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Sample records for impairs mitochondrial function

  1. Reductive stress impairs myoblasts mitochondrial function and triggers mitochondrial hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, François; Charles, Anne-Laure; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Bouitbir, Jamal; Bonifacio, Annalisa; Piquard, François; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Geny, Bernard; Zoll, Joffrey

    2015-07-01

    Even though oxidative stress damage from excessive production of ROS is a well known phenomenon, the impact of reductive stress remains poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that cellular reductive stress could lead to mitochondrial malfunction, triggering a mitochondrial hormesis (mitohormesis) phenomenon able to protect mitochondria from the deleterious effects of statins. We performed several in vitro experiments on L6 myoblasts and studied the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at different exposure times. Direct NAC exposure (1mM) led to reductive stress, impairing mitochondrial function by decreasing maximal mitochondrial respiration and increasing H₂O₂production. After 24h of incubation, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased. The resulting mitochondrial oxidation activated mitochondrial biogenesis pathways at the mRNA level. After one week of exposure, mitochondria were well-adapted as shown by the decrease of cellular ROS, the increase of mitochondrial content, as well as of the antioxidant capacities. Atorvastatin (ATO) exposure (100μM) for 24h increased ROS levels, reduced the percentage of live cells, and increased the total percentage of apoptotic cells. NAC exposure during 3days failed to protect cells from the deleterious effects of statins. On the other hand, NAC pretreatment during one week triggered mitochondrial hormesis and reduced the deleterious effect of statins. These results contribute to a better understanding of the redox-dependant pathways linked to mitochondria, showing that reductive stress could trigger mitochondrial hormesis phenomenon.

  2. Impaired mitochondrial functions in organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Anwar; Kiran, Ravi; Sandhir, Rajat

    2009-12-01

    Acute exposure to organophosphates induces a delayed neurodegenerative condition known as organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN). The mechanism of OPIDN has not been fully understood as it does not involve cholinergic crisis. The present study has been designed to evaluate the role of mitochondrial dysfunctions in the development of OPIDN. OPIDN was induced in rats by administering acute dose of monocrotophos (MCP, 20 mg/kg body weight, orally) or dichlorvos (DDVP, 200 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously), 15-20 min after treatment with antidotes [atropine (20 mg/kg body weight) and 2-PAM (100 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally]. MDA levels were observed to be higher and thiol content was lower in mitochondria from brain regions of OP exposed animals. This was accompanied by decreased activities of the mitochondrial enzymes; NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and cytochrome oxidase. In addition, mitochondrial functions assessed by MTT reduction also confirmed mitochondrial dysfunctions following development of OPIDN. The spatial long-term memory evaluated using elevated plus-maze test was observed to be deficit in OPIDN. The results suggest impaired mitochondrial functions as a mechanism involved in the development of organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy.

  3. Preventing mitochondrial fission impairs mitochondrial function and leads to loss of mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe A Parone

    Full Text Available Mitochondria form a highly dynamic tubular network, the morphology of which is regulated by frequent fission and fusion events. However, the role of mitochondrial fission in homeostasis of the organelle is still unknown. Here we report that preventing mitochondrial fission, by down-regulating expression of Drp1 in mammalian cells leads to a loss of mitochondrial DNA and a decrease of mitochondrial respiration coupled to an increase in the levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. At the cellular level, mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the lack of fission leads to a drop in the levels of cellular ATP, an inhibition of cell proliferation and an increase in autophagy. In conclusion, we propose that mitochondrial fission is required for preservation of mitochondrial function and thereby for maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  4. Fast-twitch glycolytic skeletal muscle is predisposed to age-induced impairments in mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Robert A; Díaz, Víctor; Soldini, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of mammalian senescence is suggested to involve the progressive impairment of mitochondrial function; however, direct observations of age-induced alterations in actual respiratory chain function are lacking. Accordingly, we assessed mitochondrial function via high-resolution respirom...

  5. Impairment of striatal mitochondrial function by acute paraquat poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniczyniec, Analía; Lanza, E M; Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are essential for survival. Their primary function is to support aerobic respiration and to provide energy for intracellular metabolic pathways. Paraquat is a redox cycling agent capable of generating reactive oxygen species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in cortical and striatal mitochondrial function in an experimental model of acute paraquat toxicity and to compare if the brain areas and the molecular mechanisms involved were similar to those observed after chronic exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats received paraquat (25 mg/Kg i.p.) or saline and were sacrificed after 24 h. Paraquat treatment decreased complex I and IV activity by 37 and 21 % respectively in striatal mitochondria. Paraquat inhibited striatal state 4 and state 3 KCN-sensitive respiration by 80 % and 62 % respectively, indicating a direct effect on respiratory chain. An increase of 2.2 fold in state 4 and 2.3 fold in state 3 in KCN-insensitive respiration was observed in striatal mitochondria from paraquat animals, suggesting that paraquat redox cycling also consumed oxygen. Paraquat treatment increased hydrogen peroxide production (150 %), TBARS production (42 %) and cardiolipin oxidation/depletion (12 %) in striatal mitochondria. Also, changes in mitochondrial polarization was induced after paraquat treatment. However, no changes were observed in any of these parameters in cortical mitochondria from paraquat treated-animals. These results suggest that paraquat treatment induced a clear striatal mitochondrial dysfunction due to both paraquat redox cycling reactions and impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport, causing oxidative damage. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction could probably lead to alterations in cellular bioenergetics.

  6. Cryopreservation of human skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Wright-Paradis, C; Gnaiger, E

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated if cryopreservation is a viable approach for functional mitochondrial analysis. Different tissues have been studied, and conflicting results have been published. The aim of the present study was to investigate if mitochondria in human skeletal muscle maintain...... loss from the mitochondria. The results from this study demonstrate that normal mitochondrial functionality is not maintained in cryopreserved human skeletal muscle samples....... functionality after long term cryopreservation (1 year). Skeletal muscle samples were preserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for later analysis. Human skeletal muscle fibres were thawed and permeabilised with saponin, and mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry. The capacity...

  7. Cryopreservation of human skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S; Wright-Paradis, C; Gnaiger, E

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated if cryopreservation is a viable approach for functional mitochondrial analysis. Different tissues have been studied, and conflicting results have been published. The aim of the present study was to investigate if mitochondria in human skeletal muscle maintain...... functionality after long term cryopreservation (1 year). Skeletal muscle samples were preserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for later analysis. Human skeletal muscle fibres were thawed and permeabilised with saponin, and mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry. The capacity...... loss from the mitochondria. The results from this study demonstrate that normal mitochondrial functionality is not maintained in cryopreserved human skeletal muscle samples....

  8. Mitochondrial function and morphology are impaired in parkin-mutant fibroblasts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortiboys, H.; Thomas, K.J.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Klaffke, S.; Abou-Sleiman, P.; Olpin, S.; Wood, N.W.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Cookson, M.R.; Bandmann, O.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are marked mitochondrial abnormalities in parkin-knock-out Drosophila and other model systems. The aim of our study was to determine mitochondrial function and morphology in parkin-mutant patients. We also investigated whether pharmacological rescue of impaired mitochondrial functio

  9. Characterization of mitochondrial function in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlante, Anna; Favia, Maria; Bobba, Antonella; Guerra, Lorenzo; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-06-01

    Evidence supporting the occurrence of oxidative stress in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is well established and the literature suggests that oxidative stress is inseparably linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we have characterized mitochondrial function, in particular as it regards the steps of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS production, in airway cells either homozygous for the F508del-CFTR allele or stably expressing wt-CFTR. We find that oxygen consumption, ΔΨ generation, adenine nucleotide translocator-dependent ADP/ATP exchange and both mitochondrial Complex I and IV activities are impaired in CF cells, while both mitochondrial ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation increase. Importantly, treatment of CF cells with the small molecules VX-809 and 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin, which act as "correctors" for F508del CFTR by rescuing the F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion, while having no effect per sè on mitochondrial function in wt-CFTR cells, significantly improved all the above mitochondrial parameters towards values found in the airway cells expressing wt-CFTR. This novel study on mitochondrial bioenergetics provides a springboard for future research to further understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the involvement of mitochondria in CF and identify the proteins primarily responsible for the F508del-CFTR-dependent mitochondrial impairment and thus reveal potential novel targets for CF therapy.

  10. Impaired mitochondrial function in human placenta with increased maternal adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, James; Muralimanoharan, Sribalasubashini; Maloyan, Alina; Myatt, Leslie

    2014-09-01

    The placenta plays a key role in regulation of fetal growth and development and in mediating in utero developmental programming. Obesity, which is associated with chronic inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in many tissues, exerts a programming effect in pregnancy. We determined the effect of increasing maternal adiposity and of fetal sex on placental ATP generation, mitochondrial biogenesis, expression of electron transport chain subunits, and mitochondrial function in isolated trophoblasts. Placental tissue was collected from women with prepregnancy BMI ranging from 18.5 to 45 following C-section at term with no labor. Increasing maternal adiposity was associated with excessive production of reactive oxygen species and a significant reduction in placental ATP levels in placentae with male and female fetuses. To explore the potential mechanism of placental mitochondrial dysfunction, levels of transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in electron transport and mitochondrial biogenesis were measured. Our in vitro studies showed significant reduction in mitochondrial respiration in cultured primary trophoblasts with increasing maternal obesity along with an abnormal metabolic flexibility of these cells. This reduction in placental mitochondrial respiration in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity could compromise placental function and potentially underlie the increased susceptibility of these pregnancies to fetal demise in late gestation and to developmental programming.

  11. Preventing Mitochondrial Fission Impairs Mitochondrial Function and Leads to Loss of Mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Parone, Philippe A.; Sandrine Da Cruz; Daniel Tondera; Yves Mattenberger; James, Dominic I.; Pierre Maechler; François Barja; Jean-Claude Martinou

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria form a highly dynamic tubular network, the morphology of which is regulated by frequent fission and fusion events. However, the role of mitochondrial fission in homeostasis of the organelle is still unknown. Here we report that preventing mitochondrial fission, by down-regulating expression of Drp1 in mammalian cells leads to a loss of mitochondrial DNA and a decrease of mitochondrial respiration coupled to an increase in the levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). At t...

  12. Mutant Parkin impairs mitochondrial function and morphology in human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Grünewald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in Parkin are the most common cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD. The mitochondrially localized E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Parkin has been reported to be involved in respiratory chain function and mitochondrial dynamics. More recent publications also described a link between Parkin and mitophagy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the impact of Parkin mutations on mitochondrial function and morphology in a human cellular model. Fibroblasts were obtained from three members of an Italian PD family with two mutations in Parkin (homozygous c.1072delT, homozygous delEx7, compound-heterozygous c.1072delT/delEx7, as well as from two relatives without mutations. Furthermore, three unrelated compound-heterozygous patients (delEx3-4/duplEx7-12, delEx4/c.924C>T and delEx1/c.924C>T and three unrelated age-matched controls were included. Fibroblasts were cultured under basal or paraquat-induced oxidative stress conditions. ATP synthesis rates and cellular levels were detected luminometrically. Activities of complexes I-IV and citrate synthase were measured spectrophotometrically in mitochondrial preparations or cell lysates. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured with 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide. Oxidative stress levels were investigated with the OxyBlot technique. The mitochondrial network was investigated immunocytochemically and the degree of branching was determined with image processing methods. We observed a decrease in the production and overall concentration of ATP coinciding with increased mitochondrial mass in Parkin-mutant fibroblasts. After an oxidative insult, the membrane potential decreased in patient cells but not in controls. We further determined higher levels of oxidized proteins in the mutants both under basal and stress conditions. The degree of mitochondrial network branching was comparable in mutants and

  13. Impaired mitochondrial function in chronically ischemic human heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis Ottesen; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    mitochondrial damage, hereby reinforcing a vicious circle. Ischemic preconditioning has been proven protective in acute ischemia, but the subject of chronic ischemic preconditioning has not been explored in humans. We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory capacity would be diminished in chronic ischemic...... regions of human myocardium but that these mitochondria would be more resistant to ex vivo ischemia and, second, that ROS generation would be higher in ischemic myocardium. The aim of this study was to test mitochondrial respiratory capacity during hyperoxia and hypoxia, to investigate ROS production......, and finally to assess myocardial antioxidant levels. Mitochondrial respiration in biopsies from ischemic and nonischemic regions from the left ventricle of the same heart was compared in nine human subjects. Maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity in fresh muscle fibers was lower in ischemic compared...

  14. Abnormal mitochondrial function impairs calcium influx in diabetic mouse pancreatic beta cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fei; D. Marshall Porterfield; ZHENG Xi-yan; WANG Wen-jun; XU Yue; ZHANG Zong-ming

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal insulin secretion of pancreatic beta cells is now regarded as the more primary defect than the insulin function in the etiology of type 2 diabetes.Previous studies found impaired mitochondrial function and impaired Ca2+ influx in beta cells in diabetic patients and animal models,suggesting a role for these processes in proper insulin secretion.The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed relationship of mitochondrial function,Ca2+ influx,and defective insulin secretion.Methods We investigated mitochondrial function and morphology in pancreatic beta cell of diabetic KK-Ay mice and C57BL/6J mice.Two types of Ca2+ channel activities,L-type and store-operated Ca2+ (SOC),were evaluated using whole-cell patch-clamp recording.The glucose induced Ca2+ influx was measured by a non-invasive micro-test technique (NMT).Results Mitochondria in KK-Ay mice pancreatic beta cells were swollen with disordered cristae,and mitochondrial function decreased compared with C57BL/6J mice.Ca2+ channel activity was increased and glucose induced Ca2+ influx was impaired,but could be recovered by genipin.Conclusion Defective mitochondrial function in diabetic mice pancreatic beta cells is a key cause of abnormal insulin secretion by altering Ca2+ influx,but not via Ca2+ channel activity.

  15. Mitochondrial transfer from Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells to mitochondria-defective cells recaptures impaired mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shang-Der; Hsu, Te-Yao; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Jin-Bor; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-conducted mitochondrial transfer has been recently shown to rescue cellular bioenergetics and prevent cell death caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJMSCs) harvested from postpartum umbilical cords are an accessible and abundant source of stem cells. This study aimed to determine the capability of WJMSCs to transfer their own mitochondria and rescue impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and bioenergetics caused by mitochondrial DNA defects. To do this, WJMSCs were co-cultured with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted ρ(0) cells and the recapture of mitochondrial function was evaluated. WJMSCs were shown to be capable of transferring their own mitochondria into ρ(0) cells and underwent interorganellar mixture within these cells. Permissive culture media (BrdU-containing and pyruvate- and uridine-free) sieved out a survival cell population from the co-cultured WJMSCs (BrdU-sensitive) and ρ(0) cells (pyruvate/uridine-free). The survival cells had mtDNA identical to that of WJMSCs, whereas they expressed cellular markers identical to that of ρ(0) cells. Importantly, these ρ(0)-plus -WJMSC-mtDNA (ρ(+W)) cells recovered the expression of mtDNA-encoded proteins and exhibited functional oxygen consumption and respiratory control, as well as the activity of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I, II, III and IV. In addition, ETC complex V-inhibitor-sensitive ATP production and metabolic shifting were also recovered. Furthermore, cellular behaviors including attachment-free proliferation, aerobic viability and OXPHOS-reliant cellular motility were also regained after mitochondrial transfer by WJMSCs. The therapeutic effect of WJMSCs-derived mitochondrial transfer was able to stably sustain for at least 45 passages. In conclusion, this study suggests that WJMSCs may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases linked to mitochondrial dysfunction through the donation of healthy

  16. Dynein mutations associated with hereditary motor neuropathies impair mitochondrial morphology and function with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschbach, Judith; Sinniger, Jérôme; Bouitbir, Jamal; Fergani, Anissa; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard; René, Frédérique; Larmet, Yves; Marion, Vincent; Baloh, Robert H; Harms, Matthew B; Shy, Michael E; Messadeq, Nadia; Weydt, Patrick; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in the DYNC1H1 gene encoding for dynein heavy chain cause two closely related human motor neuropathies, dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED) and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, and lead to sensory neuropathy and striatal atrophy in mutant mice. Dynein is the molecular motor carrying mitochondria retrogradely on microtubules, yet the consequences of dynein mutations on mitochondrial physiology have not been explored. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts bearing heterozygous or homozygous point mutation in Dync1h1, similar to human mutations, show profoundly abnormal mitochondrial morphology associated with the loss of mitofusin 1. Furthermore, heterozygous Dync1h1 mutant mice display progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle and mitochondria progressively increase in size and invade sarcomeres. As a likely consequence of systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, Dync1h1 mutant mice develop hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia and progress to glucose intolerance with age. Similar defects in mitochondrial morphology and mitofusin levels are observed in fibroblasts from patients with SMA-LED. Last, we show that Dync1h1 mutant fibroblasts show impaired perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in response to mitochondrial uncoupling. Our results show that dynein function is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and function with aging and suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to dynein-dependent neurological diseases, such as SMA-LED.

  17. Impaired Cerebral Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Function in a Rat Model of Ventricular Fibrillation and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest brain injury significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients suffering from cardiac arrest (CA. Evidence that shows that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be a key factor in tissue damage after ischemia/reperfusion is accumulating. However, limited data are available regarding the cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and its relationship to the alterations of high-energy phosphate. Here, we sought to identify alterations of mitochondrial morphology and oxidative phosphorylation function as well as high-energy phosphates during CA and CPR in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF. We found that impairment of mitochondrial respiration and partial depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr developed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus following a prolonged cardiac arrest. Optimal CPR might ameliorate the deranged phosphorus metabolism and preserve mitochondrial function. No obvious ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria have been found during CA. We conclude that CA causes cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction along with decay of high-energy phosphates, which would be mitigated with CPR. This study may broaden our understanding of the pathogenic processes underlying global cerebral ischemic injury and provide a potential therapeutic strategy that aimed at preserving cerebral mitochondrial function during CA.

  18. Dietary choline deprivation impairs rat brain mitochondrial function and behavioral phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacelli, Consiglia; Coluccia, Addolorata; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Cocco, Tiziana; Petrosillo, Giuseppe; Paradies, Giuseppe; De Nitto, Emanuele; Massaro, Antonio; Persichella, Michele; Borracci, Pietro; Portincasa, Piero; Carratù, Maria Rosaria

    2010-06-01

    Dietary choline deprivation (CD) is associated with behavioral changes, but mechanisms underlying these detrimental effects are not well characterized. For instance, no literature data are available concerning the CD effects on brain mitochondrial function related to impairment in cognition. Therefore, we investigated brain mitochondrial function and redox status in male Wistar rats fed a CD diet for 28 d. Moreover, the CD behavioral phenotype was characterized. Compared with rats fed a control diet (CTRL), CD rats showed lower NAD-dependent mitochondrial state III and state IV respiration, 40% lower complex I activity, and significantly higher reactive oxygen species production. Total glutathione was oxidatively consumed more in CD than in CTRL rats and the rate of protein oxidation was 40% higher in CD than in CTRL rats, reflecting an oxidative stress condition. The mitochondrial concentrations of cardiolipin, a phospholipid required for optimal activity of complex I, was 20% lower in CD rats than in CTRL rats. Compared with CTRL rats, the behavioral phenotype of CD rats was characterized by impairment in motor coordination and motor learning assessed with the rotarod/accelerod test. Furthermore, compared with CTRL rats, CD rats were less capable of learning the active avoidance task and the number of attempts they made to avoid foot shock was fewer. The results suggest that CD-induced dysfunction in brain mitochondria may be responsible for impairment in cognition and underline that, similar to the liver, the brain also needs an adequate choline supply for its normal functioning.

  19. Postnatal Hyperoxia Exposure Durably Impairs Right Ventricular Function and Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Kara N; Kumari, Santosh; Tetri, Laura H; Barton, Greg; Braun, Rudolf K; Hacker, Timothy A; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2017-05-01

    Prematurity complicates 12% of births, and young adults with a history of prematurity are at risk to develop right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy and impairment. The long-term risk for pulmonary vascular disease, as well as mechanisms of RV dysfunction and ventricular-vascular uncoupling after prematurity, remain poorly defined. Using an established model of prematurity-related lung disease, pups from timed-pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to normoxia or hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen, 0.85) exposure for the first 14 days of life. After aging to 1 year in standard conditions, rats underwent hemodynamic assessment followed by tissue harvest for biochemical and histological evaluation. Aged hyperoxia-exposed rats developed significantly greater RV hypertrophy, associated with a 40% increase in RV systolic pressures. Although cardiac index was similar, hyperoxia-exposed rats demonstrated a reduced RV ejection fraction and significant RV-pulmonary vascular uncoupling. Hyperoxia-exposed RV cardiomyocytes demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial dysregulation and mitochondrial DNA damage, suggesting potential mitochondrial dysfunction as a cause of RV dysfunction. Aged rats exposed to postnatal hyperoxia recapitulate many features of young adults born prematurely, including increased RV hypertrophy and decreased RV ejection fraction. Our data suggest that postnatal hyperoxia exposure results in mitochondrial dysregulation that persists into adulthood with eventual RV dysfunction. Further evaluation of long-term mitochondrial function is warranted in both animal models of premature lung disease and in human adults who were born preterm.

  20. TMEM175 deficiency impairs lysosomal and mitochondrial function and increases α-synuclein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinn, Sarah; Drolet, Robert E.; Cramer, Paige E.; Wong, Andus Hon-Kit; Toolan, Dawn M.; Gretzula, Cheryl A.; Voleti, Bhavya; Vassileva, Galya; Disa, Jyoti; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Stone, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder pathologically characterized by nigrostriatal dopamine neuron loss and the postmortem presence of Lewy bodies, depositions of insoluble α-synuclein, and other proteins that likely contribute to cellular toxicity and death during the disease. Genetic and biochemical studies have implicated impaired lysosomal and mitochondrial function in the pathogenesis of PD. Transmembrane protein 175 (TMEM175), the lysosomal K+ channel, is centered under a major genome-wide association studies peak for PD, making it a potential candidate risk factor for the disease. To address the possibility that variation in TMEM175 could play a role in PD pathogenesis, TMEM175 function was investigated in a neuronal model system. Studies confirmed that TMEM175 deficiency results in unstable lysosomal pH, which led to decreased lysosomal catalytic activity, decreased glucocerebrosidase activity, impaired autophagosome clearance by the lysosome, and decreased mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, TMEM175 deficiency in rat primary neurons resulted in increased susceptibility to exogenous α-synuclein fibrils. Following α-synuclein fibril treatment, neurons deficient in TMEM175 were found to have increased phosphorylated and detergent-insoluble α-synuclein deposits. Taken together, data from these studies suggest that TMEM175 plays a direct and critical role in lysosomal and mitochondrial function and PD pathogenesis and highlight this ion channel as a potential therapeutic target for treating PD. PMID:28193887

  1. Mammalian adaptation to extrauterine environment: mitochondrial functional impairment caused by prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcarce, C; Izquierdo, J M; Chamorro, M; Cuezva, J M

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report that, compared with term rat neonates, both mitochondrial content and function are diminished in liver of preterm neonates (delivered 24 h before full term) compromising cellular energy provision in the postnatal period. In addition, there is a parallel reduction in the content of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins in preterm rats. Also, efficient oxidative phosphorylation is not attained in these pups until 3 h after birth. Although isolated liver mitochondria from preterm neonates show a two-fold increase in F1-ATPase beta-subunit and cytochrome c oxidase activity 1 h after birth, the abnormal coupling efficiency between respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (ADP/O ratio) is due to maintenance of high H(+)-leakage values in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Postnatal reduction of the H+ leak occurs concomitantly with an increase in intra-mitochondrial adenine nucleotide concentration. Accumulation of adenine nucleotides in preterm and term liver mitochondria parallels the postnatal increase in total liver adenine nucleotides. Delayed postnatal induction of adenine biosynthesis most likely accounts for the lower adenine nucleotide pool in the liver of preterm neonates. The delayed postnatal accumulation of adenine nucleotides in mitochondria is thus responsible for the impairment in oxidative phosphorylation displayed by organelles of the preterm liver. Images Figure 1 PMID:7980455

  2. Impaired mitochondrial trafficking in Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao-Jiang; Orr, Adam L.; Li, Shihua

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Impaired mitochondrial function has been well documented in Huntington?s disease. Mutant huntingtin is found to affect mitochondria via various mechanisms including the dysregulation of gene transcription and impairment of mitochondrial function or trafficking. The lengthy and highly branched neuronal processes constitute complex neural networks in which there is a large demand for mitochondria-generated energy. Thus, the impaired mitochondria trafficking in neuronal cells...

  3. Different sensitivity of rabbit heart and skeletal muscle to endotoxin-induced impairment of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbeckaite, S; Opalka, J R; Neuhof, C; Zierz, S; Gellerich, F N

    2001-03-01

    The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in septic disturbances of tissues is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of endotoxin-induced sepsis on the function of heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria. Rabbits were made septic by subcutaneous injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) from Escherichia coli at concentrations of 100 or 150 microg LPS.kg(-1) 24 h prior to the experiments. Mitochondrial respiration was measured in saponin-skinned muscle fibers and compared with photometrically detected activities of respiratory chain enzymes as well as with function of perfused hearts. In heart fibers a dosage of 100 microg LPS.kg(-1) caused a significant decrease of state 3-respiration for the substrates pyruvate (-38%), octanoyl-carnitine (-38%) and succinate (-30%) with correspondingly decreased respiratory control indexes (RCI). In addition, endotoxin caused a decreased temporal stability of the rate of state 3-respiration. At least in part these changes can be attributed to a reduced activity of complex I + III (-50%) of the respiratory chain. State 4-respiration rates were not significantly altered. The lowered state 3-respiration in heart mitochondria seems to contribute to the impairment of heart muscle function as detected by an increase of coronary vascular resistance (CVR) in endotoxin-treated hearts. Functional properties of mitochondria from M. Vastus lasteralis were not affected by 100 microg LPS.kg(-1) but a higher dosage of 150 microg LPS.kg(-1) caused decreased RCI for the substrates pyruvate (-29%) and octanoyl-carnitine (-32%). Also the activity of complex I + III was not significantly affected at lower dose of endotoxin but decreased (-42%) after treatment with 150 microg LPS.kg(-1). Results demonstrate the involvement of impaired mitochondria in the pathophysiology of septic organ failure and a tissue specificity of endotoxaemia.

  4. The metabolic enhancer piracetam ameliorates the impairment of mitochondrial function and neurite outgrowth induced by beta-amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, C; Ungerer, I; Lipka, U; Kirr, S; Schütt, T; Eckert, A; Leuner, K; Müller, W E

    2010-05-01

    beta-Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by initiating a cascade of events from mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been shown to improve mitochondrial dysfunction following brain aging and experimentally induced oxidative stress. We used cell lines (PC12 and HEK cells) and murine dissociated brain cells. The protective effects of piracetam in vitro and ex vivo on Abeta-induced impairment of mitochondrial function (as mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production), on secretion of soluble Abeta and on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were investigated. Piracetam improves mitochondrial function of PC12 cells and acutely dissociated brain cells from young NMRI mice following exposure to extracellular Abeta(1-42). Similar protective effects against Abeta(1-42) were observed in dissociated brain cells from aged NMRI mice, or mice transgenic for mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) treated with piracetam for 14 days. Soluble Abeta load was markedly diminished in the brain of those animals after treatment with piracetam. Abeta production by HEK cells stably transfected with mutant human APP was elevated by oxidative stress and this was reduced by piracetam. Impairment of neuritogenesis is an important consequence of Abeta-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and Abeta-induced reduction of neurite growth in PC12 cells was substantially improved by piracetam. Our findings strongly support the concept of improving mitochondrial function as an approach to ameliorate the detrimental effects of Abeta on brain function.

  5. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. miR-125b affects mitochondrial biogenesis and impairs brite adipocyte formation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maude Giroud

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-125b-5p plays an important role in the repression of brite adipocyte function by modulating oxygen consumption and mitochondrial gene expression.

  7. The mitochondrial function was impaired in APP knockout mouse embryo fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG BaiYang; NIU Ying; ZHOU Hui; YAN JiaXin; ZHAO NanMing; ZHANG XiuFang; GONG YanDao

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is recognized as the source of Aβ, which plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease. However, the biological function of APP is obscure. Previous studies showed that mitochondria could be a target of APP. In this work, APP knockout mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells were used to test if APP plays any role in maintaining the mitochondrial function. As the result, APP knockout MEF cells (APP-/- cells) showed the abnormal mitochondrial function, including slower cell proliferation, lower mitochondrial membrane potential, lower intracellular ROS, higher mitochon-drial membrane fluidity and lower cytochrome c oxidase activity than their wild-type counterparts. However, no change was found in the amount of mitochondria in MEF APP-/- cells.

  8. High-dose clevudine impairs mitochondrial function and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in INS-1E cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Yoon-Ok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clevudine is a nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor that exhibits potent antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV without serious side effects. However, mitochondrial myopathy has been observed in patients with chronic HBV infection taking clevudine. Moreover, the development of diabetes was recently reported in patients receiving long-term treatment with clevudine. In this study, we investigated the effects of clevudine on mitochondrial function and insulin release in a rat clonal β-cell line, INS-1E. Methods The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number and the mRNA levels were measured by using quantitative PCR. MTT analysis, ATP/lactate measurements, and insulin assay were performed. Results Both INS-1E cells and HepG2 cells, which originated from human hepatoma, showed dose-dependent decreases in mtDNA copy number and cytochrome c oxidase-1 (Cox-1 mRNA level following culture with clevudine (10 μM-1 mM for 4 weeks. INS-1E cells treated with clevudine had reduced total mitochondrial activities, lower cytosolic ATP contents, enhanced lactate production, and more lipid accumulation. Insulin release in response to glucose application was markedly decreased in clevudine-treated INS-1E cells, which might be a consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that high-dose treatment with clevudine induces mitochondrial defects associated with mtDNA depletion and impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in insulin-releasing cells. These findings partly explain the development of diabetes in patients receiving clevudine who might have a high susceptibility to mitochondrial toxicity.

  9. The metabolic enhancer piracetam ameliorates the impairment of mitochondrial function and neurite outgrowth induced by ß-amyloid peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, C; Ungerer, I; Lipka, U; Kirr, S; Schütt, T; Eckert, A; Leuner, K; Müller, WE

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by initiating a cascade of events from mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been shown to improve mitochondrial dysfunction following brain aging and experimentally induced oxidative stress. Experimental approach: We used cell lines (PC12 and HEK cells) and murine dissociated brain cells. The protective effects of piracetam in vitro and ex vivo on Aβ-induced impairment of mitochondrial function (as mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production), on secretion of soluble Aβ and on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were investigated. Key results: Piracetam improves mitochondrial function of PC12 cells and acutely dissociated brain cells from young NMRI mice following exposure to extracellular Aβ1-42. Similar protective effects against Aβ1-42 were observed in dissociated brain cells from aged NMRI mice, or mice transgenic for mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) treated with piracetam for 14 days. Soluble Aβ load was markedly diminished in the brain of those animals after treatment with piracetam. Aβ production by HEK cells stably transfected with mutant human APP was elevated by oxidative stress and this was reduced by piracetam. Impairment of neuritogenesis is an important consequence of Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and Aβ-induced reduction of neurite growth in PC12 cells was substantially improved by piracetam. Conclusion and implications: Our findings strongly support the concept of improving mitochondrial function as an approach to ameliorate the detrimental effects of Aβ on brain function. This article is commented on by Moncada, pp. 217–219 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00706.x and to view related papers by Pravdic et al. and Puerta et al. visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00698.x and http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j

  10. Apolipoprotein O expression in mouse liver enhances hepatic lipid accumulation by impairing mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Wu, Chen-Lu; Yu, Bi-Lian; Liu, Ling; Hu, Jia-Rui

    2017-09-09

    Apolipoprotein O (ApoO) was recently observed in the cellular mitochondrial inner membrane, which plays a role in mitochondrial function and is associated with myocardiopathy. Empirical information on the physiological functions of apoO is therefore limited. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effect of apoO on hepatic fatty acid metabolism. An adenoviral vector expressing hApoO was constructed and introduced into chow diet and high-fat diet induced mice and the L02 human hepatoma cell line. High levels of hApoO mRNA and protein were detected in the liver, and the expression of lipid metabolism genes was significantly altered compared with negative controls. The liver function indices (serum ALT and AST) were clearly elevated, and the ultrastructure of cellular mitochondria was distinctly altered in the liver after apoO overexpression. Further, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased with hApoO treatment in L02 cells. These results establish a link between apoO and lipid accumulation and could suggest a new pathway for regulating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impaired mitochondrial energy production and ABC transporter function-A crucial interconnection in dementing proteopathies of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahnke, Jens; Fröhlich, Christina; Krohn, Markus; Schumacher, Toni; Paarmann, Kristin

    2013-10-01

    Ageing is the main risk factor for the development of dementing neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) and it is accompanied by the accumulation of variations in mitochondrial DNA. The resulting tissue-specific alterations in ATP production and availability cause deteriorations of cerebral clearance mechanisms that are important for the removal of toxic peptides and its aggregates. ABC transporters were shown to be the most important exporter superfamily for toxic peptides, e.g. β-amyloid and α-synuclein. Their activity is highly dependent on the availability of ATP and forms a directed energy-exporter network, linking decreased mitochondrial function with highly impaired ABC transporter activity and disease progression. In this paper, we describe a network based on interactions between ageing, energy metabolism, regeneration, accumulation of toxic peptides and the development of proteopathies of the brain with a focus on Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additionally, we provide new experimental evidence for interactions within this network in regenerative processes in AD.

  12. Abnormal Mitochondrial Function and Impaired Granulosa Cell Differentiation in Androgen Receptor Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Sheng Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the ovary, the paracrine interactions between the oocyte and surrounded granulosa cells are critical for optimal oocyte quality and embryonic development. Mice lacking the androgen receptor (AR−/− were noted to have reduced fertility with abnormal ovarian function that might involve the promotion of preantral follicle growth and prevention of follicular atresia. However, the detailed mechanism of how AR in granulosa cells exerts its effects on oocyte quality is poorly understood. Comparing in vitro maturation rate of oocytes, we found oocytes collected from AR−/− mice have a significantly poor maturating rate with 60% reached metaphase II and 30% remained in germinal vesicle breakdown stage, whereas 95% of wild-type AR (AR+/+ oocytes had reached metaphase II. Interestingly, we found these AR−/− female mice also had an increased frequency of morphological alterations in the mitochondria of granulosa cells with reduced ATP generation (0.18 ± 0.02 vs. 0.29 ± 0.02 µM/mg protein; p < 0.05 and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis. Mechanism dissection found loss of AR led to a significant decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ co-activator 1-β (PGC1-β and its sequential downstream genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM, in controlling mitochondrial biogenesis. These results indicate that AR may contribute to maintain oocyte quality and fertility via controlling the signals of PGC1-β-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis in granulosa cells.

  13. In vivo administration of MKT-077 causes partial yet reversible impairment of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, E L; Koya, K; Modica-Napolitano, J; Li, Y; Chen, L B

    1996-02-01

    The effects of in vivo administration of a pharmacologically toxic dose of the lipophilic cationic compound, MKT-077, were investigated in selected vital organs of the rat. MKT-077 (15 mg/kg body weight), administered by bolus i.v. injection every day for 5 days, did not detectably influence rat heart and kidney mitochondrial respiration. Although the same dosage of MKT-077 significantly decreased respiratory rates in rat liver mitochondria relative to untreated controls, complete recovery was evident within 3 days following drug withdrawal. Whereas the mitochondrial DNA of rat kidney and liver appeared to be unaffected by MKT-077 treatment, levels of heart mtDNA were noticeably less than control levels in the immediate interval following drug administration. However, this latter effect was partially reversed as early as 10 days following treatment and completely reversed within a 30-day posttreatment period. These results strongly suggest that a pharmacologically toxic dose of MKT-077 minimally affects the overall functional integrity of mitochondria in such critical, although highly vulnerable, tissues as the heart, liver, and kidney.

  14. Pioglitazone ameliorates the lowered exercise capacity and impaired mitochondrial function of the skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shingo; Hirabayashi, Kagami; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Yokota, Takashi; Matsushima, Shouji; Suga, Tadashi; Kadoguchi, Tomoyasu; Fukushima, Arata; Homma, Tsuneaki; Mizushima, Wataru; Masaki, Yoshihiro; Furihata, Takaaki; Katsuyama, Ryoichi; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-05

    We have reported that exercise capacity is reduced in high fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mice, and that this reduction is associated with impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle (SKM). However, it remains to be clarified whether the treatment of diabetes ameliorates the reduced exercise capacity. Therefore, we examined whether an insulin-sensitizing drug, pioglitazone, could improve exercise capacity in HFD mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or HFD, then treated with or without pioglitazone (3 mg/kg/day) to yield the following 4 groups: ND+vehicle, ND+pioglitazone, HFD+vehicle, and HFD+pioglitazone (n=10 each). After 8 weeks, body weight, plasma glucose, and insulin in the HFD+vehicle were significantly increased compared to the ND+vehicle group. Pioglitazone normalized the insulin levels in HFD-fed mice, but did not affect the body weight or plasma glucose. Exercise capacity determined by treadmill tests was significantly reduced in the HFD+vehicle, and this reduction was almost completely ameliorated in HFD+pioglitazone mice. ADP-dependent mitochondrial respiration, complex I and III activities, and citrate synthase activity were significantly decreased in the SKM of the HFD+vehicle animals, and these decreases were also attenuated by pioglitazone. NAD(P)H oxidase activity was significantly increased in the HFD+vehicle compared with the ND+vehicle, and this increase was ameliorated in HFD+pioglitazone mice. Pioglitazone improved the exercise capacity in diabetic mice, which was due to the improvement in mitochondrial function and attenuation of oxidative stress in the SKM. Our data suggest that pioglitazone may be useful as an agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  15. Impaired Mitochondrial Respiratory Functions and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbuswamy K. Prabu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown a tissue-specific increase in oxidative stress in the early stages of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. In this study, we investigated oxidative stress-related long-term complications and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the different tissues of STZ-induced diabetic rats (>15 mM blood glucose for 8 weeks. These animals showed a persistent increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively production. Oxidative protein carbonylation was also increased with the maximum effect observed in the pancreas of diabetic rats. The activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes ubiquinol: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (Complex III and cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV were significantly decreased while that of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex II were moderately increased in diabetic rats, which was confirmed by the increased expression of the 70 kDa Complex II sub-unit. Mitochondrial matrix aconitase, a ROS sensitive enzyme, was markedly inhibited in the diabetic rat tissues. Increased expression of oxidative stress marker proteins Hsp-70 and HO-1 was also observed along with increased expression of nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that mitochondrial respiratory complexes may play a critical role in ROS/RNS homeostasis and oxidative stress related changes in type 1 diabetes and may have implications in the etiology of diabetes and its complications.

  16. Impaired mitochondrial function due to familial Alzheimer's disease-causing presenilins mutants via Ca(2+) disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toglia, Patrick; Cheung, King-Ho; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Ullah, Ghanim

    2016-05-01

    Mutants in presenilins (PS1 or PS2) is the major cause of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). FAD causing PS mutants affect intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis by enhancing the gating of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) Ca(2+) release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to exaggerated Ca(2+) release into the cytoplasm. Using experimental IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release data, in conjunction with a computational model of cell bioenergetics, we explore how the differences in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in control cells and cells expressing FAD-causing PS mutants affect key variables such as ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS), NADH, and mitochondrial Ca(2+). We find that as a result of exaggerated cytosolic Ca(2+) in FAD-causing mutant PS-expressing cells, the rate of oxygen consumption increases dramatically and overcomes the Ca(2+) dependent enzymes that stimulate NADH production. This leads to decreased rates in proton pumping due to diminished membrane potential along with less ATP and enhanced ROS production. These results show that through Ca(2+) signaling disruption, mutant PS leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and potentially to cell death.

  17. Biotin deprivation impairs mitochondrial structure and function and has implications for inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Ruiz, Estefanía; Díaz-Ruiz, Rodrigo; Hernández-Vázquez, Alaín de J; Ibarra-González, Isabel; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Rembao, Daniel; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Viollet, Benoit; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Corella, José Ahmed; Velázquez-Arellano, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Certain inborn errors of metabolism result from deficiencies in biotin containing enzymes. These disorders are mimicked by dietary absence or insufficiency of biotin, ATP deficit being a major effect,whose responsible mechanisms have not been thoroughly studied. Here we show that in rats and cultured cells it is the result of reduced TCA cycle flow, partly due to deficient anaplerotic biotin-dependent pyruvate carboxylase. This is accompanied by diminished flow through the electron transport chain, augmented by deficient cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) activity with decreased cytochromes and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. There was also severe mitochondrial damage accompanied by decrease of mitochondria, associated with toxic levels of propionyl CoA as shown by carnitine supplementation studies, which explains the apparently paradoxical mitochondrial diminution in the face of the energy sensor AMPK activation, known to induce mitochondria biogenesis. This idea was supported by experiments on AMPK knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The multifactorial ATP deficit also provides a plausible basis for the cardiomyopathy in patients with propionic acidemia, and other diseases.Additionally, systemic inflammation concomitant to the toxic state might explain our findings of enhanced IL-6, STAT3 and HIF-1α, associated with an increase of mitophagic BNIP3 and PINK proteins, which may further increase mitophagy. Together our results imply core mechanisms of energy deficit in several inherited metabolic disorders.

  18. Impaired mitochondrial functions contribute to 3-bromopyruvate toxicity in primary rat and mouse hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotka, Ondřej; Endlicher, René; Drahota, Zdeněk; Kučera, Otto; Rychtrmoc, David; Raad, Marjan; Hakeem, Khurum; Červinková, Zuzana

    2016-08-01

    A compound with promising anticancer properties, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is a synthetic derivative of a pyruvate molecule; however, its toxicity in non-malignant cells has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, we elected to study the effects of 3-BP on primary hepatocytes in monolayer cultures, permeabilized hepatocytes and isolated mitochondria. After a 1-h treatment with 100 μM 3-BP cell viability of rat hepatocytes was decreased by 30 % as measured by the WST-1 test (p < 0.001); after 3-h exposure to ≥200 μM 3-BP lactate dehydrogenase leakage was increased (p < 0.001). Reactive oxygen species production was increased in the cell cultures after a 1-h treatment at concentrations ≥100 μmol/l (p < 0.01), and caspase 3 activity was increased after a 20-h incubation with 150 μM and 200 μM 3-BP (p < 0.001). This toxic effect of 3-BP was also proved using primary mouse hepatocytes. In isolated mitochondria, 3-BP induced a dose- and time-dependent decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential during a 10-min incubation both with Complex I substrates glutamate + malate or Complex II substrate succinate, although this decrease was more pronounced with the latter. We also measured the effect of 3-BP on respiration of isolated mitochondria. ADP-activated respiration was inhibited by 20 μM 3-BP within 10 min. Similar effects were also found in permeabilized hepatocytes of both species.

  19. Early Stress History Alters Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 and Impairs Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Adult Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Banerjee, K K; Vaidya, V A; Kolthur-Seetharam, U

    2016-09-01

    Early-life adversity is associated with an enhanced risk for adult psychopathology. Psychiatric disorders such as depression exhibit comorbidity for metabolic dysfunction, including obesity and diabetes. However, it is poorly understood whether, besides altering anxiety and depression-like behaviour, early stress also evokes dysregulation of metabolic pathways and enhances vulnerability for metabolic disorders. We used the rodent model of the early stress of maternal separation (ES) to examine the effects of early stress on serum metabolites, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signalling, and muscle mitochondrial content. Adult ES animals exhibited dyslipidaemia, decreased serum IGF1 levels, increased expression of liver IGF binding proteins, and a decline in the expression of specific metabolic genes in the liver and muscle, including Pck1, Lpl, Pdk4 and Hmox1. These changes occurred in the absence of alterations in body weight, food intake, glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance or insulin levels. ES animals also exhibited a decline in markers of muscle mitochondrial content, such as mitochondrial DNA levels and expression of TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial). Furthermore, the expression of several genes involved in mitochondrial function, such as Ppargc1a, Nrf1, Tfam, Cat, Sesn3 and Ucp3, was reduced in skeletal muscle. Adult-onset chronic unpredictable stress resulted in overlapping and distinct consequences from ES, including increased circulating triglyceride levels, and a decline in the expression of specific metabolic genes in the liver and muscle, with no change in the expression of genes involved in muscle mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results indicate that a history of early adversity can evoke persistent changes in circulating IGF-1 and muscle mitochondrial function and content, which could serve to enhance predisposition for metabolic dysfunction in adulthood. © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  20. Angiotensin receptor-mediated oxidative stress is associated with impaired cardiac redox signaling and mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Popovich, Irina; Thorwald, Max A; Viscarra, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ruben; Sonanez-Organis, Jose G; Lam, Lisa; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-08-15

    Activation of angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) contributes to NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived oxidative stress during metabolic syndrome. However, the specific role of AT1 in modulating redox signaling, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress in the heart remains more elusive. To test the hypothesis that AT1 activation increases oxidative stress while impairing redox signaling and mitochondrial function in the heart during diet-induced insulin resistance in obese animals, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats (n = 8/group) were treated with the AT1 blocker (ARB) olmesartan for 6 wk. Cardiac Nox2 protein expression increased 40% in OLETF compared with age-matched, lean, strain-control Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats, while mRNA and protein expression of the H₂O₂-producing Nox4 increased 40-100%. ARB treatment prevented the increase in Nox2 without altering Nox4. ARB treatment also normalized the increased levels of protein and lipid oxidation (nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxynonenal) and increased the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 by 30% and the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase, GPx) by 50-70%. Citrate synthase (CS) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities decreased 60-70%, whereas cardiac succinate levels decreased 35% in OLETF compared with LETO, suggesting that mitochondrial function in the heart is impaired during obesity-induced insulin resistance. ARB treatment normalized CS and SDH activities, as well as succinate levels, while increasing AMPK and normalizing Akt, suggesting that AT1 activation also impairs cellular metabolism in the diabetic heart. These data suggest that the cardiovascular complications associated with metabolic syndrome may result from AT1 receptor-mediated Nox2 activation leading to impaired redox signaling, mitochondrial activity, and dysregulation of cellular metabolism in the heart.

  1. Impaired cardiac mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    mitochondrial oxidative stress in HCM. Cardiac and skeletal muscles were obtained from 9 domestic cats with spontaneously occurring HCM with preserved left ventricular systolic function and from 15 age-matched control cats. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacities with nonfatty acid and fatty acid substrates......Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are important players in the development of various cardiovascular diseases, but their roles in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remain unknown. We examined whether mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity was impaired with enhanced...... in the heart were significantly increased in cats with HCM. In contrast, there were no significant differences in mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity, mitochondrial ROS release, and oxidative damage in skeletal muscle between groups. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with both nonfatty acid substrates and fatty acid...

  2. Sulforaphane Protects against High Cholesterol-Induced Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impairments, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Carrasco-Pozo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol plays an important role in inducing pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, leading to an impaired insulin secretory response to glucose. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate Nrf2-inducer, against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction, through molecular and cellular mechanisms involving mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sulforaphane prevented cholesterol-induced alterations in the coupling efficiency of mitochondrial respiration, improving ATP turnover and spare capacity, and averted the impairment of the electron flow at complexes I, II, and IV. Sulforaphane also attenuated the cholesterol-induced activation of the NFκB pathway, normalizing the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, it also inhibited the decrease in sirtuin 1 expression and greatly increased Pgc-1α expression in Min6 cells. Sulforaphane increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes downstream of the Nrf2 pathway and prevented lipid peroxidation induced by cholesterol. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane and its ability to protect and improve mitochondrial bioenergetic function contribute to its protective action against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Our data provide a scientifically tested foundation upon which sulforaphane can be developed as nutraceutical to preserve β-cell function and eventually control hyperglycemia.

  3. Sulforaphane Protects against High Cholesterol-Induced Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impairments, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Tan, Kah Ni; Gotteland, Martin; Borges, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in inducing pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, leading to an impaired insulin secretory response to glucose. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate Nrf2-inducer, against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction, through molecular and cellular mechanisms involving mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sulforaphane prevented cholesterol-induced alterations in the coupling efficiency of mitochondrial respiration, improving ATP turnover and spare capacity, and averted the impairment of the electron flow at complexes I, II, and IV. Sulforaphane also attenuated the cholesterol-induced activation of the NFκB pathway, normalizing the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, it also inhibited the decrease in sirtuin 1 expression and greatly increased Pgc-1α expression in Min6 cells. Sulforaphane increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes downstream of the Nrf2 pathway and prevented lipid peroxidation induced by cholesterol. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane and its ability to protect and improve mitochondrial bioenergetic function contribute to its protective action against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Our data provide a scientifically tested foundation upon which sulforaphane can be developed as nutraceutical to preserve β-cell function and eventually control hyperglycemia.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Sadie L.; Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA increases with aging. This damage has the potential to affect mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription which could alter the abundance or functionality of mitochondrial proteins. This review describes mitochondrial DNA alterations and changes in mitochondrial function that occur with aging. Age-related alterations in mitochondrial DNA as a possible contributor to the reduction in mitochondrial function are discussed.

  5. The mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel G Valdivieso

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease. It results from different possible mutations in the CFTR gene, which encodes the CFTR chloride channel. We have previously studied the differential expression of genes in CF and CF corrected cell lines, and found a reduced expression of MTND4 in CF cells. MTND4 is a mitochondrial gene encoding the MTND4 subunit of the mitochondrial Complex I (mCx-I. Since this subunit is essential for the assembly and activity of mCx-I, we have now studied whether the activity of this complex was also affected in CF cells. By using Blue Native-PAGE, the in-gel activity (IGA of the mCx-I was found reduced in CFDE and IB3-1 cells (CF cell lines compared with CFDE/6RepCFTR and S9 cells, respectively (CFDE and IB3-1 cells ectopically expressing wild-type CFTR. Moreover, colon carcinoma T84 and Caco-2 cells, which express wt-CFTR, either treated with CFTR inhibitors (glibenclamide, CFTR(inh-172 or GlyH101 or transfected with a CFTR-specific shRNAi, showed a significant reduction on the IGA of mCx-I. The reduction of the mCx-I activity caused by CFTR inhibition under physiological or pathological conditions may have a profound impact on mitochondrial functions of CF and non-CF cells.

  6. OXPHOS-Dependent Cells Identify Environmental Disruptors of Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with numerous chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome. Environmental chemicals can impair mitochondrial function through numerous mechanisms such as membrane disruption, complex inhibition and electron transport chain uncoupling. Curr...

  7. Elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs metabolic adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D Crane

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a complex phenomenon that is inherently tied to energy provision and is implicated in many metabolic disorders. Exercise training increases mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle yet it remains unclear if oxidative stress plays a role in regulating these adaptations. We demonstrate that the chronic elevation in mitochondrial oxidative stress present in Sod2 (+/- mice impairs the functional and biochemical mitochondrial adaptations to exercise. Following exercise training Sod2 (+/- mice fail to increase maximal work capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity and mtDNA copy number, despite a normal augmentation of mitochondrial proteins. Additionally, exercised Sod2 (+/- mice cannot compensate for their higher amount of basal mitochondrial oxidative damage and exhibit poor electron transport chain complex assembly that accounts for their compromised adaptation. Overall, these results demonstrate that chronic skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative stress does not impact exercise induced mitochondrial biogenesis, but impairs the resulting mitochondrial protein function and can limit metabolic plasticity.

  8. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease.

  9. Sesamin prevents decline in exercise capacity and impairment of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in mice with high-fat diet-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shingo; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Matsushima, Shouji; Takemoto, Daisuke; Furihata, Takaaki; Mizushima, Wataru; Fukushima, Arata; Yokota, Takashi; Ono, Yoshiko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    What is the central question of this study? Our aim was to examine whether sesamin can prevent a decline in exercise capacity in high-fat diet-induced diabetic mice. Our hypothesis was that maintenance of mitochondrial function and attenuation of oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle would contribute to this result. What is the main finding and its importance? The new findings are that sesamin prevents the diabetes-induced decrease in exercise capacity and impairment of mitochondrial function through the inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle. Sesamin may be useful as a novel agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. We previously reported that exercise capacity and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in diabetic mice were impaired, in association with the activation of NAD(P)H oxidase. It has been reported that sesamin inhibits NAD(P)H oxidase-induced superoxide production. Therefore, we examined whether the antioxidant sesamin could prevent a decline in exercise capacity in mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetes. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or HFD, then treated or not with sesamin (0.2%) to yield the following four groups: ND, ND+Sesamin, HFD and HFD+Sesamin (n = 10 each). After 8 weeks, body weight, fat weight, blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol and fatty acid were significantly increased in HFD compared with ND mice. Sesamin prevented the increases in blood insulin and lipid levels in HFD-fed mice, but did not affect the plasma glucose. Exercise capacity determined by treadmill tests was significantly reduced in HFD mice, but almost completely recovered in HFD+Sesamin mice. Citrate synthase activity was significantly decreased in the skeletal muscle of HFD mice, and these decreases were also inhibited by sesamin. Superoxide anion and NAD(P)H oxidase activity were significantly increased in HFD mice compared with the ND mice and were ameliorated by sesamin. Sesamin

  10. Targeting mitochondrial function to treat optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, Nuri; Nadikudi, Monila; Daniel, Abraham; Chhetri, Jamuna

    2016-07-28

    Many reports have illustrated a tight connection between vision and mitochondrial function. Not only are most mitochondrial diseases associated with some form of vision impairment, many ophthalmological disorders such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy also show signs of mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite a vast amount of evidence, vision loss is still only treated symptomatically, which is only partially a consequence of resistance to acknowledge that mitochondria could be the common denominator and hence a promising therapeutic target. More importantly, clinical support of this concept is only emerging. Moreover, only a few drug candidates and treatment strategies are in development or approved that selectively aim to restore mitochondrial function. This review rationalizes the currently developed therapeutic approaches that target mitochondrial function by discussing their proposed mode(s) of action and provides an overview on their development status with regards to optic neuropathies.

  11. Metformin impairs mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of both lean and diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Bart; Ciapaite, Jolita; van den Broek, Nicole M. A.; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin is a widely prescribed drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated in vitro that metformin specifically inhibits Complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This seems contraindicative since muscle mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pat

  12. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  13. Impaired cardiac mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Liselotte B; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen; Hansen, Christina N; Leifsson, Pall S; Yokota, Takashi

    2015-05-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are important players in the development of various cardiovascular diseases, but their roles in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remain unknown. We examined whether mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity was impaired with enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in HCM. Cardiac and skeletal muscles were obtained from 9 domestic cats with spontaneously occurring HCM with preserved left ventricular systolic function and from 15 age-matched control cats. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacities with nonfatty acid and fatty acid substrates in permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria were assessed using high-resolution respirometry. ROS release originating from isolated mitochondria was assessed by spectrofluorometry. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were also measured as a marker of oxidative damage. Mitochondrial ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration with complex I-linked nonfatty acid substrates and with fatty acid substrates, respectively, was significantly lower in the hearts of HCM cats compared with control cats. Mitochondrial ROS release during state 3 with complex I-linked substrates and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the heart were significantly increased in cats with HCM. In contrast, there were no significant differences in mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity, mitochondrial ROS release, and oxidative damage in skeletal muscle between groups. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with both nonfatty acid substrates and fatty acid substrates was impaired with increased mitochondrial ROS release in the feline HCM heart. These findings provide new insights into the pathophysiology of HCM and support the hypothesis that restoration of the redox state in the mitochondria is beneficial in the treatment of HCM. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Mitochondrial phospholipids: role in mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Edgard M; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are essential components of eukaryotic cells and are involved in a diverse set of cellular processes that include ATP production, cellular signalling, apoptosis and cell growth. These organelles are thought to have originated from a symbiotic relationship between prokaryotic cells in an effort to provide a bioenergetic jump and thus, the greater complexity observed in eukaryotes (Lane and Martin 2010). Mitochondrial processes are required not only for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, but also allow cell to cell and tissue to tissue communication (Nunnari and Suomalainen 2012). Mitochondrial phospholipids are important components of this system. Phospholipids make up the characteristic outer and inner membranes that give mitochondria their shape. In addition, these membranes house sterols, sphingolipids and a wide variety of proteins. It is the phospholipids that also give rise to other characteristic mitochondrial structures such as cristae (formed from the invaginations of the inner mitochondrial membrane), the matrix (area within cristae) and the intermembrane space (IMS) which separates the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Phospholipids are the building blocks that make up these structures. However, the phospholipid composition of the OMM and IMM is unique in each membrane. Mitochondria are able to synthesize some of the phospholipids it requires, but the majority of cellular lipid biosynthesis takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in conjunction with the Golgi apparatus (Fagone and Jackowski 2009). In this review, we will focus on the role that mitochondrial phospholipids play in specific cellular functions and discuss their biosynthesis, metabolism and transport as well as the differences between the OMM and IMM phospholipid composition. Finally, we will focus on the human diseases that result from disturbances to mitochondrial phospholipids and the current research being performed to help

  15. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human mitochondrial variants influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Whether mitochondrial respiratory capacity per mitochondrion (intrinsic activity) in human skeletal muscle is affected by differences in mitochondrial variants is not known. We recruited 54 males...... and determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  16. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  17. Exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals during gestation lowers energy expenditure and impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Erin J; Ragauskas, Alyse; Jaligama, Sridhar; Redd, JeAnna R; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Peloquin, Matthew J; Saravia, Jordy; Han, Joan C; Cormier, Stephania A; Bridges, Dave

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the effects of in utero exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) on growth, metabolism, energy utilization, and skeletal muscle mitochondria in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Pregnant mice were treated with laboratory-generated, combustion-derived particular matter (MCP230). The adult offspring were placed on a high-fat diet for 12 wk, after which we observed a 9.8% increase in their body weight. The increase in body size observed in the MCP230-exposed mice was not associated with increases in food intake but was associated with a reduction in physical activity and lower energy expenditure. The reduced energy expenditure in mice indirectly exposed to MCP230 was associated with reductions in skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA copy number, lower mRNA levels of electron transport genes, and reduced citrate synthase activity. Upregulation of key genes involved in ameliorating oxidative stress was also observed in the muscle of MCP230-exposed mice. These findings suggest that gestational exposure to MCP230 leads to a reduction in energy expenditure at least in part through alterations to mitochondrial metabolism in the skeletal muscle.

  18. Mutations in the phospholipid remodeling gene SERAC1 impair mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking and cause dystonia and deafness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortmann, S.B.; Vaz, F.M.; Gardeitchik, T.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Renkema, G.H.; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, J.H.M.; Kulik, W.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Christin, C.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Grunewald, A.; Klein, C.; Gerhold, J.M.; Kozicz, T.L.; Hasselt, P.M. van; Harakalova, M.; Kloosterman, W.; Baric, I.; Pronicka, E.; Ucar, S.K.; Naess, K.; Singhal, K.K.; Krumina, Z.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Veltman, J.A.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Lefeber, D.J.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Wevers, R.A.; Morava, E.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de

    2012-01-01

    Using exome sequencing, we identify SERAC1 mutations as the cause of MEGDEL syndrome, a recessive disorder of dystonia and deafness with Leigh-like syndrome, impaired oxidative phosphorylation and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. We localized SERAC1 at the interface between the mitochondria and the endo

  19. Impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2006-01-01

    expression analysis and proteomics have pointed to abnormalities in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cellular stress in muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects, and recent work suggests that impaired mitochondrial activity is another early defect in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. This review...... will discuss the latest advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes with focus on possible links between impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction....

  20. Reduction of Mitochondrial Function by FCCP During Mouse Cleavage Stage Embryo Culture Reduces Birth Weight and Impairs the Metabolic Health of Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander-Fox, Deirdre L; Fullston, Tod; McPherson, Nicole O; Sandeman, Lauren; Kang, Wan Xian; Good, Suzanne B; Spillane, Marni; Lane, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    The periconceptual environment represents a critical window for programming fetal growth trajectories and susceptibility to disease; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for programming remains elusive. This study demonstrates a causal link between reduction of precompaction embryonic mitochondrial function and perturbed offspring growth trajectories and subsequent metabolic dysfunction. Incubation of embryos with carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), which uncouples mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in 8-cell embryos and the number of inner cell mass cells within blastocysts; however, blastocyst development was unchanged. This perturbed embryonic mitochondrial function was concomitant with reduced birth weight in female offspring following embryo transfer, which persisted until weaning. FCCP-treated females also exhibited increased adiposity at 4 wk, increased adiposity gain between 4 and 14 wk, glucose intolerance at 8 wk, and insulin resistance at 14 wk. Although FCCP-treated males also exhibited reduced glucose tolerance, but their insulin sensitivity and adiposity gain between 4 and 14 wk was unchanged. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to demonstrate that reducing mitochondrial function and, thus, decreasing ATP output in the precompacting embryo can influence offspring phenotype. This is of great significance as a large proportion of patients requiring assisted reproductive technologies are of advanced maternal age or have a high body mass index, both of which have been independently linked with perturbed early embryonic mitochondrial function.

  1. Receptor-interacting protein 140 overexpression impairs cardiac mitochondrial function and accelerates the transition to heart failure in chronically infarcted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YanFang; Chen, ShaoRui; Yue, ZhongBao; Zhang, YiQiang; Zhou, ChangHua; Cao, WeiWei; Chen, Xi; Zhang, LuanKun; Liu, PeiQing

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with myocardial energy metabolic abnormality. Receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) is an important transcriptional cofactor for maintaining energy balance in high-oxygen consumption tissues. However, the role of RIP140 in the pathologic processes of HF remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of RIP140 in mitochondrial and cardiac functions in rodent hearts under myocardial infarction (MI) stress. MI was created by a permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and exogenous expression of RIP140 by adenovirus (Ad) vector delivery. Four weeks after MI or Ad-RIP140 treatment, cardiac function was assessed by echocardiographic and hemodynamics analyses, and the mitochondrial function was determined by mitochondrial genes expression, biogenesis, and respiration rates. In Ad-RIP140 or MI group, a subset of metabolic genes changed, accompanied with slight reductions in mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration rates but no change in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content. Cardiac malfunction was compensated. However, under MI stress, rats overexpressing RIP140 exhibited greater repressions in mitochondrial genes, state 3 respiration rates, respiration control ratio, and ATP content and had further deteriorated cardiac malfunction. In conclusion, RIP140 overexpression leads to comparable cardiac function as resulted from MI, but RIP140 aggravates metabolic repression, mitochondrial malfunction, and further accelerates the transition to HF in response to MI stress.

  2. Enhanced Cardiac Akt/Protein Kinase B Signaling Contributes to Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy in Part by Impairing Mitochondrial Function via Transcriptional Repression of Mitochondrion-Targeted Nuclear Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Adam R.; O'Neill, Brian T.; Bugger, Heiko; Riehle, Christian; Tuinei, Joseph; Buchanan, Jonathan; Tsushima, Kensuke; Wang, Li; Caro, Pilar; Guo, Aili; Sloan, Crystal; Kim, Bum Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Pereira, Renata O.; McCrory, Mark A.; Nye, Brenna G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Shioi, Tetsuo; Weimer, Bart C.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained Akt activation induces cardiac hypertrophy (LVH), which may lead to heart failure. This study tested the hypothesis that Akt activation contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological LVH. Akt activation induced LVH and progressive repression of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathways. Preventing LVH by inhibiting mTOR failed to prevent the decline in mitochondrial function, but glucose utilization was maintained. Akt activation represses expression of mitochondrial regulatory, FAO, and oxidative phosphorylation genes in vivo that correlate with the duration of Akt activation in part by reducing FOXO-mediated transcriptional activation of mitochondrion-targeted nuclear genes in concert with reduced signaling via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/PGC-1α and other transcriptional regulators. In cultured myocytes, Akt activation disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics, which could be partially reversed by maintaining nuclear FOXO but not by increasing PGC-1α. Thus, although short-term Akt activation may be cardioprotective during ischemia by reducing mitochondrial metabolism and increasing glycolysis, long-term Akt activation in the adult heart contributes to pathological LVH in part by reducing mitochondrial oxidative capacity. PMID:25535334

  3. Impaired barrier function by dietary fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS in rats is accompanied by increased colonic mitochondrial gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Evelien

    2008-03-01

    well as three other peptide hormone genes; peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide and cholecystokinin. Conclusion We conclude that altered energy metabolism may underly colonic barrier function disruption due to FOS feeding in rats.

  4. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gabriel Valdivieso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy.

  5. Mitochondria: impaired mitochondrial translation in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczonadi, Veronika; Horvath, Rita

    2014-03-01

    Defects of the mitochondrial protein synthesis cause a subgroup of mitochondrial diseases, which are usually associated with decreased activities of multiple respiratory chain (RC) enzymes. The clinical presentations of these disorders are often disabling, progressive or fatal, affecting the brain, liver, skeletal muscle, heart and other organs. Currently there are no effective cures for these disorders and treatment is at best symptomatic. The diagnosis in patients with multiple respiratory chain complex defects is particularly difficult because of the massive number of nuclear genes potentially involved in intra-mitochondrial protein synthesis. Many of these genes are not yet linked to human disease. Whole exome sequencing rapidly changed the diagnosis of these patients by identifying the primary defect in DNA, and preventing the need for invasive and complex biochemical testing. Better understanding of the mitochondrial protein synthesis apparatus will help us to explore disease mechanisms and will provide clues for developing novel therapies.

  6. Prolonged Activation of the Htr2b Serotonin Receptor Impairs Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion and Mitochondrial Function in MIN6 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Luis Rodrigo; Mizgier, María L.; Bravo Sagua, Roberto; Jaña, Fabián; Cárdenas, César; Llanos, Paola; Busso, Dolores; Olmos, Pablo; Galgani, José E.; Santos, José L.; Cortés, Víctor A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims Pancreatic β-cells synthesize and release serotonin (5 hydroxytryptamine, 5HT); however, the role of 5HT receptors on glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and the mechanisms mediating this function is not fully understood. The aims of this study were to determine the expression profile of 5HT receptors in murine MIN6 β-cells and to examine the effects of pharmacological activation of 5HT receptor Htr2b on GSIS and mitochondrial function. Materials and Methods mRNA levels of 5HT receptors in MIN6 cells were quantified by RT qPCR. GSIS was assessed in MIN6 cells in response to global serotonergic activation with 5HT and pharmacological Htr2b activation or inhibition with BW723C86 or SB204741, respectively. In response to Htr2b activation also was evaluated the mRNA and protein levels of PGC1α and PPARy by RT-qPCR and western blotting and mitochondrial function by oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and ATP cellular content. Results We found that mRNA levels of most 5HT receptors were either very low or undetectable in MIN6 cells. By contrast, Htr2b mRNA was present at moderate levels in these cells. Preincubation (6 h) of MIN6 cells with 5HT or BW723C86 reduced GSIS and the effect of 5HT was prevented by SB204741. Preincubation with BW723C86 increased PGC1α and PPARy mRNA and protein levels and decreased mitochondrial respiration and ATP content in MIN6 cells. Conclusions Our results indicate that prolonged Htr2b activation in murine β-cells decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mitochondrial activity by mechanisms likely dependent on enhanced PGC1α/PPARy expression. PMID:28129327

  7. Mitochondrial Respiration Is Impaired during Late-Stage Hamster Prion Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Robert; Moore, Roger A; Ward, Anne; Sturdevant, Dan E; Priola, Suzette A

    2017-09-15

    Mitochondria are crucial to proper neuronal function and overall brain health. Mitochondrial dysfunction within the brain has been observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion disease. Several markers of decreased mitochondrial activity during prion infection have been reported, yet the bioenergetic respiratory status of mitochondria from prion-infected animals is unknown. Here we show that clinically ill transgenic mice overexpressing hamster prion protein (Tg7) infected with the hamster prion strain 263K suffer from a severe deficit in mitochondrial oxygen consumption in response to the respiratory complex II substrate succinate. Characterization of the mitochondrial proteome of purified brain mitochondria from infected and uninfected Tg7 mice showed significant differences in the relative abundance of key mitochondrial electron transport proteins in 263K-infected animals relative to that in controls. Our results suggest that at clinical stages of prion infection, dysregulation of respiratory chain proteins may lead to impairment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain.IMPORTANCE Mitochondrial dysfunction is present in most major neurodegenerative diseases, and some studies have suggested that mitochondrial processes may be altered during prion disease. Here we show that hamster prion-infected transgenic mice overexpressing the hamster prion protein (Tg7 mice) suffer from mitochondrial respiratory deficits. Tg7 mice infected with the 263K hamster prion strain have little or no signs of mitochondrial dysfunction at the disease midpoint but suffer from a severe deficit in mitochondrial respiration at the clinical phase of disease. A proteomic analysis of the isolated brain mitochondria from clinically affected animals showed that several proteins involved in electron transport, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitochondrial protein synthesis were dysregulated. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly exacerbated by prion protein

  8. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment can be separated from lipofuscin accumulation in aged human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hütter, Eveline; Skovbro, Mette; Lener, Barbara;

    2007-01-01

    According to the free radical theory of aging, reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as a driving force of the aging process, and it is generally believed that mitochondrial dysfunction is a major source of increased oxidative stress in tissues with high content of mitochondria, such as muscle or brain....... However, recent experiments in mouse models of premature aging have questioned the role of mitochondrial ROS production in premature aging. To address the role of mitochondrial impairment and ROS production for aging in human muscles, we have analyzed mitochondrial properties in muscle fibres isolated...... from the vastus lateralis of young and elderly donors. Mitochondrial respiratory functions were addressed by high-resolution respirometry, and ROS production was analyzed by in situ staining with the redox-sensitive dye dihydroethidium. We found that aged human skeletal muscles contain fully functional...

  9. Kif5 regulates mitochondrial movement, morphology, function and neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iworima, Diepiriye G; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Rintoul, Gordon L

    2016-04-01

    Due to the unique architecture of neurons, trafficking of mitochondria throughout processes to regions of high energetic demand is critical to sustain neuronal health. It has been suggested that compromised mitochondrial trafficking may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated the consequences of disrupted kif5c-mediated mitochondrial trafficking on mitochondrial form and function in primary rat cortical neurons. Morphological changes in mitochondria appeared to be due to remodelling, a phenomenon distinct from mitochondrial fission, which resulted in punctate-shaped mitochondria. We also demonstrated that neurons displaying punctate mitochondria exhibited relatively decreased ROS and increased cellular ATP levels using ROS-sensitive GFP and ATP FRET probes, respectively. Somewhat unexpectedly, neurons overexpressing the dominant negative form of kif5c exhibited enhanced survival following excitotoxicity, suggesting that the impairment of mitochondrial trafficking conferred some form of neuroprotection. However, when neurons were exposed to H2O2, disruption of kif5c exacerbated cell death indicating that the effect on cell viability was dependent on the mode of toxicity. Our results suggest a novel role of kif5c. In addition to mediating mitochondrial transport, kif5c plays a role in the mechanism of regulating mitochondrial morphology. Our results also suggest that kif5c mediated mitochondrial dynamics may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function and in turn cellular health. Moreover, our studies demonstrate an interesting interplay between the regulation of mitochondrial motility and morphology.

  10. Phosphatidylethanolamine deficiency in Mammalian mitochondria impairs oxidative phosphorylation and alters mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasseva, Guergana; Bai, Helin Daniel; Davidescu, Magdalena; Haromy, Alois; Michelakis, Evangelos; Vance, Jean E

    2013-02-08

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders, but the role of phospholipids, particularly the nonbilayer-forming lipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), in mitochondrial function is poorly understood. Elimination of mitochondrial PE (mtPE) synthesis via phosphatidylserine decarboxylase in mice profoundly alters mitochondrial morphology and is embryonic lethal (Steenbergen, R., Nanowski, T. S., Beigneux, A., Kulinski, A., Young, S. G., and Vance, J. E. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 40032-40040). We now report that moderate mitochondrial morphology and function and impairs cell growth. Acute reduction of mtPE by RNAi silencing of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase and chronic reduction of mtPE in PSB-2 cells that have only 5% of normal phosphatidylserine synthesis decreased respiratory capacity, ATP production, and activities of electron transport chain complexes (C) I and CIV but not CV. Blue native-PAGE analysis revealed defects in the organization of CI and CIV into supercomplexes in PE-deficient mitochondria, correlated with reduced amounts of CI and CIV proteins. Thus, mtPE deficiency impairs formation and/or membrane integration of respiratory supercomplexes. Despite normal or increased levels of mitochondrial fusion proteins in mtPE-deficient cells, and no reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondria were extensively fragmented, and mitochondrial ultrastructure was grossly aberrant. In general, chronic reduction of mtPE caused more pronounced mitochondrial defects than did acute mtPE depletion. The functional and morphological changes in PSB-2 cells were largely reversed by normalization of mtPE content by supplementation with lyso-PE, a mtPE precursor. These studies demonstrate that even a modest reduction of mtPE in mammalian cells profoundly alters mitochondrial functions.

  11. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent, P., E-mail: pascal.sirvent@univ-bpclermont.fr [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l' Exercice en conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques (AME2P), BP 80026, F-63171 Aubière cedex (France); Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Hillaire-Buys, D. [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France)

    2012-03-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  12. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology.

  13. Effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Ramírez, D; Torres-Vargas, C E; Guerrero-Castillo, S; Uribe-Carvajal, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Pedraza-Chaverri, J; Orozco-Ibarra, M

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enhances the neural vulnerability to excitotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro through an unknown mechanism possibly related to mitochondrial failure. However, as the effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in brain has not been studied, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of glycolysis inhibition induced by iodoacetate on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in brain. Mitochondria were isolated from brain cortex, striatum and cerebellum of rats treated systemically with iodoacetate (25 mg/kg/day for 3 days). Oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis, transmembrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, lipoperoxidation, glutathione levels, and aconitase activity were assessed. Oxygen consumption and aconitase activity decreased in the brain cortex and striatum, showing that glycolysis inhibition did not trigger severe mitochondrial impairment, but a slight mitochondrial malfunction and oxidative stress were present.

  14. Lacking power impairs executive functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, P.K.; Jostmann, N.B.; Galinsky, A.D.; Dijk, W.W. van

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments explored whether lacking power impairs executive functioning, testing the hypothesis that the cognitive presses of powerlessness increase vulnerability to performance decrements during complex executive tasks. In the first three experiments, low power impaired performance on executi

  15. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirvent, P; Fabre, Odile Martine Julie; Bordenave, S

    2012-01-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dys...

  16. Protection from palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA damage prevents from mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and impaired insulin signaling in rat L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovych, Larysa V; Solodushko, Viktoriya A; Wilson, Glenn L; Rachek, Lyudmila I

    2012-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids have been implicated in the increase of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and insulin resistance seen in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage contributed to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, impaired insulin signaling, and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Adenoviral vectors were used to deliver the DNA repair enzyme human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/(apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase (hOGG1) to mitochondria in L6 myotubes. After palmitate exposure, we evaluated mtDNA damage, mitochondrial function, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, insulin signaling pathways, and glucose uptake. Protection of mtDNA from palmitate-induced damage by overexpression of hOGG1 targeted to mitochondria significantly diminished palmitate-induced mitochondrial superoxide production, restored the decline in ATP levels, reduced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) kinase, prevented cells from entering apoptosis, increased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinase (Akt) (Ser473) and tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, and thereby enhanced glucose transporter 4 translocation to plasma membrane, and restored insulin signaling. Addition of a specific inhibitor of JNK mimicked the effect of mitochondrial overexpression of hOGG1 and partially restored insulin sensitivity, thus confirming the involvement of mtDNA damage and subsequent increase of oxidative stress and JNK activation in insulin signaling in L6 myotubes. Our results are the first to report that mtDNA damage is the proximal cause in palmitate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired insulin signaling and provide strong evidence that targeting DNA repair enzymes into mitochondria in skeletal muscles could be a potential therapeutic treatment for insulin resistance.

  17. Polyethylenimine-mediated impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Karina; Malinska, Dominika; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    The 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI) is a highly efficient synthetic polycation used in transfection protocols, but also triggers mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic cell death processes where the mechanistic issues are poorly understood. We now demonstrate that PEI in a concentration- and time......-dependent manner can affect functions (membrane potential, swelling and respiration) and ultrastructural integrity of freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria. The threshold concentration for detection of PEI-mediated impairment of rat liver mitochondrial functions is 3 µg/mL, however, lower PEI levels still exert...... some effects on mitochondrial morphology and respiration, and these may be related to the inherent membrane perturbing properties of this polycation. The PEI-mediated mitochondrial swelling phase is biphasic, with a fast decaying initial period (most prominent from 4 µg/mL PEI) followed by a slower...

  18. Transaldolase inhibition impairs mitochondrial respiration and induces a starvation-like longevity response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Bennett

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction can increase oxidative stress and extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homeostatic mechanisms exist to cope with disruptions to mitochondrial function that promote cellular health and organismal longevity. Previously, we determined that decreased expression of the cytosolic pentose phosphate pathway (PPP enzyme transaldolase activates the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt and extends lifespan. Here we report that transaldolase (tald-1 deficiency impairs mitochondrial function in vivo, as evidenced by altered mitochondrial morphology, decreased respiration, and increased cellular H2O2 levels. Lifespan extension from knockdown of tald-1 is associated with an oxidative stress response involving p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK MAPKs and a starvation-like response regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB homolog HLH-30. The latter response promotes autophagy and increases expression of the flavin-containing monooxygenase 2 (fmo-2. We conclude that cytosolic redox established through the PPP is a key regulator of mitochondrial function and defines a new mechanism for mitochondrial regulation of longevity.

  19. Mitochondrial Function and Mitophagy in the Elderly: Effects of Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo C. Moreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a natural, multifactorial and multiorganic phenomenon wherein there are gradual physiological and pathological changes over time. Aging has been associated with a decrease of autophagy capacity and mitochondrial functions, such as biogenesis, dynamics, and mitophagy. These processes are essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial structural integrity and, therefore, for cell life, since mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an impairment of energy metabolism and increased production of reactive oxygen species, which consequently trigger mechanisms of cellular senescence and apoptotic cell death. Moreover, reduced mitochondrial function can contribute to age-associated disease phenotypes in model organisms and humans. Literature data show beneficial effects of exercise on the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics and on the decrease in the mitophagic capacity associated to aging. Thus, exercise could have effects on the major cell signaling pathways that are involved in the mitochondria quality and quantity control in the elderly. Although it is known that several exercise protocols are able to modify the activity and turnover of mitochondria, further studies are necessary in order to better identify the mechanisms of interaction between mitochondrial functions, aging, and physical activity, as well as to analyze possible factors influencing these processes.

  20. Impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation induces adaptive remodeling of muscle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Shawna E; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Haynie, Kimberly R; Fuller, Scott E; Warfel, Jaycob D; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Zhang, Jingying; Noland, Robert C; Mynatt, Randall L

    2015-06-23

    The correlations between intramyocellular lipid (IMCL), decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and insulin resistance have led to the hypothesis that impaired FAO causes accumulation of lipotoxic intermediates that inhibit muscle insulin signaling. Using a skeletal muscle-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 KO model, we show that prolonged and severe mitochondrial FAO inhibition results in increased carbohydrate utilization, along with reduced physical activity; increased circulating nonesterified fatty acids; and increased IMCLs, diacylglycerols, and ceramides. Perhaps more importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial FAO also initiates a local, adaptive response in muscle that invokes mitochondrial biogenesis, compensatory peroxisomal fat oxidation, and amino acid catabolism. Loss of its major fuel source (lipid) induces an energy deprivation response in muscle coordinated by signaling through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) to maintain energy supply for locomotion and survival. At the whole-body level, these adaptations result in resistance to obesity.

  1. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism.

  2. Inhibiting the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter during Development Impairs Memory in Adult Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Drago

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of cytoplasmic calcium into mitochondria is critical for a variety of physiological processes, including calcium buffering, metabolism, and cell survival. Here, we demonstrate that inhibiting the mitochondrial calcium uniporter in the Drosophila mushroom body neurons (MBn—a brain region critical for olfactory memory formation—causes memory impairment without altering the capacity to learn. Inhibiting uniporter activity only during pupation impaired adult memory, whereas the same inhibition during adulthood was without effect. The behavioral impairment was associated with structural defects in MBn, including a decrease in synaptic vesicles and an increased length in the axons of the αβ MBn. Our results reveal an in vivo developmental role for the mitochondrial uniporter complex in establishing the necessary structural and functional neuronal substrates for normal memory formation in the adult organism.

  3. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-11-18

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER-mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic.

  4. Cryotherapy impairs proprioception function?

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Nuno; Henriques, Sara

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cryotherapy application over a joint causes a nerve conduction velocity decrease and proprioceptive changes. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to determine if cryotherapy impairs proprioception acuity. METHODS: Proprioception was assessed by joint position sense (JPS), measured with an isokinetic dynamometer Biodex System 3, in twenty one females on experimental group, before 15 minutes cryotherapy (T0) and immediately after (T1). A control group (n=20) performed also the JPS...

  5. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Mitochondrial Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Suárez-Rivero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are very versatile organelles in continuous fusion and fission processes in response to various cellular signals. Mitochondrial dynamics, including mitochondrial fission/fusion, movements and turnover, are essential for the mitochondrial network quality control. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can cause neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in which mitochondrial fusion and transport are impaired, or dominant optic atrophy which is caused by a reduced mitochondrial fusion. On the other hand, mitochondrial dysfunction in primary mitochondrial diseases promotes reactive oxygen species production that impairs its own function and dynamics, causing a continuous vicious cycle that aggravates the pathological phenotype. Mitochondrial dynamics provides a new way to understand the pathophysiology of mitochondrial disorders and other diseases related to mitochondria dysfunction such as diabetes, heart failure, or Hungtinton’s disease. The knowledge about mitochondrial dynamics also offers new therapeutics targets in mitochondrial diseases.

  6. Mutant TDP-43 does not impair mitochondrial bioenergetics in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Peixoto, Pablo; Konrad, Csaba; Palomo, Gloria; Bredvik, Kirsten; Gerges, Meri; Valsecchi, Federica; Petrucelli, Leonard; Ravits, John M; Starkov, Anatoly; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2017-05-08

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Functional studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics have focused mostly on superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutants, and showed that mutant human SOD1 impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, and dynamics. However, recent reports have indicated that alterations in transactivation response element DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) can also lead to defects of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Furthermore, it was proposed that TDP-43 mutations cause oxidative phosphorylation impairment associated with respiratory chain defects and that these effects were caused by mitochondrial localization of the mutant protein. Here, we investigated the presence of bioenergetic defects in the brain of transgenic mice expressing human mutant TDP-43 (TDP-43(A315T) mice), patient derived fibroblasts, and human cells expressing mutant forms of TDP-43. In the brain of TDP-43(A315T) mice, TDP-43 mutant fibroblasts, and cells expressing mutant TDP-43, we tested several bioenergetics parameters, including mitochondrial respiration, ATP synthesis, and calcium handling. Differences between mutant and control samples were evaluated by student t-test or by ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni correction, when more than two groups were compared. Mitochondrial localization of TDP-43 was investigated by immunocytochemistry in fibroblasts and by subcellular fractionation and western blot of mitochondrial fractions in mouse brain. We did not observe defects in any of the mitochondrial bioenergetic functions that were tested in TDP-43 mutants. We detected a small amount of TDP-43(A315T) peripherally associated with brain mitochondria. However, there was no correlation between TDP-43 associated with mitochondria and respiratory chain dysfunction. In addition, we observed increased calcium uptake in mitochondria from TDP-43(A315T) mouse

  7. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

  8. Assessment of cardiac function in mice lacking the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmström, Kira M; Pan, Xin; Liu, Julia C; Menazza, Sara; Liu, Jie; Nguyen, Tiffany T; Pan, Haihui; Parks, Randi J; Anderson, Stasia; Noguchi, Audrey; Springer, Danielle; Murphy, Elizabeth; Finkel, Toren

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial calcium is thought to play an important role in the regulation of cardiac bioenergetics and function. The entry of calcium into the mitochondrial matrix requires that the divalent cation pass through the inner mitochondrial membrane via a specialized pore known as the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Here, we use mice deficient of MCU expression to rigorously assess the role of mitochondrial calcium in cardiac function. Mitochondria isolated from MCU(-/-) mice have reduced matrix calcium levels, impaired calcium uptake and a defect in calcium-stimulated respiration. Nonetheless, we find that the absence of MCU expression does not affect basal cardiac function at either 12 or 20months of age. Moreover, the physiological response of MCU(-/-) mice to isoproterenol challenge or transverse aortic constriction appears similar to control mice. Thus, while mitochondria derived from MCU(-/-) mice have markedly impaired mitochondrial calcium handling, the hearts of these animals surprisingly appear to function relatively normally under basal conditions and during stress.

  9. Reduced basal autophagy and impaired mitochondrial dynamics due to loss of Parkinson's disease-associated protein DJ-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Krebiehl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunction and degradation takes a central role in current paradigms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD. Loss of DJ-1 function is a rare cause of familial PD. Although a critical role of DJ-1 in oxidative stress response and mitochondrial function has been recognized, the effects on mitochondrial dynamics and downstream consequences remain to be determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using DJ-1 loss of function cellular models from knockout (KO mice and human carriers of the E64D mutation in the DJ-1 gene we define a novel role of DJ-1 in the integrity of both cellular organelles, mitochondria and lysosomes. We show that loss of DJ-1 caused impaired mitochondrial respiration, increased intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and characteristic alterations of mitochondrial shape as shown by quantitative morphology. Importantly, ultrastructural imaging and subsequent detailed lysosomal activity analyses revealed reduced basal autophagic degradation and the accumulation of defective mitochondria in DJ-1 KO cells, that was linked with decreased levels of phospho-activated ERK2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that loss of DJ-1 leads to impaired autophagy and accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria that under physiological conditions would be compensated via lysosomal clearance. Our study provides evidence for a critical role of DJ-1 in mitochondrial homeostasis by connecting basal autophagy and mitochondrial integrity in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Impaired in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity after myocardial infarction assessed using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S; Atherton, Helen J; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; West, James A; Griffin, Julian L; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Heather, Lisa C; Tyler, Damian J

    2014-11-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of heart failure. An increasing body of evidence links alterations in cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial function with the progression of heart disease. The aim of this work was to, therefore, follow the in vivo mitochondrial metabolic alterations caused by MI, thereby allowing a greater understanding of the interplay between metabolic and functional abnormalities. Using hyperpolarized carbon-13 ((13)C)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in vivo alterations in mitochondrial metabolism were assessed for 22 weeks after surgically induced MI with reperfusion in female Wister rats. One week after MI, there were no detectable alterations in in vivo cardiac mitochondrial metabolism over the range of ejection fractions observed (from 28% to 84%). At 6 weeks after MI, in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity was impaired, with decreased (13)C-label flux into citrate, glutamate, and acetylcarnitine, which correlated with the degree of cardiac dysfunction. These changes were independent of alterations in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. By 22 weeks, alterations were also seen in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, which decreased at lower ejection fractions. These results were confirmed using in vitro analysis of enzyme activities and metabolomic profiles of key intermediates. The in vivo decrease in Krebs cycle activity in the 6-week post-MI heart may represent an early maladaptive phase in the metabolic alterations after MI in which reductions in Krebs cycle activity precede a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism in heart disease are progressive and proportional to the degree of cardiac impairment. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Protein carbonylation and adipocyte mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica M; Hahn, Wendy S; Stone, Matthew D; Inda, Jacob J; Droullard, David J; Kuzmicic, Jovan P; Donoghue, Margaret A; Long, Eric K; Armien, Anibal G; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J; Bernlohr, David A

    2012-09-21

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte.

  12. Polybrominated diphenyl ether congener (BDE-100) induces mitochondrial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lílian Cristina; de Souza, Alecsandra Oliveira; Dorta, Daniel Junqueira

    2013-06-01

    Brominated flame retardants are used in various consumer products to increase their resistance to fire and/or high temperatures. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are representatives of this class and among the most widely used congeners, and BDE-100 is produced on a large scale. There is a lack of toxicological data about these compounds, which has recently become a matter of concern to the scientific community. The mitochondria are recognized as the main energy-producing organelles, as well as playing a vital role in the maintenance of many cell functions. Therefore, mitochondria were used in the present work as an experimental model to evaluate the effects of the BDE-100 congeners at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 50 μM. The results showed that high concentrations of BDE-100 were able to induce mitochondrial alterations. It was observed that the substance had an affinity for the hydrophilic portion of the mitochondrial membrane, as monitored by ANS, inhibiting the glutamate + malate-stimulated mitochondrial respiration and also inducing dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, deregulation of calcium homoeostasis and mitochondrial swelling, the latter being insensitive to cyclosporin A (CsA) but partially inhibited by Ruthenium Red and N-ethyl maleimide. In addition, a significant reduction in mitochondrial ATP content was found, but on the other hand, no oxidative stress was observed after exposure of the mitochondria to BDE-100. These results show the key role of mitochondria in the cytotoxicity induced by BDE-100.

  13. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jaiswal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise.

  14. Methods for assessing mitochondrial function in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Christopher G R; Kane, Daniel A; Lanza, Ian R; Neufer, P Darrell

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of research is investigating the potential contribution of mitochondrial function to the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Numerous in vitro, in situ, and in vivo methodologies are available to examine various aspects of mitochondrial function, each requiring an understanding of their principles, advantages, and limitations. This review provides investigators with a critical overview of the strengths, limitations and critical experimental parameters to consider when selecting and conducting studies on mitochondrial function. In vitro (isolated mitochondria) and in situ (permeabilized cells/tissue) approaches provide direct access to the mitochondria, allowing for study of mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox function under defined substrate conditions. Several experimental parameters must be tightly controlled, including assay media, temperature, oxygen concentration, and in the case of permeabilized skeletal muscle, the contractile state of the fibers. Recently developed technology now offers the opportunity to measure oxygen consumption in intact cultured cells. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides the most direct way of assessing mitochondrial function in vivo with interpretations based on specific modeling approaches. The continuing rapid evolution of these technologies offers new and exciting opportunities for deciphering the potential role of mitochondrial function in the etiology and treatment of diabetes.

  15. Increase in oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment in hypothalamus of streptozotocin treated diabetic rat: Antioxidative effect of Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, P; Shetty, R; Ghafourifar, P; Parihar, M S

    2016-01-22

    Hypothalamus, the primary brain region for glucose sensing, is severely affected by oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress in this region of brain may cause severe impairment in neuronal metabolic functions. Mitochondria are prominent targets of oxidative stress and the combination of increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions may further decline hypothalamic neuronal functions. In the present study we examined the oxidative damage response, antioxidative responses and mitochondrial membrane permeability transition in hypothalamus of streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Our results show that streptozotocin significantly increases hypothalamic lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content while glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione were declined. Mitochondrial impairment marked by an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization was seen following streptozotocin treatment in the hypothalamus. The oral administration of Withania somnifera root extract stabilized mitochondrial functions and prevented oxidative damage in the hypothalamus of diabetic rat. These findings suggest an increase in the oxidative stress and decline in antioxidative responses in the hypothalamus of streptozotocin treated diabetic rats. Withania somnifera root extract was found useful in reducing oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment in hypothalamus of diabetic rat.

  16. Mitochondrial form, function and signalling in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigo, Ignacio; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Forni, Maria Fernanda; Garcia-Neto, Wilson; Kakimoto, Pâmela A; Luévano-Martínez, Luis A; Macedo, Felipe; Menezes-Filho, Sergio L; Peloggia, Julia; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2016-10-15

    Aging is often accompanied by a decline in mitochondrial mass and function in different tissues. Additionally, cell resistance to stress is frequently found to be prevented by higher mitochondrial respiratory capacity. These correlations strongly suggest mitochondria are key players in aging and senescence, acting by regulating energy homeostasis, redox balance and signalling pathways central in these processes. However, mitochondria display a wide array of functions and signalling properties, and the roles of these different characteristics are still widely unexplored. Furthermore, differences in mitochondrial properties and responses between tissues and cell types, and how these affect whole body metabolism are also still poorly understood. This review uncovers aspects of mitochondrial biology that have an impact upon aging in model organisms and selected mammalian cells and tissues. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. Ultrastructural evidence for impaired mitochondrial fission in the aged rhesus monkey dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yury M; Datta, Dibyadeep; Paspalas, Constantinos D; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2017-03-01

    Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex mediates high-order cognitive functions that are impaired early in the aging process in monkeys and humans. Here, we report pronounced changes in mitochondrial morphology in dendrites of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex neurons from aged rhesus macaques. Electron microscopy paired with 3D reconstruction from serial sections revealed an age-related increase in mitochondria with thin segments that intermingled with enlarged ones, the 'mitochondria-on-a-string' phenotype, similar to those recently reported in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The thin mitochondrial segments were associated with endoplasmic reticulum cisterns, and the mitochondrial proteins Fis1 and Drp1, all of which initiate mitochondrial fission. These data suggest that the 'mitochondria-on-a-string' phenotype may reflect malfunction in mitochondrial dynamics, whereby fission is initiated, but the process is incomplete due to malfunction of subsequent step(s). Thus, aged rhesus monkeys may be particularly helpful in exploring the age-related changes that render higher cortical circuits so vulnerable to degeneration.

  18. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-02-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  19. Dengue virus induces mitochondrial elongation through impairment of Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Vincent; Lang, Diane; Valois, Sierra; Rothman, Alan L; Medin, Carey L

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that undergo continuous cycles of fission and fusion to maintain essential cellular functions. An imbalance between these two processes can result in many pathophysiological outcomes. Dengue virus (DENV) interacts with cellular organelles, including mitochondria, to successfully replicate in cells. This study used live-cell imaging and found an increase in mitochondrial length and respiration during DENV infection. The level of mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), was decreased on mitochondria during DENV infection, as well as Drp1 phosphorylated on serine 616, which is important for mitochondrial fission. DENV proteins NS4b and NS3 were also associated with subcellular fractions of mitochondria. Induction of fission through uncoupling of mitochondria or overexpression of Drp1 wild-type and Drp1 with a phosphomimetic mutation (S616D) significantly reduced viral replication. These results demonstrate that DENV infection causes an imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics by inhibiting Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission, which promotes viral replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Subcomplex Ilambda specifically controls integrated mitochondrial functions in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni J Falk

    Full Text Available Complex I dysfunction is a common, heterogeneous cause of human mitochondrial disease having poorly understood pathogenesis. The extensive conservation of complex I composition between humans and Caenorhabditis elegans permits analysis of individual subunit contribution to mitochondrial functions at both the whole animal and mitochondrial levels. We provide the first experimentally-verified compilation of complex I composition in C. elegans, demonstrating 84% conservation with human complex I. Individual subunit contribution to mitochondrial respiratory capacity, holocomplex I assembly, and animal anesthetic behavior was studied in C. elegans by RNA interference-generated knockdown of nuclear genes encoding 28 complex I structural subunits and 2 assembly factors. Not all complex I subunits directly impact respiratory capacity. Subcomplex Ilambda subunits along the electron transfer pathway specifically control whole animal anesthetic sensitivity and complex II upregulation, proportionate to their relative impairment of complex I-dependent oxidative capacity. Translational analysis of complex I dysfunction facilitates mechanistic understanding of individual gene contribution to mitochondrial disease. We demonstrate that functional consequences of complex I deficiency vary with the particular subunit that is defective.

  1. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  2. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  3. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ortiz-Avila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats. Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm, besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  4. Diatrizoate, Iopromide and Iotrolan Enhanced Cytotoxicity of Daunorubicin in Multidrug Resistant K562/adr Cells: Impaired the Mitochondrial and Inhibited the P-Glycoprotein Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitaya S.N. Ayudhya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance was an obstacle in cancer chemotherapy because the cells decreased their intracellular drug accumulation by energy-dependent compounds efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp. This study observed some iodinated radiographic contrast media, diatrizoate, iopromide and iotrolan affected the cellular energetic state and the kinetics of P-gp in drug-sensitive K562 and drug resistant K562/adr cell lines using spectrophotometer and spectrofluorometer. By colorimetric MTT assay, it was found that contrast media (0-3500 µM had no effect on both K562 and K562/adr cell viabilities, but in co-treatment with daunorubicin (DNR, diatrizoate decreased cell viability in K562/adr cells by decreasing ICso of DNR from 610.7 ±74.5 nM to 360±108.9 nM. The change in cellular energetic state was studied using rhodamine B as a probe to estimate mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm. The results showed that 3500 µM diatrizoate decreased ΔΨm from 162.2±0.3 mV to 86.9±9.9 mV in K562/adr cells. The kinetics of P-gp-mediated efflux of DNR could be reduced by diatrizoate from 0 (no inhibition to 0.65±0.11. This inhibition could be partially prevented in co-incubation with 20 nM concanamycin A or 10 µM cytochalasin B. Among the three molecules, diatrizoate showed the best efficiency. It could be proposed for further studies that diatrizoate could be used as MDR identification or MDR imaging and also acted as MDR sensitizing agent in cancer treatments.

  5. Improvement of mitochondrial function and dynamics by the metabolic enhancer piracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, Carola; Kurz, Christopher; Koch, Konrad A; Eckert, Schamim H; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2013-10-01

    The metabolic enhancer piracetam is used in many countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging, brain injuries, as well as dementia such as AD (Alzheimer's disease). As a specific feature of piracetam, beneficial effects are usually associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In previous studies we were able to show that piracetam enhanced ATP production, mitochondrial membrane potential as well as neurite outgrowth in cell and animal models for aging and AD. To investigate further the effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function, especially mitochondrial fission and fusion events, we decided to assess mitochondrial morphology. Human neuroblastoma cells were treated with the drug under normal conditions and under conditions imitating aging and the occurrence of ROS (reactive oxygen species) as well as in stably transfected cells with the human wild-type APP (amyloid precursor protein) gene. This AD model is characterized by expressing only 2-fold more human Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) compared with control cells and therefore representing very early stages of AD when Aβ levels gradually increase over decades. Interestingly, these cells exhibit an impaired mitochondrial function and morphology under baseline conditions. Piracetam is able to restore this impairment and shifts mitochondrial morphology back to elongated forms, whereas there is no effect in control cells. After addition of a complex I inhibitor, mitochondrial morphology is distinctly shifted to punctate forms in both cell lines. Under these conditions piracetam is able to ameliorate morphology in cells suffering from the mild Aβ load, as well as mitochondrial dynamics in control cells.

  6. Role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 in higher brain functions, neuronal plasticity and network oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Hermes

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that disruptions in mitochondrial function may play a critical role in pathophysiology of mental illness. Specifically, we have shown that NMDA driven behavioral, synaptic, and brain oscillatory functions are impaired in UCP2 knockout mice.

  7. In utero exposure to prepregnancy maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet impair regulators of mitochondrial dynamics in rat placenta and offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Borengasser, Sarah J.; Faske, Jennifer; KANG, PING; Blackburn, Michael L.; Badger, Thomas M.; Shankar, Kartik

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of pregnant women who are obese at conception continues to rise. Compelling evidence suggests the intrauterine environment is an important determinant of offspring health. Maternal obesity and unhealthy diets are shown to promote metabolic programming in the offspring. Mitochondria are maternally inherited, and we have previously shown impaired mitochondrial function in rat offspring exposed to maternal obesity in utero. Mitochondrial health is maintained by mitochondrial dynam...

  8. Mitochondrial swelling impairs the transport of organelles in cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasik, Allen; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Choubey, Vinay; Kuum, Malle; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Veksler, Vladimir

    2007-11-09

    Organelle transport in neuronal processes is central to the organization, developmental fate, and functions of neurons. Organelles must be transported through the slender, highly branched neuronal processes, making the axonal transport vulnerable to any perturbation. However, some intracellular structures like mitochondria are able to considerably modify their volume. We therefore hypothesized that swollen mitochondria could impair the traffic of other organelles in neurite shafts. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the effects of mitochondrial swellers on the organelle traffic. Our data demonstrate that treatment of neurons with potassium ionophore valinomycin led to the fast time-dependent inhibition of organelle movement in cerebellar granule neurons. Similar inhibition was observed in neurons treated with the inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, sodium azide and antimycin, which also induced swelling. No decrease in the motility of organelles was observed in cultures treated with inhibitors of ATP production or transport, oligomycin or bongkrekic acid, suggesting that inhibition of the ATP-generating activity itself without swelling does not affect the motility of organelles. The effect of swellers on the traffic was more important in thin processes, thus indicating the role of steric hindrance of swollen mitochondria. We propose that the size and morphology of the transported cargo is also relevant for seamless axonal transport and speculate that mitochondrial swelling could be one of the reasons for impaired organelle transport in neuronal processes.

  9. CHCHD10 mutations promote loss of mitochondrial cristae junctions with impaired mitochondrial genome maintenance and inhibition of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Emmanuelle C; Plutino, Morgane; Bannwarth, Sylvie; Villa, Elodie; Cisneros-Barroso, Eugenia; Roy, Madhuparna; Ortega-Vila, Bernardo; Fragaki, Konstantina; Lespinasse, Françoise; Pinero-Martos, Estefania; Augé, Gaëlle; Moore, David; Burté, Florence; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Kageyama, Yusuke; Itoh, Kie; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Sesaki, Hiromi; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Vives-Bauza, Cristofol; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    CHCHD10-related diseases include mitochondrial DNA instability disorder, frontotemporal dementia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FTD-ALS) clinical spectrum, late-onset spinal motor neuropathy (SMAJ), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Here, we show that CHCHD10 resides with mitofilin, CHCHD3 and CHCHD6 within the "mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system" (MICOS) complex. CHCHD10 mutations lead to MICOS complex disassembly and loss of mitochondrial cristae with a decrease in nucleoid number and nucleoid disorganization. Repair of the mitochondrial genome after oxidative stress is impaired in CHCHD10 mutant fibroblasts and this likely explains the accumulation of deleted mtDNA molecules in patient muscle. CHCHD10 mutant fibroblasts are not defective in the delivery of mitochondria to lysosomes suggesting that impaired mitophagy does not contribute to mtDNA instability. Interestingly, the expression of CHCHD10 mutant alleles inhibits apoptosis by preventing cytochrome c release.

  10. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  11. Metabolic Determinants of Mitochondrial Function in Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Emily A; Moley, Kelle H

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial production of cellular energy is essential to oocyte function, zygote development and successful continuation of pregnancy. This review focuses on several key functions of healthy oocyte mitochondria and the effect of pathologic states such as aging, oxidative stress and apoptosis on these functions. The effect of these abnormal conditions is presented in terms of clinical presentations, specifically maternal obesity, diminished ovarian reserve and assisted reproductive technologies.

  12. Disruption of mitochondrial function in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    Electron transport system (ETS) function in mitochondria is essential for the aerobic production of energy. Because ETS function requires extensive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear gene products, coadaptation between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes may evolve within populations. Hybridization between allopatric populations may then expose functional incompatibilities between genomes that have not coevolved. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has high levels of nucleotide divergence among populations at mitochondrial loci and suffers F2 hybrid breakdown in interpopulation hybrids. We hypothesize that hybridization results in incompatibilities among subunits in ETS enzyme complexes and that these incompatibilities result in diminished mitochondrial function and fitness. To test this hypothesis, we measured fitness, mitochondrial function, and ETS enzyme activity in inbred recombinant hybrid lines of Tigriopus californicus. We found that (1) both fitness and mitochondrial function are reduced in hybrid lines, (2) only those ETS enzymes with both nuclear and mitochondrial subunits show a loss of activity in hybrid lines, and (3) positive relationships exist between ETS enzyme activity and mitochondrial function and between mitochondrial function and fitness. We also present evidence that hybrid lines harboring mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRPOL) from the same parental source population have higher fitness than those with mtDNA and mtRPOL from different populations, suggesting that mitochondrial gene regulation may play a role in disruption of mitochondrial performance and fitness of hybrids. These results suggest that disruption of coadaptation between nuclear and mitochondrial genes contributes to the phenomenon of hybrid breakdown.

  13. Geranylgeraniol and Neurological Impairment: Involvement of Apoptosis and Mitochondrial Morphology

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    Annalisa Marcuzzi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of the cholesterol pathway is an anomaly observed in human diseases, many of which have in common neurological involvement and unknown pathogenesis. In this study we have used Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency (MKD as a disease-model in order to investigate the link between the deregulation of the mevalonate pathway and the consequent neurodegeneration. The blocking of the mevalonate pathway in a neuronal cell line (Daoy, using statins or mevalonate, induced an increase in the expression of the inflammasome gene (NLRP3 and programmed cell death related to mitochondrial dysfunction. The morphology of the mitochondria changed, clearly showing the damage induced by oxidative stress and the decreased membrane potential associated with the alterations of the mitochondrial function. The co-administration of geranylgeraniol (GGOH reduced the inflammatory marker and the damage of the mitochondria, maintaining its shape and components. Our data allow us to speculate about the mechanism by which isoprenoids are able to rescue the inflammatory marker in neuronal cells, independently from the block of the mevalonate pathway, and about the fact that cell death is mitochondria-related.

  14. Geranylgeraniol and Neurological Impairment: Involvement of Apoptosis and Mitochondrial Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Zweyer, Marina; Bortul, Roberta; Loganes, Claudia; Girardelli, Martina; Baj, Gabriele; Monasta, Lorenzo; Celeghini, Claudio

    2016-03-11

    Deregulation of the cholesterol pathway is an anomaly observed in human diseases, many of which have in common neurological involvement and unknown pathogenesis. In this study we have used Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency (MKD) as a disease-model in order to investigate the link between the deregulation of the mevalonate pathway and the consequent neurodegeneration. The blocking of the mevalonate pathway in a neuronal cell line (Daoy), using statins or mevalonate, induced an increase in the expression of the inflammasome gene (NLRP3) and programmed cell death related to mitochondrial dysfunction. The morphology of the mitochondria changed, clearly showing the damage induced by oxidative stress and the decreased membrane potential associated with the alterations of the mitochondrial function. The co-administration of geranylgeraniol (GGOH) reduced the inflammatory marker and the damage of the mitochondria, maintaining its shape and components. Our data allow us to speculate about the mechanism by which isoprenoids are able to rescue the inflammatory marker in neuronal cells, independently from the block of the mevalonate pathway, and about the fact that cell death is mitochondria-related.

  15. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  16. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Stockburger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer’s disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function.

  17. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, Carola; Miano, Davide; Pallas, Thea; Müller, Walter E.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function. PMID:27747106

  18. PEDF improves mitochondrial function in RPE cells during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Leung, Kar Wah; Ren, Yuan; Pei, Jinzhi; Ge, Jian; Tombran-Tink, Joyce

    2014-09-11

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in health and aging. We have shown that oxidative stress impairs mitochondrial function and promotes RPE cell death in an age-dependent manner. This study investigates the role of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in limiting oxidative stress-induced damage to RPE cells through mitochondrial pathways. Three groups of early-passaged RPE cells from donors 50 to 55, 60 to 65, and 70 to 75 years old (yo) were either preconditioned with PEDF followed by exposure to sublethal doses of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or post-treated with PEDF after H2O2 treatment. Effects of PEDF on mitochondrial function and cell viability were examined. Oxidative stress induced an age-dependent increase in LDH release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and cell death and a decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in human RPE cells. Preconditioning or poststressed treatment with PEDF resulted in increased cell viability, inhibition of cytochrome c release and caspase 3 cleavage, and improved mitochondria function denoted by a decrease in ROS generation and increases in ATP production and ΔΨm. Oxidative stress also disrupted the reticular network, trafficking, and distribution of the mitochondria and blocked activation of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, and Erk signaling in the cells. These effects were more pronounced in RPE cells from individuals>60 yo compared to the 50 to 55 yo age group. Pigment epithelium-derived factor mitigated negative effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial remodeling and cellular distribution and unblocked its control of PI3K/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Although PEDF potentiated both PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling in the cells, stabilization of mitochondrial networks and function was dependent on its activation of PI3K/Akt. Specificity of PEDF's activity was confirmed using the pharmacological inhibitors LY294002

  19. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I), and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers. PMID:21645391

  20. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson George R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I, and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers.

  1. Bezafibrate improves mitochondrial function in the CNS of a mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Noe, Natalie; Dillon, Lloye; Lellek, Veronika; Diaz, Francisca; Hida, Aline; Moraes, Carlos T; Wenz, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction frequently affects the central nervous system. Here, we investigated the effect of bezafibrate treatment on neuronal mitochondrial function and its impact on the progression of a mitochondrial encephalopathy. We used a murine model with a forebrain-specific cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by conditional deletion of the COX10 gene. In this mouse model, bezafibrate-administration improved the phenotype of the mice associated with an increase in mitochondrial pro...

  2. Mitochondrial oxidative function and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Boushel, Robert; Dela, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    oxidative phosphorylation. This review will cover the present knowledge and literature on the topics of the activity of oxidative enzymes and the electron transport chain (ETC) in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes. Different methods of studying mitochondrial function are described, including......The cause of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is unknown. The major part of insulin-mediated glucose disposal takes place in the skeletal muscle, and increased amounts of intramyocellular lipid has been associated with insulin resistance and linked to decreased activity of mitochondrial...... discussed. Several studies show reduced activity of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetics. The reductions are independent of muscle fiber type, and are accompanied by visual evidence of damaged mitochondria. In most studies, the reduced oxidative enzyme activity is explained by decreases...

  3. MARCH5 inactivation supports mitochondrial function during neurodegenerative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eFang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction with mitochondrial maintenance critical to neuronal survival. The mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 has dual roles in the upkeep of mitochondrial function. MARCH5 is involved in targeted degradation of proteins harmful to mitochondria and impacts mitochondrial morphology upstream of the fission protein Drp1. In a neuronal cell model, dominant-negative MARCH5 prevents mitochondrial fragmentation during neurodegenerative stress induced by the neuron-specific reactive oxygen generator 6 hydroxydopamine, the complex I inhibitor rotenone or Alzheimer’s-releated Aβ peptide. In addition, preservation of mitochondrial function in terms of membrane potential and lower reactive oxygen generation was observed following inactivation of MARCH5. Our findings connect MARCH5 to neuronal stress responses and further emphasize the link between mitochondrial dynamics and function.

  4. A mild impairment of mitochondrial electron transport has sex-specific effects on lifespan and aging in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan G Hughes

    Full Text Available Impairments of various aspects of mitochondrial function have been associated with increased lifespan in various model organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to mice. For example, disruption of the function of the 'Rieske' iron-sulfur protein (RISP of complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain can result in increased lifespan in the nematode worm C. elegans. However, the mechanisms by which impaired mitochondrial function affects aging remain under investigation, including whether or not they require decreased electron transport. We have generated knock-in mice with a loss-of-function Risp mutation that is homozygous lethal. However, heterozygotes (Risp(+/P224S were viable and had decreased levels of RISP protein and complex III enzymatic activity. This decrease was sufficient to impair mitochondrial respiration and to decrease overall metabolic rate in males, but not females. These defects did not appear to exert an overtly deleterious effect on the health of the mutants, since young Risp(+/P224S mice are outwardly normal, with unaffected performance and fertility. Furthermore, biomarkers of oxidative stress were unaffected in both young and aged animals. Despite this, the average lifespan of male Risp(+/P224S mice was shortened and aged Risp(+/P224S males showed signs of more rapidly deteriorating health. In spite of these differences, analysis of Gompertz mortality parameters showed that Risp heterozygosity decreased the rate of increase of mortality with age and increased the intrinsic vulnerability to death in both sexes. However, the intrinsic vulnerability was increased more dramatically in males, which resulted in their shortened lifespan. For females, the slower acceleration of age-dependent mortality results in significantly increased survival of Risp(+/P224S mice in the second half of lifespan. These results demonstrate that even relatively small perturbations of the mitochondrial electron transport chain can

  5. Anthracycline-containing chemotherapy causes long-term impairment of mitochondrial respiration and increased reactive oxygen species release in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouspillou, Gilles; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Spendiff, Sally; Vuda, Madhusudanarao; Meehan, Brian; Mlynarski, Heather; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Purves-Smith, Fennigje M.; Konokhova, Yana; Rak, Janusz; Chevalier, Stéphanie; Taivassalo, Tanja; Hepple, Russell T.; Jagoe, R. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer treatments for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are highly effective but are now implicated in causing impaired muscle function in long-term survivors. However, no comprehensive assessment of skeletal muscle mitochondrial functions in long-term survivors has been performed and the presence of persistent chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction remains a strong possibility. Non-tumour-bearing mice were treated with two drugs that have been used frequently in ALL treatment (doxorubicin and dexamethasone) for up to 4 cycles at 3-week intervals and euthanized 3 months after the 4th cycle. Treated animals had impaired growth and lower muscle mass as well as reduced mitochondrial respiration and increased reactive oxygen species production per unit oxygen consumption. Mitochondrial DNA content and protein levels of key mitochondrial membrane proteins and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis were unchanged, but protein levels of Parkin were reduced. This suggests a novel pattern of chemotherapy-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle that persists because of an acquired defect in mitophagy signaling. The results could explain the observed functional impairments in adult survivors of childhood ALL and may also be relevant to long-term survivors of other cancers treated with similar regimes. PMID:25732599

  6. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an increase of ROS level in cellular senescence induced by IR could mediate mtDNA deletion via impairment of mitochondria biogenesis in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Our results showed that IR induced cellular senescence, intracellular ROS, and mtDNA deletion, and in particular, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM). Furthermore, these IR-induced events were abolished using a potent antioxidant, NAC, which suggests that ROS is a key cause of mtDNA deletion in IR-induced cellular senescence, and that the alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis may mediate these processes

  7. Altered mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in leukocytes of anorexia nervosa patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M Victor

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Anorexia nervosa is a common illness among adolescents and is characterised by oxidative stress. OBJECTIVE: The effects of anorexia on mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes from anorexic subjects were evaluated. DESIGN AND SETTING: A multi-centre, cross-sectional case-control study was performed. PATIENTS: Our study population consisted of 20 anorexic patients and 20 age-matched controls, all of which were Caucasian women. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anthropometric and metabolic parameters were evaluated in the study population. To assess whether anorexia nervosa affects mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes of anorexic patients, we measured mitochondrial oxygen consumption, membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial mass, and complex I and III activity in polymorphonuclear cells. RESULTS: Mitochondrial function was impaired in the leukocytes of the anorexic patients. This was evident in a decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption (P<0.05, mitochondrial membrane potential (P<0.01 and GSH levels (P<0.05, and an increase in ROS production (P<0.05 with respect to control subjects. Furthermore, a reduction of mitochondrial mass was detected in leukocytes of the anorexic patients (P<0.05, while the activity of mitochondrial complex I (P<0.001, but not that of complex III, was found to be inhibited in the same population. CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress is produced in the leukocytes of anorexic patients and is closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results lead us to propose that the oxidative stress that occurs in anorexia takes place at mitochondrial complex I. Future research concerning mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress should aim to determine the physiological mechanism involved in this effect and the physiological impact of anorexia.

  8. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g., might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced ATP production, and ...

  9. Disturbed mitochondrial function restricts glutamate uptake in the human Müller glia cell line, MIO-M1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariyaraja Sridevi; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2017-01-01

    Using the human Müller cell line, MIO-M1, the aim was to study the impact of mitochondrial inhibition in Müller glia through antimycin A treatment. MIO-M1 cell survival, levels of released lactate, mitochondrial function, and glutamate uptake were studied in response to mitochondrial inhibition...... inhibition caused impaired glutamate uptake and decreased mRNA expression of the glutamate transporter, EAAT1. Over all, we show important roles of mitochondrial activity in MIO-M1 cell function and survival....

  10. Impaired Insulin Signaling is Associated with Hepatic Mitochondrial Dysfunction in IR+/−-IRS-1+/− Double Heterozygous (IR-IRS1dh Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Franko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a pivotal role in energy metabolism, but whether insulin signaling per se could regulate mitochondrial function has not been identified yet. To investigate whether mitochondrial function is regulated by insulin signaling, we analyzed muscle and liver of insulin receptor (IR+/−-insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1+/− double heterozygous (IR-IRS1dh mice, a well described model for insulin resistance. IR-IRS1dh mice were studied at the age of 6 and 12 months and glucose metabolism was determined by glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Mitochondrial enzyme activities, oxygen consumption, and membrane potential were assessed using spectrophotometric, respirometric, and proton motive force analysis, respectively. IR-IRS1dh mice showed elevated serum insulin levels. Hepatic mitochondrial oxygen consumption was reduced in IR-IRS1dh animals at 12 months of age. Furthermore, 6-month-old IR-IRS1dh mice demonstrated enhanced mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle, but a tendency of impaired glucose tolerance. On the other hand, 12-month-old IR-IRS1dh mice showed improved glucose tolerance, but normal muscle mitochondrial function. Our data revealed that deficiency in IR/IRS-1 resulted in normal or even elevated skeletal muscle, but impaired hepatic mitochondrial function, suggesting a direct cross-talk between insulin signaling and mitochondria in the liver.

  11. The mixture of "ecstasy" and its metabolites impairs mitochondrial fusion/fission equilibrium and trafficking in hippocampal neurons, at in vivo relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Daniel José; Serrat, Romàn; Mirra, Serena; Quevedo, Martí; de Barreda, Elena Goméz; Àvila, Jesús; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Branco, Paula Sério; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lourdes Bastos, Maria de; Capela, João Paulo; Soriano, Eduardo; Carvalho, Félix

    2014-06-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy") is a potentially neurotoxic recreational drug of abuse. Though the mechanisms involved are still not completely understood, formation of reactive metabolites and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to MDMA-related neurotoxicity. Neuronal mitochondrial trafficking, and their targeting to synapses, is essential for proper neuronal function and survival, rendering neurons particularly vulnerable to mitochondrial dysfunction. Indeed, MDMA-associated disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis and ATP depletion have been described in neurons, thus suggesting possible MDMA interference on mitochondrial dynamics. In this study, we performed real-time functional experiments of mitochondrial trafficking to explore the role of in situ mitochondrial dysfunction in MDMA's neurotoxic actions. We show that the mixture of MDMA and six of its major in vivo metabolites, each compound at 10μM, impaired mitochondrial trafficking and increased the fragmentation of axonal mitochondria in cultured hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the overexpression of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) or dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) K38A constructs almost completely rescued the trafficking deficits caused by this mixture. Finally, in hippocampal neurons overexpressing a Mfn2 mutant, Mfn2 R94Q, with impaired fusion and transport properties, it was confirmed that a dysregulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion events greatly contributed to the reported trafficking phenotype. In conclusion, our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the mixture of MDMA and its metabolites, at concentrations relevant to the in vivo scenario, impaired mitochondrial trafficking and increased mitochondrial fragmentation in hippocampal neurons, thus providing a new insight in the context of "ecstasy"-induced neuronal injury.

  12. Overexpression of mitochondrial sirtuins alters glycolysis and mitochondrial function in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Barbi de Moura

    Full Text Available SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak.

  13. 38 CFR 4.10 - Functional impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Functional impairment. 4... RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.10 Functional impairment. The basis of disability... addition to the etiological, anatomical, pathological, laboratory and prognostic data required for...

  14. Towards a functional definition of the mitochondrial human proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Fasano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial human proteome project (mt-HPP was initiated by the Italian HPP group as a part of both the chromosome-centric initiative (C-HPP and the “biology and disease driven” initiative (B/D-HPP. In recent years several reports highlighted how mitochondrial biology and disease are regulated by specific interactions with non-mitochondrial proteins. Thus, it is of great relevance to extend our present view of the mitochondrial proteome not only to those proteins that are encoded by or transported to mitochondria, but also to their interactors that take part in mitochondria functionality. Here, we propose a graphical representation of the functional mitochondrial proteome by retrieving mitochondrial proteins from the NeXtProt database and adding to the network their interactors as annotated in the IntAct database. Notably, the network may represent a reference to map all the proteins that are currently being identified in mitochondrial proteomics studies.

  15. Impaired expression of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter suppresses mast cell degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuno, Tadahide; Shinkai, Narumi; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2015-12-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix influences ATP production, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and apoptosis regulation. Ca(2+) uptake across the ion-impermeable inner mitochondrial membrane is mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) complex. The MCU complex forms a pore structure composed of several proteins. MCU is a Ca(2+)-selective channel in the inner-mitochondrial membrane that allows electrophoretic Ca(2+) entry into the matrix. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake 1 (MICU1) functions as a Ca(2+)-sensing regulator of the MCU complex. Previously, by microscopic analysis at the single-cell level, we found that during mast cell activation, mitochondria capture cytosolic Ca(2+) in two steps. Consequently, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake likely plays a role in cellular function through cytosolic Ca(2+) buffering. Here, we investigate the role of MCU and MICU1 in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and mast cell degranulation using MCU- and MICU1-knockdown (KD) mast cells. Whereas MCU- and MICU1-KD mast cells show normal proliferation rates and mitochondrial membrane potential, they exhibit slow and reduced cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) elevation after antigen stimulation. Moreover, β-hexosaminidase release induced by antigen was significantly suppressed in MCU-KD cells but not MICU1-KD cells. This suggests that both MCU and MICU1 are involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in mast cells, while MCU plays a role in mast cell degranulation.

  16. Mitochondrial Composition,Function and Stress Response in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard P.Jacoby; Lei Li; Shaobai Huang; Chun Pong Lee; A.Harvey Millar; Nicolas L.Taylor

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of mitochondria is respiration,where catabolism of substrates is coupled to ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation.In plants,mitochondrial composition is relatively complex and flexible and has specific pathways to support photosynthetic processes in illuminated leaves.This review begins with outlining current models of mitochondrial composition in plant cells,with an emphasis upon the assembly of the complexes of the classical electron transport chain (ETC).Next,we focus upon the comparative analysis of mitochondrial function from different tissue types.A prominent theme in the plant mitochondrial literature involves linking mitochondrial composition to environmental stress responses,and this review then gives a detailed outline of how oxidative stress impacts upon the plant mitochondrial proteome with particular attention to the role of transition metals.This is followed by an analysis of the signaling capacity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species,which studies the transcriptional changes of stress responsive genes as a framework to define specific signals emanating from the mitochondrion.Finally,specific mitochondrial roles during exposure to harsh environments are outlined,with attention paid to mitochondrial delivery of energy and intermediates,mitochondrial support for photosynthesis,and mitochondrial processes operating within root cells that mediate tolerance to anoxia and unfavorable soil chemistries.

  17. [Functional impairment associated with cognitive impairment in hospitalised elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Chaparro, José Mauricio; Mosquera-Jiménez, José Ignacio; Davis, Annabelle S; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A

    2017-06-24

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of cognitive impairment on functional decline in hospitalised patients aged ≥60 years. Measurements at admission included demographic data, Charlson's comorbidity index, and cognitive impairment (according to education level). Data were also collected on hospital length of stay, depression, and delirium developed during hospitalisation. The outcome, Barthel Index (BI), was measured at admission, discharge, and 1-month post-discharge. Patients with BI≤75 at admission (n=54) or with a missing BI value were excluded (n=1). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore predictive factors with functional decline (BI≤75) from admission to discharge, and 1-month later. Of the 133 patients included, 24.8% and 19.6% had a BI≤75 at discharge and at 1-month, respectively. Compared with men, women had more than double risk for functional decline at discharge and 1-month (P<.05). Compared with those without delirium and without cognitive impairment, those with delirium and cognitive impairment had an increased risk for functional decline (BI≤75) at discharge (OR 5.15, 95% CI; 1.94-13.67), and at 1-month (OR 6.26, 95% CI; 2.30-17.03). Similarly, those with comorbidity (≥2) had increased functional decline at discharge (OR 2.36, 95% CI; 1.14-4.87), and at 1-month after discharge (OR 2.71, 95% CI; 1.25-5.89). Delirium during hospitalisation, together with cognitive impairment on admission, was a strong predictor of functional decline. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Myocardial mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in mice lacking adiponectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Braun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin deficiency leads to increased myocardial infarct size following ischemia reperfusion and to exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy following pressure overload, entities that are causally linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In skeletal muscle, lack of adiponectin results in impaired mitochondrial function. Thus, it was our objective to investigate whether adiponectin deficiency impairs mitochondrial energetics in the heart. At 8 weeks of age, heart weight-to-body weight ratios were not different between adiponectin knockout (ADQ-/- mice and wildtypes (WT. In isolated working hearts, cardiac output, aortic developed pressure and cardiac power were preserved in ADQ-/- mice. Rates of fatty acid oxidation, glucose oxidation and glycolysis were unchanged between groups. While myocardial oxygen consumption was slightly reduced (-24% in ADQ-/- mice in isolated working hearts, rates of maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis in saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers were preserved in ADQ-/- mice with glutamate, pyruvate or palmitoyl-carnitine as a substrate. In addition, enzymatic activity of respiratory complexes I and II was unchanged between groups. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and SIRT1 activity were not decreased, expression and acetylation of PGC-1α were unchanged, and mitochondrial content of OXPHOS subunits was not decreased in ADQ-/- mice. Finally, increasing energy demands due to prolonged subcutaneous infusion of isoproterenol did not differentially affect cardiac contractility or mitochondrial function in ADQ-/- mice compared to WT. Thus, mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in hearts of mice lacking adiponectin, suggesting that adiponectin may be expendable in the regulation of mitochondrial energetics and contractile function in the heart under non-pathological conditions.

  19. Myocardial mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in mice lacking adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Martin; Hettinger, Niko; Koentges, Christoph; Pfeil, Katharina; Cimolai, Maria C; Hoffmann, Michael M; Osterholt, Moritz; Doenst, Torsten; Bode, Christoph; Bugger, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin deficiency leads to increased myocardial infarct size following ischemia reperfusion and to exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy following pressure overload, entities that are causally linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In skeletal muscle, lack of adiponectin results in impaired mitochondrial function. Thus, it was our objective to investigate whether adiponectin deficiency impairs mitochondrial energetics in the heart. At 8 weeks of age, heart weight-to-body weight ratios were not different between adiponectin knockout (ADQ-/-) mice and wildtypes (WT). In isolated working hearts, cardiac output, aortic developed pressure and cardiac power were preserved in ADQ-/- mice. Rates of fatty acid oxidation, glucose oxidation and glycolysis were unchanged between groups. While myocardial oxygen consumption was slightly reduced (-24%) in ADQ-/- mice in isolated working hearts, rates of maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis in saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers were preserved in ADQ-/- mice with glutamate, pyruvate or palmitoyl-carnitine as a substrate. In addition, enzymatic activity of respiratory complexes I and II was unchanged between groups. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and SIRT1 activity were not decreased, expression and acetylation of PGC-1α were unchanged, and mitochondrial content of OXPHOS subunits was not decreased in ADQ-/- mice. Finally, increasing energy demands due to prolonged subcutaneous infusion of isoproterenol did not differentially affect cardiac contractility or mitochondrial function in ADQ-/- mice compared to WT. Thus, mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in hearts of mice lacking adiponectin, suggesting that adiponectin may be expendable in the regulation of mitochondrial energetics and contractile function in the heart under non-pathological conditions.

  20. Intermittent hypoxia protects cerebral mitochondrial function from calcium overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Liao, Weigong; Gao, Wenxiang; Huang, Jian; Gao, Yuqi

    2013-12-01

    Hypoxia leads to Ca(2+) overload and results in mitochondrial uncoupling, decreased ATP synthesis, and neuronal death. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload protects mitochondrial function after hypoxia. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial tolerance to Ca(2+) overload. Wistar rats were divided into control and intermittent hypoxia (IH) groups. The IH group was subject to hypoxia for 4 h daily in a hypobaric cabin (5,000 m) for 7 days. Brain mitochondria were isolated on day 7 following hypoxia. The baseline mitochondrial functions, such as ST3, ST4, and respiratory control ratio (RCR = ST3/ST4), were measured using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide concentrations were measured by HPLC. Mitochondrial membrane potential was determined by measuring rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) fluorescence in the absence and presence of high Ca(2+) concentration (0.1 M), which simulates Ca(2+) overload. Our results revealed that IH did not affect mitochondrial respiratory functions, but led to a reduction in AMP and an increase in ADP concentrations in mitochondria. Both control and IH groups demonstrated decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in the presence of high Ca(2+) (0.1 M), while the IH group showed a relative higher mitochondrial membrane potential. These results indicated that the neuroprotective effect of intermittent hypoxia was resulted partly from preserving mitochondrial membrane potential, and increasing mitochondrial tolerance to high calcium levels. The increased ADP and decreased AMP in mitochondria following intermittent hypoxia may be a mechanism underlying this protection.

  1. Complex I function in mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaz, Giorgio; Tioli, Gaia; Falasca, Anna Ida; Genova, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses the functional properties of mitochondrial Complex I originating from its presence in an assembled form as a supercomplex comprising Complex III and Complex IV in stoichiometric ratios. In particular several lines of evidence are presented favouring the concept that electron transfer from Complex I to Complex III is operated by channelling of electrons through Coenzyme Q molecules bound to the supercomplex, in contrast with the hypothesis that the transfer of reducing equivalents from Complex I to Complex III occurs via random diffusion of the Coenzyme Q molecules in the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, another property provided by the supercomplex assembly is the control of generation of reactive oxygen species by Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory Complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  2. Sulforaphane is anticonvulsant and improves mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Tan, Kah Ni; Borges, Karin

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway (Nrf2) has been previously identified to protect the brain against various impacts. Here, we investigated the effect of the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane in various seizure models and hippocampal mitochondrial bioenergetics. We found that daily injections of sulforaphane for 5 days elevated the seizure thresholds to 6 Hz stimulation and fluorothyl-, but not pentylenetetrazole-induced tonic seizures and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, sulforaphane increased the antioxidant defences within hippocampal formations and blood plasma. In addition, sulforaphane treatment reduced the extent of hippocampal lipid peroxidation 24 h post-SE and protected hippocampal mitochondria against SE-induced reduction in state 2 and uncoupler-stimulated state 3 respiration. SE-mediated partial loss of rotenone-sensitive and complex II-driven respiration was reduced, consistent with the enhanced activities of complexes I and II in sulforaphane-treated SE mice. In mitochondria isolated from both no SE and SE mice, sulforaphane increased state 3 respiration and respiration linked to ATP synthesis, which may contribute to its anticonvulsant and antioxidant effects by providing more ATP for cellular vital and protective functions. However, sulforaphane did not prevent SE-induced hippocampal cell death. In conclusion, sulforaphane and/or Nrf2 activation are viable anticonvulsant strategies, which are antioxidant and enhance mitochondrial function, especially the ability to produce ATP. Sulforaphane was anticonvulsant in two acute mouse models of epilepsy and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). We also found antioxidant effects of sulforaphane in mouse plasma and hippocampal formations, exhibited by increased catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as increased abilities of hippocampal mitochondria to produce ATP. These effects likely underlie

  3. GPA protects the nigrostriatal dopamine system by enhancing mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Tamas L; Erion, Derek M; Elsworth, John D; Roth, Robert H; Shulman, Gerald I; Andrews, Zane B

    2011-07-01

    Guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) increases AMPK activity, mitochondrial function and biogenesis in muscle and improves physiological function, for example during aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Here we tested whether GPA prevents neurodegeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system in MPTP-treated mice. Mice were fed a diet of 1% GPA or normal chow for 4 weeks and then treated with either MPTP or saline. Indices of nigrostriatal function were examined by HPLC, immunohistochemistry, stereology, electron microscopy and mitochondrial respiration. MPTP intoxication decreased TH neurons in the SNpc of normal chow-fed mice; however GPA-fed mice remarkably exhibited no loss of TH neurons in the SNpc. MPTP caused a decrease in striatal dopamine of both normal chow- and GPA-fed mice, although this effect was significantly attenuated in GPA-fed mice. GPA-fed mice showed increased AMPK activity, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial number in nigrostriatal TH neurons, suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of GPA involved AMPK-dependent increases in mitochondrial function and biogenesis. MPTP treatment produced a decrease in mitochondrial number and volume in normal chow-fed mice but not GPA-fed mice. Our results show the neuroprotective properties of GPA in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease are partially mediated by AMPK and mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common problem in neurodegeneration and thus GPA may slow disease progression in other models of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Disturbed mitochondrial function restricts glutamate uptake in the human Müller glia cell line, MIO-M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariyaraja Sridevi; Henriksen, Ulrik; Bergersen, Linda Hildegaard; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Desler, Claus; Skytt, Dorte Marie; Kolko, Miriam

    2017-09-01

    Using the human Müller cell line, MIO-M1, the aim was to study the impact of mitochondrial inhibition in Müller glia through antimycin A treatment. MIO-M1 cell survival, levels of released lactate, mitochondrial function, and glutamate uptake were studied in response to mitochondrial inhibition and glucose restriction. Lactate release decreased in response to glucose restriction. Combined glucose restriction and blocked mitochondrial activity decreased survival and caused collapse of the respiratory chain measured by oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate. Mitochondrial inhibition caused impaired glutamate uptake and decreased mRNA expression of the glutamate transporter, EAAT1. Over all, we show important roles of mitochondrial activity in MIO-M1 cell function and survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Nutrient excess and altered mitochondrial proteome and function contribute to neurodegeneration in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Fernyhough, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that results in the progressive deterioration of the sensory nervous system. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the neurodegeneration observed in diabetic neuropathy. Our recent work has shown that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rodents. In neurons, the nutrient excess associated with prolonged diabetes may trigger a switching off of AMP kinase (AMPK) and/or silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling leading to impaired peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1α) expression/activity and diminished mitochondrial activity. This review briefly summarizes the alterations of mitochondrial function and proteome in sensory neurons of STZ-diabetic rodents. We also discuss the possible involvement of AMPK/SIRT/PGC-1α pathway in other diabetic models and different tissues affected by diabetes.

  6. Eating disorder severity and functional impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Hoyt, William T.; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    2017-01-01

    diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder or eating disorder not otherwise specified. Regression analysis was applied to assess the effect of the hypothesized moderators and mediators. Eating disorder severity was measured with the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, functional impairment...

  7. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-06

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX's cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  8. Impaired Leydig cell function in infertile men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A-M; Jørgensen, N; Frydelund-Larsen, L

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether an impaired Leydig cell function is present in severely oligospermic men, serum testosterone (T), LH, estradiol (E(2)), and SHBG levels in 357 idiopathic infertile men were compared with levels in 318 proven fertile men. In addition, the T/LH ratio, E(2)/T ratio...... of the fertile levels.Thus, the group of infertile men showed significant signs of impaired Leydig cell function in parallel to their impaired spermatogenesis. The association of decreased spermatogenesis and impaired Leydig cell function might reflect a disturbed paracrine communication between the seminiferous......, and calculated free T index (cFT) were compared between the two groups.A shift toward lower serum T levels, cFT, and T/LH ratio and higher serum LH, E(2), and E(2)/T levels was observed in the group of infertile men. On average, the infertile men had 18, 26, and 34% lower serum T, cFT, and T/LH levels...

  9. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2 and 4 (PDK4. In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function.

  10. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajin Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yajin; Dong, Yuan; Cheng, Jinbo

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU)—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28208618

  12. High fat diet-induced changes in mouse muscle mitochondrial phospholipids do not impair mitochondrial respiration despite insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joris Hoeks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus and muscle insulin resistance have been associated with reduced capacity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, possibly as a result of increased intake of dietary fat. Here, we examined the hypothesis that a prolonged high-fat diet consumption (HFD increases the saturation of muscle mitochondrial membrane phospholipids causing impaired mitochondrial oxidative capacity and possibly insulin resistance. METHODOLOGY: C57BL/6J mice were fed an 8-week or 20-week low fat diet (10 kcal%; LFD or HFD (45 kcal%. Skeletal muscle mitochondria were isolated and fatty acid (FA composition of skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography followed by GC. High-resolution respirometry was used to assess oxidation of pyruvate and fatty acids by mitochondria. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by HOMA-IR. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At 8 weeks, mono-unsaturated FA (16∶1n7, 18∶1n7 and 18∶1n9 were decreased (-4.0%, p<0.001, whereas saturated FA (16∶0 were increased (+3.2%, p<0.001 in phospholipids of HFD vs. LFD mitochondria. Interestingly, 20 weeks of HFD descreased mono-unsaturated FA while n-6 poly-unsaturated FA (18∶2n6, 20∶4n6, 22∶5n6 showed a pronounced increase (+4.0%, p<0.001. Despite increased saturation of muscle mitochondrial phospholipids after the 8-week HFD, mitochondrial oxidation of both pyruvate and fatty acids were similar between LFD and HFD mice. After 20 weeks of HFD, the increase in n-6 poly-unsaturated FA was accompanied by enhanced maximal capacity of the electron transport chain (+49%, p = 0.002 and a tendency for increased ADP-stimulated respiration, but only when fuelled by a lipid-derived substrate. Insulin sensitivity in HFD mice was reduced at both 8 and 20 weeks. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings do not support the concept that prolonged HF feeding leads to increased saturation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids resulting in a decrease in

  13. Simvastatin impairs ADP-stimulated respiration and increases mitochondrial oxidative stress in primary human skeletal myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna; Anderson, Ethan J; Lin, Chien-Te; Kane, Daniel A; Lee, Nam-Sihk; Cortright, Ronald N; Bamman, Marcas M; Neufer, P Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Statins, the widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, cause adverse skeletal muscle side effects ranging from fatigue to fatal rhabdomyolysis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration, oxidative stress, and cell death in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells (i.e., myotubes). Simvastatin induced a dose-dependent decrease in viability of proliferating and differentiating primary human muscle precursor cells, and a similar dose-dependent effect was noted in differentiated myoblasts and myotubes. Additionally, there were decreases in myotube number and size following 48 h of simvastatin treatment (5 μM). In permeabilized myotubes, maximal ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, supported by palmitoylcarnitine+malate (PCM, complex I and II substrates) and glutamate+malate (GM, complex I substrates), was 32-37% lower (P<0.05) in simvastatin-treated (5 μM) vs control myotubes, providing evidence of impaired respiration at complex I. Mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generation were significantly greater in the simvastatin-treated human skeletal myotube cultures compared to control. In addition, simvastatin markedly increased protein levels of Bax (proapoptotic, +53%) and Bcl-2 (antiapoptotic, +100%, P<0.05), mitochondrial PTP opening (+44%, P<0.05), and TUNEL-positive nuclei in human skeletal myotubes, demonstrating up-regulation of mitochondrial-mediated myonuclear apoptotic mechanisms. These data demonstrate that simvastatin induces myotube atrophy and cell loss associated with impaired ADP-stimulated maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis in primary human skeletal myotubes, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction may underlie human statin-induced myopathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Human 2'-phosphodiesterase localizes to the mitochondrial matrix with a putative function in mitochondrial RNA turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Kjær, Karina Hansen

    2011-01-01

    . Interestingly, 2′-PDE shares both functionally and structurally characteristics with the CCR4-type exonuclease–endonuclease–phosphatase family of deadenylases. Here we show that 2′-PDE locates to the mitochondrial matrix of human cells, and comprise an active 3′–5′ exoribonuclease exhibiting a preference...... a role in the cellular immune system, may also function in mitochondrial RNA turnover....

  15. MCUR1 Is a Scaffold Factor for the MCU Complex Function and Promotes Mitochondrial Bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dhanendra; Dong, Zhiwei; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Koch, Diana A; Thomas, Toby; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Timbalia, Shrishiv A; Goldman, Samuel J; Breves, Sarah L; Corbally, Daniel P; Nemani, Neeharika; Fairweather, Joseph P; Cutri, Allison R; Zhang, Xueqian; Song, Jianliang; Jaña, Fabián; Huang, Jianhe; Barrero, Carlos; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Luongo, Timothy S; Schumacher, Sarah M; Rockman, Michael E; Dietrich, Alexander; Merali, Salim; Caplan, Jeffrey; Stathopulos, Peter; Ahima, Rexford S; Cheung, Joseph Y; Houser, Steven R; Koch, Walter J; Patel, Vickas; Gohil, Vishal M; Elrod, John W; Rajan, Sudarsan; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2016-05-24

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter (MCU)-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is the primary mechanism for increasing matrix Ca(2+) in most cell types. However, a limited understanding of the MCU complex assembly impedes the comprehension of the precise mechanisms underlying MCU activity. Here, we report that mouse cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells lacking MCU regulator 1 (MCUR1) have severely impaired [Ca(2+)]m uptake and IMCU current. MCUR1 binds to MCU and EMRE and function as a scaffold factor. Our protein binding analyses identified the minimal, highly conserved regions of coiled-coil domain of both MCU and MCUR1 that are necessary for heterooligomeric complex formation. Loss of MCUR1 perturbed MCU heterooligomeric complex and functions as a scaffold factor for the assembly of MCU complex. Vascular endothelial deletion of MCU and MCUR1 impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and migration but elicited autophagy. These studies establish the existence of a MCU complex that assembles at the mitochondrial integral membrane and regulates Ca(2+)-dependent mitochondrial metabolism.

  16. MCUR1 Is a Scaffold Factor for the MCU Complex Function and Promotes Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanendra Tomar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uniporter (MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is the primary mechanism for increasing matrix Ca2+ in most cell types. However, a limited understanding of the MCU complex assembly impedes the comprehension of the precise mechanisms underlying MCU activity. Here, we report that mouse cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells lacking MCU regulator 1 (MCUR1 have severely impaired [Ca2+]m uptake and IMCU current. MCUR1 binds to MCU and EMRE and function as a scaffold factor. Our protein binding analyses identified the minimal, highly conserved regions of coiled-coil domain of both MCU and MCUR1 that are necessary for heterooligomeric complex formation. Loss of MCUR1 perturbed MCU heterooligomeric complex and functions as a scaffold factor for the assembly of MCU complex. Vascular endothelial deletion of MCU and MCUR1 impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and migration but elicited autophagy. These studies establish the existence of a MCU complex that assembles at the mitochondrial integral membrane and regulates Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial metabolism.

  17. N-acetylcysteine impairs survival of luteal cells through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhrke, Berthold; Xu, Jinxian; Weitzel, Joachim M; Krüger, Burkhard; Goldammer, Tom; Viergutz, Torsten

    2010-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is known as an antioxidant and used for mucus viscosity reduction. However, this drug prevents or induces cell death depending on the cell type. The response of steroidogenic luteal cells to NAC is unknown. Our data shows that NAC can behave as an antioxidant or prooxidant in dependency on the concentration and mitochondrial energization. NAC elevated the flowcytometric-measured portion of hypodiploid (dying) cells. This rise was completely abolished by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. NAC increased the secretion of nitric oxide and cellular nitrotyrosine. An image analysis indicated that cells pretreated with NAC and loaded with DHR showed a fluorescent structure probably elicited by the oxidative product of DHR, rhodamine 123 that sequesters mitochondrially. Pretreating luteal cells with NAC or adding NAC directly to mitochondrial fractions followed by assessing the mitochondrial transmembrane potential difference (Deltapsi) by the JC-1 technique demonstrated a marked decrease in Deltapsi. A protonophore restored Deltapsi and rotenone (an inhibitor of respiratory chain complex I) inhibited mitochondrial recovering. Thus, in steroidogenic luteal cells from healthy mature corpus luteum, NAC impairs cellular survival by interfering with mitochondrial metabolism. The protonophore-induced recovering of NAC-provoked decrease in Deltapsi indicates that an ATP synthase-favored route of H(+) re-entry to the matrix is essentially switched off by NAC while other respiratory chain complexes remain intact. These data may be important for therapeutic timing of treatments with NAC. (c) 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. Hepatic mTORC1 Opposes Impaired Insulin Action to Control Mitochondrial Metabolism in Obesity

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    Blanka Kucejova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated mitochondrial metabolism during hepatic insulin resistance may contribute to pathophysiologies ranging from elevated glucose production to hepatocellular oxidative stress and inflammation. Given that obesity impairs insulin action but paradoxically activates mTORC1, we tested whether insulin action and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 contribute to altered in vivo hepatic mitochondrial metabolism. Loss of hepatic insulin action for 2 weeks caused increased gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial anaplerosis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle oxidation, and ketogenesis. However, activation of mTORC1, induced by the loss of hepatic Tsc1, suppressed these fluxes. Only glycogen synthesis was impaired by both loss of insulin receptor and mTORC1 activation. Mice with a double knockout of the insulin receptor and Tsc1 had larger livers, hyperglycemia, severely impaired glycogen storage, and suppressed ketogenesis, as compared to those with loss of the liver insulin receptor alone. Thus, activation of hepatic mTORC1 opposes the catabolic effects of impaired insulin action under some nutritional states.

  19. Spirulina platensis Improves Mitochondrial Function Impaired by Elevated Oxidative Stress in Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (ASCs) and Intestinal Epithelial Cells (IECs), and Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, Daria; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is a steadily growing life-threatening endocrine disorder linked to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Inflammatory microenvironment of adipose tissue constitutes the direct tissue milieu for various cell populations, including adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs), widely considered as a potential therapeutic cell source in the course of the treatment of metabolic disorders. Moreover, elevated oxidative stress induces inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs)—the first-line cells exposed to dietary compounds. In the conducted research, we showed that in vitro application of Spirulina platensis contributes to the restoration of ASCs’ and IECs’ morphology and function through the reduction of cellular oxidative stress and inflammation. Enhanced viability, suppressed senescence, and improved proliferation of ASCs and IECs isolated from metabolic syndrome-affected individuals were evident following exposition to Spirulina. A protective effect of the investigated extract against mitochondrial dysfunction and degeneration was also observed. Moreover, our data demonstrate that Spirulina extract effectively suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. In vivo studies showed that horses fed with a diet based on Spirulina platensis supplementation lost weight and their insulin sensitivity improved. Thus, our results indicate the engagement of Spirulina platensis nourishing as an interesting alternative approach for supporting the conventional treatment of equine metabolic syndrome. PMID:28771165

  20. Mitochondrial function in Müller cells - Does it matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Skytt, Dorte Marie; Svare, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction might play a key role in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative inner retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Therefore, the present review provides a perspective on the impact of functional mitochondria...... energy production and previous literature has primarily emphasized glycolysis as the main energy provider. However, recent studies highlight the need of mitochondrial ATP production to upheld Müller cell functions. Therefore, the present review aims to provide an overview of the current evidence...... on the impact of mitochondrial functions in Müller cells....

  1. Neurodegenerative and Fatiguing Illnesses, Infections and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Use of Natural Supplements to Improve Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth L. Nicolson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many chronic diseases and illnesses are associated with one or more chronic infections, dysfunction of mitochondria and reduced production of ATP. This results in fatigue and other symptoms that occur in most if not all chronic conditions and diseases. Methods: This is a review of the published literature on chronic infections in neurodegenerative diseases and fatiguing illnesses that are also typified by mitochondrial dysfunction. This contribution also reviews the use of natural supplements to enhance mitochondrial function and reduce the effects of chronic infections to improve overall function in various chronic illnesses. Results: Mitochondrial function can be enhanced by the use of various natural supplements, notably Lipid Replacement Therapy (LRT using glyerolphospholipids and other mitochondrial supplements. In various chronic illnesses that are characterized by the presence of chronic infections, such as intracellular bacteria (Mycoplasma, Borrelia, Chlamydia and other infections and viruses, LRT has proven useful in multiple clinical trials. For example, in clinical studies on chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia syndrome and other chronic fatiguing illnesses where a large majority of patients have chronic infections, LRT significantly reduced fatigue by 35-43% in different clinical trials and increased mitochondrial function. In clinical trials on patients with multiple intracellular bacterial infections and intractable fatigue LRT plus other mitochondrial supplements significantly decreased fatigue and improved mood and cognition. Conclusions: LRT formulations designed to improve mitochondrial function appear to be useful as non-toxic dietary supplements for reducing fatigue and restoring mitochondrial and other cellular membrane functions in patients with chronic illnesses and multiple chronic infections.

  2. Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Svendsen, Pernille Maj; Skovbro, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Objective Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, which has been linked to decreased mitochondrial function. We measured mitochondrial respiration in lean and obese women with and without PCOS using high-resolution respirometry. Methods...... Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps (40 mU/min/m2) and muscle biopsies were performed on 23 women with PCOS (9 lean (body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m2)) and 17 age- and weight-matched controls (6 lean and 11 obese). Western blotting and high-resolution respirometry was used to determine mitochondrial function. Results...... Insulin sensitivity decreased with PCOS and increasing body weight. Mitochondrial respiration with substrates for complex I and complex I+II were similar in all groups, and PCOS was not associated with a decrease in mitochondrial content as measured by mtDNA/genomicDNA. We found no correlation between...

  3. The Parkinson disease-related protein DJ-1 counteracts mitochondrial impairment induced by the tumour suppressor protein p53 by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolini, Denis; Calì, Tito; Negro, Alessandro; Brini, Marisa

    2013-06-01

    DJ-1 was first identified as an oncogene. More recently, mutations in its gene have been found causative for autosomal recessive familial Parkinson disease. Numerous studies support the DJ-1 role in the protection against oxidative stress and maintenance of mitochondria structure; however, the mechanism of its protective function remains largely unknown. We investigated whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis, a key parameter in cell physiology, could be a target for DJ-1 action. Here, we show that DJ-1 modulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients induced upon cell stimulation with an 1,4,5-inositol-tris-phosphate agonist by favouring the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria tethering. A reduction of DJ-1 levels results in mitochondria fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in stimulated cells. To functionally couple these effects with the well-recognized cytoprotective role of DJ-1, we investigated its action in respect to the tumour suppressor p53. p53 overexpression in HeLa cells impairs their ability to accumulate Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial matrix, causes alteration of the mitochondrial morphology and reduces ER-mitochondria contact sites. Mitochondrial impairments are independent from Drp1 activation, since the co-expression of the dominant negative mutant of Drp1 failed to abolish them. DJ-1 overexpression prevents these alterations by re-establishing the ER-mitochondria tethering. Similarly, the co-expression of the pro-fusion protein Mitofusin 2 blocks the effects induced by p53 on mitochondria, confirming that the modulation of the ER-mitochondria contact sites is critical to mitochondria integrity. Thus, the impairment of ER-mitochondria communication, as a consequence of DJ-1 loss-of-function, may be detrimental for mitochondria-related processes and be at the basis of mitochondrial dysfunction observed in Parkinson disease.

  4. An Essential Role for COPI in mRNA Localization to Mitochondria and Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabezhinsky, Dmitry; Slobodin, Boris; Rapaport, Doron; Gerst, Jeffrey E

    2016-04-19

    Nuclear-encoded mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins (mMPs) can localize directly to the mitochondrial surface, yet how mMPs target mitochondria and whether RNA targeting contributes to protein import into mitochondria and cellular metabolism are unknown. Here, we show that the COPI vesicle coat complex is necessary for mMP localization to mitochondria and mitochondrial function. COPI inactivation leads to reduced mMP binding to COPI itself, resulting in the dissociation of mMPs from mitochondria, a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, a decrease in protein import in vivo and in vitro, and severe deficiencies in mitochondrial respiration. Using a model mMP (OXA1), we observed that COPI inactivation (or mutation of the potential COPI-interaction site) led to altered mRNA localization and impaired cellular respiration. Overall, COPI-mediated mMP targeting is critical for mitochondrial protein import and function, and transcript delivery to the mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum is regulated by cis-acting RNA sequences and trans-acting proteins.

  5. In utero exposure to prepregnancy maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet impair regulators of mitochondrial dynamics in rat placenta and offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borengasser, Sarah J; Faske, Jennifer; Kang, Ping; Blackburn, Michael L; Badger, Thomas M; Shankar, Kartik

    2014-12-01

    The proportion of pregnant women who are obese at conception continues to rise. Compelling evidence suggests the intrauterine environment is an important determinant of offspring health. Maternal obesity and unhealthy diets are shown to promote metabolic programming in the offspring. Mitochondria are maternally inherited, and we have previously shown impaired mitochondrial function in rat offspring exposed to maternal obesity in utero. Mitochondrial health is maintained by mitochondrial dynamics, or the processes of fusion and fission, which serve to repair damaged mitochondria, remove irreparable mitochondria, and maintain mitochondrial morphology. An imbalance between fusion and fission has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and reproduction complications. In the present study, we examined the influence of maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet (HFD) on key regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission in rat offspring at important developmental milestones which included postnatal day (PND)35 (2 wk HFD) and PND130 (∼16 wk HFD). Our results indicate HFD-fed offspring had reduced mRNA expression of presenilin-associated rhomboid-like (PARL), optic atrophy (OPA)1, mitofusin (Mfn)1, Mfn2, fission (Fis)1, and nuclear respiratory factor (Nrf)1 at PND35, while OPA1 and Mfn2 remained decreased at PND130. Putative transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial dynamics were reduced in rat placenta and offspring liver and skeletal muscle [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC1)α, PGC1β, and estrogen-related receptor (ERR)α], consistent with indirect calorimetry findings revealing reduced energy expenditure and impaired fat utilization. Overall, maternal obesity detrimentally alters mitochondrial targets that may contribute to impaired mitochondrial health and increased obesity susceptibility in later life.

  6. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the peroxisomal disease X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Erauskin, J; Galino, J; Ruiz, M; Cuezva, J M; Fabregat, I; Cacabelos, D; Boada, J; Martínez, J; Ferrer, I; Pamplona, R; Villarroya, F; Portero-Otín, M; Fourcade, S; Pujol, A

    2013-08-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited metabolic disorder of the nervous system characterized by axonopathy in spinal cords and/or cerebral demyelination, adrenal insufficiency and accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in plasma and tissues. The disease is caused by malfunction of the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal transporter of VLCFAs or VLCFA-CoA. In the mouse, Abcd1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord, associated with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. We have formerly shown that an excess of the VLCFA C26:0 induces oxidative damage, which underlies the axonal degeneration exhibited by the Abcd1(-) mice. In the present study, we sought to investigate the noxious effects of C26:0 on mitochondria function. Our data indicate that in X-ALD patients' fibroblasts, excess of C26:0 generates mtDNA oxidation and specifically impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) triggering mitochondrial ROS production from electron transport chain complexes. This correlates with impaired complex V phosphorylative activity, as visualized by high-resolution respirometry on spinal cord slices of Abcd1(-) mice. Further, we identified a marked oxidation of key OXPHOS system subunits in Abcd1(-) mouse spinal cords at presymptomatic stages. Altogether, our results illustrate some of the mechanistic intricacies by which the excess of a fatty acid targeted to peroxisomes activates a deleterious process of oxidative damage to mitochondria, leading to a multifaceted dysfunction of this organelle. These findings may be of relevance for patient management while unveiling novel therapeutic targets for X-ALD.

  7. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  8. A role of taurine in mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Svend Høime; Andersen, Mogens Larsen; Cornett, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The mitochondrial pH gradient across the inner-membrane is stabilised by buffering of the matrix. A low-molecular mass buffer compound has to be localised in the matrix to maintain its alkaline pH value. Taurine is found ubiquitously in animal cells with concentrations in the millimolar range...... and its pKa value is determined to 9.0 (25 degrees C) and 8.6 (37 degrees C), respectively. Localisation of such a low-molecular buffer in the mitochondrial matrix, transforms the matrix into a biochemical reaction chamber for the important matrix-localised enzyme systems. Three acyl-CoA dehydrogenase...... enzymes, which are pivotal for beta-oxidation of fatty acids, are demonstrated to have optimal activity in a taurine buffer. By application of the model presented, taurine depletion caused by hyperglycemia could provide a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and diabetes....

  9. Mitochondrial lipid oxidation is impaired in cultured myotubes from obese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, K E; Zheng, D; Anderson, E J; Neufer, P D; Houmard, J A

    2012-08-01

    The skeletal muscle of obese humans is characterized by an inability to appropriately respond to alterations in substrate availability. The purpose of this study was to determine if this metabolic inflexibility with obesity is retained in mitochondria of human skeletal muscle cells raised in culture (HSkMC) and to identify potential mechanisms involved. Mitochondrial respiration was measured in permeabilized myotubes cultured from lean and obese individuals before and after a 24-h lipid incubation. Mitochondrial respiration (state 3) in the presence of lipid substrate (palmitoyl carnitine) increased by almost twofold after lipid incubation in HSkMC from lean, but not obese subjects, indicative of metabolic inflexibility with obesity. The 24-h lipid incubation increased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in HSkMC from lean subjects by +16% (P<0.05); conversely, mtDNA copy number decreased in myotubes cultured from obese individuals (-13%, P=0.06). When respiration data were normalized to mtDNA copy number and other indices of mitochondrial content (COX-IV protein content and CS activity), the significant treatment effects of lipid incubation persisted in the lean subjects, suggesting concomitant alterations in mitochondrial function; no similar adjustment was evident in HSkMC from obese individuals. These data indicate that the skeletal muscle of obese individuals inherently lacks metabolic flexibility in response to lipid exposure, which consists of an inability to increase mitochondrial respiration in the presence of lipid substrate and perhaps by an inability to induce mitochondrial proliferation.

  10. The abolishment of anesthesia-induced cognitive impairment by timely protection of mitochondria in the developing rat brain: the importance of free oxygen radicals and mitochondrial integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscolo, A; Starr, JA; Sanchez; Lunardi, N; DiGruccio, MR; Ori, C; Erisir, A; Trimmer, P; Bennett, J; Jevtovic-Todorovic

    2011-01-01

    Early exposure to general anesthesia (GA) causes developmental neuroapoptosis in the mammalian brain and long-term cognitive impairment. Recent evidence suggests that GA also causes functional and morphological impairment of the immature neuronal mitochondria. Injured mitochondria could be a significant source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which, if not scavenged in timely fashion, may cause excessive lipid peroxidation and damage of cellular membranes. We examined whether early exposure to GA results in ROS upregulation and whether mitochondrial protection and ROS scavenging prevent GA-induced pathomorphological and behavioral impairments. We exposed 7-day-old rats to GA with or without either EUK-134, a synthetic ROS scavenger, or R(+) pramipexole (PPX), a synthetic aminobenzothiazol derivative that restores mitochondrial integrity. We found that GA causes extensive ROS upregulation and lipid peroxidation, as well as mitochondrial injury and neuronal loss in the subiculum. As compared to rats given only GA, those also given PPX or EUK-134 had significantly downregulated lipid peroxidation, preserved mitochondrial integrity, and significantly less neuronal loss. The subiculum is highly intertwined with the hippocampal CA1 region, anterior thalamic nuclei, and both entorhinal and cingulate cortices; hence, it is important in cognitive development. We found that PPX or EUK-134 co-treatment completely prevented GA-induced cognitive impairment. Because mitochondria are vulnerable to GA-induced developmental neurotoxicity, they could be an important therapeutic target for adjuvant therapy aimed at improving the safety of commonly used GAs. PMID:22198380

  11. The Role of Mitochondrial Functional Proteins in ROS Production in Ischemic Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Pei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic heart diseases (IHD have become the leading cause of death around the world, killing more than 7 million people annually. In IHD, the blockage of coronary vessels will cause irreversible cell injury and even death. As the “powerhouse” and “apoptosis center” in cardiomyocytes, mitochondria play critical roles in IHD. Ischemia insult can reduce myocardial ATP content, resulting in energy stress and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Thus, mitochondrial abnormality has been identified as a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders. To date, many studies have suggested that these mitochondrial proteins, such as electron transport chain (ETC complexes, uncoupling proteins (UCPs, mitochondrial dynamic proteins, translocases of outer membrane (Tom complex, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP, can directly or indirectly influence mitochondria-originated ROS production, consequently determining the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial impairment. Here, the focus of this review is to summarize the present understanding of the relationship between some mitochondrial functional proteins and ROS production in IHD.

  12. Mitochondrial processes are impaired in hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, I.; Novershtern, N.; Itzhaki, Z.; Becker-Cohen, M.; Sadeh, M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Friedman, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. To elucidate the pathological mechanisms leading fr

  13. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Nakamura, China; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-07-15

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we determined if CRBN has a protective function against oxidative stress, similar to Lon protease. We report that CRBN partially distributes in mitochondria, suggesting it has a mitochondrial function. To specify the mitochondrial role of CRBN, we mitochondrially expressed CRBN in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The resulting stable SH-SY5Y cell line showed no apparent effect on the mitochondrial functions of fusion, fission, and membrane potential. However, mitochondrially expressed CRBN exhibited protease activity, and was induced by oxidative stress. In addition, stably expressed cells exhibited suppressed neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that CRBN functions specifically as a Lon-type protease in mitochondria.

  14. The Clinical Functional Impairment Scale Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Adrian; Wright, Mary Ellen; Denslow, Sheri

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the project was to review content validity and assess the span of responses for the newly developed Clinical Functional Impairment Scale (CFIS). A cross-sectional, content validity process using focus groups of developmental, behavioral pediatric clinicians was conducted. After qualitative analysis of the focus group data, adjustments were made in the CFIS based on the recommendations of the content experts. A survey was conducted of clinicians participating in the online Society of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Discussion Board. Clinicians reviewed 2 case studies and used the CFIS to score severity and interval change of predetermined functional impairments. The amount of spread in the answers was assessed by calculating the index of dispersion. Qualitative analysis of the focus groups resulted in adjustment to the CFIS to 20 functional impairments, with a 5-point Likert scale of severity and a 7-point Likert scale of interval change. Ninety-four clinicians participated in the survey. The index of dispersion ranged from 0.49 to 0.88. The interval ratings of severity and interval change had lower dispersion ranges. The CFIS uses a mutual prioritization by the family and clinician of the child's functional impairments. The study demonstrated that the clinicians' ratings of the case studies were more variable in the initial symptom severity score than their ratings of symptom severity and interval change in symptoms. Further testing of the CFIS is planned using face-to-face clinical encounters and including parent/caregiver ratings of severity and interval change.

  15. Apolipoprotein E4 (1–272 fragment is associated with mitochondrial proteins and affects mitochondrial function in neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michikawa Makoto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E allele ε4 (apoE4 is a strong risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. Secreted apoE has a critical function in redistributing lipids among central nervous system cells to maintain normal lipid homeostasis. In addition, previous reports have shown that apoE4 is cleaved by a protease in neurons to generate apoE4(1–272 fragment, which is associated with neurofibrillary tanglelike structures and mitochondria, causing mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it still remains unclear how the apoE fragment associates with mitochondria and induces mitochondrial dysfunction. Results To clarify the molecular mechanism, we carried out experiments to identify intracellular apoE-binding molecules and their functions in modulating mitochondria function. Here, we found that apoE4 binds to ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase core protein 2 (UQCRC2 and cytochrome C1, both of which are components of mitochondrial respiratory complex III, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1 (COX IV 1, which is a component of complex IV, in Neuro-2a cells. Interestingly, these proteins associated with apoE4(1–272 more strongly than intact apoE4(1–299. Further analysis showed that in Neuro-2a cells expressing apoE4(1–272, the enzymatic activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV were significantly lower than those in Neuro-2a cells expressing apoE4(1–299. Conclusion ApoE4(1–272 fragment expressed in Neuro2a cells is associated with mitochondrial proteins, UQCRC2 and cytochrome C1, which are component of respiratory complex III, and with COX IV 1, which is a member of complex IV. Overexpression of apoE4(1–272 fragment impairs activities of complex III and IV. These results suggest that the C-terminal-truncated fragment of apoE4 binds to mitochondrial complexes and affects their activities, and thereby leading to neurodegeneration.

  16. Hyperthyroidism causes cardiac dysfunction by mitochondrial impairment and energy depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Sangeeta; Kar, Dipak; De, Kakali; Chander, Vivek; Bandyopadhyay, Arun

    2013-05-01

    This study elucidates the role of metabolic remodeling in cardiac dysfunction induced by hyperthyroidism. Cardiac hypertrophy, structural remodeling, and expression of the genes associated with fatty acid metabolism were examined in rats treated with triiodothyronine (T3) alone (8 μg/100 g body weight (BW), i.p.) for 15 days or along with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist bezafibrate (Bzf; 30 μg/100 g BW, oral) and were found to improve in the Bzf co-treated condition. Ultrastructure of mitochondria was damaged in T3-treated rat heart, which was prevented by Bzf co-administration. Hyperthyroidism-induced oxidative stress, reduction in cytochrome c oxidase activity, and myocardial ATP concentration were also significantly checked by Bzf. Heart function studied at different time points during the course of T3 treatment shows an initial improvement and then a gradual but progressive decline with time, which is prevented by Bzf co-treatment. In summary, the results demonstrate that hyperthyroidism inflicts structural and functional damage to mitochondria, leading to energy depletion and cardiac dysfunction.

  17. MDMA impairs mitochondrial neuronal trafficking in a Tau- and Mitofusin2/Drp1-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Daniel José; Serrat, Román; Mirra, Serena; Quevedo, Martí; Gómez de Barreda, Elena; Avila, Jesús; Fernandes, Eduarda; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Capela, João Paulo; Carvalho, Félix; Soriano, Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Identification of the mechanisms by which drugs of abuse cause neuronal dysfunction is essential for understanding the biological bases of their acute and long-lasting effects in the brain. Here, we performed real-time functional experiments of axonal transport of mitochondria to explore the role of in situ mitochondrial dysfunction in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy")-related brain actions. We showed that MDMA dramatically reduced mitochondrial trafficking in hippocampal neurons in a Tau-dependent manner, in which glycogen synthase kinase 3β activity was implicated. Furthermore, we found that these trafficking abnormalities were rescued by over-expression of Mitofusin2 and dynamin-related protein 1, but not of Miro1. Given the relevance of mitochondrial targeting for neuronal function and neurotransmission, our data underscore a novel mechanism of action of MDMA that may contribute to our understanding of how this drug of abuse alters neuronal functioning.

  18. Maternal obesity during gestation impairs fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial SIRT3 expression in rat offspring at weaning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Borengasser

    Full Text Available In utero exposure to maternal obesity increases the offspring's risk of obesity in later life. We have also previously reported that offspring of obese rat dams develop hepatic steatosis, mild hyperinsulinemia, and a lipogenic gene signature in the liver at postnatal day (PND21. In the current study, we examined systemic and hepatic adaptations in male Sprague-Dawley offspring from lean and obese dams at PND21. Indirect calorimetry revealed decreases in energy expenditure (p<0.001 and increases in RER values (p<0.001, which were further exacerbated by high fat diet (45% kcals from fat consumption indicating an impaired ability to utilize fatty acids in offspring of obese dams as analyzed by PRCF. Mitochondrial function is known to be associated with fatty acid oxidation (FAO in the liver. Several markers of hepatic mitochondrial function were reduced in offspring of obese dams. These included SIRT3 mRNA (p = 0.012 and mitochondrial protein content (p = 0.002, electron transport chain complexes (II, III, and ATPase, and fasting PGC-1α mRNA expression (p<0.001. Moreover, hepatic LCAD, a SIRT3 target, was not only reduced 2-fold (p<0.001 but was also hyperacetylated in offspring of obese dams (p<0.005 suggesting decreased hepatic FAO. In conclusion, exposure to maternal obesity contributes to early perturbations in whole body and liver energy metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be an underlying event that reduces hepatic fatty acid oxidation and precedes the development of detrimental obesity associated co-morbidities such as insulin resistance and NAFLD.

  19. Mitochondrial genome function and maternal inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John F; de Paula, Wilson B M

    2013-10-01

    The persistence of mtDNA to encode a small subset of mitochondrial proteins reflects the selective advantage of co-location of key respiratory chain subunit genes with their gene products. The disadvantage of this co-location is exposure of mtDNA to mutagenic ROS (reactive oxygen species), which are by-products of aerobic respiration. The resulting 'vicious circle' of mitochondrial mutation has been proposed to underlie aging and its associated degenerative diseases. Recent evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that oocyte mitochondria escape the aging process by acting as quiescent genetic templates, transcriptionally and bioenergetically repressed. Transmission of unexpressed mtDNA in the female germline is considered as a reason for the existence of separate sexes, i.e. male and female. Maternal inheritance then circumvents incremental accumulation of age-related disease in each new generation.

  20. Dietary restriction, mitochondrial function and aging: from yeast to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruetenik, Andrea; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-11-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) attenuates many detrimental effects of aging and consequently promotes health and increases longevity across organisms. While over the last 15 years extensive research has been devoted towards understanding the biology of aging, the precise mechanistic aspects of DR are yet to be settled. Abundant experimental evidence indicates that the DR effect on stimulating health impinges several metabolic and stress-resistance pathways. Downstream effects of these pathways include a reduction in cellular damage induced by oxidative stress, enhanced efficiency of mitochondrial functions and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics and quality control, thereby attenuating age-related declines in mitochondrial function. However, the literature also accumulates conflicting evidence regarding how DR ameliorates mitochondrial performance and whether that is enough to slow age-dependent cellular and organismal deterioration. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge about how and to which extent the influence of different DR regimes on mitochondrial biogenesis and function contribute to postpone the detrimental effects of aging on health-span and lifespan. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Aging.

  1. The mitochondrial elongation factors MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Rong [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Jin, Shao-Bo [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Han, Liwei [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Lendahl, Urban [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhao, Jian, E-mail: Jian.Zhao@ki.se [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Nistér, Monica [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose morphology is regulated by a complex balance of fission and fusion processes, and we still know relatively little about how mitochondrial dynamics is regulated. MIEF1 (also called MiD51) has recently been characterized as a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics and in this report we explore the functions of its paralog MIEF2 (also called MiD49), to learn to what extent MIEF2 is functionally distinct from MIEF1. We show that MIEF1 and MIEF2 have many functions in common. Both are anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane, recruit Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface and cause mitochondrial fusion, and MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. MIEF1 and MIEF2, however, also differ in certain aspects. MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. When overexpressed, MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion-promoting effect than MIEF1, and in line with this, hFis1 and Mff can only partially revert the MIEF2-induced fusion phenotype, whereas MIEF1-induced fusion is reverted to a larger extent by hFis1 and Mff. MIEF2 forms high molecular weight oligomers, while MIEF1 is largely present as a dimer. Furthermore, MIEF1 and MIEF2 use distinct domains for oligomerization: in MIEF1, the region from amino acid residues 109–154 is required, whereas oligomerization of MIEF2 depends on amino acid residues 1 to 49, i.e. the N-terminal end. We also show that oligomerization of MIEF1 is not required for its mitochondrial localization and interaction with Drp1. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial regulators MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • MIEF1 and MIEF2 recruit Drp1 to mitochondria and cause mitochondrial fusion. • MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. • MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. • MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion

  2. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  3. Mitochondrial GPX1 silencing triggers differential photosynthesis impairment in response to salinity in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Melo, Yugo; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Martins, Márcio O; Passaia, Gisele; Sousa, Rachel H V; Neto, Milton C Lima; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Silveira, Joaquim A G

    2016-08-01

    The physiological role of plant mitochondrial glutathione peroxidases is scarcely known. This study attempted to elucidate the role of a rice mitochondrial isoform (GPX1) in photosynthesis under normal growth and salinity conditions. GPX1 knockdown rice lines (GPX1s) were tested in absence and presence of 100 mM NaCl for 6 d. Growth reduction of GPX1s line under non-stressful conditions, compared with non-transformed (NT) plants occurred in parallel to increased H2 O2 and decreased GSH contents. These changes occurred concurrently with photosynthesis impairment, particularly in Calvin cycle's reactions, since photochemical efficiency did not change. Thus, GPX1 silencing and downstream molecular/metabolic changes modulated photosynthesis differentially. In contrast, salinity induced reduction in both phases of photosynthesis, which were more impaired in silenced plants. These changes were associated with root morphology alterations but not shoot growth. Both studied lines displayed increased GPX activity but H2 O2 content did not change in response to salinity. Transformed plants exhibited lower photorespiration, water use efficiency and root growth, indicating that GPX1 could be important to salt tolerance. Growth reduction of GPX1s line might be related to photosynthesis impairment, which in turn could have involved a cross talk mechanism between mitochondria and chloroplast originated from redox changes due to GPX1 deficiency.

  4. Impaired cognitive function and mental performance in mild dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M-M G; Morley, J E

    2003-12-01

    Dehydration is a reliable predictor of impaired cognitive status. Objective data, using tests of cortical function, support the deterioration of mental performance in mildly dehydrated younger adults. Dehydration frequently results in delirium as a manifestation of cognitive dysfunction. Although, the occurrence of delirium suggests transient acute global cerebral dysfunction, cognitive impairment may not be completely reversible. Animal studies have identified neuronal mitochondrial damage and glutamate hypertransmission in dehydrated rats. Additional studies have identified an increase in cerebral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase activity (nitric oxide synthase, NOS) with dehydration. Available evidence also implicates NOS as a neurotransmitter in long-term potentiation, rendering this a critical enzyme in facilitating learning and memory. With ageing, a reduction of NOS activity has been identified in the cortex and striatum of rats. The reduction of NOs synthase activity that occurs with ageing may blunt the rise that occurs with dehydration, and possibly interfere with memory processing and cognitive function. Dehydration has been shown to be a reliable predictor of increasing frailty, deteriorating mental performance and poor quality of life. Intervention models directed toward improving outcomes in dehydration must incorporate strategies to enhance prompt recognition of cognitive dysfunction.

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α activation improves renal oxygenation and mitochondrial function in early chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joanna L; Pham, Hai; Li, Ying; Hall, Elanore; Perkins, Guy A; Ali, Sameh S; Patel, Hemal H; Singh, Prabhleen

    2017-08-01

    The pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is driven by alterations in surviving nephrons to sustain renal function with ongoing nephron loss. Oxygen supply-demand mismatch, due to hemodynamic adaptations, with resultant hypoxia, plays an important role in the pathophysiology in early CKD. We sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this mismatch. We utilized the subtotal nephrectomy (STN) model of CKD to investigate the alterations in renal oxygenation linked to sodium (Na) transport and mitochondrial function in the surviving nephrons. Oxygen delivery was significantly reduced in STN kidneys because of lower renal blood flow. Fractional oxygen extraction was significantly higher in STN. Tubular Na reabsorption was significantly lower per mole of oxygen consumed in STN. We hypothesized that decreased mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity may account for this and uncovered significant mitochondrial dysfunction in the early STN kidney: higher oxidative metabolism without an attendant increase in ATP levels, elevated superoxide levels, and alterations in mitochondrial morphology. We further investigated the effect of activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a master regulator of cellular hypoxia response. We observed significant improvement in renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and tubular Na reabsorption per mole of oxygen consumed with HIF-1α activation. Importantly, HIF-1α activation significantly lowered mitochondrial oxygen consumption and superoxide production and increased mitochondrial volume density. In conclusion, we report significant impairment of renal oxygenation and mitochondrial function at the early stages of CKD and demonstrate the beneficial role of HIF-1α activation on renal function and metabolism.

  6. Defective mitochondrial function in vivo in skeletal muscle in adults with Down's syndrome: a 31P-MRS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C Phillips

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome (DS is a developmental disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID. We have previously shown that people with DS engage in very low levels of exercise compared to people with ID not due to DS. Many aspects of the DS phenotype, such as dementia, low activity levels and poor muscle tone, are shared with disorders of mitochondrial origin, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in cultured DS tissue. We undertook a phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS study in the quadriceps muscle of 14 people with DS and 11 non-DS ID controls to investigate the post-exercise resynthesis kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr, which relies on mitochondrial respiratory function and yields a measure of muscle mitochondrial function in vivo. We found that the PCr recovery rate constant was significantly decreased in adults with DS compared to non-DS ID controls (1.7 ± 0.1 min(-1 vs 2.1 ± 0.1 min(-1 respectively who were matched for physical activity levels, indicating that muscle mitochondrial function in vivo is impaired in DS. This is the first study to investigate mitochondrial function in vivo in DS using (31P-MRS. Our study is consistent with previous in vitro studies, supporting a theory of a global mitochondrial defect in DS.

  7. Defective mitochondrial function in vivo in skeletal muscle in adults with Down's syndrome: a 31P-MRS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alexander C; Sleigh, Alison; McAllister, Catherine J; Brage, Soren; Carpenter, T Adrian; Kemp, Graham J; Holland, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is a developmental disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID). We have previously shown that people with DS engage in very low levels of exercise compared to people with ID not due to DS. Many aspects of the DS phenotype, such as dementia, low activity levels and poor muscle tone, are shared with disorders of mitochondrial origin, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in cultured DS tissue. We undertook a phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) study in the quadriceps muscle of 14 people with DS and 11 non-DS ID controls to investigate the post-exercise resynthesis kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr), which relies on mitochondrial respiratory function and yields a measure of muscle mitochondrial function in vivo. We found that the PCr recovery rate constant was significantly decreased in adults with DS compared to non-DS ID controls (1.7 ± 0.1 min(-1) vs 2.1 ± 0.1 min(-1) respectively) who were matched for physical activity levels, indicating that muscle mitochondrial function in vivo is impaired in DS. This is the first study to investigate mitochondrial function in vivo in DS using (31)P-MRS. Our study is consistent with previous in vitro studies, supporting a theory of a global mitochondrial defect in DS.

  8. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson’s disease patients with parkin mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merwe, Celia van der, E-mail: celiavdm@sun.ac.za [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Loos, Ben [Department of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Swart, Chrisna [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Kinnear, Craig [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology and the DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical TB Research, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Henning, Franclo [Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Merwe, Lize van der [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Department of Statistics, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town (South Africa); Pillay, Komala [National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) Histopathology Laboratory, Red Cross Children’s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Muller, Nolan [Division of Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Zaharie, Dan [Neuropathology Unit, Division of Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Engelbrecht, Lize [Cell Imaging Unit, Central Analytical Facility, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Carr, Jonathan [Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial dysfunction observed in patients with parkin-null mutations. • Mitochondrial ATP levels were decreased. • Electron-dense vacuoles were observed in the patients. • Mitochondria from muscle biopsies appeared within normal limits. • One patient did not show these defects possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. - Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients’ fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD

  9. Resveratrol Rescues Kidney Mitochondrial Function Following Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Guan, Yuxia; Karamercan, Mehmet Akif; Ye, Lan; Bhatti, Tricia; Becker, Lance B; Baur, Joseph A; Sims, Carrie A

    2015-08-01

    Hemorrhagic shock may contribute to acute kidney injury (AKI) by profoundly altering renal mitochondrial function. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activator, has been shown to promote mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative damage in a variety of aging-related disease states. We hypothesized that RSV treatment during resuscitation would ameliorate kidney mitochondrial dysfunction and decrease oxidative damage following hemorrhagic shock. Using a decompensated hemorrhagic shock model, male Long-Evans rats (n = 6 per group) were killed prior to hemorrhage (sham), at severe shock, and following either lactated Ringer's (LR) resuscitation or LR + RSV resuscitation (RSV: 30 mg/kg). At each time point, blood samples were assayed for arterial blood gases, lactate, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine. Mitochondria were also isolated from kidney samples in order to assess individual electron transport complexes (complexes I, II, and IV) using high-resolution respirometry. Total mitochondria reactive oxygen species were measured using fluorometry, and lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring 4-hydroxynonenal by Western blot. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used quantify mRNA from peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC1-α) SIRT1, and proteins known to mitigate oxidative damage and promote mitochondrial biogenesis. Resveratrol supplementation during resuscitation restored mitochondrial respiratory capacity and decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. Compared with standard LR resuscitation, RSV treatment significantly increased SIRT1 and PGC1-α expression and significantly increased both superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase expression. Although RSV was associated with decreased lactate production, pH, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine values did not differ between resuscitation strategies. Resuscitation with RSV significantly restored renal mitochondrial

  10. Erythroid dysplasia, megaloblastic anemia, and impaired lymphopoiesis arising from mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael L; Logan, T Daniel; Hochberg, Maryann L; Shelat, Suresh G; Yu, Xiang; Wilding, Gregory E; Tan, Wei; Kujoth, Gregory C; Prolla, Tomas A; Selak, Mary A; Kundu, Mondira; Carroll, Martin; Thompson, James E

    2009-11-05

    Recent reports describe hematopoietic abnormalities in mice with targeted instability of the mitochondrial genome. However, these abnormalities have not been fully described. We demonstrate that mutant animals develop an age-dependent, macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythroid maturation and megaloblastic changes, as well as profound defects in lymphopoiesis. Mice die of severe fatal anemia at 15 months of age. Bone-marrow transplantation studies demonstrate that these abnormalities are intrinsic to the hematopoietic compartment and dependent upon the age of donor hematopoietic stem cells. These abnormalities are phenotypically similar to those found in patients with refractory anemia, suggesting that, in some cases, the myelodysplastic syndromes are caused by abnormalities of mitochondrial function.

  11. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson's disease patients with parkin mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Swart, Chrisna; Kinnear, Craig; Henning, Franclo; van der Merwe, Lize; Pillay, Komala; Muller, Nolan; Zaharie, Dan; Engelbrecht, Lize; Carr, Jonathan; Bardien, Soraya

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients' fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD pathogenesis will have important implications for the design of new and more effective therapies.

  12. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Haylett

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093, while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p=0.0304. Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p=0.0001. These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation.

  13. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  14. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole J Van Bergen

    Full Text Available Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower. Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function.

  15. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Kearns, Lisa S; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W; Mackey, David A; Trounce, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function.

  16. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G.; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Kearns, Lisa S.; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Trounce, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function. PMID:26496696

  17. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators differentially potentiate brain mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, R W; Yao, J; To, J; Hamilton, R T; Cadenas, E; Brinton, R D

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity of the brain is important for long-term neurological health and is influenced by endocrine hormone responsiveness. The present study aimed to determine the role of oestrogen receptor (ER) subtypes in regulating mitochondrial function using selective agonists for ERα (propylpyrazoletriol; PPT) and ERβ (diarylpropionitrile; DPN). Ovariectomised female rats were treated with 17β-oestradiol (E(2) ), PPT, DPN or vehicle control. Both ER selective agonists significantly increased the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio and cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity relative to vehicle. Western blots of purified whole brain mitochondria detected ERα and, to a greater extent, ERβ localisation. Pre-treatment with DPN, an ERβ agonist, significantly increased ERβ association with mitochondria. In the hippocampus, DPN activated mitochondrial DNA-encoded COX I expression, whereas PPT was ineffective, indicating that mechanistically ERβ, and not ERα, activated mitochondrial transcriptional machinery. Both selective ER agonists increased protein expression of nuclear DNA-encoded COX IV, suggesting that activation of ERβ or ERα is sufficient. Selective ER agonists up-regulated a panel of bioenergetic enzymes and antioxidant defence proteins. Up-regulated proteins included pyruvate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin V. In vitro, whole cell metabolism was assessed in live primary cultured hippocampal neurones and mixed glia. The results of analyses conducted in vitro were consistent with data obtained in vivo. Furthermore, lipid peroxides, accumulated as a result of hormone deprivation, were significantly reduced by E(2) , PPT and DPN. These findings suggest that the activation of both ERα and ERβ is differentially required to potentiate mitochondrial function in brain. As active components in hormone therapy, synthetically designed oestrogens as well as natural phyto-oestrogen cocktails

  18. The causes and functions of mitochondrial proton leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Chien, L F; Ainscow, E K; Rolfe, D F; Porter, R K

    1994-08-30

    The non-linear relationship between respiration rate and protonmotive force in isolated mitochondria is explained entirely by delta p-dependent changes in the proton conductance of the mitochondrial inner membrane and is not caused by redox slip in the proton pumps. Mitochondrial proton leak occurs in intact cells and tissues: the futile cycle of proton pumping and proton leak accounts for 26% +/- 7% of the total oxygen consumption rate or 33% +/- 7% of the mitochondrial respiration rate of isolated hepatocytes (mean +/- S.D. for 43 rats); 52% of the oxygen consumption rate of resting perfused muscle and up to 38% of the basal metabolic rate of a rat, suggesting that heat production may be an important function in the proton leak in homeotherms. Together with non-mitochondrial oxygen consumption, it lowers the effective P/O ratio in cells from maximum possible values of 2.33 (palmitate oxidation) or 2.58 (glucose oxidation) to as low as 1.1 in liver or 0.8 in muscle. The effective P/O ratio increases in response to ATP demand; the ability to allow rapid switching of flux from leak to ATP turnover may be an even more important function of the leak reaction than heat production. The mitochondrial proton conductance in isolated mitochondria and in hepatocytes is greatly modulated by thyroid hormones, by phylogeny and by body mass. Usually the reactions of ATP turnover change in parallel so that the coupling ratio is not greatly affected. Changes in proton leak in tissues are brought about in the short term by changes in mitochondrial protonmotive force and in the longer term by changes in the surface area and proton permeability of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Permeability changes are probably caused by changes in the fatty acid composition of the membrane phospholipids.

  19. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieper, Nicole; Holmstroem, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila; Fiesel, Fabienne C. [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Wolburg, Hartwig [Institute of Pathology, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J. [Medical Research Council Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Martins, L. Miguel [Cell Death Regulation Laboratory, MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom); Kahle, Philipp J., E-mail: philipp.kahle@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Krueger, Rejko, E-mail: rejko.krueger@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Mitochondrial free radical overproduction due to respiratory chain impairment in the brain of a mouse model of Rett syndrome: protective effect of CNF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Rasmo, Domenico; Musto, Mattia; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Fiorentini, Carla; Laviola, Giovanni; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2015-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene associated with severe intellectual disability, movement disorders, and autistic-like behaviors. Its pathogenesis remains mostly not understood and no effective therapy is available. High circulating levels of oxidative stress markers in patients and the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in MeCP2-deficient mouse models suggest the involvement of oxidative stress in RTT pathogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism and the origin of the oxidative stress have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that a redox imbalance arises from aberrant mitochondrial functionality in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, a condition that more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. The marked increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation in the brain of RTT mice seems mainly produced by the dysfunctional complex II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In addition, both membrane potential generation and mitochondrial ATP synthesis are decreased in RTT mouse brains when succinate, the complex II respiratory substrate, is used as an energy source. Respiratory chain impairment is brain area specific, owing to a decrease in either cAMP-dependent phosphorylation or protein levels of specific complex subunits. Further, we investigated whether the treatment of RTT mice with the bacterial protein CNF1, previously reported to ameliorate the neurobehavioral phenotype and brain bioenergetic markers in an RTT mouse model, exerts specific effects on brain mitochondrial function and consequently on hydrogen peroxide production. In RTT brains treated with CNF1, we observed the reactivation of respiratory chain complexes, the rescue of mitochondrial functionality, and the prevention of brain hydrogen peroxide overproduction. These results provide definitive evidence of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species overproduction in RTT mouse brain and

  1. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkus Kristen A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  2. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkus, Kristen A; Tsika, Elpida; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2009-06-05

    While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD) as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  3. The Kunitz-protease inhibitor domain in amyloid precursor protein reduces cellular mitochondrial enzymes expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Li-Min; Lim, Mei-Li; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this can be contributed by aberrant metabolic enzyme function. But, the mechanism causing this enzymatic impairment is unclear. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is known to be alternatively spliced to produce three major isoforms in the brain (APP695, APP751, APP770). Both APP770 and APP751 contain the Kunitz Protease Inhibitory (KPI) domain, but the former also contain an extra OX-2 domain. APP695 on the other hand, lacks both domains. In AD, up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms has been reported. But the functional contribution of this elevation is unclear. In the present study, we have expressed and compared the effect of the non-KPI containing APP695 and the KPI-containing APP751 on mitochondrial function. We found that the KPI-containing APP751 significantly decreased the expression of three major mitochondrial metabolic enzymes; citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase (COX IV). This reduction lowers the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, COX IV activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. Overall, this study demonstrated that up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms is likely to contribute to the impairment of metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial function in AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. I Function, Therefore I Am: Overcoming Skepticism about Mitochondrial Supercomplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Antoni; Ugalde, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is believed to dynamically arrange in suprastructures known as supercomplexes or respirasomes, though their function remains elusive. A recent study in Science (Lapuente-Brun et al., 2013) now reports that dynamic supercomplex assembly determines electron flux from different substrates through the respiratory chain. PMID:23931749

  5. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, H.; O'Farrell, PH

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection. In contrast, matchups between distantly related genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting p...

  6. Towards non‐invasive monitoring of mitochondrial function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. Harms (Floor A.)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work presented in this thesis describes the development of a non‐invasive and clinically usable system to monitor important aspects of mitochondrial function. This translational research project started with the validation of PpIX‐TSLT for cutaneous use in an animal

  7. I function, therefore I am: overcoming skepticism about mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Antoni; Ugalde, Cristina

    2013-08-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is believed to dynamically arrange in suprastructures known as supercomplexes or respirasomes, though their function remains elusive. A recent study in Science (Lapuente-Brun et al., 2013) now reports that dynamic supercomplex assembly determines electron flux from different substrates through the respiratory chain.

  8. Sex-dependent mitochondrial respiratory impairment and oxidative stress in a rat model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarest, Tyler G; Schuh, Rosemary A; Waddell, Jaylyn; McKenna, Mary C; Fiskum, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Increased male susceptibility to long-term cognitive deficits is well described in clinical and experimental studies of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. While cell death signaling pathways are known to be sexually dimorphic, a sex-dependent pathophysiological mechanism preceding the majority of secondary cell death has yet to be described. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell death following cerebral hypoxic-ischemia (HI). Several lines of evidence suggest that there are sex differences in the mitochondrial metabolism of adult mammals. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that brain mitochondrial respiratory impairment and associated oxidative stress is more severe in males than females following HI. Maximal brain mitochondrial respiration during oxidative phosphorylation was two-fold more impaired in males following HI. The endogenous antioxidant glutathione was 30% higher in the brain of sham females compared to males. Females also exhibited increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity following HI injury. Conversely, males displayed a reduction in mitochondrial GPx4 protein levels and mitochondrial GPx activity. Moreover, a 3-4-fold increase in oxidative protein carbonylation was observed in the cortex, perirhinal cortex, and hippocampus of injured males, but not females. These data provide the first evidence for sex-dependent mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and oxidative damage, which may contribute to the relative male susceptibility to adverse long-term outcomes following HI. Lower basal GSH levels, lower post-hypoxic mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase (mtGPx) activity, and mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 (mtGPx4) protein levels may contribute to the susceptibility of the male brain to oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction following neonatal hypoxic-ischemia (HI). Treatment of male pups with acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) protects against the loss of mtGPx activity, mtGPx4 protein, and increases in protein

  9. Opposing effects of dietary sugar and saturated fat on cardiovascular risk factors and glucose metabolism in mitochondrially impaired mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlow, Doreen; Zarse, Kim; Voigt, Anja; Schulz, Tim J; Petzke, Klaus J; Schomburg, Lutz; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ristow, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Both dietary fat and dietary sucrose are major components of Western diets that may differentially affect the risk for body mass gain, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. We have phenotypically analyzed mice with ubiquitously impaired expression of mitochondrial frataxin protein that were challenged with diets differing in macronutrient content, namely high-sucrose/low-fat and high-saturated fat/low-sugar diets. We find here that a high-sucrose/low-fat diet has especially detrimental effects in mice with impaired mitochondrial metabolism promoting several independent cardiovascular risk factors, including impaired glucose metabolism, fasting hyperinsulinemia, reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, increased serum triglycerides, and elevated cholesterol levels due to increased expression of HMG-CoA reductase. In contrast, a high-saturated fat/low-sugar diet protects mice with impaired mitochondrial metabolism from diet-induced obesity by increasing total energy expenditure and increasing expression of ACAA2, a rate-limiting enzyme of mitochondrial beta-oxidation, whereas no concomitant improvement of glucose metabolism was observed. Taken together, our results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may cause sucrose to become a multifunctional cardiovascular risk factor, whereas low-sugar diets high in saturated fat may prevent weight gain without improving glucose metabolism.

  10. Functional Recovery of Human Cells Harbouring the Mitochondrial DNA Mutation MERRF A8344G via Peptide-Mediated Mitochondrial Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chih Chang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We explored the feasibility of mitochondrial therapy using the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1 to transfer mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA between cells and rescue a cybrid cell model of the mitochondrial disease myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF syndrome. Pep-1-conjugated wild-type mitochondria isolated from parent cybrid cells incorporating a mitochondria-specific tag were used as donors for mitochondrial delivery into MERRF cybrid cells (MitoB2 and mtDNA-depleted Rho-zero cells (Mitoρ°. Forty-eight hours later, translocation of Pep-1-labelled mitochondria into the mitochondrial regions of MitoB2 and Mitoρ° host cells was observed (delivery efficiencies of 77.48 and 82.96%, respectively. These internalized mitochondria were maintained for at least 15 days in both cell types and were accompanied by mitochondrial function recovery and cell survival by preventing mitochondria-dependent cell death. Mitochondrial homeostasis analyses showed that peptide-mediated mitochondrial delivery (PMD also increased mitochondrial biogenesis in both cell types, but through distinct regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial dynamics. Dramatic decreases in mitofusin-2 (MFN2 and dynamin-related protein 1/fission 1 were observed in MitoB2 cells, while Mitoρ° cells showed a significant increase in optic atrophy 1 and MFN2. These findings suggest that PMD can be used as a potential therapeutic intervention for mitochondrial disorders.

  11. Structure and function of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefani, Diego; Patron, Maria; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is the critical protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane mediating the electrophoretic Ca²⁺ uptake into the matrix. It plays a fundamental role in the shaping of global calcium signaling and in the control of aerobic metabolism as well as apoptosis. Two features of mitochondrial calcium signaling have been known for a long time: i) mitochondrial Ca²⁺ uptake widely varies among cells and tissues, and ii) channel opening strongly relies on the extramitochondrial Ca²⁺ concentration, with low activity at resting [Ca²⁺] and high capacity as soon as calcium signaling is activated. Such complexity requires a specialized molecular machinery, with several primary components can be variably gathered together in order to match energy demands and protect from toxic stimuli. In line with this, MCU is now recognized to be part of a macromolecular complex known as the MCU complex. Our understanding of the structure and function of the MCU complex is now growing promptly, revealing an unexpected complexity that highlights the pleiotropic role of mitochondrial Ca²⁺ signals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  12. Is Placental Mitochondrial Function a Regulator that Matches Fetal and Placental Growth to Maternal Nutrient Intake in the Mouse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos R Chiaratti

    Full Text Available Effective fetal growth requires adequate maternal nutrition coupled to active transport of nutrients across the placenta, which, in turn requires ATP. Epidemiological and experimental evidence has shown that impaired maternal nutrition in utero results in an adverse postnatal phenotype for the offspring. Placental mitochondrial function might link maternal food intake to fetal growth since impaired placental ATP production, in response to poor maternal nutrition, could be a pathway linking maternal food intake to reduced fetal growth.We assessed the effects of maternal diet on placental water content, ATP levels and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content in mice at embryonic (E day 18 (E18. Females maintained on either low- (LPD or normal- (NPD protein diets were mated with NPD males.To investigate the possibility of an underlying mitochondrial stress response, we studied cultured human trophoblast cells (BeWos. High throughput imaging showed that amino acid starvation induces changes in mitochondrial morphology that suggest stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion. This is a defensive response, believed to increase mitochondrial efficiency, that could underlie the increase in ATP observed in placenta.These findings reinforce the pathophysiological links between maternal diet and conceptus mitochondria, potentially contributing to metabolic programming. The quiet embryo hypothesis proposes that pre-implantation embryo survival is best served by a relatively low level of metabolism. This may extend to post-implantation trophoblast responses to nutrition.

  13. Ablation of PGC-1beta results in defective mitochondrial activity, thermogenesis, hepatic function, and cardiac performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Lelliott

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1beta (PGC-1beta has been implicated in important metabolic processes. A mouse lacking PGC-1beta (PGC1betaKO was generated and phenotyped using physiological, molecular, and bioinformatic approaches. PGC1betaKO mice are generally viable and metabolically healthy. Using systems biology, we identified a general defect in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function and, specifically, the electron transport chain. This defect correlated with reduced mitochondrial volume fraction in soleus muscle and heart, but not brown adipose tissue (BAT. Under ambient temperature conditions, PGC-1beta ablation was partially compensated by up-regulation of PGC-1alpha in BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT that lead to increased thermogenesis, reduced body weight, and reduced fat mass. Despite their decreased fat mass, PGC1betaKO mice had hypertrophic adipocytes in WAT. The thermogenic role of PGC-1beta was identified in thermoneutral and cold-adapted conditions by inadequate responses to norepinephrine injection. Furthermore, PGC1betaKO hearts showed a blunted chronotropic response to dobutamine stimulation, and isolated soleus muscle fibres from PGC1betaKO mice have impaired mitochondrial function. Lack of PGC-1beta also impaired hepatic lipid metabolism in response to acute high fat dietary loads, resulting in hepatic steatosis and reduced lipoprotein-associated triglyceride and cholesterol content. Altogether, our data suggest that PGC-1beta plays a general role in controlling basal mitochondrial function and also participates in tissue-specific adaptive responses during metabolic stress.

  14. Pre-ischemic mitochondrial substrate constraint by inhibition of malate-aspartate shuttle preserves mitochondrial function after ischemia-reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Nichlas Riise; Yokota, Takashi; Støttrup, Nicolaj Brejnholt

    2017-01-01

    and early reperfusion by AOA treatment could prevent mitochondrial damage at later reperfusion. The AOA treatment preserved mitochondrial respiratory capacity with reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress during late reperfusion to the same extent as ischaemic preconditioning (IPC). However, AOA treatment...... of mitochondrial function during late reperfusion in an IR-injured heart. ABSTRACT: Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Pre-ischaemic administration of aminooxyacetate (AOA), an inhibitor of the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS), provides cardioprotection against IR...... injury, although the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We hypothesized that a transient inhibition of the MAS during ischaemia and early reperfusion could preserve mitochondrial function at later phase of reperfusion in the IR-injured heart to the same extent as ischaemic preconditioning (IPC), which...

  15. Assay of mitochondrial functions by resazurin in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-xia ZHANG; Guan-hua DU; Jun-tian ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism of resazurin as indicator of mitochondrial function and to develop a rapid and sensitive assay for measuring metabolic activity of isolated mitochondria from rat liver in vitro. METHODS: The screening was carried out on 96-well microtitre plates by monitoring fluorescence intensity of resazurin reduced by mitochondria. Experimental conditions were optimized and influences of several inhibitors on mitochondrial function were observed. RESULTS: Fluorescence intensity increased in a linear manner when the mitochondrial protein concentration from 5 to 50 μg protein per well was incubated with resazurin (5 μmol/L) during 230 min period at 37 ℃. Edetic acid could promote the reduction of resazurin in mitochondria. The fluorescence intensity decreased greatly after pretreatment with NaN3, antimycin A, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP),and oligomycin compared with the control. However, the typical complex I inhibitor, rotenone enhanced the fluorescence intensity without mitochondria. CONCLUSION: Using resazurin to determine mitochondrial function is sensitive, inexpensive and could be easily automated for high throughput screening.

  16. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy-transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age-related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion-centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age-related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion-related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non-CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy- or redox-sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion-implicated, age-related disorders.

  17. Evaluation of functional impairment in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad Rohini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is a chronic disease, the course of which is punctuated by exacerbations and remissions. The impact of a chronic, relapsing, and disfiguring disease such as psoriasis on occupational, social, and other areas of functioning is substantial and needs attention. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the level and nature of functional impairment in psoriasis. Methods: Forty-three consecutive patients attending the dermatology clinic of a rural hospital were studied for psychiatric comorbidity and the level of functioning, using a semistructured questionnaire. Results: Psoriasis affected social functioning of 48% patients, led to decreased work efficiency in 51.1%, and to subjective distress at work in 62.8% of patients. Stress in home environment and interpersonal relationships was reported by 69.8%. Social and occupational functioning worsened with increasing severity of psoriasis after 1-year duration of illness. Patients complaining of pruritis frequently had anxiety disorders. Psychiatric comorbidity was detected in 67.4% cases. Conclusion : Substantial proportion of patients suffered deterioration of functioning, especially with increasing duration of illness. Thus, timely attention by dermatologists is needed in order to limit the disability caused by psoriasis. To achieve this, liaison with psychiatrist would be crucial along with illness education and emotional support.

  18. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishaali Natarajan

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25 on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1 urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2 redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; (3 OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4 mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05 in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function.

  19. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, defective axonal transport of mitochondria, abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and synaptic degeneration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Marcus J; Manczak, Maria; Mao, Peizhong; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in synapses and synaptic mitochondria causes synaptic mitochondrial failure and synaptic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to better understand the effects of Aβ in mitochondrial activity and synaptic alterations in neurons from a mouse model of AD. Using primary neurons from a well-characterized Aβ precursor protein transgenic (AβPP) mouse model (Tg2576 mouse line), for the first time, we studied mitochondrial activity, including axonal transport of mitochondria, mitochondrial dynamics, morphology and function. Further, we also studied the nature of Aβ-induced synaptic alterations, and cell death in primary neurons from Tg2576 mice, and we sought to determine whether the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 could mitigate the effects of oligomeric Aβ. We found significantly decreased anterograde mitochondrial movement, increased mitochondrial fission and decreased fusion, abnormal mitochondrial and synaptic proteins and defective mitochondrial function in primary neurons from AβPP mice compared with wild-type (WT) neurons. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a large number of small mitochondria and structurally damaged mitochondria, with broken cristae in AβPP primary neurons. We also found an increased accumulation of oligomeric Aβ and increased apoptotic neuronal death in the primary neurons from the AβPP mice relative to the WT neurons. Our results revealed an accumulation of intraneuronal oligomeric Aβ, leading to mitochondrial and synaptic deficiencies, and ultimately causing neurodegeneration in AβPP cultures. However, we found that the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 restored mitochondrial transport and synaptic viability, and decreased the percentage of defective mitochondria, indicating that SS31 protects mitochondria and synapses from Aβ toxicity.

  20. Taurine treatment preserves brain and liver mitochondrial function in a rat model of fulminant hepatic failure and hyperammonemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Heidari, Reza; Abasvali, Mozhgan; Zarei, Mehdi; Ommati, Mohammad Mehdi; Abdoli, Narges; Khodaei, Forouzan; Yeganeh, Yasaman; Jafari, Faezeh; Zarei, Azita; Latifpour, Zahra; Mardani, Elnaz; Azarpira, Negar; Asadi, Behnam; Najibi, Asma

    2017-02-01

    Ammonia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and energy crisis is known as a critical consequence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Hence, mitochondria are potential targets of therapy in HE. The current investigation was designed to evaluate the role of taurine treatment on the brain and liver mitochondrial function in a rat model of hepatic encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. The animals received thioacetamide (400mg/kg, i.p, for three consecutive days at 24-h intervals) as a model of acute liver failure and hyperammonemia. Several biochemical parameters were investigated in the serum, while the animals' cognitive function and locomotor activity were monitored. Mitochondria was isolated from the rats' brain and liver and several indices were assessed in isolated mitochondria. Liver failure led to cognitive dysfunction and impairment in locomotor activity in the rats. Plasma and brain ammonia was high and serum markers of liver injury were drastically elevated in the thioacetamide-treated group. An assessment of brain and liver mitochondrial function in the thioacetamide-treated animals revealed an inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDA), collapsed mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial swelling, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, a significant decrease in mitochondrial ATP was detected in the brain and liver mitochondria isolated from thioacetamide-treated animals. Taurine treatment (250, 500, and 1000mg/kg) decreased mitochondrial swelling, ROS, and LPO. Moreover, the administration of this amino acid restored brain and liver mitochondrial ATP. These data suggest taurine to be a potential protective agent with therapeutic capability against hepatic encephalopathy and hyperammonemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and energy crisis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Sphingolipids and mitochondrial function, lessons learned from yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Spincemaille

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, but also of cancer, diabetes and rare diseases such as Wilson’s disease (WD and Niemann Pick type C1 (NPC. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying human pathologies has often been associated with an aberrant cellular sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids (SLs are important membrane constituents that also act as signaling molecules. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been pivotal in unraveling mammalian SL metabolism, mainly due to the high degree of conservation of SL metabolic pathways. In this review we will first provide a brief overview of the major differences in SL metabolism between yeast and mammalian cells and the use of SL biosynthetic inhibitors to elucidate the contribution of specific parts of the SL metabolic pathway in response to for instance stress. Next, we will discuss recent findings in yeast SL research concerning a crucial signaling role for SLs in orchestrating mitochondrial function, and translate these findings to relevant disease settings such as WD and NPC. In summary, recent research shows that S. cerevisiae is an invaluable model to investigate SLs as signaling molecules in modulating mitochondrial function, but can also be used as a tool to further enhance our current knowledge on SLs and mitochondria in mammalian cells.

  2. Impaired PGC-1alpha function in muscle in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Adhihetty, Peter; Shukla, Shubha; Hennessy, Thomas; Calingasan, Noel; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Kiaei, Mahmoud; Cannella, Milena; Sassone, Jenny; Ciammola, Andrea; Squitieri, Fernando; Beal, M Flint

    2009-08-15

    We investigated the role of PPAR gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) in muscle dysfunction in Huntington's disease (HD). We observed reduced PGC-1alpha and target genes expression in muscle of HD transgenic mice. We produced chronic energy deprivation in HD mice by administering the catabolic stressor beta-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), a creatine analogue that reduces ATP levels, activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which in turn activates PGC-1alpha. Treatment with GPA resulted in increased expression of AMPK, PGC-1alpha target genes, genes for oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain and mitochondrial biogenesis, increased oxidative muscle fibers, numbers of mitochondria and motor performance in wild-type, but not in HD mice. In muscle biopsies from HD patients, there was decreased PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta and oxidative fibers. Oxygen consumption, PGC-1alpha, NRF1 and response to GPA were significantly reduced in myoblasts from HD patients. Knockdown of mutant huntingtin resulted in increased PGC-1alpha expression in HD myoblast. Lastly, adenoviral-mediated delivery of PGC-1alpha resulted increased expression of PGC-1alpha and markers for oxidative muscle fibers and reversal of blunted response for GPA in HD mice. These findings show that impaired function of PGC-1alpha plays a critical role in muscle dysfunction in HD, and that treatment with agents to enhance PGC-1alpha function could exert therapeutic benefits. Furthermore, muscle may provide a readily accessible tissue in which to monitor therapeutic interventions.

  3. Inferential Functioning in Visually Impaired Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puche-Navarro, Rebeca; Millan, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The current study explores the inferential abilities of visually impaired children in a task presented in two formats, manipulative and verbal. The results showed that in the group of visually impaired children, just as with children with normal sight, there was a wide range of inference types. It was found that the visually impaired children…

  4. Mitochondrial ceramide-rich macrodomains functionalize Bax upon irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunmi Lee

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that Bax functions as a "lipidic" pore to regulate mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP, the apoptosis commitment step, through unknown membrane elements. Here we show mitochondrial ceramide elevation facilitates MOMP-mediated cytochrome c release in HeLa cells by generating a previously-unrecognized mitochondrial ceramide-rich macrodomain (MCRM, which we visualize and isolate, into which Bax integrates.MCRMs, virtually non-existent in resting cells, form upon irradiation coupled to ceramide synthase-mediated ceramide elevation, optimizing Bax insertion/oligomerization and MOMP. MCRMs are detected by confocal microscopy in intact HeLa cells and isolated biophysically as a light membrane fraction from HeLa cell lysates. Inhibiting ceramide generation using a well-defined natural ceramide synthase inhibitor, Fumonisin B1, prevented radiation-induced Bax insertion, oligomerization and MOMP. MCRM deconstruction using purified mouse hepatic mitochondria revealed ceramide alone is non-apoptogenic. Rather Bax integrates into MCRMs, oligomerizing therein, conferring 1-2 log enhanced cytochrome c release. Consistent with this mechanism, MCRM Bax isolates as high molecular weight "pore-forming" oligomers, while non-MCRM membrane contains exclusively MOMP-incompatible monomeric Bax.Our recent studies in the C. elegans germline indicate that mitochondrial ceramide generation is obligate for radiation-induced apoptosis, although a mechanism for ceramide action was not delineated. Here we demonstrate that ceramide, generated in the mitochondrial outer membrane of mammalian cells upon irradiation, forms a platform into which Bax inserts, oligomerizes and functionalizes as a pore. We posit conceptualization of ceramide as a membrane-based stress calibrator, driving membrane macrodomain organization, which in mitochondria regulates intensity of Bax-induced MOMP, and is pharmacologically tractable in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Telmisartan enhances mitochondrial activity and alters cellular functions in human coronary artery endothelial cells via AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Sugamura, Koichi; Toyama, Kensuke; Matsubara, Junichi; Fujisue, Koichiro; Ohba, Keisuke; Maeda, Hirofumi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Sumida, Hitoshi; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in cellular senescence and impaired function of vascular endothelium, resulted in cardiovascular diseases. Telmisartan is a unique angiotensin II type I receptor blocker that has been shown to prevent cardiovascular events in high risk patients. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role in mitochondrial biogenesis and endothelial function. This study assessed whether telmisartan enhances mitochondrial function and alters cellular functions via AMPK in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). In cultured HCAECs, telmisartan significantly enhanced mitochondrial activity assessed by mitochondrial reductase activity and intracellular ATP production and increased the expression of mitochondria related genes. Telmisartan prevented cellular senescence and exhibited the anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic properties. The expression of genes related anti-oxidant and pro-angiogenic properties were increased by telmisartan. Telmisartan increased endothelial NO synthase and AMPK phosphorylation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling was not involved in telmisartan-induced improvement of mitochondrial function. All of these effects were abolished by inhibition of AMPK. Telmisartan enhanced mitochondrial activity and exhibited anti-senescence effects and improving endothelial function through AMPK in HCAECs. Telmisartan could provide beneficial effects on vascular diseases via enhancement of mitochondrial activity and modulating endothelial function through AMPK activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Insulin resistance impairs nigrostriatal dopamine function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J K; Bomhoff, G L; Gorres, B K; Davis, V A; Kim, J; Lee, P-P; Brooks, W M; Gerhardt, G A; Geiger, P C; Stanford, J A

    2011-09-01

    Clinical studies have indicated a link between Parkinson's disease (PD) and Type 2 Diabetes. Although preclinical studies have examined the effect of high-fat feeding on dopamine function in brain reward pathways, the effect of diet on neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway, which is affected in PD and parkinsonism, is less clear. We hypothesized that a high-fat diet, which models early-stage Type 2 Diabetes, would disrupt nigrostriatal dopamine function in young adult Fischer 344 rats. Rats were fed a high fat diet (60% calories from fat) or a normal chow diet for 12 weeks. High fat-fed animals were insulin resistant compared to chow-fed controls. Potassium-evoked dopamine release and dopamine clearance were measured in the striatum using in vivo electrochemistry. Dopamine release was attenuated and dopamine clearance was diminished in the high-fat diet group compared to chow-fed rats. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of the high fat group. This finding was supported by alterations in the expression of several proteins involved in iron metabolism in the substantia nigra in this group compared to chow-fed animals. The diet-induced systemic and basal ganglia-specific changes may play a role in the observed impairment of nigrostriatal dopamine function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke Kataoka; China Nakamura; Toru Asahi; Naoya Sawamura

    2016-01-01

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we ...

  8. Mitochondrial function in Antarctic nototheniids with ND6 translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix C Mark

    Full Text Available Fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have successfully radiated into the Southern Ocean and today comprise the dominant fish sub-order in Antarctic waters in terms of biomass and species abundance. During evolution in the cold and stable Antarctic climate, the Antarctic lineage of notothenioids developed several unique physiological adaptations, which make them extremely vulnerable to the rapid warming of Antarctic waters currently observed. Only recently, a further phenomenon exclusive to notothenioid fish was reported: the translocation of the mitochondrial gene encoding the NADH Dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6, an indispensable part of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system.This study investigated the potential physiological consequences of ND6 translocation for the function and thermal sensitivity of the electron transport system in isolated liver mitochondria of the two nototheniid species Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii, with special attention to the contributions of complex I (NADH DH and complex II (Succinate DH to oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, enzymatic activities of NADH:Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase and Cytochrome C Oxidase were measured in membrane-enriched tissue extracts.During acute thermal challenge (0-15°C, capacities of mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic function in the liver could only be increased until 9°C. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH Dehydrogenase was fully functional but displayed a higher thermal sensitivity than the other complexes of the electron transport system, which may specifically result from its unique amino acid composition, revealing a lower degree of stability in notothenioids in general. We interpret the translocation of ND6 as functionally neutral but the change in amino acid sequence as adaptive and supportive of cold stenothermy in Antarctic nototheniids. From these findings, an enhanced sensitivity to ocean warming can be deduced for Antarctic notothenioid fish.

  9. Mitochondrial function in Antarctic nototheniids with ND6 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Felix C; Lucassen, Magnus; Strobel, Anneli; Barrera-Oro, Esteban; Koschnick, Nils; Zane, Lorenzo; Patarnello, Tomaso; Pörtner, Hans O; Papetti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have successfully radiated into the Southern Ocean and today comprise the dominant fish sub-order in Antarctic waters in terms of biomass and species abundance. During evolution in the cold and stable Antarctic climate, the Antarctic lineage of notothenioids developed several unique physiological adaptations, which make them extremely vulnerable to the rapid warming of Antarctic waters currently observed. Only recently, a further phenomenon exclusive to notothenioid fish was reported: the translocation of the mitochondrial gene encoding the NADH Dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6), an indispensable part of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system.This study investigated the potential physiological consequences of ND6 translocation for the function and thermal sensitivity of the electron transport system in isolated liver mitochondria of the two nototheniid species Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii, with special attention to the contributions of complex I (NADH DH) and complex II (Succinate DH) to oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, enzymatic activities of NADH:Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase and Cytochrome C Oxidase were measured in membrane-enriched tissue extracts.During acute thermal challenge (0-15°C), capacities of mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic function in the liver could only be increased until 9°C. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH Dehydrogenase) was fully functional but displayed a higher thermal sensitivity than the other complexes of the electron transport system, which may specifically result from its unique amino acid composition, revealing a lower degree of stability in notothenioids in general. We interpret the translocation of ND6 as functionally neutral but the change in amino acid sequence as adaptive and supportive of cold stenothermy in Antarctic nototheniids. From these findings, an enhanced sensitivity to ocean warming can be deduced for Antarctic notothenioid fish.

  10. Alternative mitochondrial functions in cell physiopathology: beyond ATP production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowaltowski A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mitochondria are the main site for ATP generation within most tissues. However, mitochondria also participate in a surprising number of alternative activities, including intracellular Ca2+ regulation, thermogenesis and the control of apoptosis. In addition, mitochondria are the main cellular generators of reactive oxygen species, and may trigger necrotic cell death under conditions of oxidative stress. This review concentrates on these alternative mitochondrial functions, and their role in cell physiopathology.

  11. Platelet mitochondrial function and dysfunction: physiological consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, D.

    2015-07-01

    There is a general trend in revisiting mitochondria using the up-to-date technologies that uncovered novel attributes of this organelle, such as the intracellular displacement to locations where an energy supply is needed, the dynamic shape changes and turnover, the initiation of signaling to the rest of the cell, and the ability to crosstalk with other cellular organelles. The in-depth scrutiny of platelet mitochondria role in health and pathology is included within this ongoing revisiting trend. The current article puts into a nutshell the most recent data on platelet mitochondria function and disease-related ion, focusing on generation of stress- and apoptosis-related signaling molecules, overproduction of reactive oxygen species during activation and disease, on the biomarker potential of platelets mitochondria, and their prospective exploitation in translational applications. These novel findings complete the physiological profile of platelets and could have potential therapeutic effectiveness in platelet-associated disorders.

  12. Hyperforin promotes mitochondrial function and development of oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlin; Zhang, Yanbo; He, Jue; Zhang, Handi; Xiao, Lan; Nazarali, Adil; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Dai; Tan, Qingrong; Kong, Jiming; Li, Xin-Min

    2011-11-01

    St. John's wort has been found to be an effective and safe herbal treatment for depression in several clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanism of its therapeutic effects is unclear. Recent studies show that the loss and malfunction of oligodendrocytes are closely related to the neuropathological changes in depression, which can be reversed by antidepressant treatment. In this study, we evaluated the effects of hyperforin, a major active component of St. John's wort, on the proliferation, development and mitochondrial function of oligodendrocytes. The study results revealed that hyperforin promotes maturation of oligodendrocytes and increases mitochondrial function without affecting proliferation of an oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line and neural stem/progenitor cells. Hyperforin also prevented mitochondrial toxin-induced cytotoxicity in an oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line. These findings suggest that hyperforin may stimulate the development and function of oligodendrocytes, which could be a mechanism of its effect in depression. Future in vitro and in vivo studies are required to further characterize the mechanisms of hyperforin.

  13. Improving Mitochondrial Function Protects Bumblebees from Neonicotinoid Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powner, Michael B.; Salt, Thomas E.; Hogg, Chris; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Global pollination is threatened by declining insect pollinator populations that may be linked to neonicotinoid pesticide use. Neonicotinoids over stimulate neurons and depolarize their mitochondria, producing immobility and death. However, mitochondrial function can be improved by near infrared light absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondrial respiration. In flies, daily exposure to 670nm light throughout life increases average lifespan and aged mobility, and reduces systemic inflammation. Here we treat bumble bees with Imidacloprid a common neonicotinoid. This undermined ATP and rapidly induced immobility and reduced visual function and survival. Bees exposed to insecticide and daily to 670nm light showed corrected ATP levels and significantly improved mobility allowing them to feed. Physiological recordings from eyes revealed that light exposure corrected deficits induced by the pesticide. Overall, death rates in bees exposed to insecticide but also given 670nm light were indistinguishable from controls. When Imidacloprid and light exposure were withdrawn, survival was maintained. Bees and insects generally cannot see deep red light so it does not disturb their behaviour. Hence, we show that deep red light exposure that improves mitochondrial function, reverses the sensory and motor deficits induced by Imidacloprid. These results may have important implications as light delivery is economic and can be placed in hives/colonies. PMID:27846310

  14. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-10-22

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K(+) ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K(+) ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K(+) ionophore) and nigericin (K(+)/H(+) exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K(+)/H(+) exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary

  15. Isoliquiritigenin reduces oxidative damage and alleviates mitochondrial impairment by SIRT1 activation in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Kalvala, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-09-01

    Sirtuin (SIRT1) inactivation underlies the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia-associated vascular complications, but its role in diabetic neuropathy (DN) has not been yet explored. We have evaluated hyperglycaemia-induced alteration of SIRT1 signalling and the effect of isoliquiritigenin (ILQ) on SIRT1-directed AMP kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) signalling in peripheral nerves of streptozotocin (STZ) (55 mg/kg, ip)-induced diabetic rats and in high glucose (30 mM)-exposed neuro2a (N2A) cells. Diabetic rats and high glucose-exposed N2A cells showed reduction in SIRT1 expression with consequent decline in mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy. ILQ (10 & 20 mg/kg, po) administration to diabetic rats for 2 weeks and exposure to glucose-insulted N2A cells resulted in significant SIRT1 activation with concurrent increase in mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy. ILQ administration also enhanced NAD(+)/NADH ratio in peripheral sciatic nerves which explains its possible SIRT1 modulatory effect. Functional and behavioural studies show beneficial effect of ILQ as it alleviated nerve conduction and nerve blood flow deficits in diabetic rats along with improvement in behavioural parameters (hyperalgesia and allodynia). ILQ treatment to N2A cells reduced high glucose-driven ROS production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Further, ILQ-mediated SIRT1 activation facilitated the Nrf2-directed antioxidant signalling. Overall, results from this study suggest that SIRT1 activation by ILQ mimic effects of calorie restriction, that is, PGC-1α-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis, FOXO3a mediated stress resistance and AMPK mediated autophagy effects to counteract the multiple manifestations in experimental DN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. E3 Ligase Subunit Fbxo15 and PINK1 Kinase Regulate Cardiolipin Synthase 1 Stability and Mitochondrial Function in Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill B. Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is linked to mitochondrial injury, resulting in impaired cellular oxygen utilization; however, it is unknown how these events are linked on the molecular level. Cardiolipin, a mitochondrial-specific lipid, is generated by cardiolipin synthase (CLS1. Here, we show that S. aureus activates a ubiquitin E3 ligase component, Fbxo15, that is sufficient to mediate proteasomal degradation of CLS1 in epithelia, resulting in decreased cardiolipin availability and disrupted mitochondrial function. CLS1 is destabilized by the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1, which binds CLS1 to phosphorylate and regulates CLS1 disposal. Like Fbxo15, PINK1 interacts with and regulates levels of CLS1 through a mechanism dependent upon Thr219. S. aureus infection upregulates this Fbxo15-PINK1 pathway to impair mitochondrial integrity, and Pink1 knockout mice are less prone to S. aureus-induced ALI. Thus, ALI-associated disruption of cellular bioenergetics involves bioeffectors that utilize a phosphodegron to elicit ubiquitin-mediated disposal of a key mitochondrial enzyme.

  17. Dietary nitrate does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve muscle mitochondrial function in mitochondrial myopathy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabben, Miranda; Schmitz, Joep P J; Ciapaite, Jolita; Le Clercq, Carlijn M P; van Riel, Natal A; Haak, Harm R; Nicolay, Klaas; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Smeets, Hubert J M; Praet, Stephan F; van Loon, Luc J C; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2017-02-08

    Muscle weakness and exercise intolerance negatively affect the quality of life of mitochondrial myopathy patients. Short-term dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to improve exercise performance and reduce oxygen cost of exercise in healthy humans and trained athletes. We investigated if 1 week of dietary inorganic nitrate supplementation decreases the oxygen cost of exercise and improves mitochondrial function in mitochondrial myopathy patients. Ten mitochondrial myopathy patients (40 ± 5 years, maximal whole-body oxygen uptake = 21.2 ± 3.2 mL/min/kg body weight, maximal workload = 122 ± 26 W) received 8.5 mg/kg body weight/day of inorganic nitrate (~7 mmol) for 8 days. Whole-body oxygen consumption at 50% of the maximal workload, in vivo skeletal muscle oxidative capacity (evaluated from post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and ex vivo mitochondrial oxidative capacity in permeabilized skinned muscle fibers (measured with high-resolution respirometry) were determined before and after nitrate supplementation. Despite a 6-fold increase in plasma nitrate levels, nitrate supplementation did not affect whole-body oxygen cost during submaximal exercise. Additionally, no beneficial effects of nitrate were found on in vivo or ex vivo muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity. This is the first time that the therapeutic potential of dietary nitrate for mitochondrial myopathy patients was evaluated. We conclude that 1 week of dietary nitrate supplementation does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve mitochondrial function in the group of patients tested.

  18. Mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle following high-altitude exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Robert A; Boushel, Robert; Wright-Paradis, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Studies regarding mitochondrial modifications in human skeletal muscle following acclimatization to high altitude are conflicting, and these inconsistencies may be due to the prevalence of representing mitochondrial function through static and isolated measurements of specific mitochondrial.......059) to limit mass-specific maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity. These data suggest that 9-11 days of exposure to high altitude do not markedly modify integrated measures of mitochondrial functional capacity in skeletal muscle despite significant decrements in the concentrations of enzymes involved...

  19. Mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase deficiency: basal ganglia impairment may occur independently of ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquay, Stéphanie; Bourillon, Agnès; Pichard, Samia; Benoist, Jean-François; de Lonlay, Pascale; Dobbelaere, Dries; Fouilhoux, Alain; Guffon, Nathalie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Labarthe, François; Mention, Karine; Touati, Guy; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Acquaviva-Bourdain, Cécile; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Schiff, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) deficiency affects ketone body and isoleucine catabolism. Neurological impairment may occur secondary to ketoacidotic episodes. However, we observed neuromotor abnormalities without ketoacidotic events in two T2-deficient families. We hypothesized that the neurological signs were related to the genetic defect and may occur independently of ketoacidotic episodes. We therefore conducted a retrospective review on a French T2-deficient patient series searching for neuromotor impairment. In total, 26 cases were retrospectively analysed for clinical, biological and neuroimaging data. Neurological findings were observed for 6/26 (23%) patients. Among these, two had never experienced ketoacidotic episodes, though they developed extrapyramidal signs with putamen involvement. Two of the other four patients developed neurological abnormalities before the first ketoacidotic crisis, with putamen involvement in one case. The third patient developed extrapyramidal symptoms more than 10 years after the initial decompensation with globus pallidus involvement. The last patient developed extrapyramidal signs immediately after a severe ketoacidotic crisis with putaminal lesions. Most T2-deficient patients achieved normal neurodevelopment. However, on account of the role of T2 in isoleucine catabolism, these patients are potentially exposed to accumulation of toxic isoleucine-derived metabolites, which may contribute to neurological impairment. Our findings confirm previous observations that neurological symptoms in T2 deficiency may occur unrelated to ketoacidosis. The role of protein restriction as a preventive measure against neurological symptoms could not be established in this study and deserves further evaluation. Long-term follow-up data on children diagnosed by newborn screening may clarify the pathogenesis of this neurometabolic association.

  20. Early degenerative changes in transgenic mice expressing mutant huntingtin involve dendritic abnormalities but no impairment of mitochondrial energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, P; Charles, V; Chen, E Y; Reddy, P H; Kordower, J H; Whetsell, W O; Schwarcz, R; Tagle, D A

    2001-06-01

    Mitochondrial defects, which occur in the brain of late-stage Huntington's disease (HD) patients, have been proposed to underlie the selective neuronal loss in the disease. To shed light on the possible role of mitochondrial energy impairment in the early phases of HD pathophysiology, we carried out Golgi impregnation and quantitative histochemical/biochemical studies in HD full-length cDNA transgenic mice that were symptomatic but had not developed to a stage in which neuronal loss could be documented. Golgi staining showed morphologic abnormalities that included a significant decrease in the number of dendritic spines and a thickening of proximal dendrites in striatal and cortical neurons. In contrast, measurements of mitochondrial electron transport Complexes I-IV did not reveal changes in the striatum and cerebral cortex in these mice. Examination of the neostriatum and cerebral cortex in human presymptomatic and pathological Grade 1 HD cases also showed no change in the activity of mitochondrial Complexes I-IV. These data suggest that dendritic alterations precede irreversible cell loss in HD, and that mitochondrial energy impairment is a consequence, rather than a cause, of early neuropathological changes.

  1. Resveratrol Improves Vascular Function and Mitochondrial Number but Not Glucose Metabolism in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rena M; Barzilai, Nir; Anghel, Valentin; Kulkarni, Ameya S; Golden, Aaron; O'Broin, Pilib; Sinclair, David A; Bonkowski, Michael S; Coleville, Alexander J; Powell, Danielle; Kim, Sharon; Moaddel, Ruin; Stein, Daniel; Zhang, Kehao; Hawkins, Meredith; Crandall, Jill P

    2017-03-16

    Resveratrol, a plant-derived polyphenol, has been reported to improve glucose metabolism and vascular function and to extend life span in animal models, but studies in humans have been inconclusive. In a randomized, double-blind crossover study, we treated older glucose-intolerant adults (n = 30) with resveratrol (2-3 g/daily) or placebo, each for 6 weeks. A standard mixed-meal test was used to assess insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) and secretion (C-peptide deconvolution) and vascular function by reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry. Skeletal muscle samples were obtained for gene expression using RNA-Seq analysis and to assess mitochondrial morphology. There were no changes in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, weight, blood pressure, or lipid profile following resveratrol treatment. Fasting reactive hyperemia index improved with resveratrol (2.02 ± 0.2 vs 1.76 ± 0.02, p = .002). RNA-Seq analysis yielded 140 differentially expressed transcripts (corrected p-value ≤ .05), predominantly associated with mitochondrial genes and noncoding RNA. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis confirmed that mitochondrial dysfunction (p = 2.77 × 10-12) and oxidative phosphorylation (p = 1.41 × 10-11) were the most significantly perturbed pathways. Mitochondrial number, but not size, was increased. Resveratrol treatment of older adults with impaired glucose regulation may have beneficial effects on vascular function, but not glucose metabolism or insulin sensitivity. Changes in gene expression suggest effects similar to those observed with caloric restriction, which has been shown to increase life and health span in animal models, although its significance for humans is uncertain. Future human studies should address the appropriate dose range and low bioavailability of resveratrol.

  2. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hansong; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection. In contrast, matchups between distantly related genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting powerful selfish selection, a genome carrying a detrimental mutation displaced a complementing genome, leading to population death after several generations. In a different pairing, opposing selfish and purifying selection counterbalanced to give stable transmission of two genomes. Sequencing of recombinant mitochondrial genomes showed that the noncoding region, containing origins of replication, governs selfish transmission. Uniparental inheritance prevents encounters between distantly related genomes. Nonetheless, in each maternal lineage, constant competition among sibling genomes selects for super-replicators. We suggest that this relentless competition drives positive selection, promoting change in the sequences influencing transmission.

  3. Acidosis overrides oxygen deprivation to maintain mitochondrial function and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khacho, Mireille; Tarabay, Michelle; Patten, David; Khacho, Pamela; MacLaurin, Jason G.; Guadagno, Jennifer; Bergeron, Richard; Cregan, Sean P.; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Park, David S.; Slack, Ruth S.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained cellular function and viability of high-energy demanding post-mitotic cells rely on the continuous supply of ATP. The utilization of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for efficient ATP generation is a function of oxygen levels. As such, oxygen deprivation, in physiological or pathological settings, has profound effects on cell metabolism and survival. Here we show that mild extracellular acidosis, a physiological consequence of anaerobic metabolism, can reprogramme the mitochondrial metabolic pathway to preserve efficient ATP production regardless of oxygen levels. Acidosis initiates a rapid and reversible homeostatic programme that restructures mitochondria, by regulating mitochondrial dynamics and cristae architecture, to reconfigure mitochondrial efficiency, maintain mitochondrial function and cell survival. Preventing mitochondrial remodelling results in mitochondrial dysfunction, fragmentation and cell death. Our findings challenge the notion that oxygen availability is a key limiting factor in oxidative metabolism and brings forth the concept that mitochondrial morphology can dictate the bioenergetic status of post-mitotic cells. PMID:24686499

  4. Impaired water barrier function in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A; Takenouchi, K; Ito, M

    1995-01-01

    In acne vulgaris, abnormal follicular keratinization is important for comedo formation, yet the precise mechanisms of comedogenesis are not known. The present study examined the interrelationship between sebum secretion rate (SSR), lipid content and water barrier function (WBF) of the stratum corneum (SC) in 36 acne patients and 29 control subjects. All major SC lipid classes were separated and quantified by thin-layer chromatography/photodensitometry. WBF was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and the hygroscopic properties and waterholding capacity of the SC. The SSR over a period of 3 h was significantly higher in patients with moderate acne than in control subjects, but no significant difference was noticed between patients with mild acne and control subjects. Significant differences between patients with both moderate and mild acne and control subjects were noted in the amount of sphingolipids (ceramides and free sphingosine), but not for any other lipid classes. Furthermore in acne patients, lower amounts of sphingolipids were observed corresponding with a diminished WBF. These results suggest that an impaired WBF caused by decreased amounts of ceramides may be responsible for comedo formation, since barrier dysfunction is accompanied by hyperkeratosis of the follicular epithelium.

  5. The transcriptional coregulator PGC-1β controls mitochondrial function and anti-oxidant defence in skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Laverny, Gilles; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Messaddeq, Nadia; Bornert, Jean-Marc; Panza, Salvatore; Ferry, Arnaud; Geny, Bernard; Metzger, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional coregulators PGC-1α and PGC-1β modulate the expression of numerous partially overlapping genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and energetic metabolism. The physiological role of PGC-1β is poorly understood in skeletal muscle, a tissue of high mitochondrial content to produce ATP levels required for sustained contractions. Here we determine the physiological role of PGC-1β in skeletal muscle using mice, in which PGC-1β is selectively ablated in skeletal myofibres at adulthood (PGC-1β(i)skm−/− mice). We show that myofibre myosin heavy chain composition and mitochondrial number, muscle strength and glucose homeostasis are unaffected in PGC-1β(i)skm−/− mice. However, decreased expression of genes controlling mitochondrial protein import, translational machinery and energy metabolism in PGC-1β(i)skm−/− muscles leads to mitochondrial structural and functional abnormalities, impaired muscle oxidative capacity and reduced exercise performance. Moreover, enhanced free-radical leak and reduced expression of the mitochondrial anti-oxidant enzyme Sod2 increase muscle oxidative stress. PGC-1β is therefore instrumental for skeletal muscles to cope with high energetic demands. PMID:26674215

  6. Impaired endothelial function in lone atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired endothelial function has been previously documented in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and underlying comorbidities or older patients with idiopathic AF. The aim of this study was to evaluate systemic endothelial function in younger AF patients (less than 7 days lone AF. The second group comprised of 28 healthy controls in sinus rhythm (the mean age 43 ± 13, 53% male, matched by age, gender and atherosclerotic risk factors. All the participants underwent physical examination, laboratory analysis [including determination of C-reactive protein (CRP], standard echocardiography and exercise-stress testing. Brachial artery FMD and endothelium independent dilation (NMD were assessed with a high-resolution ultrasound probe and arterial diameters taken from 5 consecutive cardiac cycles were averaged for each measurement to accommodate to beat-to-beat flow variations in AF. Results. There were no differences between the 2 groups regarding age, gender and most clinical, laboratory and echocardiographic characteristics (all p > 0.05, apart from the increased heart rate (p = 0.018, body mass index (p = 0.027, CRP levels (p = 0.007 and left atrial anteroposterior dimension (p 0.05. In the multivariate analysis, the independent FMD determinants in our study population were the presence of AF, smoking and total cholesterol levels (all p < 0.001. In patients with AF, the strongest independent FMD determinant was arrhythmia duration (p < 0.001, followed by smoking (p = 0.013 and total cholesterol levels (p = 0.045. Conclusions. Our findings confirm that sustained AF is associated with systemic endothelial dysfunction even in relatively young patients with no cardiovascular disorders or risk factors. AF is an independent contributor to lower FMD and a prolonged arrhythmia duration may confer the risk for more profound endothelial damage.

  7. The seleno-organic compound ebselen impairs mitochondrial physiology and induces cell death in AR42J cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Garcia-Sanchez, Lourdes; Ruy, Deborah Clea; Fernandez-Bermejo, Miguel; Salido, Gines M; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2014-09-17

    Ebselen is a seleno-organic compound that causes cell death in several cancer cell types. The mechanisms underlying its deleterious effects have not been fully elucidated. In this study, the effects of ebselen (1 μM-40 μM) on AR42J tumor cells have been examined. Cell viability was studied using AlamarBlue(®) test. Cell cycle phase determination was carried out by flow cytometry. Changes in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration were followed by fluorimetry analysis of fura-2-loaded cells. Distribution of mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration and mitochondrial membrane potential were monitored by confocal microscopy of cells loaded with Mitotracker Green™ FM, rhod-2 or TMRM respectively. Caspase-3 activity was calculated following the luorogenic substrate ACDEVD-AMC signal with a spectrofluorimeter. Results show that cell viability decreased in the presence of ebselen. An increase in the number of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle was observed. Ebselen induced a concentration-dependent mobilization of Ca(2+) from agonist- and thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) pools. Ebselen induced also a transient increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, a progressive decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential and a disruption of the mitochondrial network. Finally, a concentration-dependent increase in caspase-3 activity was detected. We conclude that ebselen exerts deleterious actions on the cells that involve the impairment of mitochondrial physiology and the activation of caspase-3-mediated apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impaired expression of mitochondrial and adipogenic genes in adipose tissue from a patient with acquired partial lipodystrophy (Barraquer-Simons syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guallar Jordi P

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acquired partial lipodystrophy or Barraquer-Simons syndrome is a rare form of progressive lipodystrophy. The etiopathogenesis of adipose tissue atrophy in these patients is unknown. Case presentation This is a case report of a 44-year-old woman with acquired partial lipodystrophy. To obtain insight into the molecular basis of lipoatrophy in acquired partial lipodystrophy, we examined gene expression in adipose tissue from this patient newly diagnosed with acquired partial lipodystrophy. A biopsy of subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained from the patient, and DNA and RNA were extracted in order to evaluate mitochondrial DNA abundance and mRNA expression levels. Conclusion The expression of marker genes of adipogenesis and adipocyte metabolism, including the master regulator PPARγ, was down-regulated in subcutaneous adipose tissue from this patient. Adiponectin mRNA expression was also reduced but leptin mRNA levels were unaltered. Markers of local inflammatory status were unaltered. Expression of genes related to mitochondrial function was reduced despite unaltered levels of mitochondrial DNA. It is concluded that adipogenic and mitochondrial gene expression is impaired in adipose tissue in this patient with acquired partial lipodystrophy.

  9. The Brain Renin-Angiotensin System and Mitochondrial Function: Influence on Blood Pressure and Baroreflex in Transgenic Rat Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Nautiyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, and may be associated with an overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS. Angiotensin (Ang II, a potent vasoconstrictor hormone of the RAS, also impairs baroreflex and mitochondrial function. Most deleterious cardiovascular actions of Ang II are thought to be mediated by NADPH-oxidase- (NOX- derived reactive oxygen species (ROS that may also stimulate mitochondrial oxidant release and alter redox-sensitive signaling pathways in the brain. Within the RAS, the actions of Ang II are counterbalanced by Ang-(1–7, a vasodilatory peptide known to mitigate against increased oxidant stress. A balance between Ang II and Ang-(1–7 within the brain dorsal medulla contributes to maintenance of normal blood pressure and proper functioning of the arterial baroreceptor reflex for control of heart rate. We propose that Ang-(1–7 may negatively regulate the redox signaling pathways activated by Ang II to maintain normal blood pressure, baroreflex, and mitochondrial function through attenuating ROS (NOX-generated and/or mitochondrial.

  10. Genetically enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant activity improves muscle function in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umanskaya, Alisa; Santulli, Gaetano; Xie, Wenjun; Andersson, Daniel C; Reiken, Steven R; Marks, Andrew R

    2014-10-21

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is a leading cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 or greater. Here we tested the effects of increased mitochondrial antioxidant activity on age-dependent skeletal muscle dysfunction using transgenic mice with targeted overexpression of the human catalase gene to mitochondria (MCat mice). Aged MCat mice exhibited improved voluntary exercise, increased skeletal muscle specific force and tetanic Ca(2+) transients, decreased intracellular Ca(2+) leak and increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load compared with age-matched wild type (WT) littermates. Furthermore, ryanodine receptor 1 (the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channel required for skeletal muscle contraction; RyR1) from aged MCat mice was less oxidized, depleted of the channel stabilizing subunit, calstabin1, and displayed increased single channel open probability (Po). Overall, these data indicate a direct role for mitochondrial free radicals in promoting the pathological intracellular Ca(2+) leak that underlies age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle function. This study harbors implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, including mitochondria-targeted antioxidants for treatment of mitochondrial myopathies and other healthspan-limiting disorders.

  11. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Leuner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g. might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease (AD. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, these new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions.

  12. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an essential component of mitochondrial nucleoids. TFAM plays an important role in mitochondrial transcription and replication. TFAM has been previously reported to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro but NER has not yet been detected i...

  13. Reduction of brain mitochondrial β-oxidation impairs complex I and V in chronic alcohol intake: the underlying mechanism for neurodegeneration.

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    James Haorah

    Full Text Available Neuropathy and neurocognitive deficits are common among chronic alcohol users, which are believed to be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain. The specific type of brain mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (mRCC that are adversely affected by alcohol abuse has not been studied. Thus, we examined the alterations of mRCC in freshly isolated mitochondria from mice brain that were pair-fed the ethanol (4% v/v and control liquid diets for 7-8 weeks. We observed that alcohol intake severely reduced the levels of complex I and V. A reduction in complex I was associated with a decrease in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (cPT1 and cPT2 levels. The mitochondrial outer (cPT1 and inner (cPT2 membrane transporter enzymes are specialized in acylation of fatty acid from outer to inner membrane of mitochondria for ATP production. Thus, our results showed that alterations of cPT1 and cPT2 paralleled a decrease β-oxidation of palmitate and ATP production, suggesting that impairment of substrate entry step (complex I function can cause a negative impact on ATP production (complex V function. Disruption of cPT1/cPT2 was accompanied by an increase in cytochrome C leakage, while reduction of complex I and V paralleled a decrease in depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ, monitored by JC-1 fluorescence and ATP production in alcohol intake. We noted that acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC, a cofactor of cPT1 and cPT2 prevented the adverse effects of alcohol while coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 was not very effective against alcohol insults. These results suggest that understanding the molecular, biochemical, and signaling mechanisms of the CNS mitochondrial β-oxidation such as ALC can mitigate alcohol related neurological disorders.

  14. Dieldrin-induced neurotoxicity involves impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics and an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in rat dopaminergic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jordan T; Rushin, Anna; Boyda, Jonna; Souders, Christopher Laurence; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2017-08-24

    Mitochondria are sensitive targets of environmental chemicals. Dieldrin (DLD) is an organochlorine pesticide that remains a human health concern due to high lipid bioaccumulation, and it has been epidemiologically associated to an increased risk for Parkinson's disease (PD). As mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the etiology of PD, this study aimed to determine whether DLD impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics in dopaminergic cells. Rat immortalized dopaminergic N27 cells were treated for 24 or 48h with one dose of either a solvent control, 2.5, 25, or 250μM DLD. Dopaminergic cells treated with 250μM DLD showed increased Casp3/7 activity at 24 and 48h. DLD also caused a dose dependent reduction in cell viability of ∼25-30% over 24h. No significant effects on cell viability, apoptosis, nor cytotoxicity were detected at 24 or 48h with 2.5μM DLD. Following a 24h exposure to 2.5 and 25μM DLD, viable cells were subjected to a mitochondrial stress test using the Seahorse XFe24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Following three independent experiments conducted for rigor, dopaminergic cells that were treated with 2.5 and 25μM DLD consistently showed a reduction in maximum respiration and spare capacity compared to the control group. Molecular responses were measured to determine mechanisms of DLD-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. There were no changes in transcripts associated with mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability (e.g. Ant, Hk1, Tspo, Vdac), nor PI3 K/Akt/mTor signaling or mitochondrial-associated apoptotic factors (Bax, Bcl2, Casp3). However, transcript levels for Chop/Gadd153 (DNA Damage Inducible Transcript 3), an apoptotic gene activated following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, were 3-fold higher in N27 cells treated with DLD, suggesting that DLD-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is related to ER stress. Dopamine cells were also assessed for changes in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein, which did not differ among treatments. This study

  15. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs.

  16. Endocannabinoids in neuroendopsychology: multiphasic control of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Alistair; Guy, Geoffrey; Bell, Jimmy D

    2012-12-05

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a construct based on the discovery of receptors that are modulated by the plant compound tetrahydrocannabinol and the subsequent identification of a family of nascent ligands, the 'endocannabinoids'. The function of the ECS is thus defined by modulation of these receptors-in particular, by two of the best-described ligands (2-arachidonyl glycerol and anandamide), and by their metabolic pathways. Endocannabinoids are released by cell stress, and promote both cell survival and death according to concentration. The ECS appears to shift the immune system towards a type 2 response, while maintaining a positive energy balance and reducing anxiety. It may therefore be important in resolution of injury and inflammation. Data suggest that the ECS could potentially modulate mitochondrial function by several different pathways; this may help explain its actions in the central nervous system. Dose-related control of mitochondrial function could therefore provide an insight into its role in health and disease, and why it might have its own pathology, and possibly, new therapeutic directions.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA variant m.15218A > G in Finnish epilepsy patients who have maternal relatives with epilepsy, sensorineural hearing impairment or diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Soini, Heidi K; Moilanen, Jukka S; Vilmi-Kerälä, Tiina; Finnilä, Saara; Majamaa, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) affect tissues with high energy demand. Epilepsy is one of the manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction when the brain is affected. We have studied here 79 Finnish patients with epilepsy and who have maternal first- or second-degree relatives with epilepsy, sensorineural hearing impairment or diabetes mellitus. Methods The entire mtDNA was studied by using conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis and PCR f...

  18. The role of sirtuins in mitochondrial function and doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2017-08-28

    Anthracycline chemotherapeutics such as doxorubicin continue to be important treatments for many cancers. Through improved screening and therapy, more patients are surviving and living longer after the diagnosis of their cancer. However, anthracyclines are associated with both short- and long-term cardiotoxic effects. Doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a central mechanism in the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin that contributes to impaired cardiac energy levels, increased reactive oxygen species production, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the decline in cardiac function. Sirtuins are protein deacetylases that are activated by low energy levels and stimulate energy production through their activation of transcription factors and enzymatic regulators of cardiac energy metabolism. In addition, sirtuins activate oxidative stress resistance pathways. SIRT1 and SIRT3 are expressed at high levels in the cardiomyocyte. This review examines the function of sirtuins in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial function, with a focus on their role in heart failure and an emphasis on their effects on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. We discuss the potential for sirtuin activation in combination with anthracycline chemotherapy in order to mitigate its cardiotoxic side-effects without reducing the antineoplastic activity of anthracyclines.

  19. Bmi1 regulates mitochondrial function and the DNA damage response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Cao, Liu; Chen, Jichun; Song, Shiwei; Lee, In Hye; Quijano, Celia; Liu, Hongjun; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Chen, Haoqian; Cao, Long-Yue; Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Kumar, Neil G; Rovira, Ilsa I; Xu, Xiao-Ling; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Motoyama, Noboru; Deng, Chu-Xia; Finkel, Toren

    2009-05-21

    Mice deficient in the Polycomb repressor Bmi1 develop numerous abnormalities including a severe defect in stem cell self-renewal, alterations in thymocyte maturation and a shortened lifespan. Previous work has implicated de-repression of the Ink4a/Arf (also known as Cdkn2a) locus as mediating many of the aspects of the Bmi1(-/-) phenotype. Here we demonstrate that cells derived from Bmi1(-/-) mice also have impaired mitochondrial function, a marked increase in the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and subsequent engagement of the DNA damage response pathway. Furthermore, many of the deficiencies normally observed in Bmi1(-/-) mice improve after either pharmacological treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or genetic disruption of the DNA damage response pathway by Chk2 (also known as Chek2) deletion. These results demonstrate that Bmi1 has an unexpected role in maintaining mitochondrial function and redox homeostasis and indicate that the Polycomb family of proteins can coordinately regulate cellular metabolism with stem and progenitor cell function.

  20. Impairment of mitochondrial calcium handling in a mtSOD1 cell culture model of motoneuron disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zippelius Annette

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons (MN in the brain stem and spinal cord. Intracellular disruptions of cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium have been associated with selective MN degeneration, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The present evidence supports a hypothesis that mitochondria are a target of mutant SOD1-mediated toxicity in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS and intracellular alterations of cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium might aggravate the course of this neurodegenerative disease. In this study, we used a fluorescence charged cool device (CCD imaging system to separate and simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium concentrations in individual cells in an established cellular model of ALS. Results To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of SOD1G93A associated motor neuron disease, we simultaneously monitored cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium concentrations in individual cells. Voltage – dependent cytosolic Ca2+ elevations and mitochondria – controlled calcium release mechanisms were monitored after loading cells with fluorescent dyes fura-2 and rhod-2. Interestingly, comparable voltage-dependent cytosolic Ca2+ elevations in WT (SH-SY5YWT and G93A (SH-SY5YG93A expressing cells were observed. In contrast, mitochondrial intracellular Ca2+ release responses evoked by bath application of the mitochondrial toxin FCCP were significantly smaller in G93A expressing cells, suggesting impaired calcium stores. Pharmacological experiments further supported the concept that the presence of G93A severely disrupts mitochondrial Ca2+ regulation. Conclusion In this study, by fluorescence measurement of cytosolic calcium and using simultaneous [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]mito measurements, we are able to separate and simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium concentrations

  1. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Mitochondrial Oxidative Enzyme Impairment and Restoration in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Angel, Thomas E.; Lewis, Michael P.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Wiedner, Susan D.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-10-24

    High-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and concomitant development of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is not clear whether mitochondrial dysfunction is a direct effect of a HFD or if the mitochondrial function is reduced with increased HFD duration. We hypothesized that the function of mitochondrial oxidative and lipid metabolism functions in skeletal muscle mitochondria for HFD mice are similar or elevated relative to standard diet (SD) mice, thereby IR is neither cause nor consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction. We applied a chemical probe approach to identify functionally reactive ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of C57Bl/6J mice fed HFD or SD chow for 2-, 8-, or 16-weeks; feeding time points known to induce IR. A total of 293 probe-labeled proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, of which 54 differed in abundance between HFD and SD mice. We found proteins associated with the TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and lipid metabolism were altered in function when comparing SD to HFD fed mice at 2-weeks, however by 16-weeks HFD mice had TCA cycle, β-oxidation, and respiratory chain function at levels similar to or higher than SD mice.

  2. Maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA variants in familial Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer Ronald F; Rudolph Alice; Halter Cheryl A; Pauciulo Michael W; Kissell Diane K; Pankratz Nathan; Simon David K; Nichols William C; Foroud Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial function is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD, but the causes of mitochondrial impairment in PD are unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recapitulated in cell lines expressing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from PD patients, implicating mtDNA variants or mutations, though the role of mtDNA variants or mutations in PD risk remains unclear. We investigated the potential contribution of mtDNA variants or mutations to t...

  3. Alterations in intrinsic mitochondrial function with aging are fiber type-specific and do not explain differential atrophy between muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; Ritchie, Darmyn; Thomas, Melissa M; Wright, Kathryn J; Hepple, Russell T

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether mitochondrial dysfunction is causally related to muscle atrophy with aging, we examined respiratory capacity, H(2) O(2) emission, and function of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in permeabilized myofibers prepared from four rat muscles that span a range of fiber type and degree of age-related atrophy. Muscle atrophy with aging was greatest in fast-twitch gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle (-38%), intermediate in both the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus (Sol) muscles (-21%), and non-existent in adductor longus (AL) muscle (+47%). In contrast, indices of mitochondrial dysfunction did not correspond to this differential degree of atrophy. Specifically, despite higher protein expression for oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos) system in fast Gas and EDL, state III respiratory capacity per myofiber wet weight was unchanged with aging, whereas the slow Sol showed proportional decreases in oxphos protein, citrate synthase activity, and state III respiration. Free radical leak (H(2) O(2) emission per O(2) flux) under state III respiration was higher with aging in the fast Gas, whereas state II free radical leak was higher in the slow AL. Only the fast muscles had impaired mPTP function with aging, with lower mitochondrial calcium retention capacity in EDL and shorter time to mPTP opening in Gas and EDL. Collectively, our results underscore that the age-related changes in muscle mitochondrial function depend largely upon fiber type and are unrelated to the severity of muscle atrophy, suggesting that intrinsic changes in mitochondrial function are unlikely to be causally involved in aging muscle atrophy. © 2011 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Small Molecules that Protect Mitochondrial Function from Metabolic Stress Decelerate Loss of Photoreceptor Cells in Murine Retinal Degeneration Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Craig; Lindsey, Chris; Nasarre, Cecile; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Perron, Nathan; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    One feature common to many of the pathways implicated in retinal degeneration is increased metabolic stress leading to impaired mitochondrial function. We found that exposure of cells to calcium ionophores or oxidants as metabolic stressors diminish maximal mitochondrial capacity. A library of 50,000 structurally diverse "drug-like" molecules was screened for protection against loss of calcium-induced loss of mitochondrial capacity in 661W rod-derived cells and C6 glioblastomas. Initial protective hits were then tested for protection against IBMX-induced loss of mitochondrial capacity as measured via respirometry. Molecules that protected mitochondria were then evaluated for protection of rod photoreceptor cells in retinal explants from rd1 mice. Two of the molecules attenuated loss of photoreceptor cells in the rd1 model. In the 661W cells, exposure to calcium ionophore or tert-butylhydroperoxide caused mitochondrial fragmentation that was blocked with the both compounds. Our studies have identified molecules that protect mitochondria and attenuate loss of photoreceptors in models of retinal degeneration suggesting that they could be good leads for development of therapeutic drugs for treatment of a wide variety of retinal dystrophies.

  5. Short-term increase of plasma free fatty acids does not interfere with intrinsic mitochondrial function in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Myrte; Hoeks, Joris; Sauerwein, Hans P; Ackermans, Mariette T; Ouwens, Margriet; Lammers, Nicolette M; van der Plas, Mart N; Schrauwen, Patrick; Groen, Albert K; Serlie, Mireille J

    2011-10-01

    Free fatty acid (FFA)- and obesity-induced insulin resistance has been associated with disturbed mitochondrial function. Elevated plasma FFA can impair insulin-induced increase of adenosine triphosphate synthesis and downregulate the expression of genes important in the biogenesis of mitochondria in human skeletal muscle. Whether FAs have a direct effect on intrinsic mitochondrial capacity remains to be established. Therefore, we measured ex vivo mitochondrial respiratory capacity in human skeletal muscle after exposure to hyperinsulinemia and high levels of plasma FFA. Nine healthy lean men were studied during a 6-hour hyperinsulinemic (600 pmol/L) euglycemic clamp with concomitant infusion of Intralipid (Fresensius Kabi Nederland, Den Bosch, the Netherlands) (FFA clamped at 0.5 mmol/L) or saline. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity was measured by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized muscle fibers using an Oxygraph (OROBOROS Instruments, Innsbruck, Austria). Each participant served as his own control. Peripheral glucose uptake (rate of disappearance) was significantly lower during infusion of the lipid emulsion compared with the control saline infusion (68 μmol/kg·min [saline] vs 40 μmol/kg·min [lipid], P = .008). However, adenosine diphosphate-stimulated and maximal carbonylcyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenylhydrazone-stimulated uncoupled respiration rates were not different in permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers after exposure to high levels of FFA compared with the control condition. We conclude that short-term elevation of FFA within the physiological range induces insulin resistance but does not affect intrinsic mitochondrial capacity in skeletal muscle in humans.

  6. [Impaired cognitive function in hepatitis C - a review.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter; Hjerrild, Simon;

    2010-01-01

    Impaired cognitive function is commonly seen in patients with hepatitis C-virus (HCV). This might be due to a toxic effect of the virus itself or to neuroinflammatory processes with a direct damaging cerebral effect. The symptoms appear in the pre-cirrhotic stage and impair the patient's level...

  7. Targeted impairment of thymidine kinase 2 expression in cells induces mitochondrial DNA depletion and reveals molecular mechanisms of compensation of mitochondrial respiratory activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroya, Joan, E-mail: joanvillarroya@gmail.com [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Recerca l' Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lara, Mari-Carmen [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), ISCIII (Spain); Dorado, Beatriz [Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Garrido, Marta [Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular i Molecular, IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Garcia-Arumi, Elena [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), ISCIII (Spain); Meseguer, Anna [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Hirano, Michio [Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Vila, Maya R. [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We impaired TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells via siRNA-mediated interference (TK2{sup -}). {yields} TK2 impairment caused severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion in quiescent cells. {yields} Despite mtDNA depletion, TK2{sup -} cells show high cytochrome oxidase activity. {yields} Depletion of mtDNA occurs without imbalance in the mitochondrial dNTP pool. {yields} Nuclear-encoded ENT1, DNA-pol {gamma}, TFAM and TP gene expression is lowered in TK2{sup -} cells. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by reductions of the mtDNA abundance, without associated point mutations or rearrangements. We have developed the first in vitro model to study of mtDNA depletion due to reduced mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) expression in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in mtDNA depletion syndrome due to TK2 mutations. Small interfering RNA targeting TK2 mRNA was used to decrease TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells, a cell line devoid of endogenous thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Stable TK2-deficient cell lines showed a reduction of TK2 levels close to 80%. In quiescent conditions, TK2-deficient cells showed severe mtDNA depletion, also close to 80% the control levels. However, TK2-deficient clones showed increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher cytochrome c oxidase subunit I transcript levels and higher subunit II protein expression respect to control cells. No alterations of the deoxynucleotide pools were found, whereas a reduction in the expression of genes involved in nucleoside/nucleotide homeostasis (human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, thymidine phosphorylase) and mtDNA maintenance (DNA-polymerase {gamma}, mitochondrial transcription factor A) was observed. Our findings highlight the importance of cellular compensatory mechanisms that enhance the expression of respiratory components to ensure respiratory activity

  8. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment via inhibition of isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Hou, Lengchen; Chen, Dan; Lin, Fuqing; Chang, Tao; Li, Mengzhu; Zhang, Lingling; Niu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Huiying; Fu, Shukun; Zheng, Junhua

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The inhaled general anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase-3 activation in vitro and in vivo. The underlying mechanisms and functional consequences of this activity remain unclear. Isoflurane can induce caspase-3 activation by causing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen, a novel antioxidant, against isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment. Methods: H4 human neuroglioma cells overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein were treated with saline or hydrogen-rich saline (HS, 300 μM), with or without 2% isoflurane, for 6 h or 3 h. Western blot analysis, fluorescence assays, and a mitochondrial swelling assay were used to evaluate caspase-3 activation, levels of ROS and ATP, and mitochondrial function. The effect of the interaction of isoflurane (1.4% for 2 h) and HS (5 mL/kg) on cognitive function in mice was also evaluated using a fear conditioning test. Results: We found that HS attenuated isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation. Moreover, HS treatment mitigated isoflurane-induced ROS accumulation, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduction in cellular ATP levels. Finally, HS significantly alleviated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in mice. Conclusions: Our results suggest that HS attenuates isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment via inhibition of isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels. These findings warrant further research into the underlying mechanisms of this activity, and indicate that HS has the potential to attenuate anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  9. Overexpression of NYGGF4 (PID1) induces mitochondrial impairment in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yaping; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Xiaohui; Gao, Chunlin; Ji, Chenbo; Chen, Fukun; Zhu, Chun; Zhu, Jingai; Wang, Jialin; Qian, Lingmei; Guo, Xirong

    2010-07-01

    NYGGF4 is a recently discovered gene that is involved in obesity-associated insulin resistance. The exact mechanism by which NYGGF4 induces insulin resistance has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that the overexpression of NYGGF4 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes decreased mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial DNA, and intracellular ATP synthesis. In addition, NYGGF4 overexpression also led to an imbalance of the mitochondrial dynamics and excess intracellular ROS production. Collectively, our results indicated that the overexpression of NYGGF4 caused mitochondrial dysfunction in adipocytes, which might be responsible for the development of NYGGF4-induced insulin resistance.

  10. Mitochondrial function provides instructive signals for activation-induced B-cell fates.

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Kyoung-Jin; Mano, Hiroto; Aoki, Koji; Hayashi, Tatsunari; Muto, Akihiko; Nambu, Yukiko; Takahashi, Katsu; Itoh, Katsuhiko; Taketani, Shigeru; Stephen L Nutt; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Akira; Sugai, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    During immune reactions, functionally distinct B-cell subsets are generated by stochastic processes, including class-switch recombination (CSR) and plasma cell differentiation (PCD). In this study, we show a strong association between individual B-cell fates and mitochondrial functions. CSR occurs specifically in activated B cells with increased mitochondrial mass and membrane potential, which augment mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS), whereas PCD occurs in cells with decreased mit...

  11. Ethanolamine and phosphoethanolamine inhibit mitochondrial function in vitro: implications for mitochondrial dysfunction hypothesis in depression and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S; Renshaw, Perry F

    2004-02-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, including alterations in phospholipid metabolism, might be involved in the pathophysiology of affective illnesses, such as depression and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the phosphomonoester phosphoethanolamine (PE) and the lipid metabolite choline (Cho), which are known to be altered in depression and bipolar disorder, and/or their precursors/metabolites, might directly affect mitochondrial bioenergetic function in vitro. To this end, rates of oxygen consumption in freshly isolated, intact mitochondria were determined polarographically in the presence and absence of PE, Cho, ethanolamine (Etn), glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE), and glycerophosphocholine (GPC). The data demonstrate that PE and Etn inhibit mitochondrial respiratory activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas Cho, GPC, and GPE have no measurable effect on bioenergetic function. This reflects a specific inhibition by Etn and PE on mitochondrial function rather than a more generalized phenomenon induced by similarities in structure between the lipid metabolites. These results also suggest a possible relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and altered phospholipid metabolism in the brains of patients with depression and bipolar disorder.

  12. Addressing RNA Integrity to Determine the Impact of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations on Brain Mitochondrial Function with Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Scheffler, Katja; Esbensen, Ying; Strand, Janne M.; Stewart, James B.; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can result in mitochondrial dysfunction, but emerging experimental data question the fundamental role of mtDNA mutagenesis in age-associated mitochondrial impairment. The multicopy nature of mtDNA renders the impact of a given mtDNA mutation unpredictable. In this study, we compared mtDNA stability and mtRNA integrity during normal aging. Seven distinct sites in mouse brain mtDNA and corresponding mtRNA were analyzed. Accumulation of mtDNA mutations during aging was highly site-specific. The variation in mutation frequencies overrode the age-mediated increase by more than 100-fold and aging generally did not influence mtDNA mutagenesis. Errors introduced by mtRNA polymerase were also site-dependent and up to two hundred-fold more frequent than mtDNA mutations, and independent of mtDNA mutation frequency. We therefore conclude that mitochondrial transcription fidelity limits the impact of mtDNA mutations. PMID:24819950

  13. Replication stalling by catalytically impaired Twinkle induces mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjoismaki, J.L.; Goffart, S.; Spelbrink, J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been proposed to result from repair of double-strand breaks caused by blockage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. As mtDNA deletions are seen only in post-mitotic tissues, it has been suggested that they are selected out in actively d

  14. Impaired Mitochondrial Respiration in Large Cerebral Arteries of Rats with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdzo, Ivan; Rutkai, Ibolya; Sure, Venkata N L R; McNulty, Catherine A; Katakam, Prasad V G; Busija, David W

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested as a potential underlying cause of pathological conditions associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We have previously shown that mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial protein levels were similar in the large cerebral arteries of insulin-resistant Zucker obese rats and their lean controls. In this study, we extend our investigations into the mitochondrial dynamics of the cerebral vasculature of 14-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty obese (ZDFO) rats with early T2DM. Body weight and blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the ZDFO group, and basal mitochondrial respiration and proton leak were significantly decreased in the large cerebral arteries of the ZDFO rats compared with the lean controls (ZDFL). The expression of the mitochondrial proteins total manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) were significantly lower in the cerebral microvessels, and acetylated MnSOD levels were significantly reduced in the large arteries of the ZDFO group. Additionally, superoxide production was significantly increased in the microvessels of the ZDFO group. Despite evidence of increased oxidative stress in ZDFO, exogenous SOD was not able to restore mitochondrial respiration in the ZDFO rats. Our results show, for the first time, that mitochondrial respiration and protein levels are compromised during the early stages of T2DM. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Loss of the SIN3 transcriptional corepressor results in aberrant mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüttemann Maik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SIN3 is a transcriptional repressor protein known to regulate many genes, including a number of those that encode mitochondrial components. Results By monitoring RNA levels, we find that loss of SIN3 in Drosophila cultured cells results in up-regulation of not only nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes, but also those encoded by the mitochondrial genome. The up-regulation of gene expression is accompanied by a perturbation in ATP levels in SIN3-deficient cells, suggesting that the changes in mitochondrial gene expression result in altered mitochondrial activity. In support of the hypothesis that SIN3 is necessary for normal mitochondrial function, yeast sin3 null mutants exhibit very poor growth on non-fermentable carbon sources and show lower levels of ATP and reduced respiration rates. Conclusions The findings that both yeast and Drosophila SIN3 affect mitochondrial activity suggest an evolutionarily conserved role for SIN3 in the control of cellular energy production.

  16. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  17. Aeromonas caviae alters the cytosolic and mitochondrial creatine kinase activities in experimentally infected silver catfish: Impairment on renal bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Júnior, Guerino B; Verdi, Camila Marina; Moreira, Karen L S; da Rocha, Maria Izabel U M; da Veiga, Marcelo L; Santos, Roberto C V; Vizzotto, Bruno S; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2017-09-01

    Cytosolic and mitochondrial creatine kinases (CK), through the creatine kinase-phosphocreatine (CK/PCr) system, provide a temporal and spatial energy buffer to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. However, the effects of bacterial infections on the kidney remain poorly understood and are limited only to histopathological analyses. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of cytosolic and mitochondrial CK activities in renal energetic homeostasis in silver catfish experimentally infected with Aeromonas caviae. Cytosolic CK activity decreased in infected animals, while mitochondrial CK activity increased compared to uninfected animals. Moreover, the activity of the sodium-potassium pump (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase) decreased in infected animals compared to uninfected animals. Based on this evidence, it can be concluded that the inhibition of cytosolic CK activity by A. caviae causes an impairment on renal energy homeostasis through the depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. This contributes to the inhibition of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, although the mitochondrial CK activity acted in an attempt to restore the cytosolic ATP levels through a feedback mechanism. In summary, A. caviae infection causes a severe energetic imbalance in infected silver catfish, which may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue-Specific Effects of Bariatric Surgery Including Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N. Dankel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the molecular links between obesity and disease is potentially of great benefit for society. In this paper we discuss proposed mechanisms whereby bariatric surgery improves metabolic health, including acute effects on glucose metabolism and long-term effects on metabolic tissues (adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver and mitochondrial function. More short-term randomized controlled trials should be performed that include simultaneous measurement of metabolic parameters in different tissues, such as tissue gene expression, protein profile, and lipid content. By directly comparing different surgical procedures using a wider array of metabolic parameters, one may further unravel the mechanisms of aberrant metabolic regulation in obesity and related disorders.

  19. Hijacking mitochondria: bacterial toxins that modulate mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Tong, Janette; Gabriel, Kipros

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial infection has enormous global social and economic impacts stemming from effects on human health and agriculture. Although there are still many unanswered questions, decades of research has uncovered many of the pathogenic mechanisms at play. It is now clear that bacterial pathogens produce a plethora of proteins known as "toxins" and "effectors" that target a variety of physiological host processes during the course of infection. One of the targets of host targeted bacterial toxins and effectors are the mitochondria. The mitochondrial organelles are major players in many biological functions, including energy conversion to ATP and cell death pathways, which inherently makes them targets for bacterial proteins. We present a summary of the toxins targeted to mitochondria and for those that have been studied in finer detail, we also summarize what we know about the mechanisms of targeting and finally their action at the organelle.

  20. Mitochondrial function in neuronal cells depends on p97/VCP/Cdc48-mediated quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eFang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining mitochondrial function is essential for neuronal survival and offers protection against neurodegeneration. Ubiquitin-mediated, proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the form of outer mitochondrial membrane associated degradation (OMMAD was shown to play roles in maintenance of mitochondria on the level of proteostasis, but also mitophagy and cell death. Recently, the AAA-ATPase p97/VCP/Cdc48 was recognized as part of OMMAD acting as retrotranslocase of ubiquitinated mitochondrial proteins for proteasomal degradation. Thus, p97 likely plays a major role in mitochondrial maintenance. Support for this notion comes from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD caused by p97 mutation. Using SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing p97 or dominant-negative p97QQ treated with mitochondrial toxins rotenone, 6-OHDA, or Aβ-peptide as model for neuronal cells suffering from mitochondrial dysfunction, we found mitochondrial fragmentation under normal and stress conditions was significantly increased upon inactivation of p97. Furthermore, inactivation of p97 resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Under additional stress conditions, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS production was even more pronounced. Loss of mitochondrial fidelity upon inactivation of p97 was likely due to disturbed maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis as the employed treatments neither induced mitophagy nor cell death. This was supported by the accumulation of oxidatively-damaged proteins on mitochondria in response to p97 inactivation. Dysfunction of p97 under normal and stress conditions in neuron-like cells severely impacts mitochondrial function, thus supporting for the first time a role for p97 as a major component of mitochondrial

  1. Glutamatergic Neurotransmission Links Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics with Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimin, Pavel I; Woods, Christian B; Quintana, Albert; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Morgan, Philip G; Sedensky, Margaret M

    2016-08-22

    An enigma of modern medicine has persisted for over 150 years. The mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics (VAs) produce their effects (loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and immobility) remain an unsolved mystery. Many attractive putative molecular targets have failed to produce a significant effect when genetically tested in whole-animal models [1-3]. However, mitochondrial defects increase VA sensitivity in diverse organisms from nematodes to humans [4-6]. Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mice lack a subunit of mitochondrial complex I and are strikingly hypersensitive to VAs yet resistant to the intravenous anesthetic ketamine [7]. The change in VA sensitivity is the largest reported for a mammal. Limiting NDUFS4 loss to a subset of glutamatergic neurons recapitulates the VA hypersensitivity of Ndufs4(KO) mice, while loss in GABAergic or cholinergic neurons does not. Baseline electrophysiologic function of CA1 pyramidal neurons does not differ between Ndufs4(KO) and control mice. Isoflurane concentrations that anesthetize only Ndufs4(KO) mice (0.6%) decreased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) only in Ndufs4(KO) CA1 neurons, while concentrations effective in control mice (1.2%) decreased sEPSC frequencies in both control and Ndufs4(KO) CA1 pyramidal cells. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were not differentially affected between genotypes. The effects of isoflurane were similar on evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) in KO and control hippocampal slices. We propose that CA1 presynaptic excitatory neurotransmission is hypersensitive to isoflurane in Ndufs4(KO) mice due to the inhibition of pre-existing reduced complex I function, reaching a critical reduction that can no longer meet metabolic demands.

  2. Effect of fluoroquinolones on mitochondrial function in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Hany; Jörns, Anne; Rustenbeck, Ingo

    2014-02-14

    Hyper- and hypoglycaemias are known side effects of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, resulting in a number of fatalities. Fluoroquinolone-induced hypoglycaemias are due to stimulated insulin release by the inhibition of the KATP channel activity of the beta cell. Recently, it was found that fluoroquinolones were much less effective on metabolically intact beta cells than on open cell preparations. Thus the intracellular effects of gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin were investigated by measuring NAD(P)H- and FAD-autofluorescence, the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the adenine nucleotide content of isolated pancreatic islets and beta cells. 100 μM of moxifloxacin abolished the NAD(P)H increase elicited by 20mM glucose, while gatifloxacin diminished it and ciprofloxacin had no significant effect. This pattern was also seen with islets from SUR1 Ko mice, which have no functional KATP channels. Moxifloxacin also diminished the glucose-induced decrease of FAD-fluorescence, which reflects the intramitochondrial production of reducing equivalents. Moxifloxacin, but not ciprofloxacin or gatifloxacin significantly reduced the effect of 20mM glucose on the ATP/ADP ratio. The mitochondrial hyperpolarization caused by 20mM glucose was partially antagonized by moxifloxacin, but not by ciprofloxacin or gatifloxacin. Ultrastructural analyses after 20 h tissue culture showed that all three compounds (at 10 and 100 μM) diminished the number of insulin secretory granules and that gatifloxacin and ciprofloxacin, but not moxifloxacin induced fission/fusion configurations of the beta cell mitochondria. In conclusion, fluoroquinolones affect the function of the mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells which may diminish the insulinotropic effect of KATP channel closure and contribute to the hyperglycaemic episodes.

  3. Low T3 State Is Correlated with Cardiac Mitochondrial Impairments after Ischemia Reperfusion Injury: Evidence from a Proteomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Forini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are major determinants of cell fate in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IR and common effectors of cardio-protective strategies in cardiac ischemic disease. Thyroid hormone homeostasis critically affects mitochondrial function and energy production. Since a low T3 state (LT3S is frequently observed in the post infarction setting, the study was aimed to investigate the relationship between 72 h post IR T3 levels and both the cardiac function and the mitochondrial proteome in a rat model of IR. The low T3 group exhibits the most compromised cardiac performance along with the worst mitochondrial activity. Accordingly, our results show a different remodeling of the mitochondrial proteome in the presence or absence of a LT3S, with alterations in groups of proteins that play a key role in energy metabolism, quality control and regulation of cell death pathways. Overall, our findings highlight a relationship between LT3S in the early post IR and poor cardiac and mitochondrial outcomes, and suggest a potential implication of thyroid hormone in the cardio-protection and tissue remodeling in ischemic disease.

  4. MiADMSA reverses impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism and neuronal apoptotic cell death after arsenic exposure in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Nidhi; Mehta, Ashish; Yadav, Abhishek [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Defence Research and Development Establishment, Gwalior-474 002 (India); Binukumar, B.K.; Gill, Kiran Dip [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160 012 (India); Flora, Swaran J.S., E-mail: sjsflora@hotmail.com [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Defence Research and Development Establishment, Gwalior-474 002 (India)

    2011-11-15

    Arsenicosis, due to contaminated drinking water, is a serious health hazard in terms of morbidity and mortality. Arsenic induced free radicals generated are known to cause cellular apoptosis through mitochondrial driven pathway. In the present study, we investigated the effect of arsenic interactions with various complexes of the electron transport chain and attempted to evaluate if there was any complex preference of arsenic that could trigger apoptosis. We also evaluated if chelation with monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA) could reverse these detrimental effects. Our results indicate that arsenic exposure induced free radical generation in rat neuronal cells, which diminished mitochondrial potential and enzyme activities of all the complexes of the electron transport chain. Moreover, these complexes showed differential responses towards arsenic. These early events along with diminished ATP levels could be co-related with the later events of cytosolic migration of cytochrome c, altered bax/bcl{sub 2} ratio, and increased caspase 3 activity. Although MiADMSA could reverse most of these arsenic-induced altered variables to various extents, DNA damage remained unaffected. Our study for the first time demonstrates the differential effect of arsenic on the complexes leading to deficits in bioenergetics leading to apoptosis in rat brain. However, more in depth studies are warranted for better understanding of arsenic interactions with the mitochondria. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic impairs mitochondrial energy metabolism leading to neuronal apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic differentially affects mitochondrial complexes, I - III and IV being more sensitive than complex II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic-induced apoptosis initiates through ROS generation or impaired [Ca{sup 2+}]i homeostasis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiADMSA reverses arsenic toxicity via intracellular arsenic- chelation, antioxidant

  5. Characteristics and function of cardiac mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedkova, Elena N; Blatter, Lothar A

    2009-02-15

    We used laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye DAF-2 and the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive dyes CM-H(2)DCF and MitoSOX Red to characterize NO and ROS production by mitochondrial NO synthase (mtNOS) in permeabilized cat ventricular myocytes. Stimulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake by exposure to different cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i) = 1, 2 and 5 microm) resulted in a dose-dependent increase of NO production by mitochondria when L-arginine, a substrate for mtNOS, was present. Collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential with the protonophore FCCP or blocking the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter with Ru360 as well as blocking the respiratory chain with rotenone or antimycin A in combination with oligomycin inhibited mitochondrial NO production. In the absence of L-arginine, mitochondrial NO production during stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake was significantly decreased, but accompanied by increase in mitochondrial ROS production. Inhibition of mitochondrial arginase to limit L-arginine availability resulted in 50% inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced ROS production. Both mitochondrial NO and ROS production were blocked by the nNOS inhibitor (4S)-N-(4-amino-5[aminoethyl]aminopentyl)-N'-nitroguanidine and the calmodulin antagonist W-7, while the eNOS inhibitor L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine (L-NIO) or iNOS inhibitor N-(3-aminomethyl)benzylacetamidine, 2HCl (1400W) had no effect. The superoxide dismutase mimetic and peroxynitrite scavenger MnTBAP abolished Ca(2+)-induced ROS generation and increased NO production threefold, suggesting that in the absence of MnTBAP either formation of superoxide radicals suppressed NO production or part of the formed NO was transformed quickly to peroxynitrite. In the absence of L-arginine, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), which was blocked by the PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A and Mn

  6. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2 protects against streptozotocin-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy: role of GSK3β and mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yingmei

    2012-04-01

    acted against diabetes-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ dysregulation, possibly through regulation of apoptosis, glycogen synthase kinase-3β activation and mitochondrial function independent of the global metabolic profile.

  7. Early Myocardial Dysfunction is Not Caused by Mitochondrial Abnormalities in a Rat Model of Peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeding, Lonneke; van der Laarse, Willem J.; van Veelen, Toke A.; Lamberts, Regis R.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Plotz, Frans B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections are prone to develop multiple organ failure, including myocardial dysfunction. We hypothesized that early dysfunction during sepsis is associated with inflammation, mitochondrial injury, impaired mitochondrial function, and activation

  8. The efficiency of functional mitochondrial replacement in Saccharomyces species has directional character

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulo, P.; Spirek, M.; Soltesova, A.;

    2003-01-01

    Optimal interactions among nuclear and mitochondria-coded proteins are required to assemble functional complexes of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The communication between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes has been studied by transplacement of mitochondria from related species...... into mutants devoid of mitochondrial DNA (rho(0)). Recently we have reported that the mitochondria transferred from Saccharomyces paradoxus restored partially the respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae rho(0) mutants. Here we present evidence that the S. cerevisiae mitochondria completely salvage from...

  9. Protocatechuic acid protects brain mitochondrial function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaming, Yoswaris; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Pintana, Hiranya; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-10-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in diabetic animals with neurodegeneration. Protocatechuic acid (PCA), a major metabolite of anthocyanin, has been shown to exert glycemic control and oxidative stress reduction in the heart. However, its effects on oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in the brain under diabetic condition have never been investigated. We found that PCA exerted glycemic control, attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction, and contributes to the prevention of brain oxidative stress in diabetic rats.

  10. Centella asiatica Attenuates D-Galactose-Induced Cognitive Impairment, Oxidative and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    l (D-galactose. Centella asiatica also attenuated enhanced acetylcholine esterase enzyme level in D-galactose senescence mice. Present study highlights the protective effect of Centella asiatica against D-galactose induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

  11. Accumulation of lactate in the rat brain during hyperammonaemia is not associated with impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Anne Møller; Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2017-01-01

    acid cycle, uncouplers and inhibitors of the mitochondrial complexes were successively added to investigate the mitochondrial function in detail. In a separate dose-response experiment cortex from healthy rats was incubated for 120 min in ammonium acetate in concentrations up to 80 mM prior...... with respirometry in animal models of hyperammonaemia. Wistar rats with systemic inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide or liver insufficiency induced by 90% hepatectomy were given ammonium or sodium acetate for 120 min. A cerebral cortex homogenate was studied with respirometry and substrates of the citric...

  12. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function.

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    Byung Geun Ha

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action.

  13. Functional impairment, stress, and psychosocial intervention in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklowitz, David J

    2011-12-01

    The longitudinal course of bipolar disorder (BD) is highly impairing. This article reviews recent research on functional impairment in the course of BD, the roles of social and intrafamilial stress in relapse and recovery, and the role of adjunctive psychosocial interventions in reducing risk and enhancing functioning. Comparative findings in adult and childhood BD are highlighted. Life events and family-expressed emotion have emerged as significant predictors of the course of BD. Studies of social information processing suggest that impairments in the recognition of facial emotions may characterize both adult- and early-onset bipolar patients. Newly developed psychosocial interventions, particularly those that focus on family and social relationships, are associated with more rapid recovery from episodes and better psychosocial functioning. Family-based psychoeducational approaches are promising as early interventions for children with BD or children at risk of developing the disorder. For adults, interpersonal therapy, mindfulness-based strategies, and cognitive remediation may offer promise in enhancing functioning.

  14. Hepatic mitochondrial function analysis using needle liver biopsy samples.

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    Michael J J Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS AND AIM: Current assessment of pre-operative liver function relies upon biochemical blood tests and histology but these only indirectly measure liver function. Mitochondrial function (MF analysis allows direct measurement of cellular metabolic function and may provide an additional index of hepatic health. Conventional MF analysis requires substantial tissue samples (>100 mg obtained at open surgery. Here we report a method to assess MF using <3 mg of tissue obtained by a Tru-cut® biopsy needle making it suitable for percutaneous application. METHODS: An 18G Bard® Max-core® biopsy instrument was used to collect samples. The optimal Tru-cut® sample weight, stability in ice-cold University of Wisconsin solution, reproducibility and protocol utility was initially evaluated in Wistar rat livers then confirmed in human samples. MF was measured in saponin-permeabilized samples using high-resolution respirometry. RESULTS: The average mass of a single rat and human liver Tru-cut® biopsy was 5.60±0.30 and 5.16±0.15 mg, respectively (mean; standard error of mean. Two milligram of sample was found the lowest feasible mass for the MF assay. Tissue MF declined after 1 hour of cold storage. Six replicate measurements within rats and humans (n = 6 each showed low coefficient of variation (<10% in measurements of State-III respiration, electron transport chain (ETC capacity and respiratory control ratio (RCR. Ischemic rat and human liver samples consistently showed lower State-III respiration, ETC capacity and RCR, compared to normal perfused liver samples. CONCLUSION: Consistent measurement of liver MF and detection of derangement in a disease state was successfully demonstrated using less than half the tissue from a single Tru-cut® biopsy. Using this technique outpatient assessment of liver MF is now feasible, providing a new assay for the evaluation of hepatic function.

  15. Predictors of functional disability in mild cognitive impairment and dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, M. E.; Koek, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Knowledge about factors predicting functional disability in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia would help health care providers to identify those patients who are at high risk of functional disability. Previous research is scarce and focused on only a small number of possible pre

  16. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in…

  17. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

  18. Regulation of mitochondrial morphology and function by stearoylation of TFR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyilmaz, Deniz; Virtue, Sam; Xu, Xiaojun; Tan, Chong Yew; Griffin, Julian L; Miller, Aubry K; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Teleman, Aurelio A

    2015-09-03

    Mitochondria are involved in a variety of cellular functions, including ATP production, amino acid and lipid biogenesis and breakdown, signalling and apoptosis. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and ageing. Although transcriptional mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial abundance are known, comparatively little is known about how mitochondrial function is regulated. Here we identify the metabolite stearic acid (C18:0) and human transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1; also known as TFRC) as mitochondrial regulators. We elucidate a signalling pathway whereby C18:0 stearoylates TFR1, thereby inhibiting its activation of JNK signalling. This leads to reduced ubiquitination of mitofusin via HUWE1, thereby promoting mitochondrial fusion and function. We find that animal cells are poised to respond to both increases and decreases in C18:0 levels, with increased C18:0 dietary intake boosting mitochondrial fusion in vivo. Intriguingly, dietary C18:0 supplementation can counteract the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by genetic defects such as loss of the Parkinson's disease genes Pink or Parkin in Drosophila. This work identifies the metabolite C18:0 as a signalling molecule regulating mitochondrial function in response to diet.

  19. The role of recovery of mitochondrial structure and function in desiccation tolerance of pea seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Møller, Ian Max;

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial repair is of fundamental importance for seed germination. When mature orthodox seeds are imbibed and germinated, they lose their desiccation tolerance in parallel. To gain a better understanding of this process, we studied the recovery of mitochondrial structure and function in pea...

  20. Mitochondrial functional state impacts spontaneous neocortical activity and resting state FMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraju G Sanganahalli

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake, central to neural metabolism and function, is diminished in aging whereas enhanced after acute/sub-acute traumatic brain injury. To develop relevant translational models for these neuropathologies, we determined the impact of perturbed mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacities on intrinsic brain activity using clinically relevant markers. From a multi-compartment estimate of probable baseline Ca(2+ ranges in the brain, we hypothesized that reduced or enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity would decrease or increase spontaneous neuronal activity respectively. As resting state fMRI-BOLD fluctuations and stimulus-evoked BOLD responses have similar physiological origins [1] and stimulus-evoked neuronal and hemodynamic responses are modulated by mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity [2], [3] respectively, we tested our hypothesis by measuring hemodynamic fluctuations and spontaneous neuronal activities during normal and altered mitochondrial functional states. Mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity was perturbed by pharmacologically inhibiting or enhancing the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter (mCU activity. Neuronal electrical activity and cerebral blood flow (CBF fluctuations were measured simultaneously and integrated with fMRI-BOLD fluctuations at 11.7T. mCU inhibition reduced spontaneous neuronal activity and the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC, whereas mCU enhancement increased spontaneous neuronal activity but reduced RSFC. We conclude that increased or decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacities lead to diminished resting state modes of brain functional connectivity.

  1. Changed mitochondrial function by pre- and/or postpartum diet alterations in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Wenche; Gam, Christiane Marie Bourgin; Andersen, Jesper Løvind

    2009-01-01

    ) for the first 6 mo of life. We examined mitochondrial function in permeabilized muscle fibers from the lambs at 6 mo of age (adolescence) and after 24 mo of age (adulthood). The postpartum H diet for the lambs induced an approximately 30% increase (P mitochondrial VO(2max) and an approximately 50...

  2. Treatment Concerns and Functional Impairment in Pediatric Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Monica S; Salloum, Alison; Lewin, Adam B; Selles, Robert R; McBride, Nicole M; Crawford, Erika A; Storch, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    Although there are efficacious, evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders, youth often experience delays in seeking therapy. Myriad reasons may contribute to this lag in treatment initiation, with some youth possessing concerns about therapy. Treatment concerns are broadly characterized by worries/ambivalence about seeking treatment, including concerns about the negative reactions, consequences, and inconvenience of treatment. As no studies exist for youth with anxiety disorders, this study examined the phenomenology of treatment concerns in 119 treatment-seeking, anxious youth and utilized a structural equation model to examine the relationship between child anxiety, depressive symptoms, treatment concerns, and anxiety-related functional impairment. Over 90 % of the children positively endorsed some type of treatment-related fear, with the most frequently expressed concern being that therapy would take too much time (50.4 %). Based on the model, both child anxiety and depressive symptoms predicted functional impairment, and treatment concerns mediated the relationship between child anxiety and functional impairment.

  3. [Cannabis use and impairment of respiratory function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G; Meurice, J-C

    2013-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in many countries including France. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but in our country it is mainly smoked in the form of cannabis resin mixed with tobacco. The technique of inhaling cannabis differs from that of tobacco, increasing the time that the smoke spends in contact with the bronchial mucosal and its impact on respiratory function. One cigarette composed of cannabis and tobacco is much more harmful than a cigarette containing only tobacco. In cannabis smokers there is an increased incidence of respiratory symptoms and episodes of acute bronchitis. Cannabis produces a rapid bronchodilator effect; chronic use provokes a reduction in specific conductance and increase in airways resistance. Studies on the decline of Forced Expiratory Volume are discordant. Cannabis smoke and tetrahydrocannabinol irritate the bronchial tree. They bring about histological signs of airways inflammation and alter the fungicidal and antibacterial activity of alveolar macrophages. Inhalation of cannabis smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Stopping smoking cannabis will bring about important benefits for lung function. This should encourage clinicians to offer patients support in quitting smoking.

  4. Xanthoceraside Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunction Contributing to the Improvement of Learning and Memory Impairment in Mice with Intracerebroventricular Injection of Aβ1-42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Fei Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of xanthoceraside on learning and memory impairment were investigated and the possible mechanism associated with the protection of mitochondria was also preliminarily explored in Alzheimer’s disease (AD mice model induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection of Aβ1-42. The results indicated that xanthoceraside (0.08–0.32 mg/kg significantly improved learning and memory impairment in Morris water maze test and Y-maze test. Xanthoceraside significantly reversed the aberrant decrease of ATP levels and attenuated the abnormal increase of ROS levels both in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in mice injected with Aβ1-42. Moreover, xanthoceraside dose dependently reversed the decrease of COX, PDHC, and KGDHC activity in isolated cerebral cortex mitochondria of the mice compared with Aβ1-42 injected model mice. In conclusion, xanthoceraside could improve learning and memory impairment, promote the function of mitochondria, decrease the production of ROS, and inhibit oxidative stress. The improvement effects on mitochondria may be through withstanding the damage of Aβ to mitochondrial respiratory chain and the key enzymes in Kreb’s cycle. Therefore, the results from present study and previous study indicate that xanthoceraside could be a competitive candidate for the treatment of AD.

  5. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  6. Dietary phosphorus acutely impairs endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuto, Emi; Taketani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Rieko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Isshiki, Masashi; Sato, Minako; Nashiki, Kunitaka; Amo, Kikuko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Higashi, Yukihito; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-07-01

    Excessive dietary phosphorus may increase cardiovascular risk in healthy individuals as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are not completely understood. To determine whether postprandial hyperphosphatemia may promote endothelial dysfunction, we investigated the acute effect of phosphorus loading on endothelial function in vitro and in vivo. Exposing bovine aortic endothelial cells to a phosphorus load increased production of reactive oxygen species, which depended on phosphorus influx via sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, and decreased nitric oxide production via inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Phosphorus loading inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation of rat aortic rings. In 11 healthy men, we alternately served meals containing 400 mg or 1200 mg of phosphorus in a double-blind crossover study and measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery before and 2 h after the meals. The high dietary phosphorus load increased serum phosphorus at 2 h and significantly decreased flow-mediated dilation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated inversely with serum phosphorus. Taken together, these findings suggest that endothelial dysfunction mediated by acute postprandial hyperphosphatemia may contribute to the relationship between serum phosphorus level and the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  7. Hypercholesterolemia impaired sperm functionality in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania E Saez Lancellotti

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR. Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a "folded head"-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events.

  8. Deletion of the Mitochondrial Flavoprotein Apoptosis Inducing Factor (AIF) Induces β-Cell Apoptosis and Impairs β-Cell Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulthess, Fabienne T.; Katz, Sophie; Ardestani, Amin; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Georgia, Senta; Bosco, Domenico; Bhushan, Anil; Maedler, Kathrin

    2009-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is a hallmark of β-cell death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Understanding how apoptosis contributes to β-cell turnover may lead to strategies to prevent progression of diabetes. A key mediator of apoptosis, mitochondrial function, and cell survival is apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). In the present study, we investigated the role of AIF on β-cell mass and survival using the Harlequin (Hq) mutant mice, which are hypomorphic for AIF. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistochemical evaluation of pancreata from Hq mutant mice displayed much smaller islets compared to wild-type mice (WT). Analysis of β-cell mass in these mice revealed a greater than 4-fold reduction in β-cell mass together with an 8-fold increase in β-cell apoptosis. Analysis of cell cycle dynamics, using BrdU pulse as a marker for cells in S-phase, did not detect significant differences in the frequency of β-cells in S-phase. In contrast, double staining for phosphorylated Histone H3 and insulin showed a 3-fold increase in β-cells in the G2 phase in Hq mutant mice, but no differences in M-phase compared to WT mice. This suggests that the β-cells from Hq mutant mice are arrested in the G2 phase and are unlikely to complete the cell cycle. β-cells from Hq mutant mice display increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis, which was confirmed in human islets in which AIF was depleted by siRNA. AIF deficiency had no effect on glucose stimulated insulin secretion, but the impaired effect of hydrogen peroxide on β-cell function was potentiated. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that AIF is essential for maintaining β-cell mass and for oxidative stress response. A decrease in the oxidative phosphorylation capacity may counteract the development of diabetes, despite its deleterious effects on β-cell survival. PMID:19197367

  9. Deletion of the mitochondrial flavoprotein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF induces beta-cell apoptosis and impairs beta-cell mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne T Schulthess

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is a hallmark of beta-cell death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Understanding how apoptosis contributes to beta-cell turnover may lead to strategies to prevent progression of diabetes. A key mediator of apoptosis, mitochondrial function, and cell survival is apoptosis inducing factor (AIF. In the present study, we investigated the role of AIF on beta-cell mass and survival using the Harlequin (Hq mutant mice, which are hypomorphic for AIF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemical evaluation of pancreata from Hq mutant mice displayed much smaller islets compared to wild-type mice (WT. Analysis of beta-cell mass in these mice revealed a greater than 4-fold reduction in beta-cell mass together with an 8-fold increase in beta-cell apoptosis. Analysis of cell cycle dynamics, using BrdU pulse as a marker for cells in S-phase, did not detect significant differences in the frequency of beta-cells in S-phase. In contrast, double staining for phosphorylated Histone H3 and insulin showed a 3-fold increase in beta-cells in the G2 phase in Hq mutant mice, but no differences in M-phase compared to WT mice. This suggests that the beta-cells from Hq mutant mice are arrested in the G2 phase and are unlikely to complete the cell cycle. beta-cells from Hq mutant mice display increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis, which was confirmed in human islets in which AIF was depleted by siRNA. AIF deficiency had no effect on glucose stimulated insulin secretion, but the impaired effect of hydrogen peroxide on beta-cell function was potentiated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that AIF is essential for maintaining beta-cell mass and for oxidative stress response. A decrease in the oxidative phosphorylation capacity may counteract the development of diabetes, despite its deleterious effects on beta-cell survival.

  10. Effects of the Czech Propolis on Sperm Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Cedikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a natural product that honeybees collect from various plants. It is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of propolis on human sperm motility, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and membrane potential. Semen samples from 10 normozoospermic donors were processed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Propolis effects on the sperm motility and mitochondrial activity parameters were tested in the fresh ejaculate and purified spermatozoa. Propolis preserved progressive motility of spermatozoa in the native semen samples. Oxygen consumption determined in purified permeabilized spermatozoa by high-resolution respirometry in the presence of adenosine diphosphate and substrates of complex I and complex II (state OXPHOSI+II was significantly increased in the propolis-treated samples. Propolis also increased uncoupled respiration in the presence of rotenone (state ETSII and complex IV activity, but it did not influence state LEAK induced by oligomycin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was not affected by propolis. This study demonstrates that propolis maintains sperm motility in the native ejaculates and increases activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and IV without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. The data suggest that propolis improves the total mitochondrial respiratory efficiency in the human spermatozoa in vitro thereby having potential to improve sperm motility.

  11. Impact of Cold Ischemia on Mitochondrial Function in Porcine Hearts and Blood Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Schachner, Thomas; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Dorn, Melissa; Andreas, Martin; Kocher, Alfred; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of cold storage using Custodiol® (Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate, HTK) or isotonic saline solution on mitochondrial function in hearts (left and rights ventricles) and various blood vessels of pigs were investigated. Hearts, saphenous veins, internal-mammary-arteries and aortas of male landrace pigs were harvested and exposed to cold ischemia in either saline or Custodiol-HTK solution. Mitochondrial function was measured in situ in permeabilized fibers by high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiratory capacities (maximal respiration rates) were similar in the right and left ventricle in controls and after 14 h of cold storage were significantly better preserved in Custodiol-HTK than in saline solution. Mitochondrial respiration rates in various blood vessels including aorta, arteries and veins were less than 5% of myocardium rates. In contrast to the pig heart, in some blood vessels, like veins, mitochondrial function remained stable even after 24 h of cold ischemia. HTK-Custodiol protection of mitochondrial function after prolonged cold ischemia was observed in the myocardium but not in blood vessels. HTK-Custodiol solution thus offers significant protection of myocardial mitochondria against cold ischemic injury and can be used as efficient preservation solution in organ transplantation but probably has no benefit for blood vessels preservation. Analysis of mitochondrial function can be used as a valuable approach for the assessment of cold ischemic injury in various tissues including pig heart and various blood vessels. PMID:24213604

  12. Impact of Cold Ischemia on Mitochondrial Function in Porcine Hearts and Blood Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Kuznetsov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cold storage using Custodiol® (Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate, HTK or isotonic saline solution on mitochondrial function in hearts (left and rights ventricles and various blood vessels of pigs were investigated. Hearts, saphenous veins, internal-mammary-arteries and aortas of male landrace pigs were harvested and exposed to cold ischemia in either saline or Custodiol-HTK solution. Mitochondrial function was measured in situ in permeabilized fibers by high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiratory capacities (maximal respiration rates were similar in the right and left ventricle in controls and after 14 h of cold storage were significantly better preserved in Custodiol-HTK than in saline solution. Mitochondrial respiration rates in various blood vessels including aorta, arteries and veins were less than 5% of myocardium rates. In contrast to the pig heart, in some blood vessels, like veins, mitochondrial function remained stable even after 24 h of cold ischemia. HTK-Custodiol protection of mitochondrial function after prolonged cold ischemia was observed in the myocardium but not in blood vessels. HTK-Custodiol solution thus offers significant protection of myocardial mitochondria against cold ischemic injury and can be used as efficient preservation solution in organ transplantation but probably has no benefit for blood vessels preservation. Analysis of mitochondrial function can be used as a valuable approach for the assessment of cold ischemic injury in various tissues including pig heart and various blood vessels.

  13. Tactile and proprioceptive temporal discrimination are impaired in functional tremor.

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    Michele Tinazzi

    Full Text Available In order to obtain further information on the pathophysiology of functional tremor, we assessed tactile discrimination threshold and proprioceptive temporal discrimination motor threshold values in 11 patients with functional tremor, 11 age- and sex-matched patients with essential tremor and 13 healthy controls.Tactile discrimination threshold in both the right and left side was significantly higher in patients with functional tremor than in the other groups. Proprioceptive temporal discrimination threshold for both right and left side was significantly higher in patients with functional and essential tremor than in healthy controls. No significant correlation between discrimination thresholds and duration or severity of tremor was found.Temporal processing of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli is impaired in patients with functional tremor. The mechanisms underlying this impaired somatosensory processing and possible ways to apply these findings clinically merit further research.

  14. Mutated ND2 impairs mitochondrial complex I assembly and leads to Leigh syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugalde, C.; Hinttala, R.; Timal, S.; Smeets, R.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Uusimaa, J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Majamaa, K.; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel mitochondrial ND2 mutation (T4681C) in a patient presenting with Leigh Syndrome. Biochemical analyses revealed a low isolated complex I activity in patient's fibroblasts, blood and skeletal muscle. Mutant transmitochondrial cybrid clones retained the specific complex I defect,

  15. Yeast mitochondrial protein-protein interactions reveal diverse complexes and disease-relevant functional relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ke; Musso, Gabriel; Vlasblom, James; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Negroni, Jacopo; Mosca, Roberto; Malty, Ramy; Nguyen-Tran, Diem-Hang; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Minic, Zoran; Freywald, Tanya; Phanse, Sadhna; Xiang, Qian; Freywald, Andrew; Aloy, Patrick; Zhang, Zhaolei; Babu, Mohan

    2015-02-06

    Although detailed, focused, and mechanistic analyses of associations among mitochondrial proteins (MPs) have identified their importance in varied biological processes, a systematic understanding of how MPs function in concert both with one another and with extra-mitochondrial proteins remains incomplete. Consequently, many questions regarding the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human disease remain unanswered. To address this, we compiled all existing mitochondrial physical interaction data for over 1200 experimentally defined yeast MPs and, through bioinformatic analysis, identified hundreds of heteromeric MP complexes having extensive associations both within and outside the mitochondria. We provide support for these complexes through structure prediction analysis, morphological comparisons of deletion strains, and protein co-immunoprecipitation. The integration of these MP complexes with reported genetic interaction data reveals substantial crosstalk between MPs and non-MPs and identifies novel factors in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial organization, membrane structure, and mitochondrial lipid homeostasis. More than one-third of these MP complexes are conserved in humans, with many containing members linked to clinical pathologies, enabling us to identify genes with putative disease function through guilt-by-association. Although still remaining incomplete, existing mitochondrial interaction data suggests that the relevant molecular machinery is modular, yet highly integrated with non-mitochondrial processes.

  16. Time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function after acute spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang Jia; Gang Li; Zhen-yu Zhang; Hao-tian Li; Ji-quan Wang; Zhong-kai Fan; Gang Lv

    2016-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial morphology and function play an important role in secondary damage after acute spinal cord injury. We re-corded the time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function in rats with acute spinal cord injury. Results showed that mitochondria had an irregular shape, and increased in size. Mitochondrial cristae were disordered and mitochondrial membrane rupture was visible at 2–24 hours after injury. Fusion protein mitofusin 1 expression gradually increased, peaked at 8 hours after injury, and then decreased to its lowest level at 24 hours. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1, amitochondrial ifssion protein, showed the opposite kinetics. At 2–24 hours after acute spinal cord injury, malondialdehyde content, cytochrome c levels and caspase-3 expression were in-creased, but glutathione content, adenosine triphosphate content, Na+-K+-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential were gradually reduced. Furthermore, mitochondrial morphology altered during the acute stage of spinal cord injury. Fusion was important within the ifrst 8 hours, but ifssion played a key role at 24 hours. Oxidative stress was inhibited, biological productivity was diminished, and mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability were reduced in the acute stage of injury. In summary, mitochondrial apoptosis is activated when the time of spinal cord injury is prolonged.

  17. Cyclophilin D deficiency improves mitochondrial function and learning/memory in aging Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Heng; Guo, Lan; Zhang, Wensheng; Rydzewska, Monika; Yan, Shidu

    2011-03-01

    Mitochondrial stress is one of the early features of Alzheimer disease (AD). Mitochondrial Aβ has been linked to mitochondrial toxicity. Our recent study demonstrated that cyclophilin D (CypD) mediated mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is an important mechanism for neuronal and synaptic stress induced by both Aβ and oxidative stress. In transgenic AD-type mice overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ (mAPP), CypD deficiency improves mitochondrial and synaptic function and learning/memory up to 12 months old. Here we provide evidence of the protective effects of CypD deficiency in aged AD mice (22-24 months). Cyp D deficient mAPP mice demonstrate less calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling, increased mitochondrial calcium uptake capacity, preserved mitochondrial respiratory function and improved spatial learning/memory even in old age (known to be the age for late stage AD pathology and synaptic dysfunction). These data demonstrate that abrogation of CypD results in persistent life-long protection against Aβ toxicity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, thereby suggesting that blockade of CypD may be of benefit for Alzheimer disease treatment.

  18. Executive Functioning in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lucy A.; Messer, David J.; Nash, Gilly

    2012-01-01

    Background: A limited range of evidence suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulties with higher order thinking and reasoning skills (executive functioning, EF). This study involved a comprehensive investigation of EF in this population taking into account the contributions of age, nonverbal IQ and verbal…

  19. Executive Function Impairments in High IQ Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas E.; Reichel, Philipp C.; Quinlan, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate that high IQ adults diagnosed with ADHD suffer from executive function (EF) impairments that: a) can be identified with a combination of standardized measures and self-report data; and b) occur more commonly in this group than in the general population. Method: 157 ADHD adults with IQ greater than or equal to 120 were…

  20. Executive function behaviours in children with specific language impairment (SLI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, J.M.; Vugs, B.A.M.; Scheper, A.R.; Hendriks, M.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that linguistic and non-linguistic factors may contribute to the problems associated with specific language impairment (SLI). One factor that has been implicated is executive functioning (EF). Most studies investigating EF in children with SLI use performance ba

  1. Limb distribution, motor impairment, and functional classification of cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Gorter; P.L. Rosenbaum

    2004-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), limb distribution, and type of motor impairment. Data used were collected in the Ontario Motor Growth study, a longitudinal cohort study with a population-based sample of children with cerebral pals

  2. Diabetes and the impairment of reproductive function: possible role of mitochondria and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Sandra; Oliveira, Paulo J; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM), a state of chronic hyperglycemia, is a major cause of serious micro and macrovascular diseases, affecting, therefore, nearly every system in the body. Growing evidence indicates that oxidative stress is increased in diabetes due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased efficiency of antioxidant defences, a process that starts very early and worsens over the course of the disease. During the development of diabetes, oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA increase with time. Mitochondrial DNA mutations have also been reported in diabetic tissues, suggesting oxidative stress-related mitochondrial damage. Diabetes-related oxidative stress may also be the trigger for many alterations on sexual function, which can also include decreased testicular mitochondrial function. Although sexual disorders have been extensively studied in diabetic men, possible changes in the sexual function of diabetic women have only recently received attention. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic men approaches 50%, whereas in diabetic women it seems to be slightly lower. Testicular dysfunction, impotence, decreased fertility potential and retrograde ejaculations are conditions that have been described in diabetic males. Diabetes is also the most common cause of erectile dysfunction in men. Poor semen quality has also been reported in diabetic men, including decreased sperm motility and concentration, abnormal morphology and increased seminal plasma abnormalities. In addition, diabetic men may have decreased serum testosterone due to impaired Leydig cell function. Among diabetic women neuropathy, vascular impairment and psychological complaints have been implicated in the pathogenesis of decreased libido, low arousability, decreased vaginal lubrication, orgasmic dysfunction, and dyspareunia. An association between the production of excess radical oxygen species and disturbed embryogenesis in diabetic pregnancies has also been suggested

  3. Impact of Resistance Training on Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Content, and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Groennebaek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle metabolic and contractile properties are reliant on muscle mitochondrial and myofibrillar protein turnover. The turnover of these specific protein pools is compromised during disease, aging, and inactivity. Oppositely, exercise can accentuate muscle protein turnover, thereby counteracting decay in muscle function. According to a traditional consensus, endurance exercise is required to drive mitochondrial adaptations, while resistance exercise is required to drive myofibrillar adaptations. However, concurrent practice of traditional endurance exercise and resistance exercise regimens to achieve both types of muscle adaptations is time-consuming, motivationally demanding, and contended to entail practice at intensity levels, that may not comply with clinical settings. It is therefore of principle interest to identify effective, yet feasible, exercise strategies that may positively affect both mitochondrial and myofibrillar protein turnover. Recently, reports indicate that traditional high-load resistance exercise can stimulate muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial respiratory function. Moreover, fatiguing low-load resistance exercise has been shown capable of promoting muscle hypertrophy and expectedly entails greater metabolic stress to potentially enhance mitochondrial adaptations. Consequently, fatiguing low-load resistance exercise regimens may possess the ability to stimulate muscle mitochondrial adaptations without compromising muscle myofibrillar accretion. However, the exact ability of resistance exercise to drive mitochondrial adaptations is debatable, not least due to some methodological challenges. The current review therefore aims to address the evidence on the effects of resistance exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, content and function. In prolongation, a perspective is taken on the specific potential of low-load resistance exercise on promoting mitochondrial adaptations.

  4. Vascular function and mild renal impairment in stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, P; Smilde, TDJ; Buikema, H; Voors, AA; Navis, G; van Veldhuisen, DJ; van Gilst, WH

    2006-01-01

    Objective - In patients with coronary artery disease, the concomitant presence of renal function impairment is associated with decreased survival. We aimed to assess whether in coronary artery diseased patients renal function impairment is associated with systemic vascular function, functional param

  5. FUNCTIONAL IMPAIRMENTS OF GASTROINTESTINAL MOTILITY AND GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT MICROBIOTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Malkoch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional dysmotility is one of the most common evidence of pathology in gastrointestinal tract (GIT. GIT motility regulation is multilevel in nature at the level of central and peripheral nervous system, vegetative nervous system as well as locally directly in the intestinal tract. Gastrointestinal tract microbiota significantly contributes to the local regulation of motility both by forming fecal masses and secreting various metabolites, particularly short chain fatty acids whose composition and number depends on the nutritive factors of microbiota. For normal functioning and metabolism, saprophitic microbiota needs a significant number of undigestible carbohydrates, i.e. prebiotics. Prebiotics are an integral component of the complex therapy for functional impairments of gastrointestinal tract.Key words: gastrointestinal tract, motility, functional impairments, mictobiota, short chain fatty acids, prebiotics, lactulose.

  6. Diabetes mellitus induced impairment of male reproductive functions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangir, Ram Niwas; Jain, Gyan Chand

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents one of the greatest threats to human health all over the world. The incidence of DM is rising rapidly also including children and young persons of reproductive age. Diabetes has been associated with reproductive impairment in both men and women. Diabetes may affect male reproductive functions at multiple levels as a result of its effects on the endocrine control of spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis, sperm maturation, impairment of penile erection and ejaculation. A large number of studies both on diabetic men and experimental diabetic animals have been published on the impact of DM on male reproductive functions during the past few years but many of them have conflicting results. The present review summarizes the research finding of a large number of research papers on the reproductive functions especially on hypothalmo-pituitary-gonadal axis, spermatogenesis, histopathology of testis, synthesis and secretion of testosterone, sperm quality, ejaculatory function and fertility both in diabetic men and experimental diabetic animals.

  7. Erythropoietin treatment enhances mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle

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    Ulla ePlenge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Erythropoietin (Epo treatment has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle along with enhanced mitochondrial capacity in mice. We hypothesized that recombinant human Epo (rhEpo treatment enhances skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS capacity in humans. In six healthy volunteers rhEpo was administered by sub-cutaneous injection over eight weeks with oral iron (100 mg supplementation taken daily. Mitochondrial OXPHOS was quantified by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized muscle fibers obtained from biopsies of the vastus lateralis before and after rhEpo treatment. OXPHOS was determined with the mitochondrial complex I substrates malate, glutamate, pyruvate and complex II substrate succinate in the presence of saturating ADP concentrations, while maximal electron transport capacity (ETS was assessed by addition of an uncoupler. rhEpo treatment increased OXPHOS (from 92±5 to 113±7 pmol.sec-1.mg-1 and ETS (107±4 to 143±14 pmol.sec-1.mg-1, P<0.05, demonstrating that Epo treatment induces an upregulation of OXPHOS and ETS in human skeletal muscle.

  8. Calcium-dependent mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2010-09-01

    Calcium is an extraordinarily versatile signaling ion, encoding cellular responses to a wide variety of external stimuli. In neurons, mitochondria can accumulate enormous amounts of calcium, with the consequence that mitochondrial calcium uptake, sequestration and release play pivotal roles in orchestrating calcium-dependent responses as diverse as gene transcription and cell death. In this review, we consider the basic chemistry of calcium as a 'sticky' cation, which leads to extremely high bound/free ratios, and discuss areas of current interest or controversy. Topics addressed include methodologies for measuring local intracellular calcium, mitochondrial calcium buffering and loading capacity, mitochondrially directed spatial calcium gradients, and the role of calcium overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in glutamate-evoked excitotoxic injury and neurodegeneration. Finally, we consider the relationship between delayed calcium de-regulation, the mitochondrial permeability transition and the generation of reactive oxygen species, and propose a unified view of the 'source specificity' and 'calcium overload' models of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent excitotoxicity. Non-NMDA receptor mechanisms of excitotoxicity are discussed briefly. Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS. No claim to original US government works.

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are supposed to be responsible for many neurodegenerative diseases dominating in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). A growing body of evidence suggests that defects in mitochondrial metabolism and particularly of electron transport chain may play a role in pathogenesis of AD. Structurally and functionally damaged mitochondria do not produce sufficient ATP and are more prominent in producing proapoptotic factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this can be an early stage of several mitochondrial disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunctions may be caused by both mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that code mitochondrial components and by environmental causes. In the following review, common aspects of mitochondrial impairment concerned about neurodegenerative diseases are summarized including ROS production, impaired mitochondrial dynamics, and apoptosis. Also, damaged function of electron transport chain complexes and interactions between pathological proteins and mitochondria are described for AD particularly and marginally for PD and HD.

  10. Overnutrition during lactation leads to impairment in insulin signaling, up-regulation of GLUT1 and increased mitochondrial carbohydrate oxidation in heart of weaned mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Amélia F; Cortez, Erika; Neves, Fabiana A; Vieira, Anatalia K G; Soares, Vivian de M; Rodrigues-Cunha, Alessandra C de S; Andrade, Daniela C; Thole, Alessandra A; Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; Brum, Patricia C; Moura, Aníbal S; Garcia-Souza, Érica P

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that overnutrition during early postnatal period can increase the long-term risk of developing obesity and cardiac disorders, yet the short-term effects of postnatal overfeeding in cardiac metabolism remains unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the cardiac metabolism of weaned mice submitted to overnutrition during lactation, particularly as to mitochondrial function, substrate preference and insulin signaling. Postnatal overfeeding was induced by litter size reduction in mice at postnatal day 3. At 21 days of age (weaning), mice in the overfed group (OG) presented biometric and biochemical parameters of obesity, including increased body weight, visceral fat, liver weight and increased left ventricle weight/tibia length ratio; indicating cardiac hypertrophy, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and increased liver glycogen content compared to control group. In the heart, we detected impaired insulin signaling, mainly due to decreased IRβ, pTyr-IRS1, PI3K, GLUT4 and pAkt/Akt and increased PTP1B, GLUT1 and pAMPKα/AMPKα content. Activities of lactate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase were increased, accompanied by enhanced carbohydrate oxidation, as observed by high-resolution respirometry. Moreover, OG hearts had lower CPT1, PPARα and increased UCP2 mRNA expression, associated with increased oxidative stress (4-HNE content), BAX/BCL2 ratio and cardiac fibrosis. Ultrastructural analysis of OG hearts demonstrated mild mitochondrial damage without alterations in OXPHOS complexes. In conclusion, overnutrition during early life induces short-term metabolic disturbances, impairment in heart insulin signaling, up-regulates GLUT-1 and switch cardiac fuel preference in juvenile mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许民辉; 代文光; 邓洵鼎

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury and the possible mechanism.Methods: The middle degree brain injury in rats was made by BIM-III multi-function impacting machine. The brain mitochondrial respiratory function was measured with oxygen electrode and the ultra-structural changes were observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM).Results: 1. The brain mitochondrial respiratory stage III and respiration control rate reduced significantly in the untreated groups within 24 and 72 hours. But treated Group A showed certain degree of recovery of respiratory function; treated Group B showed further improvement. 2. Untreated Group, treated Groups A and B had different degrees of mitochondrial ultra-structural damage respectively, which could be attenuated after the treatment with magnesium sulfate.Conclusions: The mitochondrial respiratory function decreases significantly after traumatic brain injury. But it can be apparently improved after magnesium sulfate management along with the attenuated damage of mitochondria discovered by TEM. The longer course of treatment can obtain a better improvement of mitochondrial respiratory function.

  12. Bitter taste receptor agonists alter mitochondrial function and induce autophagy in airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shi; Sharma, Pawan; Shah, Sushrut D; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2017-07-01

    Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, is a hallmark feature of asthma and COPD. We previously identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on human ASM cells and demonstrated that known TAS2R agonists could promote ASM relaxation and bronchodilation and inhibit mitogen-induced ASM growth. In this study, we explored cellular mechanisms mediating the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists on human ASM cells. Pretreatment of ASM cells with TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine resulted in inhibition of cell survival, which was largely reversed by bafilomycin A1, an autophagy inhibitor. Transmission electron microscope studies demonstrated the presence of double-membrane autophagosomes and deformed mitochondria. In ASM cells, TAS2R agonists decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation. Inhibiting dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) reversed TAS2R agonist-induced mitochondrial membrane potential change and attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Furthermore, the expression of mitochondrial protein BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) and mitochondrial localization of DLP1 were significantly upregulated by TAS2R agonists. More importantly, inhibiting Bnip3 mitochondrial localization by dominant-negative Bnip3 significantly attenuated cell death induced by TAS2R agonist. Collectively the TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine modulate mitochondrial structure and function, resulting in ASM cell death. Furthermore, Bnip3 plays a central role in TAS2R agonist-induced ASM functional changes via a mitochondrial pathway. These findings further establish the cellular mechanisms of antimitogenic effects of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and pathways that can be targeted to mitigate airway remodeling as well as bronchoconstriction in obstructive airway diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  13. Mechanism of Cisplatin-Induced Cytotoxicity Is Correlated to Impaired Metabolism Due to Mitochondrial ROS Generation.

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    Yong-Min Choi

    Full Text Available The chemotherapeutic use of cisplatin is limited by its severe side effects. In this study, by conducting different omics data analyses, we demonstrated that cisplatin induces cell death in a proximal tubular cell line by suppressing glycolysis- and tricarboxylic acid (TCA/mitochondria-related genes. Furthermore, analysis of the urine from cisplatin-treated rats revealed the lower expression levels of enzymes involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, and genes related to mitochondrial stability and confirmed the cisplatin-related metabolic abnormalities. Additionally, an increase in the level of p53, which directly inhibits glycolysis, has been observed. Inhibition of p53 restored glycolysis and significantly reduced the rate of cell death at 24 h and 48 h due to p53 inhibition. The foremost reason of cisplatin-related cytotoxicity has been correlated to the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS that influence multiple pathways. Abnormalities in these pathways resulted in the collapse of mitochondrial energy production, which in turn sensitized the cells to death. The quenching of ROS led to the amelioration of the affected pathways. Considering these observations, it can be concluded that there is a significant correlation between cisplatin and metabolic dysfunctions involving mROS as the major player.

  14. Letrozole Potentiates Mitochondrial and Dendritic Spine Impairments Induced by β Amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K.-Y. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced estrogens, either through aging or postsurgery breast cancer treatment with the oral nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor letrozole, are linked with declined cognitive abilities. However, a direct link between letrozole and neuronal deficits induced by pathogenic insults associated with aging such as beta amyloid (Aβ1–42 has not been established. The objective of this study was to determine if letrozole aggravates synaptic deficits concurrent with Aβ1–42 insult. We examined the effects of letrozole and oligomeric Aβ1–42 treatment in dissociated and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Changes in glial cell morphology, neuronal mitochondria, and synaptic structures upon letrozole treatment were monitored by confocal microscopy, as they were shown to be affected by Aβ1–42 oligomers. Oligomeric Aβ1–42 or letrozole alone caused decreases in mitochondrial volume, dendritic spine density, synaptophysin (synaptic marker, and the postsynaptic protein, synaptopodin. Here, we demonstrated that mitochondrial and synaptic structural deficits were exacerbated when letrozole therapy was combined with Aβ1–42 treatment. Our novel findings suggest that letrozole may increase neuronal susceptibility to pathological insults, such as oligomeric Aβ1–42 in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. These changes in dendritic spine number, synaptic protein expression, and mitochondrial morphology may, in part, explain the increased prevalence of cognitive decline associated with aromatase inhibitor use.

  15. Impaired p32 Regulation Caused by the Lymphoma-Prone RECQ4 Mutation Drives Mitochondrial Dysfunction

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    Jiin-Tarng Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA encodes proteins that are important for ATP biogenesis. Therefore, changes in mtDNA copy number will have profound consequences on cell survival and proliferation. RECQ4 DNA helicase participates in both nuclear DNA and mtDNA synthesis. However, the mechanism that balances the distribution of RECQ4 in the nucleus and mitochondria is unknown. Here, we show that RECQ4 forms protein complexes with Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A, nucleophosmin (NPM, and mitochondrial p32 in different cellular compartments. Critically, the interaction with p32 negatively controls the transport of both RECQ4 and its chromatin-associated replication factor, MCM10, from the nucleus to mitochondria. Amino acids that are deleted in the most common cancer-associated RECQ4 mutation are required for the interaction with p32. Hence, this RECQ4 mutant, which is no longer regulated by p32 and is enriched in the mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial replication helicase PEO1 and induces abnormally high levels of mtDNA synthesis.

  16. AMPK dysregulation promotes diabetes-related reduction of superoxide and mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Laura L; You, Young-Hyun; Ali, Sameh S; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie; Miyamoto, Satoshi; DeCleves, Anne-Emilie; Andreyev, Aleksander; Quach, Tammy; Ly, San; Shekhtman, Grigory; Nguyen, William; Chepetan, Andre; Le, Thuy P; Wang, Lin; Xu, Ming; Paik, Kacie P; Fogo, Agnes; Viollet, Benoit; Murphy, Anne; Brosius, Frank; Naviaux, Robert K; Sharma, Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic microvascular complications have been considered to be mediated by a glucose-driven increase in mitochondrial superoxide anion production. Here, we report that superoxide production was reduced in the kidneys of a steptozotocin-induced mouse model of type 1 diabetes, as assessed by in vivo real-time transcutaneous fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. Reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis and phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were observed in kidneys from diabetic mice. These observations were consistent with an overall reduction of mitochondrial glucose oxidation. Activity of AMPK, the major energy-sensing enzyme, was reduced in kidneys from both diabetic mice and humans. Mitochondrial biogenesis, PDH activity, and mitochondrial complex activity were rescued by treatment with the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). AICAR treatment induced superoxide production and was linked with glomerular matrix and albuminuria reduction in the diabetic kidney. Furthermore, diabetic heterozygous superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2(+/-)) mice had no evidence of increased renal disease, and Ampka2(-/-) mice had increased albuminuria that was not reduced with AICAR treatment. Reduction of mitochondrial superoxide production with rotenone was sufficient to reduce AMPK phosphorylation in mouse kidneys. Taken together, these results demonstrate that diabetic kidneys have reduced superoxide and mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of AMPK enhances superoxide production and mitochondrial function while reducing disease activity.

  17. Chronic mild stress damages mitochondrial ultrastructure and function in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu; Chai, Yi; Ding, Jian-Hua; Sun, Xiu-Lan; Hu, Gang

    2011-01-13

    Increasing evidence implicates mitochondrial failure as a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of mental disorders, such as depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS), a paradigm developed in the late 1980s as an animal model of depression, on the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial ultrastructure in the mouse brain. The results showed that the CMS regime induced depressive-like symptoms in mice characterized by reduced sucrose preference and body weight. Moreover, CMS exposure was associated with a significant increase in immobility time in the tail suspension test. Exposure to the CMS paradigm inhibited mitochondrial respiration rates and dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential in hippocampus, cortex and hypothalamus of mice. In addition, we found a damaged mitochondrial ultrastructure in brains of mice exposed to CMS. These findings provide evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural damage in a mouse model of depression. Moreover, these findings suggest that mitochondrial malfunction-induced oxidative injury could play a role in stress-related disorders such as depression.

  18. Regulation of mitochondrial function by voltage dependent anion channels in ethanol metabolism and the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasters, John J; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Czerny, Christoph; Zhong, Zhi; Maldonado, Eduardo N

    2012-06-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC) are highly conserved proteins that are responsible for permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane to hydrophilic metabolites like ATP, ADP and respiratory substrates. Although previously assumed to remain open, VDAC closure is emerging as an important mechanism for regulation of global mitochondrial metabolism in apoptotic cells and also in cells that are not dying. During hepatic ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, VDAC closure suppresses exchange of mitochondrial metabolites, resulting in inhibition of ureagenesis. In vivo, VDAC closure after ethanol occurs coordinately with mitochondrial uncoupling. Since acetaldehyde passes through membranes independently of channels and transporters, VDAC closure and uncoupling together foster selective and more rapid oxidative metabolism of toxic acetaldehyde to nontoxic acetate by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. In single reconstituted VDAC, tubulin decreases VDAC conductance, and in HepG2 hepatoma cells, free tubulin negatively modulates mitochondrial membrane potential, an effect enhanced by protein kinase A. Tubulin-dependent closure of VDAC in cancer cells contributes to suppression of mitochondrial metabolism and may underlie the Warburg phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: VDAC structure, function, and regulation of mitochondrial metabolism.

  19. Mitochondrial aging and age-related dysfunction of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Revin, Victor V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in mitochondria are associated with decline in mitochondrial function. With advanced age, mitochondrial DNA volume, integrity and functionality decrease due to accumulation of mutations and oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aged subjects, mitochondria are characterized by impaired function such as lowered oxidative capacity, reduced oxidative phosphorylation, decreased ATP production, significant increase in ROS generation, and diminished antioxidant defense. Mitochondrial biogenesis declines with age due to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and inhibition of mitophagy, an autophagy process that removes dysfunctional mitochondria. Age-dependent abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control further weaken and impair mitochondrial function. In aged tissues, enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis contributes to an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. However, implementation of strategies such as caloric restriction and regular physical training may delay mitochondrial aging and attenuate the age-related phenotype in humans.

  20. Caspase-independent apoptosis in Friend's erythroleukemia cells: role of mitochondrial ATP synthesis impairment in relocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Marina; Genero, Nadia; Mavelli, Irene

    2009-02-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as the central components of both caspase-dependent and independent apoptosis signalling pathways through release of different apoptogenic proteins. We previously documented that parental and differentiated Friend's erythroleukemia cells were induced to apoptosis by oligomycin and H(2)O(2) exposure, showing that the energy impairment occurring in both cases as a consequence of a severe mitochondrial F(0)F(1)ATPsynthase inactivation was a common early feature. Here we provide evidence for AIF and Endo G mitochondrio-nuclear relocation in both cases, as a component of caspase-independent apoptosis pathways. No detectable change in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and no variation in mitochondrial levels of Bcl-2 and Bax are observed. These results point to the osmotic rupture of the mitochondrial outer membrane as occurring in response to cell exposure to the two energy-impairing treatments under conditions preserving the mitochondrial inner membrane. A critical role of the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)ATP synthase inhibition in this process is also suggested.

  1. Impact of Cognitive Impairment on Functional Outcome in Stroke

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    Nurdan Paker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cognitive impairment on functional status in patients with subacute stroke. Fifty-two patients with subacute stroke were included in the study. Mini mental state examination (MMSE test was used for the evaluation of cognitive status. Patients were separated into two groups according to their cognitive functions. Functional follow-up parameters were activities of daily living (ADL, global recovery and ambulation status. All patients were evaluated on admission to rehabilitation unit, at discharge and 6 months after discharge. Forty-four patients were completed the study. Mean age was 66 and 57 years; disease duration on admission was 4,8 and 3,5 months in the cognitively impaired and normal groups, respectively. Significant improvement was found in terms of functional follow-up parameters in both groups at discharge (<.05. Functional follow-up parameters did not show statistically significant difference between the groups. But community ambulation rate was higher in cognitively normal group at the sixth month visit. As a result of this study, inpatient rehabilitation was effective both cognitively normal and impaired subacute stroke patients.

  2. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD.

  3. Association between idiopathic hearing loss and mitochondrial DNA mutations: A study on 169 hearing-impaired subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUARAN, VALERIA; ASTOLFI, LAURA; CASTIGLIONE, ALESSANDRO; SIMONI, EDI; OLIVETTO, ELENA; GALASSO, MARCO; TREVISI, PATRIZIA; BUSI, MICOL; VOLINIA, STEFANO; MARTINI, ALESSANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been shown to be an important cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In this study, we performed a clinical and genetic analysis of 169 hearing-impaired patients and some of their relatives suffering from idiopathic SNHL, both familial and sporadic. The analysis of four fragments of their mtDNA identified several polymorphisms, the well known pathogenic mutation, A1555G, and some novel mutations in different genes, implying changes in the aminoacidic sequence. A novel sporadic mutation in 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1), not previously reported in the literature, was found in a case of possible aminoglycoside-induced progressive deafness. PMID:23969527

  4. Effect of eccentric versus concentric exercise training on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve; Rasseneur, Laurence; Lonsdorfer-Wolf, Evelyne; Dufour, Stéphane Pascal; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Bouitbir, Jamal; Zoll, Joffrey; Kapchinsky, Sophia; Geny, Bernard; Daussin, Frédéric Nicolas; Burelle, Yan; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-11-01

    The effect of eccentric (ECC) versus concentric (CON) training on metabolic properties in skeletal muscle is understood poorly. We determined the responses in oxidative capacity and mitochondrial H2 O2 production after eccentric (ECC) versus concentric (CON) training performed at similar mechanical power. Forty-eight rats performed 5- or 20-day eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CON) training programs. Mitochondrial respiration, H2 O2 production, citrate synthase activity (CS), and skeletal muscle damage were assessed in gastrocnemius (GAS), soleus (SOL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles. Maximal mitochondrial respiration improved only after 20 days of concentric (CON) training in GAS and SOL. H2 O2 production increased specifically after 20 days of eccentric ECC training in VI. Skeletal muscle damage occurred transiently in VI after 5 days of ECC training. Twenty days of ECC versus CON training performed at similar mechanical power output do not increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacities, but it elevates mitochondrial H2 O2 production in VI, presumably linked to transient muscle damage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Soy lecithin interferes with mitochondrial function in frozen-thawed ram spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle, I; Gómez-Durán, A; Holt, W V; Muiño-Blanco, T; Cebrián-Pérez, J A

    2012-01-01

    Egg yolk and milk are the 2 major membrane cryoprotectants commonly used in freezing media for the long-term preservation of semen (alone or in combination with others). However, in recent years, there have been increasing arguments against the use of egg yolk or milk because of the risk of introducing diseases through the use of cryopreserved semen. In this study, we analyzed the protective effect of lecithin as an alternative to egg yolk for the cryopreservation of ram semen, using a range of functional markers for sperm viability, motility, apoptosis, and mitochondrial functionality analyses (mitochondrial inner membrane surface [MIMS], mitochondrial inner membrane potential [MIMP], and cell membrane potential) as methods of assessment in samples diluted in 3 different media: Tris-citrate-glucose as control and 2 media supplemented with soy lecithin or egg yolk. The results showed that lecithin was able to effectively protect certain sperm quality characteristics against freezing-induced damage. However, lecithin induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential or mitochondrial loss that was not reflected by modifications in sperm motility in fresh semen. MIMS and MIMP values decreased in thawed lecithin-treated samples, concomitant with a lower (P lecithin may have affected the inner mitochondrial membrane in frozenthawed spermatozoa and confirmed that sublethal damages that seriously affect sperm functionality, not detected by classic sperm quality analyses, can be evidenced by changes in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface. These findings strengthen the relationship between mitochondrial membrane potential and motility and show that the mitochondrial alterations induced by the cryopreservation process could be specific targets for the improvement of semen cryopreservation protocols.

  6. Functional assessment taxonomy relevant to low-back impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, M

    2001-09-01

    A taxonomy of functional assessment constructs was developed to help the Social Security Administration refine the measurements of work disability. This report addresses content validity of the new taxonomy by examining the relevance of its constructs to a specific disability, and by examining the relationship between these constructs and constructs in other taxonomies. Seven experts linked the new taxonomy to consequences of low-back impairments. The selected constructs were compared to those reported independently by patients (Harper AC, Harper DA, Lambert L, Andrews HB, Lo SK, Ross FM, Straker LM. Pain 1992; 50(2): 189-195). The International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps served to bridge the two exercises. The findings reveal that it is feasible to use the taxonomy to define the impact of a specific disability and consequently link it to a set of standard measurements. Low-back impairments may be best assessed through measures of physical functional limitations, vocational impact, and interpersonal and emotional behavior. The study did not yield cognitive and intellectual measures that were relevant to this impairment.

  7. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA and Functional Investigations into the Radiosensitivity of Four Mouse Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B. Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether genetic radiosensitivity-related changes in mtDNA/nDNA ratios are significant to mitochondrial function and if a material effect on mtDNA content and function exists. BALB/c (radiosensitive, C57BL/6 (radioresistant, and F1 hybrid mouse strains were exposed to total body irradiation. Hepatic genomic DNA was extracted, and mitochondria were isolated. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ROS, and calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling were measured. Radiation influenced strain-specific survival in vivo. F1 hybrid survival was influenced by maternal input. Changes in mitochondrial content corresponded to survival in vivo among the 4 strains. Calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling was strain dependent. Isolated mitochondria from BALB/c mice were significantly more sensitive to calcium overload than mitochondria from C57BL/6 mice. Maternal input partially influenced the recovery effect of radiation on calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling in F1 hybrids; the hybrid with a radiosensitive maternal lineage exhibited a lower rate of recovery. Hybrids had a survival rate that was biased toward maternal input. mtDNA content and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTP measured in these strains before irradiation reflected a dominant input from the parent. After irradiation, the MPTP opened sooner in radiosensitive and hybrid strains, likely triggering intrinsic apoptotic pathways. These findings have important implications for translation into predictors of radiation sensitivity/resistance.

  9. Inhibition of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac dysfunction: role of AMPK-regulated mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Wang, Rui; Han, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-mediated leukocyte recruitment and inflammatory cytokine production make crucial contributions to chronic inflammation and sepsis; however, the role of LTB4 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac dysfunction remains unclear. Therefore, the present study addressed this issue using an LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) inhibitor. Administration of LPS to mice resulted in decreased cardiovascular function. Inhibition of LTB4/BLT1 with the BLT1 inhibitor U75302 significantly improved survival and attenuated the LPS-induced acute cardiac dysfunction. During LPS challenge, the phosphorylated AMPK/ACC signaling pathway was slightly activated, and this effect was enhanced by U75302. Additionally, pNF-κB, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were upregulated by LPS, and Bcl-2, IκB-α, mitochondrial complex I, complex II, and OPA1 were downregulated; however, these effects were reversed by U75302. The results indicated that the BLT1 antagonist suppressed cardiac apoptosis, inflammation, and mitochondrial impairment. Furthermore, the protection provided by the BLT1 inhibitor against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction was significantly reversed by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C. In conclusion, inhibiting the LTB4/BLT1 signaling pathway via AMPK activation is a potential treatment strategy for septic cardiac dysfunction because it efficiently attenuates cardiac apoptosis, which may occur via the inhibition of inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:28290498

  10. Improved Mitochondrial Function in Brain Aging and Alzheimer Disease – the New Mechanism of Action of the Old Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuner, Kristina; Kurz, Christopher; Guidetti, Giorgio; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc; Müller, Walter E.

    2010-01-01

    Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g., might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, this new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions. PMID:20877425

  11. Protective Effect of Sevoflurane Postconditioning against Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via Ameliorating Mitochondrial Impairment, Oxidative Stress and Rescuing Autophagic Clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yu

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction leads to heart failure. Autophagy is excessively activated in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R in rats. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the protection of sevoflurane postconditioning (SPC in myocardial I/R is through restored impaired autophagic flux.Except for the sham control (SHAM group, each rat underwent 30 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary (LAD followed by 2 h reperfusion. Cardiac infarction was determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride triazole (TTC staining. Cardiac function was examined by hemodynamics and echocardiography. The activation of autophagy was evaluated by autophagosome accumulation, LC3 conversion and p62 degradation. Potential molecular mechanisms were investigated by immunoblotting, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence staining.SPC improved the hemodynamic parameters, cardiac dysfunction, histopathological and ultrastructural damages, and decreased myocardial infarction size after myocardial I/R injury (P < 0.05 vs. I/R group. Compared with the cases in I/R group, myocardial ATP and NAD+ content, mitochondrial function related genes and proteins, and the expressions of SOD2 and HO-1 were increased, while the expressions of ROS and Vimentin were decreased in the SPC group (P < 0.05 vs. I/R group. SPC significantly activated Akt/mTOR signaling, and inhibited the formation of Vps34/Beclin1 complex via increasing expression of Bcl2 protein (P < 0.05 vs. I/R group. SPC suppressed elevated expressions of LC3 II/I ratio, Beclin1, Atg5 and Atg7 in I/R rat, which indicated that SPC inhibited over-activation of autophagy, and promoted autophagosome clearance. Meanwhile, SPC significantly suppressed the decline of Opa1 and increases of Drp1 and Parkin induced by I/R injury (P < 0.05 vs. I/R group. Moreover, SPC maintained the contents of ATP by reducing impaired mitochondria.SPC protects rat hearts against I/R injury via ameliorating mitochondrial impairment

  12. Assessment of mitochondrial function and control in normal and diseased states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radda, G K; Odoom, J; Kemp, G; Taylor, D J; Thompson, C; Styles, P

    1995-05-24

    Mitochondrial function in muscle in vivo can be quantitatively evaluated using 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. In resting muscle, the concentrations of ions (e.g. H+, Na+) and two of the major bioenergetic components (inorganic phosphate and creatine) are determined by regulated transcellular transport processes. During recovery after exercise the kinetics and control of mitochondrial ATP synthesis can be established. During exercise the relative contributions to ATP synthesis of phosphocreatine (using creatine kinase), anaerobic glycogenolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are dissected and have been shown to change with time. The consequences of mitochondrial lesions and dysfunctions on these processes have been summarised.

  13. FOXO3a regulates BNIP3 and modulates mitochondrial calcium, dynamics, and function in cardiac stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaanine, Antoine H; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Gamb, Scott I; Guenzel, Adam J; Klaus, Katherine; Fayyaz, Ahmed U; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Hajjar, Roger J; Redfield, Margaret M

    2016-12-01

    The forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) transcription factor has been shown to regulate glucose metabolism, muscle atrophy, and cell death in postmitotic cells. Its role in regulation of mitochondrial and myocardial function is not well studied. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that FOXO3a, through BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), modulates mitochondrial morphology and function in heart failure (HF). We modulated the FOXO3a-BNIP3 pathway in normal and phenylephrine (PE)-stressed adult cardiomyocytes (ACM) in vitro and developed a cardiotropic adeno-associated virus serotype 9 encoding dominant-negative FOXO3a (AAV9.dn-FX3a) for gene delivery in a rat model of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We found that FOXO3a upregulates BNIP3 expression in normal and PE-stressed ACM, with subsequent increases in mitochondrial Ca(2+), leading to decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, and apoptosis. Whereas dn-FX3a attenuated the increase in BNIP3 expression and its consequences in PE-stressed ACM, AAV9.dn-FX3a delivery in an experimental model of HFpEF decreased BNIP3 expression, reversed adverse left ventricular remodeling, and improved left ventricular systolic and, particularly, diastolic function, with improvements in mitochondrial structure and function. Moreover, AAV9.dn-FX3a restored phospholamban phosphorylation at S16 and enhanced dynamin-related protein 1 phosphorylation at S637. Furthermore, FOXO3a upregulates maladaptive genes involved in mitochondrial apoptosis, autophagy, and cardiac atrophy. We conclude that FOXO3a activation in cardiac stress is maladaptive, in that it modulates Ca(2+) cycling, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and mitochondrial dynamics and function. Our results suggest an important role of FOXO3a in HF, making it an attractive potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. The smallest detectable difference of mandibular function impairment in patients with a painfully restricted temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropmans, T.J.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van Veen, A.; Stegenga, B; de Bont, Lambertus

    Mandibular functions such as speech, laughing, yawning, mastication, and taking a large bite may be impaired if temporomandibular disorders exist. The Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire is a validated instrument that scores perceived difficulty of representative mandibular functions in

  15. Genetic risk factors affecting mitochondrial function are associated with kidney disease in people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swan, E J; Salem, R M; Sandholm, N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association with diabetic kidney disease of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. METHODS: The mitochondrial genome and 1039 nuclear genes that are integral to mitochondrial function were investigated using a case (n = 823 in...

  16. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Phosphate Transporter 3 Severely Hampers Plant Development through Regulating Mitochondrial Function in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Jia

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are abundant and important organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells, which maintain metabolic communication with the cytosol through mitochondrial carriers. The mitochondrial membrane localized phosphate transporter (MPT plays vital roles in diverse development and signaling processes, especially the ATP biosynthesis. Among the three MPT genes in Arabidopsis genome, AtMPT3 was proven to be a major member, and its overexpression gave rise to multiple developmental defects including curly leaves with deep color, dwarfed stature, and reduced fertility. Transcript profiles revealed that genes involved in plant metabolism, cellular redox homeostasis, alternative respiration pathway, and leaf and flower development were obviously altered in AtMPT3 overexpression (OEMPT3 plants. Moreover, OEMPT3 plants also accumulated higher ATP content, faster respiration rate and more reactive oxygen species (ROS than wild type plants. Overall, our studies showed that AtMPT3 was indispensable for Arabidopsis normal growth and development, and provided new sights to investigate its possible regulation mechanisms.

  17. Caffeine increases mitochondrial function and blocks melatonin signaling to mitochondria in Alzheimer's mice and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragicevic, Natasa; Delic, Vedad; Cao, Chuanhai; Copes, Neil; Lin, Xiaoyang; Mamcarz, Maggie; Wang, Li; Arendash, Gary W; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2012-12-01

    Caffeine and melatonin have been shown to protect the Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP(sw)) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease from cognitive dysfunction. But their mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. These Alzheimer's mice have extensive mitochondrial dysfunction, which likely contributes to their cognitive decline. To further explore the mechanism through which caffeine and melatonin protect cognitive function in these mice, we monitored the function of isolated mitochondria from APP(sw) mice treated with caffeine, melatonin, or both in their drinking water for one month. Melatonin treatment yielded a near complete restoration of mitochondrial function in assays of respiratory rate, membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, and ATP levels. Caffeine treatment by itself yielded a small increase in mitochondrial function. However, caffeine largely blocked the large enhancement of mitochondrial function provided by melatonin. Studies with N2a neuroblastoma cells stably expressing APP(sw) showed that specific inhibition of cAMP-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 or cGMP-dependent PDE5 also blocked melatonin protection of mitochondrial function, but A(2a) and A₁ adenosine receptor antagonists were without effect. Melatonin or caffeine at the concentrations used to modulate mitochondrial function in the cells had no effect on cAMP-dependent PDE activity or cellular cAMP or cGMP levels. Therefore, caffeine and increased cyclic nucleotide levels likely block melatonin signaling to mitochondria by independent mechanisms that do not involve adenosine receptor antagonism. The results of this study indicate that melatonin restores mitochondrial function much more potently than caffeine in APP(sw) transgenic mouse and cell models of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Extracommunicative functions of language: verbal interference causes selective categorization impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupyan, Gary

    2009-08-01

    In addition to its communicative functions, language has been argued to have a variety of extracommunicative functions, as assessed by its causal involvement in putatively nonlinguistic tasks. In the present work, I argue that language may be critically involved in the ability of human adults to categorize objects on a specific dimension (e.g., color) while abstracting over other dimensions (e.g., size). This ability is frequently impaired in aphasic patients. The present work demonstrates that normal participants placed under conditions of verbal interference show a pattern of deficits strikingly similar to that of aphasic patients: impaired taxonomic categorization along perceptual dimensions, and preserved thematic categorization. A control experiment using a visuospatial-interference task failed to find this selective pattern of deficits. The present work has implications for understanding the online role of language in normal cognition and supports the claim that language is causally involved in nonverbal cognition.

  19. Measuring functional status in children with genetic impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msall, M E; Tremont, M R

    1999-06-25

    One of the consequences of genetic impairments in early childhood is their long-term effect on children's developmental skills in communication, learning, and adaptive behaviors. Functional assessment provides families and clinicians with a common language for describing a child's strengths and limitations in self-care (feeding, dressing, grooming, bathing, continence), mobility, and communication/social cognition. The National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research described a model of disablement that includes five dimensions: pathophysiology, impairment, functional limitations, disability, and societal limitations. Using this framework, along with the Functional Independence Measure for children, the WeeFIM(R), we describe functional strengths and challenges in children with Down syndrome, spina bifida, congenital limb anomalies, congenital heart disease, urea cycle disorders, severe multiple developmental disabilities, and DiGeorge malformation sequence. We also briefly describe several pediatric functional/adaptive assessment instruments used by developmental professionals (Battelle Developmental Inventory, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Amount of Assistance Questionnaire). By tracking functional status, health professionals can prioritize secondary and tertiary prevention strategies that optimize self-care, mobility, communication, and learning. When functional limitations interfere with the acquisition of these essential skills, family and community support programs can be maximized.

  20. Amitriptyline improves motor function via enhanced neurotrophin signaling and mitochondrial functions in the murine N171-82Q Huntington disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wei-Na; Chadwick, Wayne; Wang, Rui; Daimon, Caitlin M; Cai, Huan; Amma, Jennifer; Wood, William H; Becker, Kevin G; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2015-01-30

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor impairment and cognitive alterations. Hereditary HD is primarily caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin (Htt) gene, which results in the production of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with an expanded amino-terminal polyglutamine (poly(Q)) stretch. Besides pathological mHTT aggregation, reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, impaired neurotrophin signaling, and compromised mitochondrial functions also contribute to the deleterious progressive etiology of HD. As a well tolerated Food and Drug Administration-approved antidepressant, amitriptyline (AMI) has shown efficacy in treating neurodegenerative murine models via potentiation of BDNF levels and amelioration of alterations in neurotrophin signaling pathways. In this study, we observed profound improvements in the motor coordination of AMI-treated N171-82Q HD model mice. The beneficial effects of AMI treatment were associated with its ability to reduce mHTT aggregation, potentiation of the BDNF-TrkB signaling system, and support of mitochondrial integrity and functionality. Our study not only provides preclinical evidence for the therapeutic potency of AMI in treating HD, but it also represents an important example of the usefulness of additional pharmacogenomic profiling of pre-existing drugs for novel therapeutic effects with often intractable pathological scenarios. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Mitochondrial Sulfide Detoxification Requires a Functional Isoform O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Consolación (A)lvarez; Irene García; Luis C.Romero; Cecilia Gotor

    2012-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic species,the main source of cyanide derives from ethylene and camalexin biosyntheses.In mitochondria,cyanide is a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome c oxidase and is metabolized bythe β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1,catalyzing the conversion of cysteine and cyanide to hydrogen sulfide and β-cyanoalanine.The hydrogen sulfide released also inhibits the cytochrome c oxidase and needs to be detoxified by the O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase mitochondrial isoform,OAS-C,which catalyzes the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine to produce cysteine,thus generating a cyclic pathway in the mitochondria.The loss of functional OAS-C isoforms causes phenotypic characteristics very similar to the loss of the CYS-C1 enzyme,showing defects in root hair formation.Genetic complementation with the OAS-C gene rescues the impairment of root hair elongation,restoring the wild-type phenotype.The mitochondria compromise their capacity to properly detoxify cyanide and the resulting sulfide because the latter cannot re-assimilate into cysteine in the oas-c null mutant.Consequently,we observe an accumulation of sulfide and cyanide and of the alternative oxidase,which is unable to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species probably due to the accumulation of both toxic molecules.Our results allow us to suggest that the significance of OAS-C is related to its role in the proper sulfide and cyanide detoxification in mitochondria.

  2. Nuclear genomic control of naturally occurring variation in mitochondrial function in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Bu, Su; Harbison, Susan T; Slaughter, Juanita C; Mackay, Trudy F C; Moellering, Douglas R; De Luca, Maria

    2012-11-22

    Mitochondria are organelles found in nearly all eukaryotic cells that play a crucial role in cellular survival and function. Mitochondrial function is under the control of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. While the latter has been the focus of most genetic research, we remain largely ignorant about the nuclear-encoded genomic control of inter-individual variability in mitochondrial function. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster as our model organism to address this question. We quantified mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration rates and P:O ratio in mitochondria isolated from the thoraces of 40 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. We found significant within-population genetic variability for all mitochondrial traits. Hence, we performed genome-wide association mapping and identified 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in mitochondrial respiration and efficiency (P ≤1 × 10-5). Gene-centered regression models showed that 2-3 SNPs can explain 31, 13, and 18% of the phenotypic variation in state 3, state 4, and P:O ratio, respectively. Most of the genes tagged by the SNPs are involved in organ development, second messenger-mediated signaling pathways, and cytoskeleton remodeling. One of these genes, sallimus (sls), encodes a component of the muscle sarcomere. We confirmed the direct effect of sls on mitochondrial respiration using two viable mutants and their coisogenic wild-type strain. Furthermore, correlation network analysis revealed that sls functions as a transcriptional hub in a co-regulated module associated with mitochondrial respiration and is connected to CG7834, which is predicted to encode a protein with mitochondrial electron transfer flavoprotein activity. This latter finding was also verified in the sls mutants. Our results provide novel insights into the genetic factors regulating natural variation in mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster. The integrative genomic

  3. Myopathy caused by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inactivation is not reversed by restoring mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanino, Klaas; Mazelin, Laetitia; Albert, Verena; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Lin, Shuo; Bentzinger, C Florian; Handschin, Christoph; Puigserver, Pere; Zorzato, Francesco; Schaeffer, Laurent; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Rüegg, Markus A

    2011-12-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the control of cell, organ, and body size. Skeletal muscle-specific inactivation of mTORC1 in mice results in smaller muscle fibers, fewer mitochondria, increased glycogen stores, and a progressive myopathy that causes premature death. In mTORC1-deficient muscles, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), which regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose homeostasis, is strongly down-regulated. Here we tested whether induction of mitochondrial biogenesis pharmacologically or by the overexpression of PGC-1α is sufficient to reverse the phenotype of mice deficient for mTORC1. We show that both approaches normalize mitochondrial function, such as oxidative capacity and expression of mitochondrial genes. However, they do not prevent or delay the progressive myopathy. In addition, we find that mTORC1 has a much stronger effect than PGC-1α on the glycogen content in muscle. This effect is based on the strong activation of PKB/Akt in mTORC1-deficient mice. We also show that activation of PKB/Akt not only affects glycogen synthesis but also diminishes glycogen degradation. Thus, our work provides strong functional evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction in mice with inactivated mTORC1 signaling is caused by the down-regulation of PGC-1α. However, our data also show that the impairment of mitochondria does not lead directly to the lethal myopathy.

  4. Functional Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments and Significant Cognitive Disabilities: The Perspective of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebehazy, Kim T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports opinions and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments (TSVIs) in 34 states regarding functional literacy for students with visual impairments (VIs) and significant cognitive disabilities (SCDs). The survey asked TSVIs to select a definition of functional literacy, indicate agreement with a series of literacy…

  5. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie L. Marvel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART. As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing. Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV.

  6. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronemer, Sharif I; Mandel, Jordan A; Sacktor, Ned C; Marvel, Cherie L

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing). Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV.

  7. Mitochondrial structure, function and dynamics are temporally controlled by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Anthony Graves

    Full Text Available Although the c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein controls mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, the coordination of these events and the mechanistic underpinnings of their regulation remain largely unexplored. We show here that re-expression of Myc in myc-/- fibroblasts is accompanied by a gradual accumulation of mitochondrial biomass and by increases in membrane polarization and mitochondrial fusion. A correction of OXPHOS deficiency is also seen, although structural abnormalities in electron transport chain complexes (ETC are not entirely normalized. Conversely, the down-regulation of Myc leads to a gradual decrease in mitochondrial mass and a more rapid loss of fusion and membrane potential. Increases in the levels of proteins specifically involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion support the idea that Myc affects mitochondrial mass by influencing both of these processes, albeit favoring the latter. The ETC defects that persist following Myc restoration may represent metabolic adaptations, as mitochondrial function is re-directed away from producing ATP to providing a source of metabolic precursors demanded by the transformed cell.

  8. Flow cytometric probing of mitochondrial function in equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coignoul Freddy

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The morphopathological picture of a subset of equine myopathies is compatible with a primary mitochondrial disease, but functional confirmation in vivo is still pending. The cationic dye JC-1 exhibits potential-dependent accumulation in mitochondria that is detectable by a fluorescence shift from green to orange. As a consequence, mitochondrial membrane potential can be optically measured by the orange/green fluorescence intensity ratio. A flow cytometric standardized analytic procedure of the mitochondrial function of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells is proposed along with a critical appraisal of the crucial questions of technical aspects, reproducibility, effect of time elapsed between blood sampling and laboratory processing and reference values. Results The JC-1-associated fluorescence orange and green values and their ratio were proved to be stable over time, independent of age and sex and hypersensitive to intoxication with a mitochondrial potential dissipator. Unless time elapsed between blood sampling and laboratory processing does not exceed 5 hours, the values retrieved remain stable. Reference values for clinically normal horses are given. Conclusion Whenever a quantitative measurement of mitochondrial function in a horse is desired, blood samples should be taken in sodium citrate tubes and kept at room temperature for a maximum of 5 hours before the laboratory procedure detailed here is started. The hope is that this new test may help in confirming, studying and preventing equine myopathies that are currently imputed to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Targeting Functional Impairments in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasser, Tyler; Schoenfelder, Erin N; Stein, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    The diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) require both symptoms and impairment to be present. Impairment in functioning is commonly the primary reason for referral, and is also a better predictor of long-term outcomes than ADHD symptoms. And yet, only recently has research begun to examine the impact of ADHD treatments on functional impairment using efficient and psychometrically sound outcome measures. In this article, we identify several noteworthy multidimensional measures of functional impairment (ADHD FX, Barkley Functional Impairment Scale [BFIS], Impairment Rating Scale [IRS], Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale [WFIRS]) utilized in recent clinical trials for ADHD, and describe their psychometric properties and clinical utility. We also review existing evidence on the impact of pharmacological and behavioral treatments on different domains of functional impairment in ADHD youth as measured by these specific measures. Further research is needed to evaluate longitudinal effects of ADHD treatments on functional impairment, and the use of these measures in adaptive treatment designs.

  10. Impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism in Alzheimer's disease: Impact on pathogenesis via disturbed epigenetic regulation of chromatin landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Antero; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai; Soininen, Hilkka; Hiltunen, Mikko

    2015-08-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was proposed over twenty years ago. However, the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and synaptic loss have remained elusive delaying the effective drug discovery. Recent studies have revealed that amyloid-β peptides as well as phosphorylated and fragmented tau proteins accumulate within mitochondria. This process triggers mitochondrial fission (fragmentation) and disturbs Krebs cycle function e.g. by inhibiting the activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. Oxidative stress, hypoxia and calcium imbalance also disrupt the function of Krebs cycle in AD brains. Recent studies on epigenetic regulation have revealed that Krebs cycle intermediates control DNA and histone methylation as well as histone acetylation and thus they have fundamental roles in gene expression. DNA demethylases (TET1-3) and histone lysine demethylases (KDM2-7) are included in the family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (2-OGDO). Interestingly, 2-oxoglutarate is the obligatory substrate of 2-OGDO enzymes, whereas succinate and fumarate are the inhibitors of these enzymes. Moreover, citrate can stimulate histone acetylation via acetyl-CoA production. Epigenetic studies have revealed that AD is associated with changes in DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns. However, the epigenetic results of different studies are inconsistent but one possibility is that they represent both coordinated adaptive responses and uncontrolled stochastic changes, which provoke pathogenesis in affected neurons. Here, we will review the changes observed in mitochondrial dynamics and Krebs cycle function associated with AD, and then clarify the mechanisms through which mitochondrial metabolites can control the epigenetic landscape of chromatin and induce pathological changes in AD.

  11. Executive Function Is Selectively Impaired in Old Age Bipolar Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Soares, Vânia L. D.; Vieira, Renata T.; Soares, Cândida D.; Caixeta, Victor; Ferreira, Sandra B.; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cognitive signature of bipolar disorder (BD) in elderly brains. The neuropsychological features of depressive elderly with early-onset BD are largely unknown. This issue is relevant because cognitive impairment can produce an additional impact on the already compromised functionality of elderly with BD. The aim of this study is to assess executive functions (EFs) in the depressive phase of elderly outpatients with early-onset BD. Methods: Forty-nine elderly outpatients with early-onset BD were assessed with several neuropsychological tests for EF in the depressive phase of the disorder. Results: Executive dysfunction is very common in old age bipolar depression. Thirteen patients (26.5%) had a pseudodementia presentation. The worst performances were observed in the following tests: Trail Making B, Stroop Test 3, Backward Digit Span and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion: Executive dysfunction profile in elderly BD is complex and heterogeneous, but most cases display difficulties in working memory, inhibitory control, mental flexibility, and information processing speed. The performance of elderly with bipolar depression in executive assessment can be divided into two main categories: (1) Single EF domain impairment; and (2) Multiple EF domain impairment with or without a pseudodementia syndrome. Executive dysfunction in old age bipolar depression may be explained by lack of sufficient mental energy to run those cognitive processes that require larger amounts of effort to be performed.

  12. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  13. Serum vitamin D and functional impairment in octogenarian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Martínez, Rut; Fernández-Garrido, Julio; Buigues, Cristina; Martinez-Martinez, Mary; Cantero-Díaz, Liliana; Santamaría-Carrillo, Yolanda; Serra-Catalá, Nuria; Peris, Carlos; Cauli, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Serum vitamin D deficiency has been associated with frailty in people aged 65 and over, however its relationship with functional impairment has not been investigated in octogenerian (aged 80-90 years) institutionalized women. We assessed functional impairment in this latter group by measuring frailty syndrome and other geriatric and psychological assessment scales: the Tinetti gait and balance index to determine the risk for falls, the Barthel index to measure the basic activities of daily living, the Lawton index for instrumental activities, the mini-mental score examination test for cognitive impairment, the Yesavage scale for geriatric depression, and the Norton scale for the risk of ulceration. Frail individuals had significantly reduced serum vitamin D concentrations (measured as total 25-hydroxyvitamin D; 25(OH)D) compared to robust individuals, but reduced 25(OH)D concentration did not significantly correlate with frailty syndrome severity, and mean 25(OH)D concentrations were within the recommended levels in all groups. The 25(OH)D concentration did not correlate with any of the blood analytical parameters measured and with the geriatric assessment scales used, suggesting a selective relationship with frailty. These results highlight the need to individualize treatment such as vitamin D supplementation in order to treat frailty syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. NLRP3 inflammasome activation by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species plays a key role in long-term cognitive impairment induced by paraquat exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liuji; Na, Ren; Boldt, Erin; Ran, Qitao

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to environmental toxins such as pesticides is implicated in increasing Alzheimer's disease risk. In this study, we investigated the long-term effects of paraquat exposure on cognition of Alzheimer's disease animal model APP/PS1 mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Our results showed that APP/PS1 mice had exacerbated cognition impairment and elevated Aβ levels at 5 months after paraquat exposure, and that WT mice had cognition impairment at 5 and 16 months after paraquat exposure. In addition, increased mitochondrial oxidative stress and augmented brain inflammation were observed in both paraquat-exposed APP/PS1 mice and WT mice. Interestingly, activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, which triggers inflammation in response to mitochondrial stress, was enhanced in paraquat-exposed mice. Moreover, transgenic mice overexpressing Prdx3, a key enzyme in detoxifying mitochondrial H2O2, had suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation, reduced brain inflammation, and attenuated cognition impairment after paraquat exposure. Together, our results indicate that NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species plays a key role in mediating paraquat-induced long-term cognition decline by elevating brain inflammation.

  15. Mitochondria: mitochondrial OXPHOS (dys) function ex vivo--the use of primary fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada, Ann

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles present in all nucleated cells. They perform a number of vital metabolic processes but their main function is to generate energy in the form of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), performed by the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Mitochondrial diseases affecting oxidative phosphorylation are a common group of inherited disorders with variable clinical manifestations. They are caused by mutations either in the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome. In order to study this group of heterogeneous diseases, they are often modeled in animal and microbial systems. However, these are complex, time consuming and unavailable for each specific mutation. Conversely, skin fibroblasts derived from patients provide a feasible alternative. The usefulness of fibroblasts in culture to verify and study the pathomechanism of new mitochondrial diseases and to evaluate the efficacy of individual treatment options is summarized in this review.

  16. GASZ and mitofusin-mediated mitochondrial functions are crucial for spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Mingsong; Jiang, Manxi; Wang, Yongsheng; Sun, Yun; Wang, Junpeng; Xie, Taorong; Tang, Chao; Tang, Nannan; Song, Huili; Cui, Di; Chao, Ruihua; Ding, Shuzhe; Ni, Bing; Chen, Xuejin; Wang, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Nuage is an electron-dense cytoplasmic structure in germ cells that contains ribonucleoproteins and participates in piRNA biosynthesis. Despite the observation that clustered mitochondria are associated with a specific type of nuage called intermitochondrial cement (pi-body), the importance of mitochondrial functions in nuage formation and spermatogenesis is yet to be determined. We show that a germ cell-specific protein GASZ contains a functional mitochondrial targeting signal and is largely localized at mitochondria both endogenously in germ cells and in somatic cells when ectopically expressed. In addition, GASZ interacts with itself at the outer membrane of mitochondria and promotes mitofusion in a mitofusin/MFN-dependent manner. In mice, deletion of the mitochondrial targeting signal reveals that mitochondrial localization of GASZ is essential for nuage formation, mitochondrial clustering, transposon repression, and spermatogenesis. MFN1 deficiency also leads to defects in mitochondrial activity and male infertility. Our data thus reveal a requirement for GASZ and MFN-mediated mitofusion during spermatogenesis.

  17. Altered mitochondrial function and energy metabolism is associated with a radioresistant phenotype in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Maher, Stephen G; Maguire, Aoife; Phelan, James; Muldoon, Cian; Reynolds, John V; O'Sullivan, Jacintha

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. A complete pathological response to CRT is associated with a favourable outcome. Radiation therapy is important for local tumour control, however, radioresistance remains a substantial clinical problem. We hypothesise that alterations in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are involved in the radioresistance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). To investigate this, we used an established isogenic cell line model of radioresistant OAC. Radioresistant cells (OE33 R) demonstrated significantly increased levels of random mitochondrial mutations, which were coupled with alterations in mitochondrial function, size, morphology and gene expression, supporting a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the radioresistance of this model. OE33 R cells also demonstrated altered bioenergetics, demonstrating significantly increased intracellular ATP levels, which was attributed to enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Radioresistant cells also demonstrated metabolic plasticity, efficiently switching between the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism pathways, which were accompanied by enhanced clonogenic survival. This data was supported in vivo, in pre-treatment OAC tumour tissue. Tumour ATP5B expression, a marker of oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly increased in patients who subsequently had a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT. This suggests for the first time, a role for specific mitochondrial alterations and metabolic remodelling in the radioresistance of OAC.

  18. Altered mitochondrial function and energy metabolism is associated with a radioresistant phenotype in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamh Lynam-Lennon

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. A complete pathological response to CRT is associated with a favourable outcome. Radiation therapy is important for local tumour control, however, radioresistance remains a substantial clinical problem. We hypothesise that alterations in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are involved in the radioresistance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC. To investigate this, we used an established isogenic cell line model of radioresistant OAC. Radioresistant cells (OE33 R demonstrated significantly increased levels of random mitochondrial mutations, which were coupled with alterations in mitochondrial function, size, morphology and gene expression, supporting a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the radioresistance of this model. OE33 R cells also demonstrated altered bioenergetics, demonstrating significantly increased intracellular ATP levels, which was attributed to enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Radioresistant cells also demonstrated metabolic plasticity, efficiently switching between the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism pathways, which were accompanied by enhanced clonogenic survival. This data was supported in vivo, in pre-treatment OAC tumour tissue. Tumour ATP5B expression, a marker of oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly increased in patients who subsequently had a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT. This suggests for the first time, a role for specific mitochondrial alterations and metabolic remodelling in the radioresistance of OAC.

  19. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable.

  20. Assessing depression related severity and functional impairment: the Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Ito

    Full Text Available The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS is a brief, five-item measure for assessing the frequency and intensity of depressive symptoms, as well as functional impairments in pleasurable activities, work or school, and interpersonal relationships due to depression. Although this scale is expected to be useful in various psychiatric and mental health settings, the reliability, validity, and interpretability have not yet been fully examined. This study was designed to examine the reliability, factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of a Japanese version of the ODSIS, as well as its ability to distinguish between individuals with and without a major depressive disorder diagnosis.From a pool of registrants at an internet survey company, 2830 non-clinical and clinical participants were selected randomly (619 with major depressive disorder, 619 with panic disorder, 576 with social anxiety disorder, 645 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 371 non-clinical panelists. Participants were asked to respond to the ODSIS and conventional measures of depression, functional impairment, anxiety, neuroticism, satisfaction with life, and emotion regulation.Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of three split subsamples indicated the unidimensional factor structure of ODSIS. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed invariance of factor loadings between non-clinical and clinical subsamples. The ODSIS also showed excellent internal consistency and test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients. Convergence and discriminance of the ODSIS with various measures were in line with our expectations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the ODSIS was able to detect a major depressive syndrome accurately.This study supports the reliability and validity of ODSIS in a non-western population, which can be interpreted as demonstrating cross-cultural validity.

  1. Mitochondrial respiration is sensitive to cytoarchitectural breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Judith; Angelin, Alessia A; Wallace, Douglas C; Eckmann, David M

    2016-11-07

    An abundance of research suggests that cellular mitochondrial and cytoskeletal disruption are related, but few studies have directly investigated causative connections between the two. We previously demonstrated that inhibiting microtubule and microfilament polymerization affects mitochondrial motility on the whole-cell level in fibroblasts. Since mitochondrial motility can be indicative of mitochondrial function, we now further characterize the effects of these cytoskeletal inhibitors on mitochondrial potential, morphology and respiration. We found that although they did not reduce mitochondrial inner membrane potential, cytoskeletal toxins induced significant decreases in basal mitochondrial respiration. In some cases, basal respiration was only affected after cells were pretreated with the calcium ionophore A23187 in order to stress mitochondrial function. In most cases, mitochondrial morphology remained unaffected, but extreme microfilament depolymerization or combined intermediate doses of microtubule and microfilament toxins resulted in decreased mitochondrial lengths. Interestingly, these two particular exposures did not affect mitochondrial respiration in cells not sensitized with A23187, indicating an interplay between mitochondrial morphology and respiration. In all cases, inducing maximal respiration diminished differences between control and experimental groups, suggesting that reduced basal respiration originates as a largely elective rather than pathological symptom of cytoskeletal impairment. However, viability experiments suggest that even this type of respiration decrease may be associated with cell death.

  2. Aprataxin localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-01-01

    aborted ligation reactions. We report herein that aprataxin localizes to mitochondria in human cells and we identify an N-terminal amino acid sequence that targets certain isoforms of the protein to this intracellular compartment. We also show that transcripts encoding this unique N-terminal stretch...... are expressed in the human brain, with highest production in the cerebellum. Depletion of aprataxin in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and primary skeletal muscle myoblasts results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which is revealed by reduced citrate synthase activity and mtDNA copy number. Moreover, mt...

  3. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viitanen, Matti [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Geriatrics, Turku City Hospital and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Sundström, Erik [Division of Neurodegeneration, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Baumann, Marc [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Poyhonen, Minna [Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Hospital, HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Tikka, Saara [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Behbahani, Homira, E-mail: homira.behbahani@ki.se [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  4. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen L. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research.

  5. The Early Indicators of Functional Decrease in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Fautrelle, Lilian; Bourrelier, Julien; Rouaud, Olivier; Mourey, France

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Motor deficiency is associated with cognitive frailty in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairments (MCI). In this study we aimed to test the integrity in muscle synergies involved in an arm-pointing movement in functionally unimpaired MCI patients. We hypothesized that early motor indicators exist in this population at a preclinical level. Methods: Electromyographic signals were collected for 11 muscles in 3 groups: Young Adults (YA), Older Adults (OA), and MCI patients. The OA and MCI groups presented the same functional status. Each subject performed 20 arm-pointing movements from a standing position. Results: The main differences were (1) an earlier activation of the left Obliquus internus in MCI compared with OA group, (2) an earlier activation for the MCI compared with both OA and YA. The temporal differences in muscle synergies between MCI and OA groups were linked with executive functions of MCI patients, assessed by the trail making test. Moreover, the results show a delayed activation of the right Biceps Femoris and the right Erector Spinae at l3 in MCI and OA compared with YA. Interpretation: The motor program changes highlighted in our patient MCI group suggest that discrete modifications of the motor command seem to exist even in the absence of functional impairment. Instead of showing an indication of delayed muscle activation in the MCI patients, our results highlight some early activation of several trunk muscles. PMID:27570509

  6. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {beta} deletion increases mitochondrial function and protects mice from LXR-induced hepatic steatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Shaikh M., E-mail: rmizanoor@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Choudhury, Mahua; Janssen, Rachel C.; Baquero, Karalee C. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Miyazaki, Makoto [Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Friedman, Jacob E. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LXR agonist activation increases liver TG accumulation by increasing lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mouse prevents LXR activation-mediated induction of hepatic lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} deletion increases mitochondrial transport chain function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Beneficial effects of LXR activation on liver cholesterol metabolism did not change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} inhibition might have important therapeutic potential. -- Abstract: Drugs designed specifically to activate liver X receptors (LXRs) have beneficial effects on lowering cholesterol metabolism and inflammation but unfortunately lead to severe hepatic steatosis. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP{beta}) is an important regulator of liver gene expression but little is known about its involvement in LXR-based steatosis and cholesterol metabolism. The present study investigated the role of C/EBP{beta} expression in LXR agonist (T0901317)-mediated alteration of hepatic triglyceride (TG) and lipogenesis in mice. C/EBP{beta} deletion in mice prevented LXR agonist-mediated induction of lipogenic gene expression in liver in conjunction with significant reduction of liver TG accumulation. Surprisingly, C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice showed a major increase in liver mitochondrial electron chain function compared to WT mice. Furthermore, LXR activation in C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice increased the expression of liver ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1, a gene implicated in cholesterol efflux and reducing blood levels of total and LDL-cholesterol. Together, these findings establish a central role for C/EBP{beta} in the LXR-mediated steatosis and mitochondrial function, without impairing the influence of LXR activation on lowering LDL and increasing HDL-cholesterol. Inactivation of C/EBP{beta} might therefore be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent LXR

  7. Interleukin-22 restored mitochondrial damage and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through down-regulation of uncoupling protein-2 in INS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minling; Lin, Hanxiao; Yang, Li; Cheng, Yanzhen; Zhang, Hua

    2017-01-07

    Defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) induced by chronic exposure to fatty acids is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Interleukin-22 (IL-22) has been shown to exert beneficial effects on insulin secretion and to protect pancreatic β-cells from stress. Moreover, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) plays a central role in the regulation of GSIS and β-cell dysfunction, whereas the role of UCP-2 in IL-22-enhanced glycemic control under conditions of lipotoxicity remains unclear. In this present study, we investigated the effects of IL-22 on rat insulin-secreting cells (INS-1 cells) and the mechanisms that underlie IL-22 and lipotoxicity-impaired GSIS in vitro. Chronic palmitate (PA) treatment impaired insulin secretion and activated UCP-2 expression in INS-1 cells. Furthermore, in INS-1 cells, both reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and impaired GSIS induced by PA treatment were effectively reversed by an inhibitor of UCP-2 (genipin). Additionally, compared with the PA-treated group, INS-1 cells treated with IL-22 down-regulated UCP-2 expression, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and restored GSIS. Together, our findings indicate that chronic exposure to PA could activate UCP-2, resulting in mitochondrial damage and impaired GSIS in INS-1 cells. We also suggest that IL-22 plays a protective role in this process via the down-regulation of UCP-2.

  8. Influence of cognitive impairment, functional impairment and care setting on dementia care mapping results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, P; Kuhn, D; Fulton, B R

    2004-11-01

    Quality of life (QOL) for people with dementia has become a major focus over the past decade. Dementia care mapping (DCM) is an observational measure of quality of care given by staff in formal care settings, as well as a measure of QOL that has been used in many studies of people with dementia in residential care settings. However, the method itself has not been rigorously studied in a scientific manner. For this report, mapping data were collected for 166 persons with dementia in three types of care settings: special care facilities that are licensed nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and adult day centers. The relationships between DCM and several independent variables including cognitive status, functional status, care setting, depression, length of stay, and co-morbid illnesses were assessed. Both cognitive status and functional status were found to be associated with DCM scores. Moreover, DCM was sensitive in differentiating among persons with four levels of cognitive impairment. Implications for practice are discussed.

  9. Principles of the mitochondrial fusion and fission cycle in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagalinec, Michal; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Liiv, Mailis; Liiv, Joanna; Choubey, Vinay; Wareski, Przemyslaw; Veksler, Vladimir; Kaasik, Allen

    2013-05-15

    Mitochondrial fusion-fission dynamics play a crucial role in many important cell processes. These dynamics control mitochondrial morphology, which in turn influences several important mitochondrial properties including mitochondrial bioenergetics and quality control, and they appear to be affected in several neurodegenerative diseases. However, an integrated and quantitative understanding of how fusion-fission dynamics control mitochondrial morphology has not yet been described. Here, we took advantage of modern visualisation techniques to provide a clear explanation of how fusion and fission correlate with mitochondrial length and motility in neurons. Our main findings demonstrate that: (1) the probability of a single mitochondrion splitting is determined by its length; (2) the probability of a single mitochondrion fusing is determined primarily by its motility; (3) the fusion and fission cycle is driven by changes in mitochondrial length and deviations from this cycle serves as a corrective mechanism to avoid extreme mitochondrial length; (4) impaired mitochondrial motility in neurons overexpressing 120Q Htt or Tau suppresses mitochondrial fusion and leads to mitochondrial shortening whereas stimulation of mitochondrial motility by overexpressing Miro-1 restores mitochondrial fusion rates and sizes. Taken together, our results provide a novel insight into the complex crosstalk between different processes involved in mitochondrial dynamics. This knowledge will increase understanding of the dynamic mitochondrial functions in cells and in particular, the pathogenesis of mitochondrial-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Oxidative Stress Impairs Cell Death by Repressing the Nuclease Activity of Mitochondrial Endonuclease G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L.J. Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Endonuclease G (EndoG is a mitochondrial protein that is released from mitochondria and relocated into the nucleus to promote chromosomal DNA fragmentation during apoptosis. Here, we show that oxidative stress causes cell-death defects in C. elegans through an EndoG-mediated cell-death pathway. In response to high reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, homodimeric CPS-6—the C. elegans homolog of EndoG—is dissociated into monomers with diminished nuclease activity. Conversely, the nuclease activity of CPS-6 is enhanced, and its dimeric structure is stabilized by its interaction with the worm AIF homolog, WAH-1, which shifts to disulfide cross-linked dimers under high ROS levels. CPS-6 thus acts as a ROS sensor to regulate the life and death of cells. Modulation of the EndoG dimer conformation could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of diseases resulting from oxidative stress.

  11. Endothelial NOS (NOS3) impairs myocardial function in developing sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sandt, Annette M; Windler, Rainer; Gödecke, Axel; Ohlig, Jan; Zander, Simone; Reinartz, Michael; Graf, Jürgen; van Faassen, Ernst E; Rassaf, Tienush; Schrader, Jürgen; Kelm, Malte; Merx, Marc W

    2013-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS)3-derived nitric oxide (NO) modulates inotropic response and diastolic interval for optimal cardiac performance under non-inflammatory conditions. In sepsis, excessive NO production plays a key role in severe hypotension and myocardial dysfunction. We aimed to determine the role of NOS3 on myocardial performance, NO production, and time course of sepsis development. NOS3(-/-) and C57BL/6 wildtype mice were rendered septic by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP). Cardiac function was analyzed by serial echocardiography, in vivo pressure and isolated heart measurements. Cardiac output (CO) increased to 160 % of baseline at 10 h after sepsis induction followed by a decline to 63 % of baseline after 18 h in wildtype mice. CO was unaltered in septic NOS3(-/-) mice. Despite the hyperdynamic state, cardiac function and mean arterial pressure were impaired in septic wildtype as early as 6 h post CLP. At 12 h, cardiac function in septic wildtype was refractory to catecholamines in vivo and respective isolated hearts showed impaired pressure development and limited coronary flow reserve. Hemodynamics remained stable in NOS3(-/-) mice leading to significant survival benefit. Unselective NOS inhibition in septic NOS3(-/-) mice diminished this survival benefit. Plasma NO( x )- and local myocardial NO( x )- and NO levels (via NO spin trapping) demonstrated enhanced NO( x )- and bioactive NO levels in septic wildtype as compared to NOS3(-/-) mice. Significant contribution by inducible NOS (NOS2) during this early phase of sepsis was excluded. Our data suggest that NOS3 relevantly contributes to bioactive NO pool in developing sepsis resulting in impaired cardiac contractility.

  12. Sustained Early Disruption of Mitochondrial Function Contributes to Arsenic-Induced Prostate Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B; Kulawiec, M; Owens, K M; Singh, A; Singh, K K

    2016-10-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen that affects millions of people worldwide, but the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis are unclear. Several epidemiological studies have suggested increased prostate cancer incidence and mortality due to exposure to arsenic. Due to lack of an animal model of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis, we used a prostate epithelial cell culture model to identify a role for mitochondria in arsenic-induced prostate cancer. Mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential was impacted within a few hours of arsenic exposure of non-neoplastic prostate epithelial cells. Chronic arsenic treatment induced mutations in mitochondrial genes and altered mitochondrial functions. Human non-neoplastic prostate epithelial cells continuously cultured for seven months in the presence of 5 µM arsenite showed tumorigenic properties in vitro and induced tumors in SCID mice, which indicated transformation of these cells. Protein and mRNA expression of subunits of mtOXPHOS complex I were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Alterations in complex I, a main site for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as increased expression of ROS-producing NOX4 in arsenic-transformed cells suggested a role of oxidative stress in tumorigenic transformation of prostate epithelial cells. Whole genome cGH array analyses of arsenic-transformed prostate cells identified extensive genomic instability. Our study revealed mitochondrial dysfunction induced oxidative stress and decreased expression of p53 in arsenic-transformed cells as an underlying mechanism of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomic instability. These studies suggest that early changes in mitochondrial functions are sustained during prolong arsenic exposure. Overall, our study provides evidence that arsenic disruption of mitochondrial function is an early and key step in tumorigenic transformation of prostate epithelial cells.

  13. A Trypanosomatid Iron Transporter that Regulates Mitochondrial Function Is Required for Leishmania amazonensis Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidyottam Mittra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron, an essential co-factor of respiratory chain proteins, is critical for mitochondrial function and maintenance of its redox balance. We previously reported a role for iron uptake in differentiation of Leishmania amazonensis into virulent amastigotes, by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS production and is independent of the classical pH and temperature cues. Iron import into mitochondria was proposed to be essential for this process, but evidence supporting this hypothesis was lacking because the Leishmania mitochondrial iron transporter was unknown. Here we describe MIT1, a homolog of the mitochondrial iron importer genes mrs3 (yeast and mitoferrin-1 (human that is highly conserved among trypanosomatids. MIT1 expression was essential for the survival of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic but not bloodstream forms, which lack functional respiratory complexes. L. amazonensis LMIT1 null mutants could not be generated, suggesting that this mitochondrial iron importer is essential for promastigote viability. Promastigotes lacking one LMIT1 allele (LMIT1/Δlmit1 showed growth defects and were more susceptible to ROS toxicity, consistent with the role of iron as the essential co-factor of trypanosomatid mitochondrial superoxide dismutases. LMIT1/Δlmit1 metacyclic promastigotes were unable to replicate as intracellular amastigotes after infecting macrophages or cause cutaneous lesions in mice. When induced to differentiate axenically into amastigotes, LMIT1/Δlmit1 showed strong defects in iron content and function of mitochondria, were unable to upregulate the ROS-regulatory enzyme FeSOD, and showed mitochondrial changes suggestive of redox imbalance. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial iron uptake in trypanosomatid parasites, and highlight the role of LMIT1 in the iron-regulated process that orchestrates differentiation of L. amazonensis into infective amastigotes.

  14. Structure and function of the N-terminal domain of the human mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Min, Choon Kee; Kim, Tae Gyun; Song, Hong Ki; Lim, Yunki; Kim, Dongwook; Shin, Kahee; Kang, Moonkyung; Kang, Jung Youn; Youn, Hyung-Seop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lim, Jia Jia; Kim, Ji Hun; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Zee Yong; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Wang, Jimin; Kim, Do Han; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is responsible for mitochondrial calcium uptake and homeostasis. It is also a target for the regulation of cellular anti-/pro-apoptosis and necrosis by several oncogenes and tumour suppressors. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the MCU N-terminal domain (NTD) at a resolution of 1.50 Å in a novel fold and the S92A MCU mutant at 2.75 Å resolution; the residue S92 is a predicted CaMKII phosphorylation site. The assembly of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex (uniplex) and the interaction with the MCU regulators such as the mitochondrial calcium uptake-1 and mitochondrial calcium uptake-2 proteins (MICU1 and MICU2) are not affected by the deletion of MCU NTD. However, the expression of the S92A mutant or a NTD deletion mutant failed to restore mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in a stable MCU knockdown HeLa cell line and exerted dominant-negative effects in the wild-type MCU-expressing cell line. These results suggest that the NTD of MCU is essential for the modulation of MCU function, although it does not affect the uniplex formation.

  15. Balance Functional Assessment in People with Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutkowska Izabela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were twofold: to assess the level of balance of people with visual impairment against the BOT-2 standard scores for the able-bodied, and to identify in which trials subjects had the greatest difficulties in maintaining balance with respect to the degree of vision loss and age categories. One hundred twenty-seven subjects with visual impairment aged 6-16 years, participated in the study (68 girls and 59 boys. The division for partially sighted people (61 and the blind (66 was made according to the WHO classification. Functional balance assessment was made using a balance subtest from the Bruininks-Oseretsky test. Significant relationships were noticed between age and the level of balance (χ2 = 8.35 p <0,05, as well as between the degree of vision loss and the level of balance (χ2 = 24.53 p <0,001. The level of balance of almost all blind subjects was below (20% or well-below (60% the average for the able-bodied. The subjects’ ability to maintain balance was not dependent on gender and was associated primarily with the degree of visual impairment and age. Partially sighted people had better balance than the blind and the decrease in visual acuity resulted in reduction of balance skills. The lowest level of balance was observed in blind students aged 7-11 years. Elaborating physical fitness improvement programs for children and adolescents with visual impairment, diversity of age, the degree of vision loss and limitations of ablility to maintain balance should be taken into account.

  16. Relationship between coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity and mitochondrial function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Fujii, Wataru; Hori, Hisako; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2016-04-01

    The manifestation of coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity may differ and depends on the frequency of administration to rats. A single coumarin dose induces hepatocellular necrosis while repeated doses induce only hepatocyte degeneration. However, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism of coumarin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Coumarin was administered to male rats as a single dose or for 4 consecutive days, and samples were obtained 4 or 24 h after a single dose or 24 h after the repeated doses. A single coumarin dose significantly induced hepatocellular necrosis in rats; however, toxicity was attenuated after repeated dosing. With a single dose, hepatocellular necrosis was preceded by increased mitochondrial number and size and decreased mitochondrial function. An increased expression of granular cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 protein was observed in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of coumarin-treated rats compared to the expression in the untreated controls. Nevertheless, repeated dosing showed mitochondrial function that was equivalent to that of the control while enlarged CYP2E1 protein droplets were distributed outside the mitochondria. These results suggest that mitochondrial function and CYP2E1 expression might be involved in coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity in rats. A reduction in mitochondrial CYP2E1 might be implicated in the acquisition of coumarin resistance after repeated doses.

  17. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle is normal and unrelated to insulin action in young men born with low birth weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Charlotte; Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Low birth weight (LBW) is an independent risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Recent studies suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) may play a key role in the pathogenesis of insulin...... mitochondrial dysfunction per se is the underlying key metabolic defect that explains or precedes whole body insulin resistance in LBW subjects at risk for developing type 2 diabetes....

  18. S-glutathionylation reactions in mitochondrial function and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Mailloux

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly efficient energy-transforming organelles that convert energy stored in carbon bonds into the universal energy currency ATP. The production of ATP by mitochondria is dependent on oxidation of nutrients and coupling of exergonic electron transfer reactions to the genesis of transmembrane electrochemical potential of protons. Electrons can also prematurely spin-off from the respiratory complexes and univalently reduce di-oxygen to generate ROS, an important signaling molecule that can be toxic at high concentrations. Production of ATP and ROS are intimately linked by the respiratory chain and the genesis of one or the other inherently depends on the metabolic state of mitochondria. Various control mechanisms converge on mitochondria to adjust ATP and ROS output in response to changing cellular demands. One control mechanism that has gained a high amount of attention recently is S-glutathionylation, a redox sensitive covalent modification that involves formation of a disulfide bridge between glutathione and an available protein cysteine thiol. A number of S-glutathionylation targets have been identified in mitochondria. It has also been established that S-glutathionylation reactions in mitochondria are mediated by the thiol oxidoreductase glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2. In the following review, emerging knowledge on S-glutathionylation reactions and its importance in modulation mitochondrial ATP and ROS production will be discussed. Major focus will be placed on Complex I of the respiratory chain since 1 it is a target for reversible S-glutathionylation by Grx2 and 2 deregulation of Complex I S-glutathionylation is associated with development of various disease states particularly heart disease. Other mitochondrial enzymes and how their S-glutathionylation profile is affected in different disease states will also be discussed.

  19. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet alters myocardial oxidative stress and impairs recovery of cardiac function after ischemia and reperfusion in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Lloyd, Steven G

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is associated with elevated risk of heart disease. A solid understanding of the safety and potential adverse effects of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet (HFLCD) similar to that used by humans for weight loss on the heart is crucial. High fat intake is known to promote increases in reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial damage. We hypothesized that there would be adverse effects of HFLCD on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury through enhancing oxidative stress injury and impairing mitochondrial biogenesis in a nongenetic, diet-induced rat model of obesity. To test the hypothesis, 250-g male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an obesity-promoting diet for 7 weeks to induce obesity, then switched to HFLCD or a low-fat control diet for 2 weeks. Isolated hearts underwent global low flow ischemia for 60 minutes and reperfusion for 60 minutes. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet resulted in greater weight gain and lower myocardial glycogen, plasma adiponectin, and insulin. Myocardial antioxidant gene transcript and protein expression of superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced in HFLCD, along with increased oxidative gene NADPH oxidase-4 transcript and xanthine oxidase activity, and a 37% increase in nitrated protein (nitrotyrosine) in HFLCD hearts. The cardiac expression of key mitochondrial regulatory factors such as nuclear respiratory factor-1 and transcription factor A-mitochondrial were inhibited and myocardial mitochondrial DNA copy number decreased. The cardiac expression of adiponectin and its receptors was down-regulated in HFLCD. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet impaired recovery of left ventricular rate-pressure product after ischemia/reperfusion and led to 3.5-fold increased injury as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release. In conclusion, HFLCD leads to increased ischemic myocardial injury and impaired recovery of function after reperfusion and was associated with attenuation of mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced oxidative stress in obese rats

  20. Impaired presynaptic cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium dynamics in aged compared to young adult hippocampal CA1 synapses ameliorated by calcium chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkikh, A A; Carlen, P L

    2009-04-10

    Impaired regulation of presynaptic intracellular calcium is thought to adversely affect synaptic plasticity and cognition in the aged brain. We studied presynaptic cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium (Ca) dynamics using axonally loaded Calcium Green-AM and Rhod-2 AM fluorescence respectively in young (2-3 months) and aged (23-26 months) CA3 to CA1 Schaffer collateral excitatory synapses in hippocampal brain slices from Fisher 344 rats. After a tetanus (100 Hz, 200 ms), the presynaptic cytosolic Ca peaked at approximately 10 s in the young and approximately 12 s in the aged synapses. Administration of the membrane permeant Ca chelator, bis (O-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM), significantly attenuated the Ca response in the aged slices, but not in the young slices. The presynaptic mitochondrial Ca signal was much slower, peaking at approximately 90 s in both young and aged synapses, returning to baseline by 300 s. BAPTA-AM significantly attenuated the mitochondrial calcium signal only in the young synapses. Uncoupling mitochondrial respiration by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) application evoked a massive intracellular cytosolic Ca increase and a significant drop of mitochondrial Ca, especially in aged slices wherein the cytosolic Ca signal disappeared after approximately 150 s of washout and the mitochondrial Ca signal disappeared after 25 s of washout. These signals were preserved in aged slices by BAPTA-AM. Five minutes of oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) was associated with a significant increase in cytosolic Ca in both young and aged synapses, which was irreversible in the aged synapses. These responses were significantly attenuated by BAPTA-AM in both the young and aged synapses. These results support the hypothesis that increasing intracellular calcium neuronal buffering in aged rats ameliorates age-related impaired presynaptic Ca regulation.

  1. Melatonin improves mitochondrial function in inguinal white adipose tissue of Zücker diabetic fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenéz-Aranda, Aroa; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Mohammad A-Serrano, María; Reiter, Russel J; Agil, Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue may contribute to obesity-related metabolic derangements such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because mitochondria are a target for melatonin action, the goal of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on mitochondrial function in white (WAT) and beige inguinal adipose tissue of Zücker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, a model of obesity-related T2DM. In this experimental model, melatonin reduces obesity and improves the metabolic profile. At 6 wk of age, ZDF rats and lean littermates (ZL) were subdivided into two groups, each composed of four rats: control (C-ZDF and C-ZL) and treated with oral melatonin in the drinking water (10 mg/kg/day) for 6 wk (M-ZDF and M-ZL). After the treatment period, animals were sacrificed, tissues dissected, and mitochondrial function assessed in isolated organelles. Melatonin increased the respiratory control ratio (RCR) in mitochondria from white fat of both lean (by 26.5%, P types of fat, white and beige, in both lean and obese rats. These results demonstrate that chronic oral melatonin improves mitochondrial respiration and reduces the oxidative status and susceptibility to apoptosis in white and beige adipocytes. These melatonin effects help to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and thereby to improve obesity-related metabolic disorders such as diabetes and dyslipidemia of ZDF rats.

  2. Regulation of mitochondrial function and endoplasmic reticulum stress by nitric oxide in pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Terron-Bautista, José; Beltrán-Povea, Amparo; Cahuana, Gladys M; Soria, Bernat; Nabil, Hajji; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) are global processes that are interrelated and regulated by several stress factors. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional biomolecule with many varieties of physiological and pathological functions, such as the regulation of cytochrome c inhibition and activation of the immune response, ERS and DNA damage; these actions are dose-dependent. It has been reported that in embryonic stem cells, NO has a dual role, controlling differentiation, survival and pluripotency, but the molecular mechanisms by which it modulates these functions are not yet known. Low levels of NO maintain pluripotency and induce mitochondrial biogenesis. It is well established that NO disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain and causes changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ flux that induce ERS. Thus, at high concentrations, NO becomes a potential differentiation agent due to the relationship between ERS and the unfolded protein response in many differentiated cell lines. Nevertheless, many studies have demonstrated the need for physiological levels of NO for a proper ERS response. In this review, we stress the importance of the relationships between NO levels, ERS and mitochondrial dysfunction that control stem cell fate as a new approach to possible cell therapy strategies. PMID:28289506

  3. Mitochondrial remnant organelles of Giardia function in iron-sulphur protein maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Jorge; León-Avila, Gloria; Sánchez, Lidya B; Sutak, Robert; Tachezy, Jan; van der Giezen, Mark; Hernández, Manuel; Müller, Miklós; Lucocq, John M

    2003-11-13

    Giardia intestinalis (syn. lamblia) is one of the most widespread intestinal protozoan pathogens worldwide, causing hundreds of thousands of cases of diarrhoea each year. Giardia is a member of the diplomonads, often described as an ancient protist group whose primitive nature is suggested by the lack of typical eukaryotic organelles (for example, mitochondria, peroxisomes), the presence of a poorly developed endomembrane system and by their early branching in a number of gene phylogenies. The discovery of nuclear genes of putative mitochondrial ancestry in Giardia and the recent identification of mitochondrial remnant organelles in amitochondrial protists such as Entamoeba histolytica and Trachipleistophora hominis suggest that the eukaryotic amitochondrial state is not a primitive condition but is rather the result of reductive evolution. Using an in vitro protein reconstitution assay and specific antibodies against IscS and IscU--two mitochondrial marker proteins involved in iron-sulphur cluster biosynthesis--here we demonstrate that Giardia contains mitochondrial remnant organelles (mitosomes) bounded by double membranes that function in iron-sulphur protein maturation. Our results indicate that Giardia is not primitively amitochondrial and that it has retained a functional organelle derived from the original mitochondrial endosymbiont.

  4. Impaired olfactory function in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseoglu, Sezen Bozkurt; Koseoglu, Sabri; Deveer, Ruya; Derin, Serhan; Kececioglu, Mehmet; Sahan, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder which affects 6.6% of women of child-bearing age. Although olfactory dysfunction is frequent in the population and it negatively affects quality of life, neither physicians or patients consider this important. This case-control study included 30 patients diagnosed with PCOS, and 25 healthy age-matched controls. Sniffin' sticks tests (BurghartGmbH, Wedel, Germany) were used to analyze olfactory functions, and the Beck Depression Inventory was used to evaluate depressive symptoms. The total odor score was significantly lower in the PCOS group compared to the control group (pdepression score was higher in the PCOS group (pDepression Score. Patients with PCOS have impaired olfactory function. This might be related to depressive disorders that are also observed in those patients.

  5. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group.

  6. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

  7. Impaired mitochondrial degradation by autophagy in the skeletal muscle of the aged female interleukin 10 null mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Fred; Abadir, Peter; Marx, Ruth; Westbrook, Reyhan; Cooke, Carol; Yang, Huanle; Walston, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and muscle aging are closely linked. Mitochondrial clearance is a process to dampen inflammation and is a critical pre-requisite to mitobiogenesis. The combined effect of aging and chronic inflammation on mitochondrial degradation by autophagy is understudied. In interleukin 10 null mouse (IL-10(tm/tm)), a rodent model of chronic inflammation, we studied the effects of aging and inflammation on mitochondrial clearance. We show that aging in IL-10(tm/tm) is associated with reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial death signaling and altered formation of autophagosomes, compared to age-matched C57BL/6 controls. Moreover, skeletal muscles of old IL-10(tm/tm) mice have the highest levels of damaged mitochondria with disrupted mitochondrial ultrastructure and autophagosomes compared to all other groups. These observations highlight the interface between chronic inflammation and aging on altered mitochondrial biology in skeletal muscles.

  8. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2015-06-05

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N'-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD.

  9. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and exercise capacity in HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy and elevated p-lactate levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Birgit Thorup; Calbet, José A L; Møller, Kirsten

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy or elevated p-lactate levels.......To investigate the skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy or elevated p-lactate levels....

  10. Functional connectivity correlates of response inhibition impairment in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantoni, Enrico; Michelon, Silvia; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Titton, Francesca; Manara, Renzo; Clementi, Maurizio; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by high levels of cognitive control and behavioral perseveration. The present study aims at exploring inhibitory control abilities and their functional connectivity correlates in patients with AN. Inhibitory control - an executive function that allows the realization of adaptive behavior according to environmental contingencies - has been assessed by means of the Stop-Signal paradigm. The study involved 155 patients with lifetime AN and 102 healthy women. A subsample underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and was genotyped for COMT and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. AN patients showed an impaired response inhibition and a disruption of the functional connectivity of the ventral attention circuit, a neural network implicated in behavioral response when a stimulus occurs unexpected. The 5-HTTLPR genotype appears to significantly interact with the functional connectivity of ventral attention network in explaining task performance in both patients and controls, suggesting a role of the serotoninergic system in mechanisms of response selection. The disruption of the ventral attention network in patients with AN suggests lower efficiency of bottom-up signal filtering, which might be involved in difficulties to adapt behavioral responses to environmental needs. Our findings deserve further research to confirm their scientific and therapeutic implications.

  11. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  12. Neuropsychologic function of children with severe hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J J; Rapin, I; Wilson, B C; Van Denburg, F V

    1975-12-01

    A neuropsychologic and medical study was carried out on a selected sample of 34 hearing-impaired children aged seven to 10 years at the onset of the study. In 16 children the cause of the hearing loss was thought to be exogenous. Eight of these had evidence for organic brain dysfunction. Nine children were thought to have genetic etiologies, and in nine no cause could be determined (sporadic hearing loss). Medical examination revealed several unsuspected abnormalities, particularly visual ones. Motor and visual motor deficits were frequent among hearing-impaired children with brain damage. The Performance Scale of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, and Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, as well as the Paper Folding item of the Hiskey-Nebraska Test of Learning Aptitude appeared sensitive to the presence of brain damage. The mean score for the WISC Performance Scale fell within the average range for hearing children, supporting previous findings of cognitive competence of the deaf. In this sample, Hiskey-Nebraska scores tended to be lower than WISC scores. Reasons for this discrepancy were suggested and did not appear to be accounted for by brain damage. Deficits in items requiring visual memory, sequencing, and categorization were relatively prevalent but showed no etiologic predilection. They were thought to be related to the consequence of hearing loss rather than to brain damage. Difficulty with stereognosis highlighted the problem of deciding why a hearing-impaired child might fail a particular task. This difficulty suggested that failure might not indicate a deficit in the function the task was designed to measure, but rather, reliance on an inefficient strategy for success.

  13. CBS and CSE are critical for maintenance of mitochondrial function and glucocorticoid production in adrenal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang-Nan; Liu, Yu-Jian; Duan, Guo-Li; Zhao, Wei; Li, Xiao-Han; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Ni, Xin

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are known to play a central role in adrenocortical steroidogenesis. Recently, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous transmitter endogenously produced by cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), has been found to improve mitochondrial function. The present study aimed at examining whether CBS and CSE are expressed in adrenal glands, and investigated the role of these enzymes in the maintenance of mitochondrial function and the production of glucocorticoids in adrenocortical cells. Both CBS and CSE are present in murine adrenocortical cells and account for H2S generation in adrenal glands. Using a combination of both in vivo and in vitro approaches, we demonstrated that either CBS/CSE inhibitors or small interfering RNAs led to mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction, which meanwhile resulted in blunted corticosterone responses to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). These effects were significantly attenuated by the treatment of H2S donor GYY4137. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) also caused mitochondrial damage, thereby resulting in adrenal insufficiency. Moreover, LPS inhibited CBS/CSE expression and H2S production in adrenal glands, while H₂S donor GYY4137 protected against LPS-induced mitochondrial damage and hyporesponsiveness to ACTH. Local suppression of CBS or CSE in adrenal glands significantly increased the mortality in endotoxemic mice, which was also improved by GYY4137. The identification of endogenous H2S generation as critical regulators of adrenocortical responsiveness might result in the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of relative adrenal insufficiency during sepsis. Endogenous H₂S plays a critical role in the maintenance of mitochondrial function in the adrenal cortex, thereby resulting in an adequate adrenocortical response to ACTH.

  14. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial functions in the intestinal Caco-2/15 cell line.

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    Rame Taha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are central mechanisms in various pathological conditions, they have not been extensively studied in the gastrointestinal tract, which is known to be constantly exposed to luminal oxidants from ingested foods. Key among these is the simultaneous consumption of iron salts and ascorbic acid, which can cause oxidative damage to biomolecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of the present work was to evaluate how iron-ascorbate (FE/ASC-mediated lipid peroxidation affects mitochondrion functioning in Caco-2/15 cells. Our results show that treatment of Caco-2/15 cells with FE/ASC (0.2 mM/2 mM (1 increased malondialdehyde levels assessed by HPLC; (2 reduced ATP production noted by luminescence assay; (3 provoked dysregulation of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis as evidenced by confocal fluorescence microscopy; (4 upregulated the protein expression of cytochrome C and apoptotic inducing factor, indicating exaggerated apoptosis; (5 affected mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II, III and IV; (6 elicited mtDNA lesions as illustrated by the raised levels of 8-OHdG; (7 lowered DNA glycosylase, one of the first lines of defense against 8-OHdG mutagenicity; and (8 altered the gene expression and protein mass of mitochondrial transcription factors (mtTFA, mtTFB1, mtTFB2 without any effects on RNA Polymerase. The presence of the powerful antioxidant BHT (50 microM prevented the occurrence of oxidative stress and most of the mitochondrial abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our findings indicate that acute exposure of Caco-2/15 cells to FE/ASC-catalyzed peroxidation produces harmful effects on mitochondrial functions and DNA integrity, which are abrogated by the powerful exogenous BHT antioxidant. Functional derangements of mitochondria may have implications in oxidative stress-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  15. Medroxyprogesterone acetate impairs human dendritic cell activation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe Calla, N E; Ghonime, M G; Cherpes, T L; Vicetti Miguel, R D

    2015-05-01

    Does medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) impair human dendritic cell (DC) activation and function? In vitro MPA treatment suppressed expression of CD40 and CD80 by human primary DCs responding to Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist stimulation (i.e. DC activation). Moreover, this MPA-mediated decrease in CD40 expression impaired DC capacity to stimulate T cell proliferation (i.e. DC function). MPA is the active molecule in Depo-Provera(®) (DMPA), a commonly used injectable hormonal contraceptive (HC). Although DMPA treatment of mice prior to viral mucosal tissue infection impaired the capacity of DCs to up-regulate CD40 and CD80 and prime virus-specific T cell proliferation, neither DC activation marker expression nor the ability of DCs to promote T cell proliferation were affected by in vitro progesterone treatment of human DCs generated from peripheral blood monocytes. This cross-sectional study examined MPA-mediated effects on the activation and function of human primary untouched peripheral blood DCs. Human DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by negative immunomagnetic selection were incubated for 24 h with various concentrations of MPA. After an additional 24 h incubation with the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flow cytometry was used to evaluate DC phenotype (i.e. expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR). In separate experiments, primary untouched human DCs were sequentially MPA-treated, poly I:C-activated, and incubated for 7 days with fluorescently labeled naïve allogeneic T cells. Flow cytometry was then used to quantify allogeneic T cell proliferation. Several pharmacologically relevant concentrations of MPA dramatically reduced CD40 and CD80 expression in human primary DCs responding to the immunostimulant poly I:C. In addition, MPA-treated DCs displayed a reduced capacity to promote allogeneic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation. In other DC: T cell co-cultures, the addition of antibody blocking the CD40

  16. The Reliability of the CVI Range: A Functional Vision Assessment for Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Children who are identified as visually impaired frequently have a functional vision assessment as one way to determine how their visual impairment affects their educational performance. The CVI Range is a functional vision assessment for children with cortical visual impairment. The purpose of the study presented here was to examine the…

  17. The Reliability of the CVI Range: A Functional Vision Assessment for Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Children who are identified as visually impaired frequently have a functional vision assessment as one way to determine how their visual impairment affects their educational performance. The CVI Range is a functional vision assessment for children with cortical visual impairment. The purpose of the study presented here was to examine the…

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the limelight of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkov, Anatoly A; Beal, M Flint; Thomas, Bobby

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with unknown etiology. It is marked by widespread neurodegeneration in the brain with profound loss of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Several theories of biochemical abnormalities have been linked to pathogenesis of PD of which mitochondrial dysfunction due to an impairment of mitochondrial complex I and subsequent oxidative stress seems to take the center stage in experimental models of PD and in postmortem tissues of sporadic forms of illness. Recent identification of specific gene mutations and their influence on mitochondrial functions has further reinforced the relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in disease pathogenesis. In both sporadic and familial forms of PD abnormal mitochondrial paradigms associated with disease include impaired functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, aging associated damage to mitochondrial DNA, impaired calcium buffering, and anomalies in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Here we provide an overview of specific mitochondrial functions affected in sporadic and familial PD that play a role in disease pathogenesis. We propose to utilize these gained insights to further streamline and focus the research to better understand mitochondria's role in disease development and exploit potential mitochondrial targets for therapeutic interventions in PD pathogenesis.

  19. Functional Genomic Analysis of Human Mitochondrial RNA Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley R. Wolf

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Both strands of human mtDNA are transcribed in continuous, multigenic units that are cleaved into the mature rRNAs, tRNAs, and mRNAs required for respiratory chain biogenesis. We sought to systematically identify nuclear-encoded proteins that contribute to processing of mtRNAs within the organelle. First, we devised and validated a multiplex MitoString assay that quantitates 27 mature and precursor mtDNA transcripts. Second, we applied MitoString profiling to evaluate the impact of silencing each of 107 mitochondrial-localized, predicted RNA-binding proteins. With the resulting data set, we rediscovered the roles of recently identified RNA-processing enzymes, detected unanticipated roles of known disease genes in RNA processing, and identified new regulatory factors. We demonstrate that one such factor, FASTKD4, modulates the half-lives of a subset of mt-mRNAs and associates with mtRNAs in vivo. MitoString profiling may be useful for diagnosing and deciphering the pathogenesis of mtDNA disorders.

  20. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Beekman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is r

  1. Separation of the gluconeogenic and mitochondrial functions of pgc-1α through s6 kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lustig, Y.; Ruas, J.L.; Estall, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    of gluconeogenesis in cultured hepatocytes and in vivo, while leaving the functions of PGC-1α as an activator of mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation genes completely intact. These phosphorylations interfere with the ability of PGC-1α to bind to HNF4α, a transcription factor required for gluconeogenesis, while...

  2. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Beekman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is

  3. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  4. Oxidation of intramyocellular lipids is dependent on mitochondrial function and the availability of extracellular fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corpeleijn, Eva; Hessvik, Nina P.; Bakke, Siril S.; Levin, Klaus; Blaak, Ellen E.; Thoresen, G. Hege; Gaster, Michael; Rustan, Arild C.

    2010-01-01

    Corpeleijn E, Hessvik NP, Bakke SS, Levin K, Blaak EE, Thoresen GH, Gaster M, Rustan AC. Oxidation of intramyocellular lipids is dependent on mitochondrial function and the availability of extracellular fatty acids. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 299: E14-E22, 2010. First published May 4, 2010; doi:1

  5. IFPA meeting 2015 workshop report I: placental mitochondrial function, transport systems and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco-Miotto, T; Blundell, C; Buckberry, S; Chamley, L; Chong, S; Cottrell, E; Dawson, P; Hanna, C; Holland, O; Lewis, R M; Moritz, K; Myatt, L; Perkins, A V; Powell, T; Saffery, R; Sferruzzi-Perri, A; Sibley, C; Simmons, D; O'Tierney-Ginn, P F

    2016-12-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2015 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops covered areas of placental regulation and nutrient handling: 1) placental epigenetics; 2) placental mitochondrial function; 3) placental transport systems.

  6. Regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetic function by hydrogen sulfide. Part II : Pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modis, Katalin; Bos, Eelke M.; Calzia, Enrico; van Goor, Harry; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hellmich, Mark R.; Radermacher, Peter; Bouillaud, Frederic; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Emerging work demonstrates the dual regulation of mitochondrial function by hydrogen sulfide (H2S), including, at lower concentrations, a stimulatory effect as an electron donor, and, at higher concentrations, an inhibitory effect on cytochrome C oxidase. In the current article, we overview the path

  7. Regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetic function by hydrogen sulfide. Part II : Pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modis, Katalin; Bos, Eelke M.; Calzia, Enrico; van Goor, Harry; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hellmich, Mark R.; Radermacher, Peter; Bouillaud, Frederic; Szabo, Csaba

    Emerging work demonstrates the dual regulation of mitochondrial function by hydrogen sulfide (H2S), including, at lower concentrations, a stimulatory effect as an electron donor, and, at higher concentrations, an inhibitory effect on cytochrome C oxidase. In the current article, we overview the

  8. Executive functioning in preschoolers with specific language impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance eVissers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Specific Language Impairment (SLI is still largely beyond our understanding. In this review, a neuropsychological perspective on language impairments in SLI is taken, focusing specifically on executive functioning (EF in preschoolers (age range: 2.6-6.1 years with SLI. Based on the studies described in this review, it can be concluded that similar to school-aged children with SLI, preschoolers with SLI show difficulties in working memory, inhibition and shifting, as revealed by both performance based measures and behavioural ratings. It seems plausible that a complex, reciprocal relationship exists between language and EF throughout development. Future research is needed to examine if, and if yes how, language and EF interact in SLI. Broad neuropsychological assessment in which both language and EF are taken into account may contribute to early detection of SLI. This in turn can lead to early and tailored treatment of children with (suspected SLI aimed not only at stimulating language development but also at strengthening EF.

  9. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Cristóbal-García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks and short-term (3 weeks effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW, OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water, OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW, or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis are mediated by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee [Radiation Biotechnology Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Sang [College of Natural Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion is a well-known marker for oxidative stress and aging, and contributes to harmful effects in cultured cells and animal tissues. mtDNA biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM) are essential for the maintenance of mtDNA, as well as the transcription and replication of mitochondrial genomes. Considering that oxidative stress is known to affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes mtDNA deletion by modulating the mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby leading to cellular senescence. Therefore, we examined the effects of IR on ROS levels, cellular senescence, mitochondrial biogenesis, and mtDNA deletion in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Young IMR-90 cells at population doubling (PD) 39 were irradiated at 4 or 8 Gy. Old cells at PD55, and H2O2-treated young cells at PD 39, were compared as a positive control. The IR increased the intracellular ROS level, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) activity, and mtDNA common deletion (4977 bp), and it decreased the mRNA expression of NRF-1 and TFAM in IMR-90 cells. Similar results were also observed in old cells (PD 55) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated young cells. To confirm that a increase in ROS level is essential for mtDNA deletion and changes of mitochondrial biogenesis in irradiated cells, the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were examined. In irradiated and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated cells, 5 mM NAC significantly attenuated the increases of ROS, mtDNA deletion, and SA-{beta}-gal activity, and recovered from decreased expressions of NRF-1 and TFAM mRNA. These results suggest that ROS is a key cause of IR-induced mtDNA deletion, and the suppression of the mitochondrial biogenesis gene may mediate this process.

  11. Tetracyclines Disturb Mitochondrial Function across Eukaryotic Models: A Call for Caution in Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Moullan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, tetracyclines, such as doxycycline, have become broadly used to control gene expression by virtue of the Tet-on/Tet-off systems. However, the wide range of direct effects of tetracycline use has not been fully appreciated. We show here that these antibiotics induce a mitonuclear protein imbalance through their effects on mitochondrial translation, an effect that likely reflects the evolutionary relationship between mitochondria and proteobacteria. Even at low concentrations, tetracyclines induce mitochondrial proteotoxic stress, leading to changes in nuclear gene expression and altered mitochondrial dynamics and function in commonly used cell types, as well as worms, flies, mice, and plants. Given that tetracyclines are so widely applied in research, scientists should be aware of their potentially confounding effects on experimental results. Furthermore, these results caution against extensive use of tetracyclines in livestock due to potential downstream impacts on the environment and human health.

  12. Impaired quality and efficiency of sleep impairs cognitive functioning in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michelle; Ross, Ian Louis; Wolf, Pedro Sofio Abril; Thomas, Kevin Garth Flusk

    2017-04-01

    Standard replacement therapy for Addison's disease (AD) does not restore a normal circadian rhythm. Periods of sub- and supra- physiological cortisol levels experienced by patients with AD likely induce disrupted sleep. Given that healthy sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation, the novelty of the current study was to characterise, using objective measures, the relationship between sleep and memory in patients with AD, and to examine the hypothesis that poor sleep is a biological mechanism underlying memory impairment in those patients. We used a within-subjects design. Ten patients with AD and 10 matched healthy controls completed standardised neuropsychological tests assessing declarative memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test) and procedural memory (Finger Tapping Task) before and after a period of actigraphy-measured sleep, and before and after a period of waking. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD experienced disrupted sleep characterised by poorer sleep efficiency and more time spent awake. Patients also showed impaired verbal learning and memory relative to healthy controls (p=0.007). Furthermore, whereas healthy controls' declarative memory performance benefited from a period of sleep compared to waking (p=0.032), patients with AD derived no such benefit from sleep (p=0.448). Regarding the procedural memory task, analyses detected no significant between-group differences (all p's<0.065), and neither group showed significant sleep-enhanced performance. We demonstrated, using actigraphy and standardized measures of memory performance, an association between sleep disturbances and cognitive deficits in patients with AD. These results suggest that, in patients with AD, the source of memory deficits is, at least to some extent, disrupted sleep patterns that interfere with optimal consolidation of previously-learned declarative information. Hence, treating the sleep disturbances that are frequently experienced by patients with AD may

  13. Reorganization of functional networks in mild cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M Buldú

    Full Text Available Whether the balance between integration and segregation of information in the brain is damaged in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI subjects is still a matter of debate. Here we characterize the functional network architecture of MCI subjects by means of complex networks analysis. Magnetoencephalograms (MEG time series obtained during a memory task were evaluated by synchronization likelihood (SL, to quantify the statistical dependence between MEG signals and to obtain the functional networks. Graphs from MCI subjects show an enhancement of the strength of connections, together with an increase in the outreach parameter, suggesting that memory processing in MCI subjects is associated with higher energy expenditure and a tendency toward random structure, which breaks the balance between integration and segregation. All features are reproduced by an evolutionary network model that simulates the degenerative process of a healthy functional network to that associated with MCI. Due to the high rate of conversion from MCI to Alzheimer Disease (AD, these results show that the analysis of functional networks could be an appropriate tool for the early detection of both MCI and AD.

  14. Targeting mitochondrial metal dyshomeostasis for the treatment of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Jeffrey R

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial impairment and metal dyshomeostasis are suggested to be associated with many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Friedreich's ataxia. Treatments aimed at restoring metal homeostasis are highly effective in models of these diseases, and clinical trials hold promise. However, in general, the effect of these treatments on mitochondrial metal homeostasis is unclear, and the contribution of mitochondrial metal dyshomeostasis to disease pathogenesis requires further investigation. This review describes the role of metals in mitochondria in health, how mitochondrial metals are disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases, and potential therapeutics aimed at restoring mitochondrial metal homeostasis and function.

  15. Modulating molecular chaperones improves sensory fiber recovery and mitochondrial function in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael J; Pan, Pan; Farmer, Kevin L; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2012-05-01

    Quantification of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (iENFs) is an important approach to stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and is a promising clinical endpoint for identifying beneficial therapeutics. Mechanistically, diabetes decreases neuronal mitochondrial function and enhancing mitochondrial respiratory capacity may aid neuronal recovery from glucotoxic insults. We have proposed that modulating the activity and expression of heat shock proteins (Hsp) may be of benefit in treating DPN. KU-32 is a C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor that improved thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic C57Bl/6 mice but it was not determined if this was associated with an increase in iENF density and mitochondrial function. After 16 weeks of diabetes, Swiss Webster mice showed decreased electrophysiological and psychosensory responses and a >30% loss of iENFs. Treatment of the mice with ten weekly doses of 20mg/kg KU-32 significantly reversed pre-existing deficits in nerve conduction velocity and responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli. KU-32 therapy significantly reversed the pre-existing loss of iENFs despite the identification of a sub-group of drug-treated diabetic mice that showed improved thermal sensitivity but no increase in iENF density. To determine if the improved clinical indices correlated with enhanced mitochondrial activity, sensory neurons were isolated and mitochondrial bioenergetics assessed ex vivo using extracellular flux technology. Diabetes decreased maximal respiratory capacity in sensory neurons and this deficit was improved following KU-32 treatment. In conclusion, KU-32 improved physiological and morphologic markers of degenerative neuropathy and drug efficacy may be related to enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetics in sensory neurons.

  16. SIRT1 is required for AMPK activation and the beneficial effects of resveratrol on mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Nathan L.; Gomes, Ana P.; Ling, Alvin J.Y.; Duarte, Filipe V.; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; North, Brian J.; Agarwal, Beamon; Ye, Lan; Ramadori, Giorgio; Teodoro, Joao S.; Hubbard, Basil P.; Varela, Ana T.; Davis, James G.; Varamini, Behzad; Hafner, Angela; Moaddel, Ruin; Rolo, Anabela P.; Coppari, Roberto; Palmeira, Carlos M.; de Cabo, Rafael; Baur, Joseph A.; Sinclair, David A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Resveratrol induces mitochondrial biogenesis and protects against metabolic decline but whether SIRT1 mediates these benefits is the subject of debate. To circumvent the developmental defects of germ-line SIRT1 knockouts, we have developed the first inducible system that permits whole-body deletion of SIRT1 in adult mice. Mice treated with a moderate dose of resveratrol showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and function, AMPK activation and increased NAD+ levels in skeletal muscle, whereas SIRT1 knockouts displayed none of these benefits. A mouse overexpressing SIRT1 mimicked these effects. A high dose of resveratrol activated AMPK in a SIRT1-independent manner, demonstrating that resveratrol dosage is a critical factor. Importantly, at both doses of resveratrol no improvements in mitochondrial function were observed in animals lacking SIRT1. Together these data indicate that SIRT1 plays an essential role in the ability of moderate doses of resveratrol to stimulate AMPK and improve mitochondrial function both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22560220

  17. Age-related changes in mitochondrial function and antioxidative enzyme activity in fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingying; Wong, Yee Ting; Chen, Jie; Ruan, Runsheng

    2007-03-01

    We have previously reported the changes of mitochondrial function and/or antioxidative enzyme efficiency in a few organs of rats as a result of aging. However, there is a further need to reach a conclusion about their interactions in biological functions based on other evaluation tips like the usage of advanced methods and the exploring of crucial biochemical parameters. Therefore, we investigated the mitochondrial inner membrane functional integrity by the analysis of respiration control ratio and membrane potential in the liver and brain of young (8 months) and old (26 months) Fischer 344 rats. The disintegration of mitochondrial membrane integrity was determined higher in the liver of old rats than that of young rats. This was well correlated with the decrease of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and glutathione peroxidase activities in most of the organs, except for the increase of catalase activity in heart of old rats. Similarly, the protein expressions of these enzymes were down regulated in the liver and kidney of old rats. Taken together, we suggest that the mitochondrial malfunction in old rats is associated with the decrease of antioxidative enzyme efficiency. And the data are also discussed with changes in the results from inter-laboratories.

  18. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asdonk, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.asdonk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Motz, Inga; Werner, Nikos [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Coch, Christoph; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  19. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  20. WJD 5th Anniversary Special Issues(2): Type 2 diabetes Effects of exercise training on mitochondrial function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steen; Larsen; Stinna; Skaaby; J?rn; W; Helge; Flemming; Dela

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a decreased ability of insulin to facilitate glucose uptake into insulin sensitive tissue,i.e.,skeletal muscle.The mechanism behind this is at the moment unresolved.It has been suggested that increased amount of lipids inside the skeletal muscle(intramuscular triglyceride,diacylglycerol and ceramides)will impair insulin action in skeletal muscle,but data are not consistent in the human literature.It has also been hypothesized that the impaired insulin sensitivity is due to a dysfunction in the mitochondria resulting in an impaired ability to oxidize lipids,but the majority of the literature is not supporting this hypothesis.Recently it has been suggested that the production of reactive oxygen species play an essential role in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity.It is well accepted that physical activity(endurance,strength and high intensity training)improves insulin sensitivity in healthy humans and in patients with type 2 diabetes.Whether patients with type 2 diabetes have the same beneficial effects(same improvement)as control subjects,when it comes to regular physical activity in regard to mitochondrial function,is not established in the literature.This review will focus only on the effect of physical activity on skeletal muscle(mitochondrial function)in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Relationships between mitochondrial function and metabolic flexibility in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tineke van de Weijer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility have been implicated in the etiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D, yet their interrelationship remains speculative. We investigated these interrelationships in a group of T2D and obese normoglycemic control subjects. METHODS: 49 non-insulin dependent male T2D patients and 54 male control subjects were enrolled, and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and indirect calorimetry were performed. A muscle biopsy was taken and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL was measured. In vivo mitochondrial function was measured by PCr recovery in 30 T2D patients and 31 control subjects. RESULTS: Fasting NEFA levels were significantly elevated in T2D patients compared with controls, but IMCL was not different. Mitochondrial function in T2D patients was compromised by 12.5% (p<0.01. Whole body glucose disposal (WGD was higher at baseline and lower after insulin stimulation. Metabolic flexibility (ΔRER was lower in the type 2 diabetic patients (0.050±0.033 vs. 0.093±0.050, p<0.01. Mitochondrial function was the sole predictor of basal respiratory exchange ratio (RER (R(2 = 0.18, p<0.05; whereas WGD predicted both insulin-stimulated RER (R(2 = 0.29, p<0.001 and metabolic flexibility (R(2 = 0.40, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that defects in skeletal muscle in vivo mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetic patients are only reflected in basal substrate oxidation and highlight the importance of glucose disposal rate as a determinant of substrate utilization in response to insulin.

  2. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-06-21

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products.

  3. Impairment of T cell function in parasitic infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Rodrigues

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In mammals subverted as hosts by protozoan parasites, the latter and/or the agonists they release are detected and processed by sensors displayed by many distinct immune cell lineages, in a tissue(s-dependent context. Focusing on the T lymphocyte lineage, we review our present understanding on its transient or durable functional impairment over the course of the developmental program of the intracellular parasites Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Trypanosoma cruzi in their mammalian hosts. Strategies employed by protozoa to down-regulate T lymphocyte function may act at the initial moment of naïve T cell priming, rendering T cells anergic or unresponsive throughout infection, or later, exhausting T cells due to antigen persistence. Furthermore, by exploiting host feedback mechanisms aimed at maintaining immune homeostasis, parasites can enhance T cell apoptosis. We will discuss how infections with prominent intracellular protozoan parasites lead to a general down-regulation of T cell function through T cell anergy and exhaustion, accompanied by apoptosis, and ultimately allowing pathogen persistence.

  4. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Protection of melatonin against damage of sperm mito-chondrial function induced by reactive oxygen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-JunShang; Yu-FengHuang; Zhang-QunYe; XiaoYu; Wan-JiaGu

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To study the mitochondrial function damage of sperm in-duced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the protection of melatonin (MLT) against the damage. Methods: Normal function spermatozoa were selected from semen samples by Percoll gradi-ent centrifugation technique. The ROS generated by the hypoxan-thine xanthine oxidase system was incubated with the normal sper-matozoa in the presence or absence of MLT (6 retool/L) for 30 and 60 minutes.

  6. Neuropsychological functioning in youth with obsessive compulsive disorder: an examination of executive function and memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Adam B; Larson, Michael J; Park, Jennifer M; McGuire, Joseph F; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2014-04-30

    Preliminary research suggests neuropsychological deficits in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) similar to those in adults; however, small samples and methodological confounds limit interpretation. We aimed to examine the rates and clinical correlates of cognitive sequelae in youth with OCD, focusing on executive functioning and memory abilities. Youth ages 7-17 years with OCD (N=96) completed a hypothesis-driven neuropsychological battery (including the Rey-Osterreith Complex Figure, California Verbal Learning Test, and subtests of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System and Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning) that primarily assessed executive functioning, memory and processing speed. Cognitive sequelae were identified in 65% of youth (37% using a more stringent definition of impairment). Magnitude of cognitive sequelae was not associated with OCD severity or age; however, greater neuropsychological impairments were found amongst youth prescribed atypical neuroleptics and those diagnosed with comorbid tic disorders. Comorbidity burden was associated with presence of neuropsychological impairment, but was not specific to any single test. Findings suggest that the presence of cognitive sequelae is prevalent amongst treatment-seeking youth with OCD. Deficits were found in executive functioning and non-verbal memory performance but these impairments were not associated with OCD severity.

  7. Pulmonary function impairment measured by pulmonary function tests in long-term survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, R.L.; Thönissen, N.M.; van der Pal, H.J.H.; Bresser, P.; Hanselaar, W.; Koning, C.C.E.; Oldenburger, F.; Heij, H.A.; Caron, H.N.; Kremer, L.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The prevalence and risk factors of pulmonary function impairment were investigated in a large cohort of CCSs treated with potentially pulmotoxic therapy with a minimal follow-up of 5 years after diagnosis. The study

  8. Compensating for Executive Function Impairments after TBI: A Single Case Study of Functional Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkstra, Lyn S.; Flora, Tracy L.

    2002-01-01

    Compensatory strategies were designed to enable a client with traumatic brain injury to obtain professional employment. In a series of speech-language therapy sessions, compensatory strategies targeting impairments in executive function were developed, refined, and trained in mock-interview situations. Significant improvements were noted in…

  9. Assistive Devices for Children with Functional Impairments: Impact on Child and Caregiver Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Stacey; Skelton, Heather; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Functional impairments can limit a child's ability to participate in the experiences of childhood. This "deprivation" can, in turn, have a negative effect on such children's development, academic performance, and quality of life, as well as on the lives of their caregivers and families. Many adults use assistive devices to overcome functional…

  10. Multiple sclerosis impairs regional functional connectivity in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Dogonowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI has been used to study changes in long-range functional brain connectivity in multiple sclerosis (MS. Yet little is known about how MS affects functional brain connectivity at the local level. Here we studied 42 patients with MS and 30 matched healthy controls with whole-brain rs-fMRI at 3 T to examine local functional connectivity. Using the Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance, regional homogeneity of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD-signal fluctuations was calculated for each voxel and used as a measure of local connectivity. Patients with