases.

  1. Two Avirulent, Lentogenic Strains of Newcastle Disease Virus Are Cytotoxic for Some Human Pancreatic Tumor Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Walter

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Highly infectious Newcastle disease virus (NDV strains are known to be very cytotoxic for an array of human tumor cell types in vitro and in vivo but the effects of these and avirulent NDV strains on pancreatic neoplasms are little known. Objective Here, the direct cytolytic effects of the avirulent Hitchner-B1 (B1 and Ulster (U NDV strains on 7 human pancreatic tumor cell lines and 4 normal human cell lines were studied. Methods Cytotoxicity assays used serially diluted NDV to determine minimum cytotoxic plaque forming unit (PFU doses. Results For NDV-B1, normal human cells were killed only by relatively high doses (range: 471-3,724 PFU whereas NDV-U killed these cells at low PFU (range: 0.32-1.60 PFU. Most pancreatic cancer cell types were killed by much lower NDV-B1 doses (range: 0.40- 2.60 PFU while NDV-U killed Capan-1 and SU.86.86 cultures at very low doses (0.00041 PFU and 0.0034 PFU, respectively. Conclusions On average, 1,555 times more NDV-B1 was needed to kill normal cells than most pancreatic tumor cells and 558 times more NDV-U to kill the two most sensitive pancreatic cancer lines. These innately-targeted lentogenic viruses may have meaningful potential in treating pancreatic cancer.

  2. Effect of recombinant adenovirus vector mediated human interleukin-24 gene transfection on pancreatic carcinoma growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xin-ting; ZHU Qing-yun; LI De-chun; YANG Ji-cheng; ZHANG Zi-xiang; ZHU Xing-guo; ZHAO Hua

    2008-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant tumor affecting an ever increasing number of patients with a mean 5-year survival rate below 4%. Therefore, gene therapy for cancer has become a potential novel therapeutic modality. In this study we sought to determine the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated human interleukin-24 (AdhlL-24) on pancreatic cancer.Methods Human interleukin-24 gene was cloned into replication-defective adenovirus specific for patu8988 tumor cells by virus recombination technology. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis were used to determine the expression of human interleukin-24 mRNA in patu8988 cells in vitro. Induction of apoptosis by overexpression of human interleukin-24 in patu8988 cells was determined by flow cytometry. In vivo efficacy of adenoviral delivery of human interleukin-24 was assessed in nude mice (n=10 for each group) bearing patu8988 pancreatic cancer cell lines by determining inhibition of tumor growth, endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression, and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD).Results The recombinant adenovirus vector AdVGFP/IL-24 was constructed with a packaged recombinant retrovirus titer of 1.0x1010 pfu/ml and successfully expressed of both mRNA and protein in patu8988 cells. The AdVGFP/IL-24 induced apoptosis of patu8988 tumor cells in vitro and significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo (P <0.05). The intratumoral MVD decreased significantly in the treated tumors (P <0.05).Conclusion The recombinant adenovirus AdGFP/IL-24 can effectively express biologically active human interleukin-24, which results in inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth.

  3. FGF7 and cell density are required for final differentiation of pancreatic amylase-positive cells from human ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa-Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yoshie, Susumu; Yue, Fengming; Mogi, Akimi; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-01

    The major molecular signals of pancreatic exocrine development are largely unknown. We examine the role of fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) in the final induction of pancreatic amylase-containing exocrine cells from induced-pancreatic progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Our protocol consisted in three steps: Step I, differentiation of definitive endoderm (DE) by activin A treatment of hES cell colonies; Step II, differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells by re-plating of the cells of Step I onto 24-well plates at high density and stimulation with all-trans retinoic acid; Step III, differentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells with a combination of FGF7, glucagon-like peptide 1 and nicotinamide. The expression levels of pancreatic endodermal markers such as Foxa2, Sox17 and gut tube endoderm marker HNF1β were up-regulated in both Step I and II. Moreover, in Step III, the induced cells expressed pancreatic markers such as amylase, carboxypeptidase A and chymotrypsinogen B, which were similar to those in normal human pancreas. From day 8 in Step III, cells immunohistochemically positive for amylase and for carboxypeptidase A, a pancreatic exocrine cell product, were induced by FGF7. Pancreatic progenitor Pdx1-positive cells were localized in proximity to the amylase-positive cells. In the absence of FGF7, few amylase-positive cells were identified. Thus, our three-step culture protocol for human ES cells effectively induces the differentiation of amylase- and carboxypeptidase-A-containing pancreatic exocrine cells.

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines Can Induce Prostaglandin E2 Production from Human Blood Mononuclear Cells

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    Svitlana P. Grekova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests an important role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the pathogenesis of a wide range of malignancies. The protumorigenic properties of COX-2 are generally thought to be mediated by its product, PGE2, which is shown to promote tumor spread and growth by multiple mechanisms but most importantly through modulation of the local immune response in the tumor. Pancreatic tumor cells produce various amounts of PGE2, some of them being even deficient in COX enzymes or other PGE2 synthases. Here we describe that, beside pancreatic tumor cells or stromal fibroblasts, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells can also produce PGE2 upon coculture with pancreatic cancer cells. Stimulating of cellular cPLA2 within PBMCs by secreted factors, presumably sPLA2, from tumor cells appeared crucial, while the direct contact between PBMCs and PDACs seemed to be dispensable for this effect. Our data is emphasizing the complex interactions participating in the formation of the tolerogenic immune milieu within pancreatic tumors.

  5. Generation of Rat Monoclonal Antibodies Against Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Nobuaki; Kushida, Masahiko; Yamada, Keita; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Saito, Koichi; Tachibana, Taro

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. Biomarkers that can detect the tumor in its early stages when it may be amenable to curative resection might improve prognosis. To discover novel markers expressed in primary pancreatic cancer, we generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell line BxPC3 using a rat medial iliac lymph node method. The antigen recognized by 1B5A5 was expressed on the cell surface and secreted into the conditioned medium of BxPC3 cells, and characterized as glycoproteins with molecular mass between 60 and 90 kDa. A wide range of molecular weights of 1B5A5 antigen in several pancreatic cancer cell lines were observed. Immunohistochemistry using a human multiple organ tumor tissue array showed an enhanced expression of 1B5A5 antigen in pancreas, lung, stomach, breast, urinary bladder, colon, and cervix uteri cancers. Immunoprecipitation followed by proteomic analyses identified CEACAM6 as a 1B5A5 antigen. In addition, western blot analysis results indicated that the 1B5A5 epitope is located within an amino-terminal domain of CEACAM6. These results raised the possibility that our approach could lead to discovery of novel biomarkers for the early stage of cancers in a relatively short period of time.

  6. SMAD4-dependent polysome RNA recruitment in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Jessica A; Trask, Heidi W; Ringelberg, Carol S; Ridley, Christian J A; Wang, Sinny; Sal-Lari, Richard Cowper; Moore, Jason H; Korc, Murray; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2012-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States because most patients are diagnosed too late in the course of the disease to be treated effectively. Thus, there is a pressing need to more clearly understand how gene expression is regulated in cancer cells and to identify new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Translational regulation is thought to occur primarily through non-SMAD directed signaling pathways. We tested the hypothesis that SMAD4-dependent signaling does play a role in the regulation of mRNA entry into polysomes and that novel candidate genes in pancreatic cancer could be identified using polysome RNA from the human pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 with or without a functional SMAD4 gene. We found that (i) differentially expressed whole cell and cytoplasm RNA levels are both poor predictors of polysome RNA levels; (ii) for a majority of RNAs, differential RNA levels are regulated independently in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and polysomes; (iii) for most of the remaining polysome RNA, levels are regulated via a "tagging" of the RNAs in the nucleus for rapid entry into the polysomes; (iv) a SMAD4-dependent pathway appears to indeed play a role in regulating mRNA entry into polysomes; and (v) a gene list derived from differentially expressed polysome RNA in BxPC3 cells generated new candidate genes and cell pathways potentially related to pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. An evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human subject with the use of bio-impedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papezova, S [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague (Czech Republic); Papez, V, E-mail: stanislava.papezova@fs.cvut.c, E-mail: papez@feld.cvut.c [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-01

    The influence of a magnetic field on a living human organism was monitored using a bio-impedance evaluation of vasodilatation effects. A quantitative evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human being was implemented by means of a quantitative evaluation of changes in the bio-impedance of the tissue. The pulse of the magnetic field was controlled by a pseudo-random impulse signal using a power switch that controlled the current of the applicator coil. The peak magnetic field flux density was approximately 60 mT. The bio-impedance was measured by a four-electrode method by means of a radiofrequency narrow band vector bioimpedance meter. Experiments were performed on the magnetic exposure of the forearm of an exposed human subject. During exposure to a magnetic field, the bio-impedance change signal level increases above the normal level, and reaches the maximum level after about 10 minutes. The maximum value is approximately 50 % higher than the normal level.

  8. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... pancreatitis; Pancreas - inflammation Images Digestive system Endocrine glands Pancreatitis, acute - CT scan Pancreatitis - series References Forsmark CE. Pancreatitis. ...

  9. Activation of c-Ki-ras gene in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, V S; Sakamoto, H; Nishimura, S; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

    1985-09-01

    DNA isolated from a lymph node with metastasis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a Japanese male patient transformed NIH3T3 cells upon transfection by the calcium-phosphate precipitation technique. Analysis of DNA from the transformant revealed the presence of an activated human c-Ki-ras gene, which is considered to be responsible for the transformation of the NIH3T3 cells.

  10. Tumor-specific gene therapy for pancreatic cancer using human neural stem cells encoding carboxylesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung S; Yoon, Kichul; Choi, Seon-A; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Kim, Seung U; Lee, Hong J

    2016-11-15

    Advanced pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignant human diseases lacking effective treatment. Its extremely low survival rate necessitates development of novel therapeutic approach. Human neural stem cells (NSCs) are known to have tumor-tropic effect. We genetically engineered them to express rabbit carboxyl esterase (F3.CE), which activates prodrug CPT-11(irinotecan) into potent metabolite SN-38. We found significant inhibition of the growth of BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cell line in vitro by F3.CE in presence of CPT-11. Apoptosis was also markedly increased in BxPC3 cells treated with F3.CE and CPT-11. The ligand VEGF and receptor VEGF-1(Flt1) were identified to be the relevant tumor-tropic chemoattractant. We confirmed in vivo that in mice injected with BxPC3 on their skin, there was significant reduction of tumor size in those treated with both F3.CE and BxPC3 adjacent to the cancer mass. Administration of F3.CE in conjunction with CPT-11 could be a new possibility as an effective treatment regimen for patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer.

  11. A scalable system for production of functional pancreatic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Schulz

    Full Text Available Development of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based therapy for type 1 diabetes will require the translation of proof-of-principle concepts into a scalable, controlled, and regulated cell manufacturing process. We have previously demonstrated that hESC can be directed to differentiate into pancreatic progenitors that mature into functional glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells in vivo. In this study we describe hESC expansion and banking methods and a suspension-based differentiation system, which together underpin an integrated scalable manufacturing process for producing pancreatic progenitors. This system has been optimized for the CyT49 cell line. Accordingly, qualified large-scale single-cell master and working cGMP cell banks of CyT49 have been generated to provide a virtually unlimited starting resource for manufacturing. Upon thaw from these banks, we expanded CyT49 for two weeks in an adherent culture format that achieves 50-100 fold expansion per week. Undifferentiated CyT49 were then aggregated into clusters in dynamic rotational suspension culture, followed by differentiation en masse for two weeks with a four-stage protocol. Numerous scaled differentiation runs generated reproducible and defined population compositions highly enriched for pancreatic cell lineages, as shown by examining mRNA expression at each stage of differentiation and flow cytometry of the final population. Islet-like tissue containing glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells was generated upon implantation into mice. By four- to five-months post-engraftment, mature neo-pancreatic tissue was sufficient to protect against streptozotocin (STZ-induced hyperglycemia. In summary, we have developed a tractable manufacturing process for the generation of functional pancreatic progenitors from hESC on a scale amenable to clinical entry.

  12. Human haptoglobin phenotypes and concentration determination by nanogold-enhanced electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Tseng, Shin-Hua; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chang, Chia-Ching [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ju-Pin, E-mail: ccchang01@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China)

    2011-06-17

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute phase protein that binds free hemoglobin (Hb), preventing Hb-induced oxidative damage in the vascular system. There are three phenotypes in human Hp, whose heterogeneous polymorphic structures and varying concentrations in plasma have been attributed to the cause of diseases and outcome of clinical treatments. Different phenotypes of Hp may be composed of the same subunits but different copy numbers, rendering their determination difficult by a single procedure. In this study, we have developed a simple, fast, reliable and sensitive method, using label-free nanogold-modified bioprobes coupled with self-development electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). By this method, probe surface charge transfer resistance is detected. The relative charge transfer resistance ratios for Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2 were characterized. We were able to determine protein size difference within 3 nm, and the linear region of the calibration curve for Hp levels in the range of 90 pg ml{sup -1} and 90 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ({approx}1 fM to 1 pM). We surmise that similar approaches can be used to investigate protein polymorphism and altered protein-protein interaction associated with diseases.

  13. Neurotensin is a Versatile Modulator of In Vitro Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell (PDAC Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While the neurotensin (NT roles in pancreatic cancer growth are well documented, its effects on pancreatic cancer cell migration have not been described. Methods: The NT-induced effects on the migration process of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells (PDACs were characterized by means of various assays including computer-assisted video-microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, ELISA-based, small GTPase pull-down and phosphorylation assays. Results: The NT-induced modifications on in vitro PDACs migration largely depended on the extra-cellular matrix environment and cell propensity to migrate collectively or individually. While NT significantly reduced the level of migration of collectively migrating PDACs on vitronectin, it significantly increased the level of individually migrating PDACs. These effects were mainly mediated through the sortilin/NTR3 receptor. Neurotensin both induced altered expression of αV and β5 integrin subunits in PDACs cultured on vitronectin resulting in modified adhesion abilities, and caused modifications to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton through the NT-mediated activation of small Rho GTPases. While the NT effects on individually migrating PDACs were mediated at least through the EGFR/ERK signaling pathways, those on collectively migrating PDACs appeared highly dependent on the PI 3-kinase pathway. Conclusion: This study strongly suggests the involvement of neurotensin in the modulation of human PDAC migration.

  14. Numb/Notch signaling pathway modulation enhances human pancreatic cancer cell radiosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yi-Liang; Min, Min; Shen, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to evaluate whether repression of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway affects the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Different doses of X-rays (0, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Gy) were applied to the PANC-1, SW1990, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines, and the Numb/Notch pathway inhibitor DAPT was added at different doses (0, 1, 3, and 5 μmol/l). MTT assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometry, scratch assay, and Transwell experiments were performed, and qRT-PCR and Western blot were conducted for the detection of Numb expression. Tumorigenicity assay in nude mice was carried out to verify the influence of blocker of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway on the radiosensitivity of xenograft tumors. The MTT assay, colony formation assay and flow cytometry experiments revealed that proliferation decreased as radiation dose increased. The viability of PANC-1 cells at 5 Gy, SW 1990 cells at 4 Gy and 5 Gy, and MIA PaCa-2 cells at 2-5 Gy was significantly lower than that of non-irradiated cells (all P cancer cells is associated with X-ray radiation and that inhibition of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway can enhance radiosensitivity, suggesting that inhibition of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway may serve as a potential target for clinical improvement of the radiosensitivity of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Embelin suppresses growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice by inhibiting Akt and Sonic hedgehog pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzhao Huang

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease, and therefore effective treatment and/or prevention strategies are urgently needed. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro, and xenografts in Balb C nude mice, and pancreatic cancer cell growth isolated from KrasG12D transgenic mice. XTT assays were performed to measure cell viability. AsPC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously into Balb c nude mice and treated with embelin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of Akt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh and their target gene products were measured by the immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. The effects of embelin on pancreatic cancer cells isolated from 10-months old KrasG12D mice were also examined. Embelin inhibited cell viability in pancreatic cancer AsPC-1, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and Hs 766T cell lines, and these inhibitory effects were blocked either by constitutively active Akt or Shh protein. Embelin-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA and Bcl-2 and cell cycle (cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK6, and induction of apoptosis (activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP, and increased expression of Bax. In addition, embelin inhibited the expression of markers of angiogenesis (COX-2, VEGF, VEGFR, and IL-8, and metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tumor tissues. Antitumor activity of embelin was associated with inhibition of Akt and Shh pathways in xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice. Furthermore, embelin also inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug, and ZEB1. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis by suppressing Akt and

  16. Knowledge Gaps in Rodent Pancreas Biology: Taking Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Beta Cells into Our Own Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Munirah Mohamad; Low, Blaise Su Jun; Pek, Nicole Min Qian; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong

    2015-01-01

    In the field of stem cell biology and diabetes, we and others seek to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells for disease modeling and cell replacement therapy. Traditionally, knowledge gathered from rodents is extended to human pancreas developmental biology research involving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). While much has been learnt from rodent pancreas biology in the early steps toward Pdx1(+) pancreatic progenitors, much less is known about the transition toward Ngn3(+) pancreatic endocrine progenitors. Essentially, the later steps of pancreatic β cell development and maturation remain elusive to date. As a result, the most recent advances in the stem cell and diabetes field have relied upon combinatorial testing of numerous growth factors and chemical compounds in an arbitrary trial-and-error fashion to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells from hPSCs. Although this hit-or-miss approach appears to have made some headway in maturing human pancreatic β cells in vitro, its underlying biology is vaguely understood. Therefore, in this mini-review, we discuss some of these late-stage signaling pathways that are involved in human pancreatic β cell differentiation and highlight our current understanding of their relevance in rodent pancreas biology. Our efforts here unravel several novel signaling pathways that can be further studied to shed light on unexplored aspects of rodent pancreas biology. New investigations into these signaling pathways are expected to advance our knowledge in human pancreas developmental biology and to aid in the translation of stem cell biology in the context of diabetes treatments.

  17. Long-acting lipidated analogue of human pancreatic polypeptide is slowly released into circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Elling, Christian E; Madsen, Andreas N;

    2011-01-01

    of a human pancreatic polypeptide analogue specific for the human (h)Y(2) and hY(4) receptor with PEGs of different size and palmitic acid. Receptor specificity was demonstrated by competitive binding studies. Modifications had only a small influence on binding affinities and no influence on secondary......The main disadvantages of peptide pharmaceuticals are their rapid degradation and excretion, their low hydrophilicity, and low shelf lifes. These bottlenecks can be circumvented by acylation with fatty acids (lipidation) or polyethylene glycol (PEGylation). Here, we describe the modification...

  18. [Design of High Frequency Signal Detecting Circuit of Human Body Impedance Used for Ultrashort Wave Diathermy Apparatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xu; Wang, Yunguang; Cheng, Haiping; Chong, Xiaochen

    2016-02-01

    The present circuit was designed to apply to human tissue impedance tuning and matching device in ultra-short wave treatment equipment. In order to judge if the optimum status of circuit parameter between energy emitter circuit and accepter circuit is in well syntony, we designed a high frequency envelope detect circuit to coordinate with automatic adjust device of accepter circuit, which would achieve the function of human tissue impedance matching and tuning. Using the sampling coil to receive the signal of amplitude-modulated wave, we compared the voltage signal of envelope detect circuit with electric current of energy emitter circuit. The result of experimental study was that the signal, which was transformed by the envelope detect circuit, was stable and could be recognized by low speed Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and was proportional to the electric current signal of energy emitter circuit. It could be concluded that the voltage, transformed by envelope detect circuit can mirror the real circuit state of syntony and realize the function of human tissue impedance collecting.

  19. Correlation between Protein Expression of PTEN in Human Pancreatic Cancer and the Proliferation, Infiltration, Metastasis and Prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jing; XIONG Jiongxin; LI Tao; YANG Zhiyong; LI Xiaohui; LI Kai; WU Heshui; WANG Chunyou

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the correlation between protein expression of PTEN and the proliferation, infiltration, metastasis and prognosis in pancreatic cancer, immunohistochemical SP method was used to examine the protein expression of PTEN, PCNA, MVD, MMP-2, MMP-9 and TUNEL method to detect the levels of apoptosis of pancreatic cells in 41 pancreatic head cancers from regional pancreatectomy (RP) and 10 normal pancreatic tissues. The results showed that among 41 cases of pancreatic cancers, the positive staining of PTNE (39.02 %) was significantly weaker than that in normal pancreatic tissues (P<0.05). The levels of PCNA labeling index (LI), apoptotic index(AI), microvessel density (MVD), MMP-2 LI and MMP-9 LI were decreased gradually with the increase of the expression intensity of PTEN, and there was a significant difference in the above parameters among the patients having different expression levels of PTEN (P<0.01 or P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the expression of PTEN and PCNA LI, MVD, MMP-2 LI,MMP-9 LI, and a positive correlation between AI and the expression of PTEN. The expression intensity of PTEN was correlated with the postoperative survival of the patients with pancreatic cancer(x2=22.3400, P<0.0001, RR=2.030). It was suggested that the expression levels of PTEN protein were closely related with proliferation, infiltration and metastasis in human pancreatic cancer, and the expression of PTEN protein was one of the prognostic factors for pancreatic cancer following RP.

  20. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into pancreatic endoderm in patterned size-controlled clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Mendelsohn, Adam D; Seerke, Rina; Desai, Tejal A; German, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Pancreatic β-cells function optimally when clustered in islet-like structures. However, nutrient and oxygen deprivation limits the viability of cells at the core of excessively large clusters. Hence, production of functional β-cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for patients with diabetes would benefit from the growth and differentiation of these cells in size-controlled aggregates. In this study, we controlled cluster size by seeding hESCs onto glass cover slips patterned by the covalent microcontact-printing of laminin in circular patches of 120 μm in diameter. These were used as substrates to grow and differentiate hESCs first into SOX17-positive/SOX7-negative definitive endoderm, after which many clusters released and formed uniformly sized three-dimensional clusters. Both released clusters and those that remained attached differentiated into HNF1β-positive primitive gut tube-like cells with high efficiency. Further differentiation yielded pancreatic endoderm-like cells that co-expressed PDX1 and NKX6.1. Controlling aggregate size allows efficient production of uniformly-clustered pancreatic endocrine precursors for in vivo engraftment or further in vitro maturation.

  1. Depleting MEKK1 expression inhibits the ability of invasion and migration of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fuqin; Li, Hongyan; Yan, Chaoqi; Jia, Baoqing; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2009-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein/ERK kinase 1 (MEKK1) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase belonging to the MEKK/STE11 subgroup of the MAPKKK family and plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, it remains unclear about its functions in pancreatic cancer. We analyzed MEKK1 expression in 41 surgically resection pancreatic cancer patient's samples by immunohistochemistry and determined its role in BxPC3 cells via RNAi experiment. The abilities of invasion, motility, and adhesion of BxPC3 cells were detected by transwell assay, wound healing assay and adhesion assay, respectively. Gelatinase activity of MMPs in cultured cells was examined by gelatin zymography. Our data showed that MEKK1 expression is positively correlated with lymphatic metastases (P BxPC3 cells were inhibited significantly (P < 0.01) when MEKK1 was depleted with a specific siRNA. We observed that the activity of MMP2 was decreased in the MEKK1 depletion cell line (P < 0.05), accompanied with decreased phosphorylated ERK1/2. Our results indicated that the depletion of MEKK1 led to a potent inhibition on the invasion and migration of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma in vitro. It suggests that MEKK1 may be a potential target for development of anti-invasion and metastasis drugs.

  2. Regeneration of insulin-producing pancreatic cells using a volatile bioactive compound and human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Mio; Imai, Toshio; Yaegaki, Ken; Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Tanaka, Tomoko

    2014-10-30

    Transplantation of insulin (INS)-secreting cells differentiated in vitro from stem cells promises a safer and easier treatment of severe diabetes mellitus. A volatile bioactive compound, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), promotes cell differentiation; human tooth-pulp stem cells undergo hepatic differentiation. The aim of this study is to develop a novel protocol using H2S to enhance pancreatic differentiation from the CD117(+) cell fraction of human tooth pulp. During the differentiation, the cells were exposed to 0.1 ng ml(-1) H2S. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, determination of INS c-peptide content and flow cytometry of pancreatically related markers were carried out. Expression of WNT and the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway were also determined by PCR array. After differentiation, INS, glucagon (GCG), somatostatin (SST) and pancreatic polypeptide (PPY) were positive when examined by immunofluorescence. INS and GCG were also determined flow-cytometrically. Only the cells expressing INS increased after H2S exposure. The number of cells expressing GCG was significantly decreased. Genes involved in canonical WNT and the WNT/calcium pathways were highly expressed after H2S exposure. H2S accelerated INS synthesis and secretion by regenerated INS-producing cells from human teeth. All signaling pathway functions of the PI3K-AKT pathway were extremely activated by H2S exposure. The matured INS-producing cells originating in human teeth were increased by H2S in order to control blood-glucose level.

  3. Interdependence of Gemcitabine Treatment, Transporter Expression, and Resistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hagmann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine is widely used as first-line chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Our previous experimental chemotherapy studies have shown that treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU alters the cellular transporter expression profile and that modulation of the expression of multidrug resistance protein 5 (MRP5; ABCC5 influences the chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Here, we studied the influence of acute and chronic gemcitabine treatment on the expression of relevant uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunoblot analyses. The specific role of MRP5 in cellular gemcitabine sensitivity was studied by cytotoxicity assays using MRP5-overexpressing and MRP5-silenced cells. Exposure to gemcitabine (12 nM for 3 days did not alter the messenger RNA (mRNA expression of MRP1, MRP3, MRP5, and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1, whereas high dosages of the drug (20 µM for 1 hour elicited up-regulation of these transporters in most cell lines studied. In cells with acquired gemcitabine resistance (up to 160 nM gemcitabine, the mRNA or protein expression of the gemcitabine transporters MRP5 and ENT1 was upregulated in several cell lines. Combined treatment with 5-FU and gemcitabine caused a 5- to 40-fold increase in MRP5 and ENT1 expressions. Cytotoxicity assays using either MRP5-overexpressing (HEK and PANC-1 or MRP5-silenced (PANC1/shMRP5 cells indicated that MRP5 contributes to gemcitabine resistance. Thus, our novel data not only on drug-induced alterations of transporter expression relevant for gemcitabine uptake and export but also on the link between gemcitabine sensitivity and MRP5 expression may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine in pancreatic carcinoma patients.

  4. Iranian staff nurses' views of their productivity and human resource factors improving and impeding it: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salsali Mahvash

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nurses, as the largest human resource element of health care systems, have a major role in providing ongoing, high-quality care to patients. Productivity is a significant indicator of professional development within any professional group, including nurses. The human resource element has been identified as the most important factor affecting productivity. This research aimed to explore nurses' perceptions and experiences of productivity and human resource factors improving or impeding it. Method A qualitative approach was used to obtain rich data; open, semi-structured interviews were also conducted. The sampling was based on the maximum variant approach; data analysis was carried out by content analysis, with the constant comparative method. Results Participants indicated that human resources issues are the most important factor in promoting or impeding their productivity. They suggested that the factors influencing effectiveness of human resource elements include: systematic evaluation of staff numbers; a sound selection process based on verifiable criteria; provision of an adequate staffing level throughout the year; full involvement of the ward sister in the process of admitting patients; and sound communication within the care team. Paying attention to these factors creates a suitable background for improved productivity and decreases negative impacts of human resource shortages, whereas ignoring or interfering with them would result in lowering of nurses' productivity. Conclusion Participants maintained that satisfactory human resources can improve nurses' productivity and the quality of care they provide; thereby fulfilling the core objective of the health care system.

  5. Applied Developmental Biology: Making Human Pancreatic Beta Cells for Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genes and signaling pathways that determine the differentiation and fate of a cell is a central goal of developmental biology. Using that information to gain mastery over the fates of cells presents new approaches to cell transplantation and drug discovery for human diseases including diabetes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. HETEROGENEITY IN THE GLYCOSYLATION PATTERN OF HUMAN PANCREATIC RIBONUCLEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RIBO, M; BEINTEMA, JJ; OSSET, M; BRAVO, J; DELLORENS, R; CUCHILLO, CM

    1994-01-01

    Different molecular forms of ribonuclease were isolated from fresh human pancreas obtained from healthy transplant donors. The purification procedure consists of the preparation of an acetone powder, followed by (NH4)(2)SO4 precipitation and two chromatography steps (cationic exchange and reversed-p

  7. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol is a known risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Therefore it is recommended that all HP patients ... Pancreatitis Patient Info Animated Pancreas Patient Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Research Research Grant Application Research History Grant ...

  8. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  9. Tumor-associated MUC5AC stimulates in vivo tumorigenicity of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Hirotaka; Sawada, Tetsuji; Uchida, Motoyuki; Saito, Hikaru; Iijima, Hiroko; Toda-Agetsuma, Mikako; Wada, Tsutomu; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min; Hirakawa, Kosei; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2011-03-01

    MUC5AC, a high molecular weight glycoprotein, is overexpressed in the ductal region of human pancreatic cancer but is not detectable in the normal pancreas, suggesting its association with disease development. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of MUC5AC knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) in the MUC5AC-overexpressing SW1990 and BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cell lines in order to clarify its function. Significant decreases in the expression levels of MUC5AC mRNA and protein were observed in SW1990 and BxPC3 cells that had been stably transfected with a MUC5AC siRNA expression vector (SW1990/si-MUC5AC and BxPC3/si-MUC5AC cells) compared to those in cells transfected with an si-mock vector (SW1990/si-mock and BxPC3/si-mock cells). In in vitro studies, neither type of MUC5AC-knockdown cell showed any difference in cell survival, proliferation, or morphology from the si-mock cells or parental cells. However, in vivo xenograft studies demonstrated that MUC5AC knockdown significantly reduced the tumorigenicity and suppressed the tumor growth of si-MUC5AC cells compared to those of the si-mock cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CD45R/B220+ and Gr-1+ cells had infiltrated into the tumor tissue of the SW1990/si-MUC5AC cells. Furthermore, cancer-associated antigen specific antibodies were detected at high levels in the sera from the SW1990/si-MUC5AC cell-bearing mice. These results suggest that tumor-associated MUC5AC expressed on the surface of pancreatic cancer cells supports the escape of pancreatic cancer cells from immunosurveillance. The present findings highlight a new dimension of MUC5AC as a functional immunosuppressive agent and its important role in pancreatic cancer progression.

  10. Heat Shock Factor-1 and Nuclear Factor-kappaB Are Systemically Activated in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A O’Reilly

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Context :Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkappaB is a transcription factor for a wide range of proinflammatory mediators while heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1 transcribes stress proteins that protect against cellular damage. Both are attractive therapeutic targets, undergoing investigation in other acute inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis. Objective :To evaluate the role of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and HSF-1 in human acute pancreatitis and their relationship to cytokine/chemokine production, disease severity and outcome. Patients :Twenty-four patients with acute pancreatitis and 12 healthy controls. Main outcome measures :Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated. NF-kappaB and HSF-1 were measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor II and interleukin-8 were measured by ELISA. Acute physiology scores (APS, APACHE II scores and final Atlanta designations of severity were also determined. Results: Systemic NF-kappaB activation occurs in acute pancreatitis compared to healthy controls (P=0.004. However, there was no significant difference between those with mild and severe disease (P=0.685. Systemic activation of HSF-1 was observed in acute pancreatitis compared to healthy controls although this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.053. Activation, however, was greatest in those who had a final Atlanta designation of mild pancreatitis compared to those who had a severe attack of acute pancreatitis (P=0.036. Furthermore, HSF-1 was inversely correlated with acute physiology score (APS; r=-0.49, P=0.019 and APACHE II score (r=-0.47, P=0.026. Conclusions: Both NF-kappaB and HSF-1 are systemically activated in human acute pancreatitis. HSF-1 activation may protect against severity of pancreatitis

  11. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V; Said, Hamid M

    2014-08-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na(+)-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na(+)-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS.

  12. Aberrant expression of zinc transporter ZIP4 (SLC39A4) significantly contributes to human pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Yuqing; Liu, Zijuan; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xinwen; Zhang, Sheng; Liuzzi, Juan P; Chang, Shou-Mei; Cousins, Robert J; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Logsdon, Craig D; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2007-11-20

    Zinc is an essential trace element and catalytic/structural component used by many metalloenzymes and transcription factors. Recent studies indicate a possible correlation of zinc levels with the cancer risk; however, the exact role of zinc and zinc transporters in cancer progression is unknown. We have observed that a zinc transporter, ZIP4 (SLC39A4), was substantially overexpressed in 16 of 17 (94%) clinical pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens compared with the surrounding normal tissues, and ZIP4 mRNA expression was significantly higher in human pancreatic cancer cells than human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells. This indicates that aberrant ZIP4 up-regulation may contribute to the pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression. We studied the effects of ZIP4 overexpression in pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro and pancreatic cancer progression in vivo. We found that forced expression of ZIP4 increased intracellular zinc levels, increased cell proliferation by 2-fold in vitro, and significantly increased tumor volume by 13-fold in the nude mice model with s.c. xenograft compared with the control cells. In the orthotopic nude mice model, overexpression of ZIP4 not only increased the primary tumor weight (7.2-fold), it also increased the peritoneal dissemination and ascites incidence. Moreover, increased cell proliferation and higher zinc content were also observed in the tumor tissues that overexpressed ZIP4. These data reveal an important outcome of aberrant ZIP4 expression in contributing to pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression. It may suggest a therapeutic strategy whereby ZIP4 is targeted to control pancreatic cancer growth.

  13. Pancreatic beta cells and islets take up thiamin by a regulated carrier-mediated process: studies using mice and human pancreatic preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Lisa; Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Sekar, V. Thillai; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Maedler, Kathrin; Said, Hamid M.

    2009-01-01

    Thiamin is essential for the normal function of the endocrine pancreas, but very little is known about uptake mechanism(s) and regulation by beta cells. We addressed these issues using mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells, and freshly isolated primary mouse and human pancreatic islets. Results showed that thiamin uptake by beta-TC-6 cells involves a pH (but not Na+)-dependent carrier-mediated process that is saturable at both the nanomolar (apparent Km = 37.17 ± 9.9 nM) and micromolar (apparent Km = 3.26 ± 0.86 μM) ranges, cis-inhibited by thiamin structural analogs, and trans-stimulated by unlabeled thiamin. Involvement of carrier-mediated process was also confirmed in primary mouse and human pancreatic islets. Both THTR-1 and THTR-2 were found to be expressed in these mouse and human pancreatic preparations. Maintaining beta-TC-6 cells in the presence of a high level of thiamin led to a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in thiamin uptake, which was associated with a significant downregulation in level of expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein and mRNA levels and a decrease in transcriptional (promoter) activity. Modulators of intracellular Ca2+/calmodulin- and protein-tyrosine kinase-mediated pathways also altered thiamin uptake. Finally, confocal imaging of live beta-TC-6 cells showed that clinical mutants of THTR-1 have mixed expression phenotypes and all led to impairment in thiamin uptake. These studies demonstrate for the first time that thiamin uptake by the endocrine pancreas is carrier mediated and is adaptively regulated by the prevailing vitamin level via transcriptional mechanisms. Furthermore, clinical mutants of THTR-1 impair thiamin uptake via different mechanisms. PMID:19423748

  14. SMAD4 regulates cell motility through transcription of N-cadherin in human pancreatic ductal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya'an Kang

    Full Text Available Expression of the cellular adhesion protein N-cadherin is a critical event during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. The SMAD4 protein has been identified as a mediator of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily signaling, which regulates EMT, but the mechanisms linking TGF-β signaling to N-cadherin expression remain unclear. When the TGF-β pathway is activated, SMAD proteins, including the common mediator SMAD4, are subsequently translocated into the nucleus, where they influence gene transcription via SMAD binding elements (SBEs. Here we describe a mechanism for control of CDH2, the gene encoding N-cadherin, through the canonical TGFβ-SMAD4 pathway. We first identified four previously undescribed SBEs within the CDH2 promoter. Using telomerase immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelium, we found that TGF-β stimulation prompted specific SMAD4 binding to all four SBEs. Luciferase reporter and SMAD4-knockdown experiments demonstrated that specific SMAD4 binding to the SBE located at -3790 bp to -3795 bp within the promoter region of CDH2 was necessary for TGF-β-stimulated transcription. Expression of N-cadherin on the surface of epithelial cells facilitates motility and invasion, and we demonstrated that knockdown of SMAD4 causes decreased N-cadherin expression, which results in diminished migration and invasion of human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Similar reduction of cell motility was produced after CDH2 knockdown. Together, these findings suggest that SMAD4 is critical for the TGF-β-driven upregulation of N-cadherin and the resultant invasive phenotype of human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells during EMT.

  15. Characterization of pancreatic stem cells derived from adult human pancreas ducts by fluorescence activated cell sorting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Tso Lin; Shih-Hwa Chiou; Chung-Lan Kao; Yi-Ming Shyr; Chien-Jen Hsu; Yih-Wen Tarng; Larry L-T Ho; Ching-Fai Kwok; Hung-Hai Ku

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To isolate putative pancreatic stem cells (PSCs)from human adult tissues of pancreas duct using serumfree, conditioned medium. The characterization of surface phenotype of these PSCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. The potential for pancreatic lineage and the capability of β-cell differentiation in these PSCs were evaluated as well.METHODS: By using serum-free medium supplemented with essential growth factors, we attempted to isolate the putative PSCs which has been reported to express nestin and pdx-1. The MatrigelTM was employed to evaluate the differential capacity of isolated cells. Dithizone staining, insulin content/secretion measurement, and immunohistochemistry staining were used to monitor the differentiation. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)was used to detect the phenotypic markers of putative PSCs.RESULTS: A monolayer of spindle-like cells was cultivated. The putative PSCs expressed pdx-1 and nestin.They were also able to differentiate into insulin-, glucagon-, and somatostatin-positive cells. The spectrum of phenotypic markers in PSCs was investigated; a similarity was revealed when using human bone marrow-derived stem cells as the comparative experiment, such as CD29,CD44, CD49, CD50, CD51, CD62E, PDGFR-α, CD73 (SH2),CD81, CD105(SH3).CONCLUSION: In this study, we successfully isolated PSCs from adult human pancreatic duct by using serumfree medium. These PSCs not only expressed nestin and pdx-1 but also exhibited markers attributable to mesenchymal stem cells. Although work is needed to elucidate the role of these cells, the application of these PSCs might be therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus.

  16. Effects of apigenin on cell proliferation of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line BxPC-3 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiancang Ma; Qiang Li; Jun Zhao; Ying Guo; Qinghua Su; Zongzheng Ji

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of apigenin on cell proliferation of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line BxPC-3 in vitro.Methods :The inhibitive effects of apigenin at different concentrations (0 μmol/L, 100 μmol/L, 200 μmol/L, and 400 μmol/L)on human pancreatic carcinoma cell line BxPC-3 were detected by MTT assays, transmission electron microscope, agarose gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry. The immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax gene. Results:Apigenin at different concentrations could inhibit the proliferation of human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines BxPC-3, and the inhibitive effect was dose-dependent. The cell cycle of pancreatic carcinoma cells was arrested at G2/M phase. The results of immunohistochemistry showed that the density of apigenin increased, and the expression of Bcl-2 gene was reduced gradually. At the same time the expression of Bax gene was enhanced. Conclusion: Apigenin could inhibit the proliferation of human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines BxPC-3 in vitro. The effect of apoptosis was accompanied with the expression of Bcl-2 decrease and Bax increase.

  17. Neurotransmitters act as paracrine signals to regulate insulin secretion from the human pancreatic islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Menegaz, Danusa; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2014-08-15

    In this symposium review we discuss the role of neurotransmitters as paracrine signals that regulate pancreatic islet function. A large number of neurotransmitters and their receptors has been identified in the islet, but relatively little is known about their involvement in islet biology. Interestingly, neurotransmitters initially thought to be present in autonomic axons innervating the islet are also present in endocrine cells of the human islet. These neurotransmitters can thus be released as paracrine signals to help control hormone release. Here we propose that the role of neurotransmitters may extend beyond controlling endocrine cell function to work as signals modulating vascular flow and immune responses within the islet.

  18. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, Andre; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs

  19. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, R.M.; Schaap, F.G.; Smits, A.J.A.; Kremer, A.E.; Akkermans, L.M.; Kroese, A.B.A.; Rijkers, G.T.; Schipper, M.E.; Verheem, A.; Wijmenga, C.; Gooszen, H.G.; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs

  20. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Rian M; Schaap, Frank G; Smits, Alexander J J; Kremer, Andreas E; Akkermans, Louis M A; Kroese, A.B.; Rijkers, Ger T; Schipper, Marguerite E I; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G; van Erpecum, Karel J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs in

  1. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, Andre; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs in

  2. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  3. Purinergic receptors and calcium signalling in human pancreatic duct cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette R; Krabbe, Simon; Novak, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Purinergic receptors regulate various processes including epithelial transport. There are several studies on P2 receptors in pancreatic ducts of various species, but relatively little is known about these receptors in human tissue. The aim of this study was to identify purinergic receptors in human......ATP, commonly used to stimulate P2X7 receptors, elicited non-oscillatory and transient Ca(2+) responses. Ivermectin, a potentiator of P2X4 receptors, increased Ca(2+) signals evoked by ATP. The single cell Ca(2+) measurements indicated functional expression of P2Y2 and other P2Y receptors, and notably...... expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors. Expression of P2Y2, P2X4 and P2X7 receptors was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. This fingerprint of P2 receptors in human pancreatic duct models forms the basis for studying effect of nucleotides on ion and fluid secretion, as well as on Ca(2+) and tissue homeostasis...

  4. Efficient gene delivery and silencing of mouse and human pancreatic islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moerman Ericka

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of the importance of beta cells in glucose homeostasis and the profound repercussions of beta cell pathology on human health, the acquisition of tools to study pancreatic islet function is essential for the design of alternative novel therapies for diabetes. One promising approach toward this goal involves the modification of gene expression profile of beta cells. Results This study describes a new method of gene and siRNA delivery into human pancreatic islets by microporation technology. We demonstrated that mild islet distention with accutase greatly enhanced the transfection efficiency without compromising in vitro function (secretion, apoptosis and viability. As an example, the recently identified gene involved in type 2 diabetes, ZnT8, can be over-expressed or silenced by RNA interference using this technology. Microporation can also be used on rodent islets. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrate that microporation technology can be used to modify gene expression in whole rodent and human islets without altering their in vitro function and will be key to the elucidation of the factors responsible for proper islet function.

  5. Plasticity of adult human pancreatic duct cells by neurogenin3-mediated reprogramming.

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    Nathalie Swales

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3. In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it. METHODS: The extent of the Ngn3-mediated duct-to-endocrine cell reprogramming was measured employing genome wide mRNA profiling. By modulation of the Delta-Notch signaling or addition of pancreatic endocrine transcription factors Myt1, MafA and Pdx1 we intended to improve the reprogramming. RESULTS: Ngn3 stimulates duct cells to express a focused set of genes that are characteristic for islet endocrine cells and/or neural tissues. This neuro-endocrine shift however, is incomplete with less than 10% of full duct-to-endocrine reprogramming achieved. Transduction of exogenous Ngn3 activates endogenous Ngn3 suggesting auto-activation of this gene. Furthermore, pancreatic endocrine reprogramming of human duct cells can be moderately enhanced by inhibition of Delta-Notch signaling as well as by co-expressing the transcription factor Myt1, but not MafA and Pdx1. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The results provide further insight into the plasticity of adult human duct cells and suggest measurable routes to enhance Ngn3-mediated in vitro reprogramming protocols for regenerative beta cell therapy in diabetes.

  6. Study on the immune responses against pancreatic cancer induced by mucin 4 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA co-transfected dendritic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-tumor immune response induced by human pancreatic cancer mucin 4mRNA and human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT)mRNA cotransfected dendritic cells(DC),and to provide the experimental evidences for the treatment of pancreatic cancer with multi-epitope loaded DC vaccine.Methods DC were isolated from peripheral DC.

  7. Human pancreatic β-cell G1/S molecule cell cycle atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Salim, Fatimah G; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E; Takane, Karen K; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F

    2013-07-01

    Expansion of pancreatic β-cells is a key goal of diabetes research, yet induction of adult human β-cell replication has proven frustratingly difficult. In part, this reflects a lack of understanding of cell cycle control in the human β-cell. Here, we provide a comprehensive immunocytochemical "atlas" of G1/S control molecules in the human β-cell. This atlas reveals that the majority of these molecules, previously known to be present in islets, are actually present in the β-cell. More importantly, and in contrast to anticipated results, the human β-cell G1/S atlas reveals that almost all of the critical G1/S cell cycle control molecules are located in the cytoplasm of the quiescent human β-cell. Indeed, the only nuclear G1/S molecules are the cell cycle inhibitors, pRb, p57, and variably, p21: none of the cyclins or cdks necessary to drive human β-cell proliferation are present in the nuclear compartment. This observation may provide an explanation for the refractoriness of human β-cells to proliferation. Thus, in addition to known obstacles to human β-cell proliferation, restriction of G1/S molecules to the cytoplasm of the human β-cell represents an unanticipated obstacle to therapeutic human β-cell expansion.

  8. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  9. In vitro cultivation of human fetal pancreatic ductal stem cells and their differentiation into insulin-producing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Xiang Yao; Mao-Lin Qin; Jian-Jun Liu; Xing-Shu Chen; De-Shan Zhou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To isolate, culture and identify the human fetal pancreatic ductal stem cells in vitro, and to observe the potency of these multipotential cells differentiation into insulin-producing cells.METHODS: The human fetal pancreas was digested by 1 g/L collagease type Ⅳ and then 2.5 g/L trypsin was used to isolate the pancreatic ducta stem cells, followed by culture in serum-free, glucose-free DMEM media with some additional chemical substrates in vitro (according to the different Stage). The cells were induced by glucose-free (control),5 mmol/L, 17.8 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L glucose, respectively.The cell types of differentiated cells were identified using immunocytochemical staining.RESULTS: The shape of human fetal pancreatic ductal stem cells culturedin vitro was firstly fusiform in the first 2 wk,and became monolayer and cobblestone pattern after another 3 to 4 wk. After induced and differentiated by the glucose of different concentrations for another 1 to 2 wk,the cells formed the pancreatic islet-like structures. The identification and potency of these cells were then identified by using the pancreatic ductal stem cell marker, cytokeratin-19 (CK-19), pancreatic β cell marker, insulin and pancreatic α cell marker, glucagons with immunocytochemical staining.At the end of the second week, 95.2% of the cells were positive for CK-19 immunoreactivity. Up to 22.7% of the cells induced by glucose were positive for insulin immunoreactivity, and less than 3.8% of the cells were positive for glucagon immunoreactivity in pancreatic isletlike structures. The positive ratio of immunoreactive staining was dependent on the concentration of glucose, and it was observed that the 17.8 mmol/L glucose stimulated effectively to produce insulin- and glucagons-producing cells.CONCLUSION: The human fetal pancreatic ductal stem cells are capable of proliferation in vitro. These cells have multidifferentiation potential and can be induced by glucose and differentiated into insulin

  10. Celecoxib Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis via Cyclooxygen-ase-2 Pathway in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Gaosong; YI Jilin; DI Fang; ZOU Shengquan; LI Xingrui

    2005-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects and mechanisms of celecoxib in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis on human pancreatic carcinoma cells, the anti-proliferative effect was measured by using methabenzthiazuron (MTT) assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by using flow cytometry (FCM), and the PGE2 levels in the supernatant of cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunoabsordent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that celecoxib suppressed the production of PGE2 and inhibited the growth of JF-305 cells, and the anti-proliferative effect of celecoxib could be abolished by addition of PGE2. FCM revealed that celecoxib could inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis by G1-S cell cycle arrest. It was concluded that cyclooxygenase-2 specific inhibitor celecoxib could inhibit proliferation and induced apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma cells via suppression of PGE2 production in vitro.

  11. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1)-dependent inhibition of insulin secretion by leptin in INS-1 pancreatic β-cells and human pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnen, Peter; Laubner, Katharina; Raile, Klemens; Schöfl, Christof; Jakob, Franz; Pilz, Ingo; Päth, Günter; Seufert, Jochen

    2011-05-01

    Leptin inhibits insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, and in turn, insulin stimulates leptin biosynthesis and secretion from adipose tissue. Dysfunction of this adipoinsular feedback loop has been proposed to be involved in the development of hyperinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. At the molecular level, leptin acts through various pathways, which in combination confer inhibitory effects on insulin biosynthesis and secretion. The aim of this study was to identify molecular mechanisms of leptin action on insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. To identify novel leptin-regulated genes, we performed subtraction PCR in INS-1 β-cells. Regulated expression of identified genes was confirmed by RT-PCR and Northern and Western blotting. Furthermore, functional impact on β-cell function was characterized by insulin-secretion assays, intracellular Ca²(+) concentration measurements, and enzyme activity assays. PP-1α, the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1), was identified as a novel gene down-regulated by leptin in INS-1 pancreatic β-cells. Expression of PP-1α was verified in human pancreatic sections. PP-1α mRNA and protein expression is down-regulated by leptin, which culminates in reduction of PP-1 enzyme activity in β-cells. In addition, glucose-induced insulin secretion was inhibited by nuclear inhibitor of PP-1 and calyculin A, which was in part mediated by a reduction of PP-1-dependent calcium influx into INS-1 β-cells. These results identify a novel molecular pathway by which leptin confers inhibitory action on insulin secretion, and impaired PP-1 inhibition by leptin may be involved in dysfunction of the adipoinsular axis during the development of hyperinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Killing effect of adenoviral mediated cytosine deaminase gene on human pancreatic cancer cell line PaTu 8988

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xue; LI Zhao-shen; XU Guo-ming; CUI Long; ZHANG Su-zhen; GONG Yan-fang; TU Zhen-xing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in vitro killing effects of cytosine deaminase gene mediated by adenovirus vector on human pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: Cytosine Deaminase (CD) gene was cloned into pAdTrack-CMV-CD, pAdTrack-CMV-CD and pAdEasy-1 were recombined in bacteria, and the products containing green fluorescent protein (GFP)were propagated in 293 cells and purified by cesium chloride gradient centrifugation. Human pancreatic carcinoma cell line 8988 were infected with this virus, then 5-FC was added; XTT assay was used to estimate the relative numbers of viable cells. Results: The positive clones were confirmed by using endonuclease digestion, and the titer of the virus containing CD gene was 2 × 1011 pfu/ml. It was found that 5-FC possessed significant cytotoxic activities for CD gene transfected 8988cell line, but had little effects on non-transfected pancreatic carcinoma cells. Conclusion: CD gene mediated by adenovirus has a high infectivity and is efficient for killing cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells, indicating suicide gene may be effective for pancreatic cancer in furure.

  13. Evaluation of Traditional Indian Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants for Human Pancreatic Amylase Inhibitory Effect In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Ponnusamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Eleven Ayurvedic Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on pancreatic α-amylase. Analysis of 91 extracts, showed that 10 exhibited strong Human Pancreatic Amylase (HPA inhibitory potential. Of these, 6 extracts showed concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, namely, cold and hot water extracts from Ficus bengalensis bark (4.4 and 125 μgmL-1, Syzygium cumini seeds (42.1 and 4.1 μgmL-1, isopropanol extracts of Cinnamomum verum leaves (1.0 μgmL-1 and Curcuma longa rhizome (0.16 μgmL-1. The other 4 extracts exhibited concentration independent inhibition, namely, methanol extract of Bixa orellana leaves (49 μgmL-1, isopropanol extract from Murraya koenigii leaves (127 μgmL-1, acetone extracts from C. longa rhizome (7.4 μgmL-1 and Tribulus terrestris seeds (511 μgmL-1. Thus, the probable mechanism of action of the above fractions is due to their inhibitory action on HPA, thereby reducing the rate of starch hydrolysis leading to lowered glucose levels. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, proteins, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and steroids as probable inhibitory compounds.

  14. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls.

  15. Cells Lines vs. Animals Studies for Developing New Therapeutic Strategies in Human Pancreatic Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past, most of the knowledge gained regarding the physiology and the pathology of the pancreas has been evaluated in experimental studies on animals especially on rats/mice. This approach has been criticized in recent years because most of the data obtained from animals cannot be fully applied to humans [1]. A new approach to the physiology and pathology of the pancreas comes from studying its molecular biology, and the results obtained seem to be more reliable than those obtained in animals. An example of this assumption comes from studies on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: this cancer seems to result from a progressive accumulation of mutations in genes such as K-ras, CDKN2A, p53, BRCA2, p164ink, and SMAD4 [2]; in particular, the SMAD4 mutations which result in the constitutive activation of transforming growth factor b1 signalling, are generally considered to be responsible for the desmoplastic response, which includes upregulated expression of the extracellular matrix, and type I collagen [3, 4, 5, 6]. Grzesiak et al. [7, 8] have also shown that a2b1 integrin-mediated adhesion on type I collagen promotes a malignant phenotype in FG pancreatic cells, as defined by increased proliferation and haptokinetic cell migration, downregulated expression and localization of E-cadherin and b-catenin in cell-cell contacts, increased phosphorylation of GSK3b and PKB/Akt, and downregulated expression of PTHrP, IL-6, and IL-8 as compared to fibronectin, type IV collagen, laminin, or vitronectin. These results are in agreement with previous studies demonstrating that type I collagen downregulates E-cadherin expression in Panc-1, BxPC-3, and PaTu8988s pancreatic cancer cells, resulting in increased proliferation and migration compared to fibronectin.

  16. Adenoviral vectors stimulate glucagon transcription in human mesenchymal stem cells expressing pancreatic transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Zaldumbide

    Full Text Available Viral gene carriers are being widely used as gene transfer systems in (transdifferentiation and reprogramming strategies. Forced expression of key regulators of pancreatic differentiation in stem cells, liver cells, pancreatic duct cells, or cells from the exocrine pancreas, can lead to the initiation of endocrine pancreatic differentiation. While several viral vector systems have been employed in such studies, the results reported with adenovirus vectors have been the most promising in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined whether the viral vector system itself could impact the differentiation capacity of human bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs toward the endocrine lineage. Lentivirus-mediated expression of Pdx-1, Ngn-3, and Maf-A alone or in combination does not lead to robust expression of any of the endocrine hormones (i.e. insulin, glucagon and somatostatin in hMSCs. Remarkably, subsequent transduction of these genetically modified cells with an irrelevant early region 1 (E1-deleted adenoviral vector potentiates the differentiation stimulus and promotes glucagon gene expression in hMSCs by affecting the chromatin structure. This adenovirus stimulation was observed upon infection with an E1-deleted adenovirus vector, but not after exposure to helper-dependent adenovirus vectors, pointing at the involvement of genes retained in the E1-deleted adenovirus vector in this phenomenon. Lentivirus mediated expression of the adenovirus E4-ORF3 mimics the adenovirus effect. From these data we conclude that E1-deleted adenoviral vectors are not inert gene-transfer vectors and contribute to the modulation of the cellular differentiation pathways.

  17. Impedance Scaling and Impedance Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; Griffin, J.

    1997-06-01

    When a machine becomes really large, such as the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), of which the circumference could reach the order of megameters, beam instability could be an essential bottleneck. This paper studies the scaling of the instability threshold vs. machine size when the coupling impedance scales in a ``normal`` way. It is shown that the beam would be intrinsically unstable for the VLHC. As a possible solution to this problem, it is proposed to introduce local impedance inserts for controlling the machine impedance. In the longitudinal plane, this could be done by using a heavily detuned rf cavity (e.g., a biconical structure), which could provide large imaginary impedance with the right sign (i.e., inductive or capacitive) while keeping the real part small. In the transverse direction, a carefully designed variation of the cross section of a beam pipe could generate negative impedance that would partially compensate the transverse impedance in one plane.

  18. Electric impedance sensing in cell-substrates for rapid and selective multipotential differentiation capacity monitoring of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitinger, Stephan; Wissenwasser, Jürgen; Kapferer, Werner; Heer, Rudolf; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2012-04-15

    Biosensor systems which enable impedance measurements on adherent cell layers under label-free conditions are considered powerful tools for monitoring specific biological characteristics. A radio frequency identification-based sensor platform was adopted to characterize cultivation and differentiation of human bone marrow-derived multipotent stem cells (bmMSC) over periods of up to several days and weeks. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was achieved through fabrication of sensitive elements onto glass substrates which comprised two comb-shaped interdigitated gold electrodes covering an area of 1.8 mm×2 mm. The sensing systems were placed into the wells of a 6-well tissue culture plate, stacked onto a reader unit and could thus be handled and operated under sterile conditions. Continuous measurements were carried out with a sinusoidal voltage of 35 mV at a frequency of 10 kHz. After seeding of human bmMSC, this sensor was able to trace significant impedance changes contingent upon cell spreading and adhesion. The re-usable system was further proven suitable for live examination of cell-substrate attachment or continuous cell monitoring up to several weeks. Induction of either osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation could be validated in bmMSC cultures within a few days, in contrast to state-of-the-art protocols, which require several weeks of cultivation time. In the context of medical cell production in a GMP-compliant process, the here presented interdigitated electric microsensor technology allows the documentation of MSC quality in a fast, efficient and reliable fashion.

  19. Neuromagnetic field strength outside the human head due to impedance changes from neuronal depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadzi, G M; Liston, A D; Bayford, R H; Holder, D S

    2004-02-01

    The holy grail of neuroimaging would be to have an imaging system, which could image neuronal electrical activity over milliseconds. One way to do this would be by imaging the impedance changes associated with ion channels opening in neuronal membranes in the brain during activity. In principle, we could measure this change by using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) but it is close to its threshold of detectability. With the inherent limitation in the use of electrodes, we propose a new scheme based on recording the magnetic field resulting from an injected current with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), used in magnetoencephalography (MEG). We have performed a feasibility study using computer simulation. The head was modelled as concentric spheres to mimic the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid and brain using the finite element method. The magnetic field 1 cm away from the scalp was estimated. An impedance change of 1% in a 2 cm radius volume in the brain was modelled as the region of depolarization. A constant current of 100 microA was injected into the head from diametrically opposite electrodes. The model predicts that the standing magnetic field is about 10 pT and changed by about 3 fT (0.03%) on depolarization. The spectral noise density in a typical MEG system in the frequency band 1-100 Hz is about 7 fT, so this places the change at the limit of detectability. This is similar to electrical recording, as in conventional EIT systems, but there may be advantages to MEG in that the magnetic field directly traverses the skull and instrumentation errors from the electrode-skin interface will be obviated.

  20. Effects of disulfiram on apoptosis in PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, M. Nikbakht; Babazadeh, Z.; Rabbani, M.; Gharagozloo, M.; Esmaeili, A.; Narimani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is currently considered as a rapidly progressive and fatal disease, and is typically diagnosed late in its natural course. It is characterized by a poor diagnosis and lack of response to conventional therapy. Recent studies have suggested that disulfiram (DSF), a member of the dithiocarbamate family, may have antitumor activity. This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro effect of DSF on apoptosis in human pancreatic cancerous cell line (PANC-1). PANC-1 cells were cultured and treated with DSF at doses of 5, 10, 13 μM for 24 h and apoptosis was measured. Methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR were carried out to detect the methylation pattern and to estimate the mRNA expression levels of RASSF1A, p21 and Bax. MS-PCR analysis demonstrated that no unmethylated band was apeared in PANC-1 cell line after DSF treatments. The real-time quantitative PCR results showed no significant mRNA expression for RASSF1A (p>0.05); whereas p21 and Bax expression were significantly (p<0.01) enhanced after treatment with DSF. The results of the current study indicated that DSF can induce appoptosis in PANC-1 through p21 and Bax pathway but not through RASSF1A. PMID:25657800

  1. THE AUTOCRINE REGULATORY EFFECT OF VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL PEPTIDE ON THE GROWTH OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CARCINOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈元方; 陈潜; 陆国钧; 范振符; 钟守先

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the effets of VIP on the growth of two human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines PU-PAH-1 and PANC-1 were determined using tritiated thymidine incorporation, VIP receptors, intracellular cAMP and polyamings were investlsa.ted, The results indicated that VIP at a concentcation of 10-8mol/L to 10-7 mol/L can significantly Stimulate the growth of PU-PAN-1 cells but not PANC-1 cells, This effect is dose-dependent and abolished by VIP receptor antagonist, [4-CI-Phe6 , Leu7] VIP, suggesting VIP receptors in PU-PAN-1 cells maymediate this effect. VIP can markedly elevate the levels of intracellular cAMP and polyammes in PU-PAN-1 cells,indicating that the growth-promoting effect stimulated by VIP may be via a rapid increase in the biosynth~es of cAMP and polyamines. In addition, the VIP-antibody ir2Libited the growth of PU-PAN-1 cells in serum-free culture medium. The results above suggested that VIP has an autoctine regulatory effect on this pancreatic carcinoma cell line(PU-PAN-1).

  2. Direct long-term effects of L-asparaginase on rat and human pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Niels; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    L-Asparaginase, an effective agent in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, may induce a diabetic state. The pathogenesis of the diabetogenic effect was studied in cultured pancreatic islets. Mean serum concentrations in three children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were 2.4 U/mL (range...... 1.4-4.5) before and 31.5 U/mL (range 18.6-51.8) immediately after an intravenous injection of 1000 U/kg L-asparaginase. Glucose-induced insulin release from pancreatic islets of rat and man was measured after 3 and 7 days of culture in media with or without clinically relevant concentrations...... of Escherichia coli L-asparaginase (0.01-100 U/mL). After culture, the remaining insulin, glucagon, and DNA in the islets were determined. After 7 days of culture of adult rat or human islets, both the accumulation of insulin in the medium and the content of insulin and glucagon in the islets were significantly...

  3. Efficient Generation of Glucose-Responsive Beta Cells from Isolated GP2+ Human Pancreatic Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Ameri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes would benefit from implementation of a cell purification step at the pancreatic endoderm stage. This would increase the safety of the final cell product, allow the establishment of an intermediate-stage stem cell bank, and provide a means for upscaling β cell manufacturing. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed glycoprotein 2 (GP2 as a specific cell surface marker for isolating pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs from differentiated hESCs and human fetal pancreas. Isolated GP2+ PECs efficiently differentiated into glucose responsive insulin-producing cells in vitro. We found that in vitro PEC proliferation declines due to enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors CDKN1A and CDKN2A. However, we identified a time window when reducing CDKN1A or CDKN2A expression increased proliferation and yield of GP2+ PECs. Altogether, our results contribute tools and concepts toward the isolation and use of PECs as a source for the safe production of hPSC-derived β cells.

  4. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  5. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Hai-zhou [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Weng, Xiao-chuan [Department of Anesthesiology, Hangzhou Xia-sha Hospital, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Sun, Peng [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Liu, Li-li [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinhangzhou126@126.com [Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery, First People’s Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou 310006 (China)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  6. Calcium sensing receptor suppresses human pancreatic tumorigenesis through a novel NCX1/Ca(2+)/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Chow, Jimmy Y C; Dong, Tobias Xiao; Yang, Shi-Ming; Lu, De-Sheng; Carethers, John M; Dong, Hui

    2016-07-10

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is functionally expressed in normal human pancreases, but its pathological role in pancreatic tumorigenesis is currently unknown. We sought to investigate the role of CaSR in pancreatic cancer (PC) and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We revealed that the expression of CaSR was consistently downregulated in the primary cancer tissues from PC patients, which was correlated with tumor size, differentiation and poor survival of the patients. CaSR activation markedly suppressed pancreatic tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo likely through the Ca(2+) entry mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) to induce Ca(2+) entry into PC cells. Moreover, NCX1-mediated Ca(2+) entry resulted in Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition of β-catenin signaling in PC cells, eventually leading to the inhibition of pancreatic tumorigenesis. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that CaSR exerts a suppressive function in pancreatic tumorigenesis through a novel NCX1/Ca(2+)/β-catenin signaling pathway. Targeting this specific signaling pathway could be a potential therapeutic strategy for PC.

  7. LLL12 inhibits endogenous and exogenous interleukin-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiguo; Liu, Yan; Li, Pui-Kai; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most serious types of cancer, with a five-year survival rate at only 6%. There is a critical need to develop more effective treatments for pancreatic cancer. Growing evidence shows that chronic inflammation plays a crucial role in tumor initiation and progression. Here we demonstrated that the endogenous expression of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) correlates with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Inhibition of the endogenous IL-6/STAT3 pathway reduces cell viability. Exogenous IL-6 induces STAT3 phosphorylation, but differently induces phosphorylation of STAT3 upstream kinases, Janus kinase 1(JAK1), JAK2, and tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2). Interestingly, LLL12, a nonpeptide, cell-permeable small molecule, selectively blocked exogenous IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in both PANC-1 and ASPC-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines independently of the phosphorylation of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2. These results suggest that the inhibition of endogenous and exogenous IL-6-mediated STAT3 signaling may be a potential therapeutic approach for pancreatic cancer.

  8. Label-free electrochemical impedance biosensor to detect human interleukin-8 in serum with sub-pg/ml sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R; Deacon, S E; Nowak, D; George, S E; Szymonik, M P; Tang, A A S; Tomlinson, D C; Davies, A G; McPherson, M J; Wälti, C

    2016-06-15

    Biosensors with high sensitivity and short time-to-result that are capable of detecting biomarkers in body fluids such as serum are an important prerequisite for early diagnostics in modern healthcare provision. Here, we report the development of an electrochemical impedance-based sensor for the detection in serum of human interleukin-8 (IL-8), a pro-angiogenic chemokine implicated in a wide range of inflammatory diseases. The sensor employs a small and robust synthetic non-antibody capture protein based on a cystatin scaffold that displays high affinity for human IL-8 with a KD of 35 ± 10 nM and excellent ligand specificity. The change in the phase of the electrochemical impedance from the serum baseline, ∆θ(ƒ), measured at 0.1 Hz, was used as the measure for quantifying IL-8 concentration in the fluid. Optimal sensor signal was observed after 15 min incubation, and the sensor exhibited a linear response versus logarithm of IL-8 concentration from 900 fg/ml to 900 ng/ml. A detection limit of around 90 fg/ml, which is significantly lower than the basal clinical levels of 5-10 pg/ml, was observed. Our results are significant for the development of point-of-care and early diagnostics where high sensitivity and short time-to-results are essential.

  9. Comparison of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines and Human Pancreatic Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Assadollahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genes are involved in the control of stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer. Objectives: In this study, the expression of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 in cell lines MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1 and pancreatic cancer tissue were examined. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, cell lines, MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1, were cultured in DMEM (Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium and RPMI-1640 (Roswell Park Memorial Institute containing FBS 10% (fetal bovine serum in a 37°C incubator containing Co2 5% and humidity 90%. Samples of tumor and non-cancer pancreatic tumor were purchased Iran tumor bank. Extraction of RNA and synthesis of cDNA was performed. Expression levels of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 were determined using Real-time PCR. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were studied by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Results: The expression rate of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 is more in the cancer cell lines than those in the control (normal tissue samples. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were confirmed by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: The genes are involved in stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer that detected in the pancreatic cell lines. Maybe, these genes play important role in the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells.

  10. Conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines demonstrate enhanced proliferation and migration in response to IGF-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, Ann H., E-mail: ann.rosendahl@med.lu.se [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Surgery, Lund (Sweden); Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Oncology and Pathology, Lund (Sweden); Gundewar, Chinmay; Said Hilmersson, Katarzyna [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Surgery, Lund (Sweden); Ni, Lan; Saleem, Moin A. [University of Bristol, School of Clinical Sciences, Children' s Renal Unit and Academic Renal Unit, Bristol (United Kingdom); Andersson, Roland [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Surgery, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a key role in the dense desmoplastic stroma associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Studies on human PSCs have been minimal due to difficulty in maintaining primary PSC in culture. We have generated the first conditionally immortalized human non-tumor (NPSC) and tumor-derived (TPSC) pancreatic stellate cells via transformation with the temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase (hTERT). These cells proliferate at 33°C. After transfer to 37°C, the SV40LT is switched off and the cells regain their primary PSC phenotype and growth characteristics. NPSC contained cytoplasmic vitamin A-storing lipid droplets, while both NPSC and TPSC expressed the characteristic markers αSMA, vimentin, desmin and GFAP. Proteome array analysis revealed that of the 55 evaluated proteins, 27 (49%) were upregulated ≥3-fold in TPSC compared to NPSC, including uPA, pentraxin-3, endoglin and endothelin-1. Two insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) were inversely expressed. Although discordant IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 levels, IGF-I was found to stimulate proliferation of both NPSC and TPSC. Both basal and IGF-I stimulated motility was significantly enhanced in TPSC compared to NPSC. In conclusion, these cells provide a unique resource that will facilitate further study of the active stroma compartment associated with pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Generation of human conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines. • Temperature-sensitive SV40LT allows switch to primary PSC phenotype characteristics. • Proteome profiling revealed distinct expression patterns between TPSC and NPSC. • Enhanced IGF-I-stimulated proliferation and motility by TPSC compared to NPSC.

  11. Species-Related Differences in the Proteome of Rat and Human Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Martens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The core proteomes of human and rat pancreatic beta cells were compared by label-free LC-MS/MS: this resulted in quantification of relative molar abundances of 707 proteins belonging to functional pathways of intermediary metabolism, protein synthesis, and cytoskeleton. Relative molar abundances were conserved both within and between pathways enabling the selection of a housekeeping network for geometric normalization and the analysis of potentially relevant differential expressions. Human beta cells differed from rat beta cells in their lower level of enzymes involved in glucose sensing (MDH1, PC, and ACLY and upregulation of lysosomal enzymes. Human cells also expressed more heat shock proteins and radical scavenging systems: apart from SOD2, they expressed high levels of H2O2-scavenger peroxiredoxin 3 (PRDX3, confirmed by microarray, Western blotting, and microscopy. Besides conferring lower susceptibility to oxidative stress to human cells PRDX3 might also play a role in physiological redox regulation as, in rat, its expression was restricted to a beta cell subset with higher metabolic glucose responsiveness. In conclusion, although their core proteomic architecture is conserved, human and rat beta cells differ in their molar expression of key enzymes involved in glucose sensing and redox control.

  12. Adult Human Biliary Tree Stem Cells Differentiate to β-Pancreatic Islet Cells by Treatment with a Recombinant Human Pdx1 Peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Cardinale

    Full Text Available Generation of β-pancreatic cells represents a major goal in research. The aim of this study was to explore a protein-based strategy to induce differentiation of human biliary tree stem cells (hBTSCs towards β-pancreatic cells. A plasmid containing the sequence of the human pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1 has been expressed in E. coli. Epithelial-Cell-Adhesion-Molecule positive hBTSCs or mature human hepatocyte cell line, HepG2, were grown in medium to which Pdx1 peptide was added. Differentiation toward pancreatic islet cells were evaluated by the expression of the β-cell transcription factors, Pdx1 and musculoapo-neurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A, and of the pancreatic hormones, insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, investigated by real time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, light microscopy and immunofluorescence. C-peptide secretion in response to high glucose was also measured. Results indicated how purified Pdx1 protein corresponding to the primary structure of the human Pdx1 by mass spectroscopy was efficiently produced in bacteria, and transduced into hBTSCs. Pdx1 exposure triggered the expression of both intermediate and mature stage β-cell differentiation markers only in hBTSCs but not in HepG2 cell line. Furthermore, hBTSCs exposed to Pdx1 showed up-regulation of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin genes and formation of 3-dimensional islet-like structures intensely positive for insulin and glucagon. Finally, Pdx1-induced islet-like structures exhibited glucose-regulated C-peptide secretion. In conclusion, the human Pdx1 is highly effective in triggering hBTSC differentiation toward functional β-pancreatic cells.

  13. Lipid-Conjugation of Endogenous Neuropeptides: Improved Biotherapy against Human Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Lepetre, Sinda; Maksimenko, Andrei; Mura, Simona; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Neuropeptides are small neuronal signaling molecules that act as neuromodulators for a variety of neural functions including analgesia, reproduction, social behavior, learning, and memory. One of the endogenous neuropeptides-Met-Enkephalin (Met-Enk), has been shown to display an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, a novel lipid-modification approach is shown to create a small library of neuropeptides that will allow increased bioavailability and plasma stability after systemic administration. It is demonstrated, on an experimental model of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, that lipid conjugation of Met-Enk enhances its tumor suppression efficacy compared to its nonlipidated counterparts, both in vitro and in vivo. More strikingly, the in vivo studies show that a combination therapy with a reduced concentration of Gemcitabine has suppressed the tumor growth considerably even three weeks after the last treatment.

  14. Efficient Generation of Glucose-Responsive Beta Cells from Isolated GP2+ Human Pancreatic Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ameri, Jacqueline; Borup, Rehannah; Prawiro, Christy

    2017-01-01

    cell manufacturing. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed glycoprotein 2 (GP2) as a specific cell surface marker for isolating pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs) from differentiated hESCs and human fetal pancreas. Isolated GP2+ PECs efficiently differentiated into glucose responsive insulin......-producing cells in vitro. We found that in vitro PEC proliferation declines due to enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors CDKN1A and CDKN2A. However, we identified a time window when reducing CDKN1A or CDKN2A expression increased proliferation and yield of GP2+ PECs. Altogether, our...... results contribute tools and concepts toward the isolation and use of PECs as a source for the safe production of hPSC-derived β cells....

  15. A nuclear-directed human pancreatic ribonuclease (PE5) targets the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2016-04-05

    Ribonucleases represent a new class of antitumor RNA-damaging drugs. However, many wild-type members of the vertebrate secreted ribonuclease family are not cytotoxic because they are not able to evade the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor. We previously engineered the human pancreatic ribonuclease to direct it to the cell nucleus where the inhibitor is not present. The best characterized variant is PE5 that kills cancer cells through apoptosis mediated by the p21(WAF1/CIP1) induction and the inactivation of JNK. Here, we have used microarray-derived transcriptional profiling to identify PE5 regulated genes on the NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cell line. RT-qPCR analyses have confirmed the expression microarray findings. The results show that PE5 cause pleiotropic effects. Among them, it is remarkable the down-regulation of multiple genes that code for enzymes involved in deregulated metabolic pathways in cancer cells.

  16. Adaptive Impedance Control to Enhance Human Skill on a Haptic Interface System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive assistive control for a haptic interface system is proposed in the present paper. The assistive control system consists of three subsystems: a servo controller to match the response of the controlled machine to the virtual model, an online identifier of the operator’s control characteristics, and a variable dynamics control using adaptive mechanism. The adaptive mechanism tunes an impedance of the virtual model for the haptic device according to the identified operator’s characteristics so as to enhance the operator’s control performance. The adaptive law is derived by utilizing a Lyapunov candidate function. Using a haptic interface device composed by a xy-stage, an effectiveness of the proposed control method was evaluated experimentally. As a result, it was confirmed that the operator’s characteristics can be estimated sufficiently and that performance of the operation was enhanced by the variable dynamics assistive control.

  17. Experimental validations of in vivo human musculoskeletal tissue conductivity images using MR-based electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Meng, Zi Jun; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a widely used imaging technique that provides high-resolution conductivity images at DC or below the 1 kHz frequency range. Using an MR scanner, this technique injects imaging currents into the human body and measures induced internal magnetic flux density data. By applying the recent progress of MREIT techniques, such as chemical shift artifact correction, multi-echo pulse sequence, and improved reconstruction algorithm, we can successfully reconstruct conductivity images of the human body. Meanwhile, numerous studies reported that the electrical conductivity of human tissues could be inferred from in vitro or ex vivo measurements of different species. However, in vivo tissues may differ from in vitro and/or ex vivo state due to the complicated tissue responses in living organs. In this study, we performed in vivo MREIT imaging of a human lower extremity and compared the resulting conductivity images with ex vivo biological tissue phantom images. The human conductivity images showed unique contrast between two different types of bones, muscles, subcutaneous adipose tissues, and conductive body fluids. Except for muscles and adipose tissues, the human conductivity images showed a similar pattern when compared with phantom results due to the anisotropic characteristic of muscle and the high conductive fluids in the adipose tissue.

  18. Effect of gemcitabine on the expression of apoptosis-related genes in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Hong Jiang; Yoshiharu Motoo; Norio Sawabu; Toshinari Minamoto

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of genes involved in the gemcitabine-induced cytotoxicity in human pancreatic cancer cells.METHODS: A human pancreatic cancer cell line,PANC-1, was cultured. 1×104 PANC-1 cells were plated in 96-well microtiter plates. After being incubated for 24 h,gemcitabine was added to the medium at concentrations ranging 2.5 -1 000 mg/L. The AlamarBlue dye method was used for cell growth analysis. DNA fragmentation was quantitatively assayed using a DNA fragmentation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. PAP and TP53INP1 mRNA expression was determined using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with semi-quantitative analysis. The expression of GSK-3β and phospho-GSK-3β proteins was examined with Western blot analysis.RESULTS: The IC50 for the drug after a 48-h exposure to gemcitabine was 16 mg/L. The growth of PANC-1 cells was inhibited by gemcitabine in a concentrationdependent manner (P< 0.0001) and the cell growth was also inhibited throughout the time course (P<0.0001).The DNA fragmentation rate in the gemcitabine-treated group at 48 h was 44.7 %, whereas it was 25.3 % in the untreated group. The PAP mRNA expression was decreased after being treated with gemcitabine, whereas the TP53INP1 mRNA was increased by the gemcitabine treatment. Western blot analysis showed that phosphoGSK-3βser9 was induced by the gemcitabine treatment.CONCLUSION: Gemcitabine suppresses PANC-1cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Apoptosis is considered to be associated with the inhibition of PAP and GSK-3β, and the activation of TP53INP1 and posphoGSK-33ser9 .

  19. Protection of Human Pancreatic Islets from Lipotoxicity by Modulation of the Translocon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Cassel

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. Elevated free fatty acids (FFAs may impair beta cell function and mass (lipotoxicity. Altered calcium homeostasis may be involved in defective insulin release. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the major intracellular calcium store. Lipotoxicity induces ER stress and in parallel an ER calcium depletion through unknown ER calcium leak channels. The main purposes of this study is first to identify one of these channels and secondly, to check the opportunity to restore beta cells function (i.e., insulin secretion after pharmacological inhibition of ER calcium store depletion. We investigated the functionality of translocon, an ER calcium leak channel and its involvement on FFAs-induced alterations in MIN6B1 cells and in human pancreatic islets. We evidenced that translocon acts as a functional ER calcium leak channel in human beta cells using anisomycin and puromycin (antibiotics, respectively blocker and opener of this channel. Puromycin induced a significant ER calcium release, inhibited by anisomycin pretreatment. Palmitate treatment was used as FFA model to induce a mild lipotoxic effect: ER calcium content was reduced, ER stress but not apoptosis were induced and glucose induced insulin secretion was decreased in our beta cells. Interestingly, translocon inhibition by chronic anisomycin treatment prevented dysfunctions induced by palmitate, avoiding reticular calcium depletion, ER stress and restoring insulin secretion. Our results provide for the first time compelling evidence that translocon actively participates to the palmitate-induced ER calcium leak and insulin secretion decrease in beta cells. Its inhibition reduces these lipotoxic effects. Taken together, our data indicate that TLC may be a new potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  20. Comparative study of human erythrocytes by digital holographic microscopy, confocal microscopy, and impedance volume analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Barbul, Alexander; Emery, Yves; Korenstein, Rafi; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) parameters such as morphology, volume, refractive index, and hemoglobin content are of great importance for diagnostic purposes. Existing approaches require complicated calibration procedures and robust cell perturbation. As a result, reference values for normal RBC differ depending on the method used. We present a way for measuring parameters of intact individual RBCs by using digital holographic microscopy (DHM), a new interferometric and label-free technique with nanometric axial sensitivity. The results are compared with values achieved by conventional techniques for RBC of the same donor and previously published figures. A DHM equipped with a laser diode (lambda = 663 nm) was used to record holograms in an off-axis geometry. Measurements of both RBC refractive indices and volumes were achieved via monitoring the quantitative phase map of RBC by means of a sequential perfusion of two isotonic solutions with different refractive indices obtained by the use of Nycodenz (decoupling procedure). Volume of RBCs labeled by membrane dye Dil was analyzed by confocal microscopy. The mean cell volume (MCV), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were also measured with an impedance volume analyzer. DHM yielded RBC refractive index n = 1.418 +/- 0.012, volume 83 +/- 14 fl, MCH = 29.9 pg, and MCHC 362 +/- 40 g/l. Erythrocyte MCV, MCH, and MCHC achieved by an impedance volume analyzer were 82 fl, 28.6 pg, and 349 g/l, respectively. Confocal microscopy yielded 91 +/- 17 fl for RBC volume. In conclusion, DHM in combination with a decoupling procedure allows measuring noninvasively volume, refractive index, and hemoglobin content of single-living RBCs with a high accuracy.

  1. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  2. Highly efficient differentiation of human ES cells and iPS cells into mature pancreatic insulin-producing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghui Zhang; Wei Jiang; Meng Liu; Xin Sui; Xiaolei Yin; Song Chen; Yan Shi; Hongkui Deng

    2009-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a potentially unlimited source of functional pancreatic endocrine lineage cells. Here we report a highly efficient approach to induce human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to differentiate into mature insulin-producing cells in a chemical-defined culture system. The differentiated human ES cells obtained by this approach comprised nearly 25% insulin-positive cells as assayed by flow cytometry analysis, which released insulin/C-peptide in response to glucose stimuli in a manner comparable to that of adult human islets. Most of these insulin-producing cells co-expressed mature β cell-specific markers such as NKX6-1 and PDX1, indicating a similar gene expression pattern to adult islet β cells in vivo. In this study, we also demonstrated that EGF facilitates the expansion of PDX1-positive pancreatic progenitors. Moreover, our protocol also succeeded in efficiently inducing human iPS cells to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. Therefore, this work not only provides a new model to study the mechanism of human pancreatic specialization and maturation in vitro, but also enhances the possibility of utilizing patient-specific iPS cells for the treatment of diabetes.

  3. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Activation and IFN-α Production Are Prominent Features of Murine Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Human IgG4-Related Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Kouhei; Kuriyama, Katsutoshi; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Uchida, Kazushige; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Strober, Warren; Chiba, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    The abnormal immune response accompanying IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is presently unclear. In this study, we examined the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) activation and IFN-α production in this disease as well as in a murine model of AIP (MRL/Mp mice treated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid). We found that the development of AIP in treated MRL/Mp mice occurred in parallel with pancreatic accumulation of pDCs producing IFN-α, and with pDC depletion and IFN-α-blocking studies, we showed that such accumulation was necessary for AIP induction. In addition, we found that the pancreas of treated MRL/Mp mice contained neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) shown previously to stimulate pDCs to produce IFN-α. Consistent with these findings, we found that patients with IgG4-related AIP also exhibited pancreatic tissue localization of IFN-α-expressing pDCs and had significantly higher serum IFN-α levels than healthy controls. In addition, the inflamed pancreas of these patients but not controls also contained NETs that were shown to be capable of pDC activation. More importantly, patient pDCs cultured in the presence of NETs produced greatly increased levels of IFN-α and induced control B cells to produce IgG4 (but not IgG1) as compared with control pDCs. These data suggest that pDC activation and production of IFN-α is a major cause of murine AIP; in addition, the increased pDC production of IFN-α and its relation to IgG4 production observed in IgG4-related AIP suggest that this mechanism also plays a role in the human disease.

  4. Evaluation of a gene-directed enzyme-product therapy (GDEPT in human pancreatic tumor cells and their use as in vivo models for pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Hlavaty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT is a two-step treatment protocol for solid tumors that involves the transfer of a gene encoding a prodrug-activating enzyme followed by administration of the inactive prodrug that is subsequently activated by the enzyme to its tumor toxic form. However, the establishment of such novel treatment regimes to combat pancreatic cancer requires defined and robust animal model systems. METHODS: Here, we comprehensively compared six human pancreatic cancer cell lines (PaCa-44, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Hs-766T, Capan-2, and BxPc-3 in subcutaneous and orthotopical mouse models as well as in their susceptibility to different GDEPTs. RESULTS: Tumor uptake was 83% to 100% in the subcutaneous model and 60% to 100% in the orthotopical mouse model, except for Hs-766T cells, which did not grow orthotopically. Pathohistological analyses of the orthotopical models revealed an infiltrative growth of almost all tumors into the pancreas; however, the different cell lines gave rise to tumors with different morphological characteristics. All of the resultant tumors were positive for MUC-1 staining indicating their origin from glandular or ductal epithelium, but revealed scattered pan-cytokeratin staining. Transfer of the cytochrome P450 and cytosine deaminase suicide gene, respectively, into the pancreatic cancer cell lines using retroviral vector technology revealed high level infectibility of these cell lines and allowed the analysis of the sensitivity of these cells to the chemotherapeutic drugs ifosfamide and 5-fluorocytosine, respectively. CONCLUSION: These data qualify the cell lines as part of valuable in vitro and in vivo models for the use in defined preclinical studies for pancreas tumor therapy.

  5. Dimethylenastron suppresses human pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro via allosteric inhibition of mitotic kinesin Eg5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-dong SUN; LIU Jun ZHOU; Xing-juan SHl; Xiao-ou SUN; You-guang LUO; Xiao-jing WU; Chang-fu YAO; Hai-yang YU; Deng-wen; LI Min

    2011-01-01

    The mitotic kinesin Eg5 plays a critical role in bipolar spindle assembly,and its inhibitors have shown impressive anticancer activity in preclinical studies.This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of dimethylenastron,a specific inhibitor of Eg5,on the migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.Methods:Human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC1,EPP85,BxPC3,CFPAC1,and AsPAC1 were used.Eg5 expression was examined using immunofluorescence microscopy.Cell migration and invasion were analyzed with wound healing and transwell assays.Cell pro-liferation was examined using sulforhodamine B and MTT assays.The binding of dimethylenastron to Eg5 was analyzed with a molecular modeling study,and the ADP release rate was examined with the MANT-ADP reagent.Results:Eg5 expression was 9-16-fold up-regulated in the 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines.Treatment of PANC1 pancreatic cancer cells with dimethylenastron (3 and 10 μmol/L) for 24 h suppressed the migratory ability of the cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner.The invasion ability of the cancer cells was also reduced by the treatment.However,treatment of PANC1 cells with dimeth-ylenastron (3 and 10 μmol/L) for 24 h had no detectable effect on their proliferation,which was inhibited when the cancer cells were treated with the drug for 72 h.Molecular modeling study showed that dimethylenastron could allosterically inhibit the motor domain ATPase of Eg5 by decreasing the rate of ADP release.Conclusion:Dimethylenastron inhibits the migration and invasion of PANC1 pancreatic cancer cells,independent of suppressing the cell proliferation.The findings provide a novel insight into the mechanisms of targeting Eg5 for pancreatic cancer chemotherapy.

  6. Acoustic impedances of ear canals measured by impedance tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciric, Dejan; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    During hearing sensitivity tests, the sound field is commonly generated by an earphone placed on a subject ear. One of the factors that can affect the sound transmission in the ear is the acoustic impedance of the ear canal. Its importance is related to the contribution of other elements involved...... in the transmission such as the earphone impedance. In order to determine the acoustic impedances of human ear canals, the standardized method for measurement of complex impedances used for the measurement of the audiometric earphone impedances is applied. It is based on the transfer function between two microphone...... locations in an impedance tube. The end of the tube representing the measurement plane is placed at the ear canal entrance. Thus, the impedance seen from the entrance inward is measured on 25 subjects. Most subjects participated in the previous measurement of the ratio between the pressures at the open...

  7. Nickel nanowires induced and reactive oxygen species mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleve MG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Md. Zakir Hossain1, Maurice G Kleve21Applied Biosciences (Bionanotechnology Research, Department of Applied Science, 2Molecular Biotechnology and Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biology, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, Arkansas, USABackground: The ability to evade apoptosis is one of the key properties of cancer. The apoptogenic effect of nickel nanowires (Ni NWs on cancer cell lines has never been adequately addressed. Due to the unique physicochemical characteristics of Ni NWs, we envision the development of a novel anticancer therapeutics specifically for pancreatic cancer. Thus, we investigated whether Ni NWs induce ROS-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Panc-1 cells. Methods: In this study Ni NWs were fabricated using the electrodeposition method. Synthesized Ni NWs were physically characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy of NanoDrop 2000 (UV-Vis, magnetization study, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Assessment of morphological apoptotic characteristics by phase contrast microscopy (PCM, Ni-NWs-induced apoptosis staining with ethidium bromide (EB and acridine orange (AO followed by fluorescence microscopy (FM was performed. For molecular biological and biochemical characterization, Panc-1 cell culture and cytotoxic effect of Ni NWs were determined by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Quantitative apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry staining with propidium iodide through cell cycle arrest and generation of ROS using 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence intensity. In all experiments, Panc-1 cancer cells without any treatment were used as the negative controls.Results: The intracellular uptake of Ni NWs through endocytosis by Panc-1 cells was observed by PCM. EB and AO staining of FM and MTT assay qualitatively and quantitatively confirmed the extent of apoptosis. Flow

  8. MicroRNA expression in alpha and beta cells of human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Klein

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in pancreatic development and adult β-cell physiology. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that each islet cell type has a specific pattern of miRNA expression. We sought to determine the profile of miRNA expression in α-and β-cells, the main components of pancreatic islets, because this analysis may lead to a better understanding of islet gene regulatory pathways. Highly enriched (>98% subsets of human α-and β-cells were obtained by flow cytometric sorting after intracellular staining with c-peptide and glucagon antibody. The method of sorting based on intracellular staining is possible because miRNAs are stable after fixation. MiRNA expression levels were determined by quantitative high throughput PCR-based miRNA array platform screening. Most of the miRNAs were preferentially expressed in β-cells. From the total of 667 miRNAs screened, the Significant Analysis of Microarray identified 141 miRNAs, of which only 7 were expressed more in α-cells (α-miRNAs and 134 were expressed more in β-cells (β-miRNAs. Bioinformatic analysis identified potential targets of β-miRNAs analyzing the Beta Cell Gene Atlas, described in the T1Dbase, the web platform, supporting the type 1 diabetes (T1D community. cMaf, a transcription factor regulating glucagon expression expressed selectively in α-cells (TFα is targeted by β-miRNAs; miR-200c, miR-125b and miR-182. Min6 cells treated with inhibitors of these miRNAs show an increased expression of cMaf RNA. Conversely, over expression of miR-200c, miR-125b or miR-182 in the mouse alpha cell line αTC6 decreases the level of cMAF mRNA and protein. MiR-200c also inhibits the expression of Zfpm2, a TFα that inhibits the PI3K signaling pathway, at both RNA and protein levels.In conclusion, we identified miRNAs differentially expressed in pancreatic α- and β-cells and their potential transcription factor targets that could add new insights into different

  9. Selection of polymers for application in scaffolds applicable for human pancreatic islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smink, Alexandra M; de Haan, Bart J; Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A; Wolters, Anouk H G; Kuipers, Jeroen; Giepmans, Ben N G; Schwab, Leendert; Engelse, Marten A; van Apeldoorn, Aart A; de Koning, Eelco; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-05-13

    The liver is currently the site for transplantation of islets in humans. This is not optimal for islets, but alternative sites in humans are not available. Polymeric scaffolds in surgically accessible areas are a solution. As human donors are rare, the polymers should not interfere with functional survival of human-islets. We applied a novel platform to test the adequacy of polymers for application in scaffolds for human-islet transplantation. Viability, functionality, and immune parameters were included to test poly(D,L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PDLLCL), poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/polybutylene terephthalate (PEOT/PBT) block copolymer, and polysulfone. The type of polymer influenced the functional survival of human islets. In islets cultured on PDLLCL the glucagon-producing α-cells and insulin-producing β-cells contained more hormone granules than in islets in contact with PEOT/PBT or polysulfone. This was studied with ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy (nanotomy) during 7 d of culture. PDLLCL was also associated with statistically significant lower release of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, a so called danger-associate molecular pattern (DAMP)) from islets on PDLLCL when compared to the other polymers. DAMPs support undesired immune responses. Hydrophilicity of the polymers did not influence dsDNA release. Islets on PDLLCL also showed less cellular outgrowth. These outgrowing cells were mainly fibroblast and some β-cells undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition. None of the polymers influenced the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. As PDLLCL was associated with less release of DAMPs, it is a promising candidate for creating a scaffold for human islets. Our study demonstrates that for sensitive, rare cadaveric donor tissue such as pancreatic islets it might be necessary to first select materials that do not influence functionality before proposing the biomaterial for in vivo application. Our presented platform may facilitate

  10. Nicotine Alters the Proteome of Two Human Pancreatic Duct Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Joao A

    2015-01-01

    Context Cigarette smoking is a known risk factor of pancreatic disease. Nicotine - a major cigarette tobacco component - can traffic through the circulatory system and may induce fibrosis and metastasis, hallmarks of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma, respectively. However, at the biomolecular level, particularly in pancreatic research, the effects of nicotine remain unresolved. Methods The effects of nicotine on the proteomes of two pancreatic duct cell lines–an immortalized normal cell line (HPNE) and a cancer cell line (PanC1)- were investigated using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. For each cell line, the global proteomesof cells exposed to nicotine for 24 hrswere compared with untreated cells in triplicate using 6-plex tandem mass tag-based isobaric labeling techniques. Results Over 5,000 proteins were detectedper cell line. Of these, over 900 proteins were differentially abundant with statistical significance (corrected p-value <0.01) upon nicotine treatment, 57 of which were so in both cell lines. Amyloid precursor protein, previously observed to increase expression in pancreatic stellate cells when exposed to nicotine, was also up-regulated in both cell lines.In general, the two cell lines varied in the classes of proteins altered by nicotine treatment, supporting published evidence that nicotine may play different roles in the initiation and progression of pancreatic disease. Conclusions Understanding the underlying mechanisms associating nicotine with pancreatic function is paramount to intervention aiming to retard, arrest, or ameliorate pancreatic disease. PMID:25262714

  11. Expression profiles of miRNAs in human pancreatic cancer cell lines%胰腺癌细胞系中miRNAs的表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shineng Zhang; Haijun Zuo; Zhong Yu; Fengting Huang; Wa Zhong

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To analyze initially the differences of miRNAs expression profiles in human pancreatic cencer cell lines by microarray technique.Methods:A total of 743 probes were designed according to lhe known miRNAs sequences of human,mice,and rats.miRNAs microarray was manufactured and its credibility was verified.Total RNAs were extracted and miRNAs were separated from human pancreatic cancer cell lines(SW1990,Capan-2.BxPC-3,Aspc-1,and Panc 1)and immortal human pancreatic duct epithelial cell line H6C7.They were labeled with T4 RNA ligase.then were hybridized with microarray.Through array scan and analysis,miRNAs expression profiles in pancreatic cancer were obtained.The results were verified by Northern blotting and RT-PCR.Results:A totsl of 63 miRNAs related to pancreatic cancer were found to be differentially expressed in 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines.including 25 down-regulated and 38 up-regulated miRNAs.Expres- sions of mir-21 and let-7 were also confirmed.Conclusion:The results suggested that miRNAs expression profiles could befound in pancreatic cancer cells.

  12. Pasireotide and octreotide antiproliferative effects and sst2 trafficking in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amira; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Albertelli, Manuela; Barbieri, Federica; Brue, Thierry; Niccoli, Patricia; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Monges, Genevieve; Garcia, Stephane; Ferone, Diego; Florio, Tullio; Enjalbert, Alain; Moutardier, Vincent; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Gerard, Corinne; Barlier, Anne; Saveanu, Alexandru

    2014-10-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) raise difficult therapeutic problems despite the emergence of targeted therapies. Somatostatin analogs (SSA) remain pivotal therapeutic drugs. However, the tachyphylaxis and the limited antitumoral effects observed with the classical somatostatin 2 (sst2) agonists (octreotide and lanreotide) led to the development of new SSA, such as the pan sst receptor agonist pasireotide. Our aim was to compare the effects of pasireotide and octreotide on cell survival, chromogranin A (CgA) secretion, and sst2 phosphorylation/trafficking in pancreatic NET (pNET) primary cells from 15 tumors. We established and characterized the primary cultures of human pancreatic tumors (pNETs) as powerful preclinical models for understanding the biological effects of SSA. At clinically relevant concentrations (1-10 nM), pasireotide was at least as efficient as octreotide in inhibiting CgA secretion and cell viability through caspase-dependent apoptosis during short treatments, irrespective of the expression levels of the different sst receptors or the WHO grade of the parental tumor. Interestingly, unlike octreotide, which induces a rapid and persistent partial internalization of sst2 associated with its phosphorylation on Ser341/343, pasireotide did not phosphorylate sst2 and induced a rapid and transient internalization of the receptor followed by a persistent recycling at the cell surface. These results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of striking differences in the dynamics of sst2 trafficking in pNET cells treated with the two SSAs, but with similar efficiency in the control of CgA secretion and cell viability.

  13. Structure of Human Pancreatic Lipase-Related Protein 2 with the Lid in an Open Conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eydoux, Cecilia; Spinelli, Silvia; Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Seitova, Alma; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; De Caro, Alain; Cambillau, Christian; Carriere, Frederic (CNRS-UMR); (Toronto)

    2008-10-02

    Access to the active site of pancreatic lipase (PL) is controlled by a surface loop, the lid, which normally undergoes conformational changes only upon addition of lipids or amphiphiles. Structures of PL with their lids in the open and functional conformation have required cocrystallization with amphiphiles. Here we report two crystal structures of wild-type and unglycosylated human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (HPLRP2) with the lid in an open conformation in the absence of amphiphiles. These structures solved independently are strikingly similar, with some residues of the lid being poorly defined in the electron-density map. The open conformation of the lid is however different from that previously observed in classical liganded PL, suggesting different kinetic properties for HPLRP2. Here we show that the HPLRP2 is directly inhibited by E600, does not present interfacial activation, and acts preferentially on substrates forming monomers or small aggregates (micelles) dispersed in solution like monoglycerides, phospholipids and galactolipids, whereas classical PL displays reverse properties and a high specificity for unsoluble substrates like triglycerides and diglycerides forming oil-in-water interfaces. These biochemical properties imply that the lid of HPLRP2 is likely to spontaneously adopt in solution the open conformation observed in the crystal structure. This open conformation generates a large cavity capable of accommodating the digalactose polar head of galactolipids, similar to that previously observed in the active site of the guinea pig PLRP2, but absent from the classical PL. Most of the structural and kinetic properties of HPLRP2 were found to be different from those of rat PLRP2, the structure of which was previously obtained with the lid in a closed conformation. Our findings illustrate the essential role of the lid in determining the substrate specificity and the mechanism of action of lipases.

  14. TGFβ Pathway Inhibition Redifferentiates Human Pancreatic Islet β Cells Expanded In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginat Toren-Haritan

    Full Text Available In-vitro expansion of insulin-producing cells from adult human pancreatic islets could provide an abundant cell source for diabetes therapy. However, proliferation of β-cell-derived (BCD cells is associated with loss of phenotype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Nevertheless, BCD cells maintain open chromatin structure at β-cell genes, suggesting that they could be readily redifferentiated. The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ pathway has been implicated in EMT in a range of cell types. Here we show that human islet cell expansion in vitro involves upregulation of the TGFβ pathway. Blocking TGFβ pathway activation using short hairpin RNA (shRNA against TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFBR1, ALK5 transcripts inhibits BCD cell proliferation and dedifferentiation. Treatment of expanded BCD cells with ALK5 shRNA results in their redifferentiation, as judged by expression of β-cell genes and decreased cell proliferation. These effects, which are reproducible in cells from multiple human donors, are mediated, at least in part, by AKT-FOXO1 signaling. ALK5 inhibition synergizes with a soluble factor cocktail to promote BCD cell redifferentiation. The combined treatment may offer a therapeutically applicable way for generating an abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells following ex-vivo expansion.

  15. Characterization of the human pancreatic islet proteome by two-dimensional LC/MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Thomas O; Jacobs, Jon M; Gritsenko, Marina A; Fontès, Ghislaine; Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G; Poitout, Vincent; Smith, Richard D

    2006-12-01

    The pancreatic beta-cell plays a central role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Elucidation of the insulin secretory defects observed in diabetes first requires a better understanding of the complex mechanisms regulating insulin secretion, which are only partly understood. While there have been reports detailing proteomic analyses of islet cell lines or isolated rodent islets, the information gained is not always applicable to humans. Therefore, definition of the human islet proteome could contribute to a better understanding of islet biology and lead to more effective treatment strategies. We have applied a two-dimensional LC-MS/MS-based analysis to the characterization of the human islet proteome, resulting in the confident identification of 29,021 different tryptic peptides covering 3365 proteins (> or =2 unique peptide identifications per protein). As expected, the three major islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin) were detected, as well as various beta-cell enriched secretory products, ion channels, and transcription factors. In addition, significant proteome coverage of metabolic enzymes and cellular pathways was observed, including the integrin signaling cascade and the MAP kinase, NF-kappa beta, and JAK/STAT pathways. The resulting peptide reference library provides a resource for future higher throughput and quantitative studies of islet biology.

  16. Process techniques for human thoracic electrical bio-impedance signal in remote healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Muhammad Zia Ur; Mirza, Shafi Shahsavar

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of thoracic electrical bio-impedance (TEB) facilitates heart stroke volume in sudden cardiac arrest. This Letter proposes several efficient and computationally simplified adaptive algorithms to display high-resolution TEB component. In a clinical environment, TEB signal encounters with various physiological and non-physiological phenomenon, which masks the tiny features that are important in identifying the intensity of the stroke. Moreover, computational complexity is an important parameter in a modern wearable healthcare monitoring tool. Hence, in this Letter, the authors propose a new signal conditioning technique for TEB enhancement in remote healthcare systems. For this, the authors have chosen higher order adaptive filter as a basic element in the process of TEB. To improve filtering capability, convergence speed, to reduce computational complexity of the signal conditioning technique, the authors apply data normalisation and clipping the data regressor. The proposed implementations are tested on real TEB signals. Finally, simulation results confirm that proposed regressor clipped normalised higher order filter is suitable for a practical healthcare system.

  17. Downregulation of tight junction-associated MARVEL protein marvelD3 during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takashi; Takasawa, Akira; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-10-01

    The novel tight junction protein marvelD3 contains a conserved MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain like occludin and tricellulin. However, little is yet known about the detailed role and regulation of marvelD3 in normal epithelial cells and cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we investigated marvelD3 expression in well and poorly differentiated human pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells in which the hTERT gene was introduced into human pancreatic duct epithelial cells in primary culture, and the changes of marvelD3 during Snail-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) under hypoxia, TGF-β treatment and knockdown of FOXA2 in well differentiated pancreatic cancer HPAC cells. MarvelD3 was transcriptionally downregulated in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cells and during Snail-induced EMT of pancreatic cancer cells in which Snail was highly expressed and the fence function downregulated, whereas it was maintained in well differentiated human pancreatic cancer cells and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Depletion of marvelD3 by siRNAs in HPAC cells resulted in downregulation of barrier functions indicated as a decrease in transepithelial electric resistance and an increase of permeability to fluorescent dextran tracers, whereas it did not affect fence function of tight junctions. In conclusion, marvelD3 is transcriptionally downregulated in Snail-induced EMT during the progression for the pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE.

  19. Establishment and characterization of a new human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic potential to the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzenbach Heidi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is still associated with devastating prognosis. Real progress in treatment options has still not been achieved. Therefore new models are urgently needed to investigate this deadly disease. As a part of this process we have established and characterized a new human pancreatic cancer cell line. Methods The newly established pancreatic cancer cell line PaCa 5061 was characterized for its morphology, growth rate, chromosomal analysis and mutational analysis of the K-ras, EGFR and p53 genes. Gene-amplification and RNA expression profiles were obtained using an Affymetrix microarray, and overexpression was validated by IHC analysis. Tumorigenicity and spontaneous metastasis formation of PaCa 5061 cells were analyzed in pfp-/-/rag2-/- mice. Sensitivity towards chemotherapy was analysed by MTT assay. Results PaCa 5061 cells grew as an adhering monolayer with a doubling time ranging from 30 to 48 hours. M-FISH analyses showed a hypertriploid complex karyotype with multiple numerical and unbalanced structural aberrations. Numerous genes were overexpressed, some of which have previously been implicated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (GATA6, IGFBP3, IGFBP6, while others were detected for the first time (MEMO1, RIOK3. Specifically highly overexpressed genes (fold change > 10 were identified as EGFR, MUC4, CEACAM1, CEACAM5 and CEACAM6. Subcutaneous transplantation of PaCa 5061 into pfp-/-/rag2-/- mice resulted in formation of primary tumors and spontaneous lung metastasis. Conclusion The established PaCa 5061 cell line and its injection into pfp-/-/rag2-/- mice can be used as a new model for studying various aspects of the biology of human pancreatic cancer and potential treatment approaches for the disease.

  20. Adult stromal cells derived from human adipose tissue provoke pancreatic cancer cell death both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Cousin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. Disrupting this homeostasis can induce aberrant cell proliferation, adhesion, function and migration that might promote malignant behavior. Indeed, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC spread and metastasis, and this raises the possibility that novel stroma-targeted therapies represent additional approaches for combating this malignant disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of human stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ADSC on pancreatic tumor cell proliferation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Co-culturing pancreatic tumor cells with ADSC and ADSC-conditioned medium sampled from different donors inhibited cancer cell viability and proliferation. ADSC-mediated inhibitory effect was further extended to other epithelial cancer-derived cell lines (liver, colon, prostate. ADSC conditioned medium induced cancer cell necrosis following G1-phase arrest, without evidence of apoptosis. In vivo, a single intra-tumoral injection of ADSC in a model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced a strong and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that ADSC strongly inhibit PDAC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo and induce tumor cell death by altering cell cycle progression. Therefore, ADSC may constitute a potential cell-based therapeutic alternative for the treatment of PDAC for which no effective cure is available.

  1. Targeting pancreatic progenitor cells in human embryonic stem cell differentiation for the identification of novel cell surface markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Bettina; Segev, Hanna; Kopper, Oded; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Schulman, Margarita; Benvenisty, Nissim; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Kitsberg, Danny

    2012-09-01

    New sources of beta cells are needed in order to develop cell therapies for patients with diabetes. An alternative to forced expansion of post-mitotic beta cells is the induction of differentiation of stem-cell derived progenitor cells that have a natural self-expansion capacity into insulin-producing cells. In order to learn more about these progenitor cells at different stages along the differentiation process in which they become progressively more committed to the final beta cell fate, we took the approach of identifying, isolating and characterizing stage specific progenitor cells. We generated human embryonic stem cell (HESC) clones harboring BAC GFP reporter constructs of SOX17, a definitive endoderm marker, and PDX1, a pancreatic marker, and identified subpopulations of GFP expressing cells. Using this approach, we isolated a highly enriched population of pancreatic progenitor cells from hESCs and examined their gene expression with an emphasis on the expression of stage-specific cell surface markers. We were able to identify novel molecules that are involved in the pancreatic differentiation process, as well as stage-specific cell markers that may serve to define (alone or in combination with other markers) a specific pancreatic progenitor cell. These findings may help in optimizing conditions for ultimately generating and isolating beta cells for transplantation therapy.

  2. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Roy

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  3. Examining the effects of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas P J; Knudsen, Sine H; Karstoft, Kristian;

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the impact of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function promotes our understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia-related disease.......Investigating the impact of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function promotes our understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia-related disease....

  4. Glucosyl epi-cyclophellitol allows mechanism-based inactivation and structural analysis of human pancreatic α-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Sami; Zhang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Jianbing; Chen, Hong-Ming; Nguyen, Nham T; Overkleeft, Hermen; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    As part of a search for selective, mechanism-based covalent inhibitors of human pancreatic α-amylase we describe the chemoenzymatic synthesis of the disaccharide analog α-glucosyl epi-cyclophellitol, demonstrate its stoichiometric reaction with human pancreatic α-amylase and evaluate the time dependence of its inhibition. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the covalent derivative so formed confirms its reaction at the active site with formation of a covalent bond to the catalytic nucleophile D197. The structure illuminates the interactions with the active site and confirms OH4' on the nonreducing end sugar as a good site for attachment of fluorescent tags in generating probes for localization and quantitation of amylase in vivo.

  5. In vitro differentiation potential of human haematopoietic CD34(+) cells towards pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Manne Mudhu; Srikanth, Lokanathan; Santhosh Kumar, Pasupuleti; Chandrasekhar, Chodimella; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2016-10-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess multipotent ability to differentiate into various types of cells on providing appropriate niche. In the present study, the differentiating potential of human HSCs into β-cells of islets of langerhans was explored. Human HSCs were apheretically isolated from a donor and cultured. Phenotypic characterization of CD34 glycoprotein in the growing monolayer HSCs was confirmed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry techniques. HSCs were induced by selection with beta cell differentiating medium (BDM), which consists of epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), transferrin, Triiodo-l-Tyronine, nicotinamide and activin A. Distinct morphological changes of differentiated cells were observed on staining with dithizone (DTZ) and expression of PDX1, insulin and synaptophysin was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed distinct expression of specific β-cell markers, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1), glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), synaptophysin (SYP) and insulin (INS) in these differentiated cells compared to HSCs. Further, these cells exhibited elevated expression of INS gene at 10 mM glucose upon inducing with different glucose concentrations. The prominent feature of the obtained β-cells was the presence of glucose sensors, which was determined by glucokinase activity and high glucokinase activity compared with CD34(+) stem cells. These findings illustrate the differentiation of CD34(+) HSCs into β-cells of islets of langerhans.

  6. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate, and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiologic albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC.

  7. Development of a dielectric equivalent gel for better impedance matching for human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaga, Takahiro; Ikehira, Hiroo; Furukawa, Shigeo; Tamura, Mitsuru; Yoshitome, Eiji; Obata, Takayuki; Shinkai, Hiroshi; Tanada, Shuji; Murata, Hajime; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    2003-04-01

    It would be useful to develop a tissue equivalent gel to improve the uniformity of the electromagnetic field in the human body, and for making a tissue equivalent dielectric human phantom. In this study, solid type, water based gelatin-honey gels were developed which have the electrical characteristics of skin tissue. It was demonstrated that a stable and homogeneous gel, with a relative dielectric constant epsilon ' chosen from desired ranges found in skin, can be made for 200-400 MHz.

  8. The Metastatic Potential and Chemoresistance of Human Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash J Bhagwandin

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs typically have the capacity to evade chemotherapy and may be the principal source of metastases. CSCs for human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC have been identified, but neither the metastatic potential nor the chemoresistance of these cells has been adequately evaluated. We have addressed these issues by examining side-population (SP cells isolated from the Panc-1 and BxPC3 lines of human PDAC cells, the oncogenotypes of which differ. SP cells could be isolated from monolayers of Panc-1, but only from spheroids of BxPC3. Using orthotopic xenografts into the severely immunocompromised NSG mouse, we found that SP cells isolated from both cell lines produced tumors that were highly metastatic, in contrast to previous experience with PDAC cell lines. SP cells derived from both cell lines expressed the ABCG2 transporter, which was demonstrably responsible for the SP phenotype. SP cells gave rise to non-SP (NSP cells in vitro and in vivo, a transition that was apparently due to posttranslational inhibition of the ABCG2 transporter. Twenty-two other lines of PDAC cells also expressed ABCG2. The sensitivity of PDAC SP cells to the vinca alkaloid vincristine could be greatly increased by verapamil, a general inhibitor of transporters. In contrast, verapamil had no effect on the killing of PDAC cells by gemcitabine, the current first-line therapeutic for PDAC. We conclude that the isolation of SP cells can be a convenient and effective tool for the study of PDAC CSCs; that CSCs may be the principal progenitors of metastasis by human PDAC; that the ABCG2 transporter is responsible for the SP phenotype in human PDAC cells, and may be a ubiquitous source of drug-resistance in PDAC, but does not confer resistance to gemcitabine; and that inhibition of ABCG2 might offer a useful adjunct in a therapeutic attack on the CSCs of PDAC.

  9. The Metastatic Potential and Chemoresistance of Human Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Bishop, J Michael; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) typically have the capacity to evade chemotherapy and may be the principal source of metastases. CSCs for human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) have been identified, but neither the metastatic potential nor the chemoresistance of these cells has been adequately evaluated. We have addressed these issues by examining side-population (SP) cells isolated from the Panc-1 and BxPC3 lines of human PDAC cells, the oncogenotypes of which differ. SP cells could be isolated from monolayers of Panc-1, but only from spheroids of BxPC3. Using orthotopic xenografts into the severely immunocompromised NSG mouse, we found that SP cells isolated from both cell lines produced tumors that were highly metastatic, in contrast to previous experience with PDAC cell lines. SP cells derived from both cell lines expressed the ABCG2 transporter, which was demonstrably responsible for the SP phenotype. SP cells gave rise to non-SP (NSP) cells in vitro and in vivo, a transition that was apparently due to posttranslational inhibition of the ABCG2 transporter. Twenty-two other lines of PDAC cells also expressed ABCG2. The sensitivity of PDAC SP cells to the vinca alkaloid vincristine could be greatly increased by verapamil, a general inhibitor of transporters. In contrast, verapamil had no effect on the killing of PDAC cells by gemcitabine, the current first-line therapeutic for PDAC. We conclude that the isolation of SP cells can be a convenient and effective tool for the study of PDAC CSCs; that CSCs may be the principal progenitors of metastasis by human PDAC; that the ABCG2 transporter is responsible for the SP phenotype in human PDAC cells, and may be a ubiquitous source of drug-resistance in PDAC, but does not confer resistance to gemcitabine; and that inhibition of ABCG2 might offer a useful adjunct in a therapeutic attack on the CSCs of PDAC.

  10. Liposomal insulin promoter-thymidine kinase gene therapy followed by ganciclovir effectively ablates human pancreatic cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, James X; Liu, Shi-He; Nemunaitis, John J; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2015-04-10

    PDX1 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and activates the insulin promoter (IP). Adenoviral IP-thymidine kinase and ganciclovir (TK/GCV) suppresses human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) in mice, but repeated doses carry significant toxicity. We hypothesized that multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity compared to adenoviral IP-TK/GCV. SCID mice with intraperitoneal human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 tumor implants were given a single cycle of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK, or four cycles of 1, 10, 20, 30, or 35 µg iv L-IP-TK (n = 20 per group), followed by intraperitoneal GCV. Insulin and glucose levels were monitored in mice treated with four cycles of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK. We found that four cycles of 10-35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV ablated more PANC-1 tumor volume compared to a single cycle with 35 µg. Mice that received four cycles of 10 µg L-IP-TK demonstrated the longest survival (P SCID mice with minimal toxicity, suggesting non-viral vectors are superior to adenoviral vectors for IP-gene therapy.

  11. Loss of canonical Smad4 signaling promotes KRAS driven malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Leung

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in North America. Activating KRAS mutations and Smad4 loss occur in approximately 90% and 55% of PDAC, respectively. While their roles in the early stages of PDAC development have been confirmed in genetically modified mouse models, their roles in the multistep malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct cells have not been directly demonstrated. Here, we report that Smad4 represents a barrier in KRAS-mediated malignant transformation of the near normal immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE cell line model. Marked Smad4 downregulation by shRNA in KRAS (G12V expressing HPDE cells failed to cause tumorigenic transformation. However, KRAS-mediated malignant transformation occurred in a new HPDE-TGF-β resistant (TβR cell line that completely lacks Smad4 protein expression and is resistant to the mito-inhibitory activity of TGF-β. This transformation resulted in tumor formation and development of metastatic phenotype when the cells were implanted orthotopically into the mouse pancreas. Smad4 restoration re-established TGF-β sensitivity, markedly increased tumor latency by promoting apoptosis, and decreased metastatic potential. These results directly establish the critical combination of the KRAS oncogene and complete Smad4 inactivation in the multi-stage malignant transformation and metastatic progression of normal human HPDE cells.

  12. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  13. Pancreatic pseudocysts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    at formulating a classification that can be used to dictate treatment strategy ... standing of the natural history of pancreatic fluid collec- ... ring, protein plug, or stone, the ongoing pancreatic secretion ... exocrine function in chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) from human pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, MacLean; Liu, Hao; Malafa, Mokenge; Centeno, Barbara; Hodul, Pamela J; Pimiento, José; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Sarnaik, Amod A

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated whether tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) could be expanded from surgically resected tumors from pancreatic cancer patients. Tumors were resected from pancreatic cancer patients. Tumors were minced into fragments and cultured in media containing high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) for up to 6 weeks. T cell phenotype, activation markers, and reactivity were measured. TIL expansion was measured in 19 patient samples. The majority of these TIL were CD4(+) T cells and were highly activated. Purified CD8(+) T cells produced IFN-γ in response to HLA-matched pancreatic tumor targets. PD-1 blockade and 4-1BB stimulation were demonstrated as effective strategies to improve effective TIL yield, including the production of tumor-reactive pancreatic TIL. TIL expanded from pancreatic tumors are functional and able to respond to pancreatic tumor associated antigens. PD-1 blockade, 41BB stimulation, and CD8(+) T cell enrichment are effective strategies to improve TIL yield and tumor reactivity. These results support the development of adoptive cell therapy strategies using TIL for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Use of 3-D magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography in detecting human cerebral stroke: a simulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Nuo; ZHU Shan-an; HE Bin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new three dimensional (3-D) conductivity imaging approach and have used it to detect human brain conductivity changes corresponding to acute cerebral stroke. The proposed Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) approach is based on the J-Substitution algorithm and is expanded to imaging 3-D subject conductivity distribution changes. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the present MREIT imaging approach.Simulations of both types of cerebral stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke, were performed on a four-sphere head model Simulation results showed that the correlation coefficient (CC) and relative error (RE) between target and estimated conductivity distributions were 0.9245±0.0068 and 8.9997%±0.0084%, for hemorrhagic stroke, and 0.6748±0.0197 and 8.8986%±0.0089%,for ischemic stroke, when the SNR (signal-to-noise radio) of added GWN (Gaussian White Noise) was 40. The convergence characteristic was also evaluated according to the changes of CC and RE with different iteration numbers. The CC increases and RE decreases monotonously with the increasing number of iterations. The present simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed 3-D MREIT approach in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke detection and suggest that the method may become a useful alternative in clinical diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke in humans.

  16. In the absence of nutrients, pancreatic-biliary secretions in the jejunum do not exert feedback control of human pancreatic or gastric function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawisz, B R; Miller, L J; DiMagno, E P; Go, V L

    1980-01-01

    Feedback inhibition of basal pancreatic enzyme secretion by luminal pancreatic enzymes appears to be an important regulator of pancreatic secretion in some laboratory animals. To determine whether pancreatic enzymes in the jejunum influence pancreatic or gastric functions in healthy man, we intubated six subjects with a gastric sump tube and a four-lumen duodenal tube which provided (1) a duodenal perfusion site, (2) a duodenal aspiration site, (3) an inflatable balloon immediately distal to the aspiration site, and (4) a jejunal perfusion site immediately beyond the balloon. In this way, the gastroduodenal segment could be functionally separated from the remainder of the intestine. The jejunum was exposed to normal saline, active pancreatic-biliary secretions, or pancreatic-biliary secretions in which the enzymes had been inactivated by heat. Ten minutes after initiation of each jejunal perfusion, normal saline was instilled into the stomach. No differences in trypsin secretion, gastric acid secretion, or gastric emptying occurred with the different jejunal perfusates. We therefore conclude that normal man, in the absence of intraluminal nutrients, does not exhibit a jejunal pancreatic enzyme-dependent feedback control mechanism for pancreatic enzyme or gastric secretion. However, our study does not exclude the possibility of a duodenal feedback regulatory mechanism.

  17. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  18. A sub-domain based regularization method with prior information for human thorax imaging using electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Kang, Suk; Khambampati, Anil Kumar; Jeon, Min Ho; Kim, Bong Seok; Kim, Kyung Youn

    2016-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can be used as a bed-side monitoring tool for human thorax imaging. EIT has high temporal resolution characteristics but at the same time it suffers from poor spatial resolution due to ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Often regularization methods are used as a penalty term in the cost function to stabilize the sudden changes in resistivity. In human thorax monitoring, with conventional regularization methods employing Tikhonov type regularization, the reconstructed image is smoothed between the heart and the lungs, that is, it makes it difficult to distinguish the exact boundaries of the lungs and the heart. Sometimes, obtaining structural information of the object prior to this can be incorporated into the regularization method to improve the spatial resolution along with helping create clear and distinct boundaries between the objects. However, the boundary of the heart is changed rapidly due to the cardiac cycle hence there is no information concerning the exact boundary of the heart. Therefore, to improve the spatial resolution for human thorax monitoring during the cardiac cycle, in this paper, a sub-domain based regularization method is proposed assuming the lungs and part of background region is known. In the proposed method, the regularization matrix is modified anisotropically to include sub-domains as prior information, and the regularization parameter is assigned with different weights to each sub-domain. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments for 2D human thorax monitoring are performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed regularization method. The results show a better reconstruction performance with the proposed regularization method.

  19. Sensitivity field distributions for segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis based on real human anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, A. A.; Kramarenko, V. K.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Rudnev, S. G.; Salamatova, V. Yu; Smirnov, A. V.; Vassilevski, Yu V.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, an adaptive unstructured tetrahedral mesh generation technology is applied for simulation of segmental bioimpedance measurements using high-resolution whole-body model of the Visible Human Project man. Sensitivity field distributions for a conventional tetrapolar, as well as eight- and ten-electrode measurement configurations are obtained. Based on the ten-electrode configuration, we suggest an algorithm for monitoring changes in the upper lung area.

  20. Crystal structures of human pancreatic alpha-amylase in complex with carbohydrate and proteinaceous inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahoum, V; Roux, G; Anton, V; Rougé, P; Puigserver, A; Bischoff, H; Henrissat, B; Payan, F

    2000-01-01

    Crystal structures of human pancreatic alpha-amylase (HPA) in complex with naturally occurring inhibitors have been solved. The tetrasaccharide acarbose and a pseudo-pentasaccharide of the trestatin family produced identical continuous electron densities corresponding to a pentasaccharide species, spanning the -3 to +2 subsites of the enzyme, presumably resulting from transglycosylation. Binding of the acarviosine core linked to a glucose residue at subsites -1 to +2 appears to be a critical part of the interaction process between alpha-amylases and trestatin-derived inhibitors. Two crystal forms, obtained at different values of pH, for the complex of HPA with the protein inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris (alpha-amylase inhibitor) have been solved. The flexible loop typical of the mammalian alpha-amylases was shown to exist in two different conformations, suggesting that loop closure is pH-sensitive. Structural information is provided for the important inhibitor residue, Arg-74, which has not been observed previously in structural analyses. PMID:10657258

  1. Epidrug-induced upregulation of functional somatostatin type 2 receptors in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Marije J; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Dogan, Fadime; Farrell, William E; Feelders, Richard A; Lamberts, Steven W J; de Herder, Wouter W; Vitale, Giovanni; Hofland, Leo J

    2016-05-19

    Somatostatin receptors are a pivotal target for treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), either with somatostatin analogues (SSA) or radiolabeled SSA. The highest affinity target for the most commonly used SSA is the somatostatin receptor type 2 (sst2). An important factor that may complicate treatment efficacy, is the variable number of receptors expressed on pNETs. Gene expression is subject to complex regulation, in which epigenetics has a central role. In this study we explored the possible role of epigenetic modifications in the variations in sst2 expression levels in two human pNET cell lines, BON-1 and QGP-1. We found upregulation of sst2 mRNA after treatment with the epidrugs 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and valproic acid (VPA), an increased uptake of radiolabeled octreotide, as well as increased sensitivity to the SSA octreotide in functional cAMP inhibition. At epigenetic level we observed low methylation levels of the sst2 gene promoter region irrespective of expression. Activating histone mark H3K9Ac can be regulated with epidrug treatment, with an angle of effect corresponding to the effect on mRNA expression. Repressive histone mark H3K27me3 is not regulated by either 5-aza-dC or VPA. We conclude that epidrug treatment, in particular with combined 5-aza-dC and VPA treatment, might hold promise for improving and adding to current SSA treatment strategies of patients with pNETs.

  2. The nuclear transport capacity of a human-pancreatic ribonuclease variant is critical for its cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubert, Pere; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2011-10-01

    We have previously described a human pancreatic-ribonuclease variant, named PE5, which carries a non-contiguous extended bipartite nuclear localization signal. This signal comprises residues from at least three regions of the protein. We postulated that the introduction of this signal in the ribonuclease provides it with cytotoxic activity because although the variant poorly evades the ribonuclease inhibitor in vitro, it is routed to the nucleus, which is devoid of the inhibitor. In this work, we have investigated the relationship between the cytotoxicity produced by PE5 and its ability to reach the nucleus. First, we show that this enzyme, when incubated with HeLa cells, specifically cleaves nuclear RNA while it leaves cytoplasmic RNA unaffected. On the other hand, we have created new variants in which the residues of the nuclear localization signal that are important for the nuclear transport have been replaced. As expected, the individual changes produce a significant decrease in the cytotoxicity of the resulting variants. We conclude that the nuclear transport of PE5 is critical for its cytotoxicity. Therefore, routing a ribonuclease to the nucleus is an alternative strategy to endow it with cytotoxic activity.

  3. Constitutive expression of human pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloulou, Ahmed; Grandval, Philippe; De Caro, Josiane; De Caro, Alain; Carrière, Frédéric

    2006-06-01

    High-level constitutive expression of the human pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 (HPLRP1) was achieved using the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The HPLRP1 cDNA, including its original leader sequence, was subcloned into the pGAPZB vector and further integrated into the genome of P. pastoris X-33 under the control of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) constitutive promoter. A major protein with a molecular mass of 50 kDa was found to be secreted into the culture medium and was identified using anti-HPLRP1 polyclonal antibodies as HPLRP1 recombinant protein. The level of expression reached 100-120 mg of HPLRP1 per liter of culture medium after 40 h, as attested by specific and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A single cation-exchange chromatography sufficed to obtain a highly purified recombinant HPLRP1 after direct batch adsorption onto S-Sepharose of the HPLRP1 present in the culture medium, at pH 5.5. N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis were carried out to monitor the production of the mature protein and to confirm that its signal peptide was properly processed.

  4. Autoimmunity against INS-IGF2 protein expressed in human pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatsuna, Norio; Taneera, Jalal; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Wierup, Nils; Larsson, Helena Elding; Delli, Ahmed; Skärstrand, Hanna; Balhuizen, Alexander; Bennet, Hedvig; Steiner, Donald F; Törn, Carina; Fex, Malin; Lernmark, Åke

    2013-10-04

    Insulin is a major autoantigen in islet autoimmunity and progression to type 1 diabetes. It has been suggested that the insulin B-chain may be critical to insulin autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. INS-IGF2 consists of the preproinsulin signal peptide, the insulin B-chain, and eight amino acids of the C-peptide in addition to 138 amino acids from the IGF2 gene. We aimed to determine the expression of INS-IGF2 in human pancreatic islets and autoantibodies in newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and controls. INS-IGF2, expressed primarily in beta cells, showed higher levels of expression in islets from normal compared with donors with either type 2 diabetes (p = 0.006) or high HbA1c levels (p INS-IGF2 autoantibody levels were increased in newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 304) compared with healthy controls (n = 355; p INS-IGF2 revealed that more patients than controls had doubly reactive insulin-INS-IGF2 autoantibodies. These data suggest that INS-IGF2, which contains the preproinsulin signal peptide, the B-chain, and eight amino acids of the C-peptide may be an autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. INS-IGF2 and insulin may share autoantibody-binding sites, thus complicating the notion that insulin is the primary autoantigen in type 1 diabetes.

  5. Functional proteomics screen enables enrichment of distinct cell types from human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revital Sharivkin

    Full Text Available The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+, glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9-/CD56+ and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9-/CD56-. This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples.

  6. Structural features for the mechanism of antitumor action of a dimeric human pancreatic ribonuclease variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, Antonello; Avella, Giovanna; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Arciello, Angela; Piccoli, Renata; Mazzarella, Lelio; Sica, Filomena

    2009-01-01

    A specialized class of RNases shows a high cytotoxicity toward tumor cell lines, which is critically dependent on their ability to reach the cytosol and to evade the action of the ribonuclease inhibitor (RI). The cytotoxicity and antitumor activity of bovine seminal ribonuclease (BSRNase), which exists in the native state as an equilibrium mixture of a swapped and an unswapped dimer, are peculiar properties of the swapped form. A dimeric variant (HHP2-RNase) of human pancreatic RNase, in which the enzyme has been engineered to reproduce the sequence of BSRNase helix-II (Gln28→Leu, Arg31→Cys, Arg32→Cys, and Asn34→Lys) and to eliminate a negative charge on the surface (Glu111→Gly), is also extremely cytotoxic. Surprisingly, this activity is associated also to the unswapped form of the protein. The crystal structure reveals that on this molecule the hinge regions, which are highly disordered in the unswapped form of BSRNase, adopt a very well-defined conformation in both subunits. The results suggest that the two hinge peptides and the two Leu28 side chains may provide an anchorage to a transient noncovalent dimer, which maintains Cys31 and Cys32 of the two subunits in proximity, thus stabilizing a quaternary structure, similar to that found for the noncovalent swapped dimer of BSRNase, that allows the molecule to escape RI and/or to enhance the formation of the interchain disulfides. PMID:19177350

  7. Impact of exposure to low concentrations of nitric oxide on protein profile in murine and human pancreatic islet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Limonchi, Rafael; Díaz, Irene; Cahuana, Gladys M; Bautista, Mario; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Tejedo, Juan R; Bedoya, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Homeostatic levels of nitric oxide (NO) protect efficiently against apoptotic death in both human and rodent pancreatic β cells, but the protein profile of this action remains to be determined. We have applied a 2 dimensional LC-MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF-based analysis to study the impact of protective NO in rat insulin-producing RINm5F cell line and in mouse and human pancreatic islets (HPI) exposed to serum deprivation condition. 24 proteins in RINm5F and 22 in HPI were identified to undergo changes in at least one experimental condition. These include stress response mitochondrial proteins (UQCRC2, VDAC1, ATP5C1, ATP5A1) in RINm5F cells and stress response endoplasmic reticulum proteins (HSPA5, PDIA6, VCP, GANAB) in HPI. In addition, metabolic and structural proteins, oxidoreductases and chaperones related with protein metabolism are also regulated by NO treatment. Network analysis of differentially expressed proteins shows their interaction in glucocorticoid receptor and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathways and eNOS signaling. The results indicate that exposure to exogenous NO counteracts the impact of serum deprivation on pancreatic β cell proteome. Species differences in the proteins involved are apparent.

  8. Impact of exposure to low concentrations of nitric oxide on protein profile in murine and human pancreatic islet cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Limonchi, Rafael; Díaz, Irene; Cahuana, Gladys M; Bautista, Mario; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Tejedo, Juan R; Bedoya, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Homeostatic levels of nitric oxide (NO) protect efficiently against apoptotic death in both human and rodent pancreatic β cells, but the protein profile of this action remains to be determined. We have applied a 2 dimensional LC-MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF-based analysis to study the impact of protective NO in rat insulin-producing RINm5F cell line and in mouse and human pancreatic islets (HPI) exposed to serum deprivation condition. 24 proteins in RINm5F and 22 in HPI were identified to undergo changes in at least one experimental condition. These include stress response mitochondrial proteins (UQCRC2, VDAC1, ATP5C1, ATP5A1) in RINm5F cells and stress response endoplasmic reticulum proteins (HSPA5, PDIA6, VCP, GANAB) in HPI. In addition, metabolic and structural proteins, oxidoreductases and chaperones related with protein metabolism are also regulated by NO treatment. Network analysis of differentially expressed proteins shows their interaction in glucocorticoid receptor and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathways and eNOS signaling. The results indicate that exposure to exogenous NO counteracts the impact of serum deprivation on pancreatic β cell proteome. Species differences in the proteins involved are apparent. PMID:25658244

  9. Expression of lysophosphatidic acid and its receptor in human pancreatic cancer and its clinical evaluation of diagnosis and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shao-kai; TAO Chen-jie; WANG Wei-dong; L(U)Guang-mei; GONG Yong-ling

    2011-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid(LPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid with diverse effects in various cells, ranging from immediate morphological alteration to long lasting cellular function changes, such as induction of stimulation of cell proliferation, survival, drug resistance and motility. Like many other biomediators, LPA interacts with cells through specific cell surface receptors(G protein-coupled receptors). LPA1/Edg-2,LPA2/Edg-4 and LPA3/Edg-7, named as Edg/LP subfamily, are the three most common lysophosphatidic acid receptors. LPA plays a critical role as a general growth, survival and pro-angiogenic factor in the regulation of pathophysiological processes in vivo and in vitro. Recent literatures suggest that abnormalities in LPA metabolism and function in pancreatic cancer patients may contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease. Thus, LPA might be a potential target for clinical pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein we review the expression of LPA and its receptors in the carcinogenesis of human malignancies, with focus on human pancreatic cancer, and also clinical diagnosis and treatment has been evaluated.

  10. Suppression of FAT/CD36 mRNA by human growth hormone in pancreatic β-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Gaarn, Louise Winkel;

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to examine the effect of human growth hormone (hGH) on mRNAs of fatty acid transport and binding proteins expressed in pancreatic β-cells, and to examine this in relation to β-cell survival after exposure to fatty acids. hGH decreased mRNA levels of FAT/CD36, whereas mRNAs of GPR40, FASN, FABP......Fatty acid-induced damage in pancreatic β-cells is assumed to play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Lactogens (prolactin, placental lactogen and growth hormone) improve β-cell survival via STAT5 activation but the molecular targets are incompletely characterized. The aim...

  11. Suppression of FAT/CD36 mRNA by human growth hormone in pancreatic ß-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Gaarn, Louise Winkel;

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to examine the effect of human growth hormone (hGH) on mRNAs of fatty acid transport and binding proteins expressed in pancreatic ß-cells, and to examine this in relation to ß-cell survival after exposure to fatty acids. hGH decreased mRNA levels of FAT/CD36, whereas mRNAs of GPR40, FASN, FABP......Fatty acid-induced damage in pancreatic ß-cells is assumed to play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Lactogens (prolactin, placental lactogen and growth hormone) improve ß-cell survival via STAT5 activation but the molecular targets are incompletely characterized. The aim...

  12. Expression profiling of wild type and β-catenin gene disrupted human BxPC-3 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Angell Olsen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To study the role of WNT/β-catenin signaling in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, human BxPC-3 cell lines deficient of the central canonical WNT signaling protein β-catenin were established by using zinc-finger nuclease mediated targeted genomic disruption of the β-catenin gene (CTNNB1. Comparison of the global transcription levels in wild type cells with two β-catenin gene disrupted clones identified 85 transcripts that were the most differentially regulated. Gene ontology (GO term enrichment analysis of these transcripts identified “cell adhesion” as the most significantly enriched GO term. Here we describe the data from the transcription profiling analysis published in the article “Implications of Targeted Genomic Disruption of β-Catenin in BxPC-3 Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cells” [1]. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE63072.

  13. Evidence that P12, a specific variant of P16{sup INK4A}, plays a suppressive role in human pancreatic carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poi, Ming J. [Department of Pharmacy, The Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Knobloch, Thomas J. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Division of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Yuan, Chunhua [Campus Chemical Instrument Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tsai, Ming-Daw [Genomics Research Center and Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taiwan (China); Weghorst, Christopher M. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Division of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li, Junan, E-mail: li.225@osu.edu [Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Division of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •P12, a variant of P16{sup INK4A}, inhibits the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. •P12 is distinct from P16 in function and structure. •Genetic alterations of p12 are prevalent in human pancreatic carcinoma. •P12 represents a potential pancreas-specific tumor suppressor. -- Abstract: The INK4a-ARF locus plays a central role in the development of pancreatic tumors as evidenced by the fact that up to 98% of pancreatic tumor specimens harbored genetic alterations at the INK4a-ARF locus. Interestingly, in addition to the well-known P16{sup INK4A} (P16) and P14ARF tumor suppressors, the INK4a-ARF locus in pancreas encodes another protein, P12, whose structure, function, and contributions to pancreatic carcinogenesis remain to be elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrated that over-expression of p12 in human pancreatic cancer cells led to cell arrest at the G1 phase and such cell cycle arrest was related to down-regulation of a number of oncogenes, such as c-Jun, Fos, and SEI1. Furthermore, unlike P16, P12 did not retain any cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)-inhibitory activity. Instead, P12 exhibited a transactivating activity not found in P16. We also examined the genetic status of p12 in a cohort of 40 pancreatic tumor specimens and found that p12 alteration was prevalent in pancreatic tumors with an incidence of 70% (28/40). These results support that P12 is a tumor suppressive protein distinct from P16, and its genetic inactivation is associated with pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  14. Echovirus 6 Infects Human Exocrine and Endocrine Pancreatic Cells and Induces Pro-Inflammatory Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sarmiento

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human enteroviruses (HEV, especially coxsackievirus serotype B (CVB and echovirus (E, have been associated with diseases of both the exocrine and endocrine pancreas, but so far evidence on HEV infection in human pancreas has been reported only in islets and ductal cells. This study aimed to investigate the capability of echovirus strains to infect human exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells. Infection of explanted human islets and exocrine cells with seven field strains of E6 caused cytopathic effect, virus titer increase and production of HEV protein VP1 in both cell types. Virus particles were found in islets and acinar cells infected with E6. No cytopathic effect or infectious progeny production was observed in exocrine cells exposed to the beta cell-tropic strains of E16 and E30. Endocrine cells responded to E6, E16 and E30 by upregulating the transcription of interferon-induced with helicase C domain 1 (IF1H1, 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1, interferon-β (IFN-β, chemokine (C–X–C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10 and chemokine (C–C motif ligand 5 (CCL5. Echovirus 6, but not E16 or E30, led to increased transcription of these genes in exocrine cells. These data demonstrate for the first time that human exocrine cells represent a target for E6 infection and suggest that certain HEV serotypes can replicate in human pancreatic exocrine cells, while the pancreatic endocrine cells are permissive to a wider range of HEV.

  15. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwei Sun; Chongqing Lv; Longlong Yang; Yingxiu Wang; Qingshun Zhang; Suhui Yu; Hongru Kong; Meng Wang; Jianming Xie; Chunwu Zhang; Mengtao Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptos...

  16. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  17. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  18. Proteins differentially expressed in human beta-cells-enriched pancreatic islet cultures and human insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terra, Letícia F; Teixeira, Priscila C; Wailemann, Rosangela A M

    2013-01-01

    In view of the great demand for human beta-cells for physiological and medical studies, we generated cell lines derived from human insulinomas which secrete insulin, C-peptide and express neuroendocrine and islet markers. In this study, we set out to characterize their proteomes, comparing them t...

  19. Therapeutic potential of sulindac hydroxamic acid against human pancreatic and colonic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, Stefano; Banti, Irene; Stefanelli, Fabio; Picchianti, Luca; Digiacomo, Maria; Macchia, Marco; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Lapucci, Annalina

    2010-11-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac exhibits cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and COX-independent chemopreventive properties in human cancer. The present study was aimed at investigating whether the hydroxamic acid substitution for the carboxylic acid group could enhance the in vitro antitumor and antiangiogenic activities of sulindac. Characterization tools used on this study included analyses of cell viability, caspase 3/7 induction, DNA fragmentation, and gene expression. Our findings demonstrate that the newly synthesized hydroxamic acid derivative of sulindac and its sulfone and sulfide metabolites were characterized by a good anticancer activity on human pancreatic and colon cancer cells, both in terms of potency (IC(50) mean values from 6 ± 1.1 μM to 64 ± 1.1 μM) and efficacy (E(max) of ∼100%). Hydroxamic acid derivatives trigger a higher degree of apoptosis than carboxylic acid counterparts, increase bax/bcl-2 expression ratio and induce caspase 3/7 activation. Most notably, these compounds significantly inhibit proangiogenic growth factor-stimulated proliferation of vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) at sub-micromolar concentrations. Our data also provide evidence that the COX-active metabolite of sulindac hydroxamic acid were the most active of the series and selective inhibition of COX-1 but not COX-2 can mimic its effects, suggesting that COX inhibition could only play a partial role in the mechanism of compound action. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that substitution of the carboxylic acid group with the hydroxamic acid moiety enhances in vitro antiproliferative, proapoptotic and antiangiogenic properties of sulindac, therefore increasing the therapeutic potential of this drug.

  20. High-level expression of nonglycosylated human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Deprez-Beauclair, Paule; Berton, Amelie; Crenon, Isabelle

    2006-10-01

    The human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (HPLRP2) was produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The HPLRP2 cDNA corresponding to the protein coding sequence including the native signal sequence, was cloned into the pPIC9K vector and integrated into the genome of P. pastoris. P. pastoris transformants secreting high-level rHPLRP2 were obtained and the expression level into the liquid culture medium reached about 40mg/L after 4 days of culture. rHPLRP2 was purified by a single anion-exchange step after an overnight dialysis. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that the purified rHPLRP2 mature protein possessed a correct N-terminal amino acid sequence indicating that its signal peptide was properly processed. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that the recombinant HPLRP2 molecular weight was 52,532Da which was 2451Da greater than the mass calculated from the sequence of the protein (50,081Da) and 1536Da greater than the mass of the native human protein (50,996Da). In vitro deglycosylation experiments by peptide:N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) indicated that rHPLRP2 secreted from P. pastoris was N-glycosylated. Specific conditions were setup in order to obtain a recombinant protein free of glycan chain. We observed that blocking glycosylation in vivo by addition of tunicamycin in the culture medium during the production resulted in a correct processing of the rHPLRP2 mature protein. The lipase activity of glycosylated or nonglycosylated rHPLRP2, which was about 800U/mg on tributyrin, was inhibited by the presence of bile salts and not restored by adding colipase. In conclusion, the experimental procedure which we have developed will allow us to get a high-level production in P. pastoris of glycosylated and nonglycosylated rHPLRP2, suitable for subsequent biophysical and structural studies.

  1. Detection and localization of Mip-3alpha/LARC/Exodus, a macrophage proinflammatory chemokine, and its CCR6 receptor in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, J; Kusama, T; Rossi, D L; Ishiwata, T; Maruyama, H; Friess, H; Büchler, M W; Zlotnik, A; Korc, M

    1999-05-17

    Macrophage Proinflammatory Human Chemokine-3alpha (Mip-3alpha/LARC/Exodus) belongs to a large family of chemotactic cytokines, which participate in directing inflammatory cell migration and in modulating angiogenesis. Mip-3alpha signals through a recently identified G-protein linked 7-transmembrane receptor, CCR6. In this study, we have characterized the expression of Mip-3alpha and CCR6 in 12 normal and 16 cancerous human pancreatic tissues and in 4 cultured pancreatic cancer cell lines, and assessed the effects of Mip-3alpha on growth and invasion of these cell lines. Pancreatic cancer tissues markedly overexpressed Mip-3alpha in comparison with normal pancreatic samples. By in situ hybridization Mip-3alpha and CCR6 mRNA moieties were present in cancer cells within the tumors. In addition, Mip-3alpha was abundant in the macrophages infiltrating the tumor mass. Mip-3alpha and its receptor CCR6 were expressed in all 4 tested pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mip-3alpha stimulated the growth of one cell line, enhanced the migration of another cell line, and was without effect in the other 2 cell lines. Together, our findings suggest that Mip-3alpha has the potential to act via autocrine and paracrine mechanisms to contribute to the pathobiology of human pancreatic cancer.

  2. 人类胰腺癌组织中多环芳烃含量的测定及意义%The detection and significance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuntao Liu; Limin Lun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the occurrence of human pancreatic cancer.Methods: PAHs in human pancreatic cancer, adjacent pancreatic cancer tissues and tissues without pancreatic cancer were extracted by ultrasonic extraction (UE).And then the extracts were cleaned up by solid phase extraction and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence spectroscopy.Results: Four kinds of PAHs were detected, which were chrysene, 2-methylanthracene, pyrene and benzo (a) pyrene.The contents of the four PAHs were not statistically significant between pancreatic cancer and adjacent tissues (P > 0.05).The contents of 2-methylanthracene, pyrene and benzo (a) pyrene in pancreatic cancer and adjacent tissues were higher than tissues without pancreatic cancer, the differences were statistically significant (P 0.05).Conclusion: PAHs were found in human pancreatic tissues.Human pancreatic tissues have extremely strong ability of bio-concentrating PAHs.PAHs might play an important role in the occurrence of human pancreatic cancer.

  3. Characterisation of human skin impedance at acupuncture point PC4 Ximen and pericardium meridian using the four-electrode method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Shima; Khorsand, Ali; Jamali, Jamshid

    2012-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine offers several theories to explain the mechanism of acupuncture. One of these theories proposes that acupuncture points and meridians have unique electrical properties and their electrical skin impedance is lower than surrounding areas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in electrical skin impedance between PC4 and the pericardium meridian compared with the surrounding areas. Eighteen healthy subjects (10 women) were recruited to participate in the study. An impedance meter based on the four-electrode technique was designed specifically for the study. Twenty-five points were marked on the skin: one on the point PC4, four others on the pericardium meridian and 20 points around it. The electrical impedance of each point was measured with the four-electrode device. The mean electrical skin impedance at PC4 was significantly different from the 20 of the surrounding points but not significantly different from the four adjacent points. The mean skin impedance of the five points over the pericardium meridian was significantly different from that of parallel rows of points using repeated measures analysis of variance (ppericardium meridian is lower than surrounding areas, supporting the idea of different properties of the pericardium meridian compared with the control areas. Evidence on skin impedance at PC4 is inconclusive and further studies are needed.

  4. Measurement of electrode-tissue interface impedance for improvement of a transcutaneous data transmission using human body as transmission medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Eiji; Kato, Yoshikuni; Kikuchi, Sakiko; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The electrical property between an electrode and skin or tissue is one of the important issues for communication performance of the transcutaneous communication system (TCS) using a human body as a conductive medium.In this study, we used a simple method to measure interface resistance between the electrode and skin on the surface of the body. The electrode-electrode impedance was measured by a commercially available LCR meter with changes in the distance between two electrodes on an arm of a healthy male subject, and we obtained the tissue resistivity and electrode-skin interface resistance using the cross-sectional area of the arm.We also measured transmission gain of the TCS on the surface of the body, and we investigated the relationship between electrode-skin interface resistance and transmission gain. We examined four kinds of electrodes: a stainless steel electrode, a titanium electrode, an Ag-AgCl electrode and an Ag-AgCl paste electrode. The stainless steel electrode, which had lower electrode-skin resistance, had higher transmission gain.The results indicate that an electrode that has lower electrode-skin resistance will contribute to improvement of the performance of the TCS and that electrode-skin interface resistance is one of valuable evaluation parameters for selecting an optimum electrode for the TCS.

  5. Smaller, softer, lower-impedance electrodes for human neuroprosthesis: a pragmatic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eCastagnola

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Finding the most appropriate technology for building electrodes to be used for long term implants in humans is a challenging issue. What are the most appropriate technologies? How could one achieve robustness, stability, compatibility, efficacy and versatility, for both recording and stimulation? There are no easy answers to these questions as even the most fundamental and apparently obvious factors to be taken into account, such as the necessary mechanical, electrical and biological properties and their interplay, are under debate. We present here our approach along three fundamental parallel pathways: we reduced electrode invasiveness and size without impairing signal-to-noise ratio, we increased electrode active surface area by depositing nanostructured materials and, we protected the brain from direct contact with the electrode without compromising performance. Altogether, these results converge towards high-resolution ECoG arrays that are soft and adaptable to cortical folds, and have been proven to provide high spatial and temporal resolution. This method provides a piece of work which, in our view, makes several steps ahead in bringing such novel devices into clinical settings, opening new avenues in diagnostics of brain diseases and neuroprosthetic applications.

  6. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  7. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  8. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs.

  9. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21.

  10. Time course of effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy on a human pancreatic cancer cell line (SUIT-2) in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakasugi, Hideyuki; Seo, Yohsuke; Yamada, Yukio; Hata, Kazuo; Higuchi, Kaoru; Kohno, Akira [National Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    In order to investigate time course of effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer, we used the monolayer culture of a human pancreatic cancer cell line, SUIT-2 which produces CEA and CA19-9. Into the culture various kinds of anti-cancer drugs (MMC, ADR, FAR, 5FU, FT, CDDP, CPT-11) were administered for a period of 2 days, followed by irradiation with {sup 60}Co. Observation period was 20 days, during which we measured LDH, CEA and Ca19-9 in medium, DNA, protein, CEA and CA19-9 in cells in addition to observation of cells through microscope. Effects of anti-cancer drugs on pancreatic cancer cells were greater than those of irradiation when doses of anti-cancer drugs were enough. By using a lot of anti-cancer drugs, LDH value in medium increased at early time and decreased later. CEA and Ca19-9 values in medium decreased with the lapse of time, while they were increased later when small doses of the drugs had been administered. DNA, protein, CEA and Ca19-9 values in cells showed a decrease in accordance with increased doses of the drugs. Effects of FT and CPT-11 were marginal compared with the other drugs. (author).

  11. Differential interfacial and substrate binding modes of mammalian pancreatic phospholipases A2: a comparison among human, bovine, and porcine enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitko, Y; Han, S K; Lee, B I; Cho, W

    1999-06-15

    To identify the residues essential for interfacial binding and substrate binding of human pancreatic phospholipase A2 (hpPLA2), several ionic residues in the putative interfacial binding surface (R6E, K7E, K10E, and K116E) and substrate binding site (D53K and K56E) were mutated. Interfacial affinity of these mutants was measured using anionic polymerized liposomes, and their enzymatic activity was measured using various substrates including phospholipid monomers, zwitterionic and anionic micelles, and anionic polymerized mixed liposomes. Similar mutations (R6E, K10E, K56E, and K116E) were made to porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (ppPLA2), and the properties of mutants were measured by the same methods. Results indicate that hpPLA2 and ppPLA2 have similar interfacial binding mechanisms in which cationic residues in the amino terminus and Lys-116 in the carboxy terminus are involved in binding to anionic lipid surfaces. Small but definite differences between the two enzymes were observed in overall interfacial affinity and activity and the effects of the mutations on interfacial enzyme activity. The interfacial binding of hpPLA2 and ppPLA2 is distinct from that of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 in that Lys-56 is involved in the interfacial binding of the latter enzyme. The unique phospholipid headgroup specificity of hpPLA2 derives from the presence of Asp-53 in the substrate binding site. This residue appears to participate in stabilizing electrostatic interactions with the cationic ethanolamine headgroup, hence the phosphatidylethanolamine preference of hpPLA2. Taken together, these studies reveal the similarities and the differences in the mechanisms by which mammalian pancreatic phospholipases A2 interact with lipid aggregates and perform interfacial catalysis.

  12. Purified human pancreatic duct cell culture conditions defined by serum-free high-content growth factor screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne A Hoesli

    Full Text Available The proliferation of pancreatic duct-like CK19+ cells has implications for multiple disease states including pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus. The in vitro study of this important cell type has been hampered by their limited expansion compared to fibroblast-like vimentin+ cells that overgrow primary cultures. We aimed to develop a screening platform for duct cell mitogens after depletion of the vimentin+ population. The CD90 cell surface marker was used to remove the vimentin+ cells from islet-depleted human pancreas cell cultures by magnetic-activated cell sorting. Cell sorting decreased CD90+ cell contamination of the cultures from 34±20% to 1.3±0.6%, yielding purified CK19+ cultures with epithelial morphology. A full-factorial experimental design was then applied to test the mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF, KGF and VEGF. After 6 days in test conditions, the cells were labelled with BrdU, stained and analyzed by high-throughput imaging. This screening assay confirmed the expected mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF on CK19+ cells and additionally revealed interactions between these factors and VEGF. A serum-free medium containing bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF led to CK19+ cell expansion comparable to the addition of 10% serum. The methods developed in this work should advance pancreatic cancer and diabetes research by providing effective cell culture and high-throughput screening platforms to study purified primary pancreatic CK19+ cells.

  13. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients.

  14. The expressions and significance of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in human pancreatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Bo; Ma Qingyong; Li Ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in pancreatic carcinoma and their relationship with tumor invasion, local metastasis and prognosis of the carcinoma. Methods The expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were examined in 32 patients with pancreatic carcinomas by S-P immunohistochemical technique and the correlation with pathological tumor parameters were analyzed. Survival analysis was made by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The positive rates of MMP-2, TIMP-2 in 32 patients with pancreatic carcinoma were 56.25% and 75.00%, which were significantly higher than those of the controls(P<0.05). Expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were independent of sex, age, histological grading and type, but well correlated with the lymph node metastasis and TNM clinical staging(Ⅰ and Ⅲ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ). There was a significant association between MMP-2, TIMP-2 and prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. Conclusion MMP-2 and TIMP-2 might be useful markers for biological aggressiveness of this malignancy and might contribute to the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma, which can be used to evaluate the prognosis of patients.

  15. Anticancer effect and enhanced chemotherapy potential of resveratrol in human pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumei Chen; Guangsu Xiong; Ke Zhang; Co-first author Yuanyuan Chen; Ruzhen Zheng; Penjun Zhao; Jianwei Zhu; Shuming Wu; Qinghua Deng; Shenglin Ma

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gemcitabine, the only approved drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, is not very ef ec-tive. Novel and ef ective cancer chemopreventive agents are urgently needed. Recently, emerging studies determined resveratrol possessed anticancer ef ects on various cancer cel s. We explored the anticancer ef ect of resveratrol in pancreatic cancer cel s and investigated the involved moleculars of action. We also examined whether resveratrol enhanced antitumor activity of gemcitabine in vitro. Methods Proliferation inhibition was assessed by cel count kit-8 assay. Cel cycle phase distribution and apoptotic cel s were measured by flow cytometric analysis. We determined the expression of bcl-2, cyclinD1, and activation of caspases-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase1 proteins used Western blot analysis. Results Resveratrol inhibited the proliferation of three pancreatic cancer cel lines in a dose dependent fashion, and induced accumulation of cel s at the G1 phase as wel as apoptosis. Our data also demon-strated that resveratrol enhanced gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cel s. In addition, resveratrol inhibited the expression of cyclinD1, bcl-2, and induced activation of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase1. Conclusion Our results suggested that resveratrol might be not only a potential regimen, but also an ef ective chemosensitizer for the chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Escin Chemosensitizes Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells and Inhibits the Nuclear Factor-kappaB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rimmon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is an urgent need to develop new treatment strategies and drugs for pancreatic cancer that is highly resistant to radio-chemotherapy. Aesculus hippocastanum (the horse chestnut known in Chinese medicine as a plant with anti-inflammatory, antiedema, antianalgesic, and antipyretic activities. The main active compound of this plant is Escin (C54H84O23. Objective. To evaluate the effect of Escin alone and combined with chemotherapy on pancreatic cancer cell survival and to unravel mechanism(s of Escin anticancer activity. Methods. Cell survival was measured by XTT colorimetric assay. Synergistic effect of combined therapy was determined by CalcuSyn software. Cell cycle and induction of apoptosis were evaluated by FACS analysis. Expression of NF-κB-related proteins (p65, IκBα, and p-IκBα and cyclin D was evaluated by western blot analysis. Results. Escin decreased the survival of pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 = 10–20 M. Escin combined with gemcitabine showed only additive effect, while its combination with cisplatin resulted in a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect in Panc-1 cells. High concentrations of Escin induced apoptosis and decreased NF-κB-related proteins and cyclin D expression. Conclusions. Escin decreased pancreatic cancer cell survival, induced apoptosis, and downregulated NF-κB signaling pathway. Moreover, Escin sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. Further translational research is required.

  17. Fractalkine and TGF-β1 levels reflect the severity of chronic pancreatitis in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikihiko Yasuda; Tetsuhide Ito; Takamasa Oono; Ken Kawabe; Toyoma Kaku; Hisato Igarashi; Taichi Nakzmura; Ryoichi Takayanagi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To darify whether serum chemoldne and cytokine levels can become useful biological and functional markers to assess the severity of chronic pancreatitis (CP). This study aimed at darifying whether serum chemokine and cytokine levels can become useful biological and functional markers to assess the severity of CP. METHODS: Serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), and soluble type fractalkine (s-fractalkine) concentrations were examined in patients with CP (n = 109) and healthy controls (n = 116). Severity of disease was classified in patients with CP by a staging system. Relationships between stage-specific various clinical factors and serum MCP-1, TGF-β1, and s-fractalkine levels were investigated. Furthermore, 57 patients with non-alcoholic CP were similarly evaluated in order to exclude influence of alcohol intake. RESULTS: Patients with CP showed significant higher levels of serum TGF-β1 and s-fractalkine, but not MCP-1, compared to the controls. Serum TGF-β1 in the severe stage and s-fractalkine in the mild and the severe stage of CP significantly increased compared to those of controls. However, it was observed that both TGF-β1 and s-fractalkine levels were affected by alcohol intake. In patients with non-alcoholic CP, serum TGF-β1 showed significant increase in the moderate stage of CP, and serum s-fractalkine revealed significant increase in the early stage of CP. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that the measurement of serum F-fractalkine is useful to diagnose early-stage CP. Moreover, the combined determination of both, s-fractalkine and TGF-β1, in human sera may be helpful in evaluating the severity status of CP.

  18. Intracellular Ca2+ signals in human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cells (QGP-1N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, P E; Amiranoff, B; Dunne, M J

    1994-10-01

    Single-cell microfluorimetry techniques have been used to examine the effects of acetylcholine (0.1-100 microM) on the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cell line, QGP-1N. When applied to the bath solution, acetylcholine was found to evoke a marked and rapid increase in [Ca2+]i at all concentrations tested. These responses were either sustained, or associated with the generation of complex patterns of [Ca2+]i transients. Overall, the pattern of response was concentration related. In general, 0.1-10 microM acetylcholine initiated a series of repetitive oscillations in cytoplasmic Ca2+, whilst at higher concentrations the responses consisted of a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i followed by a smaller more sustained increase. Without external Ca2+, 100 microM acetylcholine caused only a transient rise in [Ca2+]i, whereas lower concentrations of the agonist were able to initiate, but not maintain, [Ca2+]i oscillations. Acetylcholine-evoked Ca2+ signals were abolished by atropine (1-10 microM), verapamil (100 microM) and caffeine (20 mM). Nifedipine failed to have any significant effect upon agonist-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i, whilst 50 mM KCl, used to depolarise the cell membrane, only elicited a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Ryanodine (50-500 nM) and caffeine (1-20 mM) did not increase basal Ca2+ levels, but the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors 2,5-di(tert-butyl)-hydroquinone (TBQ) and thapsigargin both elevated [Ca2+]i levels. These data demonstrate for the first time cytosolic Ca2+ signals in single isolated somatostatin-secreting cells of the pancreas. We have demonstrated that acetylcholine will evoke both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilisation, and we have partially addressed the subcellular mechanism responsible for these events.

  19. Kinetic properties of mouse pancreatic lipase-related protein-2 suggest the mouse may not model human fat digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xunjun; Ross, Leah E; Miller, Rita A; Lowe, Mark E

    2011-05-01

    Genetically engineered mice have been employed to understand the role of lipases in dietary fat digestion with the expectation that the results can be extrapolated to humans. However, little is known about the properties of mouse pancreatic triglyceride lipase (mPTL) and pancreatic lipase-related protein-2 (mPLRP2). In this study, both lipases were expressed in Pichia Pastoris GS115, purified to near homogeneity, and their properties were characterized. Mouse PTL displayed the kinetics typical of PTL from other species. Like mPTL, mPLRP2 exhibited strong activity against various triglycerides. In contrast to mPTL, mPLRP2 was not inhibited by increasing bile salt concentration. Colipase stimulated mPLRP2 activity 2- to 4-fold. Additionally, mPTL absolutely required colipase for absorption to a lipid interface, whereas mPLRP2 absorbed fully without colipase. mPLRP2 had full activity in the presence of BSA, whereas BSA completely inhibited mPTL unless colipase was present. All of these properties of mPLRP2 differ from the properties of human PLRP2 (hPLRP2). Furthermore, mPLRP2 appears capable of compensating for mPTL deficiency. These findings suggest that the molecular mechanisms of dietary fat digestion may be different in humans and mice. Thus, extrapolation of dietary fat digestion in mice to humans should be done with care.

  20. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Solanine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongwei; Lv, Chongqing; Yang, Longlong; Wang, Yingxiu; Zhang, Qingshun; Yu, Suhui; Kong, Hongru; Wang, Meng; Xie, Jianming; Zhang, Chunwu; Zhou, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP) by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  2. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF ANTISENSE OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES(ASODN) ON HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER CELL LINE PaTu8988s

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of different concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN) on human pancreatic cancer cell line PaTu8988s. Method: Human pancreatic cancer cell line PaTu8988s in exponential growth stage was used to study the effect of different drug concentrations on the cell line in the presence of different concentrations (0 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, 25 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 10 μg/m, 200 μg/ml) of ASODN and sense oligodeoxynucleotides (SODN). Cell counts and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolzyl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays were carried out. Results: The inhibitory rate on the cell line PaTu8988s was 98.73%,95.76%,69.49%,33.05% and 0 for ASODM concentrations of 200 μg/ml,100 μg/ml,50 μg/ml,25 μg/ml and 5 μg/ml at 48 hours. Conclusions: K-ras complementary ASODN can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer cell line PaTu8988s by 30.05% to 98.73%. This is likely to contribute to the specificity of the K-ras mRNA complementary capped ASODN sequential codon. Non-specific effect and side effect of ASOND were observed for instance, the greater the concentration is, the earlier the peak of inhibitory rate is reached. In concentration of 25 μg/ml to 100 μg/ml ASODN showed a dose-effect correlation

  3. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover funct...

  4. A new approach for pancreatic tissue engineering: human endometrial stem cells encapsulated in fibrin gel can differentiate to pancreatic islet beta-cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknamasl, Azadeh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Azami, Mahmoud; Salmani, Maryam Kabir; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Karimi, Roya; Roozafzoon, Reza; Ai, Jafar

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic diabetes mellitus as the most serious and prevalent metabolic disease in the world has various complications. The most effective treatment of type I diabetes seems to be islet cell transplantation. Shortage of donors and difficult procedures and high rate of rejection have always restricted this approach. Tissue engineering is a novel effective solution to many medical problems such as diabetes. Endometrial mesenchymal stem cells as a lineage which have the potential to differentiate to mesodermal and endodermal tissues seem to be suitable for this purpose. Fibrin hydrogel with a high degree of biocompatibility and specific properties making it similar to normal pancreas seems to be an ideal scaffold. After successfully isolating stem cells (hEnSCs) from human endometrium, a three-step protocol was used to differentiate them into pancreatic beta cells. Fibrin was used as 3D scaffold. After 2 weeks, cells formed clusters like islets cells, and secretion of insulin was measured by chemiluminescence. PDX1, proinsulin, and c-peptide as special markers of β cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Expression of glucagon, PDX1, and insulin genes in mRNA level was detected by Real time PCR and gel electrophoresis. The former showed higher levels of gene expression in 3D cultures. SEM analysis showed good integrity between cells and scaffold. No toxicity was detected with fibrin scaffold by MTT assay.

  5. Derivation and characterization of Chinese human embryonic stem cell line with high potential to differentiate into pancreatic and hepatic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Cheng; SHEN Huan; JIANG Wei; SONG Zhi-hua; WANG Cheng-yan; WEI Li-hui

    2011-01-01

    Background Human embryonic stem cells have prospective uses in regenerative medicine and drug screening. Every human embryonic stem cell line has its own genetic background,which determines its specific ability for differentiation as well as susceptibility to drugs. It is necessary to compile many human embryonic stem cell lines with various backgrounds for future clinical use,especially in China due to its large population. This study contributes to isolating new Chinese human embryonic stem cell lines with clarified directly differentiation ability.Methods Donated embryos that exceeded clinical use in our in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) center were collected to establish human embryonic stem cells lines with informed consent. The classic growth factors of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and recombinant human leukaemia inhibitory factor (hLIF) for culturing embryonic stem cells were used to capture the stem cells from the plated embryos. Mechanical and enzymetic methods were used to propogate the newly established human embryonic stem cells line. The new cell line was checked for pluripotent characteristics with detecting the expression of stemness genes and observing spontaneous differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Finally similar step-wise protocols from definitive endoderm to target specific cells were used to check the cell line's ability to directly differentiate into pancreatic and hepatic cells.Results We generated a new Chinese human embryonic stem cells line,CH1. This cell line showed the same characteristics as other reported Chinese human embryonic stem cells lines:normal morphology,karyotype and pluripotency in vitro and in vivo. The CH1 cells could be directly differentiated towards pancreatic and hepatic cells with equal efficiency compared to the H1 cell line.Conclusions This newly established Chinese cell line,CH1,which is pluripotent and has high potential to differentiate into pancreatic and hepatic cells,will provide

  6. Shikonin promotes autophagy in BXPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    SHI, SHUQING; CAO, HAIMEI

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of shikonin on autophagy in BXPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells and its underlying mechanism. Cell viability was assessed using the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and the expression of light chain (LC) 3, p62, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, phosphorylated (p)-PI3K and p-Akt was analyzed using western blot analysis. Following treatment with 1 μmol/l shikonin for 48 h and 2.5 and 5 μmol/l shikonin for 24 and 48 h, the viability of the BXPC-3...

  7. Accumulation and biological effects of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in human pancreatic and ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašukonienė, Vita; Mlynska, Agata; Steponkienė, Simona; Poderys, Vilius; Matulionytė, Marija; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Statkutė, Urtė; Purvinienė, Rasa; Kraśko, Jan Aleksander; Jagminas, Arūnas; Kurtinaitienė, Marija; Strioga, Marius; Rotomskis, Ričardas

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) emerge as a promising tool for early cancer diagnostics and targeted therapy. However, both toxicity and biological activity of SPIONs should be evaluated in detail. The aim of this study was to synthesize superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Co-SPIONs), and to investigate their uptake, toxicity and effects on cancer stem-like properties in human pancreatic cancer cell line MiaPaCa2 and human ovarian cancer cell line A2780. Co-SPIONs were produced by Massart's co-precipitation method. The cells were treated with Co-SPIONs at three different concentrations (0.095, 0.48, and 0.95μg/mL) for 24 and 48h. Cell viability and proliferation were analyzed after treatment. The stem-like properties of cells were assessed by investigating the cell clonogenicity and expression of cancer stem cell-associated markers, including CD24/ESA in A2780 cell line and CD44/ALDH1 in MiaPaCa2 cell line. Magnetically activated cell sorting was used for the separation of magnetically labeled and unlabeled cells. Both cancer cell lines accumulated Co-SPIONs, however differences in response to nanoparticles were observed between MiaPaCa2 and A2780 cell. In particular, A2780 cells were more sensitive to exposition to Co-SPIONs than MiaPaCa2 cells, indicating that a safe concentration of nanoparticles must be estimated individually for a particular cell type. Higher doses of Co-SPIONs decreased both the clonogenicity and ESA marker expression in A2780 cells. Co-SPIONs are not cytotoxic to cancer cells, at least when used at a concentration of up to 0.95μg/mL. Co-SPIONs have a dose-dependent effect on the clonogenic potential and ESA marker expression in A2780 cells. Magnetic detection of low concentrations of Co-SPIONS in cancer cells is a promising tool for further applications of these nanoparticles in cancer diagnosis and treatment; however, extensive research in this field is needed. Copyright © 2014 Lithuanian University of

  8. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  9. Ion Transport in Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelium, Capan-1 Cells, Is Regulated by Secretin, VIP, Acetylcholine, and Purinergic Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to establish a solid model of polarized epithelium for human pancreatic ducts, where electrical parameters could be measured as indicators of ion transport. Further, we aimed to determine functional expression of several receptors, in particular, puriner......OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to establish a solid model of polarized epithelium for human pancreatic ducts, where electrical parameters could be measured as indicators of ion transport. Further, we aimed to determine functional expression of several receptors, in particular......, purinergic receptors, and determine their effects on ion transport. METHODS: Human adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 cells were grown on permeable supports and set in Ussing chambers for electrophysiological recordings. Transepithelial voltage (Vte), resistance, and short-circuit currents (Isc) were measured...... in response to agonists. RESULTS: Secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), acetylcholine, forskolin, ionomycin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl ATP, and adenosine induced lumen negative Vte and Isc. These changes were consistent with anion...

  10. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic β cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic β cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of β cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair β cell proliferation and induce β cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic β cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive β cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive β cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor β or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected β cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored β cell proliferation, and improved β cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human β cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation. PMID:12060768

  11. Anti-cancer effects of oncolytic viral therapy combined with photodynamic therapy in human pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Yazan S; Wright, Kathleen; Melcher, Alan; Jayne, David

    2015-02-26

    Oncolytic viral therapy and photodynamic therapy are potential therapies for inoperable or advanced pancreatic cancer. Our aim was to investigate the anti-cancer killing effects of reovirus therapy combined with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-mediated photodynamic therapy on a variety of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Pancreatic cancer cell lines (PsPC-1 and BXPC-3) and a non-cancer control cell line (HEK293) were infected with reovirus serotype 3 strain Dearing (T3D) at 0, 0·1, 1, and 10 plaque-forming units (PFU) per cell for 48 h. Cells were incubated with PpIX pro-drug 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 mM for 4 h. Then, cells were photo-irradiated for 15 min with visible red light-emitting diodes with a light-fluence of 0·54 J/cm(2) of 653 nm (PpIX optimal excitation wavelength). The killing effects of reovirus combined with PpIX-mediated photodynamic therapy were analysed in methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The effect of adding reovirus after photodynamic therapy was also assessed. The statistical significance of the difference between groups was assessed with the two-tailed Student's t test. pphotodynamic therapy resulted in a significantly increased cytotoxic effect compared with reovirus monotherapy and photodynamic therapy (p=0·042) with 100% cell death observed across pancreatic cell lines with 10 PFU per cell combined with 1 and 2 mM 5-ALA. There was no difference in cytotoxicity observed between added reovirus before or after photodynamic therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first in-vitro study to combine reovirus oncolytic viral therapy with PpIX-mediated photodynamic therapy to treat pancreatic cancer. These results show a significant additive effect in cell killing and they provide initial evidence for a novel combined therapeutic intervention. National Institute for Health Research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a disease often characterized by recurrent episodes of abdominal pain accompanied by progressive pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency [1] and it sometimes requires multiple hospitalizations. Obstructive jaundice, duodenal stenosis, left-sided portal hypertension, pseudocyst and mass formation, and pancreatic carcinoma may occur as complications of chronic pancreatitis. The disease is frequently the result of chronic alcohol abuse, even if other factors such as genetic alterations, autoimmune disorders, and obstructive disease of the biliary tract and the pancreas may cause the disease [2]. Medical therapy is the treatment of choice for most patients and it is based on substitutive therapy for either exocrine or endocrine insufficiency and on analgesics for pain control. In the presence of intractable pain, surgical management is the main option [3] even if, in recent years, other therapeutic options such as endoscopic therapy [4], thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy [5], and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy have been applied in clinical practice [6]. From a pathological point of view, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irregular sclerosis with destruction and loss of the exocrine parenchyma, and complete replacement of acinar, ductal and endocrine tissue by fibrotic tissue. It has recently been reported that acute alcoholic pancreatitis develops in a pancreas already affected by chronic pancreatitis [7]. In 1982, Watari et al. [8] reported the presence of vitamin A-containing cells in the vitamin A-fed rat pancreas. These were later described and characterized as stellate cells in the rat and the human pancreas [9, 10]. Pancreatic stellate cells are morphologically similar to hepatic stellate cells. They bear long cytoplasmic processes and are situated close to the pancreatic acini. In the quiescent state, these cells contain lipid droplets, store vitamin A and express markers such as desmin, glial

  13. Clinical value of serum human pancreatic elastase 1 level and ribonuclease activity in patients with pancreatic diseases%胰弹力蛋白酶I和核糖核酸酶检测的临床价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    达四平; 徐纬中; 于世远; 赵晓晏; 李宜辉; 郭萍

    2001-01-01

    目的 探讨人胰弹力蛋白酶Ⅰ(Humanpancreaticelastase1,HPE1)放射免疫测定(Radioimmunoassay,RIA)和核糖核酸酶(Ribonuclease,RNase)活性检测的临床价值。方法 参照Satake等建立的改良HPE1RIA和Thomas等的改良酸溶性产物法检测82例正常成年人和222例各类患者血清并分析结果。结果 82例健康成人HPE1值为23.8(3.4ng/L),RNase活性为57.03(12.16μ/ml);急性胰腺炎和胰腺癌HPE1值明显高于其他疾病(P<0.01)。联合检测HPE1、RNase活性可提高胰腺癌的检出率(92.47%)。结论 HPE1RIA对急性胰腺炎有诊断价值,联合检测HPE1、RNase活性检测对胰腺癌诊断有一定的临床价值。%Objective To explore the clinical value of serum human pancreaticelastase 1 (HPE1) level and ribonuclease (RNase) activity in patients with pancreatic diseases. Methods A total of 222 patients were subjected in the study, including 23 of acute pancreatitis, 12 of chronic pancreatitis, 93 of pancreartic cancer, 24 of metastatic cancer of pancreas, 50 of other cancer and 20 of peptic ulcer. Eighty two healthy individuals were served as control. Serum HPE1 level was determind by Satake's modified RIA and RNase activity by Thomas' modified method. Results The serum contents of HPE1 and Rnase were 23.8(3.4 ng/L and 57.03(12.16 μ/ml respectively in 82 normal persons. Serum level of HPE1 was much higher in patients with acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer than in others diseases (P<0.01). Combined detection of serum HPE1 level and Rnase activity increased the positive rate to 92.47% in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Conclusion HPE1RIA has the value for diagnosing acute pancreatitis, and the combined determination of serum HPE1 level and RNase activity is valuable in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Dual Effects of β3 Integrin Subunit Expression on Human Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marchán

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pancreatic cancer, the fifth leading cause of adult cancer death in Western countries, lacks early detection, and displays significant dissemination ability. Accumulating evidence shows that integrin-mediated cell attachment to the extracellular matrix induces phenotypes and signaling pathways that regulate tumor cell growth and migration.

  15. Epigenetic Induction of Definitive and Pancreatic Endoderm Cell Fate in Human Fibroblasts

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    Rangarajan Sambathkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming can occur by the introduction of key transcription factors (TFs as well as by epigenetic changes. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi Trichostatin A (TSA combined with a chromatin remodeling medium (CRM induced expression of a number of definitive endoderm and early and late pancreatic marker genes. When CRM was omitted, endoderm/pancreatic marker genes were not induced. Furthermore, treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi 5-azacytidine (5AZA CRM did not affect gene expression changes, and when 5AZA was combined with TSA, no further increase in gene expression of endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and endocrine markers was seen over levels induced with TSA alone. Interestingly, TSA-CRM did not affect expression of pluripotency and hepatocyte genes but induced some mesoderm transcripts. Upon removal of TSA-CRM, the endoderm/pancreatic gene expression profile returned to baseline. Our findings underscore the role epigenetic modification in transdifferentiation of one somatic cell into another. However, full reprogramming of fibroblasts to β-cells will require combination of this approach with TF overexpression and/or culture of the partially reprogrammed cells under β-cell specific conditions.

  16. Peptide-Conjugated Quantum Dots Act as the Target Marker for Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-ling Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In the present study, we describe a novel and straightforward approach to produce a cyclic- arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD-peptide-conjugated quantum dot (QD probe as an ideal target tumor biomarker. Due to its specific structure, the probe can be used for targeted imaging of pancreatic carcinoma cells. Methods: Pancreatic carcinoma cells were routinely cultured and marked with QD-RGD probe. The QD-RGD probe on the fluorescence-labeled cancer cell was observed by fluorescence microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. Cancer cell viability was detected by MTT assay after culturing with QD-RGD probe. Results: Fluorescence microscopy and laser confocal microscopy displayed that 10nmol/L QD-RGD probe was able to effectively mark pancreatic carcinoma cells. In comparison with organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, the quantum dot-RGD probe had unique optical and electronic properties. Conclusion: QD-RGD probe has a low cytotoxicity with an excellent optical property and biocompatibility. These findings support further evaluation of QD-RGD probes for the early detection of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Volumetric gain of the human pancreas after left partial pancreatic resection: A CT-scan based retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip, Veit; Zahel, Tina; Danninger, Assiye; Erkan, Mert; Dobritz, Martin; Steiner, Jörg M; Kleeff, Jörg; Schmid, Roland M; Algül, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of the pancreas has been well characterized in animal models. However, there are conflicting data on the regenerative capacity of the human pancreas. The aim of the present study was to assess the regenerative capacity of the human pancreas. In a retrospective study, data from patients undergoing left partial pancreatic resection at a single center were eligible for inclusion (n = 185). Volumetry was performed based on 5 mm CT-scans acquired through a 256-slice CT-scanner using a semi-automated software. Data from 24 patients (15 males/9 females) were included. Mean ± SD age was 68 ± 11 years (range, 40-85 years). Median time between surgery and the 1st postoperative CT was 9 days (range, 0-27 days; IQR, 7-13), 55 days (range, 21-141 days; IQR, 34-105) until the 2nd CT, and 191 days (range, 62-1902; IQR, 156-347) until the 3rd CT. The pancreatic volumes differed significantly between the first and the second postoperative CT scans (median volume 25.6 mL and 30.6 mL, respectively; p = 0.008) and had significantly increased further by the 3rd CT scan (median volume 37.9 mL; p = 0.001 for comparison with 1st CT scan and p = 0.003 for comparison with 2nd CT scan). The human pancreas shows a measurable and considerable potential of volumetric gain after partial resection. Multidetector-CT based semi-automated volume analysis is a feasible method for follow-up of the volume of the remaining pancreatic parenchyma after partial pancreatectomy. Effects on exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function have to be evaluated in a prospective manner. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of efficacy of Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and chemotherapy on stem-like and non-stem human pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong,; Maawy, Ali; Hassanein, Mohamed K.; Uehara, Fuminari; MIWA, SHINJI; Yano, Shuya; Momiyama, Masashi; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cell line is dimorphic, with spindle stem-like cells and round non-stem cells. We report here the in vitro IC50 values of stem-like and non-stem XPA1 human pancreatic cells cells for: (1) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (2) cisplatinum (CDDP), (3) gemcitabine (GEM), and (4) tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (A1-R). IC50 values of stem-like XPA1 cells were significantly higher than those of non-stem XPA1 cells for 5-FU (P = 0.007) and CDDP (P = 0.012). In cont...

  19. Characterization of H+ and HCO3- transporters in CFPAC-1 human pancreatic duct cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zoltán Rakonczay Jr; Amy Fearn; Péter Hegyi; Imre Boros; Michael A Gray; Barry E Argent

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize H+ and HCO3- transporters in polarized CFPAC-1 human pancreatic duct cells, which were derived from a cystic fibrosis patient with the AF508 CFTR mutation.METHODS: CFPAC-1 cells were seeded at high density onto permeable supports and grown to confluence. The cells were loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and mounted into a perfusion chamber, which allowed the simultaneous perfusion of the basolateral and apical membranes. Transmembrane base flux was calculated from the changes in intracellular pH and the buffering capacity of the cells.RESULTS: Our results showed differential permeability to HCO3-/CO2 at the apical and basolateral membranes of CFPAC-1 cells. Na+/HCO3- co-transporters (NBCs)and Cl-/HCO3- exchangers (Aes) were present on the basolateral membrane, and Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) on both the apical and basolateral membranes of the cells. Basolateral HCO3- uptake was sensitive to variations of extracellular K+ concentration, the membrane permeable carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors acetazolamide (100 μmol/L) and ethoxyzolamide (100μmol/L), and was partially inhibited by H2-DIDS (600μmol/L). The membrane-impermeable CA inhibitor 1-N-(4-sulfamoylphenylethyl)-2,4,6-trimethylpyridine perchlorate did not have any effect on HCO3- uptake.The basolateral AE had a much higher activity than that in the apical membrane, whereas there was no such difference with the NHE under resting conditions.Also, 10 μmol/L forskolin did not significantly influence Cl-/HCO3- exchange on the apical and basolateral membranes. The administration of 250 μmol/L H2-DIDS significantly inhibited the basolateral AE. Amiloride (300μmol/L) completely inhibited NHEs on both membranes of the cells. RT-PCR revealed the expression of pNBC1,AE2, and NHE1 mRNA.CONCLUSION: These data suggest that apart from the lack of CFTR and apical Cf/HCO3- exchanger activity,CFPAC-1 cells express similar H+ and HCO3- transporters to those observed in native animal

  20. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  1. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or oily stools Pale or clay-colored stools Exams and Tests Tests to diagnose pancreatitis include: Fecal ... in the diet, or as extra supplements Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. ...

  2. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  3. Pancreatic abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000270.htm Pancreatic abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A pancreatic abscess is an area filled with pus within the ...

  4. Ductal pancreatic cancer modeling and drug screening using human pluripotent stem cell and patient-derived tumor organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Holtzinger, Audrey; Jagan, Ishaan; BeGora, Michael; Lohse, Ines; Ngai, Nicholas; Nostro, Cristina; Wang, Rennian; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Crawford, Howard C.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Kalloger, Steve E.; Renouf, Daniel J.; Connor, Ashton A; Cleary, Sean; Schaeffer, David F.; Roehrl, Michael; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gallinger, Steven; Keller, Gordon; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.

    2016-01-01

    There are few in vitro models of exocrine pancreas development and primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We establish three-dimensional culture conditions to induce the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into exocrine progenitor organoids that form ductal and acinar structures in culture and in vivo. Expression of mutant KRAS or TP53 in progenitor organoids induces mutation-specific phenotypes in culture and in vivo. Expression of TP53R175H induced cytosolic SOX9 localization. In patient tumors bearing TP53 mutations, SOX9 was cytoplasmic and associated with mortality. Culture conditions are also defined for clonal generation of tumor organoids from freshly resected PDAC. Tumor organoids maintain the differentiation status, histoarchitecture, phenotypic heterogeneity of the primary tumor, and retain patient-specific physiologic changes including hypoxia, oxygen consumption, epigenetic marks, and differential sensitivity to EZH2 inhibition. Thus, pancreatic progenitor organoids and tumor organoids can be used to model PDAC and for drug screening to identify precision therapy strategies. PMID:26501191

  5. Ductal pancreatic cancer modeling and drug screening using human pluripotent stem cell- and patient-derived tumor organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Holtzinger, Audrey; Jagan, Ishaan; BeGora, Michael; Lohse, Ines; Ngai, Nicholas; Nostro, Cristina; Wang, Rennian; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Crawford, Howard C; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Kalloger, Steve E; Renouf, Daniel J; Connor, Ashton A; Cleary, Sean; Schaeffer, David F; Roehrl, Michael; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gallinger, Steven; Keller, Gordon; Muthuswamy, Senthil K

    2015-11-01

    There are few in vitro models of exocrine pancreas development and primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We establish three-dimensional culture conditions to induce the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into exocrine progenitor organoids that form ductal and acinar structures in culture and in vivo. Expression of mutant KRAS or TP53 in progenitor organoids induces mutation-specific phenotypes in culture and in vivo. Expression of TP53(R175H) induces cytosolic SOX9 localization. In patient tumors bearing TP53 mutations, SOX9 was cytoplasmic and associated with mortality. We also define culture conditions for clonal generation of tumor organoids from freshly resected PDAC. Tumor organoids maintain the differentiation status, histoarchitecture and phenotypic heterogeneity of the primary tumor and retain patient-specific physiological changes, including hypoxia, oxygen consumption, epigenetic marks and differences in sensitivity to inhibition of the histone methyltransferase EZH2. Thus, pancreatic progenitor organoids and tumor organoids can be used to model PDAC and for drug screening to identify precision therapy strategies.

  6. Palmitate activates autophagy in INS-1E β-cells and in isolated rat and human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Martino

    Full Text Available We have investigated the in vitro effects of increased levels of glucose and free fatty acids on autophagy activation in pancreatic beta cells. INS-1E cells and isolated rat and human pancreatic islets were incubated for various times (from 2 to 24 h at different concentrations of glucose and/or palmitic acid. Then, cell survival was evaluated and autophagy activation was explored by using various biochemical and morphological techniques. In INS-1E cells as well as in rat and human islets, 0.5 and 1.0 mM palmitate markedly increased autophagic vacuole formation, whereas high glucose was ineffective alone and caused little additional change when combined with palmitate. Furthermore, LC3-II immunofluorescence co-localized with that of cathepsin D, a lysosomal marker, showing that the autophagic flux was not hampered in PA-treated cells. These effects were maintained up to 18-24 h incubation and were associated with a significant decline of cell survival correlated with both palmitate concentration and incubation time. Ultrastructural analysis showed that autophagy activation, as evidenced by the occurrence of many autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of beta cells, was associated with a diffuse and remarkable swelling of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that among the metabolic alterations typically associated with type 2 diabetes, high free fatty acids levels could play a role in the activation of autophagy in beta cells, through a mechanism that might involve the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  7. Masitinib combined with standard gemcitabine chemotherapy: in vitro and in vivo studies in human pancreatic tumour cell lines and ectopic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Humbert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosine kinases are attractive targets for pancreatic cancer therapy because several are over-expressed, including PDGFRalpha/beta, FAK, Src and Lyn. A critical role of mast cells in the development of pancreatic cancer has also been reported. Masitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively targets c-Kit, PDGFRalpha/beta, Lyn, and to a lesser extent the FAK pathway, without inhibiting kinases of known toxicities. Masitinib is particularly efficient in controlling the proliferation, differentiation and degranulation of mast cells. This study evaluates the therapeutic potential of masitinib in pancreatic cancer, as a single agent and in combination with gemcitabine. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Proof-of-concept studies were performed in vitro on human pancreatic tumour cell lines and then in vivo using a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. Molecular mechanisms were investigated via gene expression profiling. Masitinib as a single agent had no significant antiproliferative activity while the masitinib/gemcitabine combination showed synergy in vitro on proliferation of gemcitabine-refractory cell lines Mia Paca2 and Panc1, and to a lesser extent in vivo on Mia Paca2 cell tumour growth. Specifically, masitinib at 10 microM strongly sensitised Mia Paca2 cells to gemcitabine (>400-fold reduction in IC(50; and moderately sensitised Panc1 cells (10-fold reduction. Transcriptional analysis identified the Wnt/beta-catenin signalling pathway as down-regulated in the cell lines resensitised by the masitinib/gemcitabine combination. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish proof-of-concept that masitinib can sensitise gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer cell lines and warrant further in vivo investigation. Indeed, such an effect has been recently observed in a phase 2 clinical study of patients with pancreatic cancer who received a masitinib/gemcitabine combination.

  8. Whole-Genome Bisulfite Sequencing of Human Pancreatic Islets Reveals Novel Differentially Methylated Regions in Type 2 Diabetes Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Petr; Bacos, Karl; Ofori, Jones K; Esguerra, Jonathan Lou S; Eliasson, Lena; Rönn, Tina; Ling, Charlotte

    2017-04-01

    Current knowledge about the role of epigenetics in type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains limited. Only a few studies have investigated DNA methylation of selected candidate genes or a very small fraction of genomic CpG sites in human pancreatic islets, the tissue of primary pathogenic importance for diabetes. Our aim was to characterize the whole-genome DNA methylation landscape in human pancreatic islets, to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in diabetic islets, and to investigate the function of DMRs in islet biology. Here, we performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, which is a comprehensive and unbiased method to study DNA methylation throughout the genome at a single nucleotide resolution, in pancreatic islets from donors with T2D and control subjects without diabetes. We identified 25,820 DMRs in islets from individuals with T2D. These DMRs cover loci with known islet function, e.g., PDX1, TCF7L2, and ADCY5 Importantly, binding sites previously identified by ChIP-seq for islet-specific transcription factors, enhancer regions, and different histone marks were enriched in the T2D-associated DMRs. We also identified 457 genes, including NR4A3, PARK2, PID1, SLC2A2, and SOCS2, that had both DMRs and significant expression changes in T2D islets. To mimic the situation in T2D islets, candidate genes were overexpressed or silenced in cultured β-cells. This resulted in impaired insulin secretion, thereby connecting differential methylation to islet dysfunction. We further explored the islet methylome and found a strong link between methylation levels and histone marks. Additionally, DNA methylation in different genomic regions and of different transcript types (i.e., protein coding, noncoding, and pseudogenes) was associated with islet expression levels. Our study provides a comprehensive picture of the islet DNA methylome in individuals with and without diabetes and highlights the importance of epigenetic dysregulation in pancreatic islets and T2D

  9. Childhood pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  10. Fibrosis Reduces Severity of Acute-on-Chronic Pancreatitis in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Chathur; Cline, Rachel A.; Jaligama, Deepthi; Noel, Pawan; Delany, James P.; Bae, Kyongtae; Furlan, Alessandro; Baty, Catherine J.; Karlsson, Jenny M.; Rosario, Bedda L; Patel, Krutika; Mishra, Vivek; Durgampudi, Chandra; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) share etiologies, but AP can be more severe and has higher mortality. We investigated features of CP that protect against severity. The amount of intra-pancreatic fat (IPF) is increased in obesity and fibrosis is increased in CP; so we studied whether fibrosis or fat regulate severity of AP attacks in patients with CP. METHODS We reviewed records from the University of Pittsburg Medical Center Autopsy database (1998–2008) for patients with diagnosed AP (n=23), CP (n=35), or both (AP-on-CP; n=15). Pancreatic histology samples from these patients and 50 randomly selected Controls (no pancreatic disease) were analyzed, and IPF data were correlated with computed tomography data. An adipocyte and acinar cell transwell co-culture system, with or without collagen Type-I (collagen-I), was used to study the effects of fibrosis on acinar-adipocyte interactions. We studied the effects of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and adipokines on acinar cells in culture. RESULTS Levels of IPF were significantly higher among non-obese patients with CP than non-obese Controls. In CP or AP-on-CP, areas of IPF were surrounded by significantly more fibrosis than in Controls or patients with AP. Fat necrosis (FN)-associated peri-fat acinar necrosis (PFAN, indicated by NEFA spillage) contributed to most of the necrosis observed in AP samples; however, PFAN and total necrosis were significantly lower in samples from patients with CP and AP-on-CP. Fibrosis appeared to wall off the FN and limit PFAN, reducing acinar necrosis. In vitro, collagen-I limited the lipolytic flux between acinar cells and adipocytes and prevented increases in adipokines in the acinar compartment. This was associated with reduced acinar cell necrosis. However, NEFA, but not adipokines, caused acinar-cell necrosis. CONCLUSIONS Based on analysis of pancreatic samples from patients with CP, AP and AP-on-CP, and in vitro studies, fibrosis reduces the

  11. Telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L limits the lifespan of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina M Burchett

    Full Text Available Telomerase is required for the unlimited lifespan of cancer cells. The vast majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas overexpress telomerase activity and blocking telomerase could limit their lifespan. GRN163L (Imetelstat is a lipid-conjugated N3'→P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide that blocks the template region of telomerase. The aim of this study was to define the effects of long-term GRN163L exposure on the maintenance of telomeres and lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells. Telomere size, telomerase activity, and telomerase inhibition response to GRN163L were measured in a panel of 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The cell lines exhibited large differences in levels of telomerase activity (46-fold variation, but most lines had very short telomeres (2-3 kb in size. GRN163L inhibited telomerase in all 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines, with IC50 ranging from 50 nM to 200 nM. Continuous GRN163L exposure of CAPAN1 (IC50 = 75 nM and CD18 cells (IC50 = 204 nM resulted in an initial rapid shortening of the telomeres followed by the maintenance of extremely short but stable telomeres. Continuous exposure to the drug eventually led to crisis and to a complete loss of viability after 47 (CAPAN1 and 69 (CD18 doublings. Crisis In these cells was accompanied by activation of a DNA damage response (γ-H2AX and evidence of both senescence (SA-β-galactosidase activity and apoptosis (sub-G1 DNA content, PARP cleavage. Removal of the drug after long-term GRN163L exposure led to a reactivation of telomerase and re-elongation of telomeres in the third week of cultivation without GRN163L. These findings show that the lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells can be limited by continuous telomerase inhibition. These results should facilitate the design of future clinical trials of GRN163L in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  12. Telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L) limits the lifespan of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchett, Katrina M; Yan, Ying; Ouellette, Michel M

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase is required for the unlimited lifespan of cancer cells. The vast majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas overexpress telomerase activity and blocking telomerase could limit their lifespan. GRN163L (Imetelstat) is a lipid-conjugated N3'→P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide that blocks the template region of telomerase. The aim of this study was to define the effects of long-term GRN163L exposure on the maintenance of telomeres and lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells. Telomere size, telomerase activity, and telomerase inhibition response to GRN163L were measured in a panel of 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The cell lines exhibited large differences in levels of telomerase activity (46-fold variation), but most lines had very short telomeres (2-3 kb in size). GRN163L inhibited telomerase in all 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines, with IC50 ranging from 50 nM to 200 nM. Continuous GRN163L exposure of CAPAN1 (IC50 = 75 nM) and CD18 cells (IC50 = 204 nM) resulted in an initial rapid shortening of the telomeres followed by the maintenance of extremely short but stable telomeres. Continuous exposure to the drug eventually led to crisis and to a complete loss of viability after 47 (CAPAN1) and 69 (CD18) doublings. Crisis In these cells was accompanied by activation of a DNA damage response (γ-H2AX) and evidence of both senescence (SA-β-galactosidase activity) and apoptosis (sub-G1 DNA content, PARP cleavage). Removal of the drug after long-term GRN163L exposure led to a reactivation of telomerase and re-elongation of telomeres in the third week of cultivation without GRN163L. These findings show that the lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells can be limited by continuous telomerase inhibition. These results should facilitate the design of future clinical trials of GRN163L in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  13. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mika Hori; Michihiro Mutoh; Toshio Imai; Hitoshi Nakagama; Mami Takahashi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mell...

  14. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  15. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  16. Amiloride sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to erlotinib in vitro through inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuan-ting; Yang, Hui-ying; Li, Tao; Zhao, Bei; Shao, Teng-fei; Xiang, Xiao-qiang; Cai, Wei-min

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Blockade of EGFR by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as erlotinib is insufficient for effective treatment of human pancreatic cancer due to independent activation of the Akt pathway, while amiloride, a potassium-sparing diuretic, has been found as a potential Akt inhibitor. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticancer effects of combined amiloride with erlotinib against human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Methods: Cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed in 4 human pancreatic cancer cell lines Bxpc-3, PANC-1, Aspc-1 and CFPAC-1 treated with erlotinib or amiloride alone, or in their combination. The synergistic analysis for the effects of combinations of amiloride and erlotinib was performed using Chou-Talalay's combination index isobolographic method. Results: Amiloride (10, 30, and 100 μmol/L) concentration-dependently potentiated erlotinib-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation in the 4 pancreatic cancer cell lines. Isobolographic analysis confirmed that combinations of amiloride and erlotinib produced synergistic cytotoxic effects. Amiloride significantly potentiated erlotinib-induced G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in Bxpc-3 and PANC-1 cells. Amiloride inhibited EGF-stimulated phorsphorylation of AKT, and significantly enhanced erlotinib-induced downregulation of phorsphorylation of EGFR, AKT, PI3K P85 and GSK 3β in Bxpc-3 and PANC-1 cells. Conclusion: Amiloride sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to erlotinib in vitro through inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Treatment of pancreatic cancer patients with combination of erlotinib and amiloride merits further investigation. PMID:25864651

  17. Melatonin influences somatostatin secretion from human pancreatic δ-cells via MT1 and MT2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibolka, Juliane; Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Peschke, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin is an effector of the diurnal clock on pancreatic islets. The membrane receptor-transmitted inhibitory influence of melatonin on insulin secretion is well established and contrasts with the reported stimulation of glucagon release from α-cells. Virtually, nothing is known concerning the melatonin-mediated effects on islet δ-cells. Analysis of a human pancreatic δ-cell model, the cell line QGP-1, and the use of a somatostatin-specific radioimmunoassay showed that melatonin primarily has an inhibitory effect on somatostatin secretion in the physiological concentration range. In the pharmacological range, melatonin elicited slightly increased somatostatin release from δ-cells. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is the major second messenger dose-dependently stimulating somatostatin secretion, in experiments employing the membrane-permeable 8-Br-cAMP. 8-Br-cyclic guanosine monophosphate proved to be of only minor relevance to somatostatin release. As the inhibitory effect of 1 nm melatonin was reversed after incubation of QGP-1 cells with the nonselective melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole, but not with the MT2-selective antagonist 4-P-PDOT (4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline), an involvement of the MT1 receptor can be assumed. Somatostatin release from the δ-cells at low glucose concentrations was significantly inhibited during co-incubation with 1 nm melatonin, an effect which was less pronounced at higher glucose levels. Transient expression experiments, overexpressing MT1, MT2, or a deletion variant as a control, indicated that the MT1 and not the MT2 receptor was the major transmitter of the inhibitory melatonin effect. These data point to a significant influence of melatonin on pancreatic δ-cells and on somatostatin release.

  18. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-12-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  19. Pegylated arginine deiminase synergistically increases the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Daylami, Rouzbeh; Muilenburg, Diego J.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Bold, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has proven to be one of the most chemo-resistant among all solid organ malignancies. Several mechanisms of resistance have been described, though few reports of strategies to overcome this chemo-resistance have been successful in restoring sensitivity to the primary chemotherapy (gemcitabine) and enter the clinical treatment arena. Methods We examined the ability of cellular arginine depletion through treatment with PEG-ADI to alter in vitro and in ...

  20. Demonstration and immunochemical characterization of carcinoembryonic antigen in human pancreatic juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, R P; Kupchik, H Z; Saravis, C A; Broitman, S A; Gregg, J A; Zamcheck, N

    1976-05-01

    Pancreatic juice collected from 10 patients without evidence of malignant disease of the pancreas or other organs was pooled, extracted, and fractionated by Sepharose 6-B and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) activity in the material was demonstrated and studied by: a) radioimmunoassay, b) competitive binding to antibodies against CEA, c) precipitin inhibition, and d) Ouchterlony analysis. The immunochemical identity of the active material to CEA purified from liver metastases of colon cancer was demonstrated.

  1. Paeoniflorin inhibits human pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis via suppression of MMP-9 and ERK signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Nanmu; Cui, Hong; Han, Feng; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Tao; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Jinxue

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin exhibits anticancer, anti-inflammatory and antioxidation effects, as well as specific pharmacological effects on smooth muscle and the immune, cardiovascular and central nervous systems. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effects of paeoniflorin on pancreatic cancer cells and to elucidate the mechanisms by which these effects occur. In the present study, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays were performed...

  2. The inhibitory effects of xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone derived from hops, on cell growth and tumorigenesis in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiliang; Zhao, Senlin; Xu, Ling; Lu, Yingying; Lu, Zhanjun; Chen, Congying; Ni, Jianbo; Wan, Rong; Yang, Lijuan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal human malignancies worldwide. Here, we demonstrated that xanthohumol (XN), the most abundant prenylated chalcone isolated from hops, inhibited the growth of cultured PC cells and their subcutaneous xenograft tumors. XN treatment was found to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of PC cells (PANC-1, BxPC-3) by inhibiting phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and expression of its downstream targeted genes cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-xL at the messenger RNA level, which involved in regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle. Overall, our results suggested that XN presents a promising candidate therapeutic agent against human PC and the STAT3 signaling pathway is its key molecular target.

  3. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing the non-tandem repeat regions of the human mucin MUC4 in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Jain

    Full Text Available The MUC4 mucin is a high molecular weight, membrane-bound, and highly glycosylated protein. It is a multi-domain protein that is putatively cleaved into a large mucin-like subunit (MUC4α and a C-terminal growth-factor like subunit (MUC4β. MUC4 plays critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions and is aberrantly overexpressed in several cancers, including those of the pancreas, cervix, breast and lung. It is also a potential biomarker for the diagnosis, prognosis and progression of several malignancies. Further, MUC4 plays diverse functional roles in cancer initiation and progression as evident from its involvement in oncogenic transformation, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, motility and invasion, and resistance to chemotherapy in human cancer cells. We have previously generated a monoclonal antibody 8G7, which is directed against the TR region of MUC4, and has been extensively used to study the expression of MUC4 in several malignancies. Here, we describe the generation of anti-MUC4 antibodies directed against the non-TR regions of MUC4. Recombinant glutathione-S-transferase (GST-fused MUC4α fragments, both upstream (MUC4α-N-Ter and downstream (MUC4α-C-Ter of the TR domain, were used as immunogens to immunize BALB/c mice. Following cell fusion, hybridomas were screened using the aforementioned recombinant proteins ad lysates from human pancreatic cell lines. Three anti MUC4α-N-Ter and one anti-MUC4α-C-Ter antibodies were characterized by several inmmunoassays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, immunoblotting, immunofluorescene, flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation using MUC4 expressing human pancreatic cancer cell lines. The antibodies also reacted with the MUC4 in human pancreatic tumor sections in immunohistochemical analysis. The new domain-specific anti-MUC4 antibodies will serve as important reagents to study the structure-function relationship of MUC4 domains and for the development of MUC4

  5. Expression of cell cycle regulator p57kip2, cyclinE protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human pancreatic cancer: An immunohistochemical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yue; Hui-Yong Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of p57kip2, cyclinE protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) on occurrence and progression of human pancreatic cancer.METHODS: The expression of p57kip2, cyclinE protein and PCNA in tumor tissues and adjacent tissues from 32patients with pancreatic cancer was detected by SP immunohistochemical technique.RESULTS: The positive expression rate of p57kip2 protein in tumor tissues was 46.9%, which was lower than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 5.317, P<0.05). P57kip2protein positive expression remarkably correlated with tumor cell differentiation (P<0.05), but not with lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). The positive expression rate of cyclinE protein in tumor tissues was 68.8%, which was higher than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 4.063,P<0.05). CyclinE protein positive expression significantly correlated with tumor cell differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). The positive expression rate of PCNA in the tumor tissues was 71.9%, which was higher than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 5.189, P<0.05).PCNA positive expression remarkably correlated with tumor cell differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The decreased expression of p57kip2 and/or overexpression of cyclinE protein and PCNA may contribute to the occurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer.p57kip2, cyclinE protein, and PCNA play an important role in occurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  7. Overexpressed EDIL3 predicts poor prognosis and promotes anchorage-independent tumor growth in human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ming-Xuan; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Mei; He, Ping; Tian, Guang-Ang; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Li, Qing; Cao, Xiao-Yan; Huo, Yan-Miao; Yang, Min-Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Li, Jiao; Liu, De-Jun; Dai, Miao; Wen, Shan-Yun; Gu, Jian-Ren; Hong, Jie; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor-like repeats and Discoidin I-Like Domains 3 (EDIL3), an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein associated with vascular morphogenesis and remodeling, is commonly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and correlates with tumor progression. However, its expression pattern and underlying cellular functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain largely unexplored. In current study, we observed that expression of EDIL3 was significantly up-regulated in PDAC compared with normal controls in both cell lines and clinical specimens. In addition, elevated EDIL3 expression was positively correlated with patients’ TNM stage and T classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high EDIL3 expression was significantly associated with shorter overall survival times in PDAC patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed EDIL3 expression, age, lymph node metastasis and histological differentiation as independent prognostic factors in PDAC. Knockdown of EDIL3 showed no significant influence on cell viability, migration, invasion and starvation-induced apoptosis, but compromised anoikis resistance and anchorage independent tumor growth of PDAC cells. Meanwhile, treatment with recombinant EDIL3 protein markedly promoted anoikis resistance and anchorage independent tumor growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that altered protein expression of Bcl-2 family might contribute to the oncogenic activities of EDIL3. In conclusion, this study provides evidences that EDIL3 is a potential predictor and plays an important role in anchorage independent tumor growth of PDAC and EDIL3-related pathways might represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26735172

  8. Calcitriol enhances gemcitabine antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo by promoting apoptosis in a human pancreatic carcinoma model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Dong; Ma, Yingyu; Flynn, Geraldine; Muindi, Josephia R; Kong, Rui-Xian; Trump, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the standard care chemotherapeutic agent to treat pancreatic cancer. Previously we demonstrated that calcitriol (1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) has significant anti-proliferative effects in vitro and in vivo in multiple tumor models and enhances the activity of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. We therefore investigated whether calcitriol could potentiate the cytotoxic activity of gemcitabine in the human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 model system. Isobologram analysis revealed that calcitriol and gemcitabine had synergistic antiproliferative effect over a wide range of drug concentrations. Calcitriol did not reduce the cytidine deaminase activity in Capan-1 tumors nor in the livers of Capan-1 tumor bearing mice. Calcitriol and gemcitabine combination promoted apoptosis in Capan-1 cells compared with either agent alone. The combination treatment also increased the activation of caspases-8, -9, -6 and -3 in Capan-1 cells. This result was confirmed by substrate-based caspase activity assay. Akt phosphorylation was reduced by calcitriol and gemcitabine combination treatment compared to single agent treatment. However, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was not modulated by either agent alone or by the combination. Tumor regrowth delay studies showed that calcitriol in combination with gemcitabine resulted in a significant reduction of Capan-1 tumor volume compared to single agent treatment. Our study suggests that calcitriol and gemcitabine in combination promotes caspase-dependent apoptosis, which may contribute to increased anti-tumor activity compared to either agent alone. PMID:20699664

  9. Human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells were differentiated into pancreatic endocrine cell by Pdx-1 electrotransfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc Thi-My Nguyen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 1 is an autoimmune disease with high incidence in adolescents and young adults. A seductive approach overcomes normally obstacles treatment is cell-replacement therapy to endogenous insulin production. At the present, to get enough pancreatic endocrine cells (PECs in cell transplantation, differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs into IPCs is an interesting and promising strategy. This study aimed to orient umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (UCB-MSCs to PECs by Pdx-1 electrotransfer. UCB-MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord blood according to published protocol. Pdx-1 was isolated and cloned into a plasmid vector. Optimal voltage of an electrotransfer was investigated to improve the cell viability and gene transfection efficacy. The results showed that 200V of the electrotransfer significantly increased in the efficiency of electrotransfer and survival cells compared with other high voltages (350V and 550V. Pdx-1 successfully transfected UCB-MSCs over-expressed pancreatic related genes as Ngn3, Nkx6.1. These results suggested that Pdx-1 transfected UCB-MSCs were successfully oriented PECs. Different to lentiviral vectors, electrotransfer is a safer method to transfer Pdx-1 to UCB-MSCs and a useful tool in translational research. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(2.000: 50-56

  10. Downregulation of Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity Onset Diabetes of Young Pathways in Human Pancreatic Islets from Hyperglycemic Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Taneera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several molecular pathways have been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D pathogenesis, it is uncertain which pathway has the most implication on the disease. Changes in the expression of an entire pathway might be more important for disease pathogenesis than changes in the expression of individual genes. To identify the molecular alterations in T2D, DNA microarrays of human pancreatic islets from donors with hyperglycemia n=20 and normoglycemia n=58 were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA. About 178 KEGG pathways were investigated for gene expression changes between hyperglycemic donors compared to normoglycemic. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY pathways are downregulated in hyperglycemic donors, while proteasome and spliceosome pathways are upregulated. The mean centroid of gene expression of T2DM and MODY pathways was shown to be associated positively with insulin secretion and negatively with HbA1c level. To conclude, downregulation of T2DM and MODY pathways is involved in islet function and might be involved in T2D. Also, the study demonstrates that gene expression profiles from pancreatic islets can reveal some of the biological processes related to regulation of glucose hemostats and diabetes pathogenesis.

  11. Chmp 1A is a mediator of the anti-proliferative effects of All-trans Retinoic Acid in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Hanh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently have shown that Charged multivesicular protein/Chromatin modifying protein1A (Chmp1A functions as a tumor suppressor in human pancreatic tumor cells. Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all cancers with a dismal 5-year survival rate. Preclinical studies using ATRA for treating human pancreatic cancer suggest this compound might be useful for treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. However, the molecular mechanism by which ATRA inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells is not clear. The objective of our study was to investigate whether Chmp1A is involved in ATRA-mediated growth inhibition of human pancreatic tumor cells. Results We performed microarray studies using HEK 293T cells and discovered that Chmp1A positively regulated Cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP-1. CRBP-1 is a key regulator of All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA through ATRA metabolism and nuclear localization. Since our microarray data indicates a potential involvement of Chmp1A in ATRA signaling, we tested this hypothesis by treating pancreatic tumor cells with ATRA in vitro. In the ATRA-responsive cell lines, ATRA significantly increased the protein expression of Chmp1A, CRBP-1, P53 and phospho-P53 at serine 15 and 37 position. We found that knockdown of Chmp1A via shRNA abolished the ATRA-mediated growth inhibition of PanC-1 cells. Also, Chmp1A silencing diminished the increase of Chmp1A, P53 and phospho-P53 protein expression induced by ATRA. In the ATRA non-responsive cells, ATRA did not have any effect on the protein level of Chmp1A and P53. Chmp1A over-expression, however, induced growth inhibition of ATRA non-responsive cells, which was accompanied by an increase of Chmp1A, P53 and phospho-P53. Interestingly, in ATRA responsive cells Chmp1A is localized to the nucleus, which became robust upon ATRA treatment. In the ATRA-non-responsive cells, Chmp1A was mainly translocated to the plasma membrane upon ATRA treatment. Conclusion

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  13. Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells Induce a MyD88-Dependent Stromal Response to Promote a Tumor-Tolerant Immune Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitto, Daniel; Delitto, Andrea E; DiVita, Bayli B; Pham, Kien; Han, Song; Hartlage, Emily R; Newby, Brittney N; Gerber, Michael H; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; George, Thomas J; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E; Liu, Chen; Trevino, Jose G; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cells exert mastery over the local tumor-associated stroma (TAS) to configure protective immunity within the tumor microenvironment. The immunomodulatory character of pancreatic lysates of patients with cancer differs from those with pancreatitis. In this study, we evaluated the cross-talk between pancreatic cancer and its TAS in primary human cell culture models. Upon exposure of TAS to pancreatic cancer cell-conditioned media, we documented robust secretion of IL6 and IL8. This TAS response was MyD88-dependent and sufficient to directly suppress both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, inducing Th17 polarization at the expense of Th1. We found that patients possessed a similar shift in circulating effector memory Th17:Th1 ratios compared with healthy controls. The TAS response also directly suppressed CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Overall, our results demonstrate how TAS contributes to the production of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Res; 77(3); 672-83. ©2016 AACR.

  14. INHIBITION OF ACTIVATED K-RAS GENE BY SIRNA EXPRESSION CASSETTES IN HUMAN PANCREATIC CARCINOMA CELL LINE MIAPACA-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WANG Chun-you; DONG Ji-hua; CHEN Xiong; ZHANG Min; ZHAO Gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To construct the small interfering RNA(siRNA) expression cassettes (SECs) targeting activated K-ras gene sequence and investigate the effects of SECs on K-ras gene in human pancreatic cancer cell line MIAPaCa-2. Methods: Three different sites of SECs were constructed by PCR. The K1/siRNA, K2/siRNA and K3/siRNA were located at the site 194, 491 and 327, respectively. They were transfected into MiaPaCa-2 cells by liposome to inhibit the expression of activated K-ras. In the interfering groups of site 194,491, we observed the cytopathic effect of confluent MiaPaCa-2 cells after they were incubated for 48 hours, and detected the apoptosis in cells by FACS, then we tested the alternation of K-ras gene in confluent MiaPaCa-2 cells by RT-PCR,immunofluorescence and western blot, respectively. Results: Introductions of the K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA against K-ras into MiaPaCa-2 cells led to cytopathic effect, slower proliferation and increased apoptosis, while the appearances of control MiaPaCa-2 cells remained well. The number of apoptotic cells increased compared with control cells. RT-PCR,immunofluorescence and western blot showed the effects of inhibited expression of activated K-ras gene by RNA interference in the K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA groups. We also found that the introduction of K3/siRNA had no effect on MiaPaCa-2 cells. Conclusion: K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA can inhibit the expression of activated K-ras and decrease the growth of MiaPaCa-2 cells, while K3/siRNA has no such effect, demonstrating that the suppression of tumor growth by siRNA is sequence-specific. We conclude that K-ras is involved in maintenance of tumor growth of human pancreatic cancer, and SECs against K-ras expression may be a powerful tool to be used therapeutically against human pancreatic cancer.

  15. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer.

  16. Glucose-induced β cell production of IL-1β contributes to glucotoxicity in human pancreatic islets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Sergeev, Pavel; Ris, Frédéric; Oberholzer, José; Joller-Jemelka, Helen I.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Kaiser, Nurit; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia is suggested to be detrimental to pancreatic β cells, causing impaired insulin secretion. IL-1β is a proinflammatory cytokine acting during the autoimmune process of type 1 diabetes. IL-1β inhibits β cell function and promotes Fas-triggered apoptosis in part by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Recently, we have shown that increased glucose concentrations also induce Fas expression and β cell apoptosis in human islets. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that IL-1β may mediate the deleterious effects of high glucose on human β cells. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels resulted in increased production and release of IL-1β, followed by NF-κB activation, Fas upregulation, DNA fragmentation, and impaired β cell function. The IL-1 receptor antagonist protected cultured human islets from these deleterious effects. β cells themselves were identified as the islet cellular source of glucose-induced IL-1β. In vivo, IL-1β–producing β cells were observed in pancreatic sections of type 2 diabetic patients but not in nondiabetic control subjects. Similarly, IL-1β was induced in β cells of the gerbil Psammomys obesus during development of diabetes. Treatment of the animals with phlorizin normalized plasma glucose and prevented β cell expression of IL-1β. These findings implicate an inflammatory process in the pathogenesis of glucotoxicity in type 2 diabetes and identify the IL-1β/NF-κB pathway as a target to preserve β cell mass and function in this condition. PMID:12235117

  17. Pancreatic stellate cells are an important source of MMP-2 in human pancreatic cancer and accelerate tumor progression in a murine xenograft model and CAM assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhan, Wilhelm; Diaz, Fredy; Fundel, Martin; Zhou, Shaoxia; Siech, Marco; Hasel, Cornelia; Möller, Peter; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Seufferlein, Thomas; Gress, Thomas; Adler, Guido; Bachem, Max G

    2007-02-01

    The effect of the characteristic desmoplastic reaction of pancreatic cancer on tumor progression is largely unknown. We investigated whether pancreatic stellate cells, which are responsible for the desmoplastic reaction, support tumor progression. Immunohistology revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), which is suggested to promote pancreatic cancer progression, is present in stellate cells adjacent to cancer cells. In vitro, stellate cells exhibited a much higher basal expression of MMP-2 compared with cancer cells. Panc1-, MiaPaCa2- and SW850-conditioned media stimulated MMP-2 release of stellate cells as detected by zymography. Cancer cells expressed and released basigin [BSG, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), CD147], a glycoprotein that is known to stimulate MMP-2 in mesenchymal cells, as detected by immunostaining, western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tumor cell-conditioned medium and BSG purified by affinity chromatography from supernatants of cancer cells, but not supernatants depleted from BSG, stimulated expression of MMP-1 and MMP-2 of stellate cells as demonstrated by western blot and zymography. Moreover, the interaction of stellate cells and cancer cells promoted the invasiveness of Panc-1 cells in the chorioallantoic membrane assay and increased the weight of tumors induced by all carcinoma cell lines in nude mice by 2.1-3.7-fold. Our findings support the assumption that the interaction of stellate cells and cancer cells promotes progression of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Pancreatic Juice Culture in Acute Pancreatitis and Other Pancreatic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Kikuyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively evaluated the results of pancreatic juice cultures of patients with acute pancreatitis and other pancreatic disorders. Methods Twenty patients who underwent pancreatic juice culture were studied. Nine had acute pancreatitis due to alcohol (n=5, idiopathic causes (n=2, drugs (n=1, or gallstones (n=1, and remaining 11 had other pancreatic disorders such as an intraductal papillary mucin-producing neoplasm (n=3 and main pancreatic duct dilatation with a stricture due to a tumorous lesion suspected of pancreatic cancer (n=7 or chronic pancreatitis (n=1 without symptoms. Nasopancreatic drainage tubes were placed for pancreatic duct drainage in acute pancreatitis and for pancreatic juice cytology in other disorders. Pancreatic juice was obtained through the drainage tube and cultured. Results Pancreatic juice cultures were positive in all patients with acute pancreatitis for Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus species, and others. Six among 11 patients (54.5% with other disorders showed positive results for Escherichia coli, Streptococcus salivarius, and others. The rate of positive pancreatic juice cultures was significantly higher in acute pancreatitis (p=0.038. Seven of the 9 patients with acute pancreatitis were classified as having severe acute pancreatitis, and all survived treatment. Conclusions Pancreatic juice culture was highly positive in acute pancreatitis. Further study is needed to confirm the relationship between orally indigenous bacteria identified in the pancreatic juice and acute pancreatitis.

  19. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child ... pancreatitis will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are ...

  20. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  1. Reduced insulin exocytosis in human pancreatic β-cells with gene variants linked to type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, Anders H; Braun, Matthias; Mahdi, Taman;

    2012-01-01

    The majority of genetic risk variants for type 2 diabetes (T2D) affect insulin secretion, but the mechanisms through which they influence pancreatic islet function remain largely unknown. We functionally characterized human islets to determine secretory, biophysical, and ultrastructural features...... in relation to genetic risk profiles in diabetic and nondiabetic donors. Islets from donors with T2D exhibited impaired insulin secretion, which was more pronounced in lean than obese diabetic donors. We assessed the impact of 14 disease susceptibility variants on measures of glucose sensing, exocytosis......, and structure. Variants near TCF7L2 and ADRA2A were associated with reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion, whereas susceptibility variants near ADRA2A, KCNJ11, KCNQ1, and TCF7L2 were associated with reduced depolarization-evoked insulin exocytosis. KCNQ1, ADRA2A, KCNJ11, HHEX/IDE, and SLC2A2 variants...

  2. Enhanced therapeutic effects for human pancreatic cancer by application K-ras and IGF-IR antisense oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Mei Shen; Xiao-Chun Yang; Chen Yang; Jun-Kang Shen

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the combined effects of K-ras antisense oligodeoxynucleotide(K-ras ASODN)specific to GTT point mutation at codon 12 and type I insulin-like growth factor receptor(IGF-IR)antisense oligodeoxynucleotide(IGF-IR ASODN)on proliferation and apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer Patu8988 cells in vitro and in vivo.METHODS:K-ras gene point mutation and its style at codon 12 of human pancreatic cancer cell line Patu8988 were detected by using polymerase chain reaction with special sequence primers(PCR-SSP)and sequence analysis.According to the mutation style,K-ras mutation ASODN specific to K-ras point mutation at codon 12 was designed and composed.After K-ras ASODN and IGF-IR ASODN treated on Patu8988 cells respectively or cooperatively,the proliferation and morphological change of Patu8988 cells were analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-y1)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT)assay,colony forming assay and transmission electron microscopy;the expression of K-ras and IGF-IR mRNA and protein in the treated cells was measured by reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)and flow cytometry respectively;apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry.The combined antitumor activity of K-ras ASODN and IGFIR ASODN was evaluated in BALB/C nude mice bearing human pancreatic cancer inoculated with Patu8988 cells.RESULTS:The results of PCR-SSP and sequence analysis showed that the human Dancreatic cancer cell line Patu8988 had point mutation at coclon 12,and the mutation style was GGT→GTT.2-32 μg/mL K-ras ASODN and 2-32 μg/mL IGF-IR ASODN could inhibit Patu8988 cells' growth,induce apoptosis and decrease the expression of K-ras and IGF-IR mRNA and protein alone.However,there was much more effective inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis by their combination than by each one alone.In tumor bearing mice,the combination of K-ras ASODN and IGF-IR ASODN showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of transplanted pancreatic cancer,resulting in

  3. Metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in cultured human bronchus and pancreatic duct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    The metabolism of two carcinogenic polynuclear aro matic hydrocarbons, benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, was studied in expiants of human pancreatic duct and bronchus cultured in a chemically defined medium. In cultured human bronchial mucosa, activity of aryl hydrocarbon...... hydroxylase was inducible by both benz[a]anthracene and BP. Prior exposure of the bronchial expiants to benz[a]anthracene altered the qualitative features of the metabolite profile of BP as analyzed by highpressure liquid chromatography. The metabolite profiles of BP produced by normal-appearing bronchi from...... cochromatographed with both the 9,10-diol and a triol of BP. 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene was bound to the DMA of cultured human bronchial cells at higher levels than was BP. Binding of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene to DMA in human pancreatic duct was consistently less than that in cultured bronchi in the 5...

  4. Role of tumor endothelium in CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell infiltration of human pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummer, Daniel; Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Bonertz, Andreas; Galindo, Luis; Antolovich, Dalibor; Koch, Moritz; Büchler, Markus; Weitz, Jürgen; Schirrmacher, Volker; Beckhove, Philipp

    2007-08-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have been detected in human carcinomas and may play a role in preventing the rejection of malignant cells. We quantified Treg cells and the expression of the addressins and the respective ligands that attract them in blood and in human pancreatic tumors and adjacent nonmalignant tissues from 47 patients. The capacity of Treg cells to adhere to and transmigrate through autologous endothelial cells was tested in vitro using spheroid adhesion assays and in vivo using a xenotransplant NOD/SCID model and in the presence and absence of antibodies to addressins. All statistical tests were two-sided. More Treg cells infiltrated pancreatic carcinomas than adjacent nonmalignant pancreatic tissues (120 cells per mm2 versus 80 cells per mm2, difference = 40 cells per mm2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.2 cells per mm2 to 52.1 cells per mm2; P<.001). In contrast to conventional CD4+ T cells, more blood-derived Treg cells adhered to (1.0% versus 5.2%, difference = 4.2%, 95% CI = 2.7% to 5.6%; P<.001) and transmigrated through (3332 cells versus 4976 cells, difference = 1644 cells, 95% CI = 708 cells to 2580 cells; P = .008) autologous tumor-derived endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo (458 cells versus 605 cells, difference = 147 cells, 95% CI = 50.8 to 237.2 cells; P = .04). Tumor-derived endothelial cells expressed higher levels of addressins--including mucosal adressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), CD62-E, and CD166--than endothelial cells from normal tissue. Experiments using antibodies to addressins showed that transmigration was mediated by interactions of addressins, including MAdCAM-1, VCAM-1, CD62-E, and CD166 with their respective ligands, beta7 integrin, CD62L, and CD166, which were expressed specifically on Treg cells. Tumor-induced expression of addressins on the surface of endothelial cells allows a selective transmigration of Treg cells from peripheral blood to tumor tissues.

  5. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  6. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhai Ren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone, H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone, and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes. The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes.

  7. Lupeol inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer PCNA-1 cells through AKT/ERK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Bi, Tingting; Wang, Gang; Dai, Wei; Wu, Guoliang; Qian, Liqiang; Gao, Quangen; Shen, Genhai

    2015-03-01

    Lupeol, a dietary triterpene, present in many fruits and medicinal plants, has been reported to possess many pharmacological properties including anti-cancer activities both in vitro and in vivo. However, the precise mechanism involved remains largely unknown. The present study is conducted to investigate the anti-cancer activity and the underlying mechanisms of lupeol on human pancreatic cancer proliferating cell nuclear antigen 1 (PCNA-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Lupeol significantly inhibited the proliferation of the cells in dose- and time-dependent manners and induced apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase by upregulating P21 and P27 and downregulating cyclin D1. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins in cells was evaluated by western blot analysis, and we found that lupeol induced cell apoptosis by decreasing the levels of p-AKT and p-ERK. In addition, pretreatment with a specific PI3K/AKT activator (IGF-1) significantly neutralized the pro-apoptotic activity of lupeol in PCNA-1 cells, demonstrating the important role of AKT in this process. More importantly, our in vivo studies showed that administration of lupeol decreased tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated the downregulation of p-AKT and p-ERK in tumor tissues following lupeol treatment, consistent with the in vitro results. Therefore, these findings indicate that lupeol can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest of PCNA-1 cells and might offer a therapeutic potential advantage for human pancreatic cancer chemoprevention or chemotherapy.

  8. Use of RGD-Functionalized Sandwich Cultures to Promote Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Beta Cells After In Vitro Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloy-Reverté, Caterina; Moreno-Amador, José L; Nacher, Montserrat; Montanya, Eduard; Semino, Carlos E

    2017-08-31

    Islet transplantation has provided proof of concept that cell therapy can restore normoglycemia in patients with diabetes. However, limited availability of islet tissue severely restricts the clinical use of the treatment. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new strategies to generate an abundant source of insulin-producing cells that could be used to treat diabetes. A potential approach is the in vitro expansion of pancreatic beta cells obtained from cadaveric organ donors. However, when human beta cells are expanded in vitro, they dedifferentiate and lose the expression of insulin, probably as a consequence of pancreatic islet dissociation into single cells. We have studied whether reestablishment of cell-cell and cell-matrix relationships with a biomimetic synthetic scaffold could induce redifferentiation of expanded dedifferentiated beta cells. Cells isolated from human islet preparations were expanded in monolayer cultures and allowed to reaggregate into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). Afterward, ICCs were embedded between two thin layers of the noninstructive self-assembling peptide (SAP), RAD16-I or RAD16-I functionalized with the integrin-binding motif RGD (RAD16-I/RGD) (R: arginine, G: glycine, D: aspartic acid), which was expected to promote cell-extracellular matrix interactions. ICCs cultured with RAD16-I were viable, maintained their cluster conformation, and increased in size by aggregation of ICCs, suggesting a self-organizing process. ICCs cultured in RAD16-I/RGD showed enhanced cell adhesion to RAD16-I matrix and reexpression of the beta cell-specific genes, Ins, Pdx1, Nkx6.1, and MafA. Redifferentiation was caused solely by bioactive cues introduced to the RAD16-I peptide since no differentiation factors were added to the culture medium. The results indicate that RGD-functionalized SAP in sandwich conformation is a promising three-dimensional platform to induce redifferentiation toward a beta cell phenotype and to generate insulin

  9. HDAC inhibitors, MS-275 and salermide, potentiates the anticancer effect of EF24 in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yar Saglam, Atiye Seda; Yilmaz, Akin; Onen, Hacer Ilke; Alp, Ebru; Kayhan, Handan; Ekmekci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a major role in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression by changing acetylation status of histone and non-histone proteins. MS-275 (entinostat, MS) is a well-known benzamide-based HDACI and Salermide (SAL), a reverse amide compound HDACI, have antiproliferative effects on several human cancer cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of HDACIs (MS and SAL) alone and/or combined use with EF24 (EF), a novel synthetic curcumin analog, on human pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3). In vitro, BxPC-3 cells were exposed to varying concentrations of MS, SAL with or without EF, and their effects on cell viability, acetylated Histone H3 and H4 levels, cytotoxicity, and cleaved caspase 3 levels, and cell cycle distribution were measured. The viability of BxPC-3 cells decreased significantly after treatment with EF, MS and SAL treatments. MS and SAL treatment increased the acetylation of histone H3 and H4 in a dose dependent manner. MS and SAL alone or combined with EF were increased the number of cells in G1 phase. In addition, treatment with agents significantly decreased the ratio of cell in G2/M phase. There were significant dose-dependent increases at cleaved Caspase 3 levels after MS treatment but not after SAL treatment. Our results showed that HDAC inhibitors (MS and SAL), when combined with EF, may effectively reduce pancreatic cancer cell (BxPC-3) progression and stop the cell cycle at G1 phase. Further molecular analyses are needed to understand the fundamental molecular consequences of HDAC inhibition in pancreas cancer cells. PMID:27330528

  10. THE CYTOTOXIC EFFECTS OF CRUDE BILE ON HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To identify effects of bile acids on pancreatic cancer, The ultrastructure and growth of PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cell lines in crude bile modified medium were studied. Methods The growth of PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells in RPMI 1640 with or without 1%, 2% and 4% of the purified crude bile (containing total bile acids 10.17mmol/L) was assessed for 2, 4, 6, 8d by using MTT assay to determine inhibitory rate. The cell surface and intracellular ultrastructure of PANC-1 cells was investigated by SEM and TEM at 24h and 48h, respectively. Re sults The proliferation of both cell lines in bile treated medium were greatly retarded (P <0.001). The inhibitory rate of 1%, 2% and 4% bile on Panc-1 cells in 4d were 38%, 60% and 66%, respectively (P <0. 05), on MIA PaCa-2 cells at 4d were 28%, 39% and 52%, respectively (P <0. 05). The cells grown in bile for 48h lost their mi crovilli, their mitochondria and other organelles became vacuolated. Conclusion The bile acids in bile has cytotoxicity on PANC-1 and MIAPACA-2 cells, which may inhibit pancreatic cancer progress in patients clinically.

  11. Evaluation of the Significance of Starch Surface Binding Sites on Human Pancreatic α-Amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Caner, Sami; Kwan, Emily; Li, Chunmin; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-11-01

    Starch provides the major source of caloric intake in many diets. Cleavage of starch into malto-oligosaccharides in the gut is catalyzed by pancreatic α-amylase. These oligosaccharides are then further cleaved by gut wall α-glucosidases to release glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. Potential surface binding sites for starch on the pancreatic amylase, distinct from the active site of the amylase, have been identified through X-ray crystallographic analyses. The role of these sites in the degradation of both starch granules and soluble starch was probed by the generation of a series of surface variants modified at each site to disrupt binding. Kinetic analysis of the binding and/or cleavage of substrates ranging from simple maltotriosides to soluble starch and insoluble starch granules has allowed evaluation of the potential role of each such surface site. In this way, two key surface binding sites, on the same face as the active site, are identified. One site, containing a pair of aromatic residues, is responsible for attachment to starch granules, while a second site featuring a tryptophan residue around which a malto-oligosaccharide wraps is shown to heavily influence soluble starch binding and hydrolysis. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which enzymes tackle the degradation of largely insoluble polymers and also present some new approaches to the interrogation of the binding sites involved.

  12. Obesity, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbs, Andrew A

    2008-09-01

    The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on the contribution of chronic inflammatory state of morbidly obese patients in an effort to better understand the contribution of inflammation to the comorbidities of obesity. Notably, population studies are beginning to show that one of the most serious potential comorbidities of obesity is an increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. In this article, the current literature that exists supporting this Chronic Inflammatory Hypothesis as it pertains to obesity and pancreatic carcinogenesis is reviewed. To date, studies have focused on interleukin-6, a cytokine known to play a role in obesity, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The anti-inflammatory adipocytokine, adiponectin, has also shown promise as a key player in this mechanism and has recently been found to be more specific than standard tumor markers in differentiating pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis. If the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer is related to hormone levels associated with obesity, such as adipocytokines, and cytokines associated with chronic inflammation, this could potentially lead to the development of new pancreatic cancer tumor markers and ultimately new therapies and methods of prevention.

  13. Tolerance induction and reversal of diabetes in mice transplanted with human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szot, Gregory L; Yadav, Mahesh; Lang, Jiena; Kroon, Evert; Kerr, Justin; Kadoya, Kuniko; Brandon, Eugene P; Baetge, Emmanuel E; Bour-Jordan, Hélène; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-05

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the islets of Langerhans. In most cases, reversal of disease would require strategies combining islet cell replacement with immunotherapy that are currently available only for the most severely affected patients. Here, we demonstrate that immunotherapies that target T cell costimulatory pathways block the rejection of xenogeneic human embryonic-stem-cell-derived pancreatic endoderm (hESC-PE) in mice. The therapy allowed for long-term development of hESC-PE into islet-like structures capable of producing human insulin and maintaining normoglycemia. Moreover, short-term costimulation blockade led to robust immune tolerance that could be transferred independently of regulatory T cells. Importantly, costimulation blockade prevented the rejection of allogeneic hESC-PE by human PBMCs in a humanized model in vivo. These results support the clinical development of hESC-derived therapy, combined with tolerogenic treatments, as a sustainable alternative strategy for patients with T1D.

  14. Enhanced expression of the type II transforming growth factor beta receptor in human pancreatic cancer cells without alteration of type III receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, H; Yamanaka, Y; Büchler, M; Berger, H G; Kobrin, M S; Baldwin, R L; Korc, M

    1993-06-15

    We have recently found that human pancreatic adenocarcinomas exhibit strong immunostaining for the three mammalian transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) isoforms. These important growth-regulating polypeptides bind to a number of proteins, including the type I TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-I), type II TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-II), and the type III TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-III). In the present study we sought to determine whether T beta R-II and T beta R-III expression is altered in pancreatic cancer. Northern blot analysis indicated that, by comparison with the normal pancreas, pancreatic adenocarcinomas exhibited a 4.6-fold increase (P beta R-II. In contrast, mRNA levels encoding T beta R-III were not increased. In situ hybridization showed that T beta R-II mRNA was expressed in the majority of cancer cells, whereas mRNA grains encoding T beta R-III were detectable in only a few cancer cells and were present mainly in the surrounding stroma. These findings suggest that enhanced levels of T beta R-II may have a role in regulating human pancreatic cancer cell growth, while T beta R-III may function in the extracellular matrix.

  15. RNA interference suppression of mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) reduces the adhesive and invasive capacity of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Sawada, Tetsuji; Amano, Ryosuke; Yamada, Nobuya; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2010-05-23

    MUC5AC is a secretory mucin normally expressed in the surface muconous cells of stomach and bronchial tract. It has been known that MUC5AC de novo expression occurred in the invasive ductal carcinoma and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm with no detectable expression in normal pancreas, however, its function remains uncertain. Here, we report the impact of MUC5AC on the adhesive and invasive ability of pancreatic cancer cells. We used two MUC5AC expressing cell lines derived from human pancreatic cancer, SW1990 and BxPC3. Small-interfering (si) RNA directed against MUC5AC were used to assess the effects of MUC5AC on invasion and adhesion of pancreas cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We compared parental cells (SW1990 and BxPC3) with MUC5AC suppressed cells by si RNA (si-SW1990 and si-BxPC3). MUC5AC was found to express in more than 80% of pancreatic ductal carcinoma specimens. Next we observed that both of si-SW1990 and si-BxPC3 showed significantly lower adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix components compared with parental cell lines. Expression of genes associated with adhesion and invasion including several integerins, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -3 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were down-regulated in both MUC5AC suppressed cells. Furthermore, production of VEGF and phosphorylation of VEGFR-1 were significantly reduced by MUC5AC down regulation. Both of si-SW1990 and si-BxPC3 attenuated activation of Erk1/2. In vivo, si-SW1990 did not establish subcutaneous tumor in nude mice. Knockdown of MUC5AC reduced the ability of pancreatic cancer cells to adhesion and invasion, suggesting that MUC5AC might contribute to the invasive motility of pancreatic cancer cells by enhancing the expression of integrins, MMP-3, VEGF and activating Erk pathway.

  16. SNAIL induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in a human pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC3) and promotes distant metastasis and invasiveness in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Ryohei; Itoh, Shunji; Gui, Ting; Gai, Zhibo; Oikawa, Kosuke; Kawai, Manabu; Tani, Masaji; Yamaue, Hiroki; Muragaki, Yasuteru

    2010-10-01

    SNAIL, a potent repressor of E-cadherin expression, plays a key role in inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in epithelial cells. During EMT, epithelial cells lose cell polarity and adhesion, and undergo drastic morphological changes acquiring highly migratory abilities. Although there is increasing evidence that EMT is involved in the progression of some human cancers, its significance in the progression of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. In Panc-1, a well-known human pancreatic cancer cell line in which EMT is triggered by TGF-β1 treatment, SNAIL and vimentin are highly expressed, whereas E-cadherin expression is scant. In contrast, another human pancreatic cancer cell line, BxPC3, in which SNAIL expression is not detected, has high levels of E-cadherin expression and does not undergo EMT upon TGF-β1 treatment. After transfecting the SNAIL gene into BxPC3, however, the cells undergo EMT with remarkable alterations in cell morphology and molecular expression patterns without the addition of any growth factors. Furthermore, in an orthotopic transplantation model using SCID mice, SNAIL-transfected BxPC3 displayed highly metastatic and invasive activities. In the immunohistochemical analysis of the tumor derived from the SNAIL-expressing BxPC3, alterations suggestive of EMT were observed in the invasive tumor front. SNAIL enabled BxPC3 to undergo EMT, endowing it with a highly malignant potential in vivo. These results indicate that SNAIL-mediated EMT may be relevant in the progression of pancreatic cancer, and SNAIL could be a molecular target for a pancreatic cancer intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist, Losartan on the apoptosis, proliferation and migration of the human pancreatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Bin Liu; Xing-Peng Wang; Kai Wu; Ru-Ling Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of AT1 (Type 1 angiotensin Ⅱ receptor) antagonist (Losartan) on the apoptosis,proliferation and migration of the human pancreaticstellate cells (hPSCs).METHODS: hPSCs were isolated from pancreatic sample of patients with pancreatic carcinoma using radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique to detect the concentration of AngⅡ in culture media and cell homogenate. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) methods were utilized to test AT1 expression in hPSCs. Effects of Losartan on hPSCs proliferation, apoptosis and migration were investigated using BrdU incorporation, TUNEL, flow cytometry (FCM),and phase-contrast microscope separately when cells treated with Losartan. Immunofluorescence and Western blot were applied to quantify the expression of type Ⅰ collagen in hPSCs.RESULTS: There exists AT1 expression in hPSCs, while no AngⅡ was detected in culture media and cell homogenate. Losartan induces cell apoptosis in a doseand time-dependent manner (apparently at 10-5 mol/L),no pro-proliferative effect was observed in the same condition.Corresponding dosage of Losartan can also alleviate the motion capability and type Ⅰ collagen content of hPSCs compared with AngⅡ treatment and non-treatment control groups.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that paracrine not autocrine functions of AngⅡ may have effects on hPSCs,which was mediated by AT1 expressed on cells, while Losartan may exert anti-fibrotic effects by inhibiting hPSCs motion and partly by inducing apoptosis.

  18. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and se- lective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepres- sant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancre- atic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. METHODS: A subcutaneous xenograft model of hu- man pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was estab- lished in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were ran- domly divided into mirtazapine group [10 mg/(kg'd)], (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). RESULTS: Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 ± 2.1 vs 7.1 ± 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no significant difference in tumor vol- ume and tumor weight of the three groups. CONCLUSION: Mirtazapine and fluoxetine have no effect on the growth of pancreatic tumor. However, mirtazapine can significantly increase food intake and improve nutrition compared with fluoxetine in a pan- creatic cancer mouse model.

  19. An electrochemical quartz crystal impedance study on anti-human immunoglobulin G immobilization in the polymer grown during dopamine oxidation at an Au electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hua; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2005-09-15

    The polymeric film grown during dopamine oxidation at an Au electrode was studied as a novel matrix for immobilizing anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) via the electrochemical quartz crystal impedance analysis (EQCIA) method. The growth of the polymeric films at Au electrodes during dopamine oxidation in neutral phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and the immobilization of anti-human IgG into the polymeric films during their growth have been traced at real time. Lysozyme control experiments suggested that anti-human IgG was electrostatically incorporated into the polymeric film. Also, the porosity of the polymeric films has been discussed by measuring the "wet" and "dry" frequency shifts. Compared with a polypyrrole film immobilized with anti-human IgG, the proposed matrix possessed a larger amount of specific binding sites for human IgG by subsequent immunoreaction tests. The association constant of the anti-human IgG immunoreaction was obtained with satisfactory results.

  20. Experimental Study of the Course of Threshold Current, Voltage and Electrode Impedance During Stepwise Stimulation From the Skin Surface to the Human Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szelenyi, Andrea; Journee, Henricus Louis; Herrlich, Simon; Galistu, Gianni M.; van den Berg, Joris; van Dijk, J. Marc C.

    Background: Transcranial electric stimulation as used during intraoperative neurostimulation is dependent on electrode and skull impedances. Objective: Threshold currents, voltages and electrode impedances were evaluated with electrical stimulation at 8 successive layers between the skin and the

  1. Experimental Study of the Course of Threshold Current, Voltage and Electrode Impedance During Stepwise Stimulation From the Skin Surface to the Human Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szelenyi, Andrea; Journee, Henricus Louis; Herrlich, Simon; Galistu, Gianni M.; van den Berg, Joris; van Dijk, J. Marc C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Transcranial electric stimulation as used during intraoperative neurostimulation is dependent on electrode and skull impedances. Objective: Threshold currents, voltages and electrode impedances were evaluated with electrical stimulation at 8 successive layers between the skin and the cer

  2. Mechanical Impedance Control in the Human Arm While Manually Transporting an Open-Top Fluid Filled Dish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navit Roth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with stabilizing aspects of a hand-held dish filled with liquid while walking steadily. This is an attempt to decipher the neuro-muscular strategies employed and the mechanical responses of the arm during certain tasks of manual materials handling. The experimental configuration included a cup and the test-subject’s hand as an ‘end-effector’ of a serial three-link system representing the upper limb. These links are connected together by the wrist, elbow and shoulder joints. The tested subjects walked at constant speed on a treadmill while aiming to minimize liquid spillage from the cup. The motion of the limb and shoulder girdle served as inputs to a model to reveal the impedance adjustments during the simultaneous control of grasping and walking under ordinary conditions, and when one of the joints is affected. A regressive function used to express stiffness, included first-order dependence on angle and on angular velocity. The function used for damping included first-order dependence on angular velocity. Redundancies in the numerical solution were eliminated using multicollinearity diagnostic algorithms. The results revealed that the wrist joint was found to have constant stiffness and damping and no regulation of these coefficients was necessary during gait. Both in the elbow and shoulder joints stiffness included a constant coefficient as well as an angular velocity-dependent coefficient. Although all tested subjects demonstrated ability to prevent spillage of liquid, there was a considerable variability among the results obtained, indicating that the compensatory mechanisms employed by each subject to regulate the mechanical impedance were subjective. These results can help in the optimization of manual materials handeling tasks in industrial settings as well as future design of prosthetic arms, robotic appliances and man machine interfacing devices.

  3. Immunological and Functional Characterization of RhoGDI3 and Its Molecular Targets RhoG and RhoB in Human Pancreatic Cancerous and Normal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León-Bautista, Mercedes Piedad; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Casique-Aguirre, Diana; Almaraz-Salinas, Manuel; Parraguirre-Martinez, Sara; Olivo-Diaz, Angelica; Thompson-Bonilla, María del Rocío

    2016-01-01

    RhoGDI proteins have been implicated in several human cancers; changes in their expression levels have shown pro- or anti-tumorigenic effects. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a complex pathology, with poor prognosis, and most patients die shortly after diagnosis. Efforts have been focused on understanding the role of RhoGDI's in PDAC, specially, RhoGDI1 and RhoGDI2. However, the role of RhoGDI3 has not been studied in relation to cancer or to PDAC. Here, we characterized the expression and functionality of RhoGDI3 and its target GTPases, RhoG and RhoB in pancreatic cell lines from both normal pancreatic tissue and tissue in late stages of PDAC, and compared them to human biopsies. Through immunofluorescences, pulldown assays and subcellular fractionation, we found a reduction in RhoGDI3 expression in the late stages of PDAC, and this reduction correlates with tumor progression and aggressiveness. Despite the reduction in the expression of RhoGDI3 in PDAC, we found that RhoB was underexpressed while RhoG was overexpressed, suggesting that cancerous cells preserve their capacity to activate this pathway, thus these cells may be more eager to response to the stimuli needed to proliferate and become invasive unlike normal cells. Surprisingly, we found nuclear localization of RhoGDI3 in non-cancerous pancreatic cell line and normal pancreatic tissue biopsies, which could open the possibility of novel nuclear functions for this protein, impacting gene expression regulation and cellular homeostasis. PMID:27832197

  4. Identification of biomarkers of human pancreatic adenocarcinomas by expression profiling and validation with gene expression analysis in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henrik Laurell; Louis Buscail; Michèle Bouisson; Philippe Berthelémy; Philippe Rochaix; Sébastien Déjean; Philippe Besse; Christiane Susini; Lucien Pradayrol; Nicole Vaysse

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare gene expression profiles of pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissue specimens, human pancreatic and colon adenocarcinoma and leukemia cell lines and normal pancreas samples in order to distinguish differentially expressed genes and to validate the differential expression of a subset of genes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-QPCR) in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-guided FNA) specimens.METHODS: Commercially dedicated cancer cDNA macroarrays (Atlas Human Cancer 1.2) containing 1176 genes were used. Different statistical approaches (hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis (PCA) and SAM) were used to analyze the expression data. RT-QPCR and immunohistochemical studies were used for validation of results.RESULTS: RT-QPCR validated the increased expression of LCN2 (lipocalin 2) and for the first time PLAT (tissue-type plasminogen activator or tPA) in malignant pancreas as compared with normal pancreas.Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the increased expression of LCN2 protein localized in epithelial cells of ducts invaded by carcinoma. The analysis of PLAT and LCN2 transcripts in 12 samples obtained through EUS-guided FNA from patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma showed significantly increased expression levels in comparison with those found in normal tissues, indicating that a sufficient amount of high quality RNA can be obtained with this technique.CONCLUSION: Expression profiling is a useful method to identify biomarkers and potential target genes.Molecular analysis of EUS-guided FNA samples in pancreatic cancer appears as a valuable strategy for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  5. Inconsistent formation and nonfunction of insulin-positive cells from pancreatic endoderm derived from human embryonic stem cells in athymic nude rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveyenko, Aleksey V; Georgia, Senta; Bhushan, Anil; Butler, Peter C

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem cell therapy has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to restore β-cell mass and function in T1DM. Recently, a group from Novocell (now ViaCyte) reported successful development of glucose-responsive islet-like structures after implantation of pancreatic endoderm (PE) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into immune-deficient mice. Our objective was to determine whether implantation of hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm from Novocell into athymic nude rats results in development of viable glucose-responsive pancreatic endocrine tissue. Athymic nude rats were implanted with PE derived from hESC either via implantation into the epididymal fat pads or by subcutaneous implantation into TheraCyte encapsulation devices for 20 wk. Blood glucose, weight, and human insulin/C-peptide secretion were monitored by weekly blood draws. Graft β-cell function was assessed by a glucose tolerance test, and graft morphology was assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. At 20 wk postimplantation, epididymal fat-implanted PE progressed to develop islet-like structures in 50% of implants, with a mean β-cell fractional area of 0.8 ± 0.3%. Human C-peptide and insulin were detectable, but at very low levels (C-peptide = 50 ± 26 pmol/l and insulin = 15 ± 7 pmol/l); however, there was no increase in human C-peptide/insulin levels after glucose challenge. There was no development of viable pancreatic tissue or meaningful secretory function when human PE was implanted in the TheraCyte encapsulation devices. These data confirm that islet-like structures develop from hESC differentiated to PE by the protocol developed by NovoCell. However, the extent of endocrine cell formation and secretory function is not yet sufficient to be clinically relevant.

  6. TYK2, a Candidate Gene for Type 1 Diabetes, Modulates Apoptosis and the Innate Immune Response in Human Pancreatic β-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroqui, Laura; Dos Santos, Reinaldo Sousa; Fløyel, Tina; Grieco, Fabio A; Santin, Izortze; Op de Beeck, Anne; Marselli, Lorella; Marchetti, Piero; Pociot, Flemming; Eizirik, Decio L

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are destroyed by an autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes. Linkage and genome-wide association studies point to >50 loci that are associated with the disease in the human genome. Pathway analysis of candidate genes expressed in human islets identified a central role for interferon (IFN)-regulated pathways and tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2). Polymorphisms in the TYK2 gene predicted to decrease function are associated with a decreased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. We presently evaluated whether TYK2 plays a role in human pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and production of proinflammatory mediators. TYK2-silenced human β-cells exposed to polyinosinic-polycitidilic acid (PIC) (a mimick of double-stranded RNA produced during viral infection) showed less type I IFN pathway activation and lower production of IFNα and CXCL10. These cells also had decreased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins, a hallmark of early β-cell inflammation in type 1 diabetes. Importantly, TYK2 inhibition prevented PIC-induced β-cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway of cell death. The present findings suggest that TYK2 regulates apoptotic and proinflammatory pathways in pancreatic β-cells via modulation of IFNα signaling, subsequent increase in MHC class I protein, and modulation of chemokines such as CXCL10 that are important for recruitment of T cells to the islets.

  7. MicroRNA-200c modulates the expression of MUC4 and MUC16 by directly targeting their coding sequences in human pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Radhakrishnan

    Full Text Available Transmembrane mucins, MUC4 and MUC16 are associated with tumor progression and metastatic potential in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We discovered that miR-200c interacts with specific sequences within the coding sequence of MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs, and evaluated the regulatory nature of this association. Pancreatic cancer cell lines S2.028 and T3M-4 transfected with miR-200c showed a 4.18 and 8.50 fold down regulation of MUC4 mRNA, and 4.68 and 4.82 fold down regulation of MUC16 mRNA compared to mock-transfected cells, respectively. A significant reduction of glycoprotein expression was also observed. These results indicate that miR-200c overexpression regulates MUC4 and MUC16 mucins in pancreatic cancer cells by directly targeting the mRNA coding sequence of each, resulting in reduced levels of MUC4 and MUC16 mRNA and protein. These data suggest that, in addition to regulating proteins that modulate EMT, miR-200c influences expression of cell surface mucins in pancreatic cancer.

  8. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved ge

  9. Pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 digests fats in human milk and formula in concert with gastric lipase and carboxyl ester lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karin; Ross, Leah; Miller, Rita; Xiao, Xunjun; Lowe, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Dietary fats must be digested into fatty acids and monoacylglycerols prior to absorption. In adults, colipase-dependent pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PTL) contributes significantly to fat digestion. In newborn rodents and humans, the pancreas expresses low levels of PTL. In rodents, a homologue of PTL, pancreatic lipase related protein 2 (PLRP2) and carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) compensate for the lack of PTL. In human newborns, the role for PLRP2 in dietary fat digestion is unclear. To clarify the potential of human PLRP2 to influence dietary fat digestion in newborns, we determined PLRP2 activity against human milk and infant formula. METHODS The activity of purified recombinant PLRP2, gastric lipase and CEL against fats in human milk and formula was measured with each lipase alone and in combination with a standard pH-stat assay. RESULTS Colipase added to human milk stimulated fat digestion. PLRP2 and CEL had activity against human milk and formula. Pre-digestion with gastric lipase increased PLRP2 activity against both substrates. Together, CEL and PLRP2 activity was additive with formula and synergistic with human milk. CONCLUSIONS PLRP2 can digest fats in human milk and formula. PLRP2 acts in concert with CEL and gastric lipase to digest fats in human milk in vitro. PMID:23732775

  10. Chemical Constituents of Propolis from Vietnamese Trigona minor and Their Antiausterity Activity against the PANC-1 Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai X; Nguyen, Mai T T; Nguyen, Nhan T; Awale, Suresh

    2017-08-25

    The ethanol extract of propolis from the Vietnamese stingless bee Trigona minor possessed potent preferential cytotoxicity against PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells in nutrient-deprived medium, with a PC50 value of 14.0 μg/mL. Chemical investigation of this extract led to the isolation of 15 cycloartane-type triterpenoids, including five new compounds (1-5), and a lanostane-type triterpenoid. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of NMR spectroscopic analysis. Among the isolated compounds, 23-hydroxyisomangiferolic acid B (5) and 27-hydroxyisomangiferolic acid (13) exhibited the most potent preferential cytotoxicity against PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells under nutrition-deprived conditions, with PC50 values of 4.3 and 3.7 μM, respectively.

  11. High molecular weight PEGylation of human pancreatic polypeptide at position 22 improves stability and reduces food intake in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, V; Jolly, N; Madsen, A N

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) is known to suppress appetite and food intake, thereby representing a potential therapeutic approach against obesity and associated metabolic disorders. The aim of this study was to improve hPP stability by covalent PEGylation with diverse...... fasting-induced food intake and bioavailability. KEY RESULTS: In human epithelia and colonic mucosal preparations, activity of the modified hPP peptides depended on the core sequence and latency of the peptides was related to PEG size. Peptides modified with a 22 kDa PEG (PEG22) remained intact in blood...... plasma and on incubation with liver homogenates for more than 96 h. Finally, hPP2-36 , [K(22) (PEG22)]hPP2-36 and [K(22) (PEG22),Q(34) ]hPP significantly reduced cumulative food intake in mice over 16 h after s.c. administration. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Modification with PEG22 at position 22...

  12. Hypoxia induces upregulation of the deoxyribonuclease I gene in the human pancreatic cancer cell line QGP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Iida, Reiko; Nakajima, Tamiko; Tajima, Yutaka; Takagi, Rie; Makita, Chikako; Kishi, Koichiro; Ueki, Misuzu; Kawai, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Toshihiro

    2007-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ischemia caused by acute myocardial infarction induces an abrupt increase of serum deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) activity. In this study, we examined whether hypoxia can affect the levels of DNase I activity and/or its transcripts in vitro. We first exposed the human pancreatic cancer cell line QGP-1, which is the first documented DNase-I-producing cell line, to hypoxia (2% O2), and found that this induced a significant increase in both the activity and transcripts of DNase I. This response was mediated by increased transcription only from exon 1a of the two alternative transcription-initiating exons utilized simultaneously in the human DNase I gene (DNASE1); exposure of QGP-1 cells to hypoxia for 24 h resulted in a 15-fold increase of DNASE1 transcripts starting from exon 1a compared with the expression level under normoxic conditions. Promoter, electrophoretic mobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with QGP-1 cells exposed to hypoxia or normoxia showed that the region just upstream from exon 1a was involved in this response in a hypoxia-induced factor-1-independent, but at least in a Sp1 transcription factor-dependent manner possibly through enhanced binding of Sp1 protein to the promoter. These results indicate that DNASE1 expression is upregulated by hypoxia in the cells.

  13. Identification of a macromolecule containing an anticarcinoembryonic antigen-reactive substance and immunoglobulin M in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S R; Van Dusen, L R; Douglass, H O; Holyoke, E D; Chu, T M

    1978-11-01

    Ascitic fluid from a patient with carcinoma of the pancreas was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The fraction precipitated between 25 and 50% saturation of ammonium sulfate was sequentially chromatographed on Sephadex G-200 and Sepharose 6B. A macromolecular fraction (greater than 10(6) daltons) obtained was found to react with both antihuman IgM and antiserum to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This fraction was further purified by adsorption with protein A-Sepharose CL-4B and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel. The purified macromolecular fraction had a sedimentation value of 28S as determined by ultracentrifugation. Upon dissociation of the purified macromolecule at pH 2.3 and purification of the dissociated components on Sepharose CL-2B and BioGel A 1.5M, a 19S protein and a 5S protein were recovered. The 19S protein showed a complete line of identity with a reference human IgM when reacted with antihuman IgM in gel diffusion, whereas the 5S protein showed a partial immunologic identity with colon CEA against anti-CEA. These results indicated the existence of an IgM-containing macromolecular complex with an anti-CEA cross-reactive substance in the extracellular fluid of human pancreatic cancer.

  14. Hepato-pancreatic ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Uptal; Mukherjee, M; Das, S; Kumar, Rupesh

    2010-10-01

    Intestinal infestation of humans by Ascaris lumbricoides is endemic in India. The usual habitat of the adult worm is the jejunum. Hepatopancreatic ascariasis (HPA) is designated to a rare group of diseases caused by lodgement of adult worms in the bile or pancreatic ducts. This short report illustrates four rare cases of patients with HPA.

  15. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Xiao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h. Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more

  16. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular

  17. Secretion of neurotensin from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line (QGP-1N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kitayama, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1993-12-10

    Effects of various secretagogues on secretion of neurotensin from a pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line (QGP-1N) were examined. Carbachol stimulated secretion of neurotensin concentration-dependently in the range of 10(-6) - 10(-4) M. The neurotensin secretion stimulated with 10(-5) M carbachol was completely inhibited by atropine at 10(-5) M. Phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (A23187) stimulated secretion of neurotensin. The removal of extracellular Ca2+ suppressed the secretion through the stimulation with 10(-5) M carbachol. Fluoride, an activator of guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein, stimulated secretion of neurotensin. Neurotensin released into culture medium through stimulation with carbachol coeluted with neurotensin 1-13 on a gel-chromatography. Our results suggest that secretion of neurotensin from QGP-1N cells is mainly regulated by acetylcholine through muscarinic receptors coupled to G protein and that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and protein kinase C play an important role in stimulus-secretion coupling.

  18. [Autoimmune pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, G; Menzel, J; Krüger, P-C; Ribback, S; Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare form of chronic pancreatitis which is characterized by a lymphoplasmatic infiltrate with a storiform fibrosis and often goes along with painless jaundice and discrete discomfort of the upper abdomen. Clinically we distinguish between two subtypes, which differ in terms of their histology, clinical picture and prognosis. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is the pancreatic manifestation of the IgG4-associated syndrome which also involves other organs. About one third of the patients can only be diagnosed after either histological prove or a successful steroid trail. Type 2 is IgG4-negative with the histological picture of an idiopathic duct centric pancreatitis and is to higher degree associated with inflammatory bowel disease. A definitive diagnosis can only be made using biopsy. Usually both forms show response to steroid treatment, but in type 1 up to 50 % of the patients might develop a relapse. The biggest challenge and most important differential diagnosis remains the discrimination of AIP from pancreatic cancer, because also AIP can cause mass of the pancreatic head, lymphadenopathy and ductal obstruction. This article summarizes recent advances on epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic strategy, therapy and differential diagnosis in this relatively unknown disease.

  19. Anatomic pathways of peripancreatic fluid draining to mediastinum in recurrent acute pancreatitis: visible human project and CT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haotong Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In past reports, researchers have seldom attached importance to achievements in transforming digital anatomy to radiological diagnosis. However, investigators have been able to illustrate communication relationships in the retroperitoneal space by drawing potential routes in computerized tomography (CT images or a virtual anatomical atlas. We established a new imaging anatomy research method for comparisons of the communication relationships of the retroperitoneal space in combination with the Visible Human Project and CT images. Specifically, the anatomic pathways of peripancreatic fluid extension to the mediastinum that may potentially transform into fistulas were studied. METHODS: We explored potential pathways to the mediastinum based on American and Chinese Visible Human Project datasets. These drainage pathways to the mediastinum were confirmed or corrected in CT images of 51 patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis in 2011. We also investigated whether additional routes to the mediastinum were displayed in CT images that were not in Visible Human Project images. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All hypothesized routes to the mediastinum displayed in Visible Human Project images, except for routes from the retromesenteric plane to the bilateral retrorenal plane across the bilateral fascial trifurcation and further to the retrocrural space via the aortic hiatus, were confirmed in CT images. In addition, route 13 via the narrow space between the left costal and crural diaphragm into the retrocrural space was demonstrated for the first time in CT images. CONCLUSION: This type of exploration model related to imaging anatomy may be used to support research on the communication relationships of abdominal spaces, mediastinal spaces, cervical fascial spaces and other areas of the body.

  20. Accelerated Maturation of Human Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells into Insulin-Secreting Cells in Immunodeficient Rats Relative to Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are a potential source of transplantable cells for treating patients with diabetes. To investigate the impact of the host recipient on hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cell maturation, cells were transplanted into immunodeficient SCID-beige mice or nude rats. Following the transplant, basal human C-peptide levels were consistently higher in mice compared with rats, but only rats showed robust meal- and glucose-responsive human C-peptide secretion by 19–21 weeks. Grafts from rats contained a higher proportion of insulin:glucagon immunoreactivity, fewer exocrine cells, and improved expression of mature β cell markers compared with mice. Moreover, ECM-related genes were enriched, the collagen network was denser, and blood vessels were more intricately integrated into the engrafted endocrine tissue in rats relative to mice. Overall, hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells matured faster in nude rats compared with SCID-beige mice, indicating that the host recipient can greatly influence the fate of immature pancreatic progenitor cells post-transplantation.

  1. Antiausterity agents from Uvaria dac and their preferential cytotoxic activity against human pancreatic cancer cell lines in a nutrient-deprived condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awale, Suresh; Ueda, Jun-ya; Athikomkulchai, Sirivan; Abdelhamed, Sherif; Yokoyama, Satoru; Saiki, Ikuo; Miyatake, Ryuta

    2012-06-22

    Human pancreatic cancer cell lines are known for their inherent tolerance to nutrition starvation, which enables them to survive under a hypovascular (austerity) tumor microenvironment. The search for agents that preferentially retard the survival of cancer cells under low nutrition conditions (antiausterity agent) is a novel approach to anticancer drug discovery. In this study, it was found that a dichloromethane extract of the stem of Uvaria dac preferentially inhibited PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells survival under nutrition-deprived conditions at a concentration of 10 μg/mL. Workup of this bioactive extract led to the discovery of (+)-grandifloracin (8) as a potent antiausterity agent as evaluated in a panel of four human pancreatic cancer cell lines, PANC-1 (PC(50), 14.5 μM), PSN-1 (PC(50), 32.6 μM), MIA PaCa-2 (PC(50), 17.5 μM), and KLM-1 (32.7 μM). (+)-Grandifloracin (8) has been isolated from a natural source for the first time. Its absolute stereochemistry was established by single-crystal X-ray crystallography and circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis. In addition to this, seven other new highly oxygenated cyclohexene derivatives, named uvaridacanes A (1) and B (2), uvaridacols A-D (3, 4, 6, 7), and uvaridapoxide A (5), were also isolated and structurally characterized.

  2. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  3. Binding studies of L-tryptophan to human serum albumin with nanogold-structured sensor by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yumei; Yao, Shouzhuo; Chen, Jinhua

    2011-12-01

    Nanogold-modified sensor was constructed and applied to study the binding of L-tryptophan to human serum albumin (HSA) in situ by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance (PQCI) analysis. It was interesting that the as-prepared nanogold modified sensor was more sensitive and biocompatible than bare gold electrode. The frequency changes due to protein adsorption on the nanogold-modified sensor might be described as a sum of two exponential functions and detailed explanation was given. Additionally, the kinetics of the binding process was also investigated. The binding constant (K) and the number of binding site (n) for the binding process without competitor are fitted to be 1.07 x 10(4) (mol l(-1))(-1) s(-1) and 1.13, respectively, and 2.24 x 10(3) (mol l-(1))(-1) s(-1) and 1.18, respectively for the binding process with competitor.

  4. Distinct differences in the responses of the human pancreatic β-cell line EndoC-βH1 and human islets to proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Bryndon J; McGraw, Jennifer A; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Annamalai, Mani; Chen, Jing; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Davis, Dawn B; Corbett, John A; Mathews, Clayton E

    2015-09-01

    While insulinoma cells have been developed and proven to be extremely useful in studies focused on mechanisms controlling β-cell function and viability, translating findings to human β-cells has proven difficult because of the limited access to human islets and the absence of suitable insulinoma cell lines of human origin. Recently, a human β-cell line, EndoC-βH1, has been derived from human fetal pancreatic buds. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human EndoC-βH1 cells respond to cytokines in a fashion comparable to human islets. Unlike most rodent-derived insulinoma cell lines that respond to cytokines in a manner consistent with rodent islets, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to a combination of cytokines (IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF) in a manner consistent with human islets. Nitric oxide, produced following inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, is a major mediator of cytokine-induced human islet cell damage. We show that EndoC-βH1 cells fail to express iNOS or produce nitric oxide in response to this combination of cytokines. Inhibitors of iNOS prevent cytokine-induced loss of human islet cell viability; however, they do not prevent cytokine-induced EndoC-βH1 cell death. Stressed human islets or human islets expressing heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) are resistant to cytokines, and, much like stressed human islets, EndoC-βH1 cells express HSP70 under basal conditions. Elevated basal expression of HSP70 in EndoC-βH1 cells is consistent with the lack of iNOS expression in response to cytokine treatment. While expressing HSP70, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress activators, such as thapsigargin. These findings indicate that EndoC-βH1 cells do not faithfully recapitulate the response of human islets to cytokines. Therefore, caution should be exercised when making conclusions regarding the actions of cytokines on human islets when using this human-derived insulinoma cell line.

  5. Disposition of the Dietary Mutagen 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline in Healthy and Pancreatic Cancer Compromised Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfatti, Michael A; Kuhn, Edward A; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Vickers, Selwyn M; Jensen, Eric H; Strayer, Lori; Anderson, Kristin E

    2016-03-21

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Once diagnosed, prognosis is poor with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Exposure to carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs) derived from cooked meat has been shown to be positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk. To evaluate the processes that determine the carcinogenic potential of HCAs for human pancreas, 14-carbon labeled 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), a putative human carcinogenic HCA found in well-done cooked meat, was administered at a dietary relevant dose to human volunteers diagnosed with pancreatic cancer undergoing partial pancreatectomy and healthy control volunteers. After (14)C-MeIQx exposure, blood and urine were collected for pharmacokinetic and metabolite analysis. MeIQx-DNA adducts levels were quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry from pancreatic tissue excised during surgery from the cancer patient group. Pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma revealed a rapid distribution of MeIQx with a plasma elimination half-life of approximately 3.5 h in 50% of the cancer patients and all of the control volunteers. In 2 of the 4 cancer patients, very low levels of MeIQx were detected in plasma and urine suggesting low absorption from the gut into the plasma. Urinary metabolite analysis revealed five MeIQx metabolites with 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline-8-carboxylic acid being the most abundant accounting for 25%-50% of the recovered 14-carbon/mL urine. There was no discernible difference in metabolite levels between the cancer patient volunteers and the control group. MeIQx-DNA adduct analysis of pancreas and duodenum tissue revealed adduct levels indistinguishable from background levels. Although other meat-derived HCA mutagens have been shown to bind DNA in pancreatic tissue, indicating that exposure to HCAs from cooked meat cannot be discounted as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the results from this current study show that

  6. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches,chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments.Here,we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments.

  7. Bioactive compounds from Mexican lime ( Citrus aurantifolia ) juice induce apoptosis in human pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Jaiprakash R; Chidambara Murthy, K N; Jayaprakasha, G K; Chetti, Mahadev B; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2009-11-25

    Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) is one of the major citrus fruits and widely consumed, but there is limited evidence about its health-promoting properties. Hence, an investigation was conducted to understand the chemopreventive effects of lime juice on pancreatic cancer cells and the possible mechanism for induction of apoptosis using Panc-28 cells. Freeze-dried lime juice was extracted with different solvents, such as chloroform, acetone, MeOH, and MeOH/water (8:2). The chloroform extract showed the highest (85.4 and 90%) radical-scavenging activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) methods at 624 microg/mL, whereas the MeOH/water extract showed the lowest (<20%) activity. The active components were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a C-18 column as rutin, neohesperidin, hesperidin, and hesperitin. Furthermore, the limonoids identified are limonexic acid, isolimonexic acid, and limonin. All of the extracts of lime juice inhibited Panc-28 cancer cell growth. The MeOH extract exhibited the maximum activity, with an IC50 value of 81.20 microg/mL after 72 h. The inhibition of Panc-28 cells was in the range of 73-89%, at 100 microg/mL at 96 h. The involvement of apoptosis in induction of cytotoxicity was confirmed by expression of Bax, Bcl-2, casapase-3, and p53. The results of the present study clearly indicate that antioxidant activity is proportionate to the content of flavonoids and proliferation inhibition ability is proportionate to the content of both flavonoids and limonoids.

  8. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  9. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be cancerous when found. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a growth in the main pancreatic duct or one of its side branches. IPMN may be precancerous or cancerous. It occurs most ...

  10. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Hori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, which are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, whether fatty infiltration is a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer has not been established. Recent clinical studies show there is a positive correlation between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas. Animal experimental studies also show an association between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Syrian golden hamsters, which are sensitive to chemical carcinogens in the pancreas, develop fatty infiltration of the pancreas with age. The combination of a high-fat diet and a chemical carcinogen that induces a K-ras mutation increases the severity of fatty infiltration of the pancreas. Thus, fatty infiltration of the pancreas is suggested to promote pancreatic carcinogenesis via a K-ras activating mutation. It is assumed that increased expression of adipokines and of inflammatory and proliferation-associated factors elicited by fatty infiltration of the pancreas may contribute to pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to suppression of Ras activation, methods to modulate fatty infiltration in the pancreas can be considered as a strategy for preventing pancreatic cancer.

  11. Groove pancreatitis: A rare form of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharivi Jani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the "groove" of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple′s procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction

  12. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  13. A somatostatin-secreting cell line established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma (somatostatinoma): release experiment and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, H; Hayashi, I; Kono, A

    1990-06-15

    Production and secretion of somatostatin (SRIF) were studied using a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing cell line (QGP-1) established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. High concentrations of SRIF (274 +/- 51 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) and CEA (3083 +/- 347 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) were present in QGP-1 cells, and the basal secretion rates of SRIF and CEA by the cells (n = 5) were 46.4 +/- 4.8 and 1690 +/- 78 pg/10(5) cells/h, respectively. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of SRIF in xenografts of QGP-1 cells and colocalization of SRIF and CEA. Secretion of SRIF by QGP-1 cells was stimulated in the presence of high K+ (50 mmol) and theophylline (10 mmol), but arginine (10 mmol) and glucose (300 mg/dl) had no effect on the SRIF secretion. The QGP-1 cell line may be useful for studying the regulation mechanism of SRIF secretion.

  14. Models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Markus M; Gorelick, Fred S

    2013-06-01

    Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis have been created to examine mechanisms of pathogenesis, test therapeutic interventions, and study the influence of inflammation on the development of pancreatic cancer. In vitro models can be used to study early stage, short-term processes that involve acinar cell responses. Rodent models reproducibly develop mild or severe disease. One of the most commonly used pancreatitis models is created by administration of supraphysiologic concentrations of caerulein, an ortholog of cholecystokinin. Induction of chronic pancreatitis with factors thought to have a role in human disease, such as combinations of lipopolysaccharide and chronic ethanol feeding, might be relevant to human disease. Models of autoimmune chronic pancreatitis have also been developed. Most models, particularly of chronic pancreatitis, require further characterization to determine which features of human disease they include.

  15. Exocrine pancreatic function during the early recovery phase of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Patrizia Simoni; Riccardo Casadei; Antonio M. Morselli-Labate

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exocrine pancreatic dysfunction has been reported in humans in the convalescent period after acute pancreatitis, but the data are scarce and conlficting. This study aimed to prospectively assess the exocrine pancreatic function in patients with acute pancreatitis at the time of their refeeding. METHODS: Fecal elastase-1 was determined on the day of refeeding in all consecutive acute pancreatitis patients with their ifrst episode of the disease. They were 75 patients including 60 (80.0%) patients with mild acute pancreatitis and 15 (20.0%) patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Etiologically 61 patients (81.3%) had biliary disease, 1 (1.3%) had alcoholic disease and 3 (4.0%) had hypertriglyceridemia. No causes of acute pancreatitis were found in the remaining 10 patients (13.3%). The mean (±SD) refeeding time after the attack of acute panereatitis was 11.2±10.2 days. RESULTS: Pathological values of FE-1 were found in 9 of the 75 patients (12.0%): 7 (9.3%) patients with mild pancreatitis and 2 (2.7%) patients with severe pancreatitis (P=1.000). The frequency of the pathological values of fecal elastase-1 was signiifcantly different from that of various etiologies of the disease (P=0.030). It was signiifcantly lower in patients with biliary pancreatitis (9.8%;P=0.035) than in one patient with alcoholic pancreatitis (P=0.126), one patient with hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis (33.3%;P=0.708), and one patient with idiopathic pancreatitis (10.0%;P=0.227). Pathological fecal elastase-1 was not signiifcantly related to sex, age or day of refeeding.CONCLUSION: Exocrine pancreatic function should be routinely assessed in patients with acute pancreatitis at the time of refeeding in order to supplement their diet with pancreatic extracts.

  16. Transcriptional profiling of type 1 diabetes genes on chromosome 21 in a rat beta-cell line and human pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Karlsen, A.E.; Hagedorn, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    We recently finemapped a type 1 diabetes (T1D)-linked region on chromosome 21, indicating that one or more T1D-linked genes exist in this region with 33 annotated genes. In the current study, we have taken a novel approach using transcriptional profiling in predicting and prioritizing the most...... likely candidate genes influencing beta-cell function in this region. Two array-based approaches were used, a rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1alphabeta) overexpressing pancreatic duodenum homeobox 1 (pdx-1) and treated with interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) as well as human pancreatic islets stimulated...... with a mixture of cytokines. Several candidate genes with likely functional significance in T1D were identified. Genes showing differential expression in the two approaches were highly similar, supporting the role of these specific gene products in cytokine-induced beta-cell damage. These were genes involved...

  17. Identification of novel type 1 diabetes candidate genes by integrating genome-wide association data, protein-protein interactions, and human pancreatic islet gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Regine; Brorsson, Caroline; Palleja, Albert;

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have heralded a new era in susceptibility locus discovery in complex diseases. For type 1 diabetes, >40 susceptibility loci have been discovered. However, GWAS do not inevitably lead to identification of the gene or genes in a given locus associated...... with disease, and they do not typically inform the broader context in which the disease genes operate. Here, we integrated type 1 diabetes GWAS data with protein-protein interactions to construct biological networks of relevance for disease. A total of 17 networks were identified. To prioritize...... and substantiate these networks, we performed expressional profiling in human pancreatic islets exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. Three networks were significantly enriched for cytokine-regulated genes and, thus, likely to play an important role for type 1 diabetes in pancreatic islets. Eight of the regulated...

  18. Response gene to complement-32 enhances metastatic phenotype by mediating transforming growth factor beta-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Liang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Response gene to complement-32 (RGC-32 is comprehensively expressed in many kinds of tissues and has been reported to be expressed abnormally in different kinds of human tumors. However, the role of RGC-32 in cancer remains controversial and no reports have described the effect of RGC-32 in pancreatic cancer. The present study investigated the expression of RGC-32 in pancreatic cancer tissues and explored the role of RGC-32 in transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in human pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3. Methods Immunohistochemical staining of RGC-32 and E-cadherin was performed on specimens from 42 patients with pancreatic cancer, 12 with chronic pancreatitis and 8 with normal pancreas. To evaluate the role of RGC-32 in TGF-β-induced EMT in pancreatic cancer cells, BxPC-3 cells were treated with TGF-β1, and RGC-32 siRNA silencing and gene overexpression were performed as well. The mRNA expression and protein expression of RGC-32 and EMT markers such E-cadherin and vimentin were determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR and western blot respectively. Finally, migration ability of BxPC-3 cells treated with TGF-β and RGC-32 siRNA transfection was examined by transwell cell migration assay. Results We found stronger expression of RGC-32 and higher abnormal expression rate of E-cadherin in pancreatic cancer tissues than those in chronic pancreatitis tissues and normal pancreatic tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that both RGC-32 positive expression and E-cadherin abnormal expression in pancreatic cancer were correlated with lymph node metastasis and TNM staging. In addition, a significant and positive correlation was found between positive expression of RGC-32 and abnormal expression of E-cadherin. Furthermore, in vitro, we found sustained TGF-β stimuli induced EMT and up-regulated RGC-32 expression in BxPC-3 cells. By means of si

  19. IL-1β impedes the chondrogenic differentiation of synovial fluid mesenchymal stem cells in the human temporomandibular joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjing; Sun, Yangpeng; He, Yiqing; Zhang, Hong; Zheng, Youhua; Yao, Yu; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy has great therapeutic potential for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) cartilage repair. However, the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells in the inflammatory milieu following their delivery remains poorly understood. Synovial fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SFMSCs) are a promising resource for TMJ cartilage repair, as they are easily obtained from patients with TMJ disorders (TMD). In this study, we obtained SFMSCs from patients with TMD and expanded them in vitro; we then stimulated the cells with interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-12p. The cells expressed CD90, CD44, CD105 and CD73, and were negative for CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19 and HLA-DR. They could be induced to differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic and neurogenic lineages in vitro. Only the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were upregulated significantly following stimulation with IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-12p. Furthermore, IL-6 and IL-8 expression was driven mainly by IL-1β-dependent nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway activation, and was independent of IL-8, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-12p. IL-6 and IL-8 expression was inhibited completely by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, BAY11-7082. SRY-box 9 (SOX9) was downregulated and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)13 was upregulated upon chondrogenic differentiation induced in the cells also exposed to IL-1β. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan production was also reduced upon chondrogenic differentiation in the presence of IL-6, but not IL-8. Thus, IL-1β in the inflammatory milieu is crucial in regulating SFMSCs. In doing so, IL-1β impedes the chondrogenic differentiation of SFMSCs. The upregulation of IL-6 and NF-κB pathway activation also contribute to this biological behavior. The findings of our study indicate the potential adverse effects of IL-1β on the chondrogenic differentiation of SFMSCs, and may thus provide new insight into the pathogenesis of TMD. PMID

  20. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-03-15

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis.

  1. PDZ-domain containing-2 (PDZD2) drives the maturity of human fetal pancreatic progenitor-derived islet-like cell clusters with functional responsiveness against membrane depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kwan Keung; Suen, Po Man; Lau, Tse Kin; Ko, Wing Hung; Yao, Kwok Ming; Leung, Po Sing

    2009-09-01

    We recently reported the isolation and characterization of a population of pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) from early trimester human fetal pancreata. The PPCs, being the forerunners of adult pancreatic cell lineages, were amenable to growth and differentiation into insulin-secreting islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) upon stimulation by adequate morphogens. Of note, a novel morphogenic factor, PDZ-domain containing-2 (PDZD2) and its secreted form (sPDZD2) were ubiquitously expressed in the PPCs. Our goals for this study were to evaluate the potential role of sPDZD2 in stimulating PPC differentiation and to establish the optimal concentration for such stimulation. We found that 10(-9)M sPDZD2 promoted PPC differentiation, as evidenced by the upregulation of the pancreatic endocrine markers (PDX-1, NGN3, NEURO-D, ISL-1, NKX 2.2, NKX 6.1) and INSULIN mRNA. Inhibited endogenous production of sPDZD2 suppressed expression of these factors. Secreted PDZD2 treatment significantly elevated the C-peptide content of the ICCs and increased the basal rate of insulin secretion. However, they remained unresponsive to glucose stimulation, reflected by a minimal increase in GLUT-2 and GLUCOKINASE mRNA expression. Interestingly, sPDZD2 treatment induced increased expression of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(v)1.2) in the ICCs, triggering calcium ion influx under KCl stimulation and conferring an ability to secrete insulin in response to KCl. Pancreatic progenitor cells from 10- and 13-week fetal pancreata showed peak expression of endogenous sPDZD2, implying that sPDZD2 has a specific role in islet development during the first trimester. In conclusion, our data suggest that sPDZD2 promotes functional maturation of human fetal PPC-derived ICCs, thus enhancing its transplanting potentials.

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  3. Differential interleukin-1 receptor antagonism on pancreatic beta and alpha cells. Studies in rodent and human islets and in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zumsteg, U; Reimers, J I; Pociot, F;

    1993-01-01

    The monokines interleukin-1 alpha and -beta have been implicated as effector molecules in the immune-mediated pancreatic beta-cell destruction leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1 receptor antagonism on insulin and glucagon release of rat......, mouse and human islets exposed to recombinant human interleukin-1 beta, and on interleukin-1 beta induced changes in blood glucose, serum insulin and serum glucagon levels in Wistar Kyoto rats. The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist reduced the co-mitogenic effect of interleukin-1 beta on mouse and rat...

  4. Genetic evidence that HNF-1alpha-dependent transcriptional control of HNF-4alpha is essential for human pancreatic beta cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara K; Párrizas, Marcelina; Jensen, Maria L;

    2002-01-01

    , and consequently in reduced HNF-1alpha-dependent activation. These findings provide genetic evidence that HNF-1alpha serves as an upstream regulator of HNF-4alpha and interacts directly with the P2 promoter in human pancreatic cells. Furthermore, they indicate that this regulation is essential to maintain normal...... in human islets and exocrine cells is primarily mediated by the P2 promoter. Furthermore, we describe a G --> A mutation in a conserved nucleotide position of the HNF-1alpha binding site of the P2 promoter, which cosegregates with MODY. The mutation results in decreased affinity for HNF-1alpha...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Mark; A; Wells; Katrina; J; Schneider; Shailender; Singh

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellatecells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is "THE" effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease.

  6. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpe-Rutledge, Alexandra C; Fontès, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A; Norbeck, Angela D; Anderson, David J; Waters, Katrina M; Adkins, Joshua N; Smith, Richard D; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is characterized by insulin resistance and insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent regulator of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, identification of the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of human beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins (∼p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to neuron navigator 1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and synaptotagmin-17. Up-regulation of dicer 1 and SLC27A2 and down-regulation of phospholipase Cβ4 were confirmed by Western blots. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation are annotated as uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  7. Preservation of beta cell function in adult human pancreatic islets for several months in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunstedt, J; Andersson, A; Frimodt-Møller, C

    1979-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans were isolated from four human kidney donors, aged 16 to 21 years by the collagenase method described for isolation of rodent islets. So far the human islets have been kept in tissue culture, without attachment, in medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 10% calf serum for more than...... 9 months, with preservation of the ability to release insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Replacement of calf serum with serum from normal human subjects did not affect B-cell survival, but resulted in elevated insulin values partly due to lower insulin degrading activity. Thus the described...

  8. Identification of markers for quiescent pancreatic stellate cells in the normal human pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2017-01-01

    cells in the normal human pancreas and perisinusoidal cells in the normal human liver. The immunolabelling capacity was evaluated according to a semiquantitative scoring system. Double-IF of the markers of interest together with markers for other periacinar cells was performed. Moreover, the utility...... of histochemical stains for the identification of human qPSCs was examined, and their ultrastructure was revisited by electron microscopy. Adipophilin, CRBP-1, cytoglobin and vinculin were expressed in qHSCs in the liver, whereas cytoglobin and adipophilin were expressed in qPSCs in the pancreas. Adipophilin...... are markers of qPSCs in the normal human pancreas. However, the use of adipophilin as a qPSC marker may be limited due to its high dependence on optimal PATI. Cytoglobin, on the other hand, is a sensitive marker for qPSCs but is expressed in FBs as well....

  9. Supravital dithizone staining in the isolation of human and rat pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, W A; Christie, M R; Kahn, R

    1989-01-01

    Dithizone, a zinc chelating agent, is known to selectively stain the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. In the present study, we have used this stain to aid the identification of islets in material obtained by collagenase digestion of human pancreas. Islets were shown to rapidly and reversibly...... techniques for the large scale isolation of functionally intact human islets.......Dithizone, a zinc chelating agent, is known to selectively stain the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. In the present study, we have used this stain to aid the identification of islets in material obtained by collagenase digestion of human pancreas. Islets were shown to rapidly and reversibly...... no effect on insulin release in tissue culture, on acute responses to stimulatory glucose concentrations or on the insulin content of cells. These results suggest that dithizone staining can assist in the identification of islets from the human pancreas and may prove to be a useful tool in developing...

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a putative risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and temporality of this association. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for observational studies investigating the association between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We...... computed overall effect estimates (EEs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects meta-analytic model. The EEs were stratified by length of follow-up from chronic pancreatitis diagnosis to pancreatic cancer (lag period). Robustness of the results was examined in sensitivity...... analyses. We identified 13 eligible studies. Pooled EEs for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis were 16.16 (95% CI: 12.59-20.73) for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 2 years from their chronic pancreatitis diagnosis. The risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic...

  11. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of human pancreatic islet cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter D; Estella, Eugene; Dudek, Nadine L; Jhala, Gaurang; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H; Mannering, Stuart I

    2008-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are believed to play an essential role in beta-cell destruction leading to development of type 1 diabetes and allogeneic islet graft failure. We aimed to identify the mechanisms used by CTL to kill human beta cells. CTL clones that recognize epitopes from influenza virus and Epstein-Barr virus restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A0201 and -B0801, respectively, were used to investigate the susceptibility of human beta cells to CTL. In a short-term (5-hour) assay, CTL killed human islet cells of the appropriate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I type that had been pulsed with viral peptides. Killing was increased by pretreating islets with interferon gamma that increases MHC class I on target cells. Killing was abolished by incubation of CTL with the perforin inhibitor concanamycin A. The Fas pathway did not contribute to killing because blocking with neutralizing anti-Fas ligand antibody did not significantly reduce beta-cell killing. In conclusion, we report a novel way of investigating the interaction between CTL and human islets. Human islets were rapidly killed in vitro by MHC class I-restricted CTL predominantly by the granule exocytosis pathway.

  12. Evaluation of (89Zr-labeled human anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody as a positron emission tomography probe in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Sugyo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer and its prognosis remains poor. Therefore, additional effective therapy is required to augment and/or complement current therapy. CD147, high expression in pancreatic cancer, is involved in the metastatic process and is considered a good candidate for targeted therapy. CD147-specfic imaging could be useful for selection of appropriate patients. Therefore, we evaluated the potential of a fully human anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody 059-053 as a new positron emission tomography (PET probe for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: CD147 expression was evaluated in four pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA Paca-2, PANC-1, BxPC-3, and AsPC-1 and a mouse cell line A4 as a negative control. Cell binding, competitive inhibition and internalization assays were conducted with (125I-, (67Ga-, or (89Zr-labeled 059-053. In vivo biodistribution of (125I- or (89Zr-labeled 059-053 was conducted in mice bearing MIA Paca-2 and A4 tumors. PET imaging with [(89Zr]059-053 was conducted in subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor mouse models. RESULTS: Among four pancreatic cancer cell lines, MIA Paca-2 cells showed the highest expression of CD147, while A4 cells had no expression. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MIA Paca-2 xenografts also highly expressed CD147 in vivo. Radiolabeled 059-053 specifically bound to MIA Paca-2 cells with high affinity, but not to A4. [(89Zr]059-053 uptake in MIA Paca-2 tumors increased with time from 11.0±1.3% injected dose per gram (ID/g at day 1 to 16.9±3.2% ID/g at day 6, while [(125I]059-053 uptake was relatively low and decreased with time, suggesting that 059-053 was internalized into tumor cells in vivo and (125I was released from the cells. PET with [(89Zr]059-053 clearly visualized subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors. CONCLUSION: [(89Zr]059-053 is a promising PET probe for imaging CD147 expression in pancreatic cancer and has the potential to select appropriate patients with CD147

  13. RNA interference suppression of mucin 5AC (MUC5AC reduces the adhesive and invasive capacity of human pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Nobuya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MUC5AC is a secretory mucin normally expressed in the surface muconous cells of stomach and bronchial tract. It has been known that MUC5AC de novo expression occurred in the invasive ductal carcinoma and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm with no detectable expression in normal pancreas, however, its function remains uncertain. Here, we report the impact of MUC5AC on the adhesive and invasive ability of pancreatic cancer cells. Methods We used two MUC5AC expressing cell lines derived from human pancreatic cancer, SW1990 and BxPC3. Small-interfering (si RNA directed against MUC5AC were used to assess the effects of MUC5AC on invasion and adhesion of pancreas cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We compared parental cells (SW1990 and BxPC3 with MUC5AC suppressed cells by si RNA (si-SW1990 and si-BxPC3. Results MUC5AC was found to express in more than 80% of pancreatic ductal carcinoma specimens. Next we observed that both of si-SW1990 and si-BxPC3 showed significantly lower adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix components compared with parental cell lines. Expression of genes associated with adhesion and invasion including several integerins, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP -3 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were down-regulated in both MUC5AC suppressed cells. Furthermore, production of VEGF and phosphorylation of VEGFR-1 were significantly reduced by MUC5AC down regulation. Both of si-SW1990 and si-BxPC3 attenuated activation of Erk1/2. In vivo, si-SW1990 did not establish subcutaneous tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Knockdown of MUC5AC reduced the ability of pancreatic cancer cells to adhesion and invasion, suggesting that MUC5AC might contribute to the invasive motility of pancreatic cancer cells by enhancing the expression of integrins, MMP-3, VEGF and activating Erk pathway.

  14. Acute pancreatitis due to ascariasis: a sonographic pictorial essay on four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynser, Donboklang; Thangkhiew, R S; Laloo, Demitrost; Hek, M D; Marbaniang, Evarisalin; Tariang, Satisfy

    2016-06-01

    Ascariasis is the commonest helminthic disease to infect humans. Due to their wandering nature, the roundworms from the second part of the duodenum migrate through the biliary opening into the hepatobiliary and pancreatic ducts. Ascariasis is the most common parasitic cause of pancreatitis in endemic region. Pancreatitis can result due to pancreatic ascariasis, biliary ascariasis or both. Pancreatitis due to ascariasis can be severe and life-threatening. We present a pictorial essay of acute pancreatitis due to ascariasis on four cases.

  15. Human-machine interaction force control:using a model-referenced adaptive impedance device to control an index finger exoskeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian BI; Can-jun YANG

    2014-01-01

    Exoskeleton robots and their control methods have been extensively developed to aid post-stroke rehabilitation. Most of the existing methods using linear controllers are designed for position control and are not suitable for human-machine interaction (HMI) force control, as the interaction system between the human body and exoskeleton is uncertain and nonlinear. We present an approach for HMI force control via model reference adaptive impedance control (MRAIC) to solve this problem in case of index finger exoskeleton control. First, a dynamic HMI model, which is based on a position control inner loop, is for-mulated. Second, the theoretical MRAC framework is implemented in the control system. Then, the adaptive controllers are designed according to the Lyapunov stability theory. To verify the performance of the proposed method, we compare it with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method in the time domain with real experiments and in the frequency domain with simu-lations. The results illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method in solving the nonlinear HMI force control problem in hand exoskeleton.

  16. Pancreatic hyperechogenicity on endoscopic ultrasound examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yucel Ustundag; Guray Ceylan; Koray Hekimoglu

    2011-01-01

    There is an ongoing discussion on how to diagnose a hyperechogenic pancreas and what is the clinical signifi-cance of diffusely hyperechogenic pancreas. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are the more appropriate methods to diagnose pancreatic hyper-echogenicity when compared with transcutaneous or en-doscopic ultrasound examination. More importantly, pan-creatic hyperechogenicity may not be a certain indicator of pancreatic fat infiltration. Even if it is true, we do not know the clinical significances of pancreatic fat accumulation. Some suggested that excess fat in the pancreas is associ-ated with chronic pancreatitis. However, several histologi-cal studies on human alcoholic chronic pancreatitis did not prove the presence of fatty pancreas in such cases. Thus, except for aging, it is very rare to have truly steatotic pan-creas in the absence of certain human diseases.

  17. Human pancreatic islet preparations release HMGB1: (ir)relevance for graft engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nano, Rita; Racanicchi, Leda; Melzi, Raffaella; Mercalli, Alessia; Maffi, Paola; Sordi, Valeria; Ling, Zhidong; Scavini, Marina; Korsgren, Olle; Celona, Barbara; Secchi, Antonio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    High levels of donor-derived high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein have been associated with poor islet graft outcome in mouse models. The aim of our work was to determine whether HMGB1 released by human islets had independent proinflammatory effects that influence engraftment in humans. Human islet preparations contained and released HMGB1 in different amounts, as determined by Western blot and ELISA (median 17 pg/ml/IEQ/24 h; min-max 0-211, n = 74). HMGB1 release directly correlated with brain death, donor hyperamilasemia, and factors related to the pancreas digestion procedure (collagenase and digestion time). HMGB1 release was significantly positively associated with the release of other cytokines/chemokines, particularly with the highly released "proinflammatory" CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL1/GRO-α, and the IFN-γ-inducible chemokines CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL9/MIG. HMGB1 release was not modulated by Toll-like receptor 2, 3, 4, 5, and 9 agonists or by exposure to IL-1β. When evaluated after islet transplantation, pretransplant HMGB1 release was weakly associated with the activation of the coagulation cascade (evaluated as serum cross-linked fibrin products), but not with the immediate posttransplant inflammatory response. Concordantly, HMGB1 did not affect short-term human islet function. Our data show that human islet HMGB1 release is a sign of "damaged" islets, although without any independent direct role in graft failure.

  18. Wakefields and coupling impedances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S. (Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory, 2550 Beckleymeade Ave., Dallas, Texas 75237 (United States))

    1995-02-01

    After a short introduction of the wake potentials and coupling impedances, a few new results in impedance calculations are discussed. The first example is a new analytical method for calculating impedances of axisymmetric structures in the low frequency range, below the cutoff frequency of the vacuum chamber. The second example demonstrates that even very small discontinuities on a smooth waveguide can result in appearance of trapped modes, with frequencies slightly below the waveguide cutoff frequency. The high-frequency (above the cutoff) behavior of the coupling impedance of many small discontinuities is discussed in the third example. [copyright] 1995 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  19. Wakefields and coupling impedances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1995-02-01

    After a short introduction of the wake potentials and coupling impedances, a few new results in impedance calculations are discussed. The first example is a new analytical method for calculating impedances of axisymmetric structures in the low frequency range, below the cutoff frequency of the vacuum chamber. The second example demonstrates that even very small discontinuities on a smooth waveguide can result in appearance of trapped modes, with frequencies slightly below the waveguide cutoff frequency. The high-frequency (above the cutoff) behavior of the coupling impedance of many small discontinuities is discussed in the third example.

  20. Impedance plethysmography of thoracic region: impedance cardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande A

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available Impedance plethysmograms were recorded from thoracic region in 254 normal subjects, 183 patients with coronary artery disease, 391 patients with valvular heart disease and 107 patients with congenital septal disorder. The data in 18 normal subjects and 55 patients showed that basal impedance decreases markedly during exercise in patients with ischaemic heart disease. Estimation of cardiac index by this technique in a group of 99 normal subjects has been observed to be more consistent than that of the stroke volume. Estimation of systolic time index from impedance plethysmograms in 34 normal subjects has been shown to be as reliable as that from electrocardiogram, phonocardiogram and carotid pulse tracing. Changes in the shape of plethysmographic waveform produced by valvular and congenital heart diseases are briefly described and the role of this technique in screening cardiac patients has been highlighted.

  1. Downstream mediators of the intratumoral interferon response suppress antitumor immunity, induce gemcitabine resistance and associate with poor survival in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitto, Daniel; Perez, Chelsey; Han, Song; Gonzalo, David H; Pham, Kien; Knowlton, Andrea E; Graves, Christina L; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; Liu, Chen; George, Thomas J; Trevino, Jose G; Wallet, Shannon M; Hughes, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    The cancer microenvironment allows tumor cells to evade immune surveillance through a variety of mechanisms. While interferon-γ (IFNγ) is central to effective antitumor immunity, its effects on the microenvironment are not as clear and have in some cancers been shown to induce immune checkpoint ligands. The heterogeneity of these responses to IFNγ remains poorly characterized in desmoplastic malignancies with minimal inflammatory cell infiltration, such as pancreatic cancer (PC). Thus, the IFNγ response within and on key cells of the PC microenvironment was evaluated. IFNγ induced expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II on PC cell lines, primary pancreatic cancer epithelial cells (PPCE) and patient-derived tumor-associated stroma, concomitant with an upregulation of PDL1 in the absence of CD80 and CD86 expression. As expected, IFNγ also induced high levels of CXCL10 from all cell types. In addition, significantly higher levels of CXCL10 were observed in PC specimens compared to those from chronic pancreatitis, whereby intratumoral CXCL10 concentration was an independent predictor of poor survival. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a subset of CXCR3-positive cancer cells in over 90 % of PC specimens, as well as on a subset of cultured PC cell lines and PPCE, whereby exposure to CXCL10 induced resistance to the chemotherapeutic gemcitabine. These findings suggest that IFNγ has multiple effects on many cell types within the PC microenvironment that may lead to immune evasion, chemoresistance and shortened survival.

  2. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; PANG Lin-lin; YU Lei; YANG Hai-fan; LIU Guang-da; LI Hai-jiao

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the most common pancreatic neoplasm characterized by latentmorbidit, poor prognosis, high mortality rate and limited choice of treatment. Quite a lot studies focused on its pathogenesis, and showed molecular genetic alterations, which derived of genetic and environmental factors and played an important role in tumorigenesis. Recently, more and more findings laid particular emphasis on the changes of gene molecule and some were confirmed in vitro and in vivo. In this paper, we made a review and summarized the arked molecular changes and signalings of the four pathways to understand their functions in Pancreatic carcinoma. The most important changes concentrate on K-RAS, p16 INK4α, P53 and SMAD4 gene, secondly, the changes of pl4ARF, TGF-β, LKB1 /STK11, BRCA2 and growth factor Hedgehog and Notch path way and Telomere also play a important role in pancreatic carcinoma. The vast majority (83%) of pancreatic carcinomas had a distinctive genetic fingerprint, comprising activation of the K-ras oncogene and inactivation of the p 16 gene, generally also accompanied by alterations in the p53 gene (in 76 % of the tumors). The activation of K-ras appears nearly to be a prerequisite for the development of pancreatic carcinoma. Also, the binary alteration of K-ras and p16 is an extremely uncommon combination among other human tumor types. This particular genetic imprint of pancreatic carcinomas could have diagnostic utility in the evaluation of patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin. The evaluation of genetic alterations as they naturally occur in humantumors allows the formulation of hypotheses concerning the biological processes that involve human tumongenesis. A central tenet of tumori genesis, that positive selection is exerted upon those tumor cells that alterrate-limiting regulatory pathways, implies that mutation of one gene abrogates the need for inactivation of another gene in the same tumor suppressive pathway. It

  3. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and -β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5-67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43-100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  4. Susceptibility of Human Pancreatic beta Cells for Cytomegalovirus Infection and the Effects on Cellular Immunogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelt, M.J.; Faas, M.M.; de Haan, Bart; Draijer, C.; Hugenholtz, G.C.G.; de Haan, A.; Engelse, M.A.; de Koning, E.J.P.; de Vos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection has been suggested to be a causal factor in the development of type 1 diabetes, posttransplantation diabetes, and the failure of islet allografts. This effect of CMV has been interpreted as an indirect effect on the immune system rather than direct

  5. Characterization of the Human Pancreatic Islet Proteome by Two-Dimensional LC/MS/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Poitout, Vincent J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-01

    Research to elucidate the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus has traditionally focused on the genetic and immunological factors associated with the disease, and, until recently, has not considered the target cell. While there have been reports detailing proteomic analyses of established islet cell lines or isolated rodent islets, the information gained is not always easily extrapolated to humans. Therefore, extensive characterization of the human islet proteome could result in better understanding of islet biology and lead to more effective treatment strategies. We have applied a two-dimensional LC-MS/MS-based analysis to the characterization of the human islet proteome, resulting in the detection of 29,021 unique peptides corresponding to 4,925 proteins. As expected, major islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, somatostatin), beta-cell enriched secretory products (IAPP), ion channels (K-ATP channel), and transcription factors (PDX-1, Nkx 6.1, HNF-1 beta) were detected. In addition, significant proteome coverage of metabolic enzymes and cellular pathways was obtained, including the insulin signaling cascade and the MAP kinase, NF-κβ, and JAK/STAT pathways. This work represents the most extensive characterization of the human islet proteome to date and provides a peptide reference library that may be utilized in future studies of islet biology and type 1 diabetes.

  6. St. John's wort extract and hyperforin protect rat and human pancreatic islets against cytokine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Michela; Beffy, Pascale; Menegazzi, Marta; De Tata, Vincenzo; Martino, Luisa; Sgarbossa, Anna; Porozov, Svetlana; Pippa, Anna; Masini, Matilde; Marchetti, Piero; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2014-02-01

    The extract of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort, SJW) and its component hyperforin (HPF) were previously shown to inhibit cytokine-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 and nuclear factor κB and prevent apoptosis in a cultured β-cell line. Objective of this study was to assess the protection exerted by SJW and HPF on isolated rat and human islets exposed to cytokines in vitro. Functional, ultrastructural, biomolecular and cell death evaluation studies were performed. In both rat and human islets, SJW and HPF counteracted cytokine-induced functional impairment and down-regulated mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory target genes, such as iNOS, CXCL9, CXCL10, COX2. Cytokine-induced NO production from cultured islets, evaluated by nitrites measurement in the medium, was significantly reduced in the presence of the vegetal compounds. Noteworthy, the increase in apoptosis and necrosis following 48-h exposure to cytokines was fully prevented by SJW and partially by HPF. Ultrastructural morphometric analysis in human islets exposed to cytokines for 20 h showed that SJW or HPF avoided early β-cell damage (e.g., mitochondrial alterations and loss of insulin granules). In conclusion, SJW compounds protect rat and human islets against cytokine effects by counteracting key mechanisms of cytokine-mediated β-cell injury and represent promising pharmacological tools for prevention or limitation of β-cell dysfunction and loss in type 1 diabetes.

  7. Plasticity of adult human pancreatic duct cells by neurogenin3-mediated reprogramming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swales, Nathalie; Martens, Geert A; Bonné, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3). In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it....

  8. Pharmacological reversal of histone methylation presensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to nucleoside drugs: in vitro optimization and novel nanoparticle delivery studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hung, Sau Wai; Mody, Hardik; Marrache, Sean; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Davis, Franklin; Cho, Jong Hyun; Zastre, Jason; Dhar, Shanta; Chu, Chung K; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2013-01-01

    ...), in improving the chemosensitivity of pancreatic cancer to nucleoside analogs (i.e., gemcitabine). DZNep brought delayed but selective cytotoxicity to pancreatic cancer cells without affecting normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial...

  9. Xanthohumol-Mediated Suppression of Notch1 Signaling Is Associated with Antitumor Activity in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Trevino, Jose; Tsai, Susan; Gamblin, T Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal disease with limited treatment options. At the time of diagnosis, approximately 80% of these patients present with unresectable tumors caused by either locally advanced lesions or progressive metastatic growth. Therefore, development of novel treatment strategies and new therapeutics is needed. Xanthohumol (XN) has emerged as a potential compound that inhibits various types of cancer, but the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of XN remains unclear. In the present study, we have assessed the efficacy of XN on pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, PANC-1, L3.6pl, MiaPaCa-2, 512, and 651) against cell growth in real time and using colony-forming assays. Treatment with XN resulted in reduction in cellular proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The growth suppression effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cell lines is due to increased apoptosis via the inhibition of the Notch1 signaling pathway, as evidenced by reduction in Notch1, HES-1, and survivin both at mRNA as well as protein levels. Notch1 promoter reporter analysis after XN treatment indicated that XN downregulates Notch promoter activity. Importantly, overexpression of active Notch1 in XN-treated pancreatic cancer cells resulted in negation of growth suppression. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the growth suppressive effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cells is mainly mediated by Notch1 reduction.

  10. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  11. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  12. Nicotine enhances the malignant potential of human pancreatic cancer cells via activation of atypical protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaki, Takehiko; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Nakasone, Masato; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Amisaki, Masataka; Arai, Yosuke; Tokuyasu, Naruo; Sakamoto, Teruhisa; Honjo, Soichiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Ikeguchi, Masahide; Yamashita, Kazunari; Ohno, Shigeo; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most lethal malignancy among solid tumors, and the most common risk factor for its development is cigarette smoking. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isozymes function in cell polarity, proliferation, and survival, and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. However, the involvement of aPKC in PC progression and the effect of nicotine, a major component of cigarette smoke, on the biological activities of aPKC remain to be fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of nicotine on the proliferation, migration and invasion of the human PC cell lines Panc1 and BxPC3. We analyzed aPKC localization and activity by immunohistochemistry and in vitro kinase assays, respectively, to assess their involvement in the regulation of PC progression. Moreover, we examined the effect of nicotine on implanted peritoneal tumors of PC cells in mice. Nicotine enhanced cell proliferation, migration and invasion in Panc1 and BxPC3 cells. In nicotine-treated PC cells, the aPKC was significantly activated. We also found that nicotine induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signal activation, and a specific inhibitor of the nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) as well as knockdown of nAChR prevented nicotine-mediated Akt phosphorylation and aPKC activation. In a peritoneal dissemination model of PC, nicotine-treated mice had larger tumors and increased numbers of nodules. Immunohistochemistry showed enhanced expression levels of aPKC and phosphorylated Akt in nodules from nicotine-treated mice. Nicotine induces aberrant activation of aPKC via nAChR/PI3K signaling in PC cells, resulting in enhancement of cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Trefoil factor 3 stimulates human and rodent pancreatic islet beta-cell replication with retention of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueger, Patrick T; Schisler, Jonathan C; Lu, Danhong; Babu, Daniella A; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Newgard, Christopher B; Hohmeier, Hans E

    2008-05-01

    Both major forms of diabetes involve a decline in beta-cell mass, mediated by autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells in type 1 diabetes and by increased rates of apoptosis secondary to metabolic stress in type 2 diabetes. Methods for controlled expansion of beta-cell mass are currently not available but would have great potential utility for treatment of these diseases. In the current study, we demonstrate that overexpression of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) in rat pancreatic islets results in a 4- to 5-fold increase in [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, with full retention of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This increase was almost exclusively due to stimulation of beta-cell replication, as demonstrated by studies of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and co-immunofluorescence analysis with anti-bromodeoxyuridine and antiinsulin or antiglucagon antibodies. The proliferative effect of TFF3 required the presence of serum or 0.5 ng/ml epidermal growth factor. The ability of TFF3 overexpression to stimulate proliferation of rat islets in serum was abolished by the addition of epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist AG1478. Furthermore, TFF3-induced increases in [3H]thymidine incorporation in rat islets cultured in serum was blocked by overexpression of a dominant-negative Akt protein or treatment with triciribine, an Akt inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of TFF3 also caused a doubling of [3H]thymidine incorporation in human islets. In summary, our findings reveal a novel TFF3-mediated pathway for stimulation of beta-cell replication that could ultimately be exploited for expansion or preservation of islet beta-cell mass.

  14. Differential sensitivity to beta-cell secretagogues in cultured rat pancreatic islets exposed to human interleukin-1 beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizirik, D L; Sandler, S; Hallberg, A; Bendtzen, K; Sener, A; Malaisse, W J

    1989-08-01

    The early stages of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are characterized by a selective inability to secrete insulin in response to glucose, coupled to a better response to nonnutrient secretagogues. The deficient glucose response may be a result of the autoimmune process directed toward the beta-cells. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been suggested to be one possible mediator of immunological damage of the beta-cells. In the present study we characterized the sensitivity of beta-cells to different secretagogues after human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) exposure. Furthermore, experiments were performed to clarify the biochemical mechanisms behind the defective insulin response observed in these islets. Rat pancreatic islets were isolated and kept in tissue culture (medium RPMI-1640 plus 10% calf serum) for 5 days. The islets were subsequently exposed to 60 pM human recombinant IL-1 beta during 48 h in the same culture conditions as above and examined immediately after IL-1 exposure. The rIL-1 beta-treated islets showed a marked reduction of glucose-stimulated insulin release. Stimulation with arginine plus different glucose concentrations, and leucine plus glutamine partially counteracted the rIL-1 beta-induced reduction of insulin release. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase, glucokinase, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were similar in control and IL-1-exposed islets. Treatment with IL-1 also did not impair the activities of NADH+- and NADPH+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-aspartate transaminase, glutamate-alanine transaminase, citrate synthase, and NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase. The oxidation of D-[6-14C]glucose and L-[U-14C]leucine were decreased by 50% in IL-1-treated islets. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the ratios of [2-14C]pyruvate oxidation/[1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation and L-[U-14C]leucine oxidation/L-[1-14C]leucine decarboxylation, indicating that IL-1 decreases the proportion of

  15. Impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor 4-phenylbutyrate on the clearance of apoptotic pancreatic carcinoma cells by human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Lena; Welsch, Thilo; Dovzhanskiy, Dmitriy I; Felix, Klaus; Giese, Nathalia A; Krysko, Dmitri V; Werner, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to have potent anticancer activities, partly induced by tumour cell apoptosis. The clearance of apoptotic tumour cells is an important mechanism of antitumour immune surveillance. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) and its immunological effects on the macrophage clearance of apoptotic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. To this end, a co-culture system of human macrophages from donors and PDAC patients, and PDAC cell lines (T3M4, PANC-1 and AsPC-1) was established to study the effect of 4-PB. Apoptosis and phagocytic activity were analysed using flow cytometry, and phagocytosis was confirmed by confocal microscopy. Further, p21 expression was quantified by immunoblot analysis. 4-PB treatment (0-10 mM) resulted in a dose-dependent induction of tumour cell apoptosis in two of the cell lines (T3M4 and PANC-1), but it also induced human macrophage apoptosis. The apoptotic effect of gemcitabine on PDAC cells was further enhanced by 4-PB. Moreover, 4-PB led to a dose-dependent overexpression of the cell cycle regulator p21 in tumour cells. In co-culture, apoptotic PDAC cells were phagocytosed by donor macrophages and phagocytosis was increased through tumour cell exposure to 4-PB and/or gemcitabine, whereas phagocytosis of PANC-1 cells was reduced using macrophages of PDAC patients treated with 4-PB. The 4-PB treatment induced human macrophage expression of the pro-angiogenic IL-8 and simultaneously inhibited inflammatory cytokine release through modulation of IL-10 and TNFα after phagocytosis of apoptotic PDAC cells. In conclusion, the 4-PB treatment activated tumour cell death in PDAC cells, resulting in tumour cell phagocytosis by macrophages. The latter were characterized by an anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokine response demonstrating adverse, tumour-promoting effects of macrophages on tumour cells. Thus, the potential of 4-PB as an anticancer agent against

  16. Amyloid Deposition in Transplanted Human Pancreatic Islets: A Conceivable Cause of Their Long-Term Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Andersson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the encouraging report of the Edmonton group, there was a rejuvenation of the islet transplantation field. After that, more pessimistic views spread when long-term results of the clinical outcome were published. A progressive loss of the β-cell function meant that almost all patients were back on insulin therapy after 5 years. More than 10 years ago, we demonstrated that amyloid deposits rapidly formed in human islets and in mouse islets transgenic for human IAPP when grafted into nude mice. It is, therefore, conceivable to consider amyloid formation as one potential candidate for the long-term failure. The present paper reviews attempts in our laboratories to elucidate the dynamics of and mechanisms behind the formation of amyloid in transplanted islets with special emphasis on the impact of long-term hyperglycemia.

  17. A Mouse to Human Search for Plasma Proteome Changes Associated with Pancreatic Tumor Development

    OpenAIRE

    Faca, Vitor M; Song, Kenneth S; Hong Wang; Qing Zhang; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Newcomb, Lisa F; Plentz, Ruben R.; Sushma Gurumurthy; Redston, Mark S.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Pereira-Faca, Sandra R.; Ireton, Renee C.; Hiroyuki Katayama; Veronika Glukhova; Douglas Phanstiel

    2008-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Cancers are life-threatening, disorganized masses of cells that can occur anywhere in the human body. They develop when cells acquire genetic changes that allow them to grow uncontrollably and to spread around the body (metastasize). If a cancer is detected when it is still small and has not metastasized, surgery can often provide a cure. Unfortunately, many cancers are detected only when they are large enough to press against surrounding tissues and cause pain or...

  18. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Department of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710038 (China); Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Fan, Daiming, E-mail: daimingfan@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Guo, Xuegang, E-mail: xuegangguo@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  19. An impedance grasping strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz Arias, Mauricio; Scherpen, Jacqueline M.A.; Macchelli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This work is devoted to an impedance grasping strategy for a class of standard mechanical systems in the port- Hamiltonian framework. The presented control strategy re- quires a set of coordinate transformations, since the impedance control in the port-Hamiltonian framework with structure preservati

  20. Regeneration of human epidermis on acellular dermis is impeded by small-molecule inhibitors of EGF receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Sofi; Ostman, Arne; Rollman, Ola

    2008-10-01

    The family of human epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR, HER2-4) exerts key functions in normal and malignant epithelial cells. Both EGFR and HER2 are valuable targets for anti-cancer drugs by interfering with ligand binding, receptor dimerization, or tyrosine kinase activity. A similar therapeutic strategy has been advocated for chronic psoriasis since plaque lesions overexpress EGFR and its ligands. Our aim was to characterize EGFR/HER2 protein expression in skin cultures and to evaluate the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on epidermal outgrowth, morphology, and EGFR activation. Human skin explants were established on cell-free dermis and cultured at the air-liquid interface. The impact of small-molecule HER inhibitors on outgrowth was assayed by fluorescence-based image analysis and histometry. Effects of a dual EGFR/HER2 kinase inhibitor, PKI166, on neoepidermis were studied by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Receptor immunostaining showed in vivo-like distributions with highest EGFR intensity in the proliferative layers whereas HER2 was mainly expressed by suprabasal keratinocytes. Reepithelialization was associated with EGFR autophosphorylation irrespective of exogenous ligand stimulation. PKI166 inhibited neoepidermal EGFR activation, keratinocyte proliferation, and outgrowth from normal and psoriatic skin explants. The rate of epidermalization in presence of other HER inhibitors varied suggesting that drug specificity, potency, and reversibility determine the dynamic outcome. Overall, agents predominantly targeting EGFR kinase were more efficient inhibitors of epidermal regeneration than an HER2-selective drug. The study illustrates the usefulness of a dynamic skin model and emphasizes the potential of HER-directed approaches to control epidermal growth in hyperproliferative skin disorders.

  1. Honokiol arrests cell cycle, induces apoptosis, and potentiates the cytotoxic effect of gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Arora

    Full Text Available Survival rates for patients with pancreatic cancer are extremely poor due to its asymptomatic progression to advanced and metastatic stage for which current therapies remain largely ineffective. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents and treatment approaches are desired to improve the clinical outcome. In this study, we determined the effects of honokiol, a biologically active constituent of oriental medicinal herb Magnolia officinalis/grandiflora, on two pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa and Panc1, alone and in combination with the standard chemotherapeutic drug, gemcitabine. Honokiol exerted growth inhibitory effects on both the pancreatic cancer cell lines by causing cell cycle arrest at G₁ phase and induction of apoptosis. At the molecular level, honokiol markedly decreased the expression of cyclins (D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk2 and Cdk4, and caused an increase in Cdk inhibitors, p21 and p27. Furthermore, honokiol treatment led to augmentation of Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-xL ratios to favor apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. These changes were accompanied by enhanced cytoplasmic accumulation of NF-κB with a concomitant decrease in nuclear fraction and reduced transcriptional activity of NF-κB responsive promoter. This was associated with decreased phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B alpha (IκB-α causing its stabilization and thus increased cellular levels. Importantly, honokiol also potentiated the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine, in part, by restricting the gemcitabine-induced nuclear accumulation of NF-κB in the treated pancreatic cancer cell lines. Altogether, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, the growth inhibitory effects of honokiol in pancreatic cancer and indicate its potential usefulness as a novel natural agent in prevention and therapy.

  2. Insulin-producing cells generated from dedifferentiated human pancreatic beta cells expanded in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A Russ

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansion of beta cells from the limited number of adult human islet donors is an attractive prospect for increasing cell availability for cell therapy of diabetes. However, attempts at expanding human islet cells in tissue culture result in loss of beta-cell phenotype. Using a lineage-tracing approach we provided evidence for massive proliferation of beta-cell-derived (BCD cells within these cultures. Expansion involves dedifferentiation resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Epigenetic analyses indicate that key beta-cell genes maintain open chromatin structure in expanded BCD cells, although they are not transcribed. Here we investigated whether BCD cells can be redifferentiated into beta-like cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Redifferentiation conditions were screened by following activation of an insulin-DsRed2 reporter gene. Redifferentiated cells were characterized for gene expression, insulin content and secretion assays, and presence of secretory vesicles by electron microscopy. BCD cells were induced to redifferentiate by a combination of soluble factors. The redifferentiated cells expressed beta-cell genes, stored insulin in typical secretory vesicles, and released it in response to glucose. The redifferentiation process involved mesenchymal-epithelial transition, as judged by changes in gene expression. Moreover, inhibition of the EMT effector SLUG (SNAI2 using shRNA resulted in stimulation of redifferentiation. Lineage-traced cells also gave rise at a low rate to cells expressing other islet hormones, suggesting transition of BCD cells through an islet progenitor-like stage during redifferentiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate for the first time that expanded dedifferentiated beta cells can be induced to redifferentiate in culture. The findings suggest that ex-vivo expansion of adult human islet cells is a promising approach for generation of insulin-producing cells for

  3. Direct effects of cyclosporin A on human pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Nerup, J; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1986-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CyA) may induce clinical remission in newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients. Recently, however, adverse effects of high doses of CyA on rodent islets have been reported in vivo and in vitro. The possible direct effects of CyA on the human endocrine pancreas...... by 59% (range 3-268%). The glucagon content was not affected. Cyclosporin G inhibited the insulin release, whereas dihydrocyclosporin D had no consistent effects. Glucose-stimulated insulin release from perifused islets was markedly depressed in CyA-treated islets. This effect was not fully reversed 48...

  4. Pancreatic hormones are expressed on the surfaces of human and rat islet cells through exocytotic sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L I; Hutton, J C; Madsen, O D

    1989-01-01

    . Electron microscopy reveals the labeling to occur at sites of exocytotic granule release, involving the surfaces of extruded granule cores. The surfaces of islet cells were labeled both by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, excluding that receptor-interacting, anti-idiotypic hormone antibodies were...... responsible for the staining. Human insulin cells were surface-labeled by monoclonal antibodies recognizing the mature secretory products, insulin and C-peptide but not with monoclonal antibodies specific for proinsulin. Thus, routing of unprocessed preproinsulin to the cell surface may not account...... for these results. It is concluded that the staining reflects interactions between the appropriate antibodies and exocytotic sites of hormone release....

  5. Identification of stiffness variations in supporting substances of a human canine tooth with a bracket-beam-piezoelectric sensor and its electromechanical impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector A. Tinoco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental method is described to identify the stiffness variations produced by drillings done in different supporting substances of a human canine tooth. To measure the supporting substances parameters through of a canine, a sensor-actuator system was developed. The sensor-actuator device was composed of a stainless steel bracket bonded to a steel wire attached to two piezoelectric transducers, with a concentrated mass attached to the end of the wire. To excite the device, high frequency voltage (between 5 and 10 KHz was applied through the piezo-transducers, which affects the tooth by means of the vibration of the wire. High frequency mechanical vibrations allowed the appraisal of the mechanical response from the supporting substances. Mechanical responses associated with the stiffness of the support were quantified with the electrical impedance of the piezo-transducers. The device was coupled to the crown of a canine tooth simulating a condition of fixing as in the bone, the tooth was fastened by the root portion inside the supporting substance. Four supporting substances were characterized for the tests. After establishing base values of the stiffness of each supporting substance, the stiffness variations were assessed in two stages (two drillings; these were made perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the tooth, Results show that it is possible to assess stiffness variations with the proposed methodology as well as to quantify the stiffness differences, by means of variation indexes.

  6. Pancreatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself Pancreatic cancer Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder in which thick, sticky mucus can also block tubes in your pancreas The pancreas also plays a role in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of ...

  7. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samir Habashi; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Initial diagnosis is accomplished most often by cross-sectional imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration has become the preferred test to help distinguish pseudocyst from other cystic lesions of the pancreas. Most pseudocysts resolve spontaneously with supportive care. The size of the pseudocyst and the length of time the cyst has been present are poor predictors for the potential of pseudocyst resolution or complications, but in general, larger cysts are more likely to be symptomatic or cause complications. The main two indications for some type of invasive drainage procedure are persistent patient symptoms or the presence of complications (infection, gastric outlet or biliary obstruction, bleeding). Three different strategies for pancreatic pseudocysts drainage are available: endoscopic (transpapillary or transmural) drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. To date, no prospective controlled studies have compared directly these approaches. As a result, the management varies based on local expertise, but in general, endoscopic drainage is becoming the preferred approach because it is less invasive than surgery, avoids the need for external drain, and has a high long-term success rate. A tailored therapeutic approach taking into consideration patient preferences and involving multidisciplinary team of therapeutic endoscopist, interventional radiologist and pancreatic surgeon should be considered in all cases.

  8. EGCG inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumors orthotopically implanted in Balb C nude mice through modulation of FKHRL1/FOXO3a and neuropilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sharmila; Marsh, Luke; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is currently one of the fourth leading causes of cancer-related mortality with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5 %. Since pancreatic carcinoma is largely refractory to conventional therapies, there is a strong medical need for the development of novel and innovative cancer preventive strategies. The forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXO) play a major role in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, metastasis, and tumorigenesis. The objectives of this study were to examine whether FKHRL1/FOXO3a modulates antitumor activity of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), an active ingredient in green tea, in pancreatic cancer model in vivo. PANC-1 cells were orthotopically implanted into Balb c nude mice and gavaged with EGCG after tumor formation. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of PI3K, AKT, ERK, and FOXO3a/FKHRL1 and its target genes were measured by the western blot analysis and/or q-RT-PCR. FOXO-DNA binding was measured by gel shift assay. EGCG-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK, PI3K, AKT, and FKHRL1/FOXO3a, and modulation of FOXO target genes. EGCG induced apoptosis by upregulating Bim and activating caspase-3. EGCG modulated markers of cell cycle (p27/KIP1), angiogenesis (CD31, VEGF, IL-6, IL-8, SEMA3F, and HIF1α), and metastasis (MMP2 and MMP7). The inhibition of VEGF by EGCG was associated with suppression of neuropilin. EGCG inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition by upregulating the expression of E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of N-cadherin and Zeb1. These data suggest that EGCG inhibits pancreatic cancer orthotopic tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis which are associated with inhibition of PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways and activation of FKHRL1/FOXO3a. As a conclusion, EGCG can be used for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  10. Controlled aggregation of primary human pancreatic islet cells leads to glucose-responsive pseudoislets comparable to native islets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilderink, Janneke; Spijker, Siebe; Carlotti, Françoise; Lange, Lydia; Engelse, Marten; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Koning, Eelco; Karperien, Marcel; van Apeldoorn, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation is a promising treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes. However, pancreatic islets vary in size and shape affecting their survival and function after transplantation because of mass transport limitations. To reduce diffusion restrictions and improve islet cell surv

  11. hMena+11a Isoform Serves as a Marker of Epithelial Phenotype and Sensitivity to EGFR Inhibition in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Maria S.; Balsamo, Michele; Di Modugno, Francesca; Mottolese, Marcella; Alessio, Massimo; Melucci, Elisa; Milella, Michele; McConkey, David J.; Philippar, Ulrike; Gertler, Frank B.; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Nistico, Paola

    2008-01-01

    Purpose hMena, member of the Ena/VASP protein family, is a cytoskeletal protein that is involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not the expression of hMena isoforms correlated with sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and could serve as markers with potential clinical use. Experimental design Human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines were characterized for in vitro sensitivity to erlotinib, expression of HER family receptors, markers of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), and expression of hMena and its isoform hMena+11a. The effects of EGF and erlotinib on hMena expression as well as the effect of hMena knock-down on cell proliferation were also evaluated. Results hMena was detected in all of the pancreatic tumor cell lines tested as well as in the majority of the human tumor samples [primary (92%) and metastatic (86%)]. Intriguingly, in vitro hMena+11a isoform was specifically associated with an epithelial phenotype, EGFR dependency and sensitivity to erlotinib. In epithelial BxPC3 cells EGF upregulated hMena/hMena+11a and erlotinib downregulated expression. hMena knock-down reduced cell proliferation and MAPK and AKT activation in BxPC3 cells and promoted the growth inhibitory effects of erlotinib. Conclusions Collectively, our data indicate that the hMena+11a isoform is associated with an epithelial phenotype and identifies EGFR dependent cell lines that are sensitive to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. The availability of anti-hMena+11a specific probes may offer a new tool in pancreatic cancer management if these results can be verified prospectively in cancer patients. PMID:18676769

  12. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintaining good health. Can chronic pancreatitis give my child cancer? If your child has chronic pancreatitis, he or she will be at an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to the general population. The degree of ...

  13. Pharmacological pain management in chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, S.S.; Juel, J.; Graversen, C.; Kolesnikov, Y.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Intense abdominal pain is a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis and its treatment remains a major clinical challenge. Basic studies of pancreatic nerves and experimental human pain research have provided evidence that pain processing is abnormal in these patients and in many cases resembles th

  14. Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grinó P

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic neoplasms are an uncommon aetiology of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours are a rare subgroup of pancreatic neoplasms. CASE REPORT: We report on three patients having acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, one of them with severe pancreatitis, and review the published cases up to now. Only 22 patients with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours have been reported (including the present cases. Most of these cases were of non-functioning neoplasms and the course of the pancreatitis tended to be mild. In the most recent reports and in the present cases, the initial diagnostic method was CT scan. Less than half had metastases when the tumour was diagnosed and mortality from these neoplasms reached approximately 50%. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours can cause acute pancreatitis even in patients under 50 years of age. On many occasions, the tumours are non-functioning; therefore, acute pancreatitis may be the first clinical symptom. Consequently, faced with acute pancreatitis of unknown origin, a non-functioning neuroendocrine tumour should be ruled out.

  15. Impedance and Collective Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, E; Rumolo, R; Herr, W

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '4 Impedance and Collective Effects' with the content: 4 Impedance and Collective Effects Introduction 4.1 Space Charge 4.2 Wake Fields and Impedances 4.3 Coherent Instabilities 4.4 Landau Damping 4.5 Two-Stream Effects (Electron Cloud and Ions) 4.6 Beam-Beam Effects 4.7 Numerical Modelling

  16. Apigenin Inhibits Pancreatic Stellate Cell Activity in Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Amy A.; Porro, Laura J.; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Falzon, Miriam; Spratt, Heidi; Zhou, Jia; Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by recurrent pancreatic injury, resulting in inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis. There are currently no drugs limiting pancreatic fibrosis associated with CP, and there is a definite need to fill this void in patient care. MATERIALS AND METHODS Pancreatitis was induced in C57/BL6 mice using supraphysiologic doses of cerulein (CR), and apigenin treatment (once daily, 50 μg/mouse by oral gavage) was initiated one week into the recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) protocol. Pancreata were harvested after four weeks of RAP. Immunostaining with fibronectin antibody was used to quantify the extent of pancreatic fibrosis. To assess how apigenin may decrease organ fibrosis, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) in vitro. Lastly, we assessed apigenin’s effect on gene expression in PSCs stimulated with parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), a pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory mediator of pancreatitis, using RT-PCR. RESULTS After four weeks of RAP, apigenin significantly reduced the fibrotic response to injury while preserving acinar units. Apigenin inhibited viability and induced apoptosis of PSCs in a time and dose-dependent manner. Lastly, apigenin reduced PTHrP-stimulated increases in the PSC mRNA expression levels of extracellular matrix proteins collagen 1A1 and fibronectin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, TGF-β, and IL-6. CONCLUSIONS These in vivo and in vitro studies provide novel insights regarding apigenin’s mechanism(s) of action in reducing the severity of RAP. Additional preclinical testing of apigenin analogs is warranted to develop a therapeutic agent for patients at risk for CP. PMID:25799526

  17. Value of the radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) for targeting of GLP-1 receptor-expressing pancreatic tissues in mice and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Bern (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. Moreover, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers for somatostatin and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor targeting of tumours. The present preclinical study determines therefore the value of an established GLP-1 receptor antagonist for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in mice and humans. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in mice pancreas and insulinomas as well as in human insulinomas; competition experiments were performed in the presence of increasing concentration of GLP-1(7-36)amide or exendin(9-39). The antagonist {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) labels mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells and mouse insulinomas, but it does not label human pancreatic {beta}-cells and insulinomas. High affinity displacement (IC{sub 50} approximately 2 nM) is observed in mouse {beta}-cells and insulinomas with either the exendin(9-39) antagonist or GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist. For comparison, the agonist {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide intensively labels mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells, mouse insulinoma and human insulinomas; high affinity displacement is observed for the GLP-1(7-36)amide in all tissues; however, a 5 and 20 times lower affinity is found for exendin(9-39) in the mouse and human tissues, respectively. This study reports a species-dependent behaviour of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) that can optimally target GLP-1 receptors in mice but not in human tissue. Due to its overly low binding affinity, this antagonist is an inadequate targeting agent for human GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues, as opposed to the GLP-1 receptor agonist, GLP-1(7-36)amide. (orig.)

  18. The human pancreatic islet transcriptome: expression of candidate genes for type 1 diabetes and the impact of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Décio L Eizirik

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is an autoimmune disease in which pancreatic beta cells are killed by infiltrating immune cells and by cytokines released by these cells. Signaling events occurring in the pancreatic beta cells are decisive for their survival or death in diabetes. We have used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq to identify transcripts, including splice variants, expressed in human islets of Langerhans under control conditions or following exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β and interferon-γ (IFN-γ. Based on this unique dataset, we examined whether putative candidate genes for T1D, previously identified by GWAS, are expressed in human islets. A total of 29,776 transcripts were identified as expressed in human islets. Expression of around 20% of these transcripts was modified by pro-inflammatory cytokines, including apoptosis- and inflammation-related genes. Chemokines were among the transcripts most modified by cytokines, a finding confirmed at the protein level by ELISA. Interestingly, 35% of the genes expressed in human islets undergo alternative splicing as annotated in RefSeq, and cytokines caused substantial changes in spliced transcripts. Nova1, previously considered a brain-specific regulator of mRNA splicing, is expressed in islets and its knockdown modified splicing. 25/41 of the candidate genes for T1D are expressed in islets, and cytokines modified expression of several of these transcripts. The present study doubles the number of known genes expressed in human islets and shows that cytokines modify alternative splicing in human islet cells. Importantly, it indicates that more than half of the known T1D candidate genes are expressed in human islets. This, and the production of a large number of chemokines and cytokines by cytokine-exposed islets, reinforces the concept of a dialog between pancreatic islets and the immune system in T1D. This dialog is modulated by candidate genes for the disease at both the

  19. Clinicopathological significance of Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression in human pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Dong; Jian-Ping Zhou; Hao Zhang; Ke-Jian Guo; Yu-Lin Tian; Yu-Ting Dong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the clinicopathological significance of the expression of the apoptosis-inhibitory Bcl-2 protein (pBcl-2) and the apoptosis-promoting Bax protein (pBax) in human invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) of the pancreas. METHODS: Fifty-nine surgical specimens of IDCs of the pancreas were stained immunohistochemically to detectpBcl-2 and pBax expressions whose correlation to tumor classification, staging, and prognosis was analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The expression of pBcl-2 and pBax was detected in 21 of 59 (35.6%) and in 29 of 59 (49.2%) patients with IDCs of the pancreas, respectively. Neither pBcl-2 nor pBax alone was correlated to TNM staging and differentiation degree of IDCs of the pancreas according to univariate analysis. By Mantel-Cox test, the median survival time after surgery for pBcl-2(+) and pBcl-2(-) groups were 14.3 and 7.3 mo, respectively (χ2= 9.357, P = 0.002) and that for pBax(+) and pBax(-) groups were 12.9 and 10.2 mo, respectively (χ2= 0.285, P>0.05).Contingency coefficient between pBd-2 and pBax expression was 0.298, indicating that there was correlation between them (χ2= 5.74, P<0.05). The median survival time after surgery for pBd-2(+)pBax(+) and pBcl-2(+)pBax(-) groups were 14.3 and 14.1 mo, respectively, and that for pBcl-2 (-)pBax(+) and pBcl-2(-)pBax(-) groups were 5.9 and 9.9 mo, respectively. There was a significant difference between pBcl-2(+)pBax(+) and pBcl-2(-)pBax(+) (χ2 = 5.06,P<0.05), such was the case for pBcl-2(+)pBax(+) andpBcl-2(-)pBax(-) (χ2= 7.18, P<0.01). Cox proportional hazards model for multivariate analysis was applied, indicating that pBcl-2, TNM staging, age and pBax were high risk factors of post-surgical survival time. CONCLUSION: Both pBcl-2 and pBax have high expression in IDCs of the pancreas, indicating that co-expression of pBcl-2 and pBax is a good indicator of favorable prognosis in IDCs of the pancreas.

  20. Functional role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 in double stranded RNA cleavage by human pancreatic ribonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Tabish Rehman

    Full Text Available Human pancreatic ribonuclease (HPR, a member of RNase A superfamily, has a high activity on double stranded (ds RNA. By virtue of this activity HPR appears to be involved in the host-defense against pathogenic viruses. To delineate the mechanism of dsRNA cleavage by HPR, we have investigated the role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 of HPR in its activity on dsRNA. A non-basic residue glycine 38, earlier shown to be important for dsRNA cleavage by HPR was also included in the study in the context of glutamine 28 and arginine 39. Nine variants of HPR respectively containing Q28A, Q28L, R39A, G38D, Q28A/R39A, Q28L/R39A, Q28A/G38D, R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A mutations were generated and functionally characterized. The far-UV CD-spectral analysis revealed all variants, except R39A, to have structures similar to that of HPR. The catalytic activity of all HPR variants on single stranded RNA substrate was similar to that of HPR, whereas on dsRNA, the catalytic efficiency of all single residue variants, except for the Q28L, was significantly reduced. The dsRNA cleavage activity of R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A variants was most drastically reduced to 4% of that of HPR. The variants having reduced dsRNA cleavage activity also had reduction in their dsDNA melting activity and thermal stability. Our results indicate that in HPR both glutamine 28 and arginine 39 are important for the cleavage of dsRNA. Although these residues are not directly involved in catalysis, both arginine 39 and glutamine 28 appear to be facilitating a productive substrate-enzyme interaction during the dsRNA cleavage by HPR.

  1. Functional role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 in double stranded RNA cleavage by human pancreatic ribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Md Tabish; Dey, Punyatirtha; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan; Batra, Janendra K

    2011-03-08

    Human pancreatic ribonuclease (HPR), a member of RNase A superfamily, has a high activity on double stranded (ds) RNA. By virtue of this activity HPR appears to be involved in the host-defense against pathogenic viruses. To delineate the mechanism of dsRNA cleavage by HPR, we have investigated the role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 of HPR in its activity on dsRNA. A non-basic residue glycine 38, earlier shown to be important for dsRNA cleavage by HPR was also included in the study in the context of glutamine 28 and arginine 39. Nine variants of HPR respectively containing Q28A, Q28L, R39A, G38D, Q28A/R39A, Q28L/R39A, Q28A/G38D, R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A mutations were generated and functionally characterized. The far-UV CD-spectral analysis revealed all variants, except R39A, to have structures similar to that of HPR. The catalytic activity of all HPR variants on single stranded RNA substrate was similar to that of HPR, whereas on dsRNA, the catalytic efficiency of all single residue variants, except for the Q28L, was significantly reduced. The dsRNA cleavage activity of R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A variants was most drastically reduced to 4% of that of HPR. The variants having reduced dsRNA cleavage activity also had reduction in their dsDNA melting activity and thermal stability. Our results indicate that in HPR both glutamine 28 and arginine 39 are important for the cleavage of dsRNA. Although these residues are not directly involved in catalysis, both arginine 39 and glutamine 28 appear to be facilitating a productive substrate-enzyme interaction during the dsRNA cleavage by HPR.

  2. Impedance and component heating

    CERN Document Server

    Métral, E; Mounet, N; Pieloni, T; Salvant, B

    2015-01-01

    The impedance is a complex function of frequency, which represents, for the plane under consideration (longitudinal, horizontal or vertical), the force integrated over the length of an element, from a “source” to a “test” wave, normalized by their charges. In general, the impedance in a given plane is a nonlinear function of the test and source transverse coordinates, but it is most of the time sufficient to consider only the first few linear terms. Impedances can influence the motion of trailing particles, in the longitudinal and in one or both transverse directions, leading to energy loss, beam instabilities, or producing undesirable secondary effects such as excessive heating of sensitive components at or near the chamber wall, called beam-induced RF heating. The LHC performance limitations linked to impedances encountered during the 2010-2012 run are reviewed and the currently expected situation during the HL-LHC era is discussed.

  3. Discovering Bisdemethoxycurcumin from Curcuma longa rhizome as a potent small molecule inhibitor of human pancreatic α-amylase, a target for type-2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Zinjarde, Smita; Bhargava, Shobha; Rajamohanan, P R; Ravikumar, Ameeta

    2012-12-15

    Curcuma longa rhizome is used extensively in culinary preparations in Far East and South-East Asia. Health benefits of curcuminoids from C. longa as antioxidants, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory molecules have been well documented. We report here for the first time that Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) from C. longa, acts as an inhibitor to inactivate human pancreatic α-amylase, a therapeutic target for oral hypoglycemic agents in type-2 diabetes. Bioactivity guided isolation of rhizome isopropanol extract led to the identification by HPLC and NMR of BDMC as a lead small molecule inhibitor of porcine and human pancreatic α-amylase with an IC(50) value of 0.026 and 0.025 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis revealed that using starch as the substrate, HPA exhibited an uncompetitive mode of inhibition with an apparent K(i) of 3.0 μM. The study gains importance as BDMC could be a good drug candidate in development of new inhibitors of HPA and of functional foods for controlling starch digestion in order to reduce post-prandial hyperglycemia.

  4. Camptothecin analog (CPT-11)-sensitive human pancreatic tumor cell line QGP-1N shows resistance to SN-38, an active metabolite of CPT-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, S; Shimazoe, T; Kuga, H; Sato, K; Kono, A

    1992-10-15

    In the course of our study to determine the cross-sensitivity between CPT-11 and its active metabolite, SN-38, we found a SN-38-resistant human pancreatic tumor cell line, QGP-1N, which shows sensitivity to CPT-11. The IC50 of SN-38 was 152 times greater for QGP-1N than for SUIT-2, also a human pancreatic tumor cell line, whose IC50 of CPT-11 was similar to that for QGP-1N. The uptakes of CPT-11 and SN-38 and the intracellular conversion of CPT-11 to SN-38 could not explain the difference in sensitivity. DNA synthesis of QGP-1N cells was inhibited by CPT-11 which did not affect that of SUIT-2, while SN-38 inhibited the DNA synthesis of SUIT-2 at lower concentrations than that of QGP-1N. The inhibition test of topoisomerase I catalytic activity by CPT-11 or SN-38 revealed no difference in the biochemical properties of the topoisomerase I enzymes to the compounds between these two cell lines. These results indicate that CPT-11 should have its own inhibitory effect on DNA synthesis through a yet unknown mechanism in QGP-1N cells, although SN-38 plays an essential role in the antitumor activity of CPT-11 in SUIT-2 cells. In some cases, the antitumor effect of CPT-11 might be consequent not only on SN-38 but also on CPT-11 itself.

  5. Antitumor activity of a combination of trastuzumab (Herceptin) and oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 on human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hiroyuki; Yanoma, Shunsuke; Takemiya, Shouji; Sugimasa, Yukio; Akaike, Makoto; Yukawa, Norio; Rino, Yasushi; Imada, Toshio

    2007-08-01

    The cytotoxic effect of trastuzumab in combination with oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 on human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing human pancreatic cancer cell line TRG in vitro and in vivo was investigated. HER2 expression in TRG was analyzed by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. For in vitro experiments, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was used instead of S-1. In vivo studies were conducted with TRG xenografts in athymic mice. Trastuzumab (10 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally once a week for 4 weeks. S-1 (10 mg/kg) was administered orally 5 days a week for 4 weeks. The results showed that TRG cells were positive for HER2 mRNA and overexpressed HER2 protein. Either trastuzumab or 5-FU concentration-dependently inhibited the growth of TRG cells. The combination of trastuzumab and 5-FU resulted in a significant inhibition of growth of TRG cells compared to either agent alone (P<0.001). Incubation of TRG cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with trastuzumab enhanced the antiproliferative effect of trastuzumab, which could be the result of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The combination of trastuzumab and S-1 resulted in a significant reduction in xenograft volume compared to each agent alone (P<0.0001). In conclusion, this study showed that combination therapy with trastuzumab and S-1 may be effective for HER2-overexpressing pancreatic cancer patients.

  6. The LEP impedance model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotter, B. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes a number of measurements and computations of the impedance of the Large Electron Positron collider LEP at CERN. The work has been performed over several years, together with D. Brandt, K. Cornelis, A. Hofmann, G. Sabbi and many others. The agreement between measurements of single bunch instabilities on the machine and computer simulations is in general excellent and gives confidence in the impedance model used. (author)

  7. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  8. 百里醌抑制体内外胰腺癌转移作用%Anti-metastasis effect of thymoquinone on human pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴志豪; 陈兆; 沈跃; 黄莉莉; 蒋平

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies reported that thymoquinone (TQ), a component derived from the medicinal spice Nigella sativa (also called black cumin), exhibited inhibitory effects on cell proliferation of many cancer cell lines. This study was performed to investigate the anti-metastatic effect of thymoquinone on the pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that thymoquinone suppressed the migration and invasion of Panc-1 cells in a does-dependent manner. To investigate the possible mechanisms involved in these events, Western blotting analysis was performed, and found that thymoquinone significantly down-regulates NF-kB and MMP-9 in Panc-1 cells. In addition, metastatic model simulating human pancreatic cancer was established by orthotropic implantation of histologically intact pancreatic tumor tissue into the pancreatic wall of nude mice. And administration of thymoquinone significantly reduced tumor metastasis compared to untreated control. Furthermore, the expression of NF-kB and MMP-9 in tumor tissues was also suppressed after treatment with thymoquinone. Taken together, the results indicate that thymoquinone exerts anti-metastatic activity on pancreatic cancer both in vitro and in vivo, which may be related to down-regulation of NF-kB and its regulated molecules such as MMP-9 protein. Consequently, these results provide important insights into thymoquinone as an anti-metastatic agent for the treatment of human pancreatic cancer.%为探讨百里醌抑制体内外胰腺癌转移的作用及其机制,本研究应用不同浓度百里醌作用人胰腺癌Panc-1细胞后,观察百里醌对体外Panc-1细胞迁移和侵袭的作用;Western blotting检测胰腺癌细胞中NF-κB和MMP-9表达的变化.体内建立起裸鼠胰腺癌原位移植瘤模型,分成对照组和百里醌组,实验结束后观察百里醌对裸鼠胰腺癌转移的抑制作用,同时免疫组织化学法检测裸鼠胰腺肿瘤组织中CD34、NF-κB和MMP-9的阳性表达.结果表明,百

  9. The changes of the frequency specific impedance of the human body due to the resonance in the kHz range in cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, K. P.; Nawrocka-Bogusz, H.

    2011-12-01

    The frequency-specific absorption of kHz signals has been postulated for different tissues, trace elements, vitamins, toxins, pathogens, allergens etc. for low-power (μV) signals. An increase in the impedance of the human body is observed only up to the given power of the applied signal. The highest amplification of the given signal being damped by the body makes it possible to determine the intensity of the given process in the body (e.g. amount of the toxin, trace element, intensity of the allergy) being connected with a given frequency spectrum of the signal. The mechanism of frequency-specific absorption can be explained by means of the Quantum Field Theory being applied to the structure of the water. Substantially high coincidence between the frequencies of the rotation of free quasi-excited electrons in coherent domains of water and the frequencies being used in the MORA diagnostics (Med-Tronic GmbH, EN ISO 13485, EN ISO 9001) can be observed. These frequencies are located in the proximity of f = 7kHz · i (i = 1,3,5,7,...). This fact suggests that the