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Sample records for immunologic diagnostic blood

  1. The size of the thymus: an important immunological diagnostic tool?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    of the thymus relevant to its function and could measurement of the thymus be a useful immunological diagnostic tool in the investigation of thymic function in humans with a depressed immune system? Conclusion: Studies using the size of the thymus as an immunological diagnostic tool should be encouraged....

  2. The size of the thymus: an important immunological diagnostic tool?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    The report on the influence of seasonal factors on thymic size in early life describes a pattern of ultrasonographically measured thymic growth in Gambian infants including the finding of a smaller thymus in the hungry season. These factors raise a number of important questions: Is the size...... of the thymus relevant to its function and could measurement of the thymus be a useful immunological diagnostic tool in the investigation of thymic function in humans with a depressed immune system? Conclusion: Studies using the size of the thymus as an immunological diagnostic tool should be encouraged....

  3. Aptamers Against Immunologic Targets: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyeva, Mariya; Timoshenko, Valentina; Vorobjev, Pavel; Venyaminova, Alya

    2016-02-01

    The concept of in vitro selection of nucleic acid aptamers emerged 25 years ago, and since then tremendous progress has been achieved in the development of different aptamers and their applications for various bioanalytical and therapeutic purposes. Among other protein targets of aptamers, immune system proteins are of particular interest both as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. The present review summarizes up-to-date articles concerning the selection and design of DNA and RNA aptamers against immunologic targets such as antibodies, cytokines, and T-cell and B-cell receptors. We also discuss the prospects of employing aptamers as recognizing modules of diagnostic aptasensors, potential therapeutic candidates for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer, and specific tools for functional studies of immune system proteins.

  4. Immunological Blood Parameters in Infected and Noninfected Biliary Peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bilookiy, O. V.; Rohovyy, Yu. Ye.; Bilookiy, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the study of immunological blood parameters in infected and noninfected biliary peritonitis. Materials and methods. 55 patients with infected and noninfected biliary peritonitis were examined. There were 21 men and 34 women at the age of 28-74 years. 14 patients suffered from noninfected biliary peritonitis, 41 patients suffered from infected biliary peritonitis. The control group included 12 practically healthy persons. Results. The development of noninfected biliary per...

  5. [Diagnostic significance of immunologic study of cerebrospinal fluid in neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekonenko, E P; Umanskiĭ, K G; Andreeva, L S

    1985-01-01

    An increase in the antibody titre in the blood serum, previously considered sufficient for determining the etiology of neuroinfection can no longer be regarded as a satisfactory index in the light of the contemporary level of our knowledge. The literature and the authors' own data show the importance of a simultaneous examination of antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid and the blood serum in some neuroinfections. For example, the determination in the cerebrospinal fluid of antibodies to herpes simplex virus in herpetic encephalitis is considered sufficient (in the presence of the characteristic clinical picture) to make the diagnosis of this severe disease. The examination of antibodies to herpes simplex virus in the cerebrospinal fluid of 35 patients with a suspected herpetic encephalitis revealed their presence in 34% of those studied. The data obtained suggest that immunoassay of the cerebrospinal fluid and blood sera should be used on a broader scale in patients with acute and chronic neuroinfections. The method plays an the early diagnosis of these diseases and early administration of the appropriate treatment.

  6. Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    3.1 Autoimmume disease 2006019 The study of inhibitory peptides on T cell activation in rheumatoid arthritis LI Xia(李霞) , Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, People’s Hosp, Peking Univ, Beijing 100044. Natl Med J China 2005;85(24) :1679 -1682. Objective:To study the inhibitory role of altered HA308 -317 peptides in T cell responses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods :Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from 27 HLA -

  7. OPPORTUNITIES OF VARIOUS IMMUNOLOGICAL TESTS IN DIAGNOSTICS OF TUBERCULOSIS IN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Starshinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-infection of tuberculosis and HIV-infection continues to be the current crucial issue not only due to the persistent growth of HIV-infection but also due difficulties in diagnostics of tuberculosis. Often X-ray changes in the lungs are atypical, clinical signs are manifested only in case of the severe and disseminated disease. At present the IGRA-tests are widely used worldwide while in Russia TRA tests are used. The trial provided the data on the use and comparative efficiency of the above immunological tests against Mantoux test with 2 TU when examining 239 persons from 2014 to 2015. The comparativeness of diagnostic sensitivity of all immunological tests had been proved. The specificity of IGRA-tests and TRA tests is twice higher compared to Mantoux test with 2 TU. Also it was proved that when diagnosing tuberculosis in HIV patients the skin tests (Mantoux test with 2 TU and TRA test had low diagnostic informativeness compared to IGRA tests, among which ELISPOT was the most sensitive.

  8. Diagnostic procedures in tularaemia with special focus on molecular and immunological techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, W D; Tomaso, H; Al Dahouk, S; Neubauer, H; Schuff-Werner, P

    2005-08-01

    Tularaemia is a severe bacterial zoonosis caused by the highly infectious agent Francisella tularensis. It is endemic in countries of the northern hemisphere ranging from North America to Europe, Asia and Japan. Very recently, Francisella-like strains causing disease in humans were described from tropical northern Australia. In the last decade, efforts have been made to develop sensitive and specific immunological and molecular techniques for the laboratory diagnosis of tularaemia and also for the definite identification of members of the species F. tularensis and its four subspecies. Screening for the keyword 'Francisella' a Medline search over the last decade was performed and articles describing diagnostic methods for tularaemia and its causative agent were selected. Besides classical microbiological techniques (cultivation, biochemical profiling, susceptibility testing) several new immunological and molecular approaches to identify F. tularensis have been introduced employing highly specific antibodies and various polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Whereas direct antigen detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or immunofluorescence might allow early presumptive diagnosis of tularaemia, these methods--like all PCR techniques--still await further evaluation. Therefore, diagnosis of tularaemia still relies mainly on the demonstration of specific antibodies in the host. ELISA and immunoblot methods started to replace the standard tube or micro-agglutination assays. However, the diagnostic value of antibody detection in the very early clinical phase of tularaemia is limited. Francisella tularensis is regarded as a 'highest priority' biological agent (category 'A' according to the CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA), thus rapid and reliable diagnosis of tularaemia is required not only for a timely onset of therapy, the handling of outbreak investigations but also for the surveillance of endemic foci. Only very recently, evaluated test kits for

  9. Regulatory T cells in HIV-infected immunological nonresponders are increased in blood but depleted in lymphoid tissue and predict immunological reconstitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie C; Hartling, Hans J; Ronit, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    (CD4 T-cell count 200-500 cells/μL), 30 responders (CD4 T-cell count >500 cells/μL), and 34 healthy controls. Tregs, Treg subpopulations, and intracellular staining for interleukin 10 in peripheral blood were measured using flow cytometry. Foxp3 cells in lymphoid tissue were evaluated using...... immunolabeling. The CD4 T-cell count was determined at inclusion and after 1 year of follow-up. RESULTS: INR displayed high percentage of Tregs and activated Tregs in peripheral blood accompanied by a high percentage of Tregs expressing interleukin 10, whereas numbers of Foxp3 cells in lymphoid tissue were low......BACKGROUND: HIV-infected immunological nonresponders fail to immune reconstitute despite optimal treatment. We hypothesized that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in immunological reconstitution. Tregs and Treg subpopulations were measured in blood and Foxp3 cells in lymphoid tissue...

  10. Diagnosis of Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in AIDS Patients in Brazil: Importance of Molecular and Immunological Methods Using Peripheral Blood Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Fabio A.; Vidal, José E.; Oliveira, Augusto C. Penalva de; Hernandez, Adrián V.; Bonasser-Filho, Francisco; Nogueira, Roberta S.; Focaccia, Roberto; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is the most common cerebral focal lesion in AIDS and still accounts for high morbidity and mortality in Brazil. Its occurrence is more frequent in patients with low CD4+ T-cell counts. It is directly related to the prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in the population. Therefore, it is important to evaluate sensitive, less invasive, and rapid diagnostic tests. We evaluated the value of PCR using peripheral blood samples on the diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis and whether its association with immunological assays can contribute to a timely diagnosis. We prospectively analyzed blood samples from 192 AIDS patients divided into two groups. The first group was composed of samples from 64 patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis diagnosed by clinical and radiological features. The second group was composed of samples from 128 patients with other opportunistic diseases. Blood collection from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis was done before or on the third day of anti-toxoplasma therapy. PCR for T. gondii, indirect immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an avidity test for toxoplasmosis were performed on all samples. The PCR sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis in blood were 80% and 98%, respectively. Patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis (89%) presented higher titers of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies than patients with other diseases (57%) (P < 0.001). These findings suggest the clinical value of the use of both PCR and high titers of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies for the diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. This strategy may prevent more invasive approaches. PMID:16207959

  11. Blood: Tests Used to Assess the Physiological and Immunological Properties of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. G.; Tansey, E. A.; Johnson, C. D.; Roe, S. M.; Montgomery, L. E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of blood and the relative ease of access to which it can be retrieved make it an ideal source to gauge different aspects of homeostasis within an individual, form an accurate diagnosis, and formulate an appropriate treatment regime. Tests used to determine blood parameters such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hemoglobin…

  12. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  13. Prenatal immunologic predictors of postpartum depressive symptoms : a prospective study for potential diagnostic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, Daniela; Jobst, Andrea; Kirchberg, Franka; Kieper, Susann; Härtl, Kristin; Kästner, Ralph; Myint, Aye-Mu; Müller, Norbert; Schwarz, Markus J

    2014-01-01

    In postpartum depression (PPD), immunologic changes have been proposed to be involved in the disease pathology. The study evaluates the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune response over the course of late pregnancy and postpartum period and their association with the development of postpart

  14. Distinct immunological mechanisms of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade revealed by analyzing TCR usage in blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Lidia; Harview, Christina; Emerson, Ryan; Wang, Xiaoyan; Mok, Stephen; Homet, Blanca; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Koya, Richard C; Robins, Harlan; Tumeh, Paul C; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Targeting immune inhibitory receptors has brought excitement, innovation and hope to cancer patients. Our recent work revealed the immunological effects of blocking the CTLA4 and PD-1 immune checkpoints on T cell receptor usage among peripheral blood cells, and further uncovers how the expansion of the T cell repertoire matches the immunotoxicity profile of the therapy. PMID:25083336

  15. Tuberculosis in Children: New diagnostic Blood Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Kakkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-gamma-release assays were developed to overcome the pitfalls and logistic difficulties of the tuberculin skin test (TST for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI. These blood tests measure the in vitro production of interferon-gamma by sensitized lymphocytes in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens. Two interferon-gamma-release assays are registered for use in Canada: the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay (Cellestis Inc, Australia and the T.SPOT–TB test (Oxford Immunotec, United Kingdom. Evaluation of these tests has been hampered by the lack of a gold standard for LTBI, and limited paediatric data on their use. It appears that they are more specific than the TST, and may be useful for evaluating TST-positive patients at low risk of true LTBI. Moreover, they may add sensitivity if used in addition to the TST in immunocompromised patients, very young children and close contacts of infectious adults. A summary of these tests, their limitations and their application to clinical paediatric practice are described.

  16. Alteration of immunologic responses on peripheral blood in the acute phase of ischemic stroke: blood genomic profiling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Hun; Kim, Ok-Joon; Shin, Dong-Ah; Song, Jihwan; Yoo, Hanna; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyeoung

    2012-08-15

    Peripheral blood cells and inflammatory mediators have a detrimental effect on brain during cerebral ischemia. We investigated the immunologic changes on peripheral blood in the acute phase of ischemic stroke using RNA microarray. mRNA microarray and real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for genes of interest in microarray data were analyzed in 12 stroke patients and 12 controls. Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentrations were measured in 120 stroke patients and 82 controls. In microarray analysis, a total of 11 genes of interest showed different expression in patients with ischemic stroke. The three most highly expressed genes were C19orf59 (chromosome 19 open reading frame 59), MMP9 and IL18RAP (interleukin-18 receptor accessory protein), whereas gene with the lowest expression was GNLY (granulysin). The expression patterns of three selected genes (MMP9, IL18RAP and GNLY) were validated by RT-PCR. The plasma concentration of MMP-9 was significantly elevated in the stroke patients, and showed a weakly positive correlation with infarct volume. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that gene sets related to immunity and defense, signal transduction, transport and cell adhesion were significant in acute ischemic stroke. In the peripheral blood, numerous genes of inflammatory mediators, including MMP9, IL18RAP and GNLY, are altered in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. This stroke-specific gene expression profiling provides valuable information about the role of peripheral inflammation to the pathophysiological mechanism of ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 弓形虫病免疫诊断用重组抗原及检测方法研究进展%Research progress on recombinant antigen and diagnostic technique for immunological diagnosis of toxoplasmosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永刚; 曹利民; 朱荫昌

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasma is a kind of parasitic protozoa that can infect all warm blooded animals including humans and cause toxoplasmosis manifesting various symptoms. Diagnosis for toxoplasmosis include etiology,immunology, and molecular biology methods. Immunological diagnostic methods are common for Toxoplasma infection. This article reviewed research progress on recombinant antigen and diagnostic technique development for immunological diagnosis of toxoplasmosis.%弓形虫是一种寄生原虫,可感染人在内的所有温血动物,并会引发表现为多种症状的弓形虫病.弓形虫病的诊断方法有病原学、免疫学、分子生物学等方法.免疫学诊断是进行弓形虫感染检测的常用方法.该文就弓形虫感染的免疫诊断用重组抗原及检测方法的应用和研究进展作一综述.

  18. Tuberculosis in elephants-a reemergent disease: diagnostic dilemmas, the natural history of infection, and new immunological tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, J N; Mikota, S K

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in elephants has been described since ancient times. However, it was not until 1996 when infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified in a herd of circus elephants that significant research into this disease began. The epidemiology and natural history of TB were unknown in elephants since there had been no comprehensive screening programs, and diagnostic techniques developed for cervidae and bovidae were of unknown value. And, while precepts of test and slaughter were the norm for cattle and deer, this was considered untenable for an endangered species. With no precedent for the treatment of TB in animals, treatment regimens for elephants were extrapolated from human protocols, which guided changes to the Guidelines for the Control of Tuberculosis in Elephants. In the absence of diagnostic testing to confirm cure in elephants, the efficacy of these treatment regimens is only beginning to be understood as treated elephants die and are examined postmortem. However, because of pressures arising from public relations related to elephant husbandry and the added considerations of TB infection in animals (whether real or imagined), sharing of information to aid in research and treatment has been problematic. Here we review the challenges and successes of the diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants and discuss the natural history of the disease to put the work of Landolfi et al on the immunological response to tuberculosis in elephants in perspective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Peripheral blood immunological parameters for use as markers of pre-invasive to invasive colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghella, Anna Maria; Contasta, Ida; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Del Beato, Tiziana; Adorno, Domenico

    2002-02-01

    In cancer, the extent to which the disease has spread is probably the most important factor in determining patient prognosis. Hence practical and non-invasive methods are needed to identify disease stage. In a previous paper we showed how diagnostic and prognostic indices for disease progression could be defined by evaluating parameters in peripheral blood. The aim of this study was to identify further serum parameters that could be used. Serum levels of interferon (IFN) gamma, interleukin (IL)4, IL8, IL7, IL1 beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), soluble (s) IL2 receptor (R) and sIL6R were studied but only levels of IL4, sIL2R, IL8 and IL7 were found to be significant and would therefore be of use in defining diagnostic and prognostic indices for disease progression. In further detail, our results indicate that when serum levels of sIL2R 339 pg/ml there is a 95% probability that the disease is in stage I or II where there is no infiltration of lymph nodes; when serum levels of sIL2R > or = 522 Ug/ml, 159 pg/ml or = 431 pg/ml and IL7 > or = 54 pg/ml, there is a 95% probability that the disease is in stage IV and there is metastasis.

  20. Current immunological and molecular tools for leptospirosis: diagnostics, vaccine design, and biomarkers for predicting severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Handunnetti, Shiroma M; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-01-16

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic spirochaetal illness that is endemic in many tropical countries. The research base on leptospirosis is not as strong as other tropical infections such as malaria. However, it is a lethal infection that can attack many vital organs in its severe form, leading to multi-organ dysfunction syndrome and death. There are many gaps in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of leptospirosis and the role of host immunity in causing symptoms. This hinders essential steps in combating disease, such as developing a potential vaccine. Another major problem with leptospirosis is the lack of an easy to perform, accurate diagnostic tests. Many clinicians in resource limited settings resort to clinical judgment in diagnosing leptospirosis. This is unfortunate, as many other diseases such as dengue, hanta virus, rickettsial infections, and even severe bacterial sepsis, can mimic leptospirosis. Another interesting problem is the prediction of disease severity at the onset of the illness. The majority of patients recover from leptospirosis with only a mild febrile illness, while a few others have severe illness with multi-organ failure. Clinical features are poor predictors of potential severity of infection, and therefore the search is on for potential biomarkers that can serve as early warnings for severe disease. This review concentrates on these three important aspects of this neglected tropical disease: diagnostics, developing a vaccine, and potential biomarkers to predict disease severity.

  1. The inextricable axis of targeted diagnostic imaging and therapy: An immunological natural history approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Frederick O; Abbruzzese, Bonnie; Sanders, James; Metz, Wendy; Sturms, Kristyn; Ralph, David; Blue, Michael; Zhang, Jane; Bracci, Paige; Bshara, Wiam; Behr, Spencer; Maurer, Toby; Williams, Kenneth; Walker, Joshua; Beverly, Allison; Blay, Brooke; Damughatla, Anirudh; Larsen, Mark; Mountain, Courtney; Neylon, Erin; Parcel, Kaeli; Raghuraman, Kapil; Ricks, Kevin; Rose, Lucas; Sivakumar, Akhilesh; Streck, Nicholas; Wang, Bryan; Wasco, Christopher; Williams, Amifred; McGrath, Michael

    2016-03-01

    In considering the challenges of approaches to clinical imaging, we are faced with choices that sometimes are impacted by rather dogmatic notions about what is a better or worse technology to achieve the most useful diagnostic image for the patient. For example, is PET or SPECT most useful in imaging any particular disease dissemination? The dictatorial approach would be to choose PET, all other matters being equal. But is such a totalitarian attitude toward imaging selection still valid? In the face of new receptor targeted SPECT agents one must consider the remarkable specificity and sensitivity of these agents. (99m)Tc-Tilmanocept is one of the newest of these agents, now approved for guiding sentinel node biopsy (SLNB) in several solid tumors. Tilmanocept has a Kd of 3×10(-11)M, and it specificity for the CD206 receptor is unlike any other agent to date. This coupled with a number of facts, that specific disease-associated macrophages express this receptor (100 to 150 thousand receptors), that the receptor has multiple binding sites for tilmanocept (>2 sites per receptor) and that these receptors are recycled every 15 min to bind more tilmanocept (acting as intracellular "drug compilers" of tilmanocept into non-degraded vesicles), gives serious pause as to how we select our approaches to diagnostic imaging. Clinically, the size of SLNs varies greatly, some, anatomically, below the machine resolution of SPECT. Yet, with tilmanocept targeting, the SLNs are highly visible with macrophages stably accruing adequate (99m)Tc-tilmanocept counting statistics, as high target-to-background ratios can compensate for spatial resolution blurring. Importantly, it may be targeted imaging agents per se, again such as tilmanocept, which may significantly shrink any perceived chasm between the imaging technologies and anchor the diagnostic considerations in the targeting and specificity of the agent rather than any lingering dogma about the hardware as the basis for imaging

  2. Characteristics, immunological events, and diagnostics of Babesia spp. infection, with emphasis on Babesia canis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostro Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vector-borne infection constitutes a significant health issue in dogs worldwide. Recent reports point to an increasing number of canine vector-borne disease cases in European countries, including Poland. Canine babesiosis caused by various Babesia species is a protozoal tick-borne disease with worldwide distribution and significant veterinary importance. The development and application of molecular methods have increased our knowledge about canine babesiosis, its prevalence, and clinical and pathological aspects of the infection. Parasitologists and veterinary surgeons need an accurate description of the species responsible for canine babesiosis to improve diagnostic and therapeutic methods, as well as predictions for the course of the disease. Therefore, we decided to summarise recent knowledge concerning Babesia species and B. canis.

  3. Paper-Origami-Based Multiplexed Malaria Diagnostics from Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gaolian; Nolder, Debbie; Reboud, Julien; Oguike, Mary C; van Schalkwyk, Donelly A; Sutherland, Colin J; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2016-12-05

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the multiplexed determination of microbial species from whole blood using the paper-folding technique of origami to enable the sequential steps of DNA extraction, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and array-based fluorescence detection. A low-cost handheld flashlight reveals the presence of the final DNA amplicon to the naked eye, providing a "sample-to-answer" diagnosis from a finger-prick volume of human blood, within 45 min, with minimal user intervention. To demonstrate the method, we showed the identification of three species of Plasmodium, analyzing 80 patient samples benchmarked against the gold-standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in an operator-blinded study. We also show that the test retains its diagnostic accuracy when using stored or fixed reference samples.

  4. Use and interpretation of diagnostic vaccination in primary immunodeficiency: a working group report of the Basic and Clinical Immunology Interest Section of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Jordan S; Ballow, Mark; Stiehm, E Richard; Ballas, Zuhair K; Chinen, Javier; De La Morena, Maite; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Harville, Terry O; Hesterberg, Paul; Koleilat, Majed; McGhee, Sean; Perez, Elena E; Raasch, Jason; Scherzer, Rebecca; Schroeder, Harry; Seroogy, Christine; Huissoon, Aarnoud; Sorensen, Ricardo U; Katial, Rohit

    2012-09-01

    A major diagnostic intervention in the consideration of many patients suspected to have primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDDs) is the application and interpretation of vaccination. Specifically, the antibody response to antigenic challenge with vaccines can provide substantive insight into the status of human immune function. There are numerous vaccines that are commonly used in healthy individuals, as well as others that are available for specialized applications. Both can potentially be used to facilitate consideration of PIDD. However, the application of vaccines and interpretation of antibody responses in this context are complex. These rely on consideration of numerous existing specific studies, interpolation of data from healthy populations, current diagnostic guidelines, and expert subspecialist practice. This document represents an attempt of a working group of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology to provide further guidance and synthesis in this use of vaccination for diagnostic purposes in consideration of PIDD, as well as to identify key areas for further research.

  5. 21 CFR 864.9160 - Blood group substances of nonhuman origin for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... vitro diagnostic use. 864.9160 Section 864.9160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... nonhuman origin for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. Blood group substances of nonhuman origin for in vitro diagnostic use are materials, such as blood group specific substances prepared...

  6. Blood-Mimicking Fluid for Testing Ultrasonic Diagnostic Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kouhei; Yoshida, Tomoji; Sato, Kazuishi; Kondo, Toshio; Yasukawa, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko

    2012-07-01

    We present a blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) for the Doppler test object of medical diagnostic instruments. Accurate measurement in a flow Doppler test requires a BMF that has the acoustic velocity and density defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard, and furthermore, they must be stable over time. To formulate a fluid with the desired density and acoustic velocity, we have developed a new fluid made of glycerine and water-soluble silicone oil. The new BMF includes dispersed polystyrene particles as scatterers. The density of the liquid can be adjusted to maintain it at the same value as that of the polystyrene particles, thus ensuring neutral buoyancy of the particles. The MBF was stable over a period of 2 weeks, during which the density and acoustic velocity did not change.

  7. Pearls and pitfalls of allergy diagnostic testing: report from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology/American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Specific IgE Test Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Linda; Williams, Brock; Sicherer, Scott; Oppenheimer, John; Sher, Larry; Hamilton, Robert; Golden, David

    2008-12-01

    The intended purpose of this monograph is to provide a general overview of allergy diagnostics for health care professionals who care for patients with allergic disease. For a more comprehensive review of allergy diagnostic testing, readers can refer to the Allergy Diagnostic Practice Parameters. A key message is that a positive allergy test result (skin or blood) indicates only the presence of allergen specific IgE (called sensitization). It does not necessarily mean clinical allergy (ie, allergic symptoms with exposure). It is important for this reason that the allergy evaluation be based on the patient's history and directed by a health care professional with sufficient understanding of allergy diagnostic testing to use the information obtained from his/her evaluation of the patient to determine (1) what allergy diagnostic tests to order, (2) how to interpret the allergy diagnostic test results, and (3) how to use the information obtained from the allergy evaluation to develop an appropriate therapeutic treatment plan.

  8. COMPARABLE CYTOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC OF BLOOD SMEARS ON BABESIA INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokhyl S.І.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In last time Babesiosis as a tick-borne hemoprotozoans human disease have a very important role in differentil diagnostics of modern infectious medicine. It caused by protozon of the genus Babesia, which invade and destory erythrocytes. Babesiosis olso has been called tick fever. So, Babesia has been known by other genus names, including Nuttallia, Microbabesia, Babesialla, and Gonderia. Because all Babesia species are piroplasms, a more inclusive term for anthropozoonotic infections caused by these organisms would be piroplasmosis.They detective complicacy are bild that, tick-borne disease agents from prolongate life cycles involving arthropod and vertebrate host. The complexity is enhanced by the diversity of hosts in different biotopes, which depends on factors life type of vegetation, climate and/or human influence, such as restoration of former industrial sites, which leads to the development of new biotopes. So, on the one hand, new habitats for plants and animals including ticks, and nature are created. About the first case of babesiosis infection was reported as a cause of human sickness in 1969 in northeastern United State. Several hundred cases are now reported from this region each year. The disease is characterized by a grandual oncet of malaise with anorexia, fever, headaches, myalgia, and other vague symptoms, which may persist for long period. Occasionally dangerous fulminating infections occur particularly in immunocompromised or aged individuals. The purpose of the present research was to study of the cytological diagnostic of blood smears from object’s with the Babesia infection. Materials and methods. Blood smears (by Romanovsky- Gimze (standart, Wright’s standart and staining, the author’s modification, 2014 of domestic dogs (n = 31 of both sexes with Babesia infection at the age from 3 months to 6 years served as the material for the study. The preparations were fixed during 1-2 seconds with 96 % ethyl alcohol. Then

  9. Diagnostic Methods for Detection of Blood-Borne Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Cornelius J; Nguyen, M Hong

    2016-01-01

    β-D-glucan (Fungitell) and polymerase chain reaction-based (T2Candida) assays of blood samples are FDA-approved adjuncts to cultures for diagnosing candidemia and other types of invasive candidiasis, but their clinical roles are unclear. In this chapter, we describe laboratory protocols for performing Fungitell and T2Candida assays. We then discuss step-by-step methods for interpreting test results at the bedside using a Bayesian framework, and for incorporating assays into rational patient management strategies. Prior to interpreting results, clinicians must recognize that test performance varies based on the type of invasive candidiasis being diagnosed. In general, the type of invasive candidiasis that is most likely in a given patient can be identified, and the pretest likelihood of disease estimated. From there, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) for an assay can be calculated. At a population level, tests can be incorporated into screening strategies for antifungal treatment. NPV and PPV thresholds can be defined for discontinuing antifungal prophylaxis or initiating preemptive treatment, respectively. Using the thresholds, it is possible to assign windows of pretest likelihood for invasive candidiasis (and corresponding patient populations) in which tests are most likely to valuable. At the individual patient level, tests may be useful outside of the windows proposed for screening populations. The interpretive and clinical decision-making processes we discuss will be applicable to other diagnostic assays as they enter the clinic, and to existing assays as more data emerge from various populations.

  10. Metabolic syndrome and the immunologic affair with the blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eMauro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies reveal an increased incidence of obesity worldwide, which is associated with increased prevalence and severity of cognitive disorders. The blood brain barrier represents the interface between the peripheral circulation and the brain, and plays a fundamental role in the cross-talk between these two compartments. The homeostatic function of the blood-brain barrier is the protection of the brain from peripheral insult/inflammation. Alterations in the function of the blood-brain barrier lead to pathologies of the central nervous system. Recently, metabolic imbalance has been shown to be an important risk factor associated with the decline of blood-brain barrier integrity and function. This has direct etiological consequences to a variety of cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative pathologies with great impact to society. Priority areas for future preclinical research include strategies to improve clinicians’ ability to diagnose, prevent, and manage blood-brain barrier abnormalities. In sharp contrast with epidemiological studies and clinical needs, little is known about the mechanisms that link metabolic syndrome to blood-brain barrier functionality and cognitive disorders. Our view is that immune responses caused by metabolic stress might play a major role in this conundrum.

  11. Immunological/virological peripheral blood biomarkers and distinct patterns of sleeping quality in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, C M O; de Lima, T A; Castro, D B; Torres, K L; da Silva Braga, W; Peruhype-Magalhães, V; Teixeira-Carvalho, A; Martins-Filho, O A; Malheiro, A

    2011-05-01

    The rational of this study we intended to investigate whether the peripheral blood immunological/virological biomarkers were associated with distinct patterns of sleeping quality in patients with chronic hepatitis C-(HCV). Distinct well-established indexes/scores were used to categorize the sleeping quality of HCV patients, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Fatigue Severity Scores. Our findings demonstrated that HCV patients classified as 'good sleeper' displayed an enhanced frequency of circulating CD8(+) T cells, lower frequency of activated (CD69(+)) neutrophils and eosinophils but enhanced frequency of activated lymphocytes besides lower seric levels of IL-4/IL-8/IL-10 but higher levels of IL-12, besides lower HCV virus load and lower anti-HCV IgG levels. In contrast, HCV patients classified as 'poor sleeper' displayed enhanced levels of activated neutrophils and eosinophils but lower frequency of activated lymphocytes, higher seric levels of IL-6/TNF-α/IL-10 but lower levels of IL-12 besides higher HCV virus load and increased anti-HCV IgG levels. Positive correlation was further confirmed by the relationship between the leucocyte activation status, the cytokine levels, the HCV viral load and the anti-HCV IgG reactivity with the PSQI indexes. Analysis of cytokine signature curves demonstrated that lower frequency of IL-10 was observed in HCV patients classified as 'good sleepers', whereas enhanced frequency of IL-6 was found HCV patients classified as 'poor sleepers'. In conclusion, our data suggest that immunological biomarkers (leucocytes activation status and seric cytokines levels) are likely to be associated with sleeping quality patterns in HCV patients, suggesting their putative use for clinical monitoring purposes.

  12. CCL8 BASED IMMUNOLOGICAL MONITORING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an immunological method and, more particularly, a method for measuring cell-mediated immune reactivity (CMI) in mammals based on the production of CCL8.The invention further discloses an assay and a kit for measuring CMI to an antigen using whole blood or other...... suitable biological samples. The methods of the present invention are useful in therapeutic and diagnostic protocols for human, livestock and veterinary and wild life applications, thus the invention further relates to a method for diagnosing an infection in a mammal....

  13. Point-of-care technologies for molecular diagnostics using a drop of blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yujun; Huang, Yu-Yen; Liu, Xuewu; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ferrari, Mauro; Qin, Lidong

    2014-03-01

    Molecular diagnostics is crucial for prevention, identification, and treatment of disease. Traditional technologies for molecular diagnostics using blood are limited to laboratory use because they rely on sample purification and sophisticated instruments, are labor and time intensive, expensive, and require highly trained operators. This review discusses the frontiers of point-of-care (POC) diagnostic technologies using a drop of blood obtained from a finger prick. These technologies, including emerging biotechnologies, nanotechnologies, and microfluidics, hold the potential for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive disease diagnostics.

  14. Carbohydrate Microarrays Identify Blood Group Precursor Cryptic Epitopes as Potential Immunological Targets of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using carbohydrate microarrays, we explored potential natural ligands of antitumor monoclonal antibody HAE3. This antibody was raised against a murine mammary tumor antigen but was found to cross-react with a number of human epithelial tumors in tissues. Our carbohydrate microarray analysis reveals that HAE3 is specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope that is normally hidden in the cores of blood group substances. Using HAE3 to screen tumor cell surface markers by flow cytometry, we found that the HAE3 glycoepitope, gpHAE3, was highly expressed by a number of human breast cancer cell lines, including some triple-negative cancers that lack the estrogen, progesterone, and Her2/neu receptors. Taken together, we demonstrate that HAE3 recognizes a conserved cryptic glycoepitope of blood group precursors, which is nevertheless selectively expressed and surface-exposed in certain breast tumor cells. The potential of this class of O-glycan cryptic antigens in breast cancer subtyping and targeted immunotherapy warrants further investigation.

  15. Prevalence of colorectal diseases in immunological fecal occult blood test (I-FOBT) positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollick, S H; Roy, P K; Bhuiyan, M R; Mia, A R; Alam, M S; Mollick, K A; Pervin, S; Hassan, M Q

    2014-10-01

    Bleeding lesion anywhere in the GI tract can cause positive reaction to Immunological Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). Although any colonic lesion can cause occult lower GI bleeding, relative frequency of this lesion not known. Guaic based tests require prior preparation and dietary restriction and less sensitive and specific than IFOBT for detection of occult bleeding .IFOBT is specific for human hemoglobin and is more sensitive and specific for detection of occult bleeding from any colonic lesion. Aim of this study was to diagnose occult gastrointestinal bleeding with positive IFOBT and the prevalence of colorectal disease in IFOBT positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Bangladesh. This was a prospective cross sectional study conducted in Department of gastroenterology in collaboration with clinical pathology, BSMMU, Dhaka during the period of January 2009 to December 2009. In this study 200 patients meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Detailed clinical history and physical findings were recorded; FOBT was done on single stool specimen. Positive occult bleeding was confirmed in 90 patients of whom 80 patients underwent colonoscopy. The mean age of study population was 36.73±13.64 (range 16 to 72) years. At colonoscopy lesion were identified in 46(57.50%) patients, of which colonic polyp in12 (15%), colorectal cancer in 11(13.7%), inflammatory bowel disease in 3(3.75%), hemorrhoids and anal fissure in 7(8.75%), tuberculosis in 5(6.25%), and proctitis in 1(1.25%) cases. A positive IFOBT is more sensitive and specific test than other FOBT for detection of occult lower GI bleeding of colonic origin. In this study colorectal diseases were detected in 57.50% of the IFOBT positive patients, so IOBT can be used as an important diagnostic tool for detection of occult lower GI bleeding.

  16. Hair: A Diagnostic Tool to Complement Blood Serum and Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugh, Thomas H., II

    1978-01-01

    Trace elements and some drugs can be identified in hair and it seems likely that other organic chemicals will be identifiable in the future. Since hair is so easily collected, stored, and analyzed it promises to be an ideal complement to serum and urine analysis as a diagnostic tool. (BB)

  17. Immune Evasion and Recognition of the Syphilis Spirochete in Blood and Skin of Secondary Syphilis Patients: Two Immunologically Distinct Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Adriana R.; Ramirez, Lady G.; Zuluaga, Ana V.; Pillay, Allan; Abreu, Christine; Valencia, Carlos A.; La Vake, Carson; Cervantes, Jorge L.; Dunham-Ems, Star; Cartun, Richard; Mavilio, Domenico; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical syndrome associated with secondary syphilis (SS) reflects the propensity of Treponema pallidum (Tp) to escape immune recognition while simultaneously inducing inflammation. Methods To better understand the duality of immune evasion and immune recognition in human syphilis, herein we used a combination of flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transcriptional profiling to study the immune response in the blood and skin of 27 HIV(-) SS patients in relation to spirochetal burdens. Ex vivo opsonophagocytosis assays using human syphilitic sera (HSS) were performed to model spirochete-monocyte/macrophage interactions in vivo. Results Despite the presence of low-level spirochetemia, as well as immunophenotypic changes suggestive of monocyte activation, we did not detect systemic cytokine production. SS subjects had substantial decreases in circulating DCs and in IFNγ-producing and cytotoxic NK-cells, along with an emergent CD56−/CD16+ NK-cell subset in blood. Skin lesions, which had visible Tp by IHC and substantial amounts of Tp-DNA, had large numbers of macrophages (CD68+), a relative increase in CD8+ T-cells over CD4+ T-cells and were enriched for CD56+ NK-cells. Skin lesions contained transcripts for cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α), chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10), macrophage and DC activation markers (CD40, CD86), Fc-mediated phagocytosis receptors (FcγRI, FcγR3), IFN-β and effector molecules associated with CD8 and NK-cell cytotoxic responses. While HSS promoted uptake of Tp in conjunction with monocyte activation, most spirochetes were not internalized. Conclusions Our findings support the importance of macrophage driven opsonophagocytosis and cell mediated immunity in treponemal clearance, while suggesting that the balance between phagocytic uptake and evasion is influenced by the relative burdens of bacteria in blood and skin and the presence of Tp subpopulations with differential capacities for binding opsonic antibodies. They also

  18. Lensless Imaging for Battlefield On-Chip Blood Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    2010, Seattle, WA USA 22. S. Seo, T. Su, A. Erlinger, and A. Ozcan, “Red blood cell analysis using holographic LUCAS technique ” Bionano Systems...41, 4489-4496 (2002) 4. Repetto, L., Piano , E. & Pontiggia, C. Lensless digital holographic microscope with light- emitting diode illumination. Opt

  19. Manufacturing routes for disposable polymer blood diagnostic microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Griffiths, Christian; Azcarate, Sabino

    2008-01-01

    The future vision of multi - analysis point of care testing (POCT) shows a hand-held device that patients can use with an ease similar to current blood sugar test systems. Additionally the mobile instrument would require transfer of the measured test results wirelessly to the doctor’s office, thus...

  20. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  1. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  2. Diagnostic fetal umbilical blood sampling in the management of isoimmunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, E A; Copel, J A; Scioscia, A L; Grannum, P A; DeGennaro, N; Hobbins, J C

    1988-11-01

    Current management of isoimmunization in pregnancy is predicted on the assumption that all sensitized women carry antigen-positive fetuses. In addition, management is based on indirect predictors of the magnitude of the fetal hemolytic disease. We present a preliminary report using a new approach of direct fetal blood sampling for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. This form of evaluation provides specific information about fetal red blood cell antigen status and the degree of fetal anemia at an earlier gestational age than that validated by the Liley curves and eliminates empiricism from both the diagnosis and treatment of the isoimmunized pregnancy. The use of such a management protocol reduces the need for multiple invasive procedures in fetuses at little risk for disease and provides specific information about the status of those fetuses truly at risk.

  3. The new immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminovitch, K A

    1992-03-01

    Among the biomedical sciences, immunology stands out as a discipline in which knowledge emanating from fundamental research has rapidly been transferred to the clinical paradigm, with consequent improvement in human health. Virtually all medical subspecialties have benefitted from diagnostic reagents and technologies provided by basic immunology. In terms of numbers of lives saved, immunologic-based therapeutic strategies, most notably vaccination, rank among the most effective measures ever achieved by medical intervention. Yet, despite immunology's profound impact on medicine and the longstanding recognition of many of the general principles and cellular components involved in immunity, until relatively recently, the operational workings of the immune system eluded precise definition. The abstract nature of the immune system rendered the field intangible or, at the very least, confusing, to the nonimmunologic medical community. However, in recent years, this situation has changed radically, as cell cloning, hybridoma, and recombinant DNA technologies have provided the means to delineate the precise immunologic cellular structures and interactions. The purpose of this review is to highlight a few of the most significant advances in immunology during the past decade, and to show how they have made possible the translation of abstract concepts of classical immunology into tangible, structural information. Striking gains in the understanding of antigen recognition, one of the most fundamental aspects of immunity, are described as an illustrative case.

  4. Production of recombinant capsid protein of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (r-MCP43) of giant freshwater prawn, M. rosenbergii (de Man) for immunological diagnostic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farook, M A; Madan, N; Taju, G; Majeed, S Abdul; Nambi, K S N; Raj, N Sundar; Vimal, S; Hameed, A S Sahul

    2014-08-01

    White tail disease (WTD) caused by Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and extra small virus (XSV) is a serious problem in prawn hatcheries. The gene for capsid protein of MrNV (MCP43) was cloned into pRSET B expression vector. The MCP43 protein was expressed as a protein with a 6-histidine tag in Escherichia coli GJ1158 with NaCl induction. This recombinant protein, which was used to raise the antiserum in rabbits, recognized capsid protein in different WTD-infected post-larvae and adult prawn. Various immunological methods such as Western blot, dot blot and ELISA techniques were employed to detect MrNV in infected samples using the antiserum raised against recombinant MCP43 of MrNV. The dot blot assay using anti-rMCP43 was found to be capable of detecting MrNV in WTD-infected post-larvae as early as at 24 h post-infection. The antiserum raised against r-MCP43 could detect the MrNV in the infected samples at the level of 100 pg of total protein. The capsid protein of MrNV estimated by ELISA using anti-rMCP43 and pure r-MCP43 as a standard was found to increase gradually during the course of infection from 24 h p.i. to moribund stage. The results of immunological diagnostic methods employed in this study were compared with that of RT-PCR to test the efficiency of antiserum raised against r-MCP43 for the detection of MrNV. The Western blot, dot blot and ELISA detected all MrNV-positive coded samples as detected by RT-PCR.

  5. Investigations of significance of blood smear results in diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkonjak Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic examination of stained smears of peripheral blood is of vital significance in the speedy diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases, in particular during the stage of infection when the cause is present in the blood, or blood cells. It is sometimes possible to make a definitive diagnosis of an infectious or parasitic disease following an examination of a stained smear of the peripheral blood. Since microscopic examinations of a peripheral blood smear are applied increasingly rarely in clinical practice, due to the development of other methods for the diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs, as well as the lack of knowledge of the morphology of the numerous causes that can be present in the blood, we carried out an investigation into the presence and spread of infections whose causes can be present in dog blood. The investigations covered 100 dogs from which peripheral blood smears were taken and then stained with a Giemsa solution according to the standard protocol and examined under a microscope with an immersion lens. The examination of peripheral blood smears stained according to Giemsa resulted in the identification of the presence of an Ehrlichia spp. morula in a neutrophil granulocyte in one dog. The presence of hemotropic mycoplasmas was established in erythrocytes of eleven dogs, while the presence of the protozoa Babesia canis in erythrocytes was identified in five dogs included in the investigations. A microscopic examination of dog peripheral blood smears stained according to Giemsa was shown as a speedy, practical, simple, and inexpensive method for making a definitive etiological diagnosis of these infections, and it should be included regularly in standard protocols for the diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases.

  6. The Diagnostic Value of Superb Microvascular Imaging (SMI) in Detecting Blood Flow Signals of Breast Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Li, Gang; Li, Jing; Ren, Wei-dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The correlation between color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) and Superb Microvascular Imaging (SMI) for detecting blood flow in breast lesions was investigated, as was the diagnostic value of SMI in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions. These lesions were evaluated using both CDFI and SMI according to Adler's method. Pathologic examination showed 57 malignant lesions and 66 benign lesions. The number of blood vessels in a single mass was detected by 2 techniques (SMI and CDFI), and the difference between the 2 values (SMI-CDFI) was calculated. The optimal threshold for the diagnosis of malignant neoplasms and the diagnostic performances of SMI, CDFI, and SMI-CDFI were calculated. For the total lesions and malignant lesions alone, the difference between SMI and CDFI for detecting blood flow was significant (P < 0.01), but the difference was not significant for benign lesions (P = 0.15). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64–0.82) for CDFI; 0.81 (95% CI: 0.74–0.89) for SMI; and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82–0.95) for SMI-CDFI. Furthermore, the modality of “SMI-CDFI” showed the best diagnostic performance. SMI provides further microvessel information in breast lesions. The diagnostic modality of “SMI-CDFI” can improve the diagnostic performance of ultrasound in the differentiation between benign and malignant masses. PMID:26356718

  7. From sample-to-answer: integrated genotyping and immunological analysis microfluidic platforms for the diagnostic and treatment of coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, M.; Höth, J.; Erwes, J.; Latta, D.; Strobach, X.; Hansen-Hagge, T.; Klemm, R.; Gärtner, C.; Demiris, T. M.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ritzi-Lehnert, M.; Drese, K. S.

    2011-02-01

    Taking advantage of microfluidics technology, a Lab-on-Chip system was developed offering the possibility of performing HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) typing to test genetic predisposition to coeliac disease and measure the level of immunodeficiency at the point-of-care. These analysis procedures are implemented on two different microfluidic cartridges, both having identical interfacial connections to the identical automated instrument. In order to assess the concentration of the targeted analytes in human blood, finger prick samples are processed to either extract genomic DNA carrying the coeliac disease gene or blood plasma containing the disease specific antibodies. We present here the different microfluidic modules integrated in a common platform, capable of automated sample preparation and analyte detection. In summary, this new microfluidic approach will dramatically reduce the costs of materials (polymer for the disposable chips and minute amount of bio-reagents) and minimize the time for analysis down to less than 20 minutes. In comparison to the state of the art detection of coeliac disease this work represents a tremendous improvement for the patient's quality of live and will significantly reduce the cost burden on the health care system.

  8. Effect of cationic polyelectrolytes on the performance of paper diagnostics for blood typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLiesh, Heather; Sharman, Scot; Garnier, Gil

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the effect that two common types of cationic polyelectrolytes used in papermaking might have on the performance of paper diagnostics using blood typing as an example. The results were analyzed in terms of red blood cells (RBC) retention and antibody-antigen specificity. Two questions were addressed: (1) can poly(amido-amine) epichlorohydrin (PAE) typically used for paper wet strength affect the diagnostic performance? (2) can high molecular weight cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) employed as retention aid enhance or affect the selectivity and sensitivity of paper diagnostics? A series of paper varying in type of fibers and drying process were constructed with PAE and tested for blood typing performance. Residual PAE has no significant effect on blood typing paper diagnostics under normal conditions. Positives are unaffected with PAE, while negatives lose slight sharpness as some RBCs are unselectively retained. CPAM, the most common retention aid, can also be used to retain cells and biomolecules on paper. Paper towel was treated with CPAM solutions varying in polymer concentration and charge density and tested for blood typing. We found that CPAM dried on paper can retain RBC. CPAM affects the negative tests by retaining non-specifically individual RBC on fibers. RBC retention increases non-linearly with the CPAM charge density and concentration. As expected, wet CPAM retain RBCs at concentrations higher than 0.1wt%. As paper diagnostics are becoming a reality, more realistic papers than the Whatman filter paper will be engineered. This study provides guidance on how best use the required polymeric wet-strength and retention agents.

  9. System Design and Development of a Robotic Device for Automated Venipuncture and Diagnostic Blood Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, Max L; Chen, Alvin I; Fromholtz, Alex; Gorshkov, Alex; Maguire, Tim J; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-10-01

    Diagnostic blood testing is the most prevalent medical procedure performed in the world and forms the cornerstone of modern health care delivery. Yet blood tests are still predominantly carried out in centralized labs using large-volume samples acquired by manual venipuncture, and no end-to-end solution from blood draw to sample analysis exists today. Our group is developing a platform device that merges robotic phlebotomy with automated diagnostics to rapidly deliver patient information at the site of the blood draw. The system couples an image-guided venipuncture robot, designed to address the challenges of routine venous access, with a centrifuge-based blood analyzer to obtain quantitative measurements of hematology. In this paper, we first present the system design and architecture of the integrated device. We then perform a series of in vitro experiments to evaluate the cannulation accuracy of the system on blood vessel phantoms. Next, we assess the effects of vessel diameter, needle gauge, flow rate, and viscosity on the rate of sample collection. Finally, we demonstrate proof-of-concept of a white cell assay on the blood analyzer using in vitro human samples spiked with fluorescently labeled microbeads.

  10. IP-I0 BASED IMMUNOLOGICAL MONITORING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an immunological method and, more particularly, a method for measuring cell-mediated immune reactivity (CMI) in mammals based on the production of IP-10.The invention further discloses an assay and a kit for measuring CMI to an antigen using whole blood or other...... suitable biological samples. The methods of the present invention are useful in therapeutic and diagnostic protocols for human, livestock and veterinary and wild life applications, thus the invention further relates to a method for diagnosing an infection in a mammal....

  11. Diagnostic value of blood clot core during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspirate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Emily N; Russell, Christopher D; Shilo, Konstantin; Islam, Shaheen; Wood, Karen L

    2013-06-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is being increasingly used in the sampling of pulmonary masses and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The blood clot core (BCC) often obtained during EBUS-TBNA may not be a true core and therefore may not be submitted for histological analysis. The frequency in which the blood clot core is positive in patients with negative cytology undergoing EBUS-TBNA is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic role of the blood clot core obtained during EBUS-TBNA. An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective chart review was performed from January through September 2011 for all patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA at The Ohio State University. The data collection included cytology and histology results for each procedure. Blood clot cores obtained from the EBUS-TBNA needle were sent in formalin for histological examination. Seventy patients underwent EBUS-TBNA and 51 (72.8 %) patients had procedures that yielded a BCC for histology and aspirate for cytology. Forty-nine percent of patients with a BCC were diagnosed with malignancy. Of those with a BCC obtained, five (9.8 %) patients diagnosed with malignancy were done so based only on the results of blood clot core alone with negative cytology. Blood clot cores obtained at EBUS-TBNA contain diagnostic material and should be subjected histopathological examination. When blood clot cores are sent for analysis, there is the potential to spare up to 10 % of patients more invasive diagnostic biopsy procedures.

  12. An assessment of various blood collection and transfer methods used for malaria rapid diagnostic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik Fred

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Four blood collection and transfer devices commonly used for malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs were assessed for their consistency, accuracy and ease of use in the hands of laboratory technicians and village health workers. Methods Laboratory technicians and village health workers collected blood from a finger prick using each device in random order, and deposited the blood either on filter paper or into a suitable casette-type RDT. Consistency and accuracy of volume delivered was determined by comparing the measurements of the resulting blood spots/heights with the measurements of laboratory-prepared pipetted standard volumes. The effect of varying blood volumes on RDT sensitivity and ease of use was also observed. Results There was high variability in blood volume collected by the devices, with the straw and the loop, the most preferred devices, usually transferring volumes greater than intended, while the glass capillary tube and the plastic pipette transferring less volume than intended or none at all. Varying the blood volume delivered to RDTs indicated that this variation is critical to RDT sensitivity only when the transferred volume is very low. Conclusion None of the blood transfer devices assessed performed consistently well. Adequate training on their use is clearly necessary, with more development efforts for improved designs to be used by remote health workers, in mind.

  13. Development of class model based on blood biochemical parameters as a diagnostic tool of PSE meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Daofeng; Zhou, Xu; Yang, Feng; Tian, Shiyi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ma, Lin; Han, Jianzhong

    2017-06-01

    A fast, sensitive and effective method based on the blood biochemical parameters for the detection of PSE meat was developed in this study. A total of 200 pigs were slaughtered in the same slaughterhouse. Meat quality was evaluated by measuring pH, electrical conductivity and color at 45min, 2h and 24h after slaughtering in M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LD). Blood biochemical parameters were determined in blood samples collected during carcass bleeding. Principal component analysis (PCA) biplot showed that high levels of exsanguination Creatine Kinase, Lactate Dehydrogenase, Aspertate aminotransferase, blood glucose and lactate were associated with the PSE meat, and the five biochemical parameters were found to be good indicators of PSE meat Discriminant function analysis (DFA) was able to clearly identify PSE meat using the five biochemical parameters as input data, and the class model is an effective diagnostic tool in pigs which can be used to detect the PSE meat and reduce economic loss for the company.

  14. Statistical analysis of polarizing maps of blood plasma laser images for the diagnostics of malignant formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungurian, V. P.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Ushenko, V. O.

    2012-01-01

    This work is aimed at searching the interconnections between the statistic structure of blood plasma microscopic images and manifestations of optical anisotropy of liquid crystal protein network. The model of linear birefringence of albumin and globulin crystals underlies in the ground of this work. The results of investigating the interrelation between statistical moments of the 1st-4th order are presented that characterize the coordinate distributions of polarization ellipticity of laser images of blood plasma smears and pathological changes in human organism. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency and its severity degree differentiation are determined.

  15. Auxiliary diagnostic value of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 of whole blood in active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Hang; Bao, Hong; Jin, Yufen; Liu, Xiaoju; Wu, Xueqiong; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the expression level of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in peripheral blood and its auxiliary diagnostic value in active tuberculosis. A chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay method was used to detect the levels of IFN-γ and MCP-1 in peripheral blood. Then the receiver operating characteristic curve were drawn to determine the threshold of IFN-γ and MCP-1 for diagnosis of active tuberculosis and to evaluate their diagnostic performance. The specific IFN-γ and MCP-1 levels in the active tuberculosis group were significantly higher than those in the non-tuberculous pulmonary disease group (P 0.05), but the MCP-1 levels in the non-tuberculous respiratory disease group were significantly higher than those of the healthy control group (P < 0.05). The specific IFN-γ and MCP-1 level cut off values were 256 pg/ml and 389 pg/ml as an active tuberculosis diagnostic standard. The sensitivities of IFN-γ and MCP-1 were 57.3% and 92.8%, respectively; specificities were 80% and 80.7%, respectively; the positive predictive values were 76.9% and 84.9%, respectively; negative predictive values were 61.7% and 78.7%, respectively; and accuracy rates were 76.9% and 84.9%, respectively. Compared with the detection of IFN-γ, we observed a better diagnostic performance of MCP-1 in peripheral blood in active tuberculosis. MCP-1 may become one of the active tuberculosis auxiliary diagnostic targets.

  16. Half a century of Dutch transplant immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rood, Jon J; Claas, Frans H J; Brand, Anneke; Tilanus, Marcel G J; van Kooten, Cees

    2014-01-01

    The sixties have not only witnessed the start of the Dutch Society for Immunology (NvvI), but were also the flourishing beginning of the discipline of transplant immunology. The interest in immunology in the Netherlands had its start in the context of blood transfusions and not for instance in the f

  17. Immunologic testing of xeno-derived osteochondral grafts using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy human donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Targoni Oleg S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One means of treating osteoarthritis is with autologous or allogeneic osteochondral grafts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the innate immunological response in humans toward xeno-derived osteochondral grafts that have been partially or entirely treated by the photooxidation process. Methods The antigens tested included bovine, porcine, ovine and equine osteochondral samples that have been treated in successive steps of photooxidation. ELISPOT assays were used to evaluate the production of IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α by human monocytes in response to the antigens. Results Results indicated vigorous production of IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α in response to untreated bovine, porcine and equine specimens. This indicates that these samples are perceived as foreign, or stimulatory, by the human monocytes. There was no induction of IL-4 or IL-12, which is required for Th2 and Th1 immunity, respectively. In contrast, the processed bovine, porcine and equine samples did not induce significant activation of cells of the innate immune system. This occurred after the first step in processing (after cleaning in increasing strengths of ethanol. This suggests that the processing steps dramatically, if not completely, negated the immunostimulatory properties of the test sample. The results for the ovine samples indicate a reverse response. Conclusion The findings of the study suggest that photooxidized bovine, porcine or equine samples have the potential to be used as an osteochondral graft. Although the first step in processing reduced the immunological response, photooxidation is still necessary to retain the structure and mechanical integrity of the cartilage, which would allow for immediate joint resurfacing.

  18. Investigation of epididymal immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zong-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Immunology is the study of the structure and function of the immune system. The immune system consists of an earlier-stage innate immunity and a later-stage adaptive immunity. The task of the immune system is to efficiently respond to non-self antigens and the invasion of pathogens, thereby protecting the host's homeostasis. This review article discusses the structure and function of the epididymis, including the composition of the epithelial cells of the epididymis and their relationship to the immune system, through the assessment of alterations in the immune cells of the epididymis. The review also shows the anti-inflammatory properties of rat epididymal defensin and the description of the blood-epididymis barrier, immune barrier, epididymitis and pathological mechanisms of infertility in males. Taken together, we see that the epididymis possesses a close link with immunology. Finally, this review discusses the future of studies involving epididymal immunology.

  19. DIAGNOSTIC UTILITY OF DIFFERENT BLOOD COMPONENTS IN GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF SEPSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslove, David M; Marshall, John C

    2016-03-01

    Most gene expression studies of sepsis have used either whole blood or specific leukocyte fractions as source tissues for RNA. Data regarding the relative utility of these different tissue sources are lacking. To evaluate the utility of different source tissues in studying gene expression in sepsis. We undertook a systematic analysis of sepsis gene expression studies, including both adult and pediatric cohorts. We used clustering methods to partition samples according to gene expression levels, and compared expression cluster labels to clinical diagnoses. We also quantified the strength of cluster formation based on expression data from different tissue sources using average silhouette widths as a measure of cluster cohesiveness. We included 22 separate expression datasets. Whole blood was used as the source tissue in 15 studies, while leukocyte isolates were used in seven studies. Whole blood samples yielded greater specificity for the diagnosis of sepsis than data from leukocyte isolates (94% vs 78%, P = 0.03). Whole blood-derived data also yielded more cohesive clusters (median silhouette widths 0.28 and 0.19 for whole blood and leukocyte isolates respectively, P blood to derive gene expression data in sepsis studies investigating novel diagnostics and subtype discovery. This strategy has a number of practical advantages, and the resulting data also have potential utility in developing molecular classifications of sepsis syndromes.

  20. Evaluation of three rapid diagnostic methods for direct identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Raquel M; Bauerle, Elizabeth R; Fang, Ferric C; Butler-Wu, Susan M

    2014-07-01

    The identification of organisms from positive blood cultures generally takes several days. However, recently developed rapid diagnostic methods offer the potential for organism identification within only a few hours of blood culture positivity. In this study, we evaluated the performance of three commercial methods to rapidly identify organisms directly from positive blood cultures: QuickFISH (AdvanDx, Wolburn, MA), Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with Sepsityper processing (Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, MA). A total of 159 blood cultures (VersaTREK Trek Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH) positive for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as yeast were analyzed with QuickFISH and MALDI-TOF MS. In all, 102 blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GP assay. For monomicrobial cultures, we observed 98.0% concordance with routine methods for both QuickFISH (143/146) and the BC-GP assay (93/95). MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated 80.1% (117/146) and 87.7% (128/146) concordance with routine methods to the genus and species levels, respectively. None of the methods tested were capable of consistently identifying polymicrobial cultures in their entirety or reliably differentiating Streptococcus pneumoniae from viridans streptococci. Nevertheless, the methods evaluated in this study are convenient and accurate for the most commonly encountered pathogens and have the potential to dramatically reduce turnaround time for the provision of results to the treating physician.

  1. Unilateral Opening of Rat Blood-Brain Barrier Assisted by Diagnostic Ultrasound Targeted Microbubbles Destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Blood-brain barrier (BBB is a key obstacle that prevents the medication from blood to the brain. Microbubble-enhanced cavitation by focused ultrasound can open the BBB and proves to be valuable in the brain drug delivery. The study aimed to explore the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of unilateral opening of BBB using diagnostic ultrasound targeted microbubbles destruction in rats. Methods. A transtemporal bone irradiation of diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous injection of lipid-coated microbubbles were performed at unilateral hemisphere. Pathological changes were monitored. Evans Blue extravasation grades, extraction from brain tissue, and fluorescence optical density were quantified. Lanthanum nitrate was traced by transmission electron microscopy. Results. After diagnostic ultrasound mediated microbubbles destruction, Evans Blue extravasation and fluorescence integrated optical density were significantly higher in the irradiated hemisphere than the contralateral side (all p<0.01. Erythrocytes extravasations were demonstrated in the ultrasound-exposed hemisphere (4±1, grade 2 while being invisible in the control side. Lanthanum nitrate tracers leaked through interendothelial cleft and spread to the nerve fiber existed in the irradiation side. Conclusions. Transtemporal bone irradiation under DUS mediated microbubble destruction provides us with a more accessible, safer, and higher selective BBB opening approach in rats, which is advantageous in brain targeted drugs delivery.

  2. Diagnostics And Treatment Of Patients With Blood Circulation Insufficiency In Vertebrobasilar Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Khachatryan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available For improvement of treatment results of patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency we have analyzed data of medical examination and treatment of 182 patients stayed in clinics of Hospital Surgery and Nervous System Diseases from the 1st of January of 2005 till the 30th of June of 2009. Method of screening diagnostics, quantitative and qualitative blood flow estimation by means of Doppler ultrasonic investigation and angiography have been performed. The cause of blood circulation insufficiency in the vertebrobasilar bed at 87 patients was vertebral artery syndrome and in 95 cases there were the significant hemodynamical damages of blood flow in aorta arch branches and intracranial arteries. The neuroangiotropic therapy has been made for all patients, but the clinical improvement period was short in most cases, more prolonged effect was observed in addition of conservative therapy with plasmapheresis by indications. In the complex treatment of patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency accompanied by degenerative diseases of spine chemical sympathectomy of vertebral artery in the III segment in the form of procaine and spirit-procaine blockades was made in 116 and 69 cases accordingly. The surgical sympathectomy was made in 15 patients. The surgical operations were made in 62 of 95 patients with significant hemodynamic pathology of blood flow in the vertebrobasilar region. In most cases isolative and combinative reconstructive surgery on carotid arteries was carried out. It played a significant role in blood flow correction. Favorable postoperative results were observed in most cases (93, 5%

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of a point-of-care blood typing kit conducted by potential end users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienek, Diane R; Perez, Nora M

    2013-05-01

    The usability of a rapid point-of-care ABO-Rh blood typing kit was determined by comparing the performance of individuals with extensive medical training/experience to those with a lesser extent. Subjects were asked to use the blood typing kit with their own blood. These outcomes were compared to that listed in the subject's medical record, stamped on their dog tag, and the result interpreted by a laboratorian. For all participants, there was ∼80% consistency between the result interpreted by the subject and that stated in their medical record. The participant's level of formal education (P ≤ 0.05) affected the accuracy of the blood typing kit. When comparing the subject's outcome to that stated in their medical record, the performance of individuals in the Medical Corps was approximately 10% and 25% higher (P < 0.05) than that observed with Hospital Corpsman or Medical Service Corps members, respectively. To remove bias that can occur when interpreting the blood type of oneself, the subjects also interpreted the result from cards prepared by the investigator. Taken together, a discrepancy between the potential diagnostic accuracy of the kit and that observed with potential end users was identified.

  4. Immunological changes in canine peripheral blood leukocytes triggered by immunization with first or second generation vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; de Andrade, Renata Aline; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Magalhães, Camila Paula; Carvalho, Andréa Teixeira; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Campolina, Sabrina Sidney; Mello, Maria Norma; Vianna, Leonardo Rocha; Mayrink, Wilson; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Rocha, Luciana Morais; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-05-15

    In this study, we summarized the major phenotypic/functional aspects of circulating leukocytes following canine immunization with Leishvaccine and Leishmune®. Our findings showed that Leishvaccine triggered early changes in the innate immunity (neutrophils and eosinophils) with late alterations on monocytes. Conversely, Leishmune(®) induced early phenotypic changes in both, neutrophils and monocytes. Moreover, Leishvaccine triggered mixed activation-related phenotypic changes on T-cells (CD4+ and CD8+ and B-lymphocytes, whereas Leishmune(®) promoted a selective response, mainly associated with CD8+ T-cell activation. Mixed cytokine profile (IFN-γ/IL-4) was observed in Leishvaccine immunized dogs whereas a selective pro-inflammatory pattern (IFN-γ/NO) was induced by Leishmune® vaccination. The distinct immunological profile triggered by Leishvaccine and Leishmune® may be a direct consequence of the distinct biochemical composition of these immunobiological, i.e. complex versus purified Leishmania antigen along with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) versus saponin adjuvant. Both immunobiologicals are able to activate phagocytes and CD8+ T-cells and therefore could be considered as a putative vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL).

  5. Sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of blood as a diagnostic test in mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Vestergaard, Hanne; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten;

    2014-01-01

    The recent progress in sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis suggests that mutation analysis of peripheral blood (PB) represents a promising diagnostic test in mastocytosis. However, there is a need for systematic assessment of the analytical sensitivity and specificity of the approach in order...... the mutation in PB in nearly all adult mastocytosis patients. The mutation was detected in PB in 78 of 83 systemic mastocytosis (94%) and 3 of 4 cutaneous mastocytosis patients (75%). The test was 100% specific as determined by analysis of clinically relevant control patients who all tested negative. Mutation...

  6. SPECT Myocardial Blood Flow Quantitation Concludes Equivocal Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Studies to Increase Diagnostic Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lung-Ching; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Ing-Jou; Ku, Chi-Tai; Chen, Yen-Kung; Hsu, Bailing

    2016-01-01

    Recently, myocardial blood flow quantitation with dynamic SPECT/CT has been reported to enhance the detection of coronary artery disease in human. This advance has created important clinical applications to coronary artery disease diagnosis and management for areas where myocardial perfusion PET tracers are not available. We present 2 clinical cases that undergone a combined test of 1-day rest/dipyridamole-stress dynamic SPECT and ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT scans using an integrated imaging protocol and demonstrate that flow parameters are capable to conclude equivocal myocardial perfusion SPECT studies, therefore increasing diagnostic benefits to add value in making clinical decisions.

  7. Immunological characterization of peripheral blood leukocytes using vaccine for mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) in swine line selected for resistance to MPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Borjigin, Liushiqi; Katayama, Yuki; Li, Meihua; Satoh, Takumi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Roh, Sang-gun; Aso, Hisashi; Katoh, Kazuo; Suda, Yoshihito; Sakuma, Akiko; Nakajo, Mituru; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2013-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate immunological changes in peripheral blood leukocytes in pigs that were genetically selected for their improved resistance to mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS), using MPS vaccine as an antigen. Twelve castrated MPS-selected Landrace pigs were compared with the same number of pigs from a nonselected line by using a time-course analysis at the hematological level. After the second sensitization with MPS vaccine, the percentages of B cells, CD4(+) T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells in total leukocytes were lower in the selected line than in the nonselected line, whereas the percentage of granulocytes in total leukocytes increased in the MPS-selected line. We also assessed the proliferative ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, lipopolysaccharide or concanavalin A, and found that although the proliferative ability of the PBMC was not different between the two lines at a steady state, the nonselected line showed a significantly higher proliferative ability after sensitization with MPS vaccine than the selected line regardless of antigens used. These results thus indicate that the selection of pigs on the basis of MPS resistance changes their immunophenotype, and would give us beneficial information for the prevention of MPS infection. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Improving detection of avian malaria from host blood: a step towards a standardised protocol for diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebuhr, Chris N; Blasco-Costa, Isabel

    2016-10-01

    Avian malaria, caused by Plasmodium spp., has been linked to the mortality and population-level declines in native birds in some regions. While molecular diagnostic methods have greatly improved our ability to detect infections of both human and bird malaria, failing to identify false negatives remains an important handicap, particularly for avian malaria due to host DNA presence in the bird blood cells. In an attempt to improve the accuracy of diagnostics by PCR, we evaluated the performance of a commercial silica-membrane-based DNA extraction kit by modifying the protocol with four unpooled elution volume alternatives. Our results suggest that the best template is the DNA extract obtained from the second eluate of a first 50 μL elution step. In one case, the only band visible was from this second eluate and, thus, may not have been identified as positive for Plasmodium spp. if a different elution protocol had been followed. Our results are likely explained by the concept of size exclusion chromatography by which particles of different sizes will elute at different rates. Overall, first elution templates may consist of a lower ratio of parasite to host DNA, while second eluates may contain a higher parasite to host DNA ratio. A low ratio of parasite to host DNA is a concern in detecting chronic infections, in which birds typically carry low levels of parasitemia, making accurate diagnostics imperative when identifying reservoirs of disease that could lead to spillback events.

  9. Optical diagnostic of hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) from human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Firdous, Shamaraz

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis is the second most common disease worldwide with half of the cases arising in the developing world. The mortality associated with hepatitis B and C can be reduced if the disease is detected at the early stages of development. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to detect biochemical changes accompanying hepatitis progression. Raman spectra were acquired from 20 individuals with six hepatitis B infected patients, six hepatitis C infected patients and eight healthy patients in order to gain an insight into the determination of biochemical changes for early diagnostic. The human blood serum was examined at a 532 nm excitation laser source. Raman characteristic peaks were observed in normal sera at 1006, 1157 and 1513 cm-1, while in the case of hepatitis B and C these peaks were found to be blue shifted with decreased intensity. New Raman peaks appeared in HBV and HCV infected sera at 1194, 1302, 844, 905, 1065 and 1303 cm-1 respectively. A Mat lab subroutine and frequency domain filter program is developed and applied to signal processing of Raman scattering data. The algorithms have been successfully applied to remove the signal noise found in experimental scattering signals. The results show that Raman spectroscopy displays a high sensitivity to biochemical changes in blood sera during disease progression resulting in exceptional prediction accuracy when discriminating between normal and malignant. Raman spectroscopy shows enormous clinical potential as a rapid non-invasive diagnostic tool for hepatitis and other infectious diseases.

  10. Detailed analysis of immunologic effects of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab in peripheral blood of patients with melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualberto Antonio

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CTLA4-blocking antibodies induce tumor regression in a subset of patients with melanoma. Analysis of immune parameters in peripheral blood may help define how responses are mediated. Methods Peripheral blood from HLA-A*0201-positive patients with advanced melanoma receiving tremelimumab (formerly CP-675,206 at 10 mg/kg monthly was repeatedly sampled during the first 4 cycles. Samples were analyzed by 1 tetramer and ELISPOT assays for reactivity to CMV, EBV, MART1, gp100, and tyrosinase; 2 activation HLA-DR and memory CD45RO markers on CD4+/CD8+ cells; and 3 real-time quantitative PCR of mRNA for FoxP3 transcription factor, preferentially expressed by T regulatory cells. The primary endpoint was difference in MART1-specific T cells by tetramer assay. Immunological data were explored for significant trends using clustering analysis. Results Three of 12 patients eligible for immune monitoring had tumor regression lasting > 2 years without relapse. There was no significant change in percent of MART1-specific T cells by tetramer assay. Additionally, there was no generalized trend toward postdosing changes in other antigen-specific CD8+ cell populations, FoxP3 transcripts, or overall changes in surface expression of T-cell activation or memory markers. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering based on immune monitoring data segregated patients randomly. However, clustering according to T-cell activation or memory markers separated patients with clinical response and most patients with inflammatory toxicity into a common subgroup. Conclusion Administration of CTLA4-blocking antibody tremelimumab to patients with advanced melanoma results in a subset of patients with long-lived tumor responses. T-cell activation and memory markers served as the only readout of the pharmacodynamic effects of this antibody in peripheral blood. Clinical trial registration number NCT00086489

  11. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  12. Pathogenic, Molecular, and Immunological Properties of a Virus Associated with Sea Turtle Fibropapillomatosis. Phase II : Viral Pathogenesis and Development of Diagnostic Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Paul A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn; Brown, Daniel R.; Bjorndal, Karen A.; Coberley, Sadie; Bolten, Alan; Moretti, Ritchie H.; Herbst, Lawrence H.; Lackovich, Joel K.

    2000-01-01

    Research conducted under this RWO from July 1, 1997 through June 30, 2000 has provided important new information about the pathogenesis, virology, and immunology of marine turtle fibropapillomatosis. In particular, we have provided strong evidence for the association of a herpesvirus with fibropapillomatosis of the green turtle,Chelonia mydas, and the loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta, in Florida. In addition we have provided new evidence for the absence of papillomaviruses fr...

  13. Computer immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephanie; Beauchemin, Catherine

    2007-04-01

    This review describes a body of work on computational immune systems that behave analogously to the natural immune system. These artificial immune systems (AIS) simulate the behavior of the natural immune system and in some cases have been used to solve practical engineering problems such as computer security. AIS have several strengths that can complement wet lab immunology. It is easier to conduct simulation experiments and to vary experimental conditions, for example, to rule out hypotheses; it is easier to isolate a single mechanism to test hypotheses about how it functions; agent-based models of the immune system can integrate data from several different experiments into a single in silico experimental system.

  14. [Mass spectrometry analysis of blood plasma lipidome as method of disease diagnostics, evuation of effectiveness and optimization of drug therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhov, P G; Maslov, D L; Balashova, E E; Trifonova, O P; Medvedeva, N V; Torkhovskaya, T I; Ipatova, O M; Archakov, A I; Malyshev, P P; Kukharchuk, V V; Shestakova, E A; Shestakova, M V; Dedov, I I

    2015-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of blood lipid based on direct mass spectrometry of lipophilic low molecular weight fraction of blood plasma has been considered. Such technique allows quantification of hundreds of various types of lipids and this changes existing concepts on diagnostics of lipid disorders and related diseases. The versatility and quickness of the method significantly simplify its wide use. This method is applicable for diagnostics of atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer and other diseases. Detalization of plasma lipid composition at the molecular level by means of mass spectrometry allows to assess the effectiveness of therapy and to optimize the drug treatment of cardiovascular diseases by phospholipid preparations.

  15. Blood lactate concentration as diagnostic predictors of uterine necrosis and its outcome in dairy cows with uterine torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    MURAKAMI, Takashi; NAKAO, Shigeru; SATO, Yohei; NAKADA, Satoshi; SATO, Akane; MUKAI, Shuhei; KOBAYASHI, Masanori; YAMADA, Yutaka; KAWAKAMI, Eiichi

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine blood lactate concentrations (bLac) and their validity as a diagnostic marker in bovine uterine torsion, blood samples were taken from 54 Holstein cows with uterine torsion before the correction of torsion. bLac in a group of cows with and without uterine necrosis were 15.0 and 3.0 mmol/l, respectively (P5.0 and >6.5 mmol/l, respectively. These findings suggest that in dairy cows with uterine torsion, an increase in bLac is a diagnostic predictor of uterine necrosis as well as poor prognosis in dams. PMID:28163266

  16. Diagnostic prediction of renal failure from blood serum analysis by FTIR spectrometry and chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmohammadi, Mohammdreza; Ghasemi, Keyvan; Garmarudi, Amir Bagheri; Ramin, Mehdi

    2015-02-01

    A new diagnostic approach based on Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry and classification algorithm has been introduced which provides a rapid, reliable, and easy way to perform blood test for the diagnosis of renal failure. Blood serum samples from 35 renal failure patients and 40 healthy persons were analyzed by ATR-FTIR spectrometry. The resulting data was processed by Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA) and QDA combined with simple filtered method. Spectroscopic studies were performed in 900-2000 cm-1 spectral region with 3.85 cm-1 data space. Results showed 93.33% and 100% of accuracy for QDA and filter-QDA models, respectively. In the first step, 30 samples were applied to construct the model. In order to modify the capability of QDA in prediction of test samples, filter-based feature selection methods were applied. It was found that the filtered spectra coupled with QDA could correctly predict the test samples in most of the cases.

  17. Correlation of central venous pressure with venous blood gas analysis parameters; a diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim-Taleghani, Sima; Fatemi, Alireza; Alavi Moghaddam, Mostafa; Shojaee, Majid; Abushouk, Abdelrahman Ibrahim; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Baratloo, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to assess the correlation between central venous pressure (CVP) and venous blood gas (VBG) analysis parameters, to facilitate management of severe sepsis and septic shock in emergency department. This diagnostic study was conducted from January 2014 until June 2015 in three major educational medical centers, Tehran, Iran. For patients selected with diagnosis of septic shock, peripheral blood sample was taken for testing the VBG parameters and the anion gap (AG) was calculated. All the mentioned parameters were measured again after infusion of 500 cc of normal saline 0.9% in about 1 h. Totally, 93 patients with septic shock were enrolled, 63 male and 30 female. The mean age was 72.53 ± 13.03 and the mean Shock Index (SI) before fluid therapy was 0.79 ± 0.30. AG and pH showed significant negative correlations with CVP, While HCO3 showed a significant positive correlation with CVP. These relations can be affected by the treatment modalities used in shock management such as fluid therapy, mechanical ventilation and vasopressor treatment. It is likely that there is a significant statistical correlation between VBG parameters and AG with CVP, but further research is needed before implementation of the results of this study.

  18. Transformation of vibration signals in rotary blood pumps: the diagnostic potential of pump failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Although non-destructive and continuous monitoring is indispensable for long-term circulatory support with rotary blood pumps, a practical monitoring system has not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of detecting pump failure caused by thrombus formation through the monitoring of vibration signals. The data acquisition equipment included vibration pickups, a charge amplifier, vibration analysis systems, and exclusive hardware. A pivot-bearing centrifugal pump with a mock circuit was investigated for vibration analysis. To simulate the four common areas of thrombus formation, we used a piece of silicon attached to each of the following four locations: the total area of the bottom of the impeller, an eccentric shape on the bottom of the impeller, a circular shape around the shaft top, and an eccentric shape on the top of the impeller. Vibration signals were picked up, and the power spectrum density analysis was performed at pump rotational speeds of 2100, 2400, and 3000 rpm. In this study, pump failure could be detected, and the types of imitation thrombi could be determined. We conclude that vibration detection with a computerized analysis system is a potentially valuable diagnostic tool for long-term circulatory support with rotary blood pumps.

  19. Blood-based biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease: diagnostic algorithms and new technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Pedro; Molina, Marina; Toledano, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    New concepts about Alzheimer's disease (AD), considered as a clinical-biological entity, make essential the definition of biomarkers that could be used for the in vivo diagnosis of the disorder before dementia develops. Different types of genetic, biochemical and neuroimaging markers have been described, highlighting some of the changes that occur in the brain during the course of the disease, yet there is little proof of their pathognomonic and diagnostic value. Furthermore, many of the assays used are difficult to perform, the equipment/reagents are expensive or potentially hazardous (e.g.; use of radioactive compounds, CSF extraction). Thus, there is a need to define more suitable and convenient approaches, such as the determination of blood parameters that are easy to obtain and that can be repeated as necessary without contraindications. These data can be used by algorithms that combine specific and non-specific changes to classify patients at different stages of AD and/or distinguish AD from other related diseases with a greater specificity and reliability (> 80%). The blood parameters considered in this review are varied, including: β-amyloid, tau, apolipoproteins and proteins, as well as the metabolic behavior of blood cells, etc. Among the proteins, cytokines/chemokines and other cell factors related to both neuro-inflammatory and peripheral-inflammatory processes in AD are of prime importance. New technologies to detect and quantify these substances, reasonably priced such as the vibrational spectroscopy, panels of parameters and algorithms to assess the results, would be fundamental for the early AD diagnosis and to define new potential therapies.

  20. Unwanted Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Supotnytskyi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the role of antigenic imprin­ting phenomena and antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in epidemic, infectious and postvaccinal processes. Based on published experimental data, it is shown that both phenomena are directly related to the laws of development and course of epide­mics, the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and safe use of vaccines. Their ignoring by researchers has led to failures in the design of vaccines against HIV/AIDS, dengue fever, influenza, malaria, hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis. These data show that, without taking into account the two phenomena, the further development of immunology and epidemiology in the direction of breakthrough discoveries in there areas of science are impossible.

  1. Learning from epidemiological, clinical, and immunological studies on Mycobacterium africanum for improving current understanding of host–pathogen interactions, and for the development and evaluation of diagnostics, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimuddin Zumla

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium africanum comprises two phylogenetic lineages within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. M. africanum was first described and isolated in 1968 from the sputum of a Senegalese patient with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB and it has been identified increasingly as an important cause of human TB, particularly prevalent in West Africa. The restricted geographical distribution of M. africanum, in contrast to the widespread global distribution of other species of MTBC, requires explanation. Available data indicate that M. africanum may also have important differences in transmission, pathogenesis, and host–pathogen interactions, which could affect the evaluation of new TB intervention tools (diagnostics and vaccines–those currently in use and those under development. The unequal geographical distribution and spread of MTBC species means that individual research findings from one country or region cannot be generalized across the continent. Thus, generalizing data from previous and ongoing research studies on MTBC may be inaccurate and inappropriate. A major rethink is required regarding the design and structure of future clinical trials of new interventions. The West, Central, East, and Southern African EDCTP Networks of Excellence provide opportunities to take forward these pan-Africa studies. More investments into molecular, epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and immunological studies across the African continent are required to enable further understanding of host–M. africanum interactions, leading to the development of more specific diagnostics, biomarkers, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for TB.

  2. Learning from epidemiological, clinical, and immunological studies on Mycobacterium africanum for improving current understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and for the development and evaluation of diagnostics, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Otchere, Isaac Darko; Mensah, Gloria Ivy; Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Gehre, Florian; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Ntoumi, Francine; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium africanum comprises two phylogenetic lineages within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). M. africanum was first described and isolated in 1968 from the sputum of a Senegalese patient with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and it has been identified increasingly as an important cause of human TB, particularly prevalent in West Africa. The restricted geographical distribution of M. africanum, in contrast to the widespread global distribution of other species of MTBC, requires explanation. Available data indicate that M. africanum may also have important differences in transmission, pathogenesis, and host-pathogen interactions, which could affect the evaluation of new TB intervention tools (diagnostics and vaccines)-those currently in use and those under development. The unequal geographical distribution and spread of MTBC species means that individual research findings from one country or region cannot be generalized across the continent. Thus, generalizing data from previous and ongoing research studies on MTBC may be inaccurate and inappropriate. A major rethink is required regarding the design and structure of future clinical trials of new interventions. The West, Central, East, and Southern African EDCTP Networks of Excellence provide opportunities to take forward these pan-Africa studies. More investments into molecular, epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and immunological studies across the African continent are required to enable further understanding of host-M. africanum interactions, leading to the development of more specific diagnostics, biomarkers, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for TB. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic value of cancer-testis antigen mRNA in peripheral blood from hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the diagnostic value of cancer-testis antigen(CTA) mRNA in peripheral blood samples from hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) patients.METHODS:Peripheral blood samples were taken from 90 patients with HCC before operation.Expression of melanoma antigen-1(MAGE-1),synovial sarcoma X breakpoint-1(SSX-1),and cancer-testis-associated protein of 11 kDa(CTp11) mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMC) was tested by nested reverse transcriptspolymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).Serum α-fetoprotein(AFP)...

  4. A malaria diagnostic tool based on computer vision screening and visualization of Plasmodium falciparum candidate areas in digitized blood smears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Linder

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Microscopy is the gold standard for diagnosis of malaria, however, manual evaluation of blood films is highly dependent on skilled personnel in a time-consuming, error-prone and repetitive process. In this study we propose a method using computer vision detection and visualization of only the diagnostically most relevant sample regions in digitized blood smears. METHODS: Giemsa-stained thin blood films with P. falciparum ring-stage trophozoites (n = 27 and uninfected controls (n = 20 were digitally scanned with an oil immersion objective (0.1 µm/pixel to capture approximately 50,000 erythrocytes per sample. Parasite candidate regions were identified based on color and object size, followed by extraction of image features (local binary patterns, local contrast and Scale-invariant feature transform descriptors used as input to a support vector machine classifier. The classifier was trained on digital slides from ten patients and validated on six samples. RESULTS: The diagnostic accuracy was tested on 31 samples (19 infected and 12 controls. From each digitized area of a blood smear, a panel with the 128 most probable parasite candidate regions was generated. Two expert microscopists were asked to visually inspect the panel on a tablet computer and to judge whether the patient was infected with P. falciparum. The method achieved a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 100% as well as 90% and 100% for the two readers respectively using the diagnostic tool. Parasitemia was separately calculated by the automated system and the correlation coefficient between manual and automated parasitemia counts was 0.97. CONCLUSION: We developed a decision support system for detecting malaria parasites using a computer vision algorithm combined with visualization of sample areas with the highest probability of malaria infection. The system provides a novel method for blood smear screening with a significantly reduced need for

  5. α-synuclein reactive antibodies as diagnostic biomarkers in blood sera of Parkinson's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Yanamandra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Auto-antibodies with specificity to self-antigens have been implicated in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including Parkinson's (PD and Alzheimer's diseases, being sensitive indicators of neurodegeneration and focus for disease prevention. Of particular interest are the studies focused on the auto-immune responses to amyloidogenic proteins associated with diseases and their applications in therapeutic treatments such as vaccination with amyloid antigens and antibodies in PD, Alzheimer's disease and potentially other neurodegeneration ailments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Generated auto-antibodies towards the major amyloidogenic protein involved in PD Lewy bodies--α-synuclein and its amyloid oligomers and fibrils were measured in the blood sera of early and late PD patients and controls by using ELISA, Western blot and Biacore surface plasmon resonance. We found significantly higher antibody levels towards monomeric α-synuclein in the blood sera of PD patients compared to controls, though the responses decreased with PD progression (P<0.0001. This indicates potential protective role of autoimmunity in maintaining the body homeostasis and clearing protein species whose disbalance may lead to amyloid assembly. There were no noticeable immune responses towards amyloid oligomers, but substantially increased levels of IgGs towards α-synuclein amyloid fibrils both in PD patients and controls, which subsided with the disease progression (P<0.0001. Pooled IgGs from PD patients and controls interacted also with the amyloid fibrils of Aβ (1-40 and hen lysozyme, however the latter were recognized with lower affinity. This suggests that IgGs bind to the generic amyloid conformational epitope, displaying higher specificity towards human amyloid species associated with neurodegeneration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings may suggest the protective role of autoimmunity in PD and therefore immune reactions towards PD major

  6. [Biochemical studies of blood serum use for diagnostics and efficacy of treatment evaluation of TMJ pain dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimova, R S

    2007-01-01

    Study of biochemical indices of blood serum in patients with the pain disfunction of temporomandibular joint syndrome was performed. Analysis of biochemical studies of blood serum revealed the essential increase of adenozintriphosphate (ATPh) level on 17.5%, histamin--on 51.7%, stress hormones: adrenalin--on 76.9%, cortizol--on 51.4% in patients with the syndrome of pain disfunction of TMJ in comparison with the control group. Biochemical studies of blood revealed the more marked lowering of the level of histamin, adrenalin, cortizol in blood serum of patients after the treatment of alternative methods than after pharmaco- and physiotherapy. the high informative level of the studying of ATPh, histamin, kortisol of blood's serum for diagnostics and evaluation of the efficiency of treatment of the pain disfunction of temporomandibular joint syndrome was proved.

  7. Immunological characterization and transcription profiling of peripheral blood (PB) monocytes in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD): case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There exists a small subset of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) characterized by fluctuating behavioral symptoms and cognitive skills following immune insults. Some of these children also exhibit specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD), resulting in frequent infection caused by encapsulated organisms, and they often require supplemental intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (ASD/SPAD). This study assessed whether these ASD/SPAD children have distinct immunological findings in comparison with ASD/non-SPAD or non-ASD/SPAD children. Case description We describe 8 ASD/SPAD children with worsening behavioral symptoms/cognitive skills that are triggered by immune insults. These ASD/SPAD children exhibited delayed type food allergy (5/8), treatment-resistant seizure disorders (4/8), and chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (5/8) at high frequencies. Control subjects included ASD children without SPAD (N = 39), normal controls (N = 37), and non-ASD children with SPAD (N = 12). Discussion and Evaluation We assessed their innate and adaptive immune responses, by measuring the production of pro-inflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in responses to agonists of toll like receptors (TLR), stimuli of innate immunity, and T cell stimulants. Transcription profiling of PB monocytes was also assessed. ASD/SPAD PBMCs produced less proinflammatory cytokines with agonists of TLR7/8 (IL-6, IL-23), TLR2/6 (IL-6), TLR4 (IL-12p40), and without stimuli (IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α) than normal controls. In addition, cytokine production of ASD/SPAD PBMCs in response to T cell mitogens (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-12p40) and candida antigen (Ag) (IL-10, IL-12p40) were less than normal controls. ASD/non-SPAD PBMDs revealed similar results as normal controls, while non-ASD/SPAD PBMCs revealed lower production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-23 with a TLR4 agonist. Only common features observed between ASD/SPAD and non

  8. Immunological characterization and transcription profiling of peripheral blood (PB monocytes in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyonouchi Harumi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There exists a small subset of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD characterized by fluctuating behavioral symptoms and cognitive skills following immune insults. Some of these children also exhibit specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD, resulting in frequent infection caused by encapsulated organisms, and they often require supplemental intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG (ASD/SPAD. This study assessed whether these ASD/SPAD children have distinct immunological findings in comparison with ASD/non-SPAD or non-ASD/SPAD children. Case description We describe 8 ASD/SPAD children with worsening behavioral symptoms/cognitive skills that are triggered by immune insults. These ASD/SPAD children exhibited delayed type food allergy (5/8, treatment-resistant seizure disorders (4/8, and chronic gastrointestinal (GI symptoms (5/8 at high frequencies. Control subjects included ASD children without SPAD (N = 39, normal controls (N = 37, and non-ASD children with SPAD (N = 12. Discussion and Evaluation We assessed their innate and adaptive immune responses, by measuring the production of pro-inflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in responses to agonists of toll like receptors (TLR, stimuli of innate immunity, and T cell stimulants. Transcription profiling of PB monocytes was also assessed. ASD/SPAD PBMCs produced less proinflammatory cytokines with agonists of TLR7/8 (IL-6, IL-23, TLR2/6 (IL-6, TLR4 (IL-12p40, and without stimuli (IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α than normal controls. In addition, cytokine production of ASD/SPAD PBMCs in response to T cell mitogens (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-12p40 and candida antigen (Ag (IL-10, IL-12p40 were less than normal controls. ASD/non-SPAD PBMDs revealed similar results as normal controls, while non-ASD/SPAD PBMCs revealed lower production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-23 with a TLR4 agonist. Only common features observed between ASD/SPAD and non

  9. Blood diagnostic biomarkers for major depressive disorder using multiplex DNA methylation profiles: discovery and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Shusuke; Ishii, Kazuo; Tajima, Atsushi; Iga, Jun-ichi; Kinoshita, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinya; Umehara, Hidehiro; Fuchikami, Manabu; Okada, Satoshi; Boku, Shuken; Hishimoto, Akitoyo; Shimodera, Shinji; Imoto, Issei; Morinobu, Shigeru; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation in the blood of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been reported in several previous studies. However, no comprehensive studies using medication-free subjects with MDD have been conducted. Furthermore, the majority of these previous studies has been limited to the analysis of the CpG sites in CpG islands (CGIs) in the gene promoter regions. The main aim of the present study is to identify DNA methylation markers that distinguish patients with MDD from non-psychiatric controls. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of peripheral leukocytes was conducted in two set of samples, a discovery set (20 medication-free patients with MDD and 19 controls) and a replication set (12 medication-free patients with MDD and 12 controls), using Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. Significant diagnostic differences in DNA methylation were observed at 363 CpG sites in the discovery set. All of these loci demonstrated lower DNA methylation in patients with MDD than in the controls, and most of them (85.7%) were located in the CGIs in the gene promoter regions. We were able to distinguish patients with MDD from the control subjects with high accuracy in the discriminant analysis using the top DNA methylation markers. We also validated these selected DNA methylation markers in the replication set. Our results indicate that multiplex DNA methylation markers may be useful for distinguishing patients with MDD from non-psychiatric controls.

  10. Liver Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  11. Detection of malaria infection in blood transfusion: a comparative study among real-time PCR, rapid diagnostic test and microscopy: sensitivity of Malaria detection methods in blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Gholamreza; Mohebali, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ahmad; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Zeraati, Hojjat; Alipour, Mohsen; Azizi, Ebrahim; Keshavarz, Hossein

    2011-06-01

    The transmission of malaria by blood transfusion was one of the first transfusion-transmitted infections recorded in the world. Transfusion-transmitted malaria may lead to serious problems because infection with Plasmodium falciparum may cause rapidly fatal death. This study aimed to compare real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) with rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and light microscopy for the detection of Plasmodium spp. in blood transfusion, both in endemic and non-endemic areas of malaria disease in Iran. Two sets of 50 blood samples were randomly collected. One set was taken from blood samples donated in blood bank of Bandar Abbas, a city located in a malarious-endemic area, and the other set from Tehran, a non-endemic one. Light microscopic examination on both thin and thick smears, RDTs, and real-time PCR were performed on the blood samples and the results were compared. Thin and thick light microscopic examinations of all samples as well as RDT results were negative for Plasmodium spp. Two blood samples from endemic area were positive only with real-time PCR. It seems that real-time PCR as a highly sensitive method can be helpful for the confirmation of malaria infection in different units of blood transfusion organization especially in malaria-endemic areas where the majority of donors may be potentially infected with malaria parasites.

  12. Evaluation of the effect of presence of blood in the stomach on endoscopic diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mittal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Presence of blood in the stomach has been thought to affect the performance of diagnostic tests used in detecting Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in the stomach. This study evaluated the effect of blood on the efficacy of rapid urease test (RUT and microscopic appearance of the biopsy after staining with Giemsa stain. Materials and Methods: Patients with bleeding oesophageal varices who met the inclusion criteria were tested for H. pylori by RUT and microscopic examination of the biopsy. A repeat endoscopy, RUT and histology were done one month following initial presentation. The performance of the diagnostic tests was evaluated with and without the presence of intraluminal blood. A combined result of the two tests, RUT and histology, carried out in presence or absence of blood for the diagnosis of H. pylori, when considered together was considered as the gold standard. Results: Thirty six patients included in the study were in the ages ranging between 15-60 years (mean age = 44.14 years ±2.1. The combination of tests at both visits showed 20/36 (55.6% patients were positive for H. pylori. The decrease in H. pylori positivity in the presence of blood was significant for RUT (8.3% vs. 38.9%; P=0.005 and combined test (19.4% vs. 47.2%; P=0.02 but the decrease in positivity for histology (11.1% vs 30.6% was not significant (P=0.08. In the presence of blood, the sensitivity of RUT, histology and combined tests were 15%, 20% and 35%, respectively. In the absence of blood, the sensitivity of RUT, histology and combination of tests was 70%, 55% and 85%, respectively. Conclusion: Blood in the stomach significantly decreased the sensitivity of RUT, histology and the combination of both. Negative results of these tests in acute upper gastro intestinal (GI bleeding should therefore be interpreted carefully.

  13. Immunological impact of Taekwondo competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y W; Shin, K W; Paik, I-Y; Jung, W M; Cho, S-Y; Choi, S T; Kim, H D; Kim, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Immunological changes in elite adolescent female athletes during Taekwondo competitions were investigated on-field. 6 female athletes (16.7 ± 0.8 year-old) volunteered and performed 5 bouts of demonstration Taekwondo competitions simulating real tournaments in intensity, duration, and break-time intervals on the same day. Blood samples were taken before, after the competitions and during the recovery, respectively. Immunological changes and oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were evaluated by flow-cytometry. During the competitions, exercise intensity was 92.2 ± 3.8% (86.1~95.7) of the maximal heart rate. Blood lactate increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0165) and decreased to baseline during recovery. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the peripheral blood increased continuously during recovery (pTaekwondo competitions. Further large-scaled Taekwondo studies on immunologic and apoptotic changes related to oxidative stress should be performed for improving and protecting the health of adolescent athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Characteristics of Blood Vessels in Female Genital Schistosomiasis: Paving the Way for Objective Diagnostics at the Point of Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigve Holmen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal changes associated with female genital schistosomiasis (FGS encompass abnormal blood vessels. These have been described as circular, reticular, branched, convoluted and having uneven calibre. However, these characteristics are subjective descriptions and it has not been explored which of them are specific to FGS.In colposcopic images of young women from a schistosomiasis endemic area, we performed computerised morphologic analyses of the cervical vasculature appearing on the mucosal surface. Study participants where the cervix was classified as normal served as negative controls, women with clinically diagnosed FGS and presence of typical abnormal blood vessels visible on the cervical surface served as positive cases. We also included women with cervical inflammatory conditions for reasons other than schistosomiasis. By automating morphological analyses, we explored circular configurations, vascular density, fractal dimensions and fractal lacunarity as parameters of interest.We found that the blood vessels typical of FGS are characterised by the presence of circular configurations (p < 0.001, increased vascular density (p = 0.015 and increased local connected fractal dimensions (p = 0.071. Using these features, we were able to correctly classify 78% of the FGS-positive cases with an accuracy of 80%.The blood vessels typical of FGS have circular configurations, increased vascular density and increased local connected fractal dimensions. These specific morphological features could be used diagnostically. Combined with colourimetric analyses, this represents a step towards making a diagnostic tool for FGS based on computerised image analysis.

  15. Diagnostic thresholds for ambulatory blood pressure moving lower: a review based on a meta-analysis-clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Kikuya, M.; Thijs, L.

    2008-01-01

    Upper limits of normal ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) have been a matter of debate in recent years. Current diagnostic thresholds for ABP rely mainly on statistical parameters derived from reference populations. Recent findings from the International Database of Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Rela...... database is therefore being updated with additional population cohorts to enable the construction of multifactorial risk score charts, which also include ABP Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5......Upper limits of normal ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) have been a matter of debate in recent years. Current diagnostic thresholds for ABP rely mainly on statistical parameters derived from reference populations. Recent findings from the International Database of Ambulatory Blood Pressure...... in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO) provide outcome-driven thresholds for ABP. Rounded systolic/diastolic thresholds for optimal ABP were found to be 115/75 mm Hg for 24 hours, 120/80 mm Hg for daytime, and 100/65 mm Hg for nighttime. The corresponding rounded thresholds for normal ABP were 125...

  16. [Clinical-immunological and microbiological parallels in chronic generalized parodontitis and peptic ulcer of the stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, L Iu; Neĭzberg, D M; Stiuf, I Iu

    2006-01-01

    Clinical, immunological and DNA diagnostic examinations of 101 patients with chronic generalized parodontitis and peptic ulcer have revealed similar features of immunological disorders of gastric and oral mucosa and the role of Helicobacter pylori.

  17. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in blood samples as a diagnostic method for complicated and persistent forms of urogenital chlamydia infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultanakhmedov E.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Goal: the study of the effectiveness of the method for laboratory diagnostics of urogenital chlamydial infection in patients with chronic form of the disease. Material and methods. The presence of DNAof C. trachomatis was detected by PCR in either genital or extragenital (blood sites in eighth patients (four men and four women. Results. It is established that in biological material taken from extragenital (blood sites, C. trachomatis was detected in all patients examined (in 100% of cases, while in clinical samples obtained from genital sites, in seven patients only (87.5%. Conclusion. We found that specific chlamydial DNAcan be detected in extragenital (blood site, despite the negative reaction in the clinical material from the genital tract of patients with genital chlamydial infection.

  18. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

  19. Prognostic and diagnostic value of moderate intensity stress test with blood pressure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Marchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of age and blood pressure values at rest,hypertensive response to moderate intensity stress testingis characterized by increasing ofprobable beginning of cardiac infarction, stroke or coronary disease in 1.36 times. The hypertensive response to stress test in people with normal blood pressure values at rest (independent of other risk factors is characterized by increasing risk of future hypertension more than in 2 times. Antihypertensive drugs affect blood pressure values differently during the stress testing. The prognosis of blood pressure values during daily physical activity is necessary for antihypertensive treatment. Low availability of convenient instruments and methodological tools for continuous measurement of blood pressure (similar to Spiroarteriocardiorhythmograph, Finapres duringthe dosed physical loads constrain wide use of stress tests with controlled blood pressure in medical practice.

  20. Half a century of Dutch transplant immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rood, Jon J; Claas, Frans H J; Brand, Anneke; Tilanus, Marcel G J; van Kooten, Cees

    2014-12-01

    The sixties have not only witnessed the start of the Dutch Society for Immunology (NvvI), but were also the flourishing beginning of the discipline of transplant immunology. The interest in immunology in the Netherlands had its start in the context of blood transfusions and not for instance in the field of infectious disease, as in many other countries. It began in the 1950-ties thanks to Joghem van Loghem at that time director of the Central Laboratory of Blood Transfusion in Amsterdam. The discoveries of these times have had major impact for transfusion medicine, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and organ transplantation. In this review we will look back at some early highlights of Dutch transplant immunology and put them in the perspective of some recent developments.

  1. Concentration and Methylation of Cell-Free DNA from Blood Plasma as Diagnostic Markers of Renal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyba, Liudmyla; Onyshchenko, Kateryna; Kashparova, Olena; Nikolaienko, Oleksii; Panasenko, Grigory; Vozianov, Sergii; Romanenko, Alina; Rynditch, Alla

    2016-01-01

    The critical point for successful treatment of cancer is diagnosis at early stages of tumor development. Cancer cell-specific methylated DNA has been found in the blood of cancer patients, indicating that cell-free DNA (cfDNA) circulating in the blood is a convenient tumor-associated DNA marker. Therefore methylated cfDNA can be used as a minimally invasive diagnostic marker. We analysed the concentration of plasma cfDNA and methylation of six tumor suppressor genes in samples of 27 patients with renal cancer and 15 healthy donors as controls. The cfDNA concentrations in samples from cancer patients and healthy donors was measured using two different methods, the SYBR Green I fluorescence test and quantitative real-time PCR. Both methods revealed a statistically significant increase of cfDNA concentrations in cancer patients. Hypermethylation on cfDNA was detected for the LRRC3B (74.1%), APC (51.9%), FHIT (55.6%), and RASSF1 (62.9%) genes in patients with renal cancer. Promoter methylation of VHL and ITGA9 genes was not found on cfDNA. Our results confirmed that the cfDNA level and methylation of CpG islands of RASSF1A, FHIT, and APC genes in blood plasma can be used as noninvasive diagnostic markers of cancer.

  2. Concentration and Methylation of Cell-Free DNA from Blood Plasma as Diagnostic Markers of Renal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypkina, Inessa; Tsyba, Liudmyla; Onyshchenko, Kateryna; Morderer, Dmytro; Kashparova, Olena; Nikolaienko, Oleksii; Panasenko, Grigory; Vozianov, Sergii; Romanenko, Alina; Rynditch, Alla

    2016-01-01

    The critical point for successful treatment of cancer is diagnosis at early stages of tumor development. Cancer cell-specific methylated DNA has been found in the blood of cancer patients, indicating that cell-free DNA (cfDNA) circulating in the blood is a convenient tumor-associated DNA marker. Therefore methylated cfDNA can be used as a minimally invasive diagnostic marker. We analysed the concentration of plasma cfDNA and methylation of six tumor suppressor genes in samples of 27 patients with renal cancer and 15 healthy donors as controls. The cfDNA concentrations in samples from cancer patients and healthy donors was measured using two different methods, the SYBR Green I fluorescence test and quantitative real-time PCR. Both methods revealed a statistically significant increase of cfDNA concentrations in cancer patients. Hypermethylation on cfDNA was detected for the LRRC3B (74.1%), APC (51.9%), FHIT (55.6%), and RASSF1 (62.9%) genes in patients with renal cancer. Promoter methylation of VHL and ITGA9 genes was not found on cfDNA. Our results confirmed that the cfDNA level and methylation of CpG islands of RASSF1A, FHIT, and APC genes in blood plasma can be used as noninvasive diagnostic markers of cancer.

  3. Diagnostics of hemangioma by the methods of correlation and fractal analysis of laser microscopic images of blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boychuk, T. M.; Bodnar, B. M.; Vatamanesku, L. I.

    2012-01-01

    For the first time the complex correlation and fractal analysis was used for the investigation of microscopic images of both tissue images and hemangioma liquids. It was proposed a physical model of description of phase distributions formation of coherent radiation, which was transformed by optical anisotropic biological structures. The phase maps of laser radiation in the boundary diffraction zone were used as the main information parameter. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of phase shifts in the points of laser images of histological sections of hemangioma, hemangioma blood smears and blood plasma with vascular system pathologies. The diagnostic criteria of hemangioma nascency are determined.

  4. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    OpenAIRE

    Berçot', Filipe Faria; Fidalgo Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thaís; Alves,Luiz Anastacio

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this publication are on ResearchGate and have made the full-text available on their profiles. As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching–learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces “Virtual Immunology,” a software program available free of charge in Portuguese...

  5. Diagnostic Value of White Blood Cell and C-Reactive Protein in Pediatric Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Buyukbese Sarsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute appendicitis (AA associated with acute phase reaction is the most prevalent disease which requires emergency surgery. Its delayed diagnosis and unnecessarily performed appendectomies lead to numerous complications. In our study, we aimed to detect the role of WBC and CRP in the exclusion of acute and complicated appendicitis and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric age group. Methods. Appendectomized patient groups were constructed based on the results of histological evaluation. The area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC was performed to examine diagnostic accuracy. Results. When WBC and CRP were used in combination, based on cut-off values of ≥13.1 × 103/μL for WBC counts and ≥1.17 mg/dL for CRP level, diagnostic parameters were as follows: sensitivity, 98.7%; specificity, 71.3%; PPV, 50.6%; NPV, 99.5%; diagnostic accuracy, 77.6%; LR(+, 3.44; LR(−, 0.017. AUC values were 0.845 (95% CI 0.800–0.891 for WBC and 0.887 (95% CI 0.841–0.932 for CRP. Conclusions. For complicated appendicitis, CRP has the highest degree of diagnostic accuracy. The diagnosis of appendicitis should be made primarily based on clinical examination, and obviously more specific and systemic inflammatory markers are needed. Combined use of cut-off values of WBC (≥13100/μL and CRP (≥1.17 mg/L yields a higher sensitivity and NPV for the diagnosis of complicated appendicitis.

  6. Development of a diagnostic sensor for measuring blood cell concentrations during haemoconcentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Craig A.; Gourlay, Terence

    2016-01-01

    Background: HemoSep® is a commercial ultrafiltration and haemoconcentration device for the concentration of residual bypass blood following surgery. This technology is capable of reducing blood loss in cardiac and other types of “clean site” procedures, including paediatric surgery. Clinical feedback suggested that the device would be enhanced by including a sensor technology capable of discerning the concentration level of the processed blood product. We sought to develop a novel sensor that can, using light absorption, give an accurate estimate of packed cell volume (PCV). Materials and methods: A sensor-housing unit was 3D printed and the factors influencing the sensor’s effectiveness – supply voltage, sensitivity and emitter intensity - were optimised. We developed a smart system, using comparator circuitry capable of visually informing the user when adequate PCV levels (⩾35%) are attained by HemoSep® blood processing, which ultimately indicates that the blood is ready for autotransfusion. Results: Our data demonstrated that the device was capable of identifying blood concentration at and beyond the 35% PCV level. The device was found to be 100% accurate at identifying concentration levels of 35% from a starting level of 20%. Discussion: The sensory capability was integrated into HemoSep’s® current device and is designed to enhance the user’s clinical experience and to optimise the benefits of HemoSep® therapy. The present study focused on laboratory studies using bovine blood. Further studies are now planned in the clinical setting to confirm the efficacy of the device. PMID:27591743

  7. Raman Tweezers as a Diagnostic Tool of Hemoglobin-Related Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the development of a Raman Tweezers system for detecting hemoglobin-related blood disorders at a single cell level. The study demonstrates that the molecular fingerprint insight provided by Raman analysis holds great promise for distinguishing between healthy and diseased cells in the field of biomedicine. Herein a Raman Tweezers system has been applied to investigate the effects of thalassemia, a blood disease quite diffuse in the Mediterranean Sea region. By resonant excitation of hemoglobin Raman bands, we examined the oxygenation capability of normal, alpha- and beta-thalassemic erythrocytes. A reduction of this fundamental red blood cell function, particularly severe for beta-thalassemia, has been found. Raman spectroscopy was also used to draw hemoglobin distribution inside single erythrocytes; the results confirmed the characteristic anomaly (target shape, occurring in thalassemia and some other blood disorders. The success of resonance Raman spectroscopy for thalassemia detection reported in this review provide an interesting starting point to explore the application of a Raman Tweezers system in the analysis of several blood disorders.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of peripheral blood in pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients identifies diagnostic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, Octavio; Prados, Jose; Ortiz, Raúl; Jiménez-Luna, Cristina; Melguizo, Consolación; Alvarez, Pablo J; Delgado, Juan R; Irigoyen, Antonio; Rojas, Ignacio; Pérez-Florido, Javier; Torres, Carolina; Perales, Sonia; Linares, Ana; Aránega, Antonia

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy associated with poor survival rates. Fast detection of PDAC appears to be the most relevant strategy to improve the long-term survival of patients. Our objective was to identify new markers in peripheral blood that differentiates between PDAC patients and healthy controls. Peripheral blood samples from PDAC patients (n = 18) and controls (n = 18) were analyzed by whole genome cDNA microarray hybridization. The most relevant genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) in the same set of samples. Finally, our gene prediction set was tested in a blinded set of new peripheral blood samples (n = 30). Microarray studies identified 87 genes differentially expressed in peripheral blood samples from PDAC patients. Four of these genes were selected for analysis by RT-qPCR, which confirmed the previously observed changes. In our blinded validation study, the combination of CLEC4D and IRAK3 predicted the diagnosis of PDAC with 93 % accuracy, with a sensitivity of 86 % and specificity of 100 %. Peripheral blood gene expression profiling is an useful tool for the diagnosis of PDAC. We present a validated four-gene predictor set (ANKRD22, CLEC4D, VNN1, and IRAK3) that may be useful in PDAC diagnosis.

  9. Mass spectrometric signatures of the blood plasma metabolome for disease diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E; Voskresenskaya, Anna A; Trifonova, Oxana P; Maslov, Dmitry L; Archakov, Alexander I

    2016-01-01

    In metabolomics, a large number of small molecules can be detected in a single run. However, metabolomic data do not include the absolute concentrations of each metabolite. Generally, mass spectrometry analyses provide metabolite concentrations that are derived from mass peak intensities, and the peak intensities are strictly dependent on the type of mass spectrometer used, as well as the technical characteristics, options and protocols applied. To convert mass peak intensities to actual concentrations, calibration curves have to be generated for each metabolite, and this represents a significant challenge depending on the number of metabolites that are detected and involved in metabolome-based diagnostics. To overcome this limitation, and to facilitate the development of diagnostic tests based on metabolomics, mass peak intensities may be expressed in quintiles. The present study demonstrates the advantage of this approach. The examples of diagnostic signatures, which were designed in accordance to this approach, are provided for lung and prostate cancer (leading causes of mortality due to cancer in developed countries) and impaired glucose tolerance (which precedes type 2 diabetes, the most common endocrinology disease worldwide).

  10. Modelling Immunological Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Garret, Simon; Walker, Joanne; Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Accurate immunological models offer the possibility of performing highthroughput experiments in silico that can predict, or at least suggest, in vivo phenomena. In this chapter, we compare various models of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors, by simulating several theories of immunological memory with known results. We then use the same system to evaluate the predicted effects of a theory of immunological memory. The resulting model has not been explored before in artificial immune systems research, and we compare the simulated in silico output with in vivo measurements. Although the theory appears valid, we suggest that there are a common set of reasons why immunological memory models are a useful support tool; not conclusive in themselves.

  11. A novel passive microfluidic device for preprocessing whole blood for point of care diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2009-01-01

    A novel strategy to sort the cells of interest (White Blood Cells (leukocytes)) by selectively lysing the Red Blood Cells (erythrocytes) in a miniaturized microfluidic device is presented. Various methods to lyse cells on a chip exist i.e. electrical, mechanical, chemical and thermal but they need...... integration of electrodes, traps, reservoirs, heaters, etc which is often difficult at microscale [1 – 4]. On the other hand, FACSlyse protocol uses only osmotic pressure to lyse erythrocytes allowing further isolation of leukocytes. This motivated us to develop a novel herringbone based lyser which works...

  12. Virtual Resting Pd/Pa From Coronary Angiography and Blood Flow Modelling: Diagnostic Performance Against Fractional Flow Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papafaklis, Michail I; Muramatsu, Takashi; Ishibashi, Yuki; Bourantas, Christos V; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Garcia-Garcia, Héctor M; Escaned, Javier; Serruys, Patrick W; Michalis, Lampros K

    2017-05-03

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) has been established as a useful diagnostic tool. The distal coronary pressure to aortic pressure (Pd/Pa) ratio at rest is a simpler physiologic index but also requires the use of the pressure wire, whereas recently proposed virtual functional indices derived from coronary imaging require complex blood flow modelling and/or are time-consuming. Our aim was to test the diagnostic performance of virtual resting Pd/Pa using routine angiographic images and a simple flow model. Three-dimensional quantitative coronary angiography (3D-QCA) was performed in 139 vessels (120 patients) with intermediate lesions assessed by FFR. The resting Pd/Pa for each lesion was assessed by computational fluid dynamics. The discriminatory power of virtual resting Pd/Pa against FFR (reference: ≤0.80) was high (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve [AUC]: 90.5% [95% CI: 85.4-95.6%]). Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the optimal virtual resting Pd/Pa cut-off (≤0.94) were 84.9%, 90.4% and 81.6%, respectively. Virtual resting Pd/Pa demonstrated superior performance (pvirtual resting Pd/Pa and FFR (r=0.69, pVirtual resting Pd/Pa using routine angiographic data and a simple flow model provides fast functional assessment of coronary lesions without requiring the pressure-wire and hyperaemia induction. The high diagnostic performance of virtual resting Pd/Pa for predicting FFR shows promise for using this simple/fast virtual index in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 21 CFR 866.5150 - Bence-Jones proteins immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866... bone marrow cells), leukemia (cancer of the blood-forming organs), and lymphoma (cancer of the...

  14. Shipping blood to a central laboratory in multicenter clinical trials: effect of ambient temperature on specimen temperature, and effects of temperature on mononuclear cell yield, viability and immunologic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fink Jonathan H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials of immunologic therapies provide opportunities to study the cellular and molecular effects of those therapies and may permit identification of biomarkers of response. When the trials are performed at multiple centers, transport and storage of clinical specimens become important variables that may affect lymphocyte viability and function in blood and tissue specimens. The effect of temperature during storage and shipment of peripheral blood on subsequent processing, recovery, and function of lymphocytes is understudied and represents the focus of this study. Methods Peripheral blood samples (n = 285 from patients enrolled in 2 clinical trials of a melanoma vaccine were shipped from clinical centers 250 or 1100 miles to a central laboratory at the sponsoring institution. The yield of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC collected before and after cryostorage was correlated with temperatures encountered during shipment. Also, to simulate shipping of whole blood, heparinized blood from healthy donors was collected and stored at 15°C, 22°C, 30°C, or 40°C, for varied intervals before isolation of PBMC. Specimen integrity was assessed by measures of yield, recovery, viability, and function of isolated lymphocytes. Several packaging systems were also evaluated during simulated shipping for the ability to maintain the internal temperature in adverse temperatures over time. Results Blood specimen containers experienced temperatures during shipment ranging from -1 to 35°C. Exposure to temperatures above room temperature (22°C resulted in greater yields of PBMC. Reduced cell recovery following cryo-preservation as well as decreased viability and immune function were observed in specimens exposed to 15°C or 40°C for greater than 8 hours when compared to storage at 22°C. There was a trend toward improved preservation of blood specimen integrity stored at 30°C prior to processing for all time points tested

  15. Epidemiology of tuberculosis immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, G J; Menzies, D

    2013-01-01

    Immunological impairment plays a major role in the epidemiology of TB. Globally, the most common causes of immunological impairment are malnutrition, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, aging, and smoking. With the notable exception of HIV, each factor leads to relatively mild immunological impairment in individuals. However, as these conditions affect a significant proportion of the population, they contribute substantially to the incidence of TB at a global scale. Understanding immunological impairment is central to understanding the global TB pandemic, and vital to the development of effective disease control strategies.

  16. Quantitative analysis of genomic DNA degradation in whole blood under various storage conditions for molecular diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permenter, Jessalyn; Ishwar, Arjun; Rounsavall, Angie; Smith, Maddie; Faske, Jennifer; Sailey, Charles J; Alfaro, Maria P

    2015-12-01

    Proper storage of whole blood is crucial for isolating nucleic acids from leukocytes and to ensure adequate performance of downstream assays in the molecular diagnostic laboratory. Short-term and long-term storage recommendations are lacking for successful isolation of genomic DNA (gDNA). Container type (EDTA or heparin), temperature (4 °C and room temperature) and time (1-130 days) were assessed as criterion for sample acceptance policies. The percentage of integrated area (%Ti) between 150 and 10,000 bp from the 2200 TapeStation electropherogram was calculated to measure gDNA degradation. Refrigerated EDTA samples yielded gDNA with low %Ti (high quality). Heparinized samples stored at room temperature yielded gDNA of worst quality. Downstream analysis demonstrated that the quality of the gDNA correlated with the quality of the data; samples with high %Ti generated significantly lower levels of high molecular weight amplicons. Recommendations from these analyses include storing blood samples intended for nucleic acid isolation in EDTA tubes at 4 °C for long term storage (>10 days). gDNA should be extracted within 3 days when blood is stored at room temperature regardless of the container. Finally, refrigerated heparinized samples should not be stored longer than 9 days if expecting high quality gDNA isolates. Laboratories should consider many factors, in addition to the results obtained herein, to update their policies for sample acceptance for gDNA extraction intended for molecular genetic testing.

  17. Blood microRNAs as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers in cerebral ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bridget Martinez; Philip V Peplow

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a family of small, genome-encoded endogenous RNAs that are transcribed but are not translated into proteins. They serve essential roles in virtually every aspect of brain function, including neurogenesis, neural development, and cellular responses leading to changes in synaptic plasticity. They are also implicated in neurodegeneration and neurological disorders, in responses to hypoxia and ischemia, and in ischemic tolerance induced by ischemic preconditioning. In recent developments, miRNA expres-sion proifling has been examined in stroke, and these studies indicate that miRNAs have emerged as key mediators in ischemic stroke biology. Both increased and decreased miRNA levels may be needed either as prevention or treatment of stroke. Novel approaches are being developed to get miRNA related therapeu-tics into the brain across an intact blood-brain barrier, including chemical modiifcation, use of targeting molecules and methods to disrupt the blood-brain barrier.

  18. Hybrid model of arm for analysis of regional blood oxygenation in non-invasive optical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowocień, Sylwester; Mroczka, Janusz

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a new comprehensive approach to modeling and analysis of processes occurring during the blood flow in the arm's small vessels as well as non-invasive measurement method of mixed venous oxygen saturation. During the work, a meta-analysis of available physiological data was performed and based on its result a hybrid model of forearm vascular tree was proposed. The model, in its structure, takes into account a classical nonlinear hydro-electric analogy in conjunction with light-tissue interaction. Several geometries of arm vascular tree obtained from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) image were analyzed which allowed to proposed the structure of electrical analog network. Proposed model allows to simulate the behavior of forearm blood flow from the vascular tree mechanics point of view, as well as effects of the impact of cuff and vessel wall mechanics on the recorded photoplethysmographic signals. In particular, it allows to analyze the reaction and anatomical effects in small vessels and microcirculation caused by occlusive maneuver in selected techniques, what was of particular interest to authors and motivation to undertake research in this area. Preliminary studies using proposed model showed that inappropriate selection of occlusion maneuver parameters (e.g. occlusion time, cuff pressure etc.), cause dangerous turbulence of blood flow in the venous section of the vascular tree.

  19. Raman spectroscopy of blood serum for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics: specificity relative to other types of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikova, Elena; Kazakov, Oleksandr; Halamkova, Lenka; Celmins, Dzintra; Malone, Paula; Molho, Eric; Zimmerman, Earl A; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-07-01

    The key moment for efficiently and accurately diagnosing dementia occurs during the early stages. This is particularly true for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this proof-of-concept study, we applied near infrared (NIR) Raman microspectroscopy of blood serum together with advanced multivariate statistics for the selective identification of AD. We analyzed data from 20 AD patients, 18 patients with other neurodegenerative dementias (OD) and 10 healthy control (HC) subjects. NIR Raman microspectroscopy differentiated patients with more than 95% sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrated the high discriminative power of artificial neural network (ANN) classification models, thus revealing the high potential of this developed methodology for the differential diagnosis of AD. Raman spectroscopic, blood-based tests may aid clinical assessments for the effective and accurate differential diagnosis of AD, decrease the labor, time and cost of diagnosis, and be useful for screening patient populations for AD development and progression. Multivariate data analysis of blood serum Raman spectra allows for the differentiation between patients with Alzheimer's disease, other types of dementia and healthy individuals.

  20. [The first pillar of patient blood management. Types of anemia and diagnostic parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basora Macaya, M; Bisbe Vives, E

    2015-06-01

    Patient Blood Management (PBM) is the design of a personalized, multimodal multidisciplinary plan for minimizing transfusion and simultaneously achieving a positive impact on patient outcomes. The first pillar of PBM consists of optimizing the erythrocyte mass. The best chance for this step is offered by preoperative preparation. In most cases, a detailed medical history, physical examination and laboratory tests will identify the cause of anemia. A correct evaluation of parameters that assess the state and function of iron, such as ferritin levels, and the parameters that measure functional iron, such as transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor levels, provide us with essential information for guiding the treatment with iron. The new blood count analyzers that measure hypochromia (% of hypochromic red blood cells and reticulocyte hemoglobin concentrations) provide us useful information for the diagnosis and follow-up of the response to iron treatment. Measuring serum folic acid and vitamin B12 levels is essential for treating deficiencies and thereby achieving better hemoglobin optimization. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunological and laboratory features of HIV infection in infants of the first year of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Timchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the characteristics of laboratory tests of infants born to HIV-positive women and left without parental care in the dynamics analyzed blood samples using methods of immunological and serological diagnosis of HIV infection, the qualitative and quantitative determination of HIV, as well as clinical blood analysis and screening for prenatal infection. There are informative PCR diagnostics of perinatal HIV infection in the first months of life, ELISA and western blot from the age of 9 months. Identified difference performance of a specific red blood cell and leukocyte parts of blood of hemogram in infants with perinatal HIV infection compared with those in not infected infants. Improvement in laboratory parameters is the result of appointment of HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  2. The immunology of filariasis*

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the available information on the immunology of filariasis, and discusses immunodiagnosis and the immunological factors influencing the host—parasite relationship in lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. Several areas that require further research are identified, particularly concerning the development of new serological techniques, and the fractionation of specific antigens. The problems associated with vaccine development are considered and the importance of finding...

  3. Immunologic Diagnostic Blood Test in Predicting Side-Effects in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Other Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neuroblastoma; Therapy-related Toxicity

  4. Diagnostic value of blood gene expression signatures in active tuberculosis in Thais: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satproedprai, N; Wichukchinda, N; Suphankong, S; Inunchot, W; Kuntima, T; Kumpeerasart, S; Wattanapokayakit, S; Nedsuwan, S; Yanai, H; Higuchi, K; Harada, N; Mahasirimongkol, S

    2015-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem. Routine laboratory tests or newly developed molecular detection are limited to the quality of sputum sample. Here we selected genes specific to TB by a minimum redundancy-maximum relevancy package using publicly available microarray data and determine level of selected genes in blood collected from a Thai TB cohort of 40 active TB patients, 38 healthy controls and 18 previous TB patients using quantitative real-time PCR. FCGR1A, FCGR1B variant 1, FCGR1B variant 2, APOL1, GBP5, PSTPIP2, STAT1, KCNJ15, MAFB and KAZN had significantly higher expression level in active TB individuals as compared with healthy controls and previous TB cases (P<0.01). A mathematical method was applied to calculate TB predictive score, which contains the level of expression of seven genes and this score can identify active TB cases with 82.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity as compared with conventional culture confirmation. In addition, TB predictive scores in active TB patients were reduced to normal after completion of standard short-course therapy, which was mostly in concordant with the disease outcome. These finding suggested that blood gene expression measurement and TB Sick Score could have potential value in terms of diagnosis of TB and anti-TB treatment monitoring.

  5. Purinergic signaling at immunological synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubyak, G R

    2000-07-01

    The early studies and hypotheses of Geoffrey Burnstock catalyzed intensive characterization of roles for nucleotides and P2 nucleotide receptors in neurotransmission and neuromodulation. These latter analyses have focused on the mechanisms of nucleotide release and action in the microenvironments of nerve endings and synapses. However, studies of various white blood cells, such as monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes, suggest that locally released nucleotides also modulate intercellular signaling at so-called 'immunological synapses'. This communication describes recent findings and speculations regarding nucleotide release and signaling in several key phases of the immune and inflammatory responses.

  6. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  7. Diagnostic microRNA markers to screen for sporadic human colon cancer in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farid E; Amed, Nancy C; Vos, Paul W; Bonnerup, Chris; Atkins, James N; Casey, Michelle; Nuovo, Gerard J; Naziri, Wade; Wiley, John E; Allison, Ron R

    2012-01-01

    We carried out this study to present proof-of-principal application, showing that by using a global microarray expression analysis, followed by quantitative stem-loop reverse transcriptase in conjunction with TaqMan® polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of micro(mi)RNA genes, on limited number of plasma and tissue samples obtained from 20 individuals (five healthy, five TNM stage 0-1 colon cancer, five stage 2 and five stage 3), we were able to quantitatively monitor miRNA changes at the various TNM stages of colon cancer progression, particularly at the early, pre-malignant adenoma stage (e.g. polyps ≥ 1 cm with high grade dysplasia). The expression of some of the tested miRNAs showed less variability in tissue than in plasma. Nevertheless, our limited preliminary data on the plasma by itself show that plasma is well-suited for screening, and that the quantitative changes in the expression of a few cell-free circulatory mature miRNA molecules in plasma, that are associated with colon cancer progression, would provide for more sensitive and specific markers than those tests currently available on the market. In addition, analysis of miRNA molecules offers a quantitative and cost-effective non-invasive diagnostic approach for screening, than currently employed methods in a prevalent cancer that can be cured if it is detected at the early TNM stages, and that becomes deadly if not diagnosed before metastasis. Thus, a larger prospective and properly randomized clinical study using plasma derived from many control individuals and at various stages of colon cancer (TNM stages 0-IV) from patients, in order to corroborate the initial results, is now urgently needed in order to allow for a statistically valid analysis, standardizing test conditions which will provide a means for determining the true sensitivity and specificity of a miRNA-screening approach. This approach, when combined with bioinformatics analysis to correlate miRNA seed data with mRNA target data

  8. Blood pyrrole-protein adducts as a diagnostic and prognostic index in pyrrolizidine alkaloid-hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hong Gao,1,* Jianqing Q Ruan,2,* Jie Chen,1 Na Li,2 Changqiang Q Ke,3 Yang Ye,3–5 Ge Lin,2,4,5 Jiyao Y Wang1,61Department of Gastroenterology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Biomedical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 3Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Joint Research Laboratory for Promoting Globalization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, 5Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 6Center of Evidence-Based Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this work and share first authorship Background: The diagnosis of hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS induced by pyrrolizidine alkaloids is mainly based on clinical investigation. There is currently no prognostic index. This study evaluated the quantitative measurement of blood pyrrole-protein adducts (PPAs as a diagnostic and prognostic index for pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced HSOS.Methods: Suspected drug-induced liver injury patients were prospectively recruited. Blood PPAs were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Patients’ age, sex, biochemistry test results, and a detailed drug history were recorded. The patients were divided into two groups, ie, those with HSOS induced by pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing drugs and those with liver injury induced by drugs without pyrrolizidine alkaloids. The relationship between herb administration, clinical outcomes, blood sampling time, and blood PPA concentration in pyrrolizidine alkaloid-associated HSOS patients was analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis.Results: Forty patients met the entry criteria, among whom 23 had pyrrolizidine alkaloid-associated HSOS and 17 had liver injury caused by drugs without pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Among the 23

  9. Impact of uncontrolled blood pressure on diagnostic accuracy of coronary flow reserve for detecting significant coronary stenosis in hypertensive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-hong; XU Wei-xian; LI Zhao-ping; LI Cui-ping; WANG Xin-yu; HE Li-yun; ZHAO Wei

    2013-01-01

    Baciground Impaired coronary flow reserve (CFR) in patients with hypertension may be caused by epicardial coronary stenosis or microvascular dysfunction.Antihypertensive treatment has been shown to improve coronary microvascular dysfunction.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) on diagnostic accuracy of CFR for detecting significant coronary stenosis.Methods A total of 98 hypertensive patients scheduled for coronary angiography (CAG) due to chest pain were studied.Of them,45 patients had uncontrolled BP (defined as the office BP >140/90 mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) in general hypertensive patients,or >130/80 mmHg in hypertensive individuals with diabetes mellitus),and the remaining 53 patients had well-controlled BP.CFR was measured in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) during adenosine triphosphate-induced hyperemia by non-invasive transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTDE) within 48 hours prior to CAG.Significant LAD stenosis was defined as >70% luminal narrowing.Diagnostic accuracy of CFR for detecting significant coronary stenosis was analyzed with a receiver operating characteristic analysis.Results CFR was significantly lower in patients with uncontrolled BP than in those with well-controlled BP (2.1±0.6 vs.2.6±0.9,P <0.01).Multivariate linear regression analysis of the study showed that the value of CFR was independently associated with the angiographically determined degree of LAD stenosis (β=-0.445,P <0.0001) and the presence of uncontrolled BP (β=-0.272,P=0.014).With a receiver operating characteristic analysis,CFR <2.2 was the optimal cut-off value for detecting LAD stenosis in all hypertensive patients (AUC 0.83,95%C/0.75-0.91) with a sensitivity of 75%,a specificity of 78%,and an accuracy of 77%.A significant reduction of diagnostic specificity was observed in patients with uncontrolled BP compared with those with well-controlled BP (67% vs.93%,P=0

  10. The diagnostic utility of stabilized blood for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA by RT-qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S. Fontél, Kristina; Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham

    In Europe, clinical signs indicative of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), would immediately lead to collection of blood and relevant organ material for further laboratory examination for this vesicular disease virus. Today, the first line system for detection of virus in the sample material is real t...... time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic utility of stabilized blood for detection of FMDV RNA in this system....

  11. Infrared tomography for diagnostic imaging of port wine stain blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The objective of this work is the development of Infrared Tomography (IRT) for detecting and characterizing subsurface chromophores in human skin. Characterization of cutaneous chromophores is crucial for advances in the laser treatment of pigmented lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks and tatoos). Infrared tomography (IRT) uses a fast infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) to detect temperature rises in a substrate induced by pulsed radiation. A pulsed laser is used to produce transient heating of an object. The temperature rise, due to the optical absorption of the pulsed laser light, creates an increase in infrared emission which is measured by the IR-FPA. Although the application of IRT to image subsurface cracks due to metal fatigue is a topic of great interest in the aircraft industry, the application to image subsurface chromophores in biological materials is novel. We present an image recovery method based on a constrained conjugate gradient algorithm that has obtained the first ever high quality images of port wine blood vessels.

  12. Direct blood dry LAMP: a rapid, stable, and easy diagnostic tool for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Hayashida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP is a rapid and sensitive tool used for the diagnosis of a variety of infectious diseases. One of the advantages of this method over the polymerase chain reaction is that DNA amplification occurs at a constant temperature, usually between 60-65°C; therefore, expensive devices are unnecessary for this step. However, LAMP still requires complicated sample preparation steps and a well-equipped laboratory to produce reliable and reproducible results, which limits its use in resource-poor laboratories in most developing countries. In this study, we made several substantial modifications to the technique to carry out on-site diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT in remote areas using LAMP. The first essential improvement was that LAMP reagents were dried and stabilized in a single tube by incorporating trehalose as a cryoprotectant to prolong shelf life at ambient temperature. The second technical improvement was achieved by simplifying the sample preparation step so that DNA or RNA could be amplified directly from detergent-lysed blood samples. With these modifications, diagnosis of HAT in local clinics or villages in endemic areas becomes a reality, which could greatly impact on the application of diagnosis not only for HAT but also for other tropical diseases.

  13. Rapid, whole blood diagnostic test for detecting anti-hantavirus antibody in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amada, Takako; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Yasuda, Shumpei P; Shimizu, Kenta; Koma, Takaaki; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Gamage, Chandika D; Nishio, Sanae; Takakura, Akira; Arikawa, Jiro

    2013-10-01

    Hantavirus is a causative agent of rodent-borne viral zoonoses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Seoul virus (SEOV) is a causative agent of urban and laboratory rat-associated HFRS worldwide. Surveillance of rodents has been done mainly by serological detection of hantavirus-specific antibodies by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA). An immunochromatographic (ICG) test was developed with the N-terminal 103 amino acids of nucleocapsid protein of Hantaan virus expressed by Escherichia coli as an antigen to detect IgG antibody specific to hantavirus in sera from Rattus sp. animals. Antibody-detecting sensitivity of the ICG test was the same as that of ELISA and about 100-times higher than that of IFA. Overall sensitivities and specificities of the ICG test in comparison to ELISA and IFA for sera from 192 urban rats and 123 laboratory rats were 99.3% and 100%, respectively. Diluted whole blood samples without separation could be used for the ICG test. The ICG test enabled detection of antibodies to SEOV, Hantaan, Dobrava/Belgrade, and Thailand viruses, which are causative agents of HFRS throughout Eurasia. The ICG test is a rapid, simple and safe method for diagnosis of SEOV infection in rats.

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus: diagnostic and prognostic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, A. (Dept. of Neurology, Sahlgren Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Bergh, A.C. (Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgren Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Bilting, M. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Sahlgren Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Aerlig, AA. (Dept. of Radiation Physics, Sahlgren Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Jacobsson, L. (Dept. of Radiation Physics, Sahlgren Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Stephensen, H. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Sahlgren Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Wikkelsoe, C. (Dept. of Neurology, Sahlgren Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    1994-02-01

    Relative regional cerebral blood flow (rrCBF) was measured by SPET using [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO as flow tracer, in 23 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). 1000 MBq [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO was given intravenously and the rrCBF calculated as regional/cerebellar count level ratios. The patients were examined before and 3-12 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. rrCBF was also determined in ten healthy aged matched volunteers who served as controls. The NPH patients had decreased rrCBF in the hippocampal regions and in the frontal and parietal white matter as compared to the controls. The frontal/parietal rrCBF ratio correlated with both psychiatric disability and the preoperative degree of incontinence. Decreased flow in frontal white matter, frontoparietal and hippocampal grey matter and a low frontalparietal grey matter flow ratio preoperatively correlated with improvement in both Mini Mental State score and psychiatric disability after shunt surgery. After shunt surgery the rrCBF increased in the mesencephalon, frontal grey and white matter, parietal white matter and hippocampus. The flow increase in hippocampal regions and frontal white matter correlated with improvement in psychiatric symptomatology. The results of this study regarding the frontal and hippocampal rrCBF patterns, and the clinical correlation, support the hypothesis that CBF changes in these regions are of patohphysiological and prognostic importance in NPH. (orig./MG)

  15. Diagnostic tool for red blood cell membrane disorders: Assessment of a new generation ektacytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Lydie; Suner, Ludovic; Galimand, Julie; Bonnel, Amandine; Pascreau, Tiffany; Couque, Nathalie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2016-01-01

    Inherited red blood cell (RBC) membrane disorders, such as hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis and hereditary ovalocytosis, result from mutations in genes encoding various RBC membrane and skeletal proteins. The RBC membrane, a composite structure composed of a lipid bilayer linked to a spectrin/actin-based membrane skeleton, confers upon the RBC unique features of deformability and mechanical stability. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. RBC membrane disorders can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include RBC cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of RBC membrane proteins and genetics. The reference technique for diagnosis of RBC membrane disorders is the osmotic gradient ektacytometry. However, in spite of its recognition as the reference technique, this technique is rarely used as a routine diagnosis tool for RBC membrane disorders due to its limited availability. This may soon change as a new generation of ektacytometer has been recently engineered. In this review, we describe the workflow of the samples shipped to our Hematology laboratory for RBC membrane disorder analysis and the data obtained for a large cohort of French patients presenting with RBC membrane disorders using a newly available version of the ektacytomer.

  16. The Diagnostic Value of Superb Microvascular Imaging (SMI) in Detecting Blood Flow Signals of Breast Lesions: A Preliminary Study Comparing SMI to Color Doppler Flow Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Li, Gang; Li, Jing; Ren, Wei-dong

    2015-09-01

    The correlation between color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) and Superb Microvascular Imaging (SMI) for detecting blood flow in breast lesions was investigated, as was the diagnostic value of SMI in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions.These lesions were evaluated using both CDFI and SMI according to Adler's method. Pathologic examination showed 57 malignant lesions and 66 benign lesions. The number of blood vessels in a single mass was detected by 2 techniques (SMI and CDFI), and the difference between the 2 values (SMI-CDFI) was calculated. The optimal threshold for the diagnosis of malignant neoplasms and the diagnostic performances of SMI, CDFI, and SMI-CDFI were calculated.For the total lesions and malignant lesions alone, the difference between SMI and CDFI for detecting blood flow was significant (P < 0.01), but the difference was not significant for benign lesions (P = 0.15). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64-0.82) for CDFI; 0.81 (95% CI: 0.74-0.89) for SMI; and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82-0.95) for SMI-CDFI. Furthermore, the modality of "SMI-CDFI" showed the best diagnostic performance.SMI provides further microvessel information in breast lesions. The diagnostic modality of "SMI-CDFI" can improve the diagnostic performance of ultrasound in the differentiation between benign and malignant masses.

  17. Stability of 35 biochemical and immunological routine tests after 10 hours storage and transport of human whole blood at 21°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Linda O; Faber, Nina R; Moller, Mette F;

    2014-01-01

    thyroxine, immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin M, orosomucoid, sodium, transferrin, and triglycerides met goals for imprecision, though they showed a minor, but statistically significant bias in results after storage. Cobalamin, folate, HDL-cholesterol, iron, phosphate, potassium, thyroid stimulating hormone...... and urate warranted concern, but only folate and phosphate showed deviations of clinical importance. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that whole blood in lithium-heparin or serum tubes stored for 10 h at 21 ± 1°C, may be used for routine analysis without restrictions for all investigated analytes but folate...... and phosphate....

  18. Transcriptional profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in pancreatic cancer patients identifies novel genes with potential diagnostic utility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Baine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well known that many malignancies, including pancreatic cancer (PC, possess the ability to evade the immune system by indirectly downregulating the mononuclear cell machinery necessary to launch an effective immune response. This knowledge, in conjunction with the fact that the trancriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells has been shown to be altered in the context of many diseases, including renal cell carcinoma, lead us to study if any such alteration in gene expression exists in PC as it may have diagnostic utility. METHODS AND FINDINGS: PBMC samples from 26 PC patients and 33 matched healthy controls were analyzed by whole genome cDNA microarray. Three hundred eighty-three genes were found to be significantly different between PC and healthy controls, with 65 having at least a 1.5 fold change in expression. Pathway analysis revealed that many of these genes fell into pathways responsible for hematopoietic differentiation, cytokine signaling, and natural killer (NK cell and CD8+ T-cell cytotoxic response. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis identified an eight-gene predictor set, consisting of SSBP2, Ube2b-rs1, CA5B, F5, TBC1D8, ANXA3, ARG1, and ADAMTS20, that could distinguish PC patients from healthy controls with an accuracy of 79% in a blinded subset of samples from treatment naïve patients, giving a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 75%. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, we report the first in-depth comparison of global gene expression profiles of PBMCs between PC patients and healthy controls. We have also identified a gene predictor set that can potentially be developed further for use in diagnostic algorithms in PC. Future directions of this research should include analysis of PBMC expression profiles in patients with chronic pancreatitis as well as increasing the number of early-stage patients to assess the utility of PBMCs in the early diagnosis of PC.

  19. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  20. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  1. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement.In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%.New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of Methylated SEPT9 for Blood-based Colorectal Cancer Detection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Jiayun; Sun, Xu; Ming, SuYang; Yan, Chen; Ma, Yunfei; Feng, Ying; Yang, Lin; Yu, Mingwei; Zhang, Ganlin; Wang, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: More convenient and effective blood-based methods are believed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) detection adoption. The effectiveness of methylated SPET9 for CRC detection has been reviewed in the newly published recommendation statement by US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), while detailed instructions were not provided, which may be a result of insufficient evidence. Therefore, more evidence is needed to assist practitioners to thoroughly understand the utilization of this special maker. Methods: Based on the standard method, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Quadas-2 was used to assess the methodological quality of studies. Relevant studies were searched and screened from PubMed, Embase and other literature databases up to June 1, 2016. Pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio were summarized by bivariate mixed effect model and area under the curve (AUC) was estimated by hierarchical summary receiver operator characteristic curve. Results: 25 studies were included for analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity and AUC were 0.71, 0.92 and 0.88, respectively. Among the various methods and assays, Epipro Colon 2.0 with 2/3 algorithm was the most effective in colorectal cancer detection. Positive ratio of mSEPT9 was higher in advanced CRC (45% in I, 70% in II, 76% in III, 79% in IV) and lower differentiation (31% in high, 73% in moderate, 90% in low) tissue. However, this marker has poor ability of identifying precancerous lesions according to current evidence. Conclusions: mSEPT9 is a reliable blood-based marker in CRC detection, particularly advanced CRC. Epipro Colon 2.0 with 2/3 algorithm is currently the optimal method and assay to detect CRC. PMID:28102859

  3. Overview of Johne's disease immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Wadhwa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is one of the most economically important diseases of the livestock. Most of the economiclosses associated with paratuberculosis are related to decreased milk production, reduced fertility and higher rates of culling.Understanding the immunology of the disease is very important for better understanding of the interplay between the host andthe causative agent, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP. After uptake of MAPby macrophages residing inhost's intestinal tissue, two possible scenarios may emerge; MAP may be destroyed or may establish persistent infectionwithin the macrophages. If MAPpersists in the infected macrophage, it continuously modulates adaptive immune responsesof the animal. In this short review we describe the host-pathogen interactions in Johne's disease and highlights potentialprotective mechanisms in order for future design of more effective diagnostic method and vaccine.

  4. Molecular imaging applications for immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Isabel Junie; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2004-05-01

    The use of multimodality molecular imaging has recently facilitated the study of molecular and cellular events in living subjects in a noninvasive and repetitive manner to improve the diagnostic capability of traditional assays. The noninvasive imaging modalities utilized for both small animal and human imaging include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT). Techniques specific to small-animal imaging include bioluminescent imaging (BIm) and fluorescent imaging (FIm). Molecular imaging permits the study of events within cells, the examination of cell trafficking patterns that relate to inflammatory diseases and metastases, and the ability to rapidly screen new drug treatments for distribution and effectiveness. In this paper, we will review the current field of molecular imaging assays (especially those utilizing PET and BIm modalities) and examine how they might impact animal models and human disease in the field of clinical immunology.

  5. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Also, blood is either Rh-positive or Rh-negative. So if you have type A blood, it's either A positive or A negative. Which type you are is important if you need a blood transfusion. And your Rh factor could be important ...

  6. Immunological memory is associative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  7. Evolution of Immunological Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaín Alonso Remedios

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, the mechanisms involved in the "decision" of the immune system to promote an essentially effector response or a tolerant response are not fully known. Throughout history, immunological thinking has changed as the available technologies have led to a better understanding of the immune system. For these reasons, the present literature review was conducted to summarize the changes in immunological thinking regarding the fundamental problem of immunology. The concept of horror autotoxicus proposed by Erlich and the meaning of the clonal selection theory for understanding central tolerance were discussed. The two-signal model, Jerne’s contributions and his immune network theory were also addressed. Finally, the danger model and the theory of dominant tolerance were analyzed. The contributions of each theory to understanding how the immune system works were included.

  8. Immunology of methanogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macario, A.J.L.; Macario, E.C. de (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Wadsworth Center for Labs. and Research School of Public Health, Albany, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to highlight some findings using immunologic methods and antibody probes developed for analysis of methanogens directly in samples from bioreactors, avoiding culture isolation. A considerable diversity of methanogens was revealed by antigenic fingerprinting in bioreactors, larger than previously suspected. It was also found that the number and immunologic characteristics of the methanogenic subpopulations form a pattern distinctive of bioreactor type, feedstocks and operating conditions. This pattern changed in response to perturbations and to temperature shifts. Time course quantitative measurements of methanogenic subpopulations demonstrated that these subpopulations undergo sequential changes during bioreactor operation. Parallel microbiologic, physiologic, and chemical determinations demonstrated the reliability of the immunologic methods and their potential for bioreactor monitoring and for manipulating microprobes (e.g. to exclude a strain from a bioreactor). (author)

  9. Systems Theory in Immunology

    CERN Document Server

    Doria, Gino; Koch, Giorgio; Strom, Roberto

    1979-01-01

    This volume collects the contributions presented at the "Working Conference on System Theory in Immunology", held in Rome, May 1978. The aim of the Conference was to bring together immunologists on one side and experts in system theory and applied mathematics on the other, in order to identify problems of common interest and to establish a network of joint effort toward their solution. The methodologies of system theory for processing experimental data and for describing dynamical phenomena could indeed contribute significantly to the under­ standing of basic immunological facts. Conversely, the complexity of experimental results and of interpretative models should stimulate mathematicians to formulate new problems and to design appropriate procedures of analysis. The multitude of scientific publications in theoretical biology, appeared in recent years, confirms this trend and calls for extensive interaction between mat- matics and immunology. The material of this volume is divided into five sections, along ...

  10. Co-culture of primary human tumor hepatocytes from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells: study of their in vitro immunological interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doumba Polyxeni P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have suggested that the immune response may play a crucial role in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Therefore, our aim was to establish a (i functional culture of primary human tumor hepatocytes and non-tumor from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and (ii a co-culture system of HCC and non-HCC hepatocytes with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in order to study in vitro cell-to-cell interactions. Methods Tumor (HCC and non-tumor (non-HCC hepatocytes were isolated from the liver resection specimens of 11 patients operated for HCC, while PBMCs were retrieved immediately prior to surgery. Four biopsies were obtained from patients with no liver disease who had surgery for non malignant tumor (normal hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were either cultured alone (monoculture or co-cultured with PBMCs. Flow cytometry measurements for MHC class II expression, apoptosis, necrosis and viability (7AAD were performed 24 h, 48 h and 72 h in co-culture and monocultures. Results HCC and non-HCC hepatocytes exhibited increased MHC-II expression at 48h and 72h in co-culture with PBMCs as compared to monoculture, with MHC II-expressing HCC hepatocytes showing increased viability at 72 h. PBMCs showed increased MHC-II expression (activation in co-culture with HCC as compared to non-HCC hepatocytes at all time points. Moreover, CD8+ T cells had significantly increased apoptosis and necrosis at 48h in co-culture with HCC hepatocytes as compared to monocultures. Interestingly, MHC-II expression on both HCC and non-HCC hepatocytes in co-culture was positively correlated with the respective activated CD8+ T cells. Conclusions We have established an in vitro co-culture model to study interactions between autologous PBMCs and primary HCC and non-HCC hepatocytes. This direct interaction leads to increased antigen presenting ability of HCC hepatocytes, activation of PBMCs with a concomitant apoptosis of

  11. Immunologic lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-07-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references.

  12. Using Nano-mechanics and Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) for Disease Monitoring and Diagnostics at a Cellular Level in Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanantha, Ninnuja; Ma, Charles; Collins, David J.; Sesen, Muhsincan; Brenker, Jason; Coppel, Ross L.; Neild, Adrian; Alan, Tuncay

    A popular approach to monitoring diseases and their diagnosis is through biological, pathological or immunological characterization. However, at a cellular level progression of certain diseases manifests itself through mechanical effects as well. Here, we present a method which exploits localised flow; surface acoustic wave (SAW) induced acoustic streaming in a 9 μL droplet to characterize the adhesive properties of red blood cells (healthy, gluteraldehyde treated and malaria infected) in approximately 50 seconds. Our results show a 79% difference in cell mobilization between healthy malaria infected RBCs (and a 39% difference between healthy and treated ones), indicating that the method can serve as a platform for rapid clinical diagnosis; where separation of two or more different cell populations in a mixed solution is desirable. It can also act as a key biomarker for monitoring some diseases offering quantitative measures of disease progression and response to therapy.

  13. Oestradiol levels in varicose vein blood of patients with and without pelvic vein incompetence (PVI): diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asciutto, G; Mumme, A; Asciutto, K C; Geier, B

    2010-07-01

    To assess the difference in the oestradiol levels of blood taken from varicose veins in patients with and without pelvic vein incompetence (PVI). Women of child-bearing age with symptomatic primary or recurrent varicose veins of the great saphenous vein (GSV) were included in a prospective study. Patients underwent duplex ultrasonography and pelvic vein phlebography. They were divided into a group with PVI (PVI group) and a control group with GSV reflux alone (VV group). Blood samples were collected from the GSV at the sapheno-femoral junction or lower in the thigh as well as from the arm. Oestradiol levels were determined by electroluminescence. Between January and December 2007, 40 women were studied, of which 19 showed phlebographic evidence of PVI (PVI group), while 21 were included in the VV group. Phlebography revealed an incompetent ovarian vein in 14 (74%) patients of the PVI group, dilated uterine and ovarian plexuses in 12 (63%) and an incompetent internal iliac vein in six cases (32%). In the PVI group, the median oestradiol level in GSV samples was 121 pgml(-1) (range: 12-4300), while in the VV group the median level was 75 pgml(-1) (range: 9-1177). In the upper limb, the PVI group patients had a median level of 78 pgml(-1) (range: 15-121) and the VV group patients 68 pgml(-1) (range: 13-568). The ratio of lower limb/upper extremity was significantly higher (pPVI group (median: 1.9; range: 0.7-33) than in those of the VV group (median: 1.1; range: 0.8-13). A threshold ratio of 1.4 showed the highest combined sensitivity and specificity in differentiating patients with PVI from those without. In patients with varicose veins arising from the GSV, oestradiol levels were significantly higher in the lower limb than in the upper extremity in the subgroup with associated PVI. It may be possible to use this observation as a diagnostic test in patients with suspected PVI. This deserves further study. Copyright 2010 European Society for Vascular Surgery

  14. Prospective evaluation of the diagnostic value of sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of blood in adults with suspected systemic mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Vestergaard, H; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of blood has been proposed to guide bone marrow (BM) investigation in suspected systemic mastocytosis (SM). The aim of this prospective study was for the first time to compare the D816V status of the "screening blood sample" used to guide BM biopsy...... in suspected SM to the outcome of the subsequent BM investigation. METHODS: Fifty-eight adult patients with suspected SM were included. The outcome of sensitive KIT D816V analysis of blood was compared to the result of the BM investigation. RESULTS: Screening blood samples from 44 of 58 patients tested D816V...... patients did not fulfill any diagnostic SM criteria (excluding tryptase criterion). Of the 48 SM patients, 90% tested D816V-positive. Thirteen SM patients presented with Hymenoptera venom-induced anaphylaxis, no skin lesions, and baseline serum tryptase ≤20 ng/mL. Of these, 92% tested D816V...

  15. Full blood count and haemozoin-containing leukocytes in children with malaria: diagnostic value and association with disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lell Bertrand

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diligent and correct laboratory diagnosis and up-front identification of risk factors for progression to severe disease are the basis for optimal management of malaria. Methods Febrile children presenting to the Medical Research Unit at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital (HAS in Lambaréné, Gabon, were assessed for malaria. Giemsa-stained thick films for qualitative and quantitative diagnosis and enumeration of malaria pigment, or haemozoin (Hz-containing leukocytes (PCL were performed, and full blood counts (FBC were generated with a Cell Dyn 3000® instrument. Results Compared to standard light microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick films, diagnosis by platelet count only, by malaria pigment-containing monocytes (PCM only, or by pigment-containing granulocytes (PCN only yielded sensitivities/specificities of 92%/93%; 96%/96%; and 85%/96%, respectively. The platelet count was significantly lower in children with malaria compared to those without (p ® instrument detected significantly more patients with PCL (p Conclusion In the age group examined in the Lambaréné area, platelets are an excellent adjuvant tool to diagnose malaria. Pigment-containing leukocytes (PCL are more readily detected by automated scatter flow cytometry than by microscopy. Automated Hz detection by an instrument as used here is a reliable diagnostic tool and correlates with disease severity. However, clinical usefulness as a prognostic tool is limited due to an overlap of PCL numbers recorded in severe versus non-severe malaria. However, this is possibly because of the instrument detection algorithm was not geared towards this task, and data lost during processing; and thus adjusting the instrument's algorithm may allow to establish a meaningful cut-off value.

  16. Pulse Arrival Time Based Cuff-Less and 24-H Wearable Blood Pressure Monitoring and its Diagnostic Value in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yali; Poon, Carmen C Y; Yan, Bryan P; Lau, James Y W

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Current standard ABPM devices use an oscillometric cuff-based method which can cause physical discomfort to the patients with repeated inflations and deflations, especially during nighttime leading to sleep disturbance. The ability to measure ambulatory BP accurately and comfortably without a cuff would be attractive. This study validated the accuracy of a cuff-less approach for ABPM using pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements on both healthy and hypertensive subjects for potential use in hypertensive management, which is the first of its kind. The wearable cuff-less device was evaluated against a standard cuff-based device on 24 subjects of which 15 have known hypertension. BP measurements were taken from each subject over a 24-h period by the cuff-less and cuff-based devices every 15 to 30 minutes during daily activities. Mean BP of each subject during daytime, nighttime and over 24-h were calculated. Agreement between mean nighttime systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measured by the two devices evaluated using Bland-Altman plot were -1.4 ± 6.6 and 0.4 ± 6.7 mmHg, respectively. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) statistics was used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the cuff-less approach in the detection of BP above the hypertension threshold during nighttime (>120/70 mmHg). The area under ROC curves were 0.975/0.79 for nighttime. The results suggest that PAT-based approach is accurate and promising for ABPM without the issue of sleep disturbances associated with cuff-based devices.

  17. Improving the screening of blood donors with syphilis rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkodie, F.; Hassall, O.; Owusu-Dabo, E.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Syphilis testing conventionally relies on a combination of non-treponemal and treponemal tests. The primary objective of this study was to describe the positive predictive value (PPV) of a screening algorithm in a combination of a treponemal rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and rapid plasm...... of blood donors by combining syphilis RDT and RPR with relatively good PPV may provide a reasonable technology for LMIC that has a limited capacity for testing and can contribute to the improvement of blood safety with a minimal loss of donors....

  18. RADIOECOLOGY AND ECOLOGICAL IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shubik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The author's investigations results are presented in comparing with literary materials concerning the application of principles and methods of ecological immunology for solving radioecological questions. The data on characteristic of immunity and health of human population affected with radiation factors of the environment is given as well as animals' population state as the links offood ecological chains.

  19. Immunological Treatments for Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sudhir

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, including the dysregulation of the immune system, and concludes that there are sufficient data to suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of autism. Various biological therapies are analyzed, including intravenous…

  20. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  1. Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukari, Ammar; Nagasaka, Misako; Al-Hadidi, Ameer; Lum, Lawrence G

    2016-11-01

    Hanahan and Weinberg described six distinct biological properties of cancer cells that enable tumor growth and metastasis. These properties were referred to as the traditional hallmarks of cancer. Recent discoveries further elucidated hallmarks including evasion of immune destruction by tumor cells that disrupt anticancer response pathways. This review discusses cancer immunology and new treatment strategies aimed at restoration of antitumor immune responses.

  2. Immunology's theories of cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary immunology has established its fundamental theory as a biological expression of personal identity, wherein the "immune self" is defended by the immune system. Protection of this agent putatively requires a cognitive capacity by which the self and the foreign are perceived and thereby discriminated; from such information, discernment of the environment is achieved and activation of pathways leading to an immune response may be initiated. This so-called cognitive paradigm embeds such functions as "perception," "recognition," "learning," and "memory" to characterize immune processes, but the conceptual character of such functions has meanings that vary with the particular theory adopted. When different formulations of cognition are considered, immunology's conceptual infrastructure shifts: Extensions of conventional psychological understanding of representational cognition based on a subject-object dichotomy support notions of immune agency; alternatively, formulations of perception that dispense with representations and attendant notions of agency reconfigure the predicate epistemology dominating current immune theory. Reviewing immunological literature of the past five decades, these two understandings of perception--representational and non-representational (considered here from ecological, enactivist, and autopoietic perspectives)--offer competing views of immune cognitive functions. These, in turn, provide competing philosophical understandings of immunology's conceptual foundations, which reflect parallel controversies dominating current debates in philosophy of mind and attendant discussions about personal identity.

  3. Basic and clinical immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  4. Immunology & Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  5. The immunologic revolution: photoimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Stephen E; Byrne, Scott N

    2012-03-01

    UV radiation targets the skin and is a primary cause of skin cancer (both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer). Exposure to UV radiation also suppresses the immune response, and UV-induced immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The efforts of dermatologists and cancer biologists to understand how UV radiation exposure suppresses the immune response and contributes to skin cancer induction led to the development of the subdiscipline we call photoimmunology. Advances in photoimmunology have generally paralleled advances in immunology. However, there are a number of examples in which investigations into the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression reshaped our understanding of basic immunological concepts. Unconventional immune regulatory roles for Langerhans cells, mast cells, and natural killer T (NKT) cells, as well as the immune-suppressive function of lipid mediators of inflammation and alarmins, are just some examples of how advances in immunodermatology have altered our understanding of basic immunology. In this anniversary issue celebrating 75 years of cutaneous science, we provide examples of how concepts that grew out of efforts by immunologists and dermatologists to understand immune regulation by UV radiation affected immunology in general.

  6. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Korber, Bette Tina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Brander, Christian [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Barouch, Dan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Division of Vaccine Research; de Boer, Rob [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands). Faculty of Biology; Haynes, Barton F. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Immunology; Koup, Richard [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). Vaccine Research Center; Moore, John P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Weill Medical College; Walker, Bruce D. [Ragon Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Watkins, David [Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  7. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Barouch, Dan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Koup, Richard [Vaccine Research Center National Institutes of Health (United States); de Boer, Rob [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Biology; Moore, John P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Weill Medical College; Brander, Christian [Institucioi Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Haynes, Barton F. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Immunology; Walker, Bruce D. [Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  8. [Use of immunological and molecular biological methods to diagnose cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubareva, E V; Goncharov, D B; Domonova, É A; Sil'veĭstrova, O Iu; Peregudova, A B; Tishkevich, O A; Ievleva, E S; Kobets, N V; Shipulina, O Iu

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is one of the leading causes of neurologic diseases with high mortality rates in patients with HIV infection. Invasion was difficult to diagnose for a number of objective reasons. The objective of the investigation was to determine the clinical sensitivity of different laboratory techniques as both a single study and their various combinations to verify the diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid were tested in 51 patients with Stage 4B HIV infection (AIDS) with the verified diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. Separate determination of specific antibodies of IgG, IgM, IgA and toxoplasma DNA in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid was shown to have an insufficient clinical sensitivity (37.3-68.6%). The benefits of various combinations of immunological and molecular biological assays enhancing the diagnostic efficiency up to 76.5-96.1% are demonstrated.

  9. Measuring Post-Partum Haemorrhage in Low-Resource Settings: The Diagnostic Validity of Weighed Blood Loss versus Quantitative Changes in Hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Cathyln Atukunda

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of blood loss is central to prompt diagnosis and management of post-partum hemorrhage (PPH, which remains a leading cause of maternal mortality in low-resource countries. In such settings, blood loss is often estimated visually and subjectively by attending health workers, due to inconsistent availability of laboratory infrastructure. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of weighed blood loss (WBL versus changes in peri-partum hemoglobin to detect PPH.Data from this analysis were collected as part of a randomized controlled trial comparing oxytocin with misoprostol for PPH (NCT01866241. Blood samples for complete blood count were drawn on admission and again prior to hospital discharge or before blood transfusion. During delivery, women were placed on drapes and had pre-weighed sanitary towels placed around their perineum. Blood was then drained into a calibrated container and the sanitary towels were added to estimate WBL, where each gram of blood was estimated as a milliliter. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values (PPVs were calculated at various blood volume loss and time combinations, and we fit receiver-operator curves using blood loss at 1, 2, and 24 hours compared to a reference standard of haemoglobin decrease of >10%.A total of 1,140 women were enrolled in the study, of whom 258 (22.6% developed PPH, defined as a haemoglobin drop >10%, and 262 (23.0% had WBL ≥500mL. WBL generally had a poor sensitivity for detection of PPH (85% in high prevalence settings when WBL exceeds 750mL.WBL has poor sensitivity but high specificity compared to laboratory-based methods of PPH diagnosis. These characteristics correspond to a high PPV in areas with high PPH prevalence. Although WBL is not useful for excluding PPH, this low-cost, simple and reproducible method is promising as a reasonable method to identify significant PPH in such settings where quantifiable red cell indices are unavailable.

  10. Immunology for rheumatology residents: working toward a Canadian national curriculum consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Shirley L; Herman-Kideckel, Sari; Mahendira, Dharini; McDonald-Blumer, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Immunologic mechanisms play an integral role in understanding the pathogenesis and management of rheumatic conditions. Currently, there is limited access to formal instruction in immunology for rheumatology trainees across Canada. The aims of this study were (1) to describe current immunology curricula among adult rheumatology training programs across Canada and (2) to compare the perceived learning needs of rheumatology trainees from the perspective of program directors and trainees to help develop a focused nationwide immunology curriculum. Rheumatology trainees and program directors from adult rheumatology programs across Canada completed an online questionnaire and were asked to rank a comprehensive list of immunology topics. A modified Delphi approach was implemented to obtain consensus on immunology topics. Only 42% of program directors and 31% of trainees felt the current method of teaching immunology was effective. Results illustrate concordance between program directors and trainees for the highest-ranked immunology topics including innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and cells and tissues of the immune system. However, there was discordance among other topics, such as diagnostic laboratory immunology and therapeutics. There is a need to improve immunology teaching in rheumatology training programs. Results show high concordance between the basic immunology topics. This study provides the groundwork for development of future immunology curricula.

  11. A Retrospective Study of the Impact of Rapid Diagnostic Testing on Time to Pathogen Identification and Antibiotic Use for Children with Positive Blood Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veesenmeyer, Angela Fimbres; Olson, Jared A; Hersh, Adam L; Stockmann, Chris; Korgenski, Kent; Thorell, Emily A; Pavia, Andrew T; Blaschke, Anne J

    2016-12-01

    Rapid identification of bloodstream pathogens provides crucial information that can improve the choice of antimicrobial therapy for children. Previous impact studies have primarily focused on adults. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of rapid testing in a children's hospital on time to organism identification and antibiotic use in the setting of an established antimicrobial stewardship program. We conducted a retrospective study over three consecutive time periods (spanning January 2013-August 2015) as our hospital sequentially introduced two rapid testing methods for positive blood cultures. An antimicrobial stewardship program was active throughout the study. In the baseline period, no rapid diagnostic methods were routinely utilized. In the second period (PNAFISH), a fluorescent in situ hybridization test was implemented for gram-positive organisms and in the third a rapid multiplex PCR (rmPCR) test was employed. For children with positive blood cultures, time to organism identification use and duration of select antimicrobial therapies were compared between periods. Positive blood cultures were analyzed. Median overall time to organism identification was 23, 11, and 0 h in the baseline, PNAFISH, and rmPCR periods, respectively (p Rapid diagnostic testing for children with positive blood cultures results in faster time to identification and can influence antibiotic prescribing in the setting of active antimicrobial stewardship particularly for gram-positive pathogens. Merck.

  12. Studies on Immunological Effect and Immunological Mechanism Avian Encephalomyelitis Oil Emulsion Inactivated Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zi-qiang; ZHAO Zhen-hua; RI Mudema

    2002-01-01

    Oil emulsion inactivated vaccine was prepared by susceptible embryos, with different strains of AEV. Four groups of normal chickens of 2 - 7 days of age were given injections for immunization, respectively. Another group was used as control. This study was expected to evaluate the immunological effect and discuss the immunological mechanism by means of five different experiments, i.e. the agar-gel precipitin test,the isolation of lymphokine, the isolation, purification and analysis of blood serum IgG, embryo-susceptibility test, and clinical and pathological examination. The results of these experiments indicated that oil emulsion inactivated vaccine is safe and effective. The chickens were normal when inoculated with AE strong virus after immunity at 4 and 37 weeks. Immunological mechanism is that the humoral immunity played an important role and celluar immunity exists, but it is not important in the process of the resistance to AEV.

  13. [The diagnostic and prognostic value of increase of blood pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in chronic lymphatic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhevak, T N; Chesnokova, N P; Shelekhova, T V

    2013-02-01

    The article presents the results of study of cytokine profile of blood of patients with B-cell lymphatic leukemia. It is established that at diferent stages of disease the regular characteristic of changes in cytokine status is the increase of concentration of interleukin 4 (IL=4) and tumor necrosis factor This fact can be considered as one of leading pathogenic factors leading to disturbances of intercellular interaction in lymphoid tissue and to development of systemic metabolic and functional disorders. The parallelism between progressing increase of concentration of interleukin 4 and a-tumor necrosis factor character of qualitative and quantitative alterations of cell structure of peripheral blood, severity of clinical manifestations of disease are established. The indicators of concentration of interleukin 4 and a-tumor necrosis factor in blood are the objective diagnostic and prognostic criteria ofpathology development. They can complement the classification attributes of staging of the course of chronic lymphatic leukemia.

  14. Cosmos-1989 immunology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The current study involved a determination of the effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies carried out on Cosmos 1887.

  15. Immunology and Epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Hraba, Tomáš

    1986-01-01

    In February 1985 a small international meeting of scientists took place at the recreation resort of the Polish Academy of Sci­ ences in Mogilany, near Cracow, Poland. The initiative for holding the workshop came from a working meeting on mathematical immunology and related topics at the International Institute for Applied Sys­ tems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria, in November 1983. In addition to representatives of IIASA, delegates of the IIASA National Member Organizations (NMO) of Czechoslovakia, Italy, and the soviet Union took part in that working meeting. The participants came to the conclusion that IIASA could play an important role in facilitating the development of research in this field. The first step that they recommended to I IASA was to organize a workshop on mathematical immunology. The purpose of the workshop was to review the progress that has been made in applying mathematics to problems in immunology and to explore ways in which further progress might be achieved, especially by more efficie...

  16. Impact of the phlebotomy training based on CLSI/NCCLS H03-a6 - procedures for the collection of diagnostic blood specimens by venipuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    The activities involving phlebotomy, a critical task for obtaining diagnostic blood samples, are poorly studied as regards the major sources of errors and the procedures related to laboratory quality control. The aim of this study was to verify the compliance with CLSI documents of clinical laboratories from South America and to assess whether teaching phlebotomists to follow the exact procedure for blood collection by venipuncture from CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - Procedures for the Collection of Diagnostic Blood Specimens by Venipuncture might improve the quality of the process. A survey was sent by mail to 3674 laboratories from South America to verify the use of CLSI documents. Thirty skilled phlebotomists were trained with the CLSI H03-A6 document to perform venipuncture procedures for a period of 20 consecutive working days. The overall performances of the phlebotomists were further compared before and after the training program. 2622 from 2781 laboratories that did answer our survey used CLSI documents to standardize their procedures and process. The phlebotomists' training for 20 days before our evaluation completely eliminated non-conformity procedures for: i) incorrect friction of the forearm, during the cleaning of the venipuncture site to ease vein location; ii) incorrect sequence of vacuum tubes collection; and iii) inadequate mixing of the blood in primary vacuum tubes containing anticoagulants or clot activators. Unfortunately the CLSI H03-A6 document does not caution against both unsuitable tourniquet application time (i.e., for more than one minute) and inappropriate request to clench the fist repeatedly. These inadequate procedures were observed for all phlebotomists. We showed that strict observance of the CLSI H03-A6 document can remarkably improve quality, although the various steps for collecting diagnostic blood specimens are not a gold standard, since they may still permit errors. Tourniquet application time and forearm clench should be verified by

  17. Impact of the phlebotomy training based on CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - procedures for the collection of diagnostic blood specimens by venipuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The activities involving phlebotomy, a critical task for obtaining diagnostic blood samples, are poorly studied as regards the major sources of errors and the procedures related to laboratory quality control. The aim of this study was to verify the compliance with CLSI documents of clinical laboratories from South America and to assess whether teaching phlebotomists to follow the exact procedure for blood collection by venipuncture from CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - Procedures for the Collection of Diagnostic Blood Specimens by Venipuncture might improve the quality of the process. Materials and methods: A survey was sent by mail to 3674 laboratories from South America to verify the use of CLSI documents. Thirty skilled phlebotomists were trained with the CLSI H03-A6 document to perform venipuncture procedures for a period of 20 consecutive working days. The overall performances of the phlebotomists were further compared before and after the training program. Results: 2622 from 2781 laboratories that did answer our survey used CLSI documents to standardize their procedures and process. The phlebotomists’ training for 20 days before our evaluation completely eliminated non-conformity procedures for: i) incorrect friction of the forearm, during the cleaning of the venipuncture site to ease vein location; ii) incorrect sequence of vacuum tubes collection; and iii) inadequate mixing of the blood in primary vacuum tubes containing anticoagulants or clot activators. Unfortunately the CLSI H03-A6 document does not caution against both unsuitable tourniquet application time (i.e., for more than one minute) and inappropriate request to clench the fist repeatedly. These inadequate procedures were observed for all phlebotomists. Conclusion: We showed that strict observance of the CLSI H03-A6 document can remarkably improve quality, although the various steps for collecting diagnostic blood specimens are not a gold standard, since they may still permit errors. Tourniquet

  18. Predicting arterial blood gas and lactate from central venous blood analysis in critically ill patients: a multicentre, prospective, diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulain, T; Garot, D; Vignon, P; Lascarrou, J-B; Benzekri-Lefevre, D; Dequin, P-F

    2016-09-01

    The estimation of arterial blood gas and lactate from central venous blood analysis and pulse oximetry [Formula: see text] readings has not yet been extensively validated. In this multicentre, prospective study performed in 590 patients with acute circulatory failure, we measured blood gases and lactate in simultaneous central venous and arterial blood samples at 6 h intervals during the first 24 h after insertion of central venous and arterial catheters. The study population was randomly divided in a 2:1 ratio into model derivation and validation sets. We derived predictive models of arterial pH, carbon dioxide partial pressure, oxygen saturation, and lactate, using clinical characteristics, [Formula: see text], and central venous blood gas values as predictors, and then tested their performance in the validation set. In the validation set, the agreement intervals between predicted and actual values were -0.078/+0.084 units for arterial pH, -1.32/+1.36 kPa for arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, -5.15/+4.47% for arterial oxygen saturation, and -1.07/+1.05 mmol litre(-1) for arterial lactate (i.e. around two times our predefined clinically tolerable intervals for all variables). This led to ∼5% (or less) of extreme-to-extreme misclassifications, thus giving our predictive models only marginal agreement. Thresholds of predicted variables (as determined from the derivation set) showed high predictive values (consistently >94%), to exclude abnormal arterial values in the validation set. Using clinical characteristics, [Formula: see text], and central venous blood analysis, we predicted arterial blood gas and lactate values with marginal accuracy in patients with circulatory failure. Further studies are required to establish whether the developed models can be used with acceptable safety. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Islet transplantation: immunological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverardi, Luca; Kenyon, Norma S; Ricordi, Camillo

    2003-10-01

    Clinical trials of islet transplantation are showing remarkable success, but they require administration of chronic immunosuppression, and are underscoring the large gap that exists between the number of human donors available and the number of patients that could benefit from the procedure. Recent progress has been made in the definition of key immunological mechanisms that are involved in determining islet transplant outcome. Clinical and preclinical studies, and studies in small animal model systems, will all eventually contribute to the definition of efficient and safe protocols for islet transplantation. If the use of xenografts is successful, it might represent a solution to the shortage of human organs.

  20. The immunological synapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Thomas; Pedersen, Lars Ostergaard; Geisler, Carsten

    2003-01-01

    . A distinct 3-dimensional supramolecular structure at the T cell/APC interface has been suggested to be involved in the information transfer. Due to its functional analogy to the neuronal synapse, the structure has been termed the "immunological synapse" (IS). Here, we review molecular aspects concerning...... IS formation, appearance, and cessation. In addition, proposed functions of the IS are discussed. The process of IS formation occurs in a sequential manner, initially causing a remarkable large-scale redistribution of a number of integral membrane and cytosolic proteins. At the T cell/APC interface...

  1. Immunology in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cose, Stephen; Bagaya, Bernard; Nerima, Barbara; Joloba, Moses; Kambugu, Andrew; Tweyongyere, Robert; Dunne, David W; Mbidde, Edward; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Elliott, Alison M

    2015-12-01

    Africa is a continent with a large burden of both infectious and non-communicable diseases. If we are to move forward as a continent, we need to equip our growing cadre of exceptional young scientists with the skills needed to tackle the diseases endemic to this continent. For this, immunology is among the key disciplines. Africans should be empowered to study and understand the diseases that affect them, and to perform their cutting-edge research in their country of origin. This requires a multifaceted approach, with buy-in from funders, overseas partners and perhaps, most important of all, African governments themselves.

  2. Mathematics in modern immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical and statistical methods enable multidisciplinary approaches that catalyse discovery. Together with experimental methods, they identify key hypotheses, define measurable observables and reconcile disparate results. We collect a representative sample of studies in T-cell biology that illustrate the benefits of modelling-experimental collaborations and that have proven valuable or even groundbreaking. We conclude that it is possible to find excellent examples of synergy between mathematical modelling and experiment in immunology, which have brought significant insight that would not be available without these collaborations, but that much remains to be discovered.

  3. Kinetics Modeling of Cancer Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-09

    CANCER IMMUNOLOGY -1 DTICS ELECTED SEP 9 8 UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND V ,1986 %,e docment ha le approved for public A." I and sale...1986 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED KINETICS MODELING OF CANCER IMMUNOLOGY Final: 1985/1986 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...137 (1986) "Kinetics Modeling of Cancer Immunology " A Trident Scholar Project Report by Midn I/C Scott Helmers, Class of 1986 United States Naval

  4. Broadening the translational immunology landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peakman, M

    2012-12-01

    It is just over 5 years since Clinical and Experimental Immunology came under the direction of a new team of Editors and made a concerted effort to refresh its approach to promoting clinical and applied immunology through its pages. There were two major objectives: to foster papers in a field which, at the time, we loosely termed 'translational immunology'; and to create a forum for the presentation and discussion of immunology that is relevant to clinicians operating in this space. So, how are we doing with these endeavours? This brief paper aims to summarize some of the key learning points and successes and highlight areas in which translational gaps remain.

  5. Performing diagnostics, especially blood cultures, on-time for infectious patients reduces length of stay and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, JH; Lo Ten Foe, J. R.; Sinha, B; Nannan Panday, P; Hendrix, R; Postma, MJ; Friedrich, AW

    2015-01-01

    Objectives As an academic center, the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands receives large numbers of patients with (complex) infectious problems. It is imperative that the correct diagnostics are performed on time for these patients in order to correctly diagnose them and treat the

  6. Complex polarization-phase and spatial-frequency selections of laser images of blood-plasma films in diagnostics of changes in their polycrystalline structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, Yu. A.; Angelskii, P. O.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Karachevtsev, A. O.; Sidor, M. I.; Mintser, O. P.; Oleinichenko, B. P.; Bizer, L. I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical formalism of correlation phase analysis of laser images of human blood plasma with spatial-frequency selection of manifestations of mechanisms of linear and circular birefringence of albumin and globulin polycrystalline networks. Comparative results of the measurement of coordinate distributions of the correlation parameter—the modulus of the degree of local correlation of amplitudes—of laser images of blood plasma taken from patients of three groups—healthy patients (donors), rheumatoid-arthritis patients, and breast-cancer patients—are presented. We investigate values and ranges of change of statistical (the first to fourth statistical moments), correlation (excess of autocorrelation functions), and fractal (slopes of approximating curves and dispersion of extrema of logarithmic dependences of power spectra) parameters of coordinate distributions of the degree of local correlation of amplitudes. Objective criteria for diagnostics of occurrence and differentiation of inflammatory and oncological states are determined.

  7. Immunology of breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Palmeira

    Full Text Available Summary In the critical phase of immunological immaturity of the newborn, particularly for the immune system of mucous membranes, infants receive large amounts of bioactive components through colostrum and breast milk. Colostrum is the most potent natural immune booster known to science. Breastfeeding protects infants against infections mainly via secretory IgA (SIgA antibodies, but also via other various bioactive factors. It is striking that the defense factors of human milk function without causing inflammation; some components are even anti-inflammatory. Protection against infections has been well evidenced during lactation against, e.g., acute and prolonged diarrhea, respiratory tract infections, including otitis media, urinary tract infection, neonatal septicemia, and necrotizing enterocolitis. The milk’s immunity content changes over time. In the early stages of lactation, IgA, anti-inflammatory factors and, more likely, immunologically active cells provide additional support for the immature immune system of the neonate. After this period, breast milk continues to adapt extraordinarily to the infant’s ontogeny and needs regarding immune protection and nutrition. The need to encourage breastfeeding is therefore justifiable, at least during the first 6 months of life, when the infant’s secretory IgA production is insignificant.

  8. Should blood gas analysis be part of the diagnostic workup of short children? Auxological data and blood gas analysis in children with renal tubular acidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Mul (Dick); F.K. Grote (Floor); J.R. Goudriaan; S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine); J.M. Wit (Jan); W. Oostdijk (Wilma)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a rare cause of growth failure, therefore it is uncertain whether routine screening with blood gas analysis of short infants and children is cost-effective. Objective: To investigate the clinical, growth and laboratory parameters in children

  9. Array CGH on unstimulated blood does not detect all cases of Pallister-Killian syndrome: a skin biopsy should remain the diagnostic gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Jennelle C; Hulshizer, Rachael L; Seger, Pam; St Antoine, Angelique; Bair, Jennifer; Kirmani, Salman

    2012-03-01

    A child whose features are consistent with Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) did not have detectable tetrasomy 12p due to an additional isochromosome 12p in an unstimulated blood specimen by interphase FISH or array CGH analysis. The diagnosis of PKS was made through these methods solely in a skin biopsy specimen. To determine the sensitivity of our array CGH platform to tetrasomy 12p mosaicism, dilutions of DNA from both the child's skin fibroblasts and a PKS cell line were analyzed. Tetrasomy 12p at 10% mosaicism was identifiable but 5% was below the limit of detection. This result suggests through extrapolation that the tetrasomy 12p is present in <10% of cells in our patient's blood, confirming the tissue-limited mosaicism of PKS. Multiple recent studies show that array CGH provides greater sensitivity than chromosome analysis to detect mosaic abnormalities including that of tetrasomy 12p in blood specimens. However, our case demonstrates that the biology of PKS precludes the exclusive use of array CGH on blood for diagnosis. A tissue sample should continue to be the diagnostic gold standard for PKS.

  10. Immunological effects of vasectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotolongo, J R

    1982-06-01

    It is only recently that the adverse effects of vasectomy have become the subject of numerous scientific and at times speculative articles in medical and in lay periodicals. In this review of the literature on the immunological effects of vasectomy, attention is directed to the following: immunological response; cellular immunity; effects on testes and epididymis, and systemic effects of sperm autoantibodies. In 1970, 50% of vasectomized men were found to have circulating spermatozoal antibodies. A more recent survey provides confirmation for this finding and presents an incidence of only 2% of agglutinating antibodies and 0% of immobilizing antibodies in a fertile control population. Some recent and convincing studies have shown sperm agglutinating and immobilizing antibodies to remain either at the same titer level or actually to increase 5-12 years postoperatively. Titers range from 2 to 2048 among different patients. The highest incidence of titers is 1 year after vasectomy, but titers can be found as early as 6 months or as late as 20 years postoperatively. The wide range in titers can be explained in terms of technical problems in immune assays, since only immunoglobulins and not those antibodies part of immune complex systems can be measured. Since sperm antigens are in abundant supply in vasectomized men because of the continuous resorption of spermatozoa after vasectomy, possibly undetectable antibody titers actually reflect high levels of antisperm antibodies circulating in the form of immune complexes. Also it may be possible that the variety in measured titers of autoantibodies, as well as the nonuniversal (70%) antibody response in a vasectomized population, is a variable dependent on genetic content and, therefore, an individual characteristic. The fact that hormonal reponse takes place rather readily after vasectomy makes at least some degree of cellular response a necessary occurrence. Studies by Alexander and Anderson, which show delayed

  11. Should blood gas analysis be part of the diagnostic workup of short children? Auxological data and blood gas analysis in children with renal tubular acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mul, D; Grote, F K; Goudriaan, J R; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M P F; Wit, J M; Oostdijk, W

    2010-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a rare cause of growth failure, therefore it is uncertain whether routine screening with blood gas analysis of short infants and children is cost-effective. To investigate the clinical, growth and laboratory parameters in children with RTA to estimate the possible value of laboratory screening for this disorder in infants and children referred for short stature according to a recent guideline. Retrospective chart analysis of 30 children diagnosed between 1978 and 2005 in The Netherlands and 3 centers in Belgium. The current guideline for short stature detected 33% of children with RTA. Assuming a pre-test probability of RTA of 0.6 per 100,000 births, the likelihood ratio of poor growth was 58 and 17 below and above 3 years, respectively. Sensitivity was 17/30 and 12/24 for a -2.0 SDS cutoff for weight and body mass index, respectively. In infants and toddlers diagnosed before 3 years of age, the mean weight loss was 1.5 SD, and 0.8 SDS in older children. In short children >3 years RTA was extremely rare, always associated with clinical symptoms, and rarely detected by blood gas analysis. According to our data a decreasing weight SDS for age is a sufficient indication to perform blood gas analysis in children 3 years of age. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Ideernes epidemiologi og kulturens immunologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    , suggested by Sperber, is extended by an ‘immunology of cultural systems’. In addition to the selective forces described by Sperber and Boyer, the immunological approach argues that the relative success of new representations is largely dependent on how well they fit already existing cultural models...

  13. Fundamentals of vaccine immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela S Clem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available From a literature review of the current literature, this article provides an introduction to vaccine immunology including a primer on the components of the immune system, passive vs. active immunization, the mechanism(s by which immunizations stimulate(s immunity, and the types of vaccines available. Both the innate and adaptive immune subsystems are necessary to provide an effective immune response to an immunization. Further, effective immunizations must induce long-term stimulation of both the humoral and cell-mediated arms of the adaptive system by the production of effector cells and memory cells. At least seven different types of vaccines are currently in use or in development that produce this effective immunity and have contributed greatly to the prevention of infectious disease around the world.

  14. Immunological Detection of Arbutin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The relative molecular mass of Arbutin is small.Both fluorolabeling and radiolabeling may affect its properties and functions.Therefore, the immunoassay of Arbutin was studied.Arbutin was coupled to bovine serum albumin to get the Arbutin-BSA conjugate with high molar ratio of Arbutin to BSA.Two rabbits were injected with the conjugate to develop the anti-Arbutin serum.Ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography were used to purify the antibody.Double agar diffusion test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were adopted to identify the antibody titer.The results demonstrated that the purity and activity of the antibody are high.The method proposed is satisfactory for the immunological detection of Arbutin.

  15. Adenoids in children: Advances in immunology, diagnosis, and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Ilaria; Pusateri, Alessandro; Pagella, Fabio; Caimmi, Davide; Caimmi, Silvia; Licari, Amelia; Barberi, Salvatore; Castellazzi, Annamaria M; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2014-04-01

    Adenoids are strategically located for mediating local and regional immune functions as they are exposed to antigens from both the outside air and the alimentary tract. Recurrent or chronic respiratory infections can induce histomorphological and functional changes in the adenoidal immunological barrier, sometimes making surgical treatment necessary. Our aim in this review is to summarize the crucial points about not only the immunological histopathology of adenoidal tissue, especially in patients with adenoid hypertrophy, but also the most common and useful diagnostic techniques and surgical options.

  16. Improved detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei from non-blood clinical specimens using enrichment culture and PCR: narrowing diagnostic gap in resource-constrained settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellapragada, Chaitanya; Shaw, Tushar; D'Souza, Annet; Eshwara, Vandana Kalwaje; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic utility of enrichment culture and PCR for improved case detection rates of non-bacteraemic form of melioidosis in limited resource settings. Clinical specimens (n = 525) obtained from patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital of South India with clinical symptoms suggestive of community-acquired pneumonia, lower respiratory tract infections, superficial or internal abscesses, chronic skin ulcers and bone or joint infections were tested for the presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei using conventional culture (CC), enrichment culture (EC) and PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CC and PCR were initially deduced using EC as the gold standard method. Further, diagnostic accuracies of all the three methods were analysed using Bayesian latent class modelling (BLCM). Detection rates of B. pseudomallei using CC, EC and PCR were 3.8%, 5.3% and 6%, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivities and specificities of CC and PCR were 71.4, 98.4% and 100 and 99.4%, respectively in comparison with EC as the gold standard test. With Bayesian latent class modelling, EC and PCR demonstrated sensitivities of 98.7 and 99.3%, respectively, while CC showed a sensitivity of 70.3% for detection of B. pseudomallei. An increase of 1.6% (95% CI: 1.08-4.32%) in the case detection rate of melioidosis was observed in the study population when EC and/or PCR were used in adjunct to the conventional culture technique. Our study findings underscore the diagnostic superiority of enrichment culture and/or PCR over conventional microbiological culture for improved case detection of melioidosis from non-blood clinical specimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Thirty years of research on diagnostic and therapeutic thresholds for the self-measured blood pressure at home.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staessen, J.A.; Thijs, L.; Ohkubo, T.; Kikuya, M.; Richart, T.; Boggia, J.; Adiyaman, A.; Dechering, D.G.; Kuznetsova, T.; Thien, Th.; Leeuw, P de; Imai, Y.; O'brien, E.; Parati, G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this review study is to summarize 30 years of research on cut-off limits for the self-measured blood pressure. METHODS: We reviewed two meta-analyses, several prospective outcome studies in populations and hypertensive patients, studies in pregnant women, three clinical trials

  18. Thirty years of research on diagnostic and therapeutic thresholds for the self-measured blood pressure at home.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staessen, J.A.; Thijs, L.; Ohkubo, T.; Kikuya, M.; Richart, T.; Boggia, J.; Adiyaman, A.; Dechering, D.G.; Kuznetsova, T.; Thien, Th.; Leeuw, P de; Imai, Y.; O'brien, E.; Parati, G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this review study is to summarize 30 years of research on cut-off limits for the self-measured blood pressure. METHODS: We reviewed two meta-analyses, several prospective outcome studies in populations and hypertensive patients, studies in pregnant women, three clinical trials

  19. [Concentration of lipids in ascitic fluid and the concentration gradient of albumin in blood and ascites: diagnostic significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbare, J C; Diab, G; Delavenne, J; Philippe, J M; Vorhauer, W; Latrive, J P; Capron, J P

    1989-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the diagnostic value of ascitic fluid cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations and of serum-ascites albumin concentration gradient in the differentiation between cirrhotic and malignant ascites. These biological parameters were determined, on the one hand in 34 cirrhotic patients, 6 of them having an hepatocellular carcinoma and 6 others having a spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and, on the other hand, in 16 patients with malignant ascites, 13 of them having an abdominal extra-hepatic or pelvic cancer, and 3 others having an extra-abdominal cancer with multiple liver metastases. Ascitic carcinoembryonic antigen assay and ascitic fluid cytology were also done in the 50 patients. In differentiating the cirrhotic patients from those with malignancy, ascitic fluid cholesterol concentration (discriminating value less than 1.1 mmol/l) ascitic fluid triglycerides concentration (discriminating value 0.5 mmol/l) and serum-ascites albumin concentration gradient (discriminating value greater than 11 g/l) allowed a diagnostic efficiency of 0.92, 0.80 and 0.77, respectively. Ascitic fluid cytology showed presence of malignant cells in 3/6 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhosis, in 9/16 patients having a malignant ascites, and was negative in other patients. Ascitic carcinoembryonic antigen assay was abnormal only in 3/16 patients with malignant ascites. These results suggest that measurement of ascitic fluid cholesterol concentration must be included in the initial evaluation of patients with ascites of unknown origin.

  20. Diagnostic imaging of musculoskeletal infection. Roentgenography; Gallium, indium-labeled white blood cell, gammaglobulin, bone scintigraphy; and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, W.A.; Alavi, A. (Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1991-07-01

    A great deal of effort has been made to evaluate and define the role of various diagnostic imaging techniques in various clinical settings that complicate the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Except possibly in neonates, bone scintigraphy remains generally recommended when there has been no previous osseous involvement. In other cases of chronic disease, previous fracture or trauma, prosthesis, and diabetic foot, In-WBC scintigraphy is generally accepted as an appropriate imaging technique. MRI will play an increasingly important role in diagnosing osteomyelitis and may prove to be an important adjunct in these cases. Research continues to improve our current diagnostic armamentarium. In-IgG appears to avoid practical deficiencies encountered with 67Ga and In-WBC; it remains to be seen what role this agent will play in routine clinical practice. All agents to date image inflammation, not infection, and most require delayed imaging sessions, usually at 24 hours. These shortcomings necessitate further research to develop new radiotracers that can provide useful images within several hours and that are specific for infection, perhaps ultimately delineating the particular microorganism involved.84 references.

  1. Magnetic permeability based diagnostic test for the determination of the canine C-reactive protein concentration in undiluted whole blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibraimi, Filiz; Kriz, Kirstin [Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); LifeAssays AB, IDEON Science Park, SE-223 70 Lund (Sweden); Merin, Henrik [Malmoe Animal Hospital, P.O. Box 9090, SE-213 63 Malmoe (Sweden); Kriz, Dario [Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); LifeAssays AB, IDEON Science Park, SE-223 70 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: dario.kriz@euris.org

    2009-05-15

    We describe an one-step 11-min magnetic permeability based two-site immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) utilizing polyclonal anti-canine CRP antibody conjugated dextran iron oxide nanoparticles (79 nm) as superparamagnetic labels and polyclonal anti-canine CRP conjugated silica microparticles (15 to 40 {mu}m) as carriers. An inductance based magnetic permeability reader was used to detect the target analyte, CRP, in 10 {mu}L whole blood samples, by measuring the magnetic permeability increase of the silica microparticle sediment due to immuno complex superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Measurements on standards showed a linear response between 0 and 17.5 mg/L CRP. Measurements performed on 16 whole blood samples from mixed breeds showed good correlation with a commercially available ELISA assay.

  2. Magnetic permeability based diagnostic test for the determination of the canine C-reactive protein concentration in undiluted whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibraimi, Filiz; Kriz, Kirstin; Merin, Henrik; Kriz, Dario

    2009-05-01

    We describe an one-step 11-min magnetic permeability based two-site immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) utilizing polyclonal anti-canine CRP antibody conjugated dextran iron oxide nanoparticles (79 nm) as superparamagnetic labels and polyclonal anti-canine CRP conjugated silica microparticles (15 to 40 μm) as carriers. An inductance based magnetic permeability reader was used to detect the target analyte, CRP, in 10 μL whole blood samples, by measuring the magnetic permeability increase of the silica microparticle sediment due to immuno complex superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Measurements on standards showed a linear response between 0 and 17.5 mg/L CRP. Measurements performed on 16 whole blood samples from mixed breeds showed good correlation with a commercially available ELISA assay.

  3. [Diagnostic performance of T-SPOT.TB on peripheral blood in combination with adenosine deaminase on pleural fluid for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy within different age group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H Y; Zhang, D Q; Ye, J R; Su, S S; Xie, Y P; Chen, C S; Li, Y P

    2017-06-27

    .911. The combination test of 2 tests had the sensitivity of 96.1% and the specificity of 90.2% respectively in the elderly patients. The AUC of T-SPOT.TB in the elderly patients was 0.747, AUC of T-SPOT.TB combined with ADA was 0.911. Conclusion: Peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB combined with pleural fluid ADA can improve the diagnostic performance for TB pleurisy with different ages, especially for elderly patients who can't tolerate pleural biopsy.

  4. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity.

  5. Immunologic endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Aaron W; Eisenbarth, George S

    2010-02-01

    Autoimmunity affects multiple glands in the endocrine system. Animal models and human studies highlight the importance of alleles in HLA-like molecules determining tissue-specific targeting that, with the loss of tolerance, leads to organ-specific autoimmunity. Disorders such as type 1A diabetes, Graves disease, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Addison disease, and many others result from autoimmune-mediated tissue destruction. Each of these disorders can be divided into stages beginning with genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, active autoimmunity, and finally metabolic derangements with overt symptoms of disease. With an increased understanding of the immunogenetics and immunopathogenesis of endocrine autoimmune disorders, immunotherapies are becoming prevalent, especially in patients with type 1A diabetes. Immunotherapies are being used more in multiple subspecialty fields to halt disease progression. Although therapies for autoimmune disorders stop the progress of an immune response, immunomodulatory therapies for cancer and chronic infections can also provoke an unwanted immune response. As a result, there are now iatrogenic autoimmune disorders arising from the treatment of chronic viral infections and malignancies. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunological responses induced by the combination of phototherapy and immunotherapy in the treatment of metastatic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei R.; Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Liu, Hong

    2008-02-01

    Combination therapy using laser photothermal interaction and immunological stimulation has demonstrated its ability to induce immunological responses. Glycated chitosan (GC), an immunological stimulant, and imiquimod, a new type of immune response modifier (IRM), when used in conjunction with laser phototherapy, have shown to have a great immunological stimulation function. Specifically, imiquimod can help release cytokines from immunocompetent cells, stimulate TH1 lymphocyte responses (CD8+ T-cells), and recruit additional dendritic cells. To study the effects of immunoadjuvnats in combination of laser photo-irradiation, we treated animal tumors with laser-ICG-GC combination and late-stage melanoma patients with laser-ICG-imiquimod combination. At designated times, tumors, blood, and spleens in both treated and untreated animals were colleted for analysis. The major immunological indicators, such as IL-6, IL-12, IFN-gamma, CD4, and CD8 were analyzed. The same immunological analysis was also performed for melanoma patients treated by the laser-imiquimod combination.

  7. Hsa_circ_0054633 in peripheral blood can be used as a diagnostic biomarker of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenzhou; Li, Xuejie; Jian, Dongdong; Hao, Peiyuan; Rao, Lixin; Li, Muwei

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the characteristic expression of circular RNAs (circRNAs) in the peripheral blood of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and their potential as diagnostic biomarkers for pre-diabetes and T2DM. CircRNAs in the peripheral blood from six healthy individuals and six T2DM patients were collected for microarray analysis, and an independent cohort study consisting of 20 normal cases, 20 pre-diabetes patients and 20 T2DM patients was conducted to verify the five chosen circRNAs. We then tested hsa_circ_0054633 in a third cohort (control group, n = 60; pre-diabetes group, n = 63; and T2DM group, n = 64) by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). In total, 489 circRNAs were discovered to be differentially expressed between the two groups, and of these, 78 were upregulated and 411 were downregulated in the T2DM group. Five circRNAs were then selected as candidate biomarkers and further verified in a second cohort. Hsa_circ_0054633 was found to have the largest area under the curve (AUC). The diagnostic capacity of hsa_circ_0054633 was tested in a third cohort. After introducing the risk factors of T2DM, the hsa_circ_0054633 AUCs for the diagnosis of pre-diabetes and T2DM slightly increased from 0.751 (95% confidence interval [0.666-0.835], P diabetes and T2DM.

  8. The Correlation-Base-Selection Algorithm for Diagnostic Schizophrenia Based on Blood-Based Gene Expression Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Xie, Ziyang; Yang, Yuwen; Zhao, Yizhen

    2017-01-01

    Microarray analysis of gene expression is often used to diagnose different types of disease. Many studies report remarkable achievements in nervous system disease. Clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia (SCZ) still depends on doctors' experience, which is unreliable and needs to be more objective and quantified. To solve this problem, we collected whole blood gene expression data from four studies, including 152 individuals with schizophrenia (SCZ) and 138 normal controls in different regions. The correlation-based feature selection (CFS, one of the machine learning methods) algorithm was applied in this study, and 103 significantly differentially expressed genes between patients and controls, called “feature genes,” were selected; then, a model for SCZ diagnosis was built. The samples were subdivided into 10 groups, and cross-validation showed that the model we constructed achieved nearly 100% classification accuracy. Mathematical evaluation of the datasets before and after data processing proved the effectiveness of our algorithm. Feature genes were enriched in Parkinson's disease, oxidative phosphorylation, and TGF-beta signaling pathways, which were previously reported to be associated with SCZ. These results suggest that the analysis of gene expression in whole blood by our model could be a useful tool for diagnosing SCZ. PMID:28280741

  9. Two-way FSI modelling of blood flow through CCA accounting on-line medical diagnostics in hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowicz, K.; Badur, J.; Narkiewicz, K.

    2014-08-01

    Flow parameters can induce pathological changes in the arteries. We propose a method to asses those parameters using a 3D computer model of the flow in the Common Carotid Artery. Input data was acquired using an automatic 2D ultrasound wall tracking system. This data has been used to generate a 3D geometry of the artery. The diameter and wall thickness have been assessed individually for every patient, but the artery has been taken as a 75mm straight tube. The Young's modulus for the arterial walls was calculated using the pulse pressure, diastolic (minimal) diameter and wall thickness (IMT). Blood flow was derived from the pressure waveform using a 2-parameter Windkessel model. The blood is assumed to be non-Newtonian. The computational models were generated and calculated using commercial code. The coupling method required the use of Arbitrary Lagrangian-Euler formulation to solve Navier-Stokes and Navier-Lame equations in a moving domain. The calculations showed that the distention of the walls in the model is not significantly different from the measurements. Results from the model have been used to locate additional risk factors, such as wall shear stress or circumferential stress, that may predict adverse hypertension complications.

  10. Immunological findings in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohly, Hari Har Parshad; Panja, Asit

    2005-01-01

    The immunopathogenesis of autism is presented schematically in Fig. 1. Two main immune dysfunctions in autism are immune regulation involving pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoimmunity. Mercury and an infectious agent like the measles virus are currently two main candidate environmental triggers for immune dysfunction in autism. Genetically immune dysfunction in autism involves the MHC region, as this is an immunologic gene cluster whose gene products are Class I, II, and III molecules. Class I and II molecules are associated with antigen presentation. The antigen in virus infection initiated by the virus particle itself while the cytokine production and inflammatory mediators are due to the response to the putative antigen in question. The cell-mediated immunity is impaired as evidenced by low numbers of CD4 cells and a concomitant T-cell polarity with an imbalance of Th1/Th2 subsets toward Th2. Impaired humoral immunity on the other hand is evidenced by decreased IgA causing poor gut protection. Studies showing elevated brain specific antibodies in autism support an autoimmune mechanism. Viruses may initiate the process but the subsequent activation of cytokines is the damaging factor associated with autism. Virus specific antibodies associated with measles virus have been demonstrated in autistic subjects. Environmental exposure to mercury is believed to harm human health possibly through modulation of immune homeostasis. A mercury link with the immune system has been postulated due to the involvement of postnatal exposure to thimerosal, a preservative added in the MMR vaccines. The occupational hazard exposure to mercury causes edema in astrocytes and, at the molecular level, the CD95/Fas apoptotic signaling pathway is disrupted by Hg2+. Inflammatory mediators in autism usually involve activation of astrocytes and microglial cells. Proinflammatory chemokines (MCP-1 and TARC), and an anti-inflammatory and modulatory cytokine, TGF-beta1, are consistently

  11. immunologically mediated transfusional reactions Reacciones transfusionales mediadas inmunológicamente

    OpenAIRE

    Elkín Ferdinand Cardona Duque

    2001-01-01

    The potential complications of blood transfusion therapy are multiple but most of them occur only in patients requiring repeated transfusions. Risks associated with transfusion of a single unit of blood are low; however, they must be weighted against the benefits at the time each transfusion is ordered. Transfusion reactions can be classified as either immunologic or non-immunologic. Many immune reactions are caused by stimulation of antibody production by foreign alloantigens present on tran...

  12. Travel-related schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, filariasis, and toxocariasis: the risk of infection and the diagnostic relevance of blood eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonder Gerard J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study prospectively assessed the occurrence of clinical and subclinical schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, filariasis, and toxocariasis, and the screening value of eosinophilia in adult short-term travelers to helminth-endemic countries. Methods Visitors of a pre-travel health advice centre donated blood samples for serology and blood cell count before and after travel. Samples were tested for eosinophilia, and for antibodies against schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, filariasis, and toxocariasis. Previous infection was defined as seropositivity in pre- and post-travel samples. Recent infection was defined as a seroconversion. Symptoms of parasitic disease were recorded in a structured diary. Results Previous infection was found in 112 of 1207 subjects: schistosomiasis in 2.7%, strongyloidiasis in 2.4%, filariasis in 3.4%, and toxocariasis in 1.8%. Recent schistosomiasis was found in 0.51% of susceptible subjects at risk, strongyloidiasis in 0.25%, filariasis in 0.09%, and toxocariasis in 0.08%. The incidence rate per 1000 person-months was 6.4, 3.2, 1.1, and 1.1, respectively. Recent infections were largely contracted in Asia. The positive predictive value of eosinophilia for diagnosis was 15% for previous infection and 0% for recent infection. None of the symptoms studied had any positive predictive value. Conclusion The chance of infection with schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, filariasis, and toxocariasis during one short-term journey to an endemic area is low. However, previous stay leads to a cumulative risk of infection. Testing for eosinophilia appeared to be of no value in routine screening of asymptomatic travelers for the four helminthic infections. Findings need to be replicated in larger prospective studies.

  13. The immunology of tuberculosis: From bench to bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    DHEDA, Keertan; SCHWANDER, Stephan K.; ZHU, Bingdong; van ZYL-SMIT, Richard N.; ZHANG, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an international public health priority and kills almost two million people annually. TB is out of control in Africa due to increasing poverty and HIV coinfection, and drug-resistant TB threatens to destabilize TB control efforts in several regions of the world. Existing diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions for TB are suboptimal. Thus, new vaccines, immunotherapeutic interventions and diagnostic tools are urgently required to facilitate TB control efforts. An improved understanding of the immunopathogenesis of TB can facilitate the identification of correlates of immune protection, the design of effective vaccines, the rational selection of immunotherapeutic agents, the evaluation of new drug candidates, and drive the development of new immunodiagnostic tools. Here we review the immunology of TB with a focus on aspects that are clinically and therapeutically relevant. An immunologically orientated approach to tackling TB can only succeed with concurrent efforts to alleviate poverty and reduce the global burden of HIV. PMID:20415982

  14. Over-Expression of Dopamine D2 Receptor and Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel Genes in Drug-Naive Schizophrenic Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes as Potential Diagnostic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Zvara

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting nearly 1% of the human population. Current diagnosis of schizophrenia is based on complex clinical symptoms. The use of easily detectable peripheral molecular markers could substantially help the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies showed that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL express subtypes of D1 and D2 subclasses of dopamine receptors. Recently, dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3 was found to be over-expressed in schizophrenic PBL and proposed to be a diagnostic and follow-up marker for schizophrenia. In this study we screened PBL of 13 drug-naive/drug-free schizophrenic patients to identify additional markers of schizophrenia. One of the benefits of our study is the use of blood samples of non-medicated, drug-naive patients. This excludes the possibility that changes detected in gene expression levels might be attributed to the medication rather than to the disorder itself. Among others, genes for dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2 and the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.3 were found to be over-expressed in microarray analysis. Increased mRNA levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR using the SybrGreen method and dual labeled TaqMan probes. The use of both molecular markers allows a more rapid and precise prediction of schizophrenia and might help find the optimal medication for schizophrenic patients.

  15. Over-expression of dopamine D2 receptor and inwardly rectifying potassium channel genes in drug-naive schizophrenic peripheral blood lymphocytes as potential diagnostic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvara, Agnes; Szekeres, György; Janka, Zoltán; Kelemen, János Z; Cimmer, Csongor; Sántha, Miklós; Puskás, László G

    2005-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting nearly 1% of the human population. Current diagnosis of schizophrenia is based on complex clinical symptoms. The use of easily detectable peripheral molecular markers could substantially help the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies showed that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) express subtypes of D1 and D2 subclasses of dopamine receptors. Recently, dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3) was found to be over-expressed in schizophrenic PBL and proposed to be a diagnostic and follow-up marker for schizophrenia. In this study we screened PBL of 13 drug-naive/drug-free schizophrenic patients to identify additional markers of schizophrenia. One of the benefits of our study is the use of blood samples of non-medicated, drug-naive patients. This excludes the possibility that changes detected in gene expression levels might be attributed to the medication rather than to the disorder itself. Among others, genes for dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.3) were found to be over-expressed in microarray analysis. Increased mRNA levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) using the SybrGreen method and dual labeled TaqMan probes. The use of both molecular markers allows a more rapid and precise prediction of schizophrenia and might help find the optimal medication for schizophrenic patients.

  16. Evaluation of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 Genes in Peripheral Blood Cells of Breast Cancer Patients and Their Potential Use as Diagnostic and Prognostic Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Maria Cláudia de B; Perez, Matheus M; Azzalis, Ligia A; Sousa, Luiz Vinícius de A; Adami, Fernando; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Alves, Beatriz da C A

    2017-03-23

    Patients with breast cancer-the deadliest cancer among women-are at constant risk of developing metastasis. Oxidative stress and hypoxia are common feature of tumor cells that can proliferate even in a resultant metabolic acidosis. Despite the low extracellular pH, intracellular pH of tumor cells remains relatively normal, or even more alkaline due to the action of a membrane protein family known as monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). The objective of this study was to verify the diagnostic and prognostic value of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 in tumor and peripheral blood samples of patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapic treatment. Differential expression of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 obtained by qPCR was determined by 2(-ΔΔCq) method between biological samples (tumor and serial samples of peripheral) of patients (n = 125) and healthy women (n = 25). tumor samples with higher histological grades have shown higher expression of these markers; this higher expression was also observed in blood samples obtained at diagnosis of patients when compared to healthy women and in patients with positive progression of the disease (metastasis development). markers studied here could be a promising strategy in routine laboratory evaluations as breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

  17. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a high...

  18. Increasing of Blood-Brain Tumor Barrier Permeability through Transcellular and Paracellular Pathways by Microbubble-Enhanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in a C6 Glioma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Liu, Heng; Du, Xuesong; Guo, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Shunan; Fang, Jingqin; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Most of the anticancer agents cannot be efficiently delivered into the brain tumor because of the existence of blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). The objective of this study was to explore the effect of microbubble-enhanced diagnostic ultrasound (MEUS) on the BTB permeability and the possible mechanism. Glioma-bearing rats were randomized into three groups as follows: the microbubble-enhanced continued diagnostic ultrasound (MECUS) group; the microbubble-enhanced intermittent diagnostic ultrasound (MEIUS) group and the control group. The gliomas were insonicated through the skull with a diagnostic ultrasound and injected with microbubbles through the tail veins. Evans Blue (EB) and dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI were used to test changes in the BTB permeability. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to observe the deposition of the EB in the tumor tissues. The distribution and expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) and calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa channels) were detected by a Western blot, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemical staining. In the MEUS groups, the EB extravasation (11.0 ± 2.2 μg/g in MECUS group and 17.9 ± 2.3 μg/g in MEIUS group) exhibited a significant increase compared with the control group (5.3 ± 0.9 μg/g). The MEIUS group had more EB extravasation than the MECUS group. The Ktrans value of the dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI in the MEUS groups was higher than that of the control group and correlated strongly with the EB extravasation in the tumor (R2 = 0.97). This showed that the Ktrans value might be a non-invasive method to evaluate the BTB permeability in rat glioma after microbubble-enhanced ultrasound treatment.Western blot, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining revealed that MEUS increased the KCa channels expression and reduced JAM-A expression in glioma. This change was more obvious in the MEIUS group than in the MECUS group. The results demonstrated that MEUS effectively increased the BTB permeability in

  19. IMMUNOLOGICAL FEATURES IN LIVER CIRRHOSIS INDUCED BY HEPATITIS B VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Urazova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A comparative analysis of immunological data was performed in the patients with HBV-induced liver cirrhosis, and in a group of patients with acute and chronic viral hepatitis B (AVHB, CVHB. Activation of B cell immune compartment (increase in CD22+ lymphocytes and IL4, circulating immune complexes in blood was demonstrated in patients with liver cirrhosis, being also associated with increased numbers of CD16+ lymphocytes and T-cell deficiency. It was revealed that the differences are most expressed upon comparison of immunologic data from the patients with liver cirrhosis, and AVHB followed by clearance of the virus. When comparing these groups, the differences in immunological state between the patients with liver cirrhosis and CVHB did not depend on the phase of viral replication or integration.

  20. Development of a preliminary diagnostic measure for bovine leukosis in dairy cows using peripheral white blood cell and lymphocyte counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    NISHIIKE, Masao; HAOKA, Michiyo; DOI, Takashi; KOHDA, Tomoko; MUKAMOTO, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the association between antibodies against bovine leukemia virus (BLV), BLV proviral load, and white blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte counts was performed with 774 dairy cows. The average age, WBC counts and lymphoid cell counts tended to be higher in BLV antibody-positive cows than in antibody-negative cows. There was a similar trend in levels of proviral DNA. We analyzed age, WBC counts and lymphocyte counts by principal component analyses to create a distribution chart of the principle component scores. Using the chart, we categorized cows into four quadrants based on additional information, such as the presence of antibody and the levels of proviral DNA. Antibody-positive cows and cows with high BLV proviral load were found mostly in one quadrant of the chart, indicating that it is possible to predict the risk of infection without any knowledge on antibody status by using information, such as WBC counts as a biomarker. When only antibody-positive cows were included in the analysis, a characteristic distribution of different levels of proviral DNA was seen in the quadrants, suggesting that it is possible to estimate the extent of bovine leukosis infection by using this analysis. For this analysis and categorization of the cows into quadrants, we computed a mathematical formulation using discriminant analysis based on age and WBC and lymphocyte counts. This mathematical formulation for the hematological preliminary diagnosis of the disease is recommended as a screening tool to monitor bovine leukosis. PMID:27064146

  1. Blood Gases Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... known as: Arterial Blood Gases; ABGs Formal name: Arterial Blood Gas Analysis Related tests: Electrolytes , Bicarbonate , BUN , Creatinine , Emergency and ... lives higher than sea level. Results from an arterial blood gas analysis are not diagnostic; they should be used in ...

  2. Immunological techniques in viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehermann, Barbara; Naoumov, Nikolai V

    2007-03-01

    The need to quantitate and monitor immune responses of large patient cohorts with standardized techniques is increasing due to the growing range of treatment options for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, the development of combination therapies, and candidate experimental vaccines for HCV. In addition, advances in immunological techniques have provided new tools for detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of cellular immune responses. At present, there is substantial variation in laboratory protocols, reagents, controls and analysis and presentation of results. Standardization of immunological assays would therefore allow better comparison of results amongst individual laboratories and patient cohorts. The EASL-sponsored and AASLD-endorsed Monothematic Conference on Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis was held at the University College London, United Kingdom, Oct 7-8, 2006 to bring together investigators with research experience in clinical immunology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections for in-depth discussion, critical evaluation and standardization of immunological assays. This report summarizes the information presented and discussed at the conference, but is not intended to represent a consensus statement. Our aim is to highlight topics and issues that were supported by general agreement and those that were controversial, as well as to provide suggestions for future work.

  3. Laboratory diagnosis of malaria by conventional peripheral blood smear examination with Quantitative Buffy Coat (QBC and Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDT - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhat Sandhya K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Rapid diagnosis is prerequisite for effective treatment and reducing mortality and morbidity of malaria. Microscopy has been the Gold standard for malaria diagnosis for decades. Recently, many new rapid diagnostic tests like Quantitative Buffy Coat (QBC examination and rapid antigen detection methods are being widely used. We made an attempt to compare peripheral smear, QBC and rapid antigen detection methods for the diagnosis of malaria. Materials and Methods: A total number of 500 samples were collected from patients presenting with classical symptoms of malaria. Thick and thin blood smears were prepared and stained with Leishman’s stain. QBC, Histidine Rich Protein-II antigen test and plasmodium Lactate Dehydrogenase tests were done using commercially available kits. Results: Taking thick smear as gold standard, thin smear had sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 90.9%, 100%, 100% and 98.6% respectively. QBC showed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 95.45%, 100%, 100% and 99.31% respectively. HRP-II antigen detection showed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 56.06%, 100%, 100% and 94.20%. pLDH showed sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 95.45%, 100%, 100% and 99.40% respectively. Conclusion: In our study, QBC had highest sensitivity followed by pLDH assay. Leishman’s stained thick smear is cost effective but requires technical expertise to interpret the results, so if facilities are available, QBC can be used for routine diagnosis. In places where facilities are not available rapid diagnostic test devices can be used, especially in endemic areas.

  4. Immunological and Psychological Benefits of Aromatherapy Massage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Kuriyama

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This preliminary investigation compares peripheral blood cell counts including red blood cells (RBCs, white blood cells (WBCs, neutrophils, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs, CD4+, CD8+ and CD16+ lymphocytes, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, hematocrit, humoral parameters including serum interferon-γ and interleukin-6, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA. Psychological measures including the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI questionnaire and the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS between recipients (n = 11 of carrier oil massage and aromatherapy massage, which includes sweet almond oil, lavender oil, cypress oil and sweet marjoram oil. Though both STAI and SDS showed a significant reduction (P 0.05 increase in PBLs, possibly due to an increase in CD8+ and CD16+ lymphocytes, which had significantly increased post-treatment (P < 0.01. Consequently, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio decreased significantly (P < 0.01. The paucity of such differences after carrier oil massage suggests that aromatherapy massage could be beneficial in disease states that require augmentation of CD8+ lymphocytes. While this study identifies the immunological benefits of aromatherapy massage, there is a need to validate the findings prospectively in a larger cohort of patients.

  5. Sarcoidosis: Immunopathogenesis and Immunological Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sheng Joshua Loke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder invariably affecting the lungs. It is a disease with noteworthy variations in clinical manifestation and disease outcome and has been described as an “immune paradox” with peripheral anergy despite exaggerated inflammation at disease sites. Despite extensive research, sarcoidosis remains a disease with undetermined aetiology. Current evidence supports the notion that the immune response in sarcoidosis is driven by a putative antigen in a genetically susceptible individual. Unfortunately, there currently exists no reliable biomarker to delineate the disease severity and prognosis. As such, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains a vexing clinical challenge. In this review, we outline the immunological features of sarcoidosis, discuss the evidence for and against various candidate etiological agents (infective and noninfective, describe the exhaled breath condensate, a novel method of identifying immunological biomarkers, and suggest other possible immunological biomarkers to better characterise the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of colour Doppler ultrasonography, CT angiography and blood-pool-enhanced MR angiography in assessing carotid stenosis: a comparative study with DSA in 170 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzidei, M; Napoli, A; Zaccagna, F; Di Paolo, P; Saba, L; Cavallo Marincola, B; Zini, C; Cartocci, G; Di Mare, L; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2012-02-01

    This study was undertaken to prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS), first-pass (FP) and steady-state (SS) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the carotid arteries using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference standard. A total of 170 patients with previous cerebrovascular events and suspected carotid artery stenoses underwent CDUS, blood-pool MRA, CTA and DSA. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for CDUS, FP MRA, SS MRA and CTA. The McNemar and Wilcoxon tests and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were used to determine significant differences (p<0.05) between the diagnostic performances of the four modalities, and the degree of stenosis was compared using linear regression. A total of 336 carotid bifurcations were studied. The area under the curve (AUC) for degree of stenosis was: CDUS 0.85±0.02, FP MRA 0.982±0.005, SS MRA 0.994±0.002 and CTA 0.997±0.001. AUC analysis showed no statistically significant difference between CTA and MRA (p=0.0174) and a statistically significant difference between CDUS and the other techniques (p<0.001). Plaque morphology analysis showed no significant difference between CTA and SS MRA; a significant difference was seen between CTA and SS MRA versus FP MRA (p=0.04) and CDUS (p=0.038). Plaque ulceration analysis showed a statistically significant difference between MRA and CTA (0.04< p<0.046) versus CDUS (p=0.019). CTA is the most accurate technique for evaluating carotid stenoses, with a slightly better performance than MRA (97% vs. 95% for SS MRA and 92% for FP MRA) and a greater accuracy than CDUS (97% vs. 76%). Blood-pool contrast-enhanced SS sequences offer improved evaluation of degree of stenosis and plaque morphology with accuracy substantially identical to CTA.

  7. Revisiting the white blood cell count: immature granulocytes count as a diagnostic marker to discriminate between SIRS and sepsis--a prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierhaus, Axel; Klatte, Stefanie; Linssen, Jo; Eismann, Nina M; Wichmann, Dominic; Hedke, Jörg; Braune, Stephan A; Kluge, Stefan

    2013-02-12

    Sepsis is a serious disease condition and a major cause of intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Its diagnosis in critically ill patients is complicated. To diagnose an infection rapidly, and to accurately differentiate systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) from sepsis, is challenging yet early diagnosis is vital for early induction of an appropriate therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the immature granulocyte (IG) count is a useful early diagnostic marker of sepsis compared to other markers. Therefore, a total of 70 consecutive surgical intensive care patients were assessed. IGs were measured from whole blood samples using an automated analyzer. C-reactive protein (CRP), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations were also determined. The observation period was a maximum of 21 days and ended with the patients' discharge from ICU or death. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted and area under the curve (AUC) was calculated to determine sensitivities and specificities for the parameters. We found that the IG count significantly discriminates between infected and non-infected patients (P SIRS onset. Regarding the discriminative power for infection, the IG count was more indicative than other clinical parameters such as CRP, LBP and IL-6, which had a sensitivity of less than 68%. Additionally, the highest diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) with 26.7 was calculated for the IG count within the first 48 hours. During the course of the disease ROC curve analyses showed a superior positive predictive value of the IG count compared to the other measured parameters during the first five days following the fulfillment of SIRS criteria. However, the number of IGs was not correlated with ICU mortality. The total number of IG in peripheral blood from ICU patients is a good marker to discriminate infected and non-infected patients very early during SIRS. However, the IG count is not suitable

  8. Diagnostic value of the APRI index for liver fibrosis in a Chinese patients population with chronic hepatitis C acquired from blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Chengduo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of various newly developed non-invasive fibrotic predictive models based on measurements of common biochemical indices in a group of ethnic Chinese patients with long-standing chronic hepatitis C (CHC infection acquired by transfusion. MethodsBetween July 2010 and June 2011, 120 of the monitored residents of Dingxi District of Gansu Province who had acquired hepatitis C infection via the regional practice of untested whole blood or plasma transfusion during the years of 1992-1995 were recruited for the current study. Each participant underwent liver biopsy for histological evaluation of liver fibrosis (S1-S4 progressive stages, from mild fibrosis to early cirrhosis. Each participant also provided serum samples for biochemical measurement of fibrotic indicators, including hyaluronic acid (HA, type Ⅲ procollagen protein (PCⅢ, laminin (LN, and type IV collagen (CⅣ. In addition, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, platelet count (PLT, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, prothrombin time (PT, and international normalized ratio (INR were measured to calculate the various non-invasive fibrotic predictive models: AST-to-PLT ratio index (APRI, the Sheth index (AST/ALT, the FibroQ index (10×[(age×AST×PT INR/(ALT×PLT], and the FIB-4 index ([age×AST/(PLT×ALT1/2]. Using the pathologic results as the reference standards, the diagnostic efficacies of these four non-invasive fibrotic predictive models were evaluated by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Accuracies of the four were compared by constructing receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and analyzing their sensitivities, specificities and area under the curves (AUCs. ResultsThe APRI, FibroQ and FIB-4 indexes, and the levels of PCⅢ, CⅣ, and HA increased in conjunction with progressive stages of liver fibrosis. However, only the APRI showed significant correlation to liver fibrosis stage (r=0.446, P<0.001. The APRI index also had

  9. [Clinical and immunological criteria of burn sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, I V; Pivovarova, L P; Krylov, K M; Filippova, O V; Il'ina, V A; Krylov, P K

    2005-01-01

    A hundred and twenty-nine victims aged 16 to 60 years who had skin burns in the area of 15 to 60% of the body surface without severe concomitant somatic disease (SAPS less than 9 scores). The clinical symptoms of a systemic inflammatory response (SIR) and the signs of wound infection were recorded in all the examinees. The victims underwent a comprehensive clinical and laboratory examination, 55 of them were immunologically studied over time (on admission, on days 3 and 10). To reveal the predictive clinical and immunological criteria for sepsis, the examinees were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 comprised 33 burnt persons who were observed to have the symptoms of SIR and the signs of burn wound infections without impaired function of organs and systems. Group 2 included 46 victims with severe sepsis and a good outcome of burn disease. Group 3 consisted of 50 patients who had died from severe sepsis. Analysis of the results of the study has indicated that the count of formed blood elements by calculating the leukocytic intoxication index, the estimation of the level of lysosomal cation proteins in the neutrophilic granulocytes, the detection of populations of T helper cells, cytotoxic lymphocytes, as well as histomorphological and bacteriological findings are early and valid criteria for the development of infectious complications. Their use for the diagnosis and prediction of sepsis permits initiation of its treatment at early stages, without awaiting the appearance of the signs of a septic process.

  10. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Orrin S; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    Recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for such 'crowdsourcing' efforts in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding opportunities, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real - it is time to jump in!

  11. MUC1体外转染脐带血DC疫苗抗乳腺肿瘤的免疫效应研究%Study on immunological effect of umbilical cord blood dendritic cell vaccine transfected by MUC1 in vitro on breast tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐贵颖; 张阳; 王英丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To research the immunological effect of umbilical cord blood dendritic cell (DC) vaccine transfected by MUC1 -VNTR gene in vitro on breast tumor. Methods: Human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes were abstracted, then umbilical cord blood dendritic cells were cultured, Iipofectamine 2000 cationic liposome method was used to transfect MUC1 - VNTR into umbilical cord blood dendritic cells, Western blot was used to detect the expression of MUC1 - VNTR gene; umbilical cord blood dendritic cells were cocul-tured with autologous T lymphocytes, MTT method was used to detect the cytotoxicity of cytotoxic lymphocytes sensitized by umbilical cord blood dendritic cells after transfection of MUC1 gene on breast cancer MCF -7 cell line; ELISA was used to detect its stimulating ability on IFN - γ secretion of T lymphocytes. Results: One special band with MUC1 - VNTR gene expression was detected by Western blot, the cytotoxicity of cytotoxic lymphocytes sensitized by umbilical cord blood dendritic cells after transfection of MUC1 - VNTR gene on breast cancer MCF -7 cell line with positive expression of MUC1 was statistically significantly stronger than that sensitized by simple umbilical cord blood dendritic cells (P < 0. 05) , and its stimulating ability on IFN - γ secretion of T lymphocytes was statistically significantly higher than sensitized by simple umbilical cord blood dendritic cells ( P < 0. 05) . Conclusion: Human umbilical cord blood dendritic cells transfected by MUC1 -VNTR gene can induce specific cytotoxic lymphocytes, produce effective cytotoxic effect targeting breast cancer MCF -7 cell line with positive expression of MUC1, and induce specific immunologic response of anti - breast cancer.%目的:研究人粘蛋白核心肽-连续重复序列(MUCl-VNTR)基因转染的脐血DC疫苗抗乳腺肿瘤的免疫效应.方法:提取人脐带血淋巴细胞,培养脐血树突状细胞(DCs),采用Lipofectamine2000阳离子脂质体法将MUC1-VNTR转染入

  12. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy coupled with a classification machine for the analysis of blood plasma or serum: a novel diagnostic approach for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Ketan; Trevisan, Júlio; Owens, Gemma; Keating, Patrick J; Wood, Nicholas J; Stringfellow, Helen F; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Martin, Francis L

    2013-07-21

    Currently available screening tests do not deliver the required sensitivity and specificity for accurate diagnosis of ovarian or endometrial cancer. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy of blood plasma or serum is a rapid, versatile, and relatively non-invasive approach which could characterize biomolecular alterations due to cancer and has potential to be utilized as a screening or diagnostic tool. In the past, no such approach has been investigated for its applicability in screening and/or diagnosis of gynaecological cancers. We set out to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform IR (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy coupled with a proposed classification machine could be applied to IR spectra obtained from plasma and serum for accurate class prediction (cancer vs. normal). Plasma and serum samples were obtained from ovarian cancer cases (n = 30), endometrial cancer cases (n = 30) and non-cancer controls (n = 30), and subjected to ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Four derived datasets were processed to estimate the real-world diagnosis of ovarian and endometrial cancer. Classification results for ovarian cancer were remarkable (up to 96.7%), whereas endometrial cancer was classified with a relatively high accuracy (up to 81.7%). The results from different combinations of feature extraction and classification methods, and also classifier ensembles, were compared. No single classification system performed best for all different datasets. This demonstrates the need for a framework that can accommodate a diverse set of analytical methods in order to be adaptable to different datasets. This pilot study suggests that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy of blood is a robust tool for accurate diagnosis, and carries the potential to be utilized as a screening test for ovarian cancer in primary care settings. The proposed classification machine is a powerful tool which could be applied to classify the vibrational spectroscopy data of different biological systems (e.g., tissue, urine, saliva

  13. Immunological effects of adalimumab in rheumatoid arthritis: Results of a Russian national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Evgenyevich Karateev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A reduction in immunological parameters during therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA can yield new data on the mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action and be of great practical importance since this allows judgment of the depth of impact on the immunological process and therefore may be regarded as one of the components of improvement and remission. Objective: to study the effect of the tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-а inhibitor adalimumab (ADA on a number of key immunological parameters in RA. Subjects and methods. The study included 100 patients (11 men and 89 women diagnosed with RA from 5 research centers. The patients were observed to have high RA activity: at baseline, DAS28 6.22+0.84 scores; C-reactive protein (CRP 37.1+34.7 mg/l. The mean number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used by a patient in the history was 2.1. During 24-week treatment, the patients took ADA in a subcutaneous dose of 40 mg every 2 weeks both alone and in combination with DMARDs. The time course of changes in the serum levels of CRP, IGM rheumatoid factor (RF and in the concentration of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide 2 (anti-CCP2 antibodies was determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA using the Axis-Shield Diagnostics commercial kits (United Kingdom. The levels of TNF-a, interleukin (IL 6, 12, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3 were measured in pg/ml by EIA using the Bender MedSystems commercial kits (USA according to the manufacturer's directions. Results. During ADA therapy, there was a rapid reduction in the level of CRP from 34.3 to 11.317.2 mg/l following 2 weeks (p<0.001, which thereafter remained low (11.9 mg/l, with some fluctuations, until week 24 of the study. There was a significant reduction in blood RF levels from 169.24 to 111.97 at 24 weeks (p<0.001. After 12 weeks of ADA treatment, there was virtually a two-fold decrease in IL-6 content from 8.87 to 4.87 pg/ml and later on to 4.03 pg/ml at week 24 (p>0,05. The mean levels of anti-CCP2

  14. The Immunological Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca A. R. Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs are chronic ailments, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis being the most important. These diseases present an inflammatory profile and they differ according to pathophysiology, the affected area in the gastrointestinal tract, and the depth of the inflammation in the intestinal wall. The immune characteristics of IBD arise from abnormal responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. The number of Th17 cells increases in the peripheral blood of IBD patients, while Treg cells decrease, suggesting that the Th17/Treg proportion plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation. The purpose of this review was to determine the current state of knowledge on the immunological basis of IBD. Many studies have shown the need for further explanation of the development and maintenance of the inflammatory process.

  15. Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns, In Vitro Production of Virulence Factors, and Evaluation of Diagnostic Modalities for the Speciation of Pathogenic Candida from Blood Stream Infections and Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Tellapragada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. have emerged as successful pathogens in both invasive and mucosal infections. Varied virulence factors and growing resistance to antifungal agents have contributed to their pathogenicity. We studied diagnostic accuracy of HiCrome Candida Differential Agar and Vitek 2 Compact system for identification of Candida spp. in comparison with species-specific PCR on 110 clinical isolates of Candida from blood stream infections (54, 49% and vulvovaginal candidiasis (56, 51%. C. albicans (61% was the leading pathogen in VVC, while C. tropicalis (46% was prominent among BSIs. HiCrome Agar and Vitek 2 Compact had good measures of agreement (κ 0.826 and 0.895, respectively, in comparison with PCR. We also tested these isolates for in vitro production of proteinase, esterase, phospholipases, and biofilms. Proteinase production was more among invasive isolates (P=0.017, while phospholipase production was more among noninvasive isolates (P=0.001. There was an overall increase in the production of virulence factors among non-albicans Candida. Identification of clinical isolates of Candida up to species level either by chromogenic agar or by Vitek 2 Compact system should be routinely done to choose appropriate therapy.

  16. Immunological aspects of Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. van Ouwerkerk (Marcel)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractAssuming an autoimmune interested to know whether apart from restoring the immunologic parameters. Freshly diagnosed hyperthyroid patients with Graves' disease were all similarly treated with MMI 10 mg t.i.d. and when euthyroidism was achieved, with substitution of thyroid hormone. At

  17. Immunology and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, D M

    1978-10-01

    This article has attempted to review evidence that suggests that immune factors may be operative in a small but significant number of infertile men. Although our current understanding of the possible processes by which autosensitization to previously sequestered reproductive antigens occurs is incomplete, there are laboratory assays presently available that give an indication, but do not prove, that immune factors may be contributing to the infertile state. Continued research is needed to develop new assays and more purified sperm antigens, which might enhance our knowledge of the underlying immunoreproductive changes. Until these are available, the following procedures should be considered when investigating a patient with infertility of suspected immune origin. The patient's history should be taken, and a physical examination should be performed. A complete blood count, urinalysis, and complete semen analysis and culture should be taken. Next, in vivo cervical tests (Sims-Huhner) are performed, followed by sperm antibody assessment (serum, semen) and perhaps in vitro cervical mucus sperm assays (especially the crossed hostility test). After the tests have been completed, the following possibe treatments exist: 1. Treatment of underlying infections 2. Correction of obstructions 3. Corticosteroid (or testosterone?) therapy 4. Washed sperm insemination 5. First portion of fresh ejaculate insemination 6. Artificial insemination with homologous donor 7. Adoption.

  18. Diagnostic examination performance by using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3-T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and brain metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Orheim, Tone E.D. [Oslo University Hospital, Interventional Centre, Oslo (Norway); Graff, Bjoern A. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Josefsen, Roger [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo (Norway); Kumar, Theresa [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Pathology, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-05-15

    Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has limited capacity to differentiate between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and metastasis. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and blood flow (CBF) in the distinction of metastasis from GBM using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MRI), and (2) to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion and permeability MR imaging. A prospective study of 61 patients (40 GBMs and 21 metastases) was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI. Normalized rCBV and rCBF from tumoral (rCBVt, rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe, rCBFe), and by dividing the value in the tumor by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e, rCBFt/e), as well as MVL were calculated. Hemodynamic and histopathologic variables were analyzed statistically and Spearman/Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed for each of the variables. The rCBVe, rCBFe, and MVL were significantly greater in GBMs compared with those of metastases. The optimal cutoff value for differentiating GBM from metastasis was 0.80 which implies a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 86%, and a negative predictive value of 97% for rCBVe ratio. We found a modest correlation between rCBVt and rCBFt ratios. MVL measurements in GBMs are significantly higher than those in metastases. Statistically, both rCBVe, rCBVt/e and rCBFe, rCBFt/e were useful in differentiating between GBMs and metastases, supporting the hypothesis that perfusion MR imaging can detect infiltration of tumor cells in the peri-enhancing region. (orig.)

  19. Measurements of diagnostic examination performance and correlation analysis using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in glial tumor grading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Graff, Bjoern A. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Orheim, Tone E.D.; Gadmar, Oeystein B. [Oslo University Hospital, Interventional Centre, Oslo (Norway); Schellhorn, Till [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Josefsen, Roger [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-06-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood flow (CBF) values derived from dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MR imaging) for grading of cerebral glial tumors, and to estimate the correlation between vascular permeability/perfusion parameters and tumor grades. A prospective study of 79 patients with cerebral glial tumors underwent DSC-MR imaging. Normalized relative CBV (rCBV) and relative CBF (rCBF) from tumoral (rCBVt and rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe and rCBFe), and the value in the tumor divided by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e and rCBFt/e), as well as MVL, expressed as the leakage coefficient K{sub 2} were calculated. Hemodynamic variables and tumor grades were analyzed statistically and with Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were also performed for each of the variables. The differences in rCBVt and the maximum MVL (MVL{sub max}) values were statistically significant among all tumor grades. Correlation analysis using Pearson was as follows: rCBVt and tumor grade, r = 0.774; rCBFt and tumor grade, r = 0.417; MVL{sub max} and tumor grade, r = 0.559; MVL{sub max} and rCBVt, r = 0.440; MVL{sub max} and rCBFt, r = 0.192; and rCBVt and rCBFt, r = 0.605. According to ROC analyses for distinguishing tumor grade, rCBVt showed the largest areas under ROC curve (AUC), except for grade III from IV. Both rCBVt and MVL{sub max} showed good discriminative power in distinguishing all tumor grades. rCBVt correlated strongly with tumor grade; the correlation between MVL{sub max} and tumor grade was moderate. (orig.)

  20. A new era in veterinary immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliwell, R.E.W.; Goudswaard, J.

    The importance of the creation of a new international journal of “Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology” is apparent following the emergence of veterinary immunology as an identifiable discipline and the vital part played by investigations of animal models of immunological diseases of

  1. A new era in veterinary immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliwell, R.E.W.; Goudswaard, J.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of the creation of a new international journal of “Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology” is apparent following the emergence of veterinary immunology as an identifiable discipline and the vital part played by investigations of animal models of immunological diseases of man. The

  2. Immunological and molecular diagnostic methods for detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... vitamins and minerals which have fuelled its usage for human consumption and ... of cowpea (Ife brown and Nigeria B7) inoculated with. Blackeye cowpea .... A biotin/streptavin ELISA was found to be more sensitive than a ...

  3. [The time course of changes in cell immunological parameters during administration of live dry plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacheva, N V; Darmov, I V; Borisevich, I V; Kriuchkov, A V; Pechenkin, D V

    2009-08-01

    The study of the time course of changes in cell immunological parameters by a magnetic separation technique in human beings during the administration of plague vaccine in relation to the immunological load revealed the higher blood levels of all T lymphocyte subpopulations on day 14 after vaccination. These changes are most typical of a primary vaccinated cohort. The increased frequency of plague vaccine administration and multiple immunizations with live plague, anthrax, and tularemia vaccines produce the time-course of changes in T lymphocyte populations (subpopulations) in response to the regular administration of plague vaccine. A high immunological load in man also promotes a significant reduction in the level of B lymphocytes.

  4. [Immunological reactivity of rats exposed on the Kosmos-605 and 690 biosatellites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A A; Shvets, V N

    1979-01-01

    Immunological reactivity of rats flown aboard the biosatellites Cosmos-605 and Cosmos-690 was compared with respect to the complementary activity of serum and frequency antibodies to sheep red blood cells. Cosmos-605 rats showed changes that rapidly returned to the normal whereas Cosmos-690 rats irradiated inflight with a dose of 800 rad exhibited significant and stable changes in immunological reactivity. Those latter seemed to be associated with the combined effect of ionizing radiation and other space flight factors.

  5. Light and immune systems: activation of immunological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Light has been used to treat diseases for hundreds of years. Convenient and powerful light sources such as lasers make photomedicine a major branch in diseases treatment and detection. Originally, light was often used for local treatment, using photomechanical, photochemical, photothermal reactions and photomodulation as the major mechanisms. More and more investigators have become interested in the systemic effects of light, particularly in its effects on immune systems. Much work has been done to activate and/or enhance the host immune system to combat cancer, either using light as a direct tool or as an adjuvant method. Light has long been used for assisting disease detection and diagnosis. Advances in light technology have made photo-diagnostics ever more precise spatially and temporally. Many techniques facilitate observation of bio-molecule interactions and other biological processes at the cellular level, hence providing opportunities to detect and monitor immune activities. This manuscript will review recent photo-immunological research in treatment of cancer. The recent development of combination therapies involving lasers will be presented. Specifically, the results of cancer treatment using laser photothermal interaction, either with or without additional immunological stimulation will be discussed. The immunological effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), and of its combination with immunotherapy in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Much interest has been recently concentrated in the immunological responses after laser treatment. Such responses at cellular and molecular levels will be discussed. The effect of these treatment modalities on the distant metastases also showed promise of light induced antitumor immunity. The combination therapy and induced immunological responses appear to be the key for long-term control of tumors.

  6. Diagnóstico del Síndrome de Burnout en trabajadores del Centro de Inmunología y Biopreparados Diagnostic of burnout Syndrome in Workers at inmunology and blood by products center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Rosales Ricardo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio transversal entre marzo y abril de 2011 con 40 trabajadores del Centro de Inmunología y Biopreparados de Holguín a los cuales se les aplicó la encuesta de Maslach Burnout Inventory con el objetivo de diagnosticar el Síndrome de Burnout en esta población. De la muestra analizada, ocho trabajadores fueron diagnosticados con Síndrome de Burnout, de estos, cuatro con una evaluación de medio y cuatro con alto, representando el 20% del total. El Síndrome de Burnout fue más frecuente en mujeres, trabajadoras de oficina de nivel superior y medio superior entre los 26 y los 52 años de edad. La aplicación de la herramienta de Maslach permitió diagnosticar el Síndrome de Burnout en los trabajadores de esta entidad entre trabajador de oficina y de producción y servirá como base para la toma de decisiones administrativas en aras de mejorar la calidad del principal recurso de una empresa: el hombre.A transversal study was carried out between March and April 2011, with 40 workers of the Immunology and Blood Products Center in Holguín, to whom we applied the Maslach Burnout Inventory Test to determinate Burnout Syndrome. Eight of these workers were diagnosed with Burnout Syndrome, 4 of which had a medium evaluation and 4 which had a high evaluation, representing 20% of the total. Women had more Burnout Syndrome than men and were office workers with medium-high school, between 26 and 52 years old. The application of this test allowed us to diagnose the Burnout Syndrome in office and production workers of the Immunology and Blood Products Center in Holguin. This tool will be useful in management decisions to improve the quality of life the company's main resource: the human being.

  7. Immunology for the toxicologic pathologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    The immune system functions primarily as a defense mechanism to provide protective immunity against microbial pathogens and cancer. The resulting protective responses occur through the complex interaction of tissues, cells, proteins, and molecular pathways that act in concert with other systems (e.g., nervous and endocrine) to provide the host with immunologic responses that cause pathologic processes seen primarily as inflammatory reactions. The pathologic responses can be attributed to either normal responses to infectious organisms and cancer cells, misdirected responses as in the case of hypersensitivity or autoimmune diseases, or deficient responses attributable to deficiencies or defects in components of the immune system. Pathologists need to have a basic understanding of the immune system to not only interpret findings as to their likely pathogenesis, but also to predict when the immune system may be a potential target. This review will be limited to a general overview of the basic immunologic responses and primary components involved.

  8. Mucosal Immunology of HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the immunology, pathogenesis, and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continue to reveal clues to the mechanisms involved in the progressive immunodeficiency attributed to infection but more importantly have shed light on the correlates of immunity to infection and disease progression. HIV selectively infects, eliminates, and/or dysregulates several key cells of the human immune system, thwarting multiple arms of the host immune response, and inflicti...

  9. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  10. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy.

  11. A prospect on cancer immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H

    1979-11-01

    There are several factors involved in studying cancer immunology. For convenience, those factors can be consolidated into two. Firstly, no definite tumor-specific or -associated antigen has been ascertained as yet, except for certain types of tumor. Secondly, there is no definite pattern of immune response of the host against weak antigenic tumor cells. Nobody knows as to what is the nature of the tumor-specific antigen even if it exists, and nobody knows the escape mechanism of tumor cells from the immune defence of the host. There have been a number of approaches for cancer immunotherapy, but so far there has been no definite answer as to whether immunotherapy is a promising approach for cancer treatment. In this review, cancer immunology is divided into three separate subjects. The first of these is tumor antigen; the second, the immune response against tumor antigen; and the third, methods of attacking tumor cells by immunological means including how to increase the antigenicity of tumor cells (xenogenization), and how to increase the immune response of the host (immunotherapy).

  12. Immunological changes following protein losing enteropathy after surgery total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) by cytomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsi, József; Lenz, Dominik; Mittag, Anja; Sauer, Ursula; Wild, Lena; Hess, John; Schranz, Dietmar; Hambsch, Jörg; Schneider, Peter; Tárnok, Attila

    2008-02-01

    Complex immunophenotyping single-cell analysis are essential for systems biology and cytomics. The application of cytomics in immunology and cardiac research and diagnostics is very broad, ranging from the better understanding of the cardiovascular cell biology to the identification of heart function and immune consequences after surgery. TCPC or Fontan-type circulation is an accepted palliative surgery for patients with a functionally univentricular heart. Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), the enteric loss of proteins, is a potential late complication after TCPC surgery. PLE etiology is poorly understood, but immunological factors seem to play a role. This study was aimed to gain insight into immune phenotype alterations following post-TCPC PLE. Patients were studied during routine follow-up up to 5yrs after surgery, blood samples of TCPC patients without (n=21, age 6.8+/-2.6 years at surgery; mean+/-SD) and with manifest PLE (n=12, age 12.8+/- 4.5 years at sampling) and age matched healthy children (control, n=22, age 8.6+/-2.5 years) were collected. Routine laboratory, immune phenotype and serological parameters were determined. Following PLE the immune phenotype dramatically changed with signs of acute inflammation (increased neutrophil and monocyte count, CRP, IL-8). In contrast, lymphocyte count (NK-cells, αβTCR +CD4 +, αβTCR +CD8 + cells) decreased (p<0.001). The residual T-cells had elevated CD25 and CD69 expression. In PLE-patients unique cell populations with CD3 +αβ/γδTCR - and αβTCR +CD4 -8 - phenotype were present in increased frequencies. Our studies show dramatically altered leukocyte phenotype after PLE in TCPC patients. These alterations resemble to changes in autoimmune diseases. We conclude that autoimmune processes may play a role in etiology and pathophysiology of PLE.

  13. Blood Transcriptomics and Metabolomics for Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-31

    progress in human immunology , where transcriptomics of isolated cell populations provided necessary information [15–17]. Nonetheless, a review on “blood...databases are biased towards cancer , under- representing the immunology in white blood cells. Second, many path- ways are based on tissues other than blood...metabolomics in oncology: a review . Clin Cancer Res 2009;15. [52] Armitage EG. Metabolomics in cancer biomarker discovery: current trends and fu- ture

  14. Arthritis, eosinophilia, and autoimmune liver disease: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farani, Júlia Boechat; Albuquerque, Carolina Berzoini; de Oliveira, Juliano Machado; de Assis, Emílio Augusto Campos Pereira; de Oliveira Ayres Pinto, Eduardo; de Lacerda Bonfante, Herval

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic liver disease of unknown etiology. It is composed of immune-mediated liver injury and significant immunological aspects. Arthritis can be observed in patients with AIH before recognition of the disease, which can lead to a diagnostic challenge. Although there are few reported cases in literature, peripheral blood eosinophilia might also play a part in such diagnosis. We report an intriguing case of a 41-year-old man who presented to our service with arthritis and eosinophilia as initial manifestations and was eventually diagnosed with overlap syndrome: AIH and primary sclerosing cholangitis. The present report aims to include eosinophilia among the clinical features of AIH, highlighting the possibility of its detection before the onset of either articular or hepatic disturbances.

  15. IMMUNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    5.1 Autoimmune disease2003029 A linkage study of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 gene and Graves’ disease in northern Chinese Han ethnic. JIN Ying ( 金迎 ), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Intern Med 2002; 41 (12): 809-812. Objective: To determine if the cytotoxic T lympho-

  16. IMMUNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    3.1 Autoimmune disease2004022 BL-2, IL-6 and their receptors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. QIAN Qihong (钱齐宏), et al. Dept Dermatol & Venereol, 1st Affili Hosp, Suzhou Univ, Suzhou 215006. Chin J Dermatol 2003; 36 (12): 696-698.

  17. IMMUNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    5.1 Autoimmune disease2004189 Serum levels of matrix metallopro-teinases-9 in patients with systemic lupus erythemato-sus. YIN Wenhao (殷文浩), et al. Dept Dermatol 2nd Affili Hosp, Med Sch Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310009. Chin J Dermatol 2004;37(2):77-79.Objective: To determine the serum levels of matrix

  18. [Fibrin(ogen degradation product concentration (SFP) as a diagnostic parameter for the differentiation of artifical and essential blood in cerebrospinal fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindersin, P; Heidrich, R

    1978-01-01

    The fibrin(ogen) degradation product concentration is another differential-diagnosis parameter for distinguishing between artificially blood-stained and essentially blood-stained CSF. Determination of the fibrin(ogen) degradation product concentration has been found to be a reliable method of recognizing natively and artificially blood-stained CSF as being different.

  19. Diagnostic opportunities for evaluation of the exposure of dairy cows to the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN): reliability of blood plasma, bile and follicular fluid as indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, J; Kersten, S; Meyer, U; Stinshoff, H; Locher, L; Rehage, J; Wrenzycki, C; Engelhardt, U H; Dänicke, S

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the usefulness of follicular fluid (FF) in relation to blood plasma and bile as indicators of exposure of dairy cows to ZEN, DON and their metabolites, a dose-response study was performed with 30 dairy cows. The cows, 10 in each group (named CON; FUS-50, FUS-100), received a diet with three different concentrations of Fusarium toxin-contaminated maize. Thereby, the following dietary concentration were reached: CON (0.02 mg ZEN and 0.07 mg DON, per kg dry matter, DM), FUS-50 (0.33 mg ZEN and 2.62 mg DON, per kg DM) and FUS-100 (0.66 mg ZEN and 5.24 mg DON, per kg DM). ZEN, DON and de-epoxy-DON (de-DON) were detected in FF. Based on the linear regression between toxin concentration in plasma and FF, it seems that about 50% (m = 0.5) of ZEN present in plasma is present in FF while an increase of 1 ng/ml DON or de-DON in plasma is paralleled by an increase of 1.5 ng/ml DON or 1.1 ng/ml de-DON in FF. ZEN, DON and their metabolites, except zearalenone (ZAN), were also detected in bile. Contrary to DON and de-DON, ZEN and its metabolites were accumulated in bile so that the concentration of ZEN and metabolites was much higher than for DON and de-DON. The main compound was β-zearalenol (β-ZEL). The biliary ZEN, α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) and β-ZEL concentration correlated linearly with each other with an uncertainty of <15% (r(2) ≥ 0.86), whereas the ratio between ZEN: α-ZEL: β-ZEL was about 1.5:1:11. With the help of established linear relationship between toxin intake and toxin concentration, bile could be used as diagnostic indicator to assess the exposure of cows. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Immunological aspects of cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate and adaptive immune systems make a crucial contribution to the antitumour effects of conventional chemotherapy-based and radiotherapy-based cancer treatments. Moreover, the molecular and cellular bases of the immunogenicity of cell death that is induced by cytotoxic agents are being progressively unravelled, challenging the guidelines that currently govern the development of anticancer drugs. Here, we review the immunological aspects of conventional cancer treatments and propose that future successes in the fight against cancer will rely on the development and clinical application of combined chemo- and immunotherapies.

  1. Confirmation studies of Soviet research on immunological effects of microwaves: Russian immunology results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Yury G; Grigoriev, Oleg A; Ivanov, Alexander A; Lyaginskaya, Antonina M; Merkulov, Anton V; Shagina, Natalia B; Maltsev, Vyacheslav N; Lévêque, Philippe; Ulanova, Alla M; Osipov, Vyacheslav A; Shafirkin, Alexander V

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a replication study performed to investigate earlier Soviet studies conducted between 1974 and 1991 that showed immunological and reproductive effects of long-term low-level exposure of rats to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. The early studies were used, in part, for developing exposure standards for the USSR population and thus it was necessary to confirm the Russian findings. In the present study, the conditions of RF exposure were made as similar as possible to those in the earlier experiments: Wistar rats were exposed in the far field to 2450 MHz continuous wave RF fields with an incident power density in the cages of 5 W/m² for 7 h/day, 5 days/week for a total of 30 days, resulting in a whole-body SAR of 0.16 W/kg. Effects of the exposure on immunological parameters in the brain and liver of rats were evaluated using the complement fixation test (CFT), as in the original studies, and an additional test, the more modern ELISA test. Our results, using CFT and ELISA, partly confirmed the findings of the early studies and indicated possible effects from non-thermal RF exposure on autoimmune processes. The RF exposure resulted in minor increases in formation of antibodies in brain tissue extract and the exposure did not appear to be pathological. In addition, a study was conducted to replicate a previous Soviet study on effects from the injection of blood serum from RF-exposed rats on pregnancy and foetal and offspring development of rats, using a similar animal model and protocol. Our results showed the same general trends as the earlier study, suggesting possible adverse effects of the blood serum from exposed rats on pregnancy and foetal development of intact rats, however, application of these results in developing exposure standards is limited.

  2. The immunology of smallpox vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2009-06-01

    In spite of the eradication of smallpox over 30 years ago; orthopox viruses such as smallpox and monkeypox remain serious public health threats both through the possibility of bioterrorism and the intentional release of smallpox and through natural outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases such as monkeypox. The eradication effort was largely made possible by the availability of an effective vaccine based on the immunologically cross-protective vaccinia virus. Although the concept of vaccination dates back to the late 1800s with Edward Jenner, it is only in the past decade that modern immunologic tools have been applied toward deciphering poxvirus immunity. Smallpox vaccines containing vaccinia virus elicit strong humoral and cellular immune responses that confer cross-protective immunity against variola virus for decades after immunization. Recent studies have focused on: establishing the longevity of poxvirus-specific immunity, defining key immune epitopes targeted by T and B cells, developing subunit-based vaccines, and developing genotypic and phenotypic immune response profiles that predict either vaccine response or adverse events following immunization.

  3. The microbiota: an exercise immunology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermon, Stéphane; Petriz, Bernardo; Kajėnienė, Alma; Prestes, Jonato; Castell, Lindy; Franco, Octavio L

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota consists of a cluster of microorganisms that produces several signaling molecules of a hormonal nature which are released into the blood stream and act at distal sites. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that microbiota may be modulated by several environmental conditions, including different exercise stimulus, as well some pathologies. Enriched bacterial diversity has also been associated with improved health status and alterations in immune system, making multiple connections between host and microbiota. Experimental evidence has shown that reduced levels and variations in the bacterial community are associated with health impairments, while increased microbiota diversity improves metabolic profile and immunological responses. So far, very few controlled studies have focused on the interactions between acute or chronic exercise and the gut microbiota. However, some preliminary experimental data obtained from animal studies or probiotics studies show some interesting results at the immune level, indicating that the microbiota also acts like an endocrine organ and is sensitive to the homeostatic and physiological changes associated with exercise. Thus, our review intends to shed some light on the interaction between gut microbiota, exercise and immunomodulation.

  4. Immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia de Vasconcellos Machado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bone marrow is the main source, mesenchymal stem cells have already been isolated from various other tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, adipose tissue, peripheral blood and dental pulp. These plastic adherent cells are morphologically similar to fibroblasts and have a high proliferative potential. This special group of cells possesses two essential characteristics: self-renewal and differentiation, with appropriate stimuli, into various cell types. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered immunologically privileged, since they do not express costimulatory molecules, required for complete T cell activation, on their surface. Several studies have shown that these cells exert an immunosuppressive effect on cells from both innate and acquired immunity systems. Mesenchymal stem cells can regulate the immune response in vitro by inhibiting the maturation of dendritic cells, as well as by suppressing the proliferation and function of T and B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. These special properties of mesenchymal stem cells make them a promising strategy in the treatment of immune mediated disorders, such as graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, as well as in regenerative medicine. The understanding of immune regulation mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells, and also those involved in the differentiation of these cells in various lineages is primordial for their successful and safe application in different areas of medicine.

  5. Immunology of the gastrointestinal tract and liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyworth, M.F.; Jones, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: T cells and Other Non-B Lymphocytes; Mucosal Mast Cells and IgE; Genetic Aspects of Gastrointestinal Immunology; Immunological Functions of the Liver; Lymphocyte Migration and Mucosal Immunity; and Immunoglobulin Circulation and Secretion.

  6. The cognitive paradigm and the immunological homunculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I R

    1992-12-01

    In last month's issue of Immunology Today, Irun Cohen discussed the inadequacies of the clonal selection paradigm and proposed a cognitive paradigm in which preformed internal images guide and restrict the process of clonal activation. Here he clarifies the nature of these internal images, during on concrete examples from the image of infection and the image of self, the immunological homunculus.

  7. Evolution and conservation of immunological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Vaz

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Paraphrasing what Gregory Bateson says on evolution, we might say that: "Immunology has long been badly taught. In particular, students - and even professional immunologists - acquire theories of immunological activity without any deep understanding of what problems these theories attempt to solve."

  8. Evolution and conservation of immunological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, N M

    2006-12-01

    Paraphrasing what Gregory Bateson says on evolution, we might say that: "Immunology has long been badly taught. In particular, students--and even professional immunologists--acquire theories of immunological activity without any deep understanding of what problems these theories attempt to solve."

  9. Immunological treatment of liver tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maurizio Chiriva-Internati; Fabio Grizzi; Cynthia A Jumper; Everardo Cobos; Paul L Hermonat; Eldo E Frezza

    2005-01-01

    Although multiple options for the treatment of liver tumors have often been described in the past, including liver resection, radiofrequency ablation with or without hepatic pump insertion, laparoscopic liver resection and the use of chemotherapy, the potential of immunotherapy and gene manipulation is still largely unexplored.Immunological therapy by gene manipulation is based on the interaction between virus-based gene delivery systems and dendritic cells. Using viruses as vectors, it is possible to transduce dendritic cells with genes encoding tumor-associated antigens, thus inducing strong humoral and cellular immunity against the antigens themselves.Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have the disadvantage of destroying healthy cells, thus causing severe side-effects. We need more precisely targeted therapies capable of killing cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. Our goal is to establish a new treatment for solid liver tumors based on the concept of cytoreduction,and propose an innovative algorithm.

  10. Immunological treatments for occupational allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellaro, M; Senna, G; Marcer, G; Passalacqua, G

    2013-01-01

    Although avoidance of occupational triggers remains the primary step in the management of work-related allergies, immunological treatments (including biological agents and specific immunotherapy) can be regarded as potential therapeutic options for IgE-mediated diseases; for example, many studies with allergen-specific immunotherapy have been carried out on latex allergy, showing overall favorable results, at least with sublingual immunotherapy. On the other hand, only few case reports have suggested the efficacy of immunotherapy in baker's asthma as well as in laboratory animal-induced asthma. The new technologies, including component-resolved diagnosis and recombinant allergens, are expected to improve the quality and efficacy of specific immunotherapy in the future. Also the use of omalizumab may represent a suitable therapeutic choice in very selected cases of occupational allergy, as well as an approach to reduce side effects of venom immunotherapy in subjects with previous severe reactions to the treatment.

  11. Distribution of certain drug products by registered blood establishments and comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic treatment centers that qualify as health care entities; Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements and administrative procedures. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-09

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations to allow certain registered blood establishments and comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic treatment centers that are also health care entities to distribute certain drug products. The final rule amends limited provisions of the regulations implementing the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA). These regulations, among other things, restrict the sale, purchase, or trade of, or the offer to sell, purchase, or trade, prescription drugs purchased by hospitals and other health care entities.

  12. [The screening assessment indices of body immunological reactivity in young people living in the Donetsk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raksha-Sliusareva, E A; Kharkovenko, N M; Borysova, E V

    1996-01-01

    Pupils from the mining-trade secondary schools aged, 17-18 from different towns of Donbass were examined for the state of immunologic reactivity, as evidenced by the peripheral blood content of leucocytes, level of Igs A, M, G, as well as cytotoxicity of blood plasma. The results obtained suggest weakening of immunological reactivity in the examined populations, with the degree of the immunological reactivity impairement being higher in Donetsk as compared with more clean ecological zone Selidovo, which fact suggests a negative influence the complex of harmful environmental factors has on human organism. The above age group warrants further study; there is also the need to devise approaches toward immunocorrecting therapy for such contingents.

  13. What is happening? The evolving role of the blood bank in the management of the bleeding patient: The impact of TEG as an early diagnostic predictor for bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Aurora; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding and treatment of coagulopathy, the management of the bleeding patient remains as a major challenge. Traditionally, the main task of the blood bank has been to guarantee the supply of high quality blood and blood components/products to the hospital. Decisions regarding the use of blood components have always been the clinicians' responsibility, with little active involvement of the transfusion service. In the last years, many hospitals have implemented the use of "acute transfusion packages" for massively bleeding patients and point-of-care (POC) instruments such as TEG and RoTEM for monitoring coagulation status in this patient group. This, in addition to the implementation of patient blood management programs in the hospitals, has led to an increasing involvement of transfusion medicine specialists in transfusion decision making, especially regarding strategies for monitoring and treatment of the massively bleeding patient. This new trend may contribute to a more optimal management and monitoring of the bleeding patient, as POC testing may be used as an early predictor for blood usage. The blood bank should optimise the use of POC testing to provide accurate information in a cost-effective way.

  14. Hematology and immunology studies - The second manned Skylab mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Johnson, P. C.; Ritzman, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    The hematologic and immunologic functions of the Skylab 3 astronauts were monitored during the preflight, inflight, and postflight phases of the mission. Plasma protein profiles showed high consistency in all phases. A transient suppression of lymphocyte responsiveness was observed postflight. A reduction in the circulating blood volume due to drops in both the plasma volume and red cell mass was found. The loss of red cell mass is most likely a suppressed erythrypoiesis. The functional integrity of the circulating red cells did not appear to be compromised in the course of flight.

  15. Immunological disturbance in West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha C. B. Montelli

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated and humoral immunity were investigated in 18 patients with West syndrome, 12 with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and 19 healthy controls. The study included determination of Ô and  peripheral blood lymphocytes, serum levels of IgG, IgA and IgM, skin sensibilization with DNCB, intracutaneous PHA, leucocyte migration inhibition test and lymphocyte blastic transformation in the presence of PHA. Cell-mediated deficiency was detected in 28 children whereas low levels of immunoglobulins were observed only in 6 children. Immunological disturbances were more prominent in children with West syndrome.

  16. [Immunologic disorders in pathogenesis of chronic generalized parodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volozhin, A I; Poriadin, G V; Kazimiski, T I; Barer, G M; Askerova, S Sh; Salmasi, Zh M

    2005-01-01

    Systemic immunity was studied in patients with chronic generalized parodontitis. This group of patients had distinct changes in immunologic system: depression of T- and stimulation of B-cellular immunity without accumulation of plasma cells and initiation of effective humoral response. Increased peripheral blood number of lymphocytes expressing induction of apoptosis CD95 receptors and ligand for this receptor CD95L (Fas-L) can lead to intensification of lymphocyte apoptosis and may be the reason for T-cell deficit development. The results of the study confirm the important role of immune system disturbances in pathogenesis of chronic generalized parodontitis.

  17. Immunological evaluation of the new stable ultrasound contrast agent LK565: a phase one clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wild P

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs allow the enhancement of vascular definition, thereby providing more diagnostic information. LK565 is a new second-generation UCA based on synthetic polymers of aspartic acid which is eliminated from the blood stream via phagocytosis. LK565 forms very stable air-filled microspheres and is capable of repeated passage through the pulmonary capillary bed after peripheral intravenous injection. This characteristic allows examination of the cardiac function or extracardiac vessel abnormalities up to 15 minutes. Methods A phase one clinical study was conducted on 15 healthy volunteers to identify the development of an undesirable immune response. Phagocytosis capacity, TNF-α secretion, and MHC class II upregulation of monocytes was monitored, as well as microsphere specific antibody development (IgM, IgG. Furthermore, the kinetics of the activation surface markers CD69, CD25, CD71, and CD11b on leukocytes were analyzed. Results Due to LK565-metabolism the administration of the UCA led to saturation of phagocytes which was reversible after 24 hrs. Compared to positive controls neither significant TNF-α elevation, neither MHC class II and activation surface markers upregulation, nor specific antibody development was detectable. Conclusion The administration of LK565 provides a comfortable duration of signal enhancement, esp. in echocardiography, without causing a major activation cascade or triggering an adaptive immune response. To minimize the risk of undesirable adverse events such as anaphylactoid reactions, immunological studies should be included in clinical trials for new UCAs. The use of LK565 as another new ultrasound contrast agent should be encouraged as a safe means to provide additional diagnostic information.

  18. Performance of rapid diagnostic test, blood-film microscopy and PCR for the diagnosis of malaria infection among febrile children from Korogwe District, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahende, Coline; Ngasala, Billy; Lusingu, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) and light microscopy are still recommended for diagnosis to guide the clinical management of malaria despite difficult challenges in rural settings. The performance of these tests may be affected by several factors, including malaria prevalence and intensi...

  19. IMMUNOLOGIC CHARACTER OF TUMOR INFILTRATING LYMPHOCYTES IN OVARIAN CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study immunologic character of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) on post in vitro expansion in ovarian carcinoma, and evaluate the prospects by adopting TIL treatment of ovarian carcinoma at an advanced stage. Methods: Cellular phenotype changes in TIL were analyzed by flow cytometry. By means of molecular biology and immunologic methods, ability to secrete cytokines and anti-tumor activities of in TIL was studied. Results: Difference of cellular phenotypes in TIL was probably related to the type, feature and resource of the tumor. TIL obtained from phoroplast and parenchyma was dominant in CD3+CD4+. TIL obtained from tumor tissues, around microvessels and ascitic fluid was dominant in CD3+CD8+. Concentration of rIL-2 in vitro played a significant role in immunologic character of TIL. By means of rIL-2 expansion in vitro, TIL has apparently been improved in competence of secreting some cytokines, such as IL-2, TNF-a , IFN-g , and anti-tumor activities.The activated TIL was more stimulated by further adding anti-CD3 or PHA (suitable concentration), which significantly increased its ability to secrete cytokines. Treatment with TIL+CTX or TIL+ rIL-2, could apparently improve phenotypes in peripheral blood of patients, with definitive effects. Conclusion: Immunologic activities of TIL in vitro are apparently improved by rIL2 expansion. Regression of tumor, by means of infusion TIL, is not largely attributed to direct cytotoxicity to tumor cells, but indirectly and partly augmenting cellular activities and abilities of immunomodulation in patients with ovarian carcinoma being dependent on secreting multiple cytokines.

  20. Birth of the science of immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstieg, Frank C; Goldman, Armond S

    2010-05-01

    The science of immunology emerged in the last of the 19th and the first of the 20th century. Substantial progress in physics, chemistry and microbiology was essential for its development. Indeed, microorganisms became one of the principal investigative tools of the major founders of that science - Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, Ilya Ilich Metchnikoff, Paul Ehrlich and Jules Bordet. It is pertinent that these pioneering scientists were born when questioning and exploration were encouraged because of the legacies of the previous century of enlightenment. Mentors greatly aided their development. Their discoveries were shaped by their individual personalities. In turn they developed other contributors to the nascent field. Their discoveries included the types of leukocytes, the roles of neutrophils in inflammation and defence, cellular lysis due to complement, the principles of humoral and cellular immunology, passive and active immunization, tissue antigens, anaphylaxis, anaphylactoid reactions and autoimmunity. Their work formed the basis of modern immunology that developed many decades later. Immunology has enormously impacted our understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of infections, immune-mediated disorders and inflammation. Burgeoning advances forecast further important clinical applications of immunology. Yet, their applications will be problematic because few physicians sufficiently understand the science. We propose that understanding modern immunology requires a grasp of how that science developed - who made the discoveries, how they were made, their successes and failures, their interactions and debates all reveal the foundation of modern immunology.

  1. The 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunney, Joan K; Kai, Chieko; Inumaru, Shigeki; Onodera, Takashi

    2012-07-15

    This special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune systems of numerous food animals and wildlife, probing basic immunity and the influence of stress, genetics, nutrition, endocrinology and reproduction. Major presentations addressed defense against pathogens and alternative control and prevention strategies including vaccines, adjuvants and novel biotherapeutics. A special Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Co-operative Research Programme Sponsored Conference on "Vaccination and Diagnosis for Food Safety in Agriculture" highlighted the particular issue of "Immunology in Bovine Paratuberculosis". In April 2010 there was an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the southern part of Japan. This stimulated a special 9th IVIS session on FMD, sponsored by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) of Japan, to discuss improvements of FMD vaccines, their use in FMD control, and risk assessment for decision management. The 9th IVIS was supported by the Veterinary Immunology Committee (VIC) of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) and included workshops for its MHC and Toolkit Committees. Finally VIC IUIS presented its 2010 Distinguished Service Award to Dr. Kazuya Yamanouchi for "outstanding contributions to the veterinary immunology community" and its 2010 Distinguished Veterinary Immunologist Award to Dr. Douglas F. Antczak for "outstanding research on equine immunology".

  2. Validation of cytogenetic risk groups according to International Prognostic Scoring Systems by peripheral blood CD34+FISH: results from a German diagnostic study in comparison with an international control group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braulke, Friederike; Platzbecker, Uwe; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Götze, Katharina; Germing, Ulrich; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Nolte, Florian; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A. N.; Lübbert, Michael; Greenberg, Peter L.; Bennett, John M.; Solé, Francesc; Mallo, Mar; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Tüchler, Heinz; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Shirneshan, Katayoon; Aul, Carlo; Stauder, Reinhard; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Valent, Peter; Fonatsch, Christa; Trümper, Lorenz; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie

    2015-01-01

    International Prognostic Scoring Systems are used to determine the individual risk profile of myelodysplastic syndrome patients. For the assessment of International Prognostic Scoring Systems, an adequate chromosome banding analysis of the bone marrow is essential. Cytogenetic information is not available for a substantial number of patients (5%–20%) with dry marrow or an insufficient number of metaphase cells. For these patients, a valid risk classification is impossible. In the study presented here, the International Prognostic Scoring Systems were validated based on fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses using extended probe panels applied to cluster of differentiation 34 positive (CD34+) peripheral blood cells of 328 MDS patients of our prospective multicenter German diagnostic study and compared to chromosome banding results of 2902 previously published patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. For cytogenetic risk classification by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of CD34+ peripheral blood cells, the groups differed significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival by uni- and multivariate analyses without discrepancies between treated and untreated patients. Including cytogenetic data of fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of peripheral CD34+ blood cells (instead of bone marrow banding analysis) into the complete International Prognostic Scoring System assessment, the prognostic risk groups separated significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival. Our data show that a reliable stratification to the risk groups of the International Prognostic Scoring Systems is possible from peripheral blood in patients with missing chromosome banding analysis by using a comprehensive probe panel (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01355913). PMID:25344522

  3. Adrenaline-induced immunological changes are altered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kittner, JM; Jacobs, R; Pawlak, CR; Heijnen, CJ; Schedlowski, M; Schmidt, RE

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients the immunological changes induced by adrenaline are different from healthy controls (HC). Methods. Fifteen female RA patients and 14 HC were infused with 1 mug/kg adrenaline over 20 min. Blood was drawn before, immediately after

  4. Use of several immunological markers to model the probability of active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruccioli, Elisa; Navarra, Assunta; Petrone, Linda; Vanini, Valentina; Cuzzi, Gilda; Gualano, Gina; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Girardi, Enrico; Goletti, Delia

    2016-10-01

    Blood-based biomarkers tests are attractive alternative for diagnosing tuberculosis to assays depending on mycobacteria detection. Given several immunological markers we used logistic regression to model the probability of active tuberculosis in a cohort of patients with active or latent tuberculosis, showing an increased accuracy in distinguishing active from latent tuberculosis.

  5. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Gülfem; Bakirtas, Arzu; Sackesen, Cansin; Reisli, Ismail; Tuncer, Ayfer

    2011-06-01

    Allergic diseases constitute a significant health problem in Turkey. According to a recent multicenter study, which used the ISAAC questionnaire, the mean prevalence of wheezing, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in 10-yr-old school children during the past year was 15.8%, 23.5%, and 8.1%, respectively. A healthcare level system, regulated by Ministry of Health, is available in Turkey. Pediatric allergists and pediatric immunologists provide patient care at the tertiary level. Currently, 48 centers deliver care for allergic and immunologic diseases in children. There are 136 pediatric and 61 adult allergists/immunologists. Although the number of allergy/clinical immunology specialists is limited, these centers are capable of delivering many of the procedures required for the proper management and diagnosis of allergy/immunology. Pediatric allergy and/or immunology is a subspecialty lasting 3 yr and follows a 4-yr pediatric specialist training. Fellow training involves gaining knowledge in basic and clinical allergy and immunology as well as the performance and interpretation of laboratory procedures in the field of allergy and clinical immunology. The Turkish National Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (TNSACI) was officially established in 1989 and currently has 356 members. The society organizes a national congress annually and winter schools for fellowship training as well as training courses for patients and their relatives. TNSACI also has a strong representation in European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) and European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID) through its participation in the executive committee, consensus reports, and initiatives in the diagnosis of allergic and immunologic diseases of children. The 30th Congress of the EAACI is also due to be held in Istanbul, Turkey, between June 11 and 15, 2011.

  6. Direct molecular detection of pathogens in blood as specific rule-in diagnostic biomarker in patients with presumed sepsis: our experience on a heterogeneous cohort of patients with signs of infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Manuela; Diamante, Paola; Modolo, Maria Luisa; De Rosa, Rita; Stano, Paola; Camporese, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The practical value of blood cultures in the diagnosis of sepsis is impaired by a delay in the turnaround time to result and by the fact that blood culture positive can be found for only about 30% of these patients. Conventional laboratory signs of sepsis and acute phase protein biomarkers are sensitive and easy to use, but often also very nonspecific. Molecular diagnostic reflects currently the most promising avenue to decrease time to result and to influence decision making for antibiotic therapy in the septic host. In this study, we wish to highlight the impact of the LightCycler SeptiFast, a multipathogen probe-based real-time polymerase chain reaction, in the rapid etiological diagnosis of sepsis in patients with clinical and laboratory signs of bloodstream infections. We have evaluated prospectively 830 adult patients with suspected bloodstream infection and at least two criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In more than 50% of critically ill patients strongly suspected of having sepsis, we arrived to an etiological diagnosis only by the molecular method in a median time of 15 h, with specificity and predictive positive values of 96% and 94%, respectively. We highlight the role of DNAemia as time-critical, high-specificity, etiological, non-culture-based rule-in diagnostic biomarker in patients with presumed sepsis.

  7. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meenupriya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spongiform encephalopathies, categorized as a subclass of neuro-degenerative diseases and commonly known as prion diseases, are a group of progressive conditions that affect the brain and nervous system of many animals, including humans. Prion diseases are common among cannibalistic communities; further research has revealed that the infected or malformed prion protein (named PrPsc spreads its virulence to the normal, healthy prion protein (named PrPc when people consume infected tissues. Knowing that a small interaction between normal and infected prion protein creates virulence, this relationship can be studied as a simple antigen-antibody interaction to understand the series of events that transform a normal prion protein into a virulent misfolded protein. Thoroughly modeled and validated structures of both PrPsc and PrPc can be effectively used to map the epitopes and thereby screen the antigen-antibody interaction using docking studies for a particular organism of concern. This simple immunological approach is used to understand the vital interaction between the normal and malformed proteins that is involved in the disease-spreading mechanism. Clarification of this mechanism could be used in various immune- and bioinformatics algorithms to map the interaction epitopes, furthering an understanding of these pathologies.

  8. Immunology of the mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Miodrag

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammary gland is an organ of specific structure whose elementary task is to supply offspring with nutritive and other biologically active substances during the first weeks, or, depending on the species, the first months of life. This prolongs the period of close contact between the mother and her young, which is necessary for their regular growth. Most mammal offspring are born with physiological agammaglobulinaemia, because of the specific structure of the placenta, so that they receive the first specific protection against pathogenic microorganisms through colostrum. Furthermore, this gland is in direct contact with the outer environment through the secretary ducts, so that there are great possibilities for the occurrence of infections. It is therefore necessary to secure protective mechanisms which would prevent such infections. It is clear that there is a distinct connection between the immunological system and the mammary gland, and that link is the central topic of this paper. It presents the basic mechanisms of mammary gland defense which are divided into two categories: nonspecific (innate and specific immune response. The mammary gland secretion contains several types of leukocytes, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophiles, as well as 2% epithelial cells. On the average, there are 0.2 x 106 somatic cells in one mililiter of milk. Macrophages account for most of these (58%, as well as lymphocytes (28%, while a smaller number of somatic cells (12% are polymorphonuclears (PMN. The paper considers the characteristics and main functions of these cell types.

  9. Instructive selection and immunological theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederberg, Joshua

    2002-07-01

    The turning point of modern immunological theory was the advent of the clonal selection theory (Burnet, Talmage - 1957). A useful heuristic in the classification of theoretical models was the contrast of 'instructive' with 'selective' models of the acquisition of information by biological systems. The neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1940s had consolidated biologists' model of evolution based on prior random variation and natural selection, viz. differential fecundity. While evolution in the large was by then pretty well settled, controversy remained about examples of cellular adaptation to chemical challenges, like induced drug-resistance, enzyme formation and the antibody response. While instructive theories have been on the decline, some clear cut examples can be found of molecular imprinting in the abiotic world, leading, e.g. to the production of specific sorbents. Template-driven assembly, as in DNA synthesis, has remained a paradigm of instructive specification. Nevertheless, the classification may break down with more microscopic scrutiny of the processes of molecular fit of substrates with enzymes, of monomers to an elongating polymer chain, as the reactants often traverse a state space from with activated components are appropriately selected. The same process may be 'instructive' from a holistic, 'selective' from an atomic perspective.

  10. Immunology of Yersinia pestis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yujing

    2016-01-01

    As a pathogen of plague, Yersinia pestis caused three massive pandemics in history that killed hundreds of millions of people. Yersinia pestis is highly invasive, causing severe septicemia which, if untreated, is usually fatal to its host. To survive in the host and maintain a persistent infection, Yersinia pestis uses several stratagems to evade the innate and the adaptive immune responses. For example, infections with this organism are biphasic, involving an initial "noninflammatory" phase where bacterial replication occurs initially with little inflammation and following by extensive phagocyte influx, inflammatory cytokine production, and considerable tissue destruction, which is called "proinflammatory" phase. In contrast, the host also utilizes its immune system to eliminate the invading bacteria. Neutrophil and macrophage are the first defense against Yersinia pestis invading through phagocytosis and killing. Other innate immune cells also play different roles, such as dendritic cells which help to generate more T helper cells. After several days post infection, the adaptive immune response begins to provide organism-specific protection and has a long-lasting immunological memory. Thus, with the cooperation and collaboration of innate and acquired immunity, the bacterium may be eliminated from the host. The research of Yersinia pestis and host immune systems provides an important topic to understand pathogen-host interaction and consequently develop effective countermeasures.

  11. The immunological barriers to xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadori, M; Cozzi, E

    2015-10-01

    The availability of cells, tissues and organs from a non-human species such as the pig could, at least in theory, meet the demand of organs necessary for clinical transplantation. At this stage, the important goal of getting over the first year of survival has been reported for both cellular and solid organ xenotransplantation in relevant preclinical primate models. In addition, xenotransplantation is already in the clinic as shown by the broad use of animal-derived medical devices, such as bioprosthetic heart valves and biological materials used for surgical tissue repair. At this stage, however, prior to starting a wide-scale clinical application of xenotransplantation of viable cells and organs, the important obstacle represented by the humoral immune response will need to be overcome. Likewise, the barriers posed by the activation of the innate immune system and coagulative pathway will have to be controlled. As far as xenogeneic nonviable xenografts, increasing evidence suggests that considerable immune reactions, mediated by both innate and adaptive immunity, take place and influence the long-term outcome of xenogeneic materials in patients, possibly precluding the use of bioprosthetic heart valves in young individuals. In this context, the present article provides an overview of current knowledge on the immune processes following xenotransplantation and on the possible therapeutic interventions to overcome the immunological drawbacks involved in xenotransplantation.

  12. Infants' Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Composition Reflects Both Maternal and Post-Natal Infection with Plasmodium falciparum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nouatin, Odilon; Gbédandé, Komi; Ibitokou, Samad; Vianou, Bertin; Houngbegnon, Parfait; Ezinmegnon, Sem; Borgella, Sophie; Akplogan, Carine; Cottrell, Gilles; Varani, Stefania; Massougbodji, Achille; Moutairou, Kabirou; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Deloron, Philippe; Luty, Adrian J F; Fievet, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Maternal parasitoses modulate fetal immune development, manifesting as altered cellular immunological activity in cord blood that may be linked to enhanced susceptibility to infections in early life...

  13. Real-time polymerase chain reaction with melting analysis of positive blood culture specimens in bloodstream infections: diagnostic value and turnaround time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Silvia; Gherardi, Giovanni; De Florio, Lucia; Avola, Alessandra; Crea, Francesca; Riva, Elisabetta; Vitali, Massimiliano Andrea; Galluzzo, Sara; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2013-01-01

    A Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with melting analysis was devised to target bacterial and fungal genes together with the most prevalent antimicrobial resistance genes in 250 positive blood culture broths. This method allowed the blood culture cultivated pathogens to be classified into clinically relevant groups such as Enterobacteriaceae, oxidase-positive bacilli, oxidase-positive coccobacilli, S. aureus and yeast. Enterococci and streptococci could be distinguished from CoNS only by the Gram stain. Gram-positive bacilli were discriminated from Gram-positive cocci by Gram stain. Furthermore, the most important antimicrobial resistant genes such as mecA, vanA, bla TEM , bla SHV and bla CTX-M could be identified. All results were obtained with a turnaround time of three hours from the moment of blood culture positivity compared to 24-72 hours for phenotypic methods. In conclusion, the proposed approach can allow the clinician to implement proper early management of sepsis patients.

  14. Evaluation of an automated rapid diagnostic assay for detection of Gram-negative bacteria and their drug-resistance genes in positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Masayoshi; Fujita, Takahiro; Ainoda, Yusuke; Nagamatsu, Maki; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Sakurai, Aki; Masui, Yoshinori; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Kirikae, Teruo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test (BC-GN; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA), an automated multiplex assay for rapid identification of positive blood cultures caused by 9 Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and for detection of 9 genes associated with β-lactam resistance. The BC-GN assay can be performed directly from positive blood cultures with 5 minutes of hands-on and 2 hours of run time per sample. A total of 397 GNB positive blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GN assay. Of the 397 samples, 295 were simulated samples prepared by inoculating GNB into blood culture bottles, and the remaining were clinical samples from 102 patients with positive blood cultures. Aliquots of the positive blood cultures were tested by the BC-GN assay. The results of bacterial identification between the BC-GN assay and standard laboratory methods were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (39 isolates for the BC-GN assay/39 for the standard methods), Citrobacter spp. (7/7), Escherichia coli (87/87), Klebsiella oxytoca (13/13), and Proteus spp. (11/11); Enterobacter spp. (29/30); Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/72); Pseudomonas aeruginosa (124/125); and Serratia marcescens (18/21); respectively. From the 102 clinical samples, 104 bacterial species were identified with the BC-GN assay, whereas 110 were identified with the standard methods. The BC-GN assay also detected all β-lactam resistance genes tested (233 genes), including 54 bla(CTX-M), 119 bla(IMP), 8 bla(KPC), 16 bla(NDM), 24 bla(OXA-23), 1 bla(OXA-24/40), 1 bla(OXA-48), 4 bla(OXA-58), and 6 blaVIM. The data shows that the BC-GN assay provides rapid detection of GNB and β-lactam resistance genes in positive blood cultures and has the potential to contributing to optimal patient management by earlier detection of major antimicrobial resistance genes.

  15. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation.

  16. Multiscale modelling in immunology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Antonio; Tieri, Paolo; Castiglione, Filippo

    2016-05-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to get a unified view of observations made from the molecular up to the organism scale. Towards this goal, multiscale models have been highly instrumental in contexts such as the cardiovascular field, angiogenesis, neurosciences and tumour biology. More recently, such models are becoming an increasingly important resource to address immunological questions as well. Systematic mining of the literature in multiscale modelling led us to identify three main fields of immunological applications: host-virus interactions, inflammatory diseases and their treatment and development of multiscale simulation platforms for immunological research and for educational purposes. Here, we review the current developments in these directions, which illustrate that multiscale models can consistently integrate immunological data generated at several scales, and can be used to describe and optimize therapeutic treatments of complex immune diseases.

  17. Clinical immunology - Autoimmunity in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical immunology is in the Netherlands a separate clinical specialty within internal medicine and pediatrics. Clinical immunologists work closely together with nephrologists, rheumatologists and many other medical specialists. Apart from research and teaching, clinical immunologists are taking ca

  18. immunological arthritis Prevalence of biochemical and abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... immunological abnormalities noted were a positive rheumatoid factor (78,9%), positive ... Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease characterised by the occurrence of articular and ..... treatment. Br Med] 1982; 285: ...

  19. Clinical immunology - Autoimmunity in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical immunology is in the Netherlands a separate clinical specialty within internal medicine and pediatrics. Clinical immunologists work closely together with nephrologists, rheumatologists and many other medical specialists. Apart from research and teaching, clinical immunologists are taking

  20. Biosensors in immunology: the story so far

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathak, S.S.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Optical biosensors are finding a range of applications in immunology. They enable biomolecular interactions to be characterized in real time without the need to label reactants, and, because individual binding steps can be visualized, are particularly suited to complex assays

  1. The pluripotent history of immunology. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraja Sankaran

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The historiography of immunology since 1999 is reviewed, in part as a response to claims by historians such as Thomas Söderqvist the field was still immature at the time (Söderqvist & Stillwell 1999. First addressed are the difficulties, past and present, surrounding the disciplinary definition of immunology, which is followed by a commentary on the recent scholarship devoted to the concept of the immune self. The new literature on broad immunological topics is examined and assessed, and specific charges leveled against the paucity of certain types of histories, e.g. biographical and institutional histories, are evaluated. In conclusion, there are compelling indications that the history of immunology has moved past the initial tentative stages identified in the earlier reviews to become a bustling, pluripotent discipline, much like the subject of its scrutiny, and that it continues to develop in many new and exciting directions.

  2. Modeling-Enabled Systems Nutritional Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghna eVerma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the fundamental role of nutrition in the maintenance of health, the immune response and disease prevention. Emerging global mechanistic insights in the field of nutritional immunology cannot be gained through reductionist methods alone or by analyzing a single nutrient at a time. We propose to investigate nutritional immunology as a massively interacting system of interconnected multistage and multiscale networks that encompass hidden mechanisms by which nutrition, microbiome, metabolism, genetic predisposition and the immune system interact to delineate health and disease. The review sets an unconventional path to applying complex science methodologies to nutritional immunology research, discovery and development through ‘use cases’ centered around the impact of nutrition on the gut microbiome and immune responses. Our systems nutritional immunology analyses, that include modeling and informatics methodologies in combination with pre-clinical and clinical studies, have the potential to discover emerging systems-wide properties at the interface of the immune system, nutrition, microbiome, and metabolism.

  3. Immunologic, hemodynamic, and adrenal incompetence in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Louise Madeleine; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2015-01-01

    dysfunction, but is not responsive to volume expansion. Recent research indicates that development of hepatic nephropathy represents a continuous spectrum of functional and structural dysfunction and may be precipitated by the inherent immunologic, adrenal, and hemodynamic incompetence in cirrhosis. New...... research explores several new markers of renal dysfunction that may replace serum creatinine in the future and give new insight on the hepatic nephropathy. Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms causing the immunologic, adrenal, and hemodynamic incompetence, and the impact on renal...

  4. Immunology of root resorption: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Root resorption seems to be related to a complex combination of mechanical factors and biological activity, which comprehends the role of immunologic structures including specialized cells. The aim of this research was to explain the development of the process - from mineralization to the destruction of hard tissues - and the possible relationship between root resorption and immunology, along with discussing current concepts described in the literature.

  5. Transfusion-transmitted malaria in endemic zone: epidemiological profile of blood donors at the Fundação HEMOAM and use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria screening in Manaus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Kátia Luz; Dos Santos Moresco, Mônica Nascimento; Sales, Luciane Rodrigues; da Silva Abranches, Josilene; Araújo Alexandre, Márcia Almeida; Malheiro, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    With 99% of the cases in Brazil, malaria is endemic in the Amazon region. Transfusion-transmitted malaria, an important risk in endemic areas, has been reported. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological profile of blood donor candidates at the Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas and evaluate the efficacy of rapid diagnostic tests used for malaria screening of blood donors within endemic regions. Between May 2008 and May 2009, 407 blood donor candidates were selected and grouped based on the Malaria Annual Parasite Index of the geographic area in which they originated: Group 1 (eligible donors - n=265) originated from areas of low to medium risk of exposure to malaria and Group 2 (ineligible donors - n=142) originated from high-risk areas. All samples were concurrently screened using two immunochromatic antigen-based rapid tests and by the thick smear test. All samples were negative by all three methods. The demographic profile indicated that the majority of participants were male, ages ranged from 18 to 39 years and less than half the candidates had only elementary schooling. Two issues need to be addressed: one is the ineligibility of donors and its impact on blood donor centers as, in this study, 22.7% of the donors were considered ineligible. The other is the limited sensitivity of the parasitological tests used, allowing a risk of false-negative results. New methods are needed to ensure transfusion safety without rejecting potential donors, which would ensure safe transfusion without harming the blood supply. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunology of allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tončić, Ružica Jurakić; Lipozenčić, Jasna; Martinac, Ivana; Gregurić, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a T-cell mediated skin inflammation caused by repeated skin exposure to contact allergens. This review summarizes current knowledge on the immunology of ACD. Different phases in ACD are distinguished, i.e. sensitization, elicitation and resolution phases. We discuss contact allergen presentation and the central role of antigen presenting cells during sensitization phase. There is an extremely complex interaction of different kinds of immune cells, such as antigen presenting cells, T, B, NK lymphocytes, keratinocytes (KCs), endothelium, mast cells (MCs) and platelets, and this complex interaction is guided through orchestration of numerous cytokines and chemokines. The role of adaptive immunity has been recognized in contact hypersensitivity but we also discuss the important role of some parts of innate immunity such as natural killer T lymphocytes (NKT) and complement system. Cooperation of innate and adaptive immunity, in this case NK cells and B cells, initiates elicitation phase by complement cascade activation, vasoactive substance release and endothelial activation. KCs are not only innocent bystanders, on the contrary, they are involved in all phases of ACD, from the early phase of initiation through sending "danger" signals and activation of innate immunity, through their role in Langerhans cells (LCs) migration, T-cell trafficking, through the height of the inflammatory phase with direct interactions with epidermotropic T-cells, and finally through the resolution phase with the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and tolerogenic presentation to effector T-cells. Th-1 and Th-17 cells are the main effector cells responsible for tissue damage. At the end, we point out several subsets of T regulatory cells, which exert down-regulatory function and regulate the magnitude and duration of inflammatory reaction.

  7. An immunologic portrait of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The advent of high-throughput technology challenges the traditional histopathological classification of cancer, and proposes new taxonomies derived from global transcriptional patterns. Although most of these molecular re-classifications did not endure the test of time, they provided bulk of new information that can reframe our understanding of human cancer biology. Here, we focus on an immunologic interpretation of cancer that segregates oncogenic processes independent from their tissue derivation into at least two categories of which one bears the footprints of immune activation. Several observations describe a cancer phenotype where the expression of interferon stimulated genes and immune effector mechanisms reflect patterns commonly observed during the inflammatory response against pathogens, which leads to elimination of infected cells. As these signatures are observed in growing cancers, they are not sufficient to entirely clear the organism of neoplastic cells but they sustain, as in chronic infections, a self-perpetuating inflammatory process. Yet, several studies determined an association between this inflammatory status and a favorable natural history of the disease or a better responsiveness to cancer immune therapy. Moreover, these signatures overlap with those observed during immune-mediated cancer rejection and, more broadly, immune-mediated tissue-specific destruction in other immune pathologies. Thus, a discussion concerning this cancer phenotype is warranted as it remains unknown why it occurs in immune competent hosts. It also remains uncertain whether a genetically determined response of the host to its own cancer, the genetic makeup of the neoplastic process or a combination of both drives the inflammatory process. Here we reflect on commonalities and discrepancies among studies and on the genetic or somatic conditions that may cause this schism in cancer behavior.

  8. Cancer immunology for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Louis M

    2015-05-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is coming of age. It has become abundantly clear that immunotherapy-which has been described as treating the body's immune system so the immune system can treat the cancer-can be routinely effective, and may indeed cure advanced cancers. Accordingly, it is important to understand the basic, clinically relevant principles of cancer immunology to better prepare for an increasingly exciting future. The host immune system is the only active enemy faced by a malignant cell population as it develops. So it is helpful to think of the battle between the cancer cell population and the developing cancer as a Darwinian crucible in which only the malignant cells most fit to thrive in the face of active immune system attack are able to survive in the reluctant host. All successful cancers thus have overcome the defenses mounted by host immune systems by actively thwarting the evolution of anticancer immunity. A malignant cell population that has "solved" the riddle of the host immune system need not employ all of these mechanisms in order to survive in a particular host. Hence, it may be that the dominant mechanism or mechanisms of immune evasion in fact represent potential Achilles' heels that can be therapeutically attacked to restore immune control of a cancer. To better understand where opportunities exist for immunotherapy, it is important to first consider how developing cancers overcome host immunity: by overwhelming, hiding from, subverting, shielding from, defending against, and outlasting the host immune response. Clearly, more than one of these mechanisms may be present in any particular patient, but it is likely that many cancer types employ dominant immune defense mechanisms. There can be no doubt that mobilizing the immune system to attack a cancer, remember the enemy, and continually target emerging clones represents an extremely promising path to cancer prevention and cure.

  9. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - 2016 Year in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Michael; Sicherer, Scott H; Zeiger, Robert S

    2017-01-28

    As editors, we concluded that it would be helpful to our readers to write a Year in Review article that highlights the Review, Original, and Clinical Communication articles published in 2016 in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. We summarized articles on the topics of asthma, rhinitis/rhinosinusitis, food allergy, anaphylaxis, drug allergy, urticarial/angioedema, eosinophilic disorders, and immunodeficiency. Within each topic, epidemiologic findings are presented, relevant aspects of prevention are described, and diagnostic and therapeutic advances are enumerated. Diagnostic tools described include history, skin tests, and in vitro tests. Treatments discussed include behavioral therapy, allergen avoidance therapy, positive and negative effects of pharmacologic therapy, and various forms of immunologic and desensitization management. We hope this review will help you, our readers, consolidate and use this extensive and practical knowledge for the benefit of your patients.

  10. Immunological consequences of strain variation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tientcheu, Leopold D; Koch, Anastasia; Ndengane, Mthawelenga; Andoseh, Genevieve; Kampmann, Beate; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    In 2015, there were an estimated 10.4 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) globally, making it one of the leading causes of death due to an infectious disease. TB is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), with human disease resulting from infection by M. tuberculosis sensu stricto and M. africanum. Recent progress in genotyping techniques, in particular the increasing availability of whole genome sequence data, has revealed previously under appreciated levels of genetic diversity within the MTBC. Several studies have shown that this genetic diversity may translate into differences in TB transmission, clinical manifestations of disease, and host immune responses. This suggests the existence of MTBC genotype-dependent host-pathogen interactions which may influence the outcome of infection and progression of disease. In this review, we highlight the studies demonstrating differences in innate and adaptive immunological outcomes consequent on MTBC genetic diversity, and discuss how these differences in immune response might influence the development of TB vaccines, diagnostics and new therapies. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Diagnosis and management of rhinitis: complete guidelines of the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykewicz, M S; Fineman, S; Skoner, D P; Nicklas, R; Lee, R; Blessing-Moore, J; Li, J T; Bernstein, I L; Berger, W; Spector, S; Schuller, D

    1998-11-01

    This document contains complete guidelines for diagnosis and management of rhinitis developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the Joint Council on Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The guidelines are comprehensive and begin with statements on clinical characteristics and diagnosis of different forms of rhinitis (allergic, non-allergic, occupational rhinitis, hormonal rhinitis [pregnancy and hypothyroidism], drug-induced rhinitis, rhinitis from food ingestion), and other conditions that may be confused with rhinitis. Recommendations on patient evaluation discuss appropriate use of history, physical examination, and diagnostic testing, as well as unproven or inappropriate techniques that should not be used. Parameters on management include use of environmental control measures, pharmacologic therapy including recently introduced therapies and allergen immunotherapy. Because of the risks to patients and society from sedation and performance impairment caused by first generation antihistamines, second generation antihistamines that reduce or eliminate these side effects should usually be considered before first generation antihistamines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The document emphasizes the importance of rhinitis management for comorbid conditions (asthma, sinusitis, otitis media). Guidelines are also presented on special considerations in patients subsets (children, the elderly, pregnancy, athletes and patients with rhinitis medicamentosa); and when consultation with an allergist-immunologist should be considered.

  12. Serum Leptin Levels in Women with Immunological Recurrent Abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Saeed; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Mohammadzadeh, Afsaneh; Arefi, Soheila; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Idali, Farah; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Savadi Shiraz, Elham; Moshref Behzad, Narges; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent abortion (RA) may be a consequence of aberrant expression of immunological factors during pregnancy. Although the relative importance of immunological factors in human reproduction remains controversial, substantial evidence suggests that autoantibodies contribute to reproductive failure. Production of such antibodies is under the control of cytokines; and leptin, besides its role in reproductive success, has a profound effect on directing the cytokine profile toward Th1 (cellular) pattern. Therefore, the present study was performed to assess serum leptin levels in women with immunological recurrent abortion. Materials and Methods In this prospective study, 250 women who attended Avicenna Infertility Clinic with RA were screened for known causes of abortion from July to December 2008 in Tehran, Iran. Eighty-one patients with normal karyotypes and hormonal profile with normal ovaries and uterus and no signs of infection were categorized as patients with immunological (IRA, n = 39) or unexplained (URA, n = 42) recurrent abortion based on presence or absence of autoantibodies. After blood sampling, levels of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-double stranded DNA antibody (anti-dsDNA), lupus anti-coagulant antibody (LACAb), anti-phospholipid antibody (APA), anti-cardiolipin antibody (ACA), anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), anti-thyroperoxidase antibody (TPOAb) and anti-thrombin III antibody (ATIIIAb) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA). Results In IRA group, 9 (23.1%), 24 (61.5%), 25(64.1%) and 1 (2.6%) women were above the normal cut-off point for ANA, TgAbs, TPOAbs and AT-III Abs, respectively. IRA patients had normal values of LACAbs, APA and ACA. With normal level of fasting blood sugar (FBS), IRA and URA groups had similar serum leptin levels (23.7 ± 13.2 ng/ml vs. 22.7 ± 12.5 ng/ml, respectively). Serum leptin concentrations showed a positive correlation with weight

  13. Over-Expression of Dopamine D2 Receptor and Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel Genes in Drug-Naive Schizophrenic Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes as Potential Diagnostic Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Ágnes Zvara; György Szekeres; Zoltán Janka; Kelemen, János Z.; Csongor Cimmer; Miklós Sántha; Puskás, László G.

    2005-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting nearly 1% of the human population. Current diagnosis of schizophrenia is based on complex clinical symptoms. The use of easily detectable peripheral molecular markers could substantially help the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies showed that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) express subtypes of D1 and D2 subclasses of dopamine receptors. Recently, dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3) was found to be over-exp...

  14. Diagnostic hematology of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Nicole I; Alleman, A Rick; Sayler, Katherine A

    2011-03-01

    The hematologic evaluation of reptiles is an indispensable diagnostic tool in exotic veterinary practice. The diversity of reptile species, their characteristic physiologic features, and effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors present unique challenges for accurate interpretation of the hemogram. Combining the clinical presentation with hematologic findings provides valuable information in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease and helps guide the clinician toward therapy and further diagnostic testing. This article outlines the normal and pathologic morphology of blood cells of reptile species. The specific comparative aspects of reptiles are emphasized, and structural and functional abnormalities in the reptilian hemogram are described.

  15. Multicenter evaluation of the Sepsityper™ extraction kit and MALDI-TOF MS for direct identification of positive blood culture isolates using the BD BACTEC™ FX and VersaTREK(®) diagnostic blood culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieffer, K M; Tan, K E; Stamper, P D; Somogyi, A; Andrea, S B; Wakefield, T; Romagnoli, M; Chapin, K C; Wolk, D M; Carroll, K C

    2014-04-01

    (i) Evaluation of delayed time to blood culture extraction by the Sepsityper kit and impact of shipping pellets off-site for MALDI-TOF MS analysis. (ii) Comparison of Sepsityper and laboratory-developed extraction methods from a literature review. Using two blood culture systems (BD BACTEC and VersaTREK), we extracted 411 positive blood cultures using the Sepsityper kit to mimic a potential protocol for institutions without a MALDI-TOF MS. Extracted pellets were shipped and analysed on the Bruker UltraflexIII. Successful extraction of 358 (87·1%) samples was determined by the presence of detectable proteins. MALDI-TOF MS correctly identified 332 (80·8%) samples. Delayed time to extraction did not affect Sepsityper extraction or MALDI-TOF MS accuracy. The extracted pellets remain stable and provide accurate results by MALDI-TOF MS when shipped at room temperature to off-site reference laboratories. This is the first study to show that institutions without a MALDI-TOF MS can take advantage of this innovative technology by shipping a volume of blood to an off-site laboratory for extraction and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. We also performed a literature review to compare various extraction methods. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Update on immunologic and molecular diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenhagen, Marcelo A; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2014-07-01

    Human strongyloidiasis is an intestinal parasitosis that may affect 100 million individuals. However, the prevalence rates of this infection may represent smaller values than the actual data, mainly due to difficulties in its diagnosis. The aim of this study was to update the immunological and molecular methods applied to the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. There is a great diversity of techniques used in the diagnosis of this parasitosis, such as immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoblotting, luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS), dispstick and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), all with advantages and disadvantages, and with unique features for specific purposes. Considering the magnitude of strongyloidiasis and the importance of early diagnosis, due to the possibility of chronicity and hyperinfection, this study analyzes the different methods currently employed, and demonstrates the necessity of developing innovative methodologies, which also maintain diagnostic accuracy, particularly for regions with limited technological resources.

  17. Use of Role-Playing Game (RPG as a didactic complement in the teaching of Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus de Oliveira Lunardi Laureano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available RPG is defined as a Role-Playing Game, in which participants can play against each other, or work together towards a objective. Thereby, an RPG game was developed to work on the content of Immunology with children and adolescents (5th to 8th grade where medieval battles, involving fantastic creatures, are associated with elements that make up the Immune System, such as a shaman representing an T lymphocyte. To teach Immunology through the RPG is primarily needed a master, will guide the participants to teach the content in a playful way, throughout a "war" within a person. The students who will control the characters responsible for attacking and defending the body (infectious agents and white blood cells, respectively having a dice for the scrolling of their actions in the game. As a result, it is expected with this work that Immunology content will be more easily fixed in a fun and enjoyable way.

  18. Immunologically reactive M. leprae antigens with relevance to diagnosis and vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Steven G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that can manifest a wide variety of immunological and clinical outcomes ranging from potent humoral responses among borderline lepromatous (BL and lepromatous (LL patients to strong cellular responses among tuberculoid (TT and borderline tuberculoid (BT patients. Until recently, relatively little has been known about the immune responses to individual proteins of M. leprae recognized during leprosy. Methods The immune reactivity to a panel of 33 M. leprae recombinant proteins was evaluated among leprosy patients and controls from a high endemic area for leprosy (Goiania/GO, Central Brazil. Serum IgG responses were measured by ELISA (45 participants/group and T cell responses (20 participants/group were evaluated by IFN-gamma production in 24 hours whole blood cultures with antigen (whole blood assay-WBA. Study groups were newly diagnosed, untreated TT/BT and BL/LL leprosy patients classified by Ridley Jopling criteria and household contacts of BL/LL patients (HHC. Control groups were HIV-1 negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients (TB and healthy individuals from the same endemic area (EC. In silico predictions indicated the level of identity of M. leprae proteins with homologues in other mycobacteria and the presence of T cell and B cell epitopes. Results Despite the prediction that all proteins would be reactive, 16 of 33 (48% of the single proteins tested were immunogenic (recognized in WBA or ELISA and seventeen were non-immunogenic (not recognized in either assay. Among the 16 immunogenic proteins, 9 were considered leprosy specific in WBA inducing cell-mediated IFN-gamma secretion from TT/BT patients and HHC. Three of these proteins were also leprosy specific in serology being recognized by serum IgG from LL/BL patients. Seven of the immunogenic proteins were not leprosy specific. Conclusions New M. leprae antigens recognized by antibody responses of

  19. Time Course and Diagnostic Accuracy of Glial and Neuronal Blood Biomarkers GFAP and UCH-L1 in a Large Cohort of Trauma Patients With and Without Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Linda; Brophy, Gretchen M; Welch, Robert D; Lewis, Lawrence M; Braga, Carolina F; Tan, Ciara N; Ameli, Neema J; Lopez, Marco A; Haeussler, Crystal A; Mendez Giordano, Diego I; Silvestri, Salvatore; Giordano, Philip; Weber, Kurt D; Hill-Pryor, Crystal; Hack, Dallas C

    2016-05-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) have been widely studied and show promise for clinical usefulness in suspected traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concussion. Understanding their diagnostic accuracy over time will help translate them into clinical practice. To evaluate the temporal profiles of GFAP and UCH-L1 in a large cohort of trauma patients seen at the emergency department and to assess their diagnostic accuracy over time, both individually and in combination, for detecting mild to moderate TBI (MMTBI), traumatic intracranial lesions on head computed tomography (CT), and neurosurgical intervention. This prospective cohort study enrolled adult trauma patients seen at a level I trauma center from March 1, 2010, to March 5, 2014. All patients underwent rigorous screening to determine whether they had experienced an MMTBI (blunt head trauma with loss of consciousness, amnesia, or disorientation and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 9-15). Of 3025 trauma patients assessed, 1030 met eligibility criteria for enrollment, and 446 declined participation. Initial blood samples were obtained in 584 patients enrolled within 4 hours of injury. Repeated blood sampling was conducted at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144, 156, 168, and 180 hours after injury. Diagnosis of MMTBI, presence of traumatic intracranial lesions on head CT scan, and neurosurgical intervention. A total of 1831 blood samples were drawn from 584 patients (mean [SD] age, 40 [16] years; 62.0% [362 of 584] male) over 7 days. Both GFAP and UCH-L1 were detectible within 1 hour of injury. GFAP peaked at 20 hours after injury and slowly declined over 72 hours. UCH-L1 rose rapidly and peaked at 8 hours after injury and declined rapidly over 48 hours. Over the course of 1 week, GFAP demonstrated a diagnostic range of areas under the curve for detecting MMTBI of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.69-0.77) to 0.94 (95% CI, 0.78-1.00), and UCH-L1 demonstrated

  20. Malaria and blood transfusion: major issues of blood safety in malaria-endemic countries and strategies for mitigating the risk of Plasmodium parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Saleh; Karunamoorthi, Kaliyaperumal

    2016-01-01

    Malaria inflicts humankind over centuries, and it remains as a major threat to both clinical medicine and public health worldwide. Though hemotherapy is a life-sustaining modality, it continues to be a possible source of disease transmission. Hence, hemovigilance is a matter of grave concern in the malaria-prone third-world countries. In order to pursue an effective research on hemovigilance, a comprehensive search has been conducted by using the premier academic-scientific databases, WHO documents, and English-language search engines. One hundred two appropriate articles were chosen for data extraction, with a particular reference to emerging pathogens transmitted through blood transfusion, specifically malaria. Blood donation screening is done through microscopic examination and immunological assays to improve the safety of blood products by detection major blood-borne pathogens, viz., HIV, HBV, HCV, syphilis, and malarial parasites. Transfusion therapy significantly dwindles the preventable morbidity and mortality attributed to various illnesses and diseases, particularly AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. Examination of thick and thin blood smears are performed to detect positivity and to identify the Plasmodium species, respectively. However, all of these existing diagnostic tools have their own limitations in terms of sensitivity, specificity, cost-effectiveness, and lack of resources and skilled personnel. Globally, despite the mandate need of screening blood and its components according to the blood-establishment protocols, it is seldom practiced in the low-income/poverty-stricken settings. In addition, each and every single phase of transfusion chain carries sizable inherent risks from donors to recipients. Interestingly, opportunities also lie ahead to enhance the safety of blood-supply chain and patients. It can be achieved through sustainable blood-management strategies like (1) appropriate usage of precise diagnostic tools/techniques, (2) promoting

  1. Inventive activity of the Department of Protein Structure and Function of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of NAS of Ukraine. Part I. Development of the diagnostic methods for detection of hemostasis disorders and characterization of certain blood coagulation factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Danilova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The practical aspects of inventive activity of the Department of Protein Structure and Function of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NAS of Ukraine are highlighted in this article. Through years of fundamental and applied researches of blood coagulation system proteins, initiated by luminaries of the world biochemistry O. V. Palladin and V. O. Belitser, the Department staff have developed a considerable number of methods, techniques and tests for the assessment of the state of the hemostasis system, which were approved in many clinics. In the first part of this work the authors describe the development of the diagnostic methods for identifying the homeostasis system disorders in detail, as well as characterize certain coagulation factors.

  2. Development of a rapid diagnostic method for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and antimicrobial resistance in positive blood culture bottles using a PCR-DNA-chromatography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Takeya; Miyagi, Chihiro; Tamaki, Yoshikazu; Mizuno, Takuya; Ezaki, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    Blood culturing and the rapid reporting of results are essential for infectious disease clinics to obtain bacterial information that can affect patient prognosis. When gram-positive coccoid cells are observed in blood culture bottles, it is important to determine whether the strain is Staphylococcus aureus and whether the strain has resistance genes, such as mecA and blaZ, for proper antibiotic selection. Previous work led to the development of a PCR method that is useful for rapid identification of bacterial species and antimicrobial susceptibility. However, that method has not yet been adopted in community hospitals due to the high cost and methodological complexity. We report here the development of a quick PCR and DNA-chromatography test, based on single-tag hybridization chromatography, that permits detection of S. aureus and the mecA and blaZ genes; results can be obtained within 1 h for positive blood culture bottles. We evaluated this method using 42 clinical isolates. Detection of S. aureus and the resistance genes by the PCR-DNA-chromatography method was compared with that obtained via the conventional identification method and actual antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Our method had a sensitivity of 97.0% and a specificity of 100% for the identification of the bacterial species. For the detection of the mecA gene of S. aureus, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 95.2%. For the detection of the blaZ gene of S. aureus, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 88.9%. The speed and simplicity of this PCR-DNA-chromatography method suggest that our method will facilitate rapid diagnoses.

  3. Contactless diagnostics of biophysical parameters of skin and blood on the basis of approximating functions for radiation fluxes scattered by skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2014-03-01

    Approximating expressions are derived to calculate spectral and spatial characteristics of diffuse reflection of light from a two-layer medium mimicking human skin. The effectiveness of the use of these expressions in the optical diagnosis of skin biophysical parameters (tissue scattering parameters, concentration of melanin in the epidermis, concentration of total haemoglobin and bilirubin in the tissues of the dermis) and content of haemoglobin derivatives in blood (oxy-, deoxy-, met-, carboxy- and sulfhaemoglobin) is analysed numerically. The methods are proposed to determine in realtime these parameters without contact of the measuring instrument with the patient's body.

  4. Contactless diagnostics of biophysical parameters of skin and blood on the basis of approximating functions for radiation fluxes scattered by skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2014-03-28

    Approximating expressions are derived to calculate spectral and spatial characteristics of diffuse reflection of light from a two-layer medium mimicking human skin. The effectiveness of the use of these expressions in the optical diagnosis of skin biophysical parameters (tissue scattering parameters, concentration of melanin in the epidermis, concentration of total haemoglobin and bilirubin in the tissues of the dermis) and content of haemoglobin derivatives in blood (oxy-, deoxy-, met-, carboxy- and sulfhaemoglobin) is analysed numerically. The methods are proposed to determine in realtime these parameters without contact of the measuring instrument with the patient's body. (biophotonics)

  5. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology.

  6. The analysis of diagnostic markers of genetic disorders in human blood and urine using tandem mass spectrometry with liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millington, David S.; Kodo, Naoki; Terada, Naoto; Roe, Diane; Chace, Donald H.

    1991-12-01

    A method has been developed for the rapid diagnosis of metabolic diseases based on the analysis of characteristic metabolites in body fluids by fast atom bombardment or liquid secondary ion tandem mass spectrometry (FAB-MS--MS or LSIMS--MS). Acylcarnitine profiles were obtained from 100 [mu]l urine. 200 [mu]l plasma or 25 [mu]l whole blood spotted onto filter paper by simple solvent extraction, esterification and analysis using a precursor ion scan function on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Specificity and sensitivity were improved by adding a small percentage of sodium octyl sulfate to the liquid matrix, which forms ion pairs with acylcarnitine esters. Acylglycines in urine were specifically detected as a group using a different precursor ion scan function. By forming methyl esters, metabolic profiles of both acylcarnitines and acylglycines were achieved in the same sample loading by application of alternating scan functions. Quantitative analysis of selected metabolites was achieved by use of stable isotope-labeled internal standards. Amino acid profiles were obtained from 100 [mu]l plasma and 25 [mu]l whole blood spots using butyl esters and a neutral loss scan function. The quantitative analysis of phenylalanine and tyrosine was achieved in these samples using stable isotope dilution. This capability will facilitate the diagnosis of phenylketonuria and other amino acidemias. These new methods have the requirements of speed, accuracy and capability for automation necessary for large-scale neonatal screening of inborn errors of matabolism.

  7. The Immunological Basis of Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Héctor; Quiroz, Yasmir; Johnson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of investigations have demonstrated the participation of the immune system in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Studies focusing on macrophages and Toll-like receptors have documented involvement of the innate immunity. The requirements of antigen presentation and co-stimulation, the critical importance of T cell–driven inflammation, and the demonstration, in specific conditions, of agonistic antibodies directed to angiotensin II type 1 receptors and adrenergic receptors support the role of acquired immunity. Experimental findings support the concept that the balance between T cell–induced inflammation and T cell suppressor responses is critical for the regulation of blood pressure levels. Expression of neoantigens in response to inflammation, as well as surfacing of intracellular immunogenic proteins, such as heat shock proteins, could be responsible for autoimmune reactivity in the kidney, arteries, and central nervous system. Persisting, low-grade inflammation in these target organs may lead to impaired pressure natriuresis, an increase in sympathetic activity, and vascular endothelial dysfunction that may be the cause of chronic elevation of blood pressure in essential hypertension. PMID:25150828

  8. Comparative anatomy of phagocytic and immunological synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence eNiedergang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of phagocytic cups and immunological synapses are crucial events of the innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. They are triggered by distinct immune receptors and performed by different cell types. However, growing experimental evidence shows that a very close series of molecular and cellular events control these two processes. Thus, the tight and dynamic interplay between receptor signaling, actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and targeted vesicle traffic are all critical features to build functional phagosomes and immunological synapses. Interestingly, both phagocytic cups and immunological synapses display particular spatial and temporal patterns of receptors and signaling molecules, leading to the notion of phagocytic synapse. Here we discuss both types of structures, their organization and the mechanisms by which they are generated and regulated.

  9. Genetic and immunological features of aggressive periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel MUÑOZ

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available clinicians and researchers due to its rapid progression and its evidences of genetic character. Different theories have tried to explain the individual differences in susceptibility, where genetic and immunological assays have assumed great importance. The purpose of this study was to review the literature in order to comprehend the genetic and immunological features of aggressive periodontitis. Literature review: Articles were examined, specifically the ones dealing with information regarding genetic and/or immunological studies of individuals related to their disease susceptibility. Conclusions: In the presence of dental biofilm, host susceptibility to aggressive periodontitis varies among regions, countries and races. Immune-inflammatory processes that seem to be modified in aggressive periodontitis patients may be transmitted vertically, explaining familial aggregation associated with this disease.

  10. Sensing Danger: Innate Immunology for Intrusion Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Uwe, Aickelin

    2008-01-01

    The immune system provides an ideal metaphor for anomaly detection in general and computer security in particular. Based on this idea, artificial immune systems have been used for a number of years for intrusion detection, unfortunately so far with little success. However, these previous systems were largely based on immunological theory from the 1970s and 1980s and over the last decade our understanding of immunological processes has vastly improved. In this paper we present two new immune inspired algorithms based on the latest immunological discoveries, such as the behaviour of Dendritic Cells. The resultant algorithms are applied to real world intrusion problems and show encouraging results. Overall, we believe there is a bright future for these next generation artificial immune algorithms.

  11. Immunological alterations in hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaruso, Vincenza; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-12-21

    A higher prevalence of immunological processes has recently been reported in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, focusing the attention of physicians and researchers on the close association between HCV and immune disorders. HCV lymphotropism represents the most important step in the pathogenesis of virus-related immunological diseases and experimental, virologic, and clinical evidence has demonstrated a trigger role for HCV both in systemic autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, hemolytic anemia and severe thrombocytopenia, and in organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune hepatitis, thyroid disorders and diabetes. This review will outline the principal aspects of such HCV-induced immunological alterations, focusing on the prevalence of these less characterized HCV extrahepatic manifestations.

  12. Infants' Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Composition Reflects Both Maternal and Post-Natal Infection with Plasmodium falciparum: e0139606

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Odilon Nouatin; Komi Gbédandé; Samad Ibitokou; Bertin Vianou; Parfait Houngbegnon; Sem Ezinmegnon; Sophie Borgella; Carine Akplogan; Gilles Cottrell; Stefania Varani; Achille Massougbodji; Kabirou Moutairou; Marita Troye-Blomberg; Philippe Deloron; Adrian J F Luty

    2015-01-01

      Maternal parasitoses modulate fetal immune development, manifesting as altered cellular immunological activity in cord blood that may be linked to enhanced susceptibility to infections in early life...

  13. Nutritional, immunological and microbiological profiles of burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASAA Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A burn is a lesion on an organic tissue resultant from direct or indirect action of heat on the organism. The present study aimed to evaluate the nutritional, immunological and microbiological status of burn patients at the Bauru State Hospital, São Paulo state, Brazil, in 2007. Eight patients, aged more than 18 years and injured up to 24 hours, were evaluated at the moment of hospitalization and seven days later. All victims were males with a mean age of 38 years. On average, 17.5% of their body surfaces were burned and 50% of the patients were eutrophic. There were significant alterations in levels of erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, total protein and albumin due to increased endothelial permeability, direct destruction of proteins in the heat-affected area and blood loss from lesions or debridement. At a second moment, cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α had augmented significantly, with IL-6 presenting elevated levels in relation to controls at the first moment. Microbiological analysis showed that 100% of the samples collected at hospital admission were negative and after one week Staphylococcus aureus was found in all cultures. Therefore, a burn patient may be considered immunosuppressed and these results indicate significant nutritional, immunological and microbiological alterations that can interfere in his recovery.

  14. Immunological sex differences in socially promiscuous African ground squirrels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Manjerovic

    Full Text Available Differences in how males and females respond to foreign antigens are common across taxa. Such sexual differences in the immune system are predicted to be greater in species with high promiscuity and sociality as these factors increase the likelihood of disease transmission. Intense sperm competition is thought to further this sexual dichotomy as increased investment in spermatogenesis likely incurs additional immunological costs. Xerus inauris, a ground squirrel found throughout southern Africa, is extremely social and promiscuous with one of the highest male reproductive investments among rodents. These life-history attributes suggest males and females should demonstrate a large dichotomy in immunity. Contrary to our prediction, we found no difference in spleen mass between the sexes. However, we did find significant biases in leukocyte types and red blood cell counts, possibly reflecting responses to parasite types. Among males, we predicted greater investments in spermatogenesis would result in reduced immunological investments. We found a negative association between testes and spleen size and a positive relationship between testes and number of lice suggesting trade-offs in reproductive investment possibly due to the costs associated with spermatogenesis and immunity. We suggest when measuring sexual differences in immunity it is important to consider the effects of reproductive pressures, parasite types, and life history costs.

  15. Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension with large regenerative nodules: A diagnostic challenge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Umberto Vespasiani Gentilucci; Antonio Picardi; Paolo Gallo; Giuseppe Perrone; Riccardo Del Vescovo; Giovanni Galati; Sandro Spataro; Chiara Mazzarelli; Adriano Pellicelli; Antonella Afeltra

    2011-01-01

    Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension is a poorly understood condition characterized by portal hypertension in the absence of conventional hepatic cirrhosis and described in association with blood coagulation disorders, myeloproliferative and immunological diseases and with exposure to toxic drugs. Very recently, precise classification criteria have been proposed in order to define four distinct subcategories. The present case highlights how the clinical presentation, the confounding results from imaging studies, and the difficulties in the histological evaluation often render cases of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension a real diagnostic challenge. It also underscores the classification problems which can be faced once this diagnosis is performed. Indeed, the different subcategories proposed result from the prevalent subtypes in a spectrum of hepatic regenerative responses to a variety of injuries determining microcirculatory disturbances. More flexibility in classification should derive from this etiopathogenic background.

  16. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts.

  17. What Can Vampires Teach Us about Immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David S

    2016-04-01

    Speculative fiction examines the leading edge of science and can be used to introduce ideas into the classroom. For example, most students are already familiar with the fictional infectious diseases responsible for vampire and zombie outbreaks. The disease dynamics of these imaginary ailments follow the same rules we see for real diseases and can be used to remind students that they already understand the basic rules of disease ecology and immunology. By engaging writers of this sort of fiction in an effort to solve problems in immunology we may be able to perform a directed evolution experiment where we follow the evolution of plots rather than genetic traits.

  18. Immunologic Abnormalities, Treatments, and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Nathalie F; Kolte, Astrid M; Larsen, Elisabeth C

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss, depending on the definition, affects 1% to 3% of women aiming to have a child. Little is known about the direct causes of recurrent pregnancy loss, and the condition is considered to have a multifactorial and complex pathogenesis. The aim of this review was to summarize ...... the evaluation and the management of the condition with specific emphasis on immunologic biomarkers identified as risk factors as well as current immunologic treatment options. The review also highlights and discusses areas in need of further research....

  19. Cancer immunology and colorectal cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Luca

    2011-06-01

    The recurrence of a cancer - local or distant (metastasis) - is manifested by the persistence of cancer cells in the organism after the ablation of the primary lesion, an ineffective anticancer immune response, and by the activity of biological/immunological factors that can stimulate and sustain its development. This review focuses on colorectal carcinoma and discusses some aspects of cancer immunology regarding cancer development and its recurrence. It is addressed also to the clinician to provide new insights helpful for designing better therapeutic strategies and patient's follow up. Therapeutic approaches used during and after surgical treatments, found capable of modulating immunity (differently affecting disease outcome), will also be described.

  20. [Some immunological changes in children with bacterial infections treated with bacteriophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagava, K I; Metskhvarishvili, G D; Gachechiladze, K K; Korinteli, I A; Khoĭle, N; Dzuliashvili, M G

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to reveal the possible immunological changes in children with bacterial infections treated with commercial bacteriophage preparations administered per os. In case of medical indications (for treatment or diagnostic) blood sampling was carried out. In serum the antibodies against bacteriophage preparations - phage cocktail components (phages against Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were investigated. The neutralisation reaction was used. There were processed samples from 65 children with following diagnoses: sepsis, bacterial pneumonia, urinary tract infection, bacterial infections of upper respiratory ways, bacterial diarrhea. In samples taken in the first days of treatment antibodies were revealed in infants up to one month (I group) in 0/29 cases - 0%, in infants aged from one month till one year (II group)- 1/25 - 4.0%, in children aged from 1 till 15 years (III group) - 3/9 - 33.3%; data after 14-20 days from the beginning of treatment - I group - 0/9 - 0%, II group - 4/15 - 26.7%, III group - 5/5 - 100%; data after 30-60 days from the beginning of the treatment - I group - 1/5 - 20.0%, II group - 6/10 - 60.0%, III group - 3/3 - 100%. Bacteriophages neitralisation degree varied between 50,7% and 97.3%. Any regularity regarding different components of used phage preparations was not established. In case of inclusion of commercial phage preparations administered per os in the treatment of bacterial infections in children, the anti-phage neutralizing antibodies are produced by the macroorganism. This fact limits the duration of phage therapy and its usage in the treatment of future bacterial infections in treated patients. Production of anti-phage antibodies in young infants is substantially less expressed and this indicates to purposefulness and presumably higher efficacy of bacteriophage therapy in this age period.

  1. Current research status of immunology in the genomic era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This review updates the current status of immunology research under the influence of genomics,both conceptually and technologically.It particularly highlights the advantages of employing the high-throughput and large-scale technology,the large genomic database,and bioinformatic power in the immunology research.The fast development in the fields of basic immunology,clinical immunology(tumor and infectious immunology) and vaccine designing is illustrated with respect to the successful usage of genomic strategy.We also speculate the future research directions of immunology in the era of genomics and post-genomics.

  2. Current research status of immunology in the genomic era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HaoWen; LI dinZhi; ZHAO GuoPing; WANG Ying

    2009-01-01

    This review updates the current status of immunology research under the influence of genomics, both conceptually and technologically. It particularly highlights the advantages of employing the high-throughput and large-scale technology, the large genomic database, and bioinformatic power in the immunology research. The fast development in the fields of basic immunology, clinical immunology (tumor and infectious immunology) and vaccine designing is illustrated with respect to the successful usage of genomic strategy. We also speculate the future research directions of immunology in the era of genomics and post-genomics.

  3. Persistent digestive disorders in the tropics: causative infectious pathogens and reference diagnostic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Sören L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent digestive disorders account for considerable disease burden in the tropics. Despite advances in understanding acute gastrointestinal infections, important issues concerning epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and control of most persistent digestive symptomatologies remain to be elucidated. Helminths and intestinal protozoa are considered to play major roles, but the full extent of the aetiologic spectrum is still unclear. We provide an overview of pathogens causing digestive disorders in the tropics and evaluate available reference tests. Methods We searched the literature to identify pathogens that might give rise to persistent diarrhoea, chronic abdominal pain and/or blood in the stool. We reviewed existing laboratory diagnostic methods for each pathogen and stratified them by (i microscopy; (ii culture techniques; (iii immunological tests; and (iv molecular methods. Pathogen-specific reference tests providing highest diagnostic accuracy are described in greater detail. Results Over 30 pathogens may cause persistent digestive disorders. Bacteria, viruses and parasites are important aetiologic agents of acute and long-lasting symptomatologies. An integrated approach, consisting of stool culture, microscopy and/or specific immunological techniques for toxin, antigen and antibody detection, is required for accurate diagnosis of bacteria and parasites. Molecular techniques are essential for sensitive diagnosis of many viruses, bacteria and intestinal protozoa, and are increasingly utilised as adjuncts for helminth identification. Conclusions Diagnosis of the broad spectrum of intestinal pathogens is often cumbersome. There is a need for rapid diagnostic tests that are simple and affordable for resource-constrained settings, so that the management of patients suffering from persistent digestive disorders can be improved.

  4. Blood profiles in unanesthetized and anesthetized guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy R; Johnston, Matthew S; Higgins, Sarah; Izzo, Angelo A; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig is a common animal model that is used in biomedical research to study a variety of systems, including hormonal and immunological responses, pulmonary physiology, corticosteroid response and others. However, because guinea pigs are evolutionarily a prey species, they do not readily show behavioral signs of disease, which can make it difficult to detect illness in a laboratory setting. Minimally invasive blood tests, such as complete blood counts and plasma biochemistry assays, are useful in both human and veterinary medicine as an initial diagnostic technique to rule in or rule out systemic illness. In guinea pigs, phlebotomy for such tests often requires that the animals be anesthetized first. The authors evaluated hematological and plasma biochemical effects of two anesthetic agents that are commonly used with guinea pigs in a research setting: isoflurane and a combination of ketamine and xylazine. Hematological and plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different when guinea pigs were under either anesthetic, compared to when they were unanesthetized. Plasma proteins, liver enzymes, white blood cells and red blood cells appeared to be significantly altered by both anesthetics, and hematological and plasma biochemical differences were greater when guinea pigs were anesthetized with the combination of ketamine and xylazine than when they were anesthetized with isoflurane. Overall these results indicate that both anesthetics can significantly influence hematological and plasma biochemical parameters in guinea pigs.

  5. SOME IMMUNOLOGICAL INDICATORS IN CERVICAL PATHOLOGY ASSOCIATED WITH PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Savchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. To study immunological indices and functional activity of neutrophils in women with human papillomavirus infection (HPV, as well as their dependence on severity of cervical morphological alterations, we examined sixty-seven female patients in their reproductive age. It was found that, regardless of severity of pathological changes in uterine cervix, the women with HPV infection show decreased numbers of NK cells and CD4+ lymphocytes in peripheral blood, along with increased contents of gd T cells. In cases of combined sub-clinical infection with leukoplakia and endocervicosis, more severe disorders of cellular immunity were detectable than in CIN I and CIN II. It is assumed, that initial neoplastic processes with HPV background are accompanied by a more pronounced immune response. Meanwhile, functional activity of neutrophilic granulocytes varies in an inverse manner, being, generally, increased in common HPV infection, followed by most significant changes in CIN I and CIN II.

  6. Immunological aspects of oral vaccination in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, P.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis immunological consequences of oral vaccination in fish have been described. The efficacy of oral vaccination can be increased by protection of the antigen against degradation in the foregut, in order to reach the hindgut in sufficient quantities for uptake and subsequent activation of

  7. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  8. Pathogen evolution and the immunological niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobey, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    Host immunity is a major driver of pathogen evolution and thus a major determinant of pathogen diversity. Explanations for pathogen diversity traditionally assume simple interactions between pathogens and the immune system, a view encapsulated by the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. However, there is growing evidence that the complexity of many host-pathogen interactions is dynamically important. This revised perspective requires broadening the definition of a pathogen's immunological phenotype, or what can be thought of as its immunological niche. After reviewing evidence that interactions between pathogens and host immunity drive much of pathogen evolution, I introduce the concept of a pathogen's immunological phenotype. Models that depart from the SIR paradigm demonstrate the utility of this perspective and show that it is particularly useful in understanding vaccine-induced evolution. This paper highlights questions in immunology, evolution, and ecology that must be answered to advance theories of pathogen diversity. © 2014 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Immunological Effects of Silica and Asbestos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takemi Otsuki; Fuminori Hyodoh; Ayako Ueki; Yasumitsu Nishimura; Megumi Maeda; Shuko Murakami; Hiroaki Hayashi; Yoshie Miura; Masayasu Kusaka; Takashi Nakano; Kazuya Fukuoka; Takumi Kishimoto

    2007-01-01

    Silicosis patients (SILs) and patients who have been exposed to asbestos develop not only respiratory diseases but also certain immunological disorders. In particular, SIL sometimes complicates autoimmune diseases such as systemic scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis (known as Caplan syndrome), and systemic lupus erythematoses. In addition, malignant complications such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma often occurr in patients exposed to asbestos, and may be involved in the reduction of tumor immunity. Although silica-induced disorders of autoimmunity have been explained as adjuvant-type effects of silica, more precise analyses are needed and should reflect the recent progress in immunomolecular findings. A brief summary of our investigations related to the immunological effects of silica/asbestos is presented. Recent advances in immunomolecular studies led to detailed analyses of the immunological effects of asbestos and silica. Both affect immuno-competent cells and these effects may be associated with the pathophysiological development of complications in silicosis and asbestos-exposed patients such as the occurrence of autoimmune disorders and malignant tumors, respectively. In addition,immunological analyses may lead to the development of new clinical tools for the modification of the pathophysiological aspects of diseases such as the regulation of autoimmunity or tumor immunity using cellmediated therapies, various cytokines, and molecule-targeting therapies. In particular, as the incidence of asbestosrelated malignancies is increasing and such malignancies have been a medical and social problem since the summer of 2005 in Japan, efforts should be focused on developing a cure for these diseases to eliminate nationwide anxiety.

  10. APPROUSH TO SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTICS OF CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDIDIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsapov D.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increased level of morbidity of infective endocarditis (IE connected with new risk factors: intravenous drug use, cardiosurgical interventions, hemodialysis brought new clinical forms of the disease. As it shown in a literature main pathogenetic factors of IE are bacteraemia, trauma of endocardium and invasive medical procedures. Very typical pathogens are streptococci and staphylococci. Most typically mitral and aortal valves are affected with spreading of vegetations on surrounding media. Discussion. IE is polyetiologic disease caused by more than 128 microorganisms, and still a challenge for medical professionals. Detection a causative agent is critical for proper specific treatment. In different sources data on percentage of proven cases very according to country and different medical centres reflecting different local epidemiology of IE, diagnostic criteria and protocols. Culture negative infectious endocarditis (CNIE is considered in case of obtaining of three negative results of cultivation of samples on a standard blood agar during 7 days and subculturing. CNIE incidence very form 2% to 33% according to different researches and higher in cases of community acquired infection and reseeding antibacterial treatment. Some of cases of CNIE caused by gram - negative fastidious microorganisms - Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Actinobacillus, Actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae, with united in HACEK group according to their properties to colonize oropharynx and requirement in special conditions and duration of incubation. Detection of some intracellular bacteria, such as C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. require immunological methods of detection, histological methods and of PCR. Conclusion. In case of diagnostics of patients with CNIE it is necessary to use a combination of prolonged subculturing of serum, emboli and histologic material on blood agar with microscopy by Warthin

  11. [Anti-alpha-gliadin antibodies. Sensitivity, specificity and correlation with blood xylose test in the 3 diagnostic stages of celiac disease in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, A; Florean, P; Trevisan, M; Not, T; Perticarari, S; Quadrifoglio, F; Torre, G; Cauci, S

    1987-01-01

    The specificity and sensibility of IgA and IgG alfagliadin antibody test (AaGA) for screening, diagnosis and follow-up of childhood coeliac disease has been evaluated. We have compared AaGA test to D-xylose blood test and at last we have examined the false positive and negative results given by the test. Two groups of subjects were considered: 1) 90 children with untreated coeliac disease (21 newly diagnosed (I stage), 50 in gluten withdrawal (II stage), 19 in challenge (III stage); 2) 255 disease controls including: 157 healthy controls; 31 children with gastroenterological disorders other than coeliac disease; 31 children with food allergy and atopic dermatitis; 36 children with "constitutional" short stature (without GH deficiency and with normal intestinal mucosa). The sensibility of AaGA test in the first stage of coeliac disease has been of 95.2% for the IgG class antibody and 90.4% for the IgA class; on the other hand the showed a specificity of 83.6% for IgG class antibody and 96.9% for IgA class. In only two newly diagnosed coeliac children we have found false negative results: in the first case the patient was IgA-deficient, in the second the age was above 3 years. AaGA IgA resulted positive only in the 12.9% of the group of gastroenterological and atopic controls; particularly most cases were affected by multiple food allergies and two patients by chronic autoimmune disease of small intestine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Origins and evolution of reproductive immunology: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, W David

    2015-04-01

    This is a brief personal assessment of the origins and development of the field of reproductive immunology from the 19th century to the present day, with special reference to the founding of the Journal of Reproductive Immunology in 1979.

  13. ESTUDIO DIAGNÓSTICO DEL CLIMA LABORAL EN LA EMPRESA DE SUEROS Y PRODUCTOS HEMODERIVADOS / DIAGNOSTIC STUDY OF ORGANIZATIONAL ENVIRONMENT IN THE ENTERPRISE OF SERA AND BLOOD PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoanys Paule-Hernández

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    El objetivo del presente trabajo es determinar las variables que inciden negativamente sobre la percepción que tienen las personas acerca de la calidad del trabajo que realizan y la actitud que asumen al respecto, en la Empresa de Sueros y Hemoderivados. Se evalúa el estado del clima socio-psicológico mediante el cuestionario OLARIS, con escala de 78 ítems, dividida en cinco variables y 19 subvariables; y el cuestionario autodiagnóstico sobre estilos de dirección, realizado a los jefes directos por áreas, que permite determinar su orientación como: analizador, controlador, apoyador, promocionador. Para ello se utilizó una muestra de 73 trabajadores, pertenecientes a todas las áreas de la planta, especificándose un 99,5% de confianza. En el trabajo se estableció la existencia de un estado del clima favorable, aunque también se reflejan las insatisfacciones con el propio desempeño del trabajo y del Centro, así como la percepción de un inadecuado funcionamiento de la organización, que entorpecen un mejor estado del mismo.

    Abstract

    The aim of this paper is to identify the variables that have a negative impact in people´s perception about the quality of their work and the attitude they assume in this regard at the enterprise of sera and blood products. To assess the state of socio-psychological environment it is applied the questionnaire OLARIS which has a scale of 78 items divided into five variables and 19 sub-variables, and the questionnaire of self-management style to direct supervisors from different areas in order to evaluate the management styles, such as: analyzer, supervisor, supporter, promotioner. It was selected a sample with 73 workers from all areas at the plant, with a 99.5% of confidence. As a result of this work it is shown that the state of socio-psychological environment is conducive to performance, however, also it reflected a number of dissatisfactions with the proper

  14. 21 CFR 866.5230 - Colostrum immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostrum immunological test system. 866.5230... Colostrum immunological test system. (a) Identification. A colostrum immunological test system is a device... colostrum. Colostrum is a substance excreted by the mammary glands during pregnancy and until production...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-storing protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurements of ferritin aid in the diagnosis of diseases... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340... Ferritin immunological test system. (a) Identification. A ferritin immunological test system is a device...

  16. Preface to the Publication of Cellular & Molecular Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Feng Chen; Kuang-Yen Chou

    2004-01-01

    @@ Immunology has made numerous important advances over the past decades and is at the forefront in uncovering the mechanisms of human immunological disorders and in eradicating pandemic infectious diseases. Immunological advances have also revealed the mystery of life and death and provided insights into creating a better environment for contemporary human existence.

  17. Preface to the Publication of Cellular & Molecular Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-FengChen; Kuang-YenChou

    2004-01-01

    Immunology has made numerous important advances over the past decades and is at the forefront in uncovering the mechanisms of human immunological disorders and in eradicating pandemic infectious diseases. Immunological advances have also revealed the mystery of life and death and

  18. Immunosensors in Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justino, Celine I L; Duarte, Armando C; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P

    2016-01-01

    The application of simple, cost-effective, rapid, and accurate diagnostic technologies for detection and identification of cardiac and cancer biomarkers has been a central point in the clinical area. Biosensors have been recognized as efficient alternatives for the diagnostics of various diseases due to their specificity and potential for application on real samples. The role of nanotechnology in the construction of immunological biosensors, that is, immunosensors, has contributed to the improvement of sensitivity, since they are based in the affinity between antibody and antigen. Other analytes than biomarkers such as hormones, pathogenic bacteria, and virus have also been detected by immunosensors for clinical point-of-care applications. In this chapter, we first introduced the various types of immunosensors and discussed their applications in clinical diagnostics over the recent 6 years, mainly as point-of-care technologies for the determination of cardiac and cancer biomarkers, hormones, pathogenic bacteria, and virus. The future perspectives of these devices in the field of clinical diagnostics are also evaluated.

  19. Astrovirus Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérot, Philippe; Lecuit, Marc; Eloit, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Various methods exist to detect an astrovirus infection. Current methods include electron microscopy (EM), cell culture, immunoassays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and various other molecular approaches that can be applied in the context of diagnostic or in surveillance studies. With the advent of metagenomics, novel human astrovirus (HAstV) strains have been found in immunocompromised individuals in association with central nervous system (CNS) infections. This work reviews the past and current methods for astrovirus detection and their uses in both research laboratories and for medical diagnostic purposes. PMID:28085120

  20. Blood sugar test - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood glucose level ( hypoglycemia ) may be due to: Hypopituitarism (a pituitary gland disorder) Underactive thyroid gland or ... tonic-clonic seizure Glucagon blood test Glucagonoma Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Hypothyroidism Insulinoma Low blood sugar Multiple endocrine neoplasia ( ...

  1. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Armenio, Lucio; Bernardini, Roberto; Boner, Attilio; Calvani, Mauro; Cardinale, Fabio; Cavagni, Giovanni; Dondi, Arianna; Duse, Marzia; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Marseglia, Gian L; del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Muraro, Antonella; Pajno, Giovanni B; Paravati, Francesco; Peroni, Diego; Tripodi, Salvatore; Ugazio, Alberto G; Indinnimeo, Luciana

    2011-05-01

    In Italy, according to the International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study, the prevalence of current asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 2006 was 7.9%, 6.5%, and 10.1% among children aged 6-7 and 8.4%, 15.5%, and 7.75% among children aged 13-14 yr. University education in this field is provided by the Postgraduate Schools of Pediatrics and those of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, as well as several annual Master courses. The Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) was founded in 1996 and counts about 1000 members. SIAIP promotes evidence-based management of allergic children and disseminates information to patients and their families through a quite innovative website and the National Journal 'Rivista Italiana di Allergologia Pediatrica'. In the last decade, four major regional, inter-regional, and national web-based networks have been created to link pediatric allergy centers and to share their clinical protocols and epidemiologic data. In addition, National Registers of Primary Immune-deficiencies and on Pediatric HIV link all clinical excellence centers. Research projects in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology are founded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by the National Research Council (CNR), but the overall investments in this research area are quite low. Only a handful Italian excellence centers participate in European Projects on Pediatric Allergy and Immunology within the 7th Framework Program. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology currently hosts two Italians in its Executive Committee (EC) and one in the EC of the Pediatric Section; moreover, major European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology meetings and courses in the area of pediatrics (e.g., PAAM, Venice, 2009) have been held in Italy in the last 3 yr. Italian hallmarks in the management of allergic diseases in childhood are a quite alive and spread interest in

  2. Chapter 29: Unproved and controversial methods and theories in allergy-immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rachna; Greenberger, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Unproved methods and controversial theories in the diagnosis and management of allergy-immunology are those that lack scientific credibility. Some definitions are provided for perspective because in chronic medical conditions, frequently, nonscientifically based treatments are developed that can have a very positive psychological effect on the patients in the absence of objective physical benefit. Standard practice can be described as "the methods of diagnosis and treatment used by reputable physicians in a particular subspecialty or primary care practice" with the understanding that diagnosis and treatment options are consistent with established mechanisms of conditions or diseases.(3) Conventional medicine (Western or allopathic medicine) is that which is practiced by the majority of MDs, DOs, psychologists, RNs, and physical therapists. Complementary medicine uses the practice of conventional medicine with complementary and alternative medicine such as using acupuncture for pain relief in addition to opioids. Alternative medicine implies use of complementary and alternative practices in place of conventional medicine. Unproved and controversial methods and theories do not have supporting data, validation, and sufficient scientific scrutiny, and they should not be used in the practice of allergy-immunology. Some examples of unproven theories about allergic immunologic conditions include allergic toxemia, idiopathic environmental intolerance, association with childhood vaccinations, and adrenal fatigue. Unconventional (unproved) diagnostic methods for allergic-immunologic conditions include cytotoxic tests, provocation-neutralization, electrodermal diagnosis, applied kinesiology assessments, and serum IgG or IgG(4) testing. Unproven treatments and intervention methods for allergic-immunologic conditions include acupuncture, homeopathy ("likes cure likes"), halotherapy, and autologous urine injections.

  3. Understanding liver immunology using intravital microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Pedro Elias; Oliveira, André Gustavo; Chang, Lynne; Paula-Neto, Heitor Affonso; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-09-01

    The liver has come a long way since it was considered only a metabolic organ attached to the gastrointestinal tract. The simultaneous ascension of immunology and intravital microscopy evidenced the liver as a central axis in the immune system, controlling immune responses to local and systemic agents as well as disease tolerance. The multiple hepatic cell populations are organized in a vascular environment that promotes intimate cellular interactions, including initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses, rapid leukocyte recruitment, pathogen clearance and production of a variety of immune mediators. In this review, we focus on the advances in liver immunology supported by intravital microscopy in diseases such as isquemia/reperfusion, acute liver injury and infections.

  4. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  5. Immunological effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Rafael Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a botanical hallucinogen traditionally used by indigenous groups of the northwest Amazon. In the last decade, the use of ayahuasca has spread from Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru to the U.S., Europe, Asia, and Africa. Despite acute and long-term evidence of good tolerability and safety for ayahuasca administered in the laboratory or ritually consumed in religious contexts, little is known about the immunological impact of ayahuasca on humans. Since ayahuasca is used by an increasing number of consumers, and considering its therapeutic potential, more information is needed regarding ayahuasca potential risks. This article presents a brief overview of the available data regarding the immunological impact of ayahuasca in humans.

  6. Findings of interest from immunology and psychoneuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Les

    2007-05-01

    The biopsychosocial paradigm is now the main model when dealing with most human health disorders. One of the strengths of this model is that it encourages broader thinking when assessing and managing patients. It also encourages broader reading into areas not traditionally associated with manual therapy. Immunology and neuroscience are amongst the fastest growing medical sciences. These fields come together in the relatively new area of psychoneuroimmunolgy. This article examines some findings from these fields that are not widely discussed in the physical therapy professions. These findings are of relevance to many of the disciplines within the physical therapies. It is the authors aim to stimulate further interest in the relevant, yet often under explored areas of immunology and psychoneuroimmunology.

  7. Proof of Principle for a Real-Time Pathogen Isolation Media Diagnostic: The Use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Discriminate Bacterial Pathogens and Antimicrobial-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Grown on Blood Agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalie A. Multari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS is a rapid, in situ, diagnostic technique in which light emissions from a laser plasma formed on the sample are used for analysis allowing automated analysis results to be available in seconds to minutes. This speed of analysis coupled with little or no sample preparation makes LIBS an attractive detection tool. In this study, it is demonstrated that LIBS can be utilized to discriminate both the bacterial species and strains of bacterial colonies grown on blood agar. A discrimination algorithm was created based on multivariate regression analysis of spectral data. The algorithm was deployed on a simulated LIBS instrument system to demonstrate discrimination capability using 6 species. Genetically altered Staphylococcus aureus strains grown on BA, including isogenic sets that differed only by the acquisition of mutations that increase fusidic acid or vancomycin resistance, were also discriminated. The algorithm successfully identified all thirteen cultures used in this study in a time period of 2 minutes. This work provides proof of principle for a LIBS instrumentation system that could be developed for the rapid discrimination of bacterial species and strains demonstrating relatively minor genomic alterations using data collected directly from pathogen isolation media.

  8. Immunological memory within the innate immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, J. C.; Ugolini, S.; Vivier, E

    2014-01-01

    Immune memory has traditionally been the domain of the adaptive immune system, present only in antigen-specific T and B cells. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for immunological memory in lower organisms (which are not thought to possess adaptive immunity) and within specific cell subsets of the innate immune system. A special focus will be given to recent findings in both mouse and humans for specificity and memory in natural killer (NK) cells, which hav...

  9. Rapid Advancement of Immunology Study in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The world-renowned Cell Press recently released a new informational supplement--Spotlight on Chi- na-to introduce the rapid developments in the basic and clinical researches in immunology in China. The electronic version of the supplement can be viewed or downloaded for free on the website of the Cell Press (http://www. cell. com/spotlightonchina), and the hard copy will be published along with the new issue of Immunity in November.

  10. Proteomics in immunological reactions to drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ariza, Adriana; Montañez, M. I.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review: To discuss the avenues that proteomic techniques are opening for the study of the chemical basis and cellular mechanisms of immunological reactions to drugs. Recent findings: Technical developments in recent years are allowing a detailed characterization of drug–protein interactions. In addition, novel metabolic pathways for drug biotransformation are being uncovered and potential targets for protein haptenation are being proposed that may help in the understanding of t...

  11. Louis Pasteur, the Father of Immunology?

    OpenAIRE

    Kendall A Smith

    2012-01-01

    Louis Pasteur is traditionally considered as the progenitor of modern immunology because of his studies in the late nineteenth century that popularized the germ theory of disease, and that introduced the hope that all infectious diseases could be prevented by prophylactic vaccination, as well as also treated by therapeutic vaccination, if applied soon enough after infection. However, Pasteur was working at the dawn of the appreciation of the microbial world, at a time when the notion of such ...

  12. ETHNIC AND POPULATION-SPECIFIC FEATURES OF SOME IMMUNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHRONIC HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Ageeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Immunophenotype profile of lymphocytes (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ from peripheral blood in gastric ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, chronic gastritis and stomach cancer has been studied in Khakassian aboriginals and migrants. Apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes was also evaluated. Some alterations of immunological indexes were revealed in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori, as compared to healthy donors and migrants. The changes were characterized by a more intense apoptotic death of lymphocytes in the patients, when compared with numbers of apoptotic cells in control group. Probable role of apoptotic events in regulation of local and system immunity in Helicobacter pylori infection is discussed.

  13. From Immunologically Archaic to Neoteric Glycovaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cavallari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides (PS are present in the outermost surface of bacteria and readily come in contact with immune cells. They interact with specific antibodies, which in turn confer protection from infections. Vaccines with PS from pneumococci, meningococci, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and Salmonella typhi may be protective, although with the important constraint of failing to generate permanent immunological memory. This limitation has in part been circumvented by conjugating glycovaccines to proteins that stimulate T helper cells and facilitate the establishment of immunological memory. Currently, protection evoked by conjugated PS vaccines lasts for a few years. The same approach failed with PS from staphylococci, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Klebsiella. All those germs cause severe infections in humans and often develop resistance to antibiotic therapy. Thereby, prevention is of increasing importance to better control outbreaks. As only 23 of more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes and 4 of 13 clinically relevant Neisseria meningitidis serogroups are covered by available vaccines there is still tremendous clinical need for PS vaccines. This review focuses on glycovaccines and the immunological mechanisms for their success or failure. We discuss recent advances that may facilitate generation of high affinity anti-PS antibodies and confer specific immunity and long-lasting protection.

  14. Photothermal effects of immunologically modified carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Ryan T.; Henderson, Brock; Goddard, Jessica; Tan, Yongqiang; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes have a great potential in the biomedical applications. To use carbon nanotubes in the treatment of cancer, we synthesized an immunologically modified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) using a novel immunomodifier, glycated chitosan (GC), as an effective surfactant for SWNT. This new composition SWNT-GC was stable due to the strong non-covalent binding between SWNT and GC. The structure of SWNT-GC is presented in this report. The photothermal effect of SWNT-GC was investigated under irradiation of a near-infrared laser. SWNT-GC retained the optical properties of SWNT and the immunological properties of GC. Specifically, the SWNT-GC could selectively absorb a 980-nm light and induce desirable thermal effects in tissue culture and in animals. It could also induce tumor cell destruction, controlled by the laser settings and the doses of SWNT and GC. Laser+SWNT-GC treatment could also induce strong expression of heat shock proteins on the surface of tumor cells. This immunologically modified carbon nanotube could be used for selective photothermal interactions in noninvasive tumor treatment.

  15. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models.

  16. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Filho, Nelson A; Jacob, Cristina M; Sole, Dirceu; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Arruda, Luisa K; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz; Cocco, Renata R; Camelo-Nunes, Inês; Chong-Neto, Herberto J; Wandalsen, Gustavo F; Castro, Ana P M; Yang, Ariana C; Pastorino, Antonio C; Sarinho, Emanuel S

    2013-06-01

    The subspecialty of pediatric allergy and immunology in Brazil is in its early years and progressing steadily. This review highlights the research developed in the past years aiming to show the characteristics of allergic and immunologic diseases in this vast country. Epidemiologic studies demonstrated the high prevalence of asthma in infants, children, and adolescents. Mortality rates and average annual variation of asthma hospitalization have reduced in all pediatric age groups. Indoor aeroallergen exposure is excessively high and contributes to the high rates of allergy sensitization. Prevalence of food allergy has increased to epidemic levels. Foods (35%), insect stings (30%), and drugs (23%) are the main etiological agents of anaphylaxis in children and adolescents. Molecular diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) showed a high incidence of fungal infections including paracoccidioidomycosis in X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome, and the occurrence of BCG adverse reactions or other mycobacterial infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease. Education in pediatric allergy and immunology is deficient for medical students, but residency programs are effective in training internists and pediatricians for the practice of allergy. The field of PID requires further training. Last, this review is a tribute to Prof. Dr. Charles Naspitz, one of the pioneers of our specialty in Brazil.

  17. House Dust Mites Confer a Distinct Immunological Feature among Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Baris

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a heterogeneous disease with regard to clinical phenotype and natural history. We investigated T cell subtypes and cytokine responses in peripheral blood and skin lesions of AD patients with various sensitivities. Immunological studies were performed in 27 subjects: 9 house dust mite (HDM-sensitized; 6 subjects with sensitizations other than HDM; 7 non-allergic AD patients and 5 healthy controls. Among those, skin biopsy samples of 13 subjects were evaluated for immunohistochemical analyses, as well. The mean age was 8.93±5.17 years. HDM-allergic AD emerged as a distinct immunologic phenotype, with higher production of interleukin (IL-4, -5, -2 both at rest and when stimulated by Der p1 or SEB along with higher Th17. As for TH17 cell percentage, it was increased in all AD groups compared to healthy controls, while HDM-allergic group was distinguished with a significantly lower production of IL-17. Patients with sensitizations other than HDM were mostly similar to non-allergic AD, with increased Th17 and CD4+CD69+interferon-gamma (IFN-γ+ T cells percentage. The biopsy of lesional skin showed that HDM-allergic AD had lower IFN-γ and IFN-γ co-expressing CD8+ T cells compared to patients with other sensitizations (p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively. Among the HDM allergic patients, pairwise comparison of lesional versus non-lesional skin revealed higher CD4+ T cells numbers, expression of forkhead box P3 (Foxp3 and T-cell-specific transcription factor (T-bet (p=0.018, p=0.018, p=0.018, respectively. HDM-allergic AD is a distinct subtype with a predominant skewing in Th2 and higher Th17 cell percentage along with a blunted Th1 response in the skin, all of which may have therapeutic implications.

  18. Immunological compatibility between the chacma baboon and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, J H; Smit, J A; Neethling, F A; Nortman, P J; Myburgh, J A

    1991-12-01

    Predictions of an increasing shortage of donor organs for the future has led to a resurgence of interest in xenotransplantation. We have methodically assessed the immunological compatibility of humans against the chacma baboon with a view to narrowing the gap of concordance by careful immunological screening. The necessity of major blood group compatibility in xenotransplantation is now established. While no group O universal donor exists in the baboon, groups A (45%), B (15%), and AB (40%) are well represented. Baboon histocompatibility antigens could not be precisely defined using human antisera. This does not necessarily imply lack of homology between the species, as we have shown specific crossreactivity of numerous antihuman monoclonal antibodies with baboon leukocytes. Normal humans do not exhibit preformed agglutinins to erythrocytes of the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus orientalis)) but cytotoxic antibodies are occasionally found. Sera from allosensitized patients may contain crossreacting hemagglutinins, leukoagglutinins and complement-dependent cytotoxic antibodies. Binding of human immunoglobulin-G and -M to baboon targets was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Negative crossmatch combinations for antibodies of the IgG subclass were easily found, but IgM antibodies from allosensitized patients were polyspecific in their action. In vitro assessment of lymphocyte mediated cytotoxicity showed that preformed cellular immunity between the species was rare. The response of human lymphocytes to xenoantigen stimulation in mixed lymphocyte cultures showed a normal distribution, permitting the selection of low-responding combinations. Screening for viruses, especially HTLV-1 and Coxsackie-BL34, is important. These findings demonstrate a closer degree of concordance than has previously been suspected.

  19. IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFECT PRODUCED BY VACCINATION WITH «PNEUMO 23» OF CHILDREN WITH CARRIAGE OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Sizonenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Sixteen children from 3 to 6 years old with complicated premorbid background, carrying S. pneumoniae, who had inflammation markers (altered IL-6 and TNFα amounts in peripheral blood analysisтalong with immunological deficiency, were vaccinated with a «Pneumo 23» preparation. A good tolerance of «Pneumo 23» vaccine was determined. A significant increase of specific antibodies was established both to pneumococcal polysaccharides and to polysaccharides, containing in «Pneumo 23». A tendency to diminished inflammatory events and activated immunological response was revealed, that was expressed as a decrease of serum IL-6 and increase in TNFα.

  20. Diagnostic Pitfalls of Discriminating Lymphoma-Associated Effusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Tseng, Guan-Chin; Chen, Li-Hsiou; Bai, Li-Yuan; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Tu, Chih-Yen; Light, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, immunologic defects, enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes, and frequent hydration and diuresis in lymphoma patients may affect the development of pleural effusion (PE). The study was to assess the clinical utility of “Light criteria” and the “recommended algorithm for investigating PEs” in patients with lymphoma. The characteristics of 126 PEs of lymphoma patients who underwent diagnostic thoracentesis between January 1, 2003, and April 30, 2012, were reviewed. Using Light criteria, 29 (23%) PEs were incorrectly classified. The sensitivity for exudates in Light criteria was 88% and the specificity was only 44%. In 32 transudates, PE LDH correlated with blood LDH concentration (P transudates were misclassified as exudates (50%; 9/18) just due to PE LDH more than two-thirds the upper limits. Among the 56 bilateral PEs, 33 (59%) were exudates. Ten (63%) polymorphonuclear (PMN)-predominant exudative PEs were malignant. Infective PEs were often mononuclear (67%) rather than PMN predominant. When a patient has lymphoma with either unilateral or bilateral PE, thoracentesis for microbiological testing and cytology is imperative. Carefully clinical correlation in addition to the result from Light criteria and differential cell count is essential for prompt management. PMID:25929933

  1. Characterization of dengue virus infections in a sample of patients suggests unique clinical, immunological, and virological profiles that impact on the diagnosis of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senaratne, Thamarasi; Wimalaratne, Harith; Alahakoon, D G S; Gunawardane, Nirmali; Carr, Jillian; Noordeen, Faseeha

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are increasing with respect to incidence and severity in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. The objective of this study was to define the clinical, immunological, and virological profiles of patients admitted to the General Hospital, Kandy with clinically apparent dengue. Demographic, clinical, hematological parameters, liver enzymes (ALT and AST), and blood samples were collected from 292 patients with fever dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF). Samples were analyzed for, anti-DENV IgM, IgG, and DENV nucleic acid. Myalgia was the commonest complaint by 65% of the patients. Packed cell volume was >45% in 27% of the patients while 42.12% had reduced platelets and 62.67% had reduced white blood cell counts. In contrast to other studies, positive tourniquet test (PTT) and petechiae were not major indicators of DENV infection or severity of the disease. Clinical profiles were significantly different between DF and DHF/DSS and showed many similarities to that reported elsewhere. Altogether, 43 patients (14.73%) were viremic as detected by RT-PCR; 181 patients (62%) were positive for anti-DENV IgM, and 245 (84%) patients were positive for anti-DENV IgG. In combination, anti-DENV IgM and RT-PCR assays detected 224 (77.5%) of DENV infected cases, thus improving the DENV diagnosis rate. Hence, the diagnostic utility of PTT, anti-DENV IgM/IgG serology, or RT-PCR used alone in the early phase of illness is low in Sri Lanka but the diagnostic value can be improved by a combination of serology and RT-PCR. J. Med. Virol. 88:1703-1710, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Diagnostic Criteria

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    Narender P. Van Orshoven

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to find out whether Postprandial hypotension (PPH occurs more frequently in patients admitted to a geriatric ward than in healthy elderly individuals, what the optimal interval between blood pressure measurements is in order to diagnose PPH and how often it is associated with symptoms.The result of this study indicates that PPH is present in a high number of frail elderly, but also in a few healthy older persons. Measuring blood pressure at least every 10 minutes for 60 minutes after breakfast will adequately diagnose PPH, defined as >20 mmHg systolic fall, in most patients. However with definition of PPH as >30 mmHg systolic fall, measuring blood pressure every 10 minutes will miss PPH in one of three patients. With the latter definition of PPH the presence of postprandial complaints is not associated with the existence of PPH.

  3. Immunological milieu in the peritoneal cavity at laparotomy for gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Yoneda; Shinichiro Ito; Seiya Susumu; Mitsutoshi Matsuo; Ken Taniguchi; Yoshitsugu Tajima; Susumu Eguchi

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the immunological repertoire in the peritoneal cavity of gastric cancer patients.METHODS:The peritoneal cavity is a compartment in which immunological host-tumor interactions can occur.However,the role of lymphocytes in the peritoneal cavity of gastric cancer patients is unclear.We observed 64 patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer and 11 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallstones and acted as controls.Lymphocytes isolated from both peripheral blood and peritoneal lavage were analyzed for surface markers of lymphocytes and their cytokine production by flow cytometry.CD4+CD25high T cells isolated from the patient's peripheral blood were co-cultivated for 4 d with the intra-peritoneal lymphocytes,and a cytokine assay was performed.RESULTS:At gastrectomy,CCR7-CD45RA CD8+ effector memory T cells were observed in the peritoneal cavity.The frequency of CD4+ CD25 high T cells in both the peripheral blood and peritoneal cavity was elevated in patients at advanced stage [control vs stage Ⅳ in the peripheral blood:6.89 (3.39-10.4) vs 15.34 (11.37-1931),P < 0.05,control vs stage Ⅳ in the peritoneal cavity:8.65 (5.28-12.0) vs 19.56 (14.81-24.32),P < 0.05].On the other hand,the suppression was restored with CD4+ CD25highT cells from their own peripheral blood.This study is the first to analyze lymphocyte and cytokine production in the peritoneal cavity in patients with gastric cancer.Immune regulation at advanced stage is reversible at the point of gastrectomy.CONCLUSION:The immunological milieu in the peritoneal cavity of patients with advanced gastric cancer elicited a Th2 response even at gastrectomy,but this response was reversible.

  4. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zahid; Husain, Syed A; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Kar, Premashis

    2011-05-23

    Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity.

  5. Immunological, hematological and biochemical changes induced by short term exposure to cadmium in catfish (Clarias gariepinus

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    Mohamed El-Said El-Boshy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the hematological, biochemical and immunological changes in catfish (Clarias gariepinus (C. gariepinus experimental exposed to cadmium. Methods: C. gariepinus were exposed to different concentrations of cadmium (Cd (0, 2, 5, and 10 mg/L for 3 weeks. Blood samples were collected for assessing some hematological, biochemical and immunological studies at the end of experiment. Results: The results showed marked normocytic normochromic anemia, leukocytosis, neutrophilia and lymphopenia in 5, 10 mg/L in cadmium exposed fish. Also the blood level activities of ALT and AST significantly increased, as well as glucose, creatinine, urea, potassium and uric acid. Meanwhile total protein, albumin and sodium were significantly decreased at 5, 10 mg/L of cadmium exposed fish. The immunological parameters in cadmium exposed experimental dose groups decreased serum bactericidal activity, lysozyme, neutrophils adhesion test as well as decreased resistance to Aeromonas hydrophilla with increasing exposure dose seemed to correspond with suppressive of non-specific immune functions. Conclusions: The treatment of C. gariepinus with cadmium under the same conditions had immunosuppressive and decrease diseases resistance in a dose-dependent effect

  6. Immunological, hematological and biochemical changes induced by short term exposure to cadmium in catfish (Clarias gariepinus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed El-Said El-Boshy; Hossam Ali Gadalla; Fatma Mostafa Abd El-Hamied

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hematological, biochemical and immunological changes in catfish (Clarias gariepinus) (C. gariepinus) experimental exposed to cadmium. Methods: C. gariepinus were exposed to different concentrations of cadmium (Cd) (0, 2, 5, and 10 mg/L) for 3 weeks. Blood samples were collected for assessing some hematological, biochemical and immunological studies at the end of experiment. Results:neutrophilia and lymphopenia in 5, 10 mg/L in cadmium exposed fish. Also the blood level activities of ALT and AST significantly increased, as well as glucose, creatinine, urea, potassium and uric acid. Meanwhile total protein, albumin and sodium were significantly decreased at 5, 10 mg/L of cadmium exposed fish. The immunological parameters in cadmium exposed experimental dose groups decreased serum bactericidal activity, lysozyme, neutrophils adhesion test as well as decreased resistance to Aeromonas hydrophilla with increasing exposure dose seemed to correspond with suppressive of non-specific immune functions. Conclusions: The treatment of C. gariepinus with cadmium under the same conditions had immunosuppressive and decrease diseases resistance in a dose-dependent effect.

  7. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. Objective In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Methods Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Results Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity. PMID:21605420

  8. Effects of Watercress (Nasturtium nasturtium extract on selected immunological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ahmadi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Watercress (Nasturtium nasturtium is a medical plant containing diverse chemically-active substances with biological properties. The present study was conducted to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of watercress extract on immunological and hematological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss. Fish were fed for 21 days with diet supplemented with 0.1% and 1% of watercress extract per 1 kg food and with a normal diet as control. Hematological parameters such as red blood cells (RBC and white blood cells (WBC, hematocrit (Hct, hemoglobin (Hb, RBC index like mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC as well as immunological parameters such as peroxidase, lysozyme and complement activities, total protein, albumin and globulin levels were measured after 21 days of watercress extract treatment. The results indicated that oral administration of 1 % watercress extract in fish may enhance some hematological and immunological parameters including Hb and MCHC, lysozyme and complement activities, total protein and globulin levels, compared to the controls after 21 days of experimental period. In conclusion, on the basis of these results, oral administration of watercress extract may be useful to improve fish’s immune system.

  9. [Acute rhinosinusitis: diagnostics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarevich, I A; Kozlov, V S

    2013-01-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a challenging clinical problem due to its high prevalence. The overwhelming majority of the cases of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) have viral etiology. Clinical manifestations of viral and bacterial rhinosinusitis can be very similar. Similar expert communities have proposed their recommendations on diagnostics and treatment of acute rhinosinusitis in the recent decade. These recommendations are underlain by the principles of evidence-based medicine, take into consideration the result of reliable investigations, and reflect the opinions of leading specialists in otorhinolaryngology, allergology and immunology. The present review contains the analysis of consensus documents and recommendations. The results of ongoing research provide convincing evidence of the effectiveness of intranasal application of corticosteroids in the patients presenting with acute rhinosinusitis. Antibacterial therapy of acute rhinosinusitis is indicated only in the case of severe or complicated clinical course of the disease.

  10. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: an update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

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    Waleed eAl-Herz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiency diseases, compiled by the ad-hoc Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS. As compared to the previous edition, more than 15 novel disease entities have been added in the updated version. For each disorders, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This updated classification is meant to help in the diagnostic approach to patients with these diseases.

  11. Educational paper. The expanding clinical and immunological spectrum of severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Mirjam; Gennery, Andy R

    2011-05-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is one of the most severe forms of primary immunodeficiency characterized by absence of functional T lymphocytes. It is a paediatric emergency, which is life-threatening when recognized too late. The clinical presentation varies from the classical form of SCID through atypical SCID to Omenn syndrome. In addition, there is a considerable immunological variation, which can hamper the diagnosis. In this educational review, we describe the immunopathological background, clinical presentations and diagnostic process of SCID, as well as the therapeutic possibilities.

  12. Scavenger Receptors: Emerging Roles in Cancer Biology and Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Fisher, Paul B; Subjeck, John R; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of evolutionally conserved protein molecules that are structurally and functionally diverse. Although scavenger receptors were originally identified based on their capacity to scavenge modified lipoproteins, these molecules have been shown to recognize and bind to a broad spectrum of ligands, including modified and unmodified host-derived molecules or microbial components. As a major subset of innate pattern recognition receptors, scavenger receptors are mainly expressed on myeloid cells and function in a wide range of biological processes, such as endocytosis, adhesion, lipid transport, antigen presentation, and pathogen clearance. In addition to playing a crucial role in maintenance of host homeostasis, scavenger receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, e.g., atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, or metabolic disorders. Emerging evidence has begun to reveal these receptor molecules as important regulators of tumor behavior and host immune responses to cancer. This review summarizes our current understanding on the newly identified, distinct functions of scavenger receptors in cancer biology and immunology. The potential of scavenger receptors as diagnostic biomarkers and novel targets for therapeutic interventions to treat malignancies is also highlighted.

  13. Saliva Preservative for Diagnostic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is an important body fluid for diagnostic purposes. Glycoproteins, glucose, steroids, DNA, and other molecules of diagnostic value are found in saliva. It is easier to collect as compared to blood or urine. Unfortunately, saliva also contains large numbers of bacteria that can release enzymes, which can degrade proteins and nucleic acids. These degradative enzymes destroy or reduce saliva s diagnostic value. This innovation describes the formulation of a chemical preservative that prevents microbial growth and inactivates the degradative enzymes. This extends the time that saliva can be stored or transported without losing its diagnostic value. Multiple samples of saliva can be collected if needed without causing discomfort to the subject and it does not require any special facilities to handle after it is collected.

  14. 外周血中钙调蛋白对阿尔茨海默病的诊断价值%Diagnostic value of calmodulin in peripheral blood for Alzheimer disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高丽丽; 唐咏春; 毛德军; 邢岩

    2016-01-01

    目的 检测阿尔茨海默病(AD)患者外周血单个核细胞和血浆中钙调蛋白(CaM)的表达水平,评价其作为AD生物标志物的诊断价值. 方法 将2013年2月~2015年1月于青岛大学医学院附属海慈医院就诊和体检的对象共116例纳入本研究,包括AD患者40例、轻度认知障碍(MCI)患者20例、帕金森病(PD)患者20例、额颞叶痴呆(FTD)患者10例、路易体痴呆(DLB)患者10例、进行性核上性麻痹(PSP)患者6例、认知正常的健康体检者(对照组)10名.取外周血分离单个核细胞和血浆,采用Western blot和酶联免疫吸附测定(ELISA)检测CaM在外周血单个核细胞和血浆中的表达水平,并通过绘制ROC曲线判断其诊断能力. 结果 AD患者外周血单个核细胞和血浆中CaM的表达水平显著高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P< 0.05),且CaM的表达水平不随AD的进展变化. 以对照组和PSP、DLB、FTD、PD患者中CaM的表达作为标准绘制ROC曲线,曲线下面积分别为0.958、0.946、0.846、0.958和0.896. 结论 CaM在AD患者外周血单个核细胞和血浆中高表达, 是一种潜在的AD生物标志物.%Objective To test the expression levels of calmodulin (CaM) in the mononuclear cells and plasma of peripheral blood of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and to evaluate its diagnostic value as the biomarker of AD. Methods Total 116 objects treated and examined in the Affiliated Hiser Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College from February 2013 to January 2015 were enrolled into the research, including 40 cases with AD, 20 cases with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 20 cases with Parkinson disease (PD), 10 cases with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), 10 cases with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 6 cases with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 10 healthy cases with normal cognition (control group). The peripheral blood was obtained to separate the mononuclear cells and plasma. Western blot and enzyme-linked immuno

  15. Cancer immunology: the search for specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Old, L J

    1982-01-01

    The major focus of cancer immunology has shifted away from arguments about the validity of the immunosurveillance theory of cancer to the more basic question of tumor-specific antigens. Despite vast effort aimed at demonstrations of such antigens, their existence in the generality of cancer remains unproved. Serological analysis of 3 tumor types, mouse leukemia and sarcoma and human malignant melanoma, has received the most attention, and a rudimentary classification of the surface antigens expressed by these tumors has begun to emerge. The prime candidates for antigens that can be considered tumor specific are the few instances of Class 1 antigens that have now been serologically defined on mouse and human tumors. These antigens show an absolute restriction to individual tumors and are not demonstrable on any other normal or malignant cell type. Biochemical and genetic characterizations of Class 1 antigens represent an essential next step in an evaluation of the significance of these antigens. The surprising features of the thymus leukemia (TL) antigens of the mouse provide insight into the genetic origin of another key class of tumor antigens, i.e., those with characteristic properties of both differentiation and tumor-specific antigens. In normal mice, TL antigens are restricted to cells in the thymus, and strains differ with regard to expression versus nonexpression of TL antigens. Genetic information for TL is universal in mice, however, as leukemias that develop in mice normally lacking TL are found to express TL. What is clear from the past two decades of research in cancer immunology is that a far more detailed knowledge of surface antigens of tumor cells will be necessary before we can begin to assess the possibility of immunological control of cancer.

  16. Coupling gene-based and classic veterinary diagnostics improves interpretation of health and immune function in the Agassiz’s desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Karla K.; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lewison, Rebecca L.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Braun, Josephine; Waters, Shannon C.; Miles, A. Keith

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of blood constituents is a widely used tool to aid in monitoring of animal health and disease. However, classic blood diagnostics (i.e. hematologic and plasma biochemical values) often do not provide sufficient information to determine the state of an animal’s health. Field studies on wild tortoises and other reptiles have had limited success in drawing significant inferences between blood diagnostics and physiological and immunological condition. However, recent research using gene transcription profiling in the threatened Mojave desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) has proved useful in identifying immune or physiologic responses and overall health. To improve our understanding of health and immune function in tortoises, we evaluated both standard blood diagnostic (body condition, hematologic, plasma biochemistry values, trace elements, plasma proteins, vitamin A levels) and gene transcription profiles in 21 adult tortoises (11 clinically abnormal; 10 clinically normal) from Clark County, NV, USA. Necropsy and histology evaluations from clinically abnormal tortoises revealed multiple physiological complications, with moderate to severe rhinitis or pneumonia being the primary cause of morbidity in all but one of the examined animals. Clinically abnormal tortoises had increased transcription for four genes (SOD, MyD88, CL and Lep), increased lymphocyte production, biochemical enzymes and organics, trace elements of copper, and decreased numbers of leukocytes. We found significant positive correlations between increased transcription for SOD and increased trace elements for copper, as well as genes MyD88 and Lep with increased inflammation and microbial insults. Improved methods for health assessments are an important element of monitoring tortoise population recovery and can support the development of more robust diagnostic measures for ill animals, or individuals directly impacted by disturbance.

  17. Cutaneous drug hypersensitivity : Immunological and genetic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisalay Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug hypersensitivity is an unpredictable, immunologically mediated adverse reaction, clustered in a genetically predisposed individual. The role of "hapten concept" in immune sensitization has recently been contested by the "pharmacological interaction" hypothesis. After completion of the "human genome project" and with the availability of high-resolution genotyping, genetic susceptibility to hypersensitivity for certain drugs has been proved beyond doubt though the trend is ethnicity and phenotype dependent. Application of this newly acquired knowledge may reduce or abolish the morbidity and mortality associated with cutaneous drug hypersensitivity.

  18. Update in clinical allergy and immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gunten, S; Marsland, B J; von Garnier, C; Simon, D

    2012-12-01

    In the recent years, a tremendous body of studies has addressed a broad variety of distinct topics in clinical allergy and immunology. In this update, we discuss selected recent data that provide clinically and pathogenetically relevant insights or identify potential novel targets and strategies for therapy. The role of the microbiome in shaping allergic immune responses and molecular, as well as cellular mechanisms of disease, is discussed separately and in the context of atopic dermatitis, as an allergic model disease. Besides summarizing novel evidence, this update highlights current areas of uncertainties and debates that, as we hope, shall stimulate scientific discussions and research activities in the field.

  19. Parasitic Helminths: New Weapons against Immunological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Osada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of allergic and autoimmune diseases is increasing in developed countries, possibly due to reduced exposure to microorganisms in childhood (hygiene hypothesis. Epidemiological and experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis is accumulating. In this context, parasitic helminths are now important candidates for antiallergic/anti-inflammatory agents. Here we summarize antiallergic/anti-inflammatory effects of helminths together along with our own study of the effects of Schistosoma mansoni on Th17-dependent experimental arthritis. We also discuss possible mechanisms of helminth-induced suppression according to the recent advances of immunology.

  20. [Novel methods for dementia diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltfang, J

    2015-04-01

    Novel diagnostic methods, such as cerebrospinal fluid-based neurochemical dementia diagnostics (CSF-NDD) and [18F] amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) are meanwhile recommended for specific indications by international guidelines for the improved early and differential diagnostics of multigenic (sporadic) Alzheimer's dementia (AD). In the case of CSF-NDD the German neuropsychiatric guidelines have already been validated on the S3 level of evidence (http://www.DGPPN.de) and the additional consideration of [18F] amyloid-PET in the current update of the guidelines is to be expected. By means of CSF-NDD and/or [18F] amyloid-PET a predictive diagnosis of incipient (preclinical) AD is also possible for patients at high risk for AD who are in prodromal stages, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). As accompanying (secondary) preventive therapy of AD cannot be offered a predictive molecular dementia diagnostics is not recommended by the German neuropsychiatric dementia guidelines (http://www.DGPPN.de). However, novel diagnostic approaches, which offer molecular positive diagnostics of AD have already gained high relevance in therapy research as they allow promising preventive treatment avenues to be validated directly in the clinical trial. Moreover, future blood-based dementia diagnostics by means of multiplex assays is becoming increasingly more feasible; however, so far corresponding proteomic or epigenetic assays could not be consistently validated in independent studies.

  1. [BMW diagnostic criteria for IBS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsueda, Kei

    2006-08-01

    Rome I diagnostic criteria for IBS was published in 1992 and it became a global diagnostic criteria. However, the criteria was not practical and somewhat complicated. Moreover, its symptomatic duration was too long (defined as more than 3 months) to be introduced in clinical practice. Therefore, Japanese member of BMW(Bowel Motility Workshop) tried to develop a new diagnostic criteria for IBS and it was established in 1995 by way of the Delphi method. The criteria was named as BMW diagnostic criteria and it was shown below: BMW diagnostic criteria for IBS (1995) At least one month or more of repetitive symptoms of the following 1) and 2) and no evidence of organic disease that likely to explain the symptoms. 1) Existence of abdominal pain, abdominal discomfort or abdominal distension 2) Existence of abnormal bowel movement (diarrhea, constipation) Abnormal bowel movement includes at least one of the below; (1) Abnormal stool frequency (2) Abnormal stool form (lumpy/hard or loose/wartery stool) Moreover, the following test should be performed as a rule to exclude organic diseases. (1) Urinalysis, fecal occult blood testing, CBC, chemistry (2) Barium enema or colonofiberscopic examination The other diagnostic criteria for IBS was also reviewed and their characteristics were compared with BMW diagnostic criteria.

  2. Thyroid diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scriba, P.C.; Boerner, W.; Emrich, S.; Gutekunst, R.; Herrmann, J.; Horn, K.; Klett, M.; Krueskemper, H.L.; Pfannenstiel, P.; Pickardt, C.R.

    1985-03-01

    None of the in-vitro and in-vivo methods listed permits on unambiguous diagnosis when applied alone, owing to the fact that similar or even identical findings are obtained for various individual parameters in different thyroid diseases. Further, especially the in-vitro tests are also subject to extrathyroidal effects which may mask the typical findings. The limited and varying specificity and sensitivity of the tests applied, as well as the falsification of results caused by the patients' idiosyncracies and the methodology, make it necessary to interpret and evaluate the in-vivo and in-vitro findings only if the clinical situation (anamnesis and physical examination) is known. For maximum diagnostic quality of the tests, the initial probability of the assumed type of thyroid disease must be increased (formulation of the clinical problem). The concepts of exclusion diagnosis and identification must be distinguished as well as the diagnosis of functional disturbances on the one hand and of thyroid diseases on the other. Both of this requires a qualified, specific and detailed anamnesis and examination procedure, and the clinical examination remains the obligatory basis of clinical diagnostics. In case of inexplicable discrepancies between the clinical manifestations and the findings obtained with specific methods, or between the findings obtained with a specific method, the patient should be referred to an expert institution, or the expert institution should be consulted.

  3. The influence of iodine on the immunological properties of thyroglobulin and its immunological complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardas, A

    1991-01-01

    Several papers described different immunological properties of thyroglobulin (Tg) after iodination. The influence of iodine-iodide solution on the immunological properties of hTg and its immunological complexes with autoantibodies (aAbs) were studied. Human Tg coated to polystyrene plates, incubated for 30 min with iodine-iodide solution at concentration from 1 to 200 microM at pH 9.0 lost its ability to bind aAbs. Preincubation with iodine (2 microM), decreased aAbs binding by 50%. Tg epitope inactivation induced by iodine depended on the buffer pH and the presence of carbonate ions. The binding of rabbit Tg-antibodies to iodine pretreated Tg was only slightly changed. Thyroglobulin preincubation with iodine solutions decreased aAbs binding from all tested sera (67) of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Excess of iodide (0.2 M KJ) or equimolar concentration of diiodotyrosine protects the Tg molecule from iodine induced inactivation. Immunological complexes of Tg with aAbs dissociate at low iodine concentrations. The results suggest that a product of iodine disproportionation reaction induces changes in the Tg molecule and Tg-aAb's complexes leading to complex dissociation or epitope inactivation.

  4. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Syed A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. Objective In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Methods Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Results Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005 compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+ ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2% were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P Conclusions Immunological factors in combination with viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity.

  5. Home Use Tests: Fecal Occult Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Fecal Occult Blood Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... test kit to measure the presence of hidden (occult) blood in your stool (feces). What is fecal ...

  6. Immigrants in immunology: the benefits of lax borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagaman, Keaton; Martinez, Emily S; Guillemin, Karen

    2015-05-01

    The field of immunology has a long history of illuminating fundamental biological processes of critical importance to human health. From an outsider's perspective, the questions are profoundly philosophical and the experimental approaches are elegantly precise. Yet immunology can also appear impenetrable. Here we recount the experience of two graduate students from the fields of ecology and computer science, who have immigrated into immunological terrain attracted by systems-level questions. We argue that such migrations enrich the field of immunology, and that cultural and institutional changes are needed to promote more interdisciplinary explorations.

  7. Immunological response to hepatitis B vaccine in polytransfused thalassemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Tabatabaei, Seyed-Vahid

    2010-05-01

    Hepatitis B is an important infection in thalassemia patients and prevention by vaccination is needed. Immunological response to hepatitis B vaccine in polytransfused thalassmia patients needs more attention.

  8. Modification of tumor growth by blood transfusion and perioperative procedures : a study in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.K. Singh

    1988-01-01

    textabstractA blood transfusion is a transplantation of all or part of the blood cells in the peripheral blood. The survival of grafted organ transplantation has been shown to be prolonged following blood transfusion. The mechanism is thought to be immunological in nature. The possibility of a relat

  9. Immunological aspects on IDDM in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, J

    1989-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus in childhood is connected to several immunological phenomena which per se do not prove that immunological mechanisms do cause the beta cell destruction, as such mechanisms could be just secondary. However, there is now evidence which strongly supports the autoimmune hypothesis, like the beta-cell destruction in the transplant given from a healthy twin to the diabetic monozygotic co-twin, the effect in newly-diagnosed diabetes of immunosuppression, the passive transfer in experimental animals of an immune process creating diabetes etc. Several facts such as presence of activated T-cells in the insulitis indicate that the cell-mediated immunity is important, while it is still debatable whether humoral factors, and if so which, alone could be responsible for the beta cell destruction. Recently interleukins and other lymphokines have shown to be of great interest as well as the release of free radicals. This knowledge opens new views on the possibility to put an end to or even prevent the beta cell destruction. Rough immunosuppression with cytostatics or cyclosporin has such severe side-effects that such therapy is contra-indicated at least in children. Until more specific therapies are discovered e.g. vaccination with lymphoblasts or blocking the autoantigens with monoclonal antibodies, supportive measures to protect the beta cells may be one practical way.

  10. Bioinformatics for cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoentong, Pornpimol; Angelova, Mihaela; Efremova, Mirjana; Gallasch, Ralf; Hackl, Hubert; Galon, Jerome; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2012-11-01

    Recent mechanistic insights obtained from preclinical studies and the approval of the first immunotherapies has motivated increasing number of academic investigators and pharmaceutical/biotech companies to further elucidate the role of immunity in tumor pathogenesis and to reconsider the role of immunotherapy. Additionally, technological advances (e.g., next-generation sequencing) are providing unprecedented opportunities to draw a comprehensive picture of the tumor genomics landscape and ultimately enable individualized treatment. However, the increasing complexity of the generated data and the plethora of bioinformatics methods and tools pose considerable challenges to both tumor immunologists and clinical oncologists. In this review, we describe current concepts and future challenges for the management and analysis of data for cancer immunology and immunotherapy. We first highlight publicly available databases with specific focus on cancer immunology including databases for somatic mutations and epitope databases. We then give an overview of the bioinformatics methods for the analysis of next-generation sequencing data (whole-genome and exome sequencing), epitope prediction tools as well as methods for integrative data analysis and network modeling. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can predict and explain important patterns in the genetic and clinical progression of cancer. Therefore, a survey of mathematical models for tumor evolution and tumor-immune cell interaction is included. Finally, we discuss future challenges for individualized immunotherapy and suggest how a combined computational/experimental approaches can lead to new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer, improved diagnosis, and prognosis of the disease and pinpoint novel therapeutic targets.

  11. Uncertainty of measurement: an immunology laboratory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sarah C; Lock, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    'Measurement uncertainty of measured quantity values' (ISO15189) requires that the laboratory shall determine the measurement uncertainty for procedures used to report measured quantity values on patients' samples. Where we have numeric data measurement uncertainty can be expressed as the standard deviation or as the co-efficient of variation. However, in immunology many of the assays are reported either as semi-quantitative (i.e. an antibody titre) or qualitative (positive or negative) results. In the latter context, measuring uncertainty is considerably more difficult. There are, however, strategies which can allow us to minimise uncertainty. A number of parameters can contribute to making measurements uncertain. These include bias, precision, standard uncertainty (expressed as standard deviation or coefficient of variation), sensitivity, specificity, repeatability, reproducibility and verification. Closely linked to these are traceability and standardisation. In this article we explore the challenges presented to immunology with regard to measurement uncertainty. Many of these challenges apply equally to other disciplines working with qualitative or semi-quantitative data.

  12. Immunological and toxinological responses to jellyfish stings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Yanagihara, Angel A; Turner, Helen C; Winkel, Ken

    2011-10-01

    Just over a century ago, animal responses to injections of jellyfish extracts unveiled the phenomenon of anaphylaxis. Yet, until very recently, understanding of jellyfish sting toxicity has remained limited. Upon contact, jellyfish stinging cells discharge complex venoms, through thousands of barbed tubules, into the skin resulting in painful and, potentially, lethal envenomations. This review examines the immunological and toxinological responses to stings by prominent species of jellyfish including Physalia sp (Portuguese Man-o-War, Blue-bottle), Cubozoan jellyfish including Chironex fleckeri, several Carybdeids including Carybdea arborifera and Alatina moseri, Linuche unguiculta (Thimble jellyfish), a jellyfish responsible for Irukandji syndrome (Carukia barnesi) and Pelagia noctiluca. Jellyfish venoms are composed of potent proteinaceous porins (cellular membrane pore-forming toxins), neurotoxic peptides, bioactive lipids and other small molecules whilst the tubules contain ancient collagens and chitins. We postulate that immunologically, both tubular structural and functional biopolymers as well as venom components can initiate innate, adaptive, as well as immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions that may be amenable to topical anti-inflammatory-immunomodifier therapy. The current challenge for immunotoxinologists is to deconstruct the actions of venom components to target therapeutic modalities for sting treatment.

  13. Sleep after vaccination boosts immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Tanja; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Bollinger, Thomas; Diekelmann, Susanne; Born, Jan

    2011-07-01

    Sleep regulates immune functions. We asked whether sleep can influence immunological memory formation. Twenty-seven healthy men were vaccinated against hepatitis A three times, at weeks 0, 8, and 16 with conditions of sleep versus wakefulness in the following night. Sleep was recorded polysomnographically, and hormone levels were assessed throughout the night. Vaccination-induced Th cell and Ab responses were repeatedly monitored for 1 y. Compared with the wake condition, sleep after vaccination doubled the frequency of Ag-specific Th cells and increased the fraction of Th1 cytokine-producing cells in this population. Moreover, sleep markedly increased Ag-specific IgG1. The effects were followed up for 1 y and were associated with high sleep slow-wave activity during the postvaccination night as well as with accompanying levels of immunoregulatory hormones (i.e., increased growth hormone and prolactin but decreased cortisol release). Our findings provide novel evidence that sleep promotes human Th1 immune responses, implicating a critical role for slow-wave sleep in this process. The proinflammatory milieu induced during this sleep stage apparently acts as adjuvant that facilitates the transfer of antigenic information from APCs to Ag-specific Th cells. Like the nervous system, the immune system takes advantage of the offline conditions during sleep to foster adaptive immune responses resulting in improved immunological memory.

  14. Rotorcraft Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haste, Deepak; Azam, Mohammad; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Monte, James

    2012-01-01

    Health management (HM) in any engineering systems requires adequate understanding about the system s functioning; a sufficient amount of monitored data; the capability to extract, analyze, and collate information; and the capability to combine understanding and information for HM-related estimation and decision-making. Rotorcraft systems are, in general, highly complex. Obtaining adequate understanding about functioning of such systems is quite difficult, because of the proprietary (restricted access) nature of their designs and dynamic models. Development of an EIM (exact inverse map) solution for rotorcraft requires a process that can overcome the abovementioned difficulties and maximally utilize monitored information for HM facilitation via employing advanced analytic techniques. The goal was to develop a versatile HM solution for rotorcraft for facilitation of the Condition Based Maintenance Plus (CBM+) capabilities. The effort was geared towards developing analytic and reasoning techniques, and proving the ability to embed the required capabilities on a rotorcraft platform, paving the way for implementing the solution on an aircraft-level system for consolidation and reporting. The solution for rotorcraft can he used offboard or embedded directly onto a rotorcraft system. The envisioned solution utilizes available monitored and archived data for real-time fault detection and identification, failure precursor identification, and offline fault detection and diagnostics, health condition forecasting, optimal guided troubleshooting, and maintenance decision support. A variant of the onboard version is a self-contained hardware and software (HW+SW) package that can be embedded on rotorcraft systems. The HM solution comprises components that gather/ingest data and information, perform information/feature extraction, analyze information in conjunction with the dependency/diagnostic model of the target system, facilitate optimal guided troubleshooting, and offer

  15. [Karl Landsteiner discovers the blood groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, J-J; Berche, P

    2010-02-01

    The discovery of ABO blood group was a major step in mastering transfusion therapy. Karl Landsteiner (1868-1843) was the author of this discovery. This paper retraces the hard career of this American scientist of Austrian origin, and describes the circumstances that led his research to the discoveries, which were turning points in the history of the immunology.

  16. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  17. The pig as a model of developmental immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothkötter, H J; Sowa, E; Pabst, R

    2002-01-01

    There are many limitations to analyse the developing immune system in humans, thus there is need for experimental animal models to study the environmental influences during the ontogeny of the immune system. However risk assessment is difficult in using rodent models alone, especially as the intrauterine period of development is much shorter than that of humans. In addition to studies in dogs, the pig provides a variety of experimental approaches for developmental immunotoxicology. The gestation period is 115 days and the occurrence of the different lines of T and B lymphocytes in the blood and organs of the porcine embryo and fetus is well documented. Fetal porcine B cells represent a naive population developing without maternal idiotypic-antiidiotypic influences. The postnatal development is highly correlated to sufficient uptake of colostrum during the first 48 hours. Although many immunotoxicological experiments have been performed, there is a limited number of original publications about these studies. With the different strains of standard pigs and miniature pigs available and the rapid growing amount of immunological reagents, the pig represents an important experimental model for cost-effective studies in developmental immunotoxicology to analyse the risk of environmental hazards.

  18. The immunological balance between host and parasite in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroost, Katrien; Pham, Thao-Thy; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van den Steen, Philippe E

    2016-03-01

    Coevolution of humans and malaria parasites has generated an intricate balance between the immune system of the host and virulence factors of the parasite, equilibrating maximal parasite transmission with limited host damage. Focusing on the blood stage of the disease, we discuss how the balance between anti-parasite immunity versus immunomodulatory and evasion mechanisms of the parasite may result in parasite clearance or chronic infection without major symptoms, whereas imbalances characterized by excessive parasite growth, exaggerated immune reactions or a combination of both cause severe pathology and death, which is detrimental for both parasite and host. A thorough understanding of the immunological balance of malaria and its relation to other physiological balances in the body is of crucial importance for developing effective interventions to reduce malaria-related morbidity and to diminish fatal outcomes due to severe complications. Therefore, we discuss in this review the detailed mechanisms of anti-malarial immunity, parasite virulence factors including immune evasion mechanisms and pathogenesis. Furthermore, we propose a comprehensive classification of malaria complications according to the different types of imbalances.

  19. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood, safe blood transfusions depend on careful blood typing and cross-matching. The ABO Blood Group System ... that provided by the ABO positive/negative blood typing. For example, sometimes if the donor and recipient ...

  20. Application of a Static Fluorescence-based Cytometer (the CellScan in Basic Cytometric Studies, Clinical Pharmacology, Oncology and Clinical Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Harel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The CellScan apparatus is a laser scanning cytometer enabling repetitive fluorescence intensity (FI and polarization (FP measurements in living cells, as a means of monitoring lymphocyte activation. The CellScan may serve as a tool for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE as well as other autoimmune diseases by monitoring FP changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs following exposure to autoantigenic stimuli. Changes in FI and FP in atherosclerotic patients' PBLs following exposure to various stimuli have established the role of the immune system in atherosclerotic disease. The CellScan has been evaluated as a diagnostic tool for drug-allergy, based on FP reduction in PBLs following incubation with allergenic drugs. FI and FP changes in cancer cells have been found to be well correlated with the cytotoxic effect of anti-neoplastic drugs. In conclusion, the CellScan has a variety of applications in cell biology, immunology, cancer research and clinical pharmacology.

  1. Non-immunologic methods of diagnosis of babesiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wagner

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of tick-borne diseases such as babesiosis still depends on observing the parasite in the infected erythrocyte. Microscopic observation is tedious and often problematic in both early and carrier infections. Better diagnostic methods are needed to prevent clinical disease, especially when susceptible cattle are being moved into disease enzootic areas. This study evaluates two techniques for early diagnosis of Babesia bovis infections in cattle, DNA probes specific for the organism and fluorescent probes specific nucleic acid. The radioisotopically labeled DNA probes are used in slot blot hybridizations whith lysed blood samples, not purified DNA. Thusfar, the probe is specific for B. bovis and can detect as few as 1000 B. bovis parasites in 10µl of blood. The specificity of the fluorescent probe depends on the characteristic morphology of the babesia in whole blood samples, as determined microscopically. The fluorescent probe detects as afew as 10,000 B. bovis parasites in 10*l as blood. The application of each method for alboratory and field use is discussed.

  2. Molecular and cellular aspects of immunologic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, G J

    1991-12-18

    This review seeks to explain the most exciting recent data concerning the nature of self/non-self discrimination by the immune system in a manner accessible to a biochemical readership. The nature of recognition in the two great lymphocyte families, B cells and T cells, is described with special emphasis on the nature of the ligands recognized by each. The history of the field of immunologic tolerance is surveyed, as are the key experiments on conventional mice which provided a conceptual framework. This suggested that tolerance was essentially due to 'holes' in the recognition repertoires of both the T and B cell populations so that lymphocytes competent to react to self antigens were not part of the immunologic dictionary. There were essentially two ways to achieve this situation. On the one hand, self antigens might 'catch' developing lymphocytes early in their ontogeny and delete the cell, a process of clonal abortion. On the other hand, self antigens might signal lymphocytes (particularly immature cells) in a negative manner, reducing or abolishing their capacity for later responses, without causing death. This process is referred to as clonal anergy. Evidence for both processes exists. Special emphasis is placed on a wave of experimentation beginning in 1988 which imaginatively uses transgenic mouse technology to study tolerance. Transgenic manipulations can produce mice which synthesize foreign antigens in a constitutive and/or inducible manner, sometimes only in specific locations; mice which possess T or B lymphocytes almost all expressing a given receptor of known specificity; and mice which are an immunologic time bomb in that the antigen is present and so too are lymphocytes all endowed with receptors for that antigen. These experiments have vindicated the possibility of both clonal abortion and clonal anergy in both T and B cell populations, the choice of which phenomenon occurs depending on a number of operational circumstances. For T cell tolerance

  3. A review of the basis of the immunological diagnosis of ruminant brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrotoy, Marie J; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Blasco, José María; Moriyón, Ignacio

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria of the genus Brucella cause brucellosis, the most common bacterial zoonosis worldwide. The diagnosis of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis ruminant brucellosis is based on bacteriological and immunological tests, the latter being routinely used in control and eradication and surveillance programs. Infections by smooth and rough Brucella spp., the use of smooth and rough vaccines, and the false-positive serological reactions caused by Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 and other cross-reacting bacteria represent the immunological contexts in which those tests are used. This complex context explains the large number of brucellosis tests that have been developed, and that vary in antigen type, antigen presentation, antibody and conditions for the reaction, the response detected and the sample required. This wealth of information and an imperfect understanding of Brucella antigens and of the peculiarities of the immunoresponse to Brucella has created confusion and led to several misconceptions on the usefulness and limitations of the brucellosis diagnostic tests. In this review, Brucella antigens are examined focusing on cellular topology, supramolecular properties, epitopic structure and lipopolysaccharide and protein cross-reactivity in the various contexts of the immune response in ruminants. Then, the significance of these features in diagnostic tests that use whole bacteria is discussed with respect to the activities of ruminant immunoglobulins, and the effect of pH on unspecific agglutinations, non-agglutinating and blocking antibodies, pseudo-prozones and complement activation. Similarly, the bacterial surface lipopolysaccharides and cognate polysaccharides are discussed with regards to topological effects, epitope exposure, ionic strength and antibody avidity in immunoprecipitation, immunosorbent and fluorescence polarization assays. Finally, the search for immunodominant protein antigens and their use in immunological tests is reviewed. Critical review

  4. Immunologic response to tumor ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Irreversible electroporation (IRE is a promising technique for the focal treatment of pathologic tissues, which involves placing minimally invasive electrodes within the targeted region. However, the knowledge about the therapeutic efficacy and immune reactions in response to IRE remains in its infancy. METHODS: In this work, to detect whether tumor ablation with IRE could trigger the immunologic response, we developed an osteosarcoma rat model and applied IRE directly to ablate the tumor. In the experiment, 118 SD rats were randomized into 4 groups: the control, sham operation, surgical resection, and IRE groups. Another 28 rats without tumor cell implantation served as the normal non-tumor-bearing group. We analyzed the changes in T lymphocyte subsets, sIL-2R and IL-10 levels in the peripheral blood one day before operation, as well as at 1, 3, 7,14 and 21 days after the operation. Moreover, splenocytes were assayed for IFN-γ and IL-4 production using intracellular cytokine staining one day before the operation, as well as at 7 and 21 days after operation. RESULTS: We found that direct IRE completely ablated the tumor cells. A significant increase in peripheral lymphocytes, especially CD3(+ and CD4(+ cells, as well as an increased ratio of CD4(+/CD8(+ were detectable 7 days after operation in both the IRE and surgical resection groups. Compared with the surgical resection group, the IRE group exhibited a stronger cellular immune response. The sIL-2R level of the peripheral blood in the IRE group decreased with time and was significantly different from that in the surgical resection group. Moreover, ablation with IRE significantly increased the percentage of IFN-γ-positive splenocytes. CONCLUSION: These findings indicated that IRE could not only locally destroy the tumor but also change the status of cellular immunity in osteosarcoma-bearing rats. This provides experimental evidence for the clinical application of IRE in

  5. BIOCHEMICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL MARKERS OF OVER-TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gleeson

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Athletes fail to perform to the best of their ability if they become infected, stale, sore or malnourished. Excessive training with insufficient recovery can lead to a debilitating syndrome in which performance and well being can be affected for months. Eliminating or minimizing these problems by providing advice and guidelines on training loads, recovery times, nutrition or pharmacological intervention and regular monitoring of athletes using an appropriate battery of markers can help prevent the development of an overtraining syndrome in athletes. The potential usefulness of objective physiological, biochemical and immunological markers of overtraining has received much attention in recent years. Practical markers would be ones that could be measured routinely in the laboratory and offered to athletes as part of their sports science and medical support. The identification of common factors among overtrained athletes in comparison with well-trained athletes not suffering from underperformance could permit appropriate intervention to prevent athletes from progressing to a more serious stage of the overtraining syndrome. To date, no single reliable objective marker of impending overtraining has been identified. Some lines of research do, however, show promise and are based on findings that overtrained athletes appear to exhibit an altered hormonal response to stress. For example, in response to a standardized bout (or repeated bouts of high intensity exercise, overtrained athletes show a lower heart rate, blood lactate and plasma cortisol response. Several immune measures that can be obtained from a resting blood sample (e.g. the expression of specific cell surface proteins such as CD45RO+ on T-lymphocytes also seem to offer some hope of identifying impending overtraining. If an athlete is suspected of suffering from overtraining syndrome, other measures will also required, if only to exclude other possible causes of underperformance including

  6. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system....5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components... complement components C1q, C1r, C1s, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8, and C9, in serum, other body fluids,...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5180 - Fecal calprotectin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fecal calprotectin immunological test system. 866....5180 Fecal calprotectin immunological test system. (a) Identification. A fecal calprotectin... measure, by immunochemical techniques, fecal calprotectin in human stool specimens. The device is...

  8. Temporal Expression of Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Biomarkers in a Macaca fascicularis Infection Model of Tuberculosis; Comparison with Human Datasets and Analysis with Parametric/Non-parametric Tools for Improved Diagnostic Biomarker Identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Javed

    Full Text Available A temporal study of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis primary, pulmonary challenge model Macaca fascicularis has been conducted. PBL samples were taken prior to challenge and at one, two, four and six weeks post-challenge and labelled, purified RNAs hybridised to Operon Human Genome AROS V4.0 slides. Data analyses revealed a large number of differentially regulated gene entities, which exhibited temporal profiles of expression across the time course study. Further data refinements identified groups of key markers showing group-specific expression patterns, with a substantial reprogramming event evident at the four to six week interval. Selected statistically-significant gene entities from this study and other immune and apoptotic markers were validated using qPCR, which confirmed many of the results obtained using microarray hybridisation. These showed evidence of a step-change in gene expression from an 'early' FOS-associated response, to a 'late' predominantly type I interferon-driven response, with coincident reduction of expression of other markers. Loss of T-cell-associate marker expression was observed in responsive animals, with concordant elevation of markers which may be associated with a myeloid suppressor cell phenotype e.g. CD163. The animals in the study were of different lineages and these Chinese and Mauritian cynomolgous macaque lines showed clear evidence of differing susceptibilities to Tuberculosis challenge. We determined a number of key differences in response profiles between the groups, particularly in expression of T-cell and apoptotic makers, amongst others. These have provided interesting insights into innate susceptibility related to different host `phenotypes. Using a combination of parametric and non-parametric artificial neural network analyses we have identified key genes and regulatory pathways which may be important in early and adaptive responses to TB. Using

  9. Immunology of term and preterm labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peltier Morgan R

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During pregnancy there is an alteration in maternal immunity within the uterus where innate, proinflammatory immune responses are tightly regulated to prevent immunological rejection of the fetal allograft. Disruption of the delicate balance of cytokines by bacteria or other factors increases the production of proinflammatory cytokines at the maternal-fetal interface and activates the parturition mechanism prematurely. Despite years of searching, there is still no broadly effective strategy for preventing preterm labor and most therapies are directed at inhibiting myometrial contractions and improving neonatal outcome. Recent studies with progestins and interleukin-10 (IL-10, however, are showing promise in randomized clinical trials and animal studies. Furthermore, the identification of the Toll-like receptors as upstream mediators of inflammation may offer alternative therapeutic targets for preventing this common pregnancy complication.

  10. Desensitization: Overcoming the Immunologic Barriers to Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Sethi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigen sensitization is a significant barrier to successful kidney transplantation. It often translates into difficult crossmatch before transplant and increased risk of acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection after transplant. Over the last decade, several immunomodulatory therapies have emerged allowing for increased access to kidney transplantation for the immunologically disadvantaged group of HLA sensitized end stage kidney disease patients. These include IgG inactivating agents, anti-cytokine antibodies, costimulatory molecule blockers, complement inhibitors, and agents targeting plasma cells. In this review, we discuss currently available agents for desensitization and provide a brief analysis of data on novel biologics, which will likely improve desensitization outcomes, and have potential implications in treatment of antibody mediated rejection.

  11. Immunological memory within the innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Joseph C; Ugolini, Sophie; Vivier, Eric

    2014-06-17

    Immune memory has traditionally been the domain of the adaptive immune system, present only in antigen-specific T and B cells. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for immunological memory in lower organisms (which are not thought to possess adaptive immunity) and within specific cell subsets of the innate immune system. A special focus will be given to recent findings in both mouse and humans for specificity and memory in natural killer (NK) cells, which have resided under the umbrella of innate immunity for decades. The surprising longevity and enhanced responses of previously primed NK cells will be discussed in the context of several immunization settings. © 2014 The Authors.

  12. Clinical and immunological responses in ocular demodecosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Chun, Yeoun Sook; Kim, Jae Chan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and immunological responses to Demodex on the ocular surface. Thirteen eyes in 10 patients with Demodex blepharitis and chronic ocular surface disorders were included in this study and treated by lid scrubbing with tea tree oil for the eradication of Demodex. We evaluated ocular surface manifestations and Demodex counts, and analyzed IL-1β, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in tear samples before and after the treatment. All patients exhibited ocular surface manifestations including corneal nodular opacity, peripheral corneal vascularization, refractory corneal erosion and infiltration, or chronic conjunctival inflammatory signs before treatment. After treatment, Demodex was nearly eradicated, tear concentrations of IL-1β and IL-17 were significantly reduced and substantial clinical improvement was observed in all patients. In conclusion, we believe that Demodex plays an aggravating role in inflammatory ocular surface disorders.

  13. Desensitization: Overcoming the Immunologic Barriers to Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jua; Vo, Ashley; Peng, Alice; Jordan, Stanley C.

    2017-01-01

    HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigen) sensitization is a significant barrier to successful kidney transplantation. It often translates into difficult crossmatch before transplant and increased risk of acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection after transplant. Over the last decade, several immunomodulatory therapies have emerged allowing for increased access to kidney transplantation for the immunologically disadvantaged group of HLA sensitized end stage kidney disease patients. These include IgG inactivating agents, anti-cytokine antibodies, costimulatory molecule blockers, complement inhibitors, and agents targeting plasma cells. In this review, we discuss currently available agents for desensitization and provide a brief analysis of data on novel biologics, which will likely improve desensitization outcomes, and have potential implications in treatment of antibody mediated rejection. PMID:28127571

  14. Immunological parameters in girls with Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Annika E; Sylvén, Lisskulla; Magnusson, Carl GM; Hultcrantz, Malou

    2004-01-01

    Disturbances in the immune system has been described in Turner syndrome, with an association to low levels of IgG and IgM and decreased levels of T- and B-lymphocytes. Also different autoimmune diseases have been connected to Turner syndrome (45, X), thyroiditis being the most common. Besides the typical features of Turner syndrome (short stature, failure to enter puberty spontaneously and infertility due to ovarian insufficiency) ear problems are common (recurrent otitis media and progressive sensorineural hearing disorder). Levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD and the four IgG subclasses as well as T- and B-lymphocyte subpopulations were investigated in 15 girls with Turners syndrome to examine whether an immunodeficiency may be the cause of their high incidence of otitis media. No major immunological deficiency was found that could explain the increased incidence of otitis media in the young Turner girls. PMID:15563731

  15. Immunological parameters in girls with Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Carl GM

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Disturbances in the immune system has been described in Turner syndrome, with an association to low levels of IgG and IgM and decreased levels of T- and B-lymphocytes. Also different autoimmune diseases have been connected to Turner syndrome (45, X, thyroiditis being the most common. Besides the typical features of Turner syndrome (short stature, failure to enter puberty spontaneously and infertility due to ovarian insufficiency ear problems are common (recurrent otitis media and progressive sensorineural hearing disorder. Levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD and the four IgG subclasses as well as T- and B-lymphocyte subpopulations were investigated in 15 girls with Turners syndrome to examine whether an immunodeficiency may be the cause of their high incidence of otitis media. No major immunological deficiency was found that could explain the increased incidence of otitis media in the young Turner girls.

  16. Myasthenia gravis: a clinical-immunological update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Sophie; Vincent, Angela; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the archetypic disorder of both the neuromuscular junction and autoantibody-mediated disease. In most patients, IgG1-dominant antibodies to acetylcholine receptors cause fatigable weakness of skeletal muscles. In the rest, a variable proportion possesses antibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase while the remainder of seronegative MG is being explained through cell-based assays using a receptor-clustering technique and, to a lesser extent, proposed new antigenic targets. The incidence and prevalence of MG are increasing, particularly in the elderly. New treatments are being developed, and results from the randomised controlled trial of thymectomy in non-thymomatous MG, due for release in early 2016, will be of particular clinical value. To help navigate an evidence base of varying quality, practising clinicians may consult new MG guidelines in the fields of pregnancy, ocular and generalised MG (GMG). This review focuses on updates in epidemiology, immunology, therapeutic and clinical aspects of GMG in adults.

  17. Thyroid carcinoma: immunology, irradiation, and lymphocytic infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, J.H.; Sharon, N.; Victor, T.A.; Scanlon, E.F.

    1979-06-01

    Patients undergoing thyroidectomies at Evanston (I11) Hospital, during a six-month period had immunological studies performed preoperatively. No differential could be found between those with carcinoma or benign pathologic findings. T- and B-cell distribution and lymphocytic response to mitogens varied widely. Quantitative immunoglobulins showed slightly increased levels of IgG in patients wih carcinoma and thyroiditis in comparison with those patients with adenomas. Antithyroglobulin antibodies were negative in all patients. Pathology slides from 107 patients with thyroid carcinoma between 1972 and 1978 at Evanston Hospital were reviewed for the presence of thyroiditis, either focal or diffuse. It was found that 50% of all carcinomas had either diffuse or focal thyroiditis. Diffuse thyroiditis was more common in patients with no history of irradiation and papillary carcinoma, and in younger age groups.

  18. Targeting Specific Immunologic Pathways in Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Guilherme Piovezani; Faubion, William A; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the immunologic pathways in intestinal inflammation is crucial for the development of new therapies that can maximize patient response and minimize toxicity. Targeting integrins and cytokines is intended to control leukocyte migration to effector sites or inhibit the action of proinflammatory cytokines. New approaches to preventing leukocyte migration may target integrin receptors expressed on the intestinal vascular endothelium. The interleukin (IL)-12/IL-23 pathway has been a therapeutic target of interest in controlling active Crohn's disease (CD). New therapeutic approaches in CD may involve the enhancement of anti-inflammatory cytokine pathways and modulation of cellular responses and intranuclear signals associated with intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anterior uveitis and diabetes mellitus: immunological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, I; Famà, F; Salmeri, G

    1995-01-01

    The association between anterior uveitis (AU) and diabetes mellitus (DM) has always been known. The purpose of this study was to estimate the incidence of this association and to consider a possible role of the cell-mediated immune system. During the years 1989-1992, 196 diabetics (66 patients affected by type I DM and 130 by type II DM) were studied. The study of the lymphocytic subsets and the measurement of the circulating immunocomplexes and autoantibodies (ANA, AMA, ADNA, ASMA, APCA) were carried out, and the results were compared with those of a control group. The results underline the correlation between AU and type I DM. Many immunological reactions could play a crucial role: the high levels of CD8 subsets found could be an expression of the unstable lymphocytic equilibrium.

  20. Immunological HCV-Associated Thrombocytopenia: Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Dimitroulis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV is affecting about 3% of the world's population, leading to liver damage, end-stage liver disease, and development of hepatocellular carcinoma, being thus the first indication for liver transplantation in the USA. Apart from the cirrhotic-liver-derived clinical signs and symptoms several conditions with immunological origin can also arise, such as, glomerulonephritis, pulmonary fibrosis, and thrombocytopenia. HCV-related autoimmune thrombocytopenia shows specific pathogenetic characteristics as well as symptoms and signs that differ in severity and frequency from symptoms in patients that are not HCV infected. Aim of this short paper is to estimate the epidemiological characteristics of the disease, to investigate the pathogenesis and clinical manifestation, and to propose treatment strategies according to the pertinent literature.

  1. A Global Approach to Tumor Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EnaWang; MonicaCPanelli; VladiaMonsurró; FrancescoMMarincola

    2004-01-01

    Biological and clinical advances in the understanding of tumor immunology suggest that immune responsiveness of human tumors is a complex biological phenomenon that could be best studied by a real-time comparison of tumor/host interactions in the tumor microenvironment through a high-throughput discovery-driven approach. This conclusion is derived from our recognition that too many hypotheses or, in other words, no solid single hypothesis exist, based on experimental results, to further drive experimentation in human subjects. Functional genomic studies entertained during the last few years consolidated the belief that in humans the interactions between tumor and immune cells are too complex to be approached exclusively with a hypothesis driven method. We believe that immune cells suit cancer cells in a Yin and Yang balance by opposing and yet mutually depending on each other. Indeed, immune infiltration in tumors may play a dual role modulating in different circumstances cancer cell growth or destruction through a physiological modulation of inflammation. It is reasonable to question what induces inflammation at the tumor site. We hypothesize that inflammation is primarily driven by the phenotype of tumor cells that can modulate theirmicroenvironment through cell-to-cell interactions or the secretion of soluble factors. Thus, in analogy the observation of immune cells within tumors parallels the presence of paramedics, police and firemen at thescene of an accident, which is reactive to and not causative of the occurrence. In this review we will explore this hypothesis by reporting and summarizing most of our recent work in the frame of available literature on the subject. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  2. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Antonio; Mazon, Angel; Martin-Mateos, Maria Anunciacion; Plaza, Ana-Maria; Garde, Jesus; Alonso, Elena; Martorell, Antonio; Boquete, Manuel; Lorente, Felix; Ibero, Marcel; Bone, Javier; Pamies, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Miguel; Echeverria, Luis; Nevot, Santiago; Martinez-Cañavate, Ana; Fernandez-Benitez, Margarita; Garcia-Marcos, Luis

    2011-11-01

    The data of the ISAAC project in Spain show a prevalence of childhood asthma ranging from 7.1% to 15.3%, with regional differences; a higher prevalence, 22.6% to 35.8%, is described for rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is found in 4.1% to 7.6% of children. The prevalence of food allergy is 3%. All children in Spain have the right to be visited in the National Health System. The medical care at the primary level is provided by pediatricians, who have obtained their titles through a 4-yr medical residency training program. The education on pediatric allergy during that period is not compulsory and thus very variable. There are currently 112 certified European pediatric allergists in Spain, who have obtained the accreditation of the European Union of Medical Specialist for proven skills and experience in pediatric allergy. Future specialists in pediatric allergy should obtain their titles through a specific education program to be developed in one of the four accredited training units on pediatric allergy, after obtaining the title on pediatrics. The Spanish Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEICAP) gathers over 350 pediatric allergists and pediatricians working in this field. SEICAP has a growing activity including yearly congresses, continued education courses, elaboration of technical clinical documents and protocols, education of patients, and collaboration with other scientific societies and associations of patients. The official journal of SEICAP is Allergologia et Immunophatologia, published every 2 months since 1972. The web site of SEICAP, http://www.seicap.es, open since 2004, offers information for professionals and extensive information on pediatric allergic and immunologic disorders for the lay public; the web site is receiving 750 daily visits during 2011. The pediatric allergy units are very active in clinical work, procedures as immunotherapy or induction of oral tolerance in food allergy, contribution to scientific literature, and

  3. Diagnostic thoracoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plavec Goran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic thoracoscopy in patients with pleural effusion of unclear origin mostly provides the correct diagnosis. Results from published reports of previous researches are not uniform. In 47 male and 20 female patients with pleural effusion of unknown etiology, after receiving negative results obtained from cytological finding of pleural effusion and percutaneous needle biopsy, thoracoscopy with biopsy of one or both pleurae was performed. Procedure was done in local anesthesia using Stortz rigid thoracoscope. In 37 patients with malignant disease (primary or metastatic diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically in 31 patient (81.12%. In 27 patients with inflammatory pleural disease diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically in 22 patients (81.4%. Among 11 patients with specific pleural effusions, tuberculosis was confirmed in 10 (90.91%. Normal finding in cases of spontaneous pneumothorax and pulmonary embolism was taken as a positive result. Total number of positive findings was 55 (82.10%. In one patient, the third spontaneous pneumothorax was the indication for thoracoscopy, and after numerous bullae were seen during the procedure, talcum powder pleurodesis was done. In four patients low intensity subcutaneous emphysema occurred one day after thoracoscopy. It can be concluded that thoracoscopy in local anesthesia out of the operating room is good and practical method for solving the unclear pleural effusions, with neglectable rate of complications.

  4. The clinical significance of immunological contact urticaria to processed grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact urticaria, is characterized by an urticarial wheal-and-flare reaction at the site of contact by an allergen. Immunological contact urticaria, while less common than non-immunological contact urticaria, has more potentially serious consequences, and therefore, its recognition and treatment is important. Immunological contact urticaria is a type I hypersensitivity reaction. Potential complications include organ system involvement other than skin and even anaphylaxis and death. A vast majority of immunological contact urticaria is work-related. We will discuss the definition of immunological contact urticaria, the mechanism of the contact urticarial reaction, contact urticaria in the occupational setting, and the role of grains in contact urticaria. Testing and treatment are also briefly discussed.

  5. Effects of diets containing different concentrations of propolis on hematological and immunological variables in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, E; Silici, S; Cetin, N; Güçlü, B K

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of 4 different levels of propolis supplementation on the hematological and immunological parameters of laying hens, a trial was conducted with 60 White Leghorn layer hens. The experiment was conducted by using a randomized design with 5 treatments, 4 replicates, and 3 hens in each replicate. Treatments included basal diet (control) and basal diet plus 0.5, 1, 3, and 6 g of propolis/kg of diet, respectively. At the end of the 12-wk treatment period, samples of blood were collected to determine hematological and immunological values. The results showed that the addition of propolis at 3 g/kg in the diet resulted in significant increases (P propolis supplementation significantly increased (P red blood cells) compared with the other treatments. On the other hand, hemoglobin and hematocrit values and total leucocyte (white blood cells) and differential leucocytes counts were not influenced by propolis supplementation. These results indicate that the inclusion of propolis at the level of 3 g/kg of diet may have a positive effect on humoral immunity of laying hens.

  6. In vitro immunological effects of blocking CCR5 on T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Ren, Han-Yun; Shi, Yong-Jin; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Blockade of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) by maraviroc may induce immunological changes independent of its antiviral effects and may have immunoregulation properties. This study was designed to determine the effects of blocking CCR5 on human activated T cells in vitro and investigate the potential immunological mechanisms. Human CD3+ T cells were purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and then activated by cytokines. We tested the surface expressions and relative messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CCR2, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, and CXCR3, chemotaxis toward their cognate ligands, internalization of chemokine receptors, and production of cytokines. In conclusion, blocking CCR5 by maraviroc not only can block CCR5 and CCR2 internalization processes induced by CCL5 and CCL2, but also inhibit T cell chemotactic activities toward their cognate ligands, respectively. Moreover, blocking CCR5 with maraviroc at high doses tends to decrease the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ. In addition, there might be a form of cross talk between CCR5 and CCR2, and this may offer a novel immunological effect for blockade of CCR5.

  7. Primary Research of Immunological Mechanism of Combined Hepatitis A-Measles-Varicella Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-hua; GUAN Feng; ZHANG Xi-zhen; ZHAO Hong-guang; LIU Jing-ye; LIN Cheng-he; WANG Peng-fu

    2011-01-01

    To explore the primary humoral and cellular immunological mechanism of the combined hepatitis A-measles-varicella vaccine, the mice were inoculated with hepatitis A-measles-varicella vaccine by intraperitoneally and two weeks later, blood was collected to observe the mice's immunological status. Antibody level was measured to appraise the humoral immunity. At the same time, T lymphocyte surface marker, NK cell activity, LAK cell activity,delayed type hypersensitivity of skin, M phagocytic function, mRNA level of cytokine IL-2 and IFN-γ plus lymphocyte transformation test were used to analyze the cellular immunity. The humoral immunity results show that the combined hepatitis A-measles-varicella vaccine produce the same antibody level as their corresponding univalent vaccine, and maintained fine immunogenicity and security. The result of cellular immunity shows that the combined vaccine could activate physical immunocyte, increase the regulative ability of cytokine, enhance the physical immune function and immune defense ability. The present research proved the security and better humoral and cellular immunity of combined hepatitis A-measles-varicella vaccine from the immunological point of view, which laid good foundation for further study and development.

  8. Immunological dynamics in response to two anthrax vaccines in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the variation of humoral and cellular immune responses to A16R live spore and AVA vaccine and to identify efficient immunological parameters for the early evaluation of post immu- nization in mice, we dynamically monitored the antibody production and cellular responses after the vaccination of Balb/C mice with the anthrax vaccines. The results show that both anti-AVA and anti-Spore antibodies were detectable in the A16R live spore vaccinated group while high titers of anti-AVA antibodies but not anti-Spore antibodies existed in the AVA-immunized group. IgG1 and IgG2 were the major subtypes of IgG in both of the two groups. However, the IgG2a level was significantly higher in the A16R group than in the AVA group. At the cellular level, responses of antigen-specific TH2, TH1 and plasma cells were detected. The peripheral TH2 responses could be seen on day 5 after vac- cination, and remained at a high level throughout the experiment (from day 5 post primary immuniza- tion to day 60 post the tertiary immunization); the TH1 responses to A16R vaccine appeared on day 5, while the responses to AVA could only be detected by day 7 after the secondary immunization; a low level of TH1 responses could be observed at the end of the experiment. Antigen-specific plasma cells could be found in the peripheral blood of both the immunized groups, however, the responses in the A16R group appeared earlier, lasted longer, and shown an ascending tendency until the end of the ex- periment when the plasma cell responses in the AVA group were reduced to a very low level. The re- sults suggest that the multiple antigen containing A16R live spore vaccine induces better immune re- sponses than AVA. Combined with serum antibody titers, TH2, TH1 and plasma cell responses could be used as immunological parameters for the evaluation of vaccine efficacy. These findings may afford new insight into the early evaluation of vaccination as well as being a powerful strategy for

  9. Immunological dynamics in response to two anthrax vaccines in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jin; HE Rui; DONG Mei; ZHANG LiangYan; WANG XiLiang

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the variation of humoral and cellular immune responses to A16R live spore and AVA vaccine and to identify efficient immunological parameters for the early evaluation of post immu-nization in mice, we dynamically monitored the antibody production and cellular responses after the vaccination of Balb/C mice with the anthrax vaccines. The results show that both anti-AVA and anti-Spore antibodies were detectable in the A16R live spore vaccinated group while high titers of anti-AVA antibodies but not anti-Spore antibodies existed in the AVA-immunized group, IgG1 and IgG2 were the major subtypes of IgG in both of the two groups. However, the IgG2a level was significantly higher in the A16R group than in the AVA group. At the cellular level, responses of antigen-specific TH2, TH1 and plasma cells were detected. The peripheral TH2 responses could be seen on day 5 after vac-cination, and remained at a high level throughout the experiment (from day 5 post primary immuniza-tion to day 60 post the tertiary immunization); the TH1 responses to A16R vaccine appeared on day 5, while the responses to AVA could only be detected by day 7 after the secondary immunization; a low level of TH1 responses could be observed at the end of the experiment. Antigen-specific plasma cells could be found in the peripheral blood of both the immunized groups, however, the responses in the A16R group appeared earlier, lasted longer, and shown an ascending tendency until the end of the ex-periment when the plasma cell responses in the AVA group were reduced to a very low level. The re-sults suggest that the multiple antigen containing A16R live spore vaccine induces better immune re-sponses than AVA. Combined with serum antibody titers, TH2, TH1 and plasma cell responses could be used as immunological parameters for the evaluation of vaccine efficacy, These findings may afford new insight into the early evaluation of vaccination as well as being a powerful strategy for vaccine

  10. Virological and immunological profiles among patients with undetectable viral load followed prospectively for 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, T L; Ullum, H; Røge, Birgit T

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify HIV-RNA in plasma, in lymphoid tissue and proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to relate these to immunological markers among patients with plasma viral load counts of

  11. Immunological abnormalities in haemophilia: are they caused by American factor VIII concentrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebel, K S; Madhok, R; Forbes, C D; Lennie, S E; Lowe, G D; Sturrock, R D

    1983-10-15

    Scottish patients with haemophilia, most of whom had received no American factor VIII concentrate for over two years, were found to have immunological abnormalities similar to those in their American counterparts--that is, a reduced proportion of T helper cells, an increased proportion of T suppressor cells, and a reduced response to concanavilin A. Factor VIII from both the United States and Scotland severely inhibited the in vitro lymphocyte response to mitogens in patients and controls. The American and Scottish concentrates could not be distinguished in terms of either patient usage or their effect in vitro. These results argue against a disease vector specific to American blood products.

  12. Potential immunological markers for diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsky-Elefant, Guita; Hoshino-Shimizu, Sumie; Jacob, Cristina Miuki Abe; Sanchez, Maria Carmen Arroyo; Ferreira, Antonio Walter

    2011-01-01

    In human toxocariasis, there are few approaches using immunological markers for diagnosis and therapeutic assessment. An immunoblot (IB) assay using excretory-secretory Toxocara canis antigen was standardized for monitoring IgG, IgE and IgA antibodies in 27 children with toxocariasis (23 visceral, three mixed visceral and ocular, and one ocular form) for 22-116 months after chemotherapy. IB sensitivity was 100% for IgG antibodies to bands of molecular weight 29-38, 48-54, 95-116, 121-162, >205 kDa, 80.8% for IgE to 29-38, 48-54, 95-121, > 205 kDa, and 65.4% for IgA to 29-38, 48-54, 81-93 kDa. Candidates for diagnostic markers should be IgG antibodies to bands of low molecular weight (29-38 and 48-54 kDa). One group of patients presented the same antibody reactivity to all bands throughout the follow-up study; in the other group, antibodies decayed partially or completely to some or all bands, but these changes were not correlated with time after chemotherapy. Candidates for monitoring patients after chemotherapy may be IgG antibodies to > 205 kDa fractions, IgA to 29-38, 48-54, 81-93 kDa and IgE to 95-121 kDa. Further identification of antigen epitopes related to these markers will allow the development of sensitive and specific immunoassays for the diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of toxocariasis.

  13. Potential immunological markers for diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guita Rubinsky-Elefant

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In human toxocariasis, there are few approaches using immunological markers for diagnosis and therapeutic assessment. An immunoblot (IB assay using excretory-secretory Toxocara canis antigen was standardized for monitoring IgG, IgE and IgA antibodies in 27 children with toxocariasis (23 visceral, three mixed visceral and ocular, and one ocular form for 22-116 months after chemotherapy. IB sensitivity was 100% for IgG antibodies to bands of molecular weight 29-38, 48-54, 95-116, 121-162, >205 kDa, 80.8% for IgE to 29-38, 48-54, 95-121, > 205 kDa, and 65.4% for IgA to 29-38, 48-54, 81-93 kDa. Candidates for diagnostic markers should be IgG antibodies to bands of low molecular weight (29-38 and 48-54 kDa. One group of patients presented the same antibody reactivity to all bands throughout the follow-up study; in the other group, antibodies decayed partially or completely to some or all bands, but these changes were not correlated with time after chemotherapy. Candidates for monitoring patients after chemotherapy may be IgG antibodies to > 205 kDa fractions, IgA to 29-38, 48-54, 81-93 kDa and IgE to 95-121 kDa. Further identification of antigen epitopes related to these markers will allow the development of sensitive and specific immunoassays for the diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of toxocariasis.

  14. Gene expression arrays reveal a rapid return to normal homeostasis in immunologically-challenged trophoblast-like JAR cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, James N; Dozmorov, Igor; Jiang, Kaiyu; Chen, Yanmin; Frank, Mark Barton; Cadwell, Craig; Turner, Sean; Centola, Michael

    2004-04-01

    The immunologic adaptations of pregnancy have come under increasing scrutiny in the past 15 years. Existing experimental evidence clearly demonstrates that placental trophoblasts play an important role in regulating immunologic/inflammatory responses at the maternal-fetal interface. We used a well-developed gene expression array to examine in greater detail the physiologic response of trophoblast-like choriocarcinoma cells to a model immunologic 'challenge.' We co-cultured PHA-activated or resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with the human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR for time periods ranging from 2 to 18 h. Messenger RNA expression in the JAR cells was then assessed using a 21,329-gene microarray and novel biostatistical analyses that we have previously published. Patterns of differential gene expression were assessed using a commercial pathway analysis software program. Differences in gene expression between JAR cells cultured with activated PBMC (experimental samples) and JAR cells cultured with resting PBMC (control samples) were seen only at the 2h time point. That is, multiple genes were transcribed in JAR cells in response to activated PBMC, but expression levels of the genes had all returned to baseline by 6h. Molecular modeling demonstrated that the differentially expressed genes were largely associated with cell growth and differentiation. This model was confirmed by noting a two-fold increase in CD10/neutral endopeptidase expression (a marker for cell differentiation) in JAR cells incubated with media from activated PBMC compared with JAR cells incubated with resting PBMC. These findings support the hypothesis that there is a delicate immunologic milieu at the maternal-fetal interface that must be maintained. Immunologic/inflammatory challenge at the maternal-fetal interface is compensated by cellular mechanisms that work to reduce inflammation and rapidly restore immunologic balance.

  15. Recreational music-making modulates immunological responses and mood states in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Masahiro; Wachi, Masatada; Utsuyama, Masanori; Bittman, Barry; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2009-06-01

    Given that previous studies have shown that recreational music-making has benefits for younger individuals, we explored two questions. (1) Could a recreational music-making protocol improve mood and modulate immunological responses in a direction opposite to that associated with chronic stress in older adults? (2) Would the protocol affect older and younger participants differently? Two groups of volunteers demarcated at age 65 years underwent identical one-hour recreational music-making interventions. Pre-and post-intervention data were collected using blood samples and mood state questionnaires. Data from 27 older and 27 younger volunteers were analyzed for cytokine production levels, natural killer cell activity, plasma catecholamines, and numbers of T cells, T cell subsets, B cells, and natural killer cells. Exercise expenditure was also recorded. In the older group, we found significant increases in the number of lymphocytes, T cells, CD4+ T cells, memory T cells, and production of interferon-gamma and interleukin-6. In the younger group, modulation was non-significant. Worthy of note was the specific immunological changes in the direction opposite to that expected with chronic stress in the older group. The increase in Th1 cytokine IFN-gamma and unchanged Th2 cytokine IL-4 and IL-10 levels in the older group suggests a shift to a Th1-dominant status, a shift opposite to that expected with stress. However, the immunological changes were not statistically different between the two groups. Mood states improved in both groups, but were also not statistically different between groups. Although no statistically significant difference was found between the two age groups, the improvement in immunological profile and mood states in the older group and the low level of energy required for participation suggest this music-making protocol has potential as a health improvement strategy for older individuals.

  16. Effects of cefodizime on chemokines of liver tissues in mice with immunological hepatic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng; KAN Quan-cheng; YU Zu-jiang; LI Ling; PAN Xue

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatic inflammation is characterized by the accumulation of lymphocytes as a consequence of increased recruitment from the blood and retention within the tissue at sites of infection. CXC chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16) mRNA has been detected in both inflamed and normal liver tissues and is strongly upregulated in the injured liver tissues in a murine model. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cefodizime on CXCL16 mRNA of liver tissues in mice with immunological hepatic injury.Methods The murine model of immunological hepatic injury was induced by Bacillus Calmette Guerin and Lipoposaccharide. The mice with immunological hepatic injury were randomly assigned to the model group, the cefodizime group and the ceftriaxone group. The three groups were continuously given agents for seven days and CXCL16 mRNA of liver tissue was determined and contrasted with the control group treated by normal saline. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to assay CXCL16 mRNA levels in liver tissues.Results The expressions of CXCL16 mRNA were significantly higher in the model group and the ceftriaxone group than in the control group and the cefodizime group (P <0.05), indicating the mice in the model group and the ceftriaxone group were immunodeficient. There was no statistical difference in the expressions of CXCL16 mRNA between the control group and the cefodizime group. Similarly, no statistical difference in the expressions of CXCL16 mRNA between the model group and the ceftriaxone group was detected (P >0.05).Conclusion Cefodizime effectively reduces the infiltration of lymphocytes into liver tissues and alleviates the liver damage by decreasing CXCL16 mRNA in liver tissues in mice with immunological hepatic injury.

  17. Neurocysticercosis: Diagnostic problems & current therapeutic strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common single cause of seizures/epilepsy in India and several other endemic countries throughout the world. It is also the most common parasitic disease of the brain caused by the cestode Taenia solium or pork tapeworm. The diagnosis of NCC and the tapeworm carrier (taeniasis) can be relatively inaccessible and expensive for most of the patients. In spite of the introduction of several new immunological tests, neuroimaging remains the main diagnostic test for NCC. The treatment of NCC is also mired in controversy although, there is emerging evidence that albendazole (a cysticidal drug) may be beneficial for patients by reducing the number of seizures and hastening the resolution of live cysts. Currently, there are several diagnostic and management issues which remain unresolved. This review will highlight some of these issues. PMID:28139530

  18. Neurocysticercosis: Diagnostic problems & current therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedantam Rajshekhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most common single cause of seizures/epilepsy in India and several other endemic countries throughout the world. It is also the most common parasitic disease of the brain caused by the cestode Taenia solium or pork tapeworm. The diagnosis of NCC and the tapeworm carrier (taeniasis can be relatively inaccessible and expensive for most of the patients. In spite of the introduction of several new immunological tests, neuroimaging remains the main diagnostic test for NCC. The treatment of NCC is also mired in controversy although, there is emerging evidence that albendazole (a cysticidal drug may be beneficial for patients by reducing the number of seizures and hastening the resolution of live cysts. Currently, there are several diagnostic and management issues which remain unresolved. This review will highlight some of these issues.

  19. [Morphofunctional characteristics of thymus and immunological parameters in golden hamster under experimental invasion with the cestode Diphyllobothrium dendriticum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronina, S V; Mazur, O E; Pronin, N M; Fomina, A S; Tolochko, L V

    2010-01-01

    Morphofunctional changes induced by the tapeworm in the thymus and blood of its definitive host, by an example of the experimental model "Diphyllobothrium dendriticum--Mesocricetus auratus", have been investigated. The morphofunctional changes in the thymus and immunological transformations in the organism of infested hamster are evidences of rather high immunogenic effect of the D. dendriticum antigens on the definitive host at the period of active growth of the parasites.

  20. Microvascular and immunological studies in Raynaud's phenomenon.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, Pieternella Maria

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the diagnostic significance of microvascular abnormalities - as observed in the nailfold - in patients with RP with respect to the presence or development of a connective tissue disease. In addition, we investigated whether the observed abnormalities wer

  1. Microvascular and immunological studies in Raynaud's phenomenon.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, Pieternella Maria

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the diagnostic significance of microvascular abnormalities - as observed in the nailfold - in patients with RP with respect to the presence or development of a connective tissue disease. In addition, we investigated whether the observed abnormalities wer

  2. Telomere length in relation to immunological parameters in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Svenson

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, telomere length (TL has gained attention as a potential biomarker in cancer disease. We previously reported that long blood TL was associated with a poorer outcome in patients with breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that certain immunological components may have an impact on TL dynamics in cancer patients. One aim of the present study was to investigate a possible association between serum cytokines and TL of peripheral blood cells, tumors and corresponding kidney cortex, in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. For this purpose, a multiplex cytokine assay was used. Correlation analysis revealed significant positive correlations between tumor TL and peripheral levels of three cytokines (IL-7, IL-8 and IL-10. In a parallel patient group with various kidney tumors, TL was investigated in whole blood and in immune cell subsets in relation to peripheral levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs. A significant positive association was found between whole blood TL and Treg levels. However, the strongest correlation was found between Tregs and TL of the T lymphocyte fraction. Thus, patients with higher Treg levels displayed longer T cell telomeres, which might reflect a suppressed immune system with fewer cell divisions and hence less telomere shortening. These results are in line with our earlier observation that long blood TL is an unfavorable prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival. In summary, we here show that immunological components are associated with TL in patients with renal cell carcinoma, providing further insight into the field of telomere biology in cancer.

  3. Virological and Immunological Aspects of AIDS Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Conway

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common and serious problem associated with long term antiretroviral therapy is waning efficacy over time. To date. a number of studies has suggested an association between drug resistance and clinical deterioration. However. a precise causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. In a large American clinical trial. resistance to zidovudine (ZDV was predictive of subsequent disease progression if this therapy was continued. Surprisingly. this was also predictive of deterioration if therapy was changed to didanosine (ddl. This suggests that other factors (perhaps virological and immunological which may be present in addition to resistance. were as important (if not more so in predicting clinical outcomes. It is likely that viral load. resistance. viral phenotype and alterations in immune function interact in this regard. Proper· studies may allow us to determine a “threshold” for a composite virological and immunological parameter beyond which disease progression will occur. As more antiretroviral agents become available. we will be in a position to intervene to “improve” laboratory markers and monitor them prospectively. potentially to maintain clinical latency for an indefinite period of time. In the authors' laboratories, a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the evaluation of circulating proviral load has been developed. In an initial study of 70 patients. proviral load/ 106 CD4 cells was clearly associated with the severity of immune disease. with up to 9.6% of cells being infected in subjects with CD4 cell counts below 200/µL. However. large variability in proviral load among individuals with comparable or dissimilar CD4 cell counts precludes the use of this measurement as an individual marker of the severity of immune disease. More recent work evaluated the combined use of proviral load (expressed as a dichotomous variable based on values above or below one copy/a03 CD4 cells and resistance in a prospective

  4. Diet selection in immunologically manipulated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Gerlinde; Paschoal, Patrícia Olaya; de Oliveira, Vivian Leite; Pedruzzi, Monique M B; Campos, Sylvia M N; Andrade, Luiz; Nóbrega, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Diet selection is a complex problem that animals in wildlife have to deal with daily. In their natural environment, these animals meet a great variety of foods some of which they are able and prepared to eat, yet, not all of it is eaten. In addition to the biological factors, some of which we shall discuss deeper in this paper, an important factor in food preference is social contact. Alterations in the physiology of mammals can have profound effects on the choice or preference for certain foods. On the other hand the decline of taste and smell perception in the elderly, the degree of food restriction, the sensorial properties of foods (such as presentation, taste, and smell) can be considered factors that influence feeding behavior leading to aversion. Many species, including man, learn to associate nausea with taste, and as a consequence avoid its specific intake, which has been shown to be persistent. Conditioned taste aversion is a form of associative learning in which animals display an aversion to the taste of a food that has previously been paired with illness. Our group has investigated the pattern of ingestion of foods that are frequently eaten by mice in wildlife and are potentially allergenic to humans in order to study the immunological consequences to these foods such as oral tolerance and inflammatory processes of the gut. We have chosen two seeds, peanuts (Arachis hypogea) and cashew nuts (Anacardium occidentale), as our source of antigens as the first is considered to be one of the most potent food allergens and for the second there seems to be very little allergy in the human setting. We used male and female, normal, adult CBA/J, A/J, C57BL/6 and Balb/c mice 2-3 months old and hybrid (C57Bl/6xBalb/c) F1, (Balb/cxC57Bl/6) F1), (C57Bl/6xDBA2) F1 mice. Food preference appeared to be strain-specific. Animals tolerized to a determined seed, then immunized with its protein extract and re-exposed to the seed in natura alter their feeding pattern. We

  5. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisawa, Motohiro; Nishima, Sankei; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kondo, Naomi

    2013-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JSPACI) was started in 1966 and currently has 3613 members as of August 1, 2012. The number of pediatricians specializing in allergies who have been certified by the Japanese Society of Allergology is 817. Among these, there are 125 training directors and training facilities for allergy and clinical immunology. The JSPACI first published an asthma guideline specific for children in 2000, and this has been revised every 3 yrs, contributing to better control of pediatric asthma. Food allergy management guidelines were first developed in 2005, which have helped to improve the care of food allergy patients. Among 514 pediatric training programs by the Japanese Society of Pediatrics, there are 312 facilities routinely performing oral food challenges. Among these, there were already 53 facilities performing oral immunotherapy at the end of 2011, treating 1400 cases of food allergy. The prevalence of pediatric allergic diseases has increased in Japan over the past 50 yrs. A number of International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood surveys have been conducted in the past at specific times. The prevalence of wheezing among children aged 13-14 yrs in 2002 was 13.0%. Multi-year surveys found a 1.5- to 2-fold increase every 10 yrs until 2002. However, according to the latest data in 2012, asthma prevalence seems to have slightly decreased in Japan. Food allergy mainly associated with infantile atopic eczema among infants younger than 1 yr of age is the most common form as with other developed countries. The estimated food allergy prevalence based on data from several surveys is 5-10% among infants (0-6 yrs) and 1-2% among schoolchildren (6-15 yrs). A variety of patients suffering from primary deficiency syndrome have been actively analyzed. Previously, antibody defects and well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiency were analyzed, but recent research is focusing on not only acquired immune

  6. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this ... several sources of blood which are described below. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  7. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some red blood cells shaped like spheres ( hereditary spherocytosis ) Increased breakdown of RBCs Presence of RBCs with ... normal Red blood cells, elliptocytosis Red blood cells, spherocytosis Acute lymphocytic leukemia - photomicrograph Red blood cells, multiple ...

  8. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  9. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  10. Blood typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    A blood sample is needed. The test to determine your blood group is called ABO typing. Your blood sample is mixed with antibodies against type A and B blood. Then, the sample is checked to see whether ...

  11. Microarray Technologies in Fungal Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Microarray technologies have been a major research tool in the last decades. In addition they have been introduced into several fields of diagnostics including diagnostics of infectious diseases. Microarrays are highly parallelized assay systems that initially were developed for multiparametric nucleic acid detection. From there on they rapidly developed towards a tool for the detection of all kind of biological compounds (DNA, RNA, proteins, cells, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, etc.) or their modifications (methylation, phosphorylation, etc.). The combination of closed-tube systems and lab on chip devices with microarrays further enabled a higher automation degree with a reduced contamination risk. Microarray-based diagnostic applications currently complement and may in the future replace classical methods in clinical microbiology like blood cultures, resistance determination, microscopic and metabolic analyses as well as biochemical or immunohistochemical assays. In addition, novel diagnostic markers appear, like noncoding RNAs and miRNAs providing additional room for novel nucleic acid based biomarkers. Here I focus an microarray technologies in diagnostics and as research tools, based on nucleic acid-based arrays.

  12. Advances of Tumor Hyperthermia and Tumor Immunology in Translational Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hooshang Lahooti

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is another important method in the treatment of tumors, secondary to surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and biotherapy. It has been demonstrated the efifcacy and versatility of hyperthermia in a lot of randomized trials across various primary cancers. Both heat shock proteins (HSPs) and dendritic cells (DCs) are greatly affected by hyperthermia and closely related to the tumor immunology. Nowadays, tumor hyperthermia and tumor immunology have been attached much attention in the field of translational medicine. In this article, the action mechanism and immunological effects of hyperthermia, activation of HSPs and DCs as well as HSP- and DC-based cancer vaccine were reviewed from the perspective of translational medicine.

  13. Advances of Tumor Hyperthermia and Tumor Immunology in Translational Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Lahooti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is another important method in the treatment of tumors, secondary to surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and biotherapy. It has been demonstrated the efficacy and versatility of hyperthermia in a lot of randomized trials across various primary cancers. Both heat shock proteins (HSPs and dendritic cells (DCs are greatly affected by hyperthermia and closely related to the tumor immunology. Nowadays, tumor hyperthermia and tumor immunology have been attached much attention in the field of translational medicine. In this article, the action mechanism and immunological effects of hyperthermia, activation of HSPs and DCs as well as HSP- and DC-based cancer vaccine were reviewed from the perspective of translational medicine.

  14. Clinical and immunological studies for 105 Japanese seropositive patients of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita examined at Kurume University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Jin, Zhexiong; Ishii, Norito

    2016-08-01

    Using our serological diagnostic criteria, we selected 105 Japanese patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), an autoimmune bullous disease (AIBD) reacting with type VII collagen, from our cohort of 5063 AIBD patients. We examined the patients clinically and immunologically. We found diversity of clinical manifestations in both cutaneous and oral mucosal lesions and a high rate of inflammatory-type EBA patients in Japan. Common treatments were systemic steroids, followed by immunosuppressives, DDS, tetracycline/minocycline and colchicine. Immunological studies revealed that indirect immunofluorescence of 1M-NaCl-split skin, immunoblotting of dermal extract, and type VII collagen ELISA were sensitive methods, with possible multiplicity of circulating autoantibodies against other basement membrane autoantigens. The present study analyzed the largest cohort of EBA patients, confirming the scarcity of EBA (only 105 of the 5063 AIBD patients), and showed that the three serological tests are useful for the diagnosis of EBA.

  15. Polio, terror and the immunological worldview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Robert

    2016-07-22

    This paper adopts a socio-historical perspective to explore when, how and why the eradication of poliomyelitis has become politicised to the extent that health workers and security personnel are targeted in drive-by shootings. Discussions of the polio crisis in Afghanistan and Pakistan have tended to focus on Taliban suspicions of a US-led public health intervention and the denunciation of 'modernity' by Islamic 'extremists'. In contrast, this paper considers a broader history of indigenous hostility and resistance to colonial immunisation on the subcontinent, suggesting how interconnected public health and political crises today have reactivated the past and created a continuity between events. The paper explores how the biomedical threat posed by polio has become intertwined with military and governmental discourses premised on the 'preemptive strike'. Here, the paper tracks the connections between biological immunity and a postcolonial politics that posits an immunological rationale for politico-military interventions. The paper concludes by reflecting on the consequences for global public health of this entanglement of infectious disease with terror.

  16. Immunological Response to Biodegradable Magnesium Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Karin; Fischerauer, Stefan; Ferlic, Peter; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Brezinsek, Hans-Peter; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Löffler, Jörg F.; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2014-04-01

    The use of biodegradable magnesium implants in pediatric trauma surgery would render surgical interventions for implant removal after tissue healing unnecessary, thereby preventing stress to the children and reducing therapy costs. In this study, we report on the immunological response to biodegradable magnesium implants—as an important aspect in evaluating biocompatibility—tested in a growing rat model. The focus of this study was to investigate the response of the innate immune system to either fast or slow degrading magnesium pins, which were implanted into the femoral bones of 5-week-old rats. The main alloying element of the fast-degrading alloy (ZX50) was Zn, while it was Y in the slow-degrading implant (WZ21). Our results demonstrate that degrading magnesium implants beneficially influence the immune system, especially in the first postoperative weeks but also during tissue healing and early bone remodeling. However, rodents with WZ21 pins showed a slightly decreased phagocytic ability during bone remodeling when the degradation rate reached its maximum. This may be due to the high release rate of the rare earth-element yttrium, which is potentially toxic. From our results we conclude that magnesium implants have a beneficial effect on the innate immune system but that there are some concerns regarding the use of yttrium-alloyed magnesium implants, especially in pediatric patients.

  17. Louis Pasteur, the father of immunology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall A Smith

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Louis Pasteur is traditionally considered as the progenitor of modern immunology because of his studies in the late 19th century that popularized the germ theory of disease, and that introduced the hope that all infectious diseases could be prevented by prophylactic vaccination, as well as also treated by therapeutic vaccination, if applied soon enough after infection. However, Pasteur was working at the dawn of the appreciation of the microbial world, at a time when the notion of such a thing as an immune system did not exist, certainly not as we know it today, more than 130 years later. Accordingly, why was Pasteur such a genius as to discern how the immune system functions to protect us against invasion by the microbial world when no one had even made the distinction between fungi, bacteria or viruses, and no one had formulated any theories of immunity. A careful reading of Pasteur’s presentations to the Academy of Sciences reveals that Pasteur was entirely mistaken as to how immunity occurs, in that he reasoned, as a good microbiologist would, that appropriately attenuated microbes would deplete the host of vital trace nutrients absolutely required for their viability and growth, and not an active response on the part of the host. Even so, he focused attention on immunity, preparing the ground for others who followed. This review chronicles Pasteur’s remarkable metamorphosis from organic chemist to microbiologist to immunologist, and from basic science to medicine.

  18. Emerging single-cell technologies in immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herderschee, Jacobus; Fenwick, Craig; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Roger, Thierry; Calandra, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    During evolution, the immune system has diversified to protect the host from the extremely wide array of possible pathogens. Until recently, immune responses were dissected by use of global approaches and bulk tools, averaging responses across samples and potentially missing particular contributions of individual cells. This is a strongly limiting factor, considering that initial immune responses are likely to be triggered by a restricted number of cells at the vanguard of host defenses. The development of novel, single-cell technologies is a major innovation offering great promise for basic and translational immunology with the potential to overcome some of the limitations of traditional research tools, such as polychromatic flow cytometry or microscopy-based methods. At the transcriptional level, much progress has been made in the fields of microfluidics and single-cell RNA sequencing. At the protein level, mass cytometry already allows the analysis of twice as many parameters as flow cytometry. In this review, we explore the basis and outcome of immune-cell diversity, how genetically identical cells become functionally different, and the consequences for the exploration of host-immune defense responses. We will highlight the advantages, trade-offs, and potential pitfalls of emerging, single-cell-based technologies and how they provide unprecedented detail of immune responses.

  19. An immunological model for detecting bot activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md E.; Phoha, Vir V.; Sultan, Md A.

    2009-05-01

    We develop a hierarchical immunological model to detect bot activities in a computer network. In the proposed model antibody (detector)-antigen (foreign object) reactions are defined using negative selection based approach and negative systems-properties are defined by various temporal as well as non-temporal systems features. Theory of sequential hypothesis testing has been used in the literature for identifying spatial-temporal correlations among malicious remote hosts and among the bots within a botnet. We use it for combining multiple immunocomputing based decisions too. Negative selection based approach defines a self and helps identifying non-selves. We define non-selves with respect to various systems characteristics and then use different combinations of non-selves to design bot detectors. Each detector operates at the client sites of the network under surveillance. A match with any of the detectors suggests presence of a bot. Preliminary results suggest that the proposed model based solutions can improve the identification of bot activities.

  20. Effects of protein aggregates: an immunologic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Amy S

    2006-08-04

    The capacity of protein aggregates to enhance immune responses to the monomeric form of the protein has been known for over a half-century. Despite the clear connection between protein aggregates and antibody mediated adverse events in treatment with early therapeutic protein products such as intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) and human growth hormone, surprisingly little is known about the nature of the aggregate species responsible for such effects. This review focuses on a framework for understanding how aggregate species potentially interact with the immune system to enhance immune responses, garnered from basic immunologic research. Thus, protein antigens presented in a highly arrayed structure, such as might be found in large nondenatured aggregate species, are highly potent in inducing antibody responses even in the absence of T-cell help. Their potency may relate to the ability of multivalent protein species to extensively cross-link B-cell receptor, which (1) activates B cells via Bt kinases to proliferate, and (2) targets protein to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-loading compartments, efficiently eliciting T-cell help for antibody responses. The review further focuses on protein aggregates as they affect an immunogenicity risk assessment, the use of animal models and studies in uncovering effects of protein aggregates, and changes in product manufacture and packaging that may affect generation of protein aggregates.

  1. A primer on cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotze, Michael T; Papamichail, Michael

    2004-03-01

    The role of immunity in cancer has been abundantly demonstrated in murine tumor models as well as in man. Induction of clinically effective antitumor immune responses, based on this information, in patients with cancer however, remains elusive. This is not because tumors lack recognizable antigens [in fact there is evidence that there are thousands of potential novel targets in each tumor cell] but rather due to the fact that the induction of responses is not adequate nor particularly well understood. Tumors seem to be rather effective at limiting immune responses. Many of the molecularly defined antigens that have been detected on tumor cells are derived from self-proteins and as such are subject to tolerizing mechanisms. Such tumors have also developed escape mechanisms capable of evading or suppressing immune responses. Understanding the role of dendritic cells during the effector phase of the immune response and the complex interactions of stromal, immune, and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment represent the next challenges to be understood for tumor immunology.

  2. Etiology and immunology of infectious bronchitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LF Caron

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV of chickens is currently one of the main diseases associated with respiratory syndrome in domestic poultry, as well as with losses related to egg production. The etiological agent is a coronavirus, which presents structural differences in the field, mainly in the S1 spike protein. The immune response against this virus is complicated by the few similarities among serotypes. Environmental and management factors, as well as the high mutation rate of the virus, render it difficult to control the disease and compromise the efficacy of the available vaccines. Bird immune system capacity to respond to challenges depend on the integrity of the mucosae, as an innate compartment, and on the generation of humoral and cell-mediated adaptive responses, and may affect the health status of breeding stocks in the medium run. Vaccination of day-old chicks in the hatchery on aims at eliciting immune responses, particularly cell-mediated responses that are essential when birds are first challenged. Humoral response (IgY and IgA are also important for virus clearance in subsequent challenges. The presence of antibodies against the S1 spike protein in 3- to 4-week-old birds is important both in broilers and for immunological memory in layers and breeders.

  3. Louis pasteur, the father of immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kendall A

    2012-01-01

    Louis Pasteur is traditionally considered as the progenitor of modern immunology because of his studies in the late nineteenth century that popularized the germ theory of disease, and that introduced the hope that all infectious diseases could be prevented by prophylactic vaccination, as well as also treated by therapeutic vaccination, if applied soon enough after infection. However, Pasteur was working at the dawn of the appreciation of the microbial world, at a time when the notion of such a thing as an immune system did not exist, certainly not as we know it today, more than 130 years later. Accordingly, why was Pasteur such a genius as to discern how the immune system functions to protect us against invasion by the microbial world when no one had even made the distinction between fungi, bacteria, or viruses, and no one had formulated any theories of immunity. A careful reading of Pasteur's presentations to the Academy of Sciences reveals that Pasteur was entirely mistaken as to how immunity occurs, in that he reasoned, as a good microbiologist would, that appropriately attenuated microbes would deplete the host of vital trace nutrients absolutely required for their viability and growth, and not an active response on the part of the host. Even so, he focused attention on immunity, preparing the ground for others who followed. This review chronicles Pasteur's remarkable metamorphosis from organic chemist to microbiologist to immunologist, and from basic science to medicine.

  4. Immunology presentation at the 1990 NASA/NSF Antarctica Biomedical Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of methodology used for determining human in vitro lymphocyte activation, proliferation and effector cell function was presented and results of previous manned space flight immunology studies from Apollo through Shuttle were reviewed. Until the Shuttle era, lymphocyte assays were not very sensitive and had such large variations among normal subjects that it was difficult to define a consistent effect of space flight. More sensitive assay, however, even with Shuttle missions as brief as 6 days indicate depressed T-cell proliferative responses are routinely observed following space flight. Using a slight modification of the Shuttle assay, five different human stress-immunology models have been studied over the last 6 years in our lab. These have included: academic examinations of medical students having blood drawn during major test periods on three separate groups of first year students and two hypoxia studies (at 25,000 feet in a 6 week chamber ascent to the equivalent of Mount Everest and twice on Pikes Peak at 14,000 feet). These studies are particularly pertinent to Antarctica, since the altitude equivalent of 11,000 feet at the South Pole may affect some of the variables that are being measured in immunology, physiology or cognitive studies. An extravehicular study was performed drawing blood from 35 individuals before and immediately following a chamber exposure study. Preliminary results from 30 Shuttle astronauts investigated immunophenotype analysis and the role of a novel monocyte population in modulating the previously observed suppressed in vitro immune function. The results of the Air Force Academy cadet stress study were also presented.

  5. Immunologic monitoring in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natavudh Townamchai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transplant biopsy has always been the gold standard for assessing the immune response to a kidney allograft (Chandraker A: Diagnostic techniques in the work-up of renal allograft dysfunction—an update. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 8:723–728, 1999. A biopsy is not without risk and is unable to predict rejection and is only diagnostic once rejection has already occurred. However, in the past two decades, we have seen an expansion in assays that can potentially put an end to the “drug level” era, which until now has been one of the few tools available to clinicians for monitoring the immune response. A better understanding of the mechanisms of rejection and tolerance, and technological advances has led to the development of new noninvasive methods to monitor the immune response. In this article, we discuss these new methods and their potential uses in renal transplant recipients.

  6. Acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses to a basketball game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Foschini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses of professional basketball players to a basketball game. The sample was composed of eight basketball athletes, with a minimum of 4 years’ experience in basketball. A real game was simulated with a total duration of 40 minutes, divided into two halves of 20 minutes each and an interval of 10 minutes between halves. Blood samples were collected before andimmediately after the game (20 ml, vacuum tube system. The variables analyzed were: testosterone and cortisol hormones, total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and the enzymes creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Statistical analysis was with descriptive statistics and the Student’s t test for paired samples to p≤0.05. The pre (13.34 nmol/L and 301.97 nmol/L and post game (17.34 nmol/L and 395.91 nmol/L levels of testosterone and cortisol were statistically different, with higher levels after the game for both hormones. The immune cell counts exhibited significant differences for total leukocytes (6393.75 nmol/L and 9158.75 nmol/L and neutrophils (3532.5 nmol/L and 6392.62 nmol/L, with levels being higher after the game. No statistical differences were observed for the enzymatic variables. Therefore, based on the markers analyzed, testosterone and cortisol exhibited pronounced increases after the game and the samebehavior was observed for total leukocytes and neutrophils.

  7. Immunological monitoring of the tumor immunoenvironment for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyguine, Anatoli M; Strobl, Susan L; Shurin, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Monitoring of immunotherapeutic clinical trials has undergone a considerable change in the last decade resulting in a general agreement that immune monitoring should guide the development of cancer vaccines. The emphasis on immune cell functions and quantitation of antigen-specific T cells have been playing a major role in the attempts to establish meaningful correlations between therapy-induced alterations in immune responses and clinical endpoints. However, one significant unresolved issue in modern immunotherapy is that when a tumor-specific cellular immune response is observed following the course of immunotherapy, it does not always lead to clinically proven cancer regression. This disappointing lack of a correlation between the tumor-specific cytotoxic immune responses and the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy may be explained, among other reasons, by the notion that the analysis of any single immunological parameter is not sufficient to provide clinically feasible information about the complex interactions between different cell subsets in the peripheral blood and immune, tumor, and stromal cells in the tumor milieu. By contrast, a systemic approach is required for improving the quality of a serial monitoring to ensure that it adequately and reliably measures potential changes induced in patients by administered vaccines or immunomodulators. Comprehensive evaluation of the balance between the immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive compartments of the immune system could be critical for a better understanding of how a given immunotherapy works or does not work in a particular clinical trial. New approaches to characterize tumor-infiltrating leukocytes, their phenotypic, biochemical, and genetic characteristics within the tumor microenvironment need to be developed and validated and should complement current monitoring techniques. These immune-monitoring assays for the local tumor immunoenvironment should be developed, validated, and standardized for

  8. Immunological parameters and residual feed intake of Nellore heifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleisy Ferreira Nascimento

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The residual feed intake (RFI is a parameter used in the identification of animals with respect to more efficient feed utilization. However, physiological basis are still unknown, however, the interrelationships between nutrition an immunity of the animal can contribute to the investigation of biological phenomena relevant to the RFI, since the defense system to oxidative effects caused by free radicals, is formed by acid polyunsaturated fatty acids, water soluble substances and enzymes, which derive mainly from the use of nutrients in the diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immunological parameters of Nellore heifers classified according to RFI. It were evaluated 176 heifers (born between 2008 and 2010, Traditional Nellore herd from Instituto de Zootecnia - Sertãozinho/SP, forming three groups of evaluation, submitted to test post weaning feed efficiency and classified into high (> mean + 0.5 SD, n= 55, medium (± 0.5 SD, n= 65 and low RFI (< mean – 0.5 SD, n= 56. The diet was formulated based on Brachiaria decumbens hay, corn, cottonseed meal and mineral mixture (45:55, forage: concentrate. The weight of the animals were performed in fasting blood samples collected by venipuncture vein, using tubes of 10 ml type vacuntainer with EDTA anticoagulant. In the clinical laboratory, we measured the values of leukocytes (LEU; Targeted (SEG and lymphocytes (LIN. The experimental design was a randomized block design using PROC GLM of SAS, considering the fixed effects of year and the age covariate in the statistical model and the averages compared by Tukey test at 5% probability. There was no significant difference (P>0,005 between variables leukocyte (LEU, SEG and LIN and class of RFI (table 1, indicating that there is no distinction between animals more efficient (low RFI and less efficient (high RFI, for inflammatory and immune responses to oxidative effects. Therefore the variables measured leukocytes not explain the differences

  9. The Immunology Database and Analysis Portal (ImmPort)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The ImmPort system serves as a long-term, sustainable archive of immunology research data generated by investigators mainly funded through the NIAID/DAIT. The core...

  10. THE IMMUNOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTIC OF RA PATIENTS WITH ANAEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Sizikov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the investigation was to study the immunological characteristics of RA patients with anaemia. Clinical and laboratory data including the percentage of the main lymphocyte subclasses, phagocyte and DTH-effector activity, serum concentration of immunoglobulins, the percentage of cells producing IFNγ and/or IL-4 and percent of monocytes producing TNF. We revealed some significant clinical, laboratory and immunological differences between RA patients and healthy donors and between patients with and without anaemia. Our data demonstrate RA anemic patients to have more severe disorders than patients without anaemia. We also revealed some significant immunological differences between RA patients and healthy donors and between patients with and without anaemia, including percent of cells producing IFNγ and/or IL-4. Our data permit to conclude that RA patients have many different immunological disturbances, more severe in anaemic patients.

  11. Tumor Biology and Immunology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor Biology and Immunology The Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium is collaborating with National Center for Advanced Translational Sciences to complete whole exome sequencing on canine meningioma samples. Results will be published and made publicly available.

  12. Immunologic and clinical outcomes of children on HAART: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immunologic and clinical outcomes of children on HAART: A retrospective cohort analysis at ... Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences ... Therefor, early diagnosis and treatment of HIV/AIDS and treatment monitoring should be strengthened.

  13. Evaluation of HIV therapeutic agents on immunological, lipid and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of HIV therapeutic agents on immunological, lipid and lipoprotein indices in Ghanaian HIV-1 infected patients. ... lipid and lipoprotein changes as well as the atherogenic indices of Ghanaian HIV-1 infected patients. ... Article Metrics.

  14. 临床免疫学检验的现状与思考%Status quo and reflection of clinical immunology in laboratory medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兰兰; 欧启水

    2014-01-01

    免疫学和分子生物学的发展日新月异,为临床免疫学检验带来许多新的启示和思路,在以临床路径管理和个体化医学为主要特点的时代背景下,如何准确把握这些变化,构建完善的临床免疫学检验质量体系、理清免疫学检验的路径并将其融入到临床路径管理中、扎实推进个体化诊断技术的推广和应用、准确评估临床免疫学检验新技术新项目的诊断价值,是值得每一个临床免疫学检验工作者深思的问题,本文对这些领域的现状和思考作一评述.%With the rapid advancement of immunology and molecular biology,many new revelations and ideas were drew for clinical immunology in laboratory medicine.In the current circumstances of application of clinical pathway management and individual medical care,how to accurately grasp these changes to build perfect quality system for clinical immunology laboratory,clarify the immunology laboratory pathway and integrate that into clinical pathway management,make solid progress for the promotion and application of individual diagnosis and evaluate the diagnostic value of new technique and item for clinical immunology laboratory accurately might be worth pondering for every people working in clinical immunology laboratory.In this paper,the status quo and reflection of clinical immunology is reviewed.

  15. Advances of Tumor Hyperthermia and Tumor Immunology in Translational Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Hooshang Lahooti

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is another important method in the treatment of tumors, secondary to surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and biotherapy. It has been demonstrated the efficacy and versatility of hyperthermia in a lot of randomized trials across various primary cancers. Both heat shock proteins (HSPs) and dendritic cells (DCs) are greatly affected by hyperthermia and closely related to the tumor immunology. Nowadays, tumor hyperthermia and tumor immunology have been attached much attention in the ...

  16. Remembrance of immunology past: conversations with Herman Eisen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Herman N; Schlesinger, Sondra

    2015-01-01

    Herman Eisen and Sondra Schlesinger spent several days together in September 2007 in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, talking about immunology, focusing on his remembrances of the field over the more than 60 years of his involvement. This article is an abridged version of those discussions (the full version is available on the Annual Reviews website). It is both an oral history and a written memory of some important but selected areas of immunology.

  17. Perspectives on psycho-neuro-immunology in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallath Nandini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Psycho-oncology and psycho-neuro-immunology are both powerful new disciplines. Although a lot of literature exists in both of these fields the evidence is often controversial. This paper gives a brief perspective on the origins of psycho-neuro-immunology and discusses how our current understanding of this subject can be translated into clinical practice in an Indian setting.

  18. Current immunological and molecular tools for leptospirosis: diagnostics, vaccine design, and biomarkers for predicting severity

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Handunnetti, Shiroma M.; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic spirochaetal illness that is endemic in many tropical countries. The research base on leptospirosis is not as strong as other tropical infections such as malaria. However, it is a lethal infection that can attack many vital organs in its severe form, leading to multi-organ dysfunction syndrome and death. There are many gaps in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of leptospirosis and the role of host immunity in causing symptoms. This hinders essential steps in ...

  19. Characteristics, immunological events, and diagnostics of Babesia spp. infection, with emphasis on Babesia canis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Vector-borne infection constitutes a significant health issue in dogs worldwide. Recent reports point to an increasing number of canine vector-borne disease cases in European countries, including Poland. Canine babesiosis caused by various Babesia species is a protozoal tick-borne disease with worldwide distribution and significant veterinary importance. The development and application of molecular methods have increased our knowledge about canine babesiosis, its prevalence, and clinical and ...

  20. Immunological cross-reactivity between four distant parvalbumins-Impact on allergen detection and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Michael F; Stephen, Juan N; Kraft, Lukas; Weiss, Thomas; Kamath, Sandip D; Lopata, Andreas L

    2015-02-01

    Fish are the largest and most diverse group of vertebrates. Fish are also a part of the eight food groups that cause the majority of IgE mediated food reactions. Detection tools for fish allergens are however limited due to the great diversity of fish species, despite fish allergy and its major allergen parvalbumin being well documented. The most commonly studied fish are frequently consumed in North America and Europe. However, much less is known about fish allergens in the Australasian region although fish is widely consumed in this region. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was performed of known parvalbumin amino acid sequences to determine possible candidate antigens for new cross-reactive antibodies to be used to detect most fish parvalbumins. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against parvalbumins from frequently consumed barramundi (Lates calcarifer), basa (Pangasius bocourti), pilchard (Sardinops sagax) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). These were evaluated for cross-reactivity against a panel of 45 fish extracts (raw, heated and canned fish). Anti-barramundi parvalbumin proved to be the most cross-reactive antibody, detecting 87.5% of the 40 species analyzed, followed by anti-pilchard and anti-basa antibody. In contrast the anti-salmon antibody was very specific and only reacted to salmonidae and a few other fish. All analyzed fish species, except mahi mahi, swordfish, yellowfin tuna and all 5 canned fish had parvalbumin detected in raw extracts. However antibody reactivity to many fish was heat liable or susceptible to denaturation, demonstrating that some parvalbumins have most likely conformational epitopes, which lose antibody reactivity after heat treatment. We have demonstrated the generation of highly cross-reactive anti-parvalbumin antibodies that could be used for the detection of allergenic fish parvalbumin in contaminated food products. This cross-reactivity study thus shows processing of fish, especially canning, can have on impact on antibody recognition by ELISA, possibly similar to IgE-binding in vivo.