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Sample records for immunoassay algorithm failed

  1. Diagnostic performance of line-immunoassay based algorithms for incident HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schüpbach Jörg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serologic testing algorithms for recent HIV seroconversion (STARHS provide important information for HIV surveillance. We have previously demonstrated that a patient's antibody reaction pattern in a confirmatory line immunoassay (INNO-LIA™ HIV I/II Score provides information on the duration of infection, which is unaffected by clinical, immunological and viral variables. In this report we have set out to determine the diagnostic performance of Inno-Lia algorithms for identifying incident infections in patients with known duration of infection and evaluated the algorithms in annual cohorts of HIV notifications. Methods Diagnostic sensitivity was determined in 527 treatment-naive patients infected for up to 12 months. Specificity was determined in 740 patients infected for longer than 12 months. Plasma was tested by Inno-Lia and classified as either incident ( Results The 10 best algorithms had a mean raw sensitivity of 59.4% and a mean specificity of 95.1%. Adjustment for overrepresentation of patients in the first quarter year of infection further reduced the sensitivity. In the preferred model, the mean adjusted sensitivity was 37.4%. Application of the 10 best algorithms to four annual cohorts of HIV-1 notifications totalling 2'595 patients yielded a mean IIR of 0.35 in 2005/6 (baseline and of 0.45, 0.42 and 0.35 in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. The increase between baseline and 2008 and the ensuing decreases were highly significant. Other adjustment models yielded different absolute IIR, although the relative changes between the cohorts were identical for all models. Conclusions The method can be used for comparing IIR in annual cohorts of HIV notifications. The use of several different algorithms in combination, each with its own sensitivity and specificity to detect incident infection, is advisable as this reduces the impact of individual imperfections stemming primarily from relatively low sensitivities and

  2. A hybrid EKF and switching PSO algorithm for joint state and parameter estimation of lateral flow immunoassay models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Nianyin; Wang, Zidong; Li, Yurong; Du, Min; Liu, Xiaohui

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid extended Kalman filter (EKF) and switching particle swarm optimization (SPSO) algorithm is proposed for jointly estimating both the parameters and states of the lateral flow immunoassay model through available short time-series measurement. Our proposed method generalizes the well-known EKF algorithm by imposing physical constraints on the system states. Note that the state constraints are encountered very often in practice that give rise to considerable difficulties in system analysis and design. The main purpose of this paper is to handle the dynamic modeling problem with state constraints by combining the extended Kalman filtering and constrained optimization algorithms via the maximization probability method. More specifically, a recently developed SPSO algorithm is used to cope with the constrained optimization problem by converting it into an unconstrained optimization one through adding a penalty term to the objective function. The proposed algorithm is then employed to simultaneously identify the parameters and states of a lateral flow immunoassay model. It is shown that the proposed algorithm gives much improved performance over the traditional EKF method.

  3. Algorithm for recall of HIV reactive Indian blood donors by sequential immunoassays enables selective donor referral for counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakral B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS pandemic brought into focus the importance of safe blood donor pool. Aims: To analyze true seroprevalence of HIV infection in our blood donors and devise an algorithm for donor recall avoiding unnecessary referrals to voluntary counseling and testing centre (VCTC. Materials and Methods: 39,784 blood units were screened for anti-HIV 1/2 using ELISA immunoassay (IA-1. Samples which were repeat reactive on IA-1 were further tested using two different immunoassays (IA-2 and IA-3 and Western blot (WB. Based on results of these sequential IAs and WB, an algorithm for recall of true HIV seroreactive blood donors is suggested for countries like India where nucleic acid testing or p24 antigen assays are not mandatory and given the limited resources may not be feasible. Results: The anti-HIV seroreactivity by repeat IA-1, IA-2, IA-3 and WB were 0.16%, 0.11%, 0.098% and 0.07% respectively. Of the 44 IA-1 reactive samples, 95.2% (20/21 of the seroreactive samples by both IA-2 and IA-3 were also WB positive and 100% (6/6 of the non-reactive samples by these IAs were WB negative. IA signal/cutoff ratio was significantly low in biological false reactive donors. WB indeterminate results were largely due to non-specific reactivity to gag protein (p55. Conclusions: HIV seroreactivity by sequential immunoassays (IA-1, IA-2 and IA-3; comparable to WHO Strategy-III prior to donor recall results in decreased referral to VCTC as compared to single IA (WHO Strategy-I being followed currently in India. Moreover, this strategy will repose donor confidence in our blood transfusion services and strengthen voluntary blood donation program.

  4. Clostridium difficile Testing Algorithm: Is There a Difference in Patients Who Test Positive by Enzyme Immunoassay vs. Those Who Only Test Positive by Nucleic Acid Amplification Methodology?

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Jonathan; Odili, Ogheneruona; Craver, Mary Ashleigh; Mayen, Anthony; Purrman, Kyle; Rahman, Asem; Sang, Charlie Joseph; Cook, Paul P

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Testing for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) commonly involves checking for the presence of toxins A and B by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) or nucleic acid amplification (NAA). The former is very specific, but not very sensitive. The latter is very sensitive. Beginning in 2011, our hospital incorporated an algorithm that involved testing liquid stool specimens for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin by EIA. For discrepant results, the stool specimen was tested for the ...

  5. What to Do When K-Means Clustering Fails: A Simple yet Principled Alternative Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykov, Yordan P; Boukouvalas, Alexis; Baig, Fahd; Little, Max A

    The K-means algorithm is one of the most popular clustering algorithms in current use as it is relatively fast yet simple to understand and deploy in practice. Nevertheless, its use entails certain restrictive assumptions about the data, the negative consequences of which are not always immediately apparent, as we demonstrate. While more flexible algorithms have been developed, their widespread use has been hindered by their computational and technical complexity. Motivated by these considerations, we present a flexible alternative to K-means that relaxes most of the assumptions, whilst remaining almost as fast and simple. This novel algorithm which we call MAP-DP (maximum a-posteriori Dirichlet process mixtures), is statistically rigorous as it is based on nonparametric Bayesian Dirichlet process mixture modeling. This approach allows us to overcome most of the limitations imposed by K-means. The number of clusters K is estimated from the data instead of being fixed a-priori as in K-means. In addition, while K-means is restricted to continuous data, the MAP-DP framework can be applied to many kinds of data, for example, binary, count or ordinal data. Also, it can efficiently separate outliers from the data. This additional flexibility does not incur a significant computational overhead compared to K-means with MAP-DP convergence typically achieved in the order of seconds for many practical problems. Finally, in contrast to K-means, since the algorithm is based on an underlying statistical model, the MAP-DP framework can deal with missing data and enables model testing such as cross validation in a principled way. We demonstrate the simplicity and effectiveness of this algorithm on the health informatics problem of clinical sub-typing in a cluster of diseases known as parkinsonism.

  6. Failing Failed States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Hans-Henrik

    2002-01-01

    coverage. A Danish survey of newsrooms shows that the national world-view and prevalent news criteria prevent consistent coverage. It is argued that politicians are the ones who determine national agendas: it is from political initiatives, rather than media coverage, that failing states and humanitarian......When states are failing, when basic state functions are no longer carried out, and when people have no security, humanitarian crises erupt. In confronting this problem, the stronger states have followed an ad hoc policy of intervention and aid. In some cases, humanitarian disasters have resulted...... from inaction. Often, the media are blamed. Politicians complain about the media when they interfere (the CNN effect), and when they do not. This article looks at how the media do cover failing states. Sierra Leone and Congo are used as examples. The analysis shows that there is little independent...

  7. Immunoassays in Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunoassays have broad applications for a wide variety of important biological compounds and environmental contaminants. Immunoassays can detect the presence of an antigen in the human body, a pollutant in the environment, or a critical antibody in a patient’s serum to develop a...

  8. Advanced techniques in immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, G.

    1982-01-01

    A brief overview of the development history of radioimmunoassay and related techniques with their theory and practice are given. A comparison of radioimmunoassay (RIA), enzyme immunoassay (EIA), spin immunoassay (SIA), sequential saturation analysis (SSA) etc., based on their main parameters, and their fields of application and recent trends are presented. (Sz.J.)

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a modified two-step algorithm using a combined glutamate dehydrogenase/toxin enzyme immunoassay and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasoo, Shawn; Stevens, Jane; Portillo, Lena; Barza, Ruby; Schejbal, Debra; Wu, May May; Chancey, Christina; Singh, Kamaljit

    2014-02-01

    The analytical performance and cost-effectiveness of the Wampole Toxin A/B EIA, the C. Diff. Quik Chek Complete (CdQCC) (a combined glutamate dehydrogenase antigen/toxin enzyme immunoassay), two RT-PCR assays (Progastro Cd and BD GeneOhm) and a modified two-step algorithm using the CdQCC reflexed to RT-PCR for indeterminate results were compared. The sensitivity of the Wampole Toxin A/B EIA, CdQCC (GDH antigen), BD GeneOhm and Progastro Cd RT-PCR were 85.4%, 95.8%, 100% and 93.8%, respectively. The algorithm provided rapid results for 86% of specimens and the remaining indeterminate results were resolved by RT-PCR, offering the best balance of sensitivity and cost savings per test (algorithm ∼US$13.50/test versus upfront RT-PCR ∼US$26.00/test). Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Radiolabelling for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Since the early 1960s labelled compounds employed in immunoassay techniques, both radioimmunoassay and immunoradiometric assay, have involved radioisotopes typically 3 H (tritium) and 125 Iodine. With the advent of increasingly stringent governmental regulations regarding usage and disposal of radioisotopes and the impetus of research towards improved immunoassay sensitivity following the discovery of monoclonal antibodies and their application to excess reagent immunometric assay methodology, radioisotopic labels are gradually being replaced by non-isotopic labels: enzyme, fluorescence and chemiluminescence

  11. Hydrogel nanoparticle based immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Espina, Virginia

    2015-04-21

    An immunoassay device incorporating porous polymeric capture nanoparticles within either the sample collection vessel or pre-impregnated into a porous substratum within fluid flow path of the analytical device is presented. This incorporation of capture particles within the immunoassay device improves sensitivity while removing the requirement for pre-processing of samples prior to loading the immunoassay device. A preferred embodiment is coreshell bait containing capture nanoparticles which perform three functions in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving, b) target analyte sequestration and concentration, and c) protection from degradation. The polymeric matrix of the capture particles may be made of co-polymeric materials having a structural monomer and an affinity monomer, the affinity monomer having properties that attract the analyte to the capture particle. This device is useful for point of care diagnostic assays for biomedical applications and as field deployable assays for environmental, pathogen and chemical or biological threat identification.

  12. Bead-based immunoassays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der F.J.; Bergervoet, J.H.W.; Achterberg, R.P.; Haasnoot, W.

    2014-01-01

    Since the first immunoassay with (radioactive) labeled antibodies in the middle of the 20th century [1], many different formats on various platforms have been developed, using antibodies for capture and/or detection. If antibodies are used to capture compounds, a support, such as the wall of a

  13. The immunoassay handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wild, David (David G.)

    2001-01-01

    ... importantly, enabling them to keep current on the basic theory behind immunoassay. Since the publication of the previous edition in 1994, the field has continued to evolve rapidly, and the need for a fully updated version of this book is now paramount. The second edition has been comprehensively updated and new chapters have been added to each section" [publisher's web site].

  14. Chemiluminescence immunoassay for chloramphenicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Si; Xu Wenge; Liu Yibing

    2007-06-01

    A simple, solid-phase chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) for the measurement of Chloramphenicol(CAP) in foodstuffs is described. A rabbit anti-CAP IgG is passively adsorbed onto the walls of polypropylene plates. The labeled conjugant is horseradish peroxidase(HRP) conjugate of CAP. Luminol solution is used as the substrate of HRP. The light yield is inversely proportional to the concentration of CAP. The method has a similar sensitivity (0.05 ng/mL), specificity, precision, and accuracy to a conventional enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The intra-assay and inter-assay CVs of ten samples were <8 and <20%, respectively, and the analytical recovery of the method was 87% 100%. The experimental correlation coefficient of dilution was found to be 0.999 using milk supernatant as buffer. The assay range for the method was 0.1-10 ng/mL, and it displayed good linearity. (authors)

  15. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    polynomial) division have been found in Vedic Mathematics which are dated much before Euclid's algorithm. A programming language Is used to describe an algorithm for execution on a computer. An algorithm expressed using a programming.

  16. Specificity of immunoassays. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, J.J.; Woldring, M.G.; Boonman, R.; Kittikool, J.

    1979-01-01

    Practical aspects of the measurement of the specificity of immunoassay are reviewed. Antibody heterogeneity in an antiserum makes a pragmatic rather than a theoretical approach necessary. A new method for the measurement of immunoassay specificity is described. This method is based on the errors caused by the cross-reacting antigens and is directly relevant to the validity of results obtained by immunoassay methods. The effect of selectively blocking the least specific antibodies in antisera raised against steroid haptens is tested. The practical consequences of these considerations are tested using steroid radioimmunoassay and enzyme-immunoassay. (orig.) [de

  17. Interference in immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Interfering factors are evident in both limited reagent (radioimmunoassay) and excess reagent (immunometric assay) technologies and should be suspected whenever there is a discrepancy between analytical results and clinical findings in the investigation of particular diseases. The overall effect of interference in immunoassay is analytical bias in result, either positive or negative of variable magnitude. The interference maybe caused by a wide spectrum of factors from poor sample collection and handling to physiological factors e.g. lipaemia, heparin treatment, binding protein abnormalities, autoimmunity and drug treatments. The range of interfering factors is extensive and difficult to discuss effectively in a short review

  18. Procedures for Sensitive Immunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Givol, D. [Department of Chemical Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    1970-02-15

    Sensitive immunoassay methods should be applied to small molecules of biological importance, which are non-immunogenic by themselves, such as small peptide hormones (e.g. bradykinin), plant hormones (e.g. indoleacetic acid), nucleotides and other small molecules. Methods of binding these small molecules, as haptens, to immunogenic carriers by various cross-linking agents are described (dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, tolylene-diisocyanate and glutaraldehyde), and the considerations involved in relation to the methods of binding and the specificity of the antibodies formed are discussed. Some uses of antibody bound to bromoacetyl cellulose as an immuno adsorbent convenient for assay of immunoglobulins are described. Finally, the sensitive immunoassay method of chemically modified phage is described. This includes methods of binding small molecules (such as the dinitrophenyl group, penicillin, indoleacetic acid) or proteins (such as insulin, immunoglobulins) to phages. Methods of direct chemical conjugation, or an indirect binding via anti-phage Fab, are described. The phage inactivation method by direct plating and its modifications (such as decision technique and complex inactivation) are compared with the more simple end-point titration method. The inhibition of phage inactivation has some advantages as it does not require radioactive material, or expensive radioactive counters, and avoids the need for separation between bound and unbound antigen. Hence, if developed, it could be used as an alternative to radioimmunoassay. (author)

  19. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to as 'divide-and-conquer'. Although there has been a large effort in realizing efficient algorithms, there are not many universally accepted algorithm design paradigms. In this article, we illustrate algorithm design techniques such as balancing, greedy strategy, dynamic programming strategy, and backtracking or traversal of ...

  20. Immunoassay separation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A method for effecting the immunoassay of a multiplicity of samples, each possibly containing an antigen or an antibody to be assayed, is discussed. Each sample is incubated with a solution containing a detectable antigen or antibody to form a multiplicity of mixtures, each mixture containing as components antigen-antibody, non-complexed antigen and non-complexed antibody. At least one of the components of the said mixture is separated by adsorption. There after, quantity of detectable antigen or antibody is detected in one of the non-adsorbed portions of the mixture. An improvement, compared to other techniques, is the continuous and sequential separation of at least one component, which is intended to be separated from each said multiplicity of mixtures

  1. Failing Decision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Recently the Danish subway trains have begun to announce “on time” when they arrive at a station on time. This action reflects a worrying acceptance of the normality of failure. If trains were generally expected to be on time, there would be no reason to – triumphantly – announce it. This chapter...... by an interest in failure as one way of improving understanding of present-day decision making in organizations.......Recently the Danish subway trains have begun to announce “on time” when they arrive at a station on time. This action reflects a worrying acceptance of the normality of failure. If trains were generally expected to be on time, there would be no reason to – triumphantly – announce it. This chapter...... deals not with traffic delays, but with failing decisions in organizations. The assumption of this chapter is that failing decisions today are as normal as delayed trains. Instead of being the exception, failure is part of the everyday reproduction of organizations – as an uncontrolled effect but also...

  2. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, P; Reischl, U

    1998-01-01

    An immunoassay may be defined as an assay that employs an immunological reagent, usually an antibody, to confer specificity for the ligand being measured. As a corollary to this, the discovery, and subsequent development, of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has greatly expanded the application and use of immunoassays. Polyclonal reagents, with their associated problems of specificity and quality control, have now been largely replaced by readily available MAbs of potential immortality and well-defined specificity and affinity. This has resulted, in the last two decades, in a great expansion in the range of immunoassays available and also a significant improvement in their reproducibility and reliability.

  3. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ticians but also forms the foundation of computer science. Two ... with methods of developing algorithms for solving a variety of problems but ... applications of computers in science and engineer- ... numerical calculus are as important. We will ...

  4. Immunoassay for thymopoietin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, G.

    1979-01-01

    The patent describes the development of a radio-immunoassay for thymopoietin in biological samples. The method of raising antibodies to this polypeptide hormone is described. This is achieved by injecting a host animal with an antigen consisting of thymopoietin covalently bonded by glutaraldehyde to a carrier protein such as bovine serum albumin and equine globulin. Different methods of radiolabelling thymopoietin with 125 I for use as the tracer antigen are described. The Bolton-Hunter procedure was preferred to the chloramine-T method since direct iodination of the tyrosyl moieties of thymopoietin resulted in some loss of immunoreactivity. Systems for separating the antigen-antibody complex and unbound antigen are compared. Binding-inhibition curves for unlabelled thymopoietin in the assay employing polyethylene glycol separation showed a sensitivity of 5 ng thymopoietin/ml. However, using the double antibody or dextran coated charcoal separation techniques, the sensitivity of thymopoietin was 0.1 ng/ml. Thus these latter two procedures are thus especially suitable for measuring thymopoietin levels in serum or plasma samples. The assay was shown to be specific for thymopoietin, no significant displacement being produced by control polypeptides. (U.K.)

  5. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    algorithm design technique called 'divide-and-conquer'. One of ... Turtle graphics, September. 1996. 5. ... whole list named 'PO' is a pointer to the first element of the list; ..... Program for computing matrices X and Y and placing the result in C *).

  6. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    algorithm that it is implicitly understood that we know how to generate the next natural ..... Explicit comparisons are made in line (1) where maximum and minimum is ... It can be shown that the function T(n) = 3/2n -2 is the solution to the above ...

  7. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    will become clear in the next article when we discuss a simple logo like programming language. ... Rod B may be used as an auxiliary store. The problem is to find an algorithm which performs this task. ... No disks are moved from A to Busing C as auxiliary rod. • move _disk (A, C);. (No + l)th disk is moved from A to C directly ...

  8. Immunoassay for determination of trilobolide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huml, L.; Jurášek, M.; Mikšátková, P.; Zimmermann, T.; Tomanová, P.; Buděšínský, Miloš; Rottnerová, Z.; Šimková, M.; Harmatha, Juraj; Kmoníčková, Eva; Lapčík, O.; Drašar, P. B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 117, Jan (2017), s. 105-111 ISSN 0039-128X. [Conference on Isoprenoids /23./. Minsk, 04.09.2016-07.09.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : trilobolide * avidin-biotin * ELISA * Laser trilobum * synthesis * immunoassay Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry (UEM-P) OBOR OECD: Biochemical research methods; Pharmacology and pharmacy (UEM-P) Impact factor: 2.282, year: 2016

  9. [Automated analyzer of enzyme immunoassay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, S

    1995-09-01

    Automated analyzers for enzyme immunoassay can be classified by several points of view: the kind of labeled antibodies or enzymes, detection methods, the number of tests per unit time, analytical time and speed per run. In practice, it is important for us consider the several points such as detection limits, the number of tests per unit time, analytical range, and precision. Most of the automated analyzers on the market can randomly access and measure samples. I will describe the recent advance of automated analyzers reviewing their labeling antibodies and enzymes, the detection methods, the number of test per unit time and analytical time and speed per test.

  10. Survey of immunoassay techniques for biological analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtis, C.A.

    1986-10-01

    Immunoassay is a very specific, sensitive, and widely applicable analytical technique. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the development of monoclonal antibodies which further improves the specificity of immunoassays. Originally, radioisotopes were used to label the antigens and antibodies used in immunoassays. However, in the last decade, numerous types of immunoassays have been developed which utilize enzymes and fluorescent dyes as labels. Given the technical, safety, health, and disposal problems associated with using radioisotopes, immunoassays that utilize the enzyme and fluorescent labels are rapidly replacing those using radioisotope labels. These newer techniques are as sensitive, are easily automated, have stable reagents, and do not have a disposal problem. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  11. Nitrocellulose membrane-based enzyme-linked immunoassay for dengue serotype-1 IgM detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, S.; Guevara, C.; Chunga, A.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specifity of a nitrocellulose membrane-based immunoassay for dengue IgM, with respect to capture enzyme immunoassay, for the diagnosis of dengue virus infection. 101 serum samples were processed and divided into 2 groups: 53 from dengue serotype 1 (DEN1) infected patients, and 48 from healthy subjects. Both groups were tested with a nitrocellulose membrane-based IgM capture enzyme immunoassay (NMB-EIA) and also with an ELISA as referential pattern. NMB-EIA testing detected IgM anti-DEN1 in 94,34% of samples from infected patients, and in 14,58% of control samples, whereas ELISA fails to report false positive or false negative results: NMB-EIA appears to be a good alternative for dengue infection diagnosis. (authors)

  12. Novel immunoassay formats for integrated microfluidic circuits: diffusion immunoassays (DIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Hatch, Anson; Kamholz, Andrew E.; Yager, Paul

    2000-03-01

    Novel designs of integrated fluidic microchips allow separations, chemical reactions, and calibration-free analytical measurements to be performed directly in very small quantities of complex samples such as whole blood and contaminated environmental samples. This technology lends itself to applications such as clinical diagnostics, including tumor marker screening, and environmental sensing in remote locations. Lab-on-a-Chip based systems offer many *advantages over traditional analytical devices: They consume extremely low volumes of both samples and reagents. Each chip is inexpensive and small. The sampling-to-result time is extremely short. They perform all analytical functions, including sampling, sample pretreatment, separation, dilution, and mixing steps, chemical reactions, and detection in an integrated microfluidic circuit. Lab-on-a-Chip systems enable the design of small, portable, rugged, low-cost, easy to use, yet extremely versatile and capable diagnostic instruments. In addition, fluids flowing in microchannels exhibit unique characteristics ('microfluidics'), which allow the design of analytical devices and assay formats that would not function on a macroscale. Existing Lab-on-a-chip technologies work very well for highly predictable and homogeneous samples common in genetic testing and drug discovery processes. One of the biggest challenges for current Labs-on-a-chip, however, is to perform analysis in the presence of the complexity and heterogeneity of actual samples such as whole blood or contaminated environmental samples. Micronics has developed a variety of Lab-on-a-Chip assays that can overcome those shortcomings. We will now present various types of novel Lab- on-a-Chip-based immunoassays, including the so-called Diffusion Immunoassays (DIA) that are based on the competitive laminar diffusion of analyte molecules and tracer molecules into a region of the chip containing antibodies that target the analyte molecules. Advantages of this

  13. False-negative syphilis treponemal enzyme immunoassay results in an HIV-infected case-patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alan R; Komeya, Alan Y; Tomas, Juval E

    2017-06-01

    We present a case report of a false-negative syphilis treponemal enzyme immunoassay test result in an HIV-infected male. While treponemal tests are widely considered to be more sensitive and specific than non-treponemal tests, our findings point to potential challenges using the reverse sequence syphilis screening algorithm.

  14. Engaging Future Failing States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    military missions in the Middle East, the Balkans, Africa, Asia , and South America. There is an increasing proliferation of failed and failing states...disparity, overpopulation , food security, health services availability, migration pressures, environmental degradation, personal and 22 community

  15. Immunoassay of β-endorphin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoellt, V.; Gramsch, C.; Herz, A.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper describes the characteristics of a series of antisera against β-endorphin (β-E) developed in our laboratory which all recognize β-lipotropin and their use in (1) the determination of β-E in tissue and in body fluids and in (2) the immunocytochemical localization of β-E containing neurons in the rat brain and in (3) the study of the conversion of the β-E/β-LPH precursor into β-LPH and β-E in the pars intermedia/nervosa of the rat pituitary. It is the purpose of the present report to critically analyze the pitfalls and drawbacks, as well as the advantage, of the use of radioimmunoassay and other immunoassays in the determination of β-E. (Auth.)

  16. Materials for Microfluidic Immunoassays: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Lei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2017-08-01

    Conventional immunoassays suffer from at least one of these following limitations: long processing time, high costs, poor user-friendliness, technical complexity, poor sensitivity and specificity. Microfluidics, a technology characterized by the engineered manipulation of fluids in channels with characteristic lengthscale of tens of micrometers, has shown considerable promise for improving immunoassays that could overcome these limitations in medical diagnostics and biology research. The combination of microfluidics and immunoassay can detect biomarkers with faster assay time, reduced volumes of reagents, lower power requirements, and higher levels of integration and automation compared to traditional approaches. This review focuses on the materials-related aspects of the recent advances in microfluidics-based immunoassays for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics of biomarkers. We compare the materials for microfluidic chips fabrication in five aspects: fabrication, integration, function, modification and cost, and describe their advantages and drawbacks. In addition, we review materials for modifying antibodies to improve the performance of the reaction of immunoassay. We also review the state of the art in microfluidic immunoassays POC platforms, from the laboratory to routine clinical practice, and also commercial products in the market. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and future developments in microfluidic immunoassays. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Variance function estimation for immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raab, G.M.; Thompson, R.; McKenzie, I.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program is described which implements a recently described, modified likelihood method of determining an appropriate weighting function to use when fitting immunoassay dose-response curves. The relationship between the variance of the response and its mean value is assumed to have an exponential form, and the best fit to this model is determined from the within-set variability of many small sets of repeated measurements. The program estimates the parameter of the exponential function with its estimated standard error, and tests the fit of the experimental data to the proposed model. Output options include a list of the actual and fitted standard deviation of the set of responses, a plot of actual and fitted standard deviation against the mean response, and an ordered list of the 10 sets of data with the largest ratios of actual to fitted standard deviation. The program has been designed for a laboratory user without computing or statistical expertise. The test-of-fit has proved valuable for identifying outlying responses, which may be excluded from further analysis by being set to negative values in the input file. (Auth.)

  18. An algorithmic programming approach for back pain symptoms in failed back surgery syndrome using spinal cord stimulation with a multicolumn surgically implanted epidural lead: a multicenter international prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoard, Philippe; Jacques, Line; Delmotte, Alexandre; Poon, Katherine; Munson, Russell; Monlezun, Olivier; Roulaud, Manuel; Prevost, Audrey; Guetarni, Farid; Bataille, Benoit; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the efficacy and the medical/economic value of epidural spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of "failed back surgery syndrome" (FBSS). However, the back pain component of FBSS has been recalcitrant. Recent clinical trials have suggested that multicolumn surgically implanted leads combined with enhanced programming capabilities in the newer implantable pulse generators demonstrate the ability to treat the back pain component of FBSS. The objective of our present international multicentre study is to prospectively evaluate these findings in a larger population. We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized, observational study on 76 patients with refractory FBSS, consecutively implanted with multicolumn spinal cord stimulation (SCS) between 2008 and 2011 in three neurosurgical pain management centers (Poitiers, France; Montréal, Canada; and Regina, Canada). The primary objective of this study was to prospectively analyze the effect of multicolumn lead programming on paresthesia coverage for the back pain region in these patients. The secondary objective was to assess the analgesic efficacy of this technique on the global and back pain components. Paresthesia could be induced in the lower extremities in the majority of patients with at least one of the configurations tested. Bilateral low back paresthesia was induced in 53.5% of patients, while unilateral low back paresthesia was induced in 78.9% of patients. Multicolumn configurations were statistically more effective than monocolumn configurations for all anatomic regions studied. At 6 months, 75.4% of patients receiving multicolumn stimulation (n = 57) obtained at least a 30% improvement of the back pain VAS score, while 42.1% of patients obtained at least a 50% improvement of the back pain VAS score. This study confirms the hypothesis that multicolumn SCS should be considered as an important tool in the treatment of radicular and axial pain in FBSS patients. The efficacy of this

  19. HIV misdiagnosis in sub-Saharan Africa: performance of diagnostic algorithms at six testing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosack, Cara S.; Shanks, Leslie; Beelaert, Greet; Benson, Tumwesigye; Savane, Aboubacar; Ng’ang’a, Anne; Andre, Bita; Zahinda, Jean-Paul BN; Fransen, Katrien; Page, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of HIV testing algorithms at six programmes in five sub-Saharan African countries. Methods: In this prospective multisite diagnostic evaluation study (Conakry, Guinea; Kitgum, Uganda; Arua, Uganda; Homa Bay, Kenya; Doula, Cameroun and Baraka, Democratic Republic of Congo), samples from clients (greater than equal to five years of age) testing for HIV were collected and compared to a state-of-the-art algorithm from the AIDS reference laboratory at the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Belgium. The reference algorithm consisted of an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay, a line-immunoassay, a single antigen-enzyme immunoassay and a DNA polymerase chain reaction test. Results: Between August 2011 and January 2015, over 14,000 clients were tested for HIV at 6 HIV counselling and testing sites. Of those, 2786 (median age: 30; 38.1% males) were included in the study. Sensitivity of the testing algorithms ranged from 89.5% in Arua to 100% in Douala and Conakry, while specificity ranged from 98.3% in Doula to 100% in Conakry. Overall, 24 (0.9%) clients, and as many as 8 per site (1.7%), were misdiagnosed, with 16 false-positive and 8 false-negative results. Six false-negative specimens were retested with the on-site algorithm on the same sample and were found to be positive. Conversely, 13 false-positive specimens were retested: 8 remained false-positive with the on-site algorithm. Conclusions: The performance of algorithms at several sites failed to meet expectations and thresholds set by the World Health Organization, with unacceptably high rates of false results. Alongside the careful selection of rapid diagnostic tests and the validation of algorithms, strictly observing correct procedures can reduce the risk of false results. In the meantime, to identify false-positive diagnoses at initial testing, patients should be retested upon initiating antiretroviral therapy. PMID:28691437

  20. Recent advancements in the immunoassay domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradelles, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The two types of immunoassay techniques, the competition analysis and the immuno-metric analysis (sandwich type), are described; the tracers used with theses methods have high specific radioactivity levels in order to be traced at extremely low content. Non radioactive tracers have been also developed, such as enzymatic, fluorescent, luminescent tracers, which are simpler and may be used at home. The Cea has recently developed some innovative immunoassay formats, such as acetylcholinesterase as a new enzymatic tracer, and immuno-metric dosage for very small molecules such as haptenes

  1. Dams designed to fail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penman, A. [Geotechnical Engineering Consultants, Harpenden (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01

    New developments in geotechnical engineering have led to methods for designing and constructing safe embankment dams. Failed dams can be categorized as those designed to fail, and those that have failed unexpectedly. This presentation outlined 3 dam failures: the 61 m high Malpasset Dam in France in 1959 which killed 421; the 71 m high Baldwin Hills Dam in the United States in 1963 which killed 5; and, the Vajont Dam in Italy in 1963 which killed 2,600 people. Following these incidents, the International Commission for Large Dams (ICOLD) reviewed regulations on reservoir safety. The 3 dams were found to have inadequate spillways and their failures were due to faults in their design. Fuse plug spillways, which address this problem, are designed to fail if an existing spillway proves inadequate. They allow additional discharge to prevent overtopping of the embankment dam. This solution can only be used if there is an adjacent valley to take the additional discharge. Examples of fuse gates were presented along with their effect on dam safety. A research program is currently underway in Norway in which high embankment dams are being studied for overtopping failure and failure due to internal erosion. Internal erosion has been the main reason why dams have failed unexpectedly. To prevent failures, designers suggested the use of a clay blanket placed under the upstream shoulder. However, for dams with soft clay cores, these underblankets could provide a route for a slip surface and that could lead to failure of the upstream shoulder. It was concluded that a safe arrangement for embankment dams includes the use of tipping gates or overturning gates which always fail at a required flood water level. Many have been installed in old and new dams around the world. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  2. Failed endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheykhol Islami V

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of failed intubation is higher in obstetric than other surgical patients. Failed intubation was the 2nd commonest cause of mortality during anesthesia. Bearing in mind that failre to intubate may be unavoidable in certain circumstances, it is worth reviewing. The factors, which may contribute to a disastrous out come. Priorities of subsequent management must include maintaining oxygenation and preventing aspiration of gastric contents. Fiber optic intubation is now the technique of choice with a high success rate and with least trauma to the patient.

  3. The right environment for the immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emon, J.M. Van; Gerlach, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    For the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the first in-house research effort began in 1987, when results of an early immunoassay field study verified the technology's potential for environmental applications. Looking at the fundamental features of immunochemical reactions from the clinical laboratories, analytical chemists realized the potential value of these methods for hazardous waste site characterization and pesticide monitoring. Immunoassays rely on the interaction between an antibody and a target analyte. For environmental purposes, enzyme immunoassays are generally used. After the target analyte binds to the antibody, an enzymatic reaction yields a colorimetric change. This change, read visually or by a spectrophotometer, indicates the concentration of the target analyte. Promising results with assays for compounds (such as paraquat and pentachlorophenol) and compound groups (such as total petroleum hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls) spurred interest among various entrepreneurs. The first target market for immunoassays was environmental engineers and field crews who needed quick answers on-site to determine the direction of further remediation efforts

  4. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martucci, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    A failed fuel detection apparatus is described for a nuclear reactor having a liquid cooled core comprising a gas collection hood adapted to engage the top of the suspect assembly and means for delivering a stripping gas to the vicinity of the bottom of the suspect fuel assembly. (U.S.)

  5. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally...

  6. Who Really Failed? Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Katherine M.; Leon, Raul A.

    2012-01-01

    Scott Jaschik's (2010) article "Who Really Failed?" details the experience of Dominique Homberger, a tenured faculty member at Louisiana State University (LSU) who was removed from teaching her introductory biology course citing student complaints in regards to "the extreme nature" of the grading policy. This removal has…

  7. FAILED FUEL DISPOSITION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2004-12-20

    In May 2004 alpha contamination was found on the lid of the pre-filter housing in the Sodium Removal Ion Exchange System during routine filter change. Subsequent investigation determined that the alpha contamination likely came from a fuel pin(s) contained in an Ident-69 (ID-69) type pin storage container serial number 9 (ID-69-9) that was washed in the Sodium Removal System (SRS) in January 2004. Because all evidence indicated that the wash water interacted with the fuel, this ID49 is designated as containing a failed fuel pin with gross cladding defect and was set aside in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell until it could be determined how to proceed for long term dry storage of the fuel pin container. This ID49 contained fuel pins from the driver fuel assembly (DFA) 16392, which was identified as a Delayed Neutron Monitor (DNM) leaker assembly. However, this DFA was disassembled and the fuel pin that was thought to be the failed pin was encapsulated and was not located in this ID49 container. This failed fuel disposition study discusses two alternatives that could be used to address long term storage for the contents of ID-69-9. The first alternative evaluated utilizes the current method of identifying and storing DNM leaker fuel pin(s) in tubes and thus, verifying that the alpha contamination found in the SRS came from a failed pin in this pin container. This approach will require unloading selected fuel pins from the ID-69, visually examining and possibly weighing suspect fuel pins to identify the failed pin(s), inserting the failed pin(s) in storage tubes, and reloading the fuel pins into ID49 containers. Safety analysis must be performed to revise the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (Reference 1) for this fuel configuration. The second alternative considered is to store the failed fuel as-is in the ID-69. This was evaluated to determine if this approach would comply with storage requirements. This

  8. FAILED FUEL DISPOSITION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    In May 2004 alpha contamination was found on the lid of the pre-filter housing in the Sodium Removal Ion Exchange System during routine filter change. Subsequent investigation determined that the alpha contamination likely came from a fuel pin(s) contained in an Ident-69 (ID-69) type pin storage container serial number 9 (ID-69-9) that was washed in the Sodium Removal System (SRS) in January 2004. Because all evidence indicated that the wash water interacted with the fuel, this ID49 is designated as containing a failed fuel pin with gross cladding defect and was set aside in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell until it could be determined how to proceed for long term dry storage of the fuel pin container. This ID49 contained fuel pins from the driver fuel assembly (DFA) 16392, which was identified as a Delayed Neutron Monitor (DNM) leaker assembly. However, this DFA was disassembled and the fuel pin that was thought to be the failed pin was encapsulated and was not located in this ID49 container. This failed fuel disposition study discusses two alternatives that could be used to address long term storage for the contents of ID-69-9. The first alternative evaluated utilizes the current method of identifying and storing DNM leaker fuel pin(s) in tubes and thus, verifying that the alpha contamination found in the SRS came from a failed pin in this pin container. This approach will require unloading selected fuel pins from the ID-69, visually examining and possibly weighing suspect fuel pins to identify the failed pin(s), inserting the failed pin(s) in storage tubes, and reloading the fuel pins into ID49 containers. Safety analysis must be performed to revise the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (Reference 1) for this fuel configuration. The second alternative considered is to store the failed fuel as-is in the ID-69. This was evaluated to determine if this approach would comply with storage requirements. This

  9. Failed fuel detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To detect failed fuel element in a reactor with high precision by measuring the radioactivity concentrations for more than one nuclides of fission products ( 131 I and 132 I, for example) contained in each sample of coolant in fuel channel. Method: The radioactivity concentrations in the sampled coolant are obtained from gamma spectra measured by a pulse height analyser after suitable cooling periods according to the half-lives of the fission products to be measured. The first measurement for 132 I is made in two hours after sampling, and the second for 131 I is started one day after the sampling. Fuel element corresponding to the high radioactivity concentrations for both 131 I and 132 I is expected with certainty to have failed

  10. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Takayuki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable early and sure detection of failed fuels by automatically changing the alarm set value depending on the operation states of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: Gaseous fission products released into coolants are transferred further into cover gases and then introduced through a pipeway to a failed fuel detector. The cover gases introduced from the pipeway to the pipeway or chamber within the detection device are detected by a radiation detector for the radiation dose of the gaseous fission products contained therein. The detected value is converted and amplified as a signal and inputted to a comparator. While on the other hand, a signal corresponding to the reactor power is converted by an alarm setter into a set value and inputted to the comparator. In such a structure, early and sure detection can be made for the fuel failures. (Yoshino, Y.)

  11. Failed fuel rod detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Katsuya; Matsuda, Yasuhiko

    1984-05-02

    The purpose of the project is to enable failed fuel rod detection simply with no requirement for dismantling the fuel assembly. A gamma-ray detection section is arranged so as to attend on the optional fuel rods in the fuel assembly. The fuel assembly is adapted such that a gamma-ray shielding plate is detachably inserted into optional gaps of the fuel rods or, alternatively, the fuel assembly can detachably be inserted to the gamma-ray shielding plate. In this way, amount of gaseous fission products accumulated in all of the plenum portions in the fuel rods as the object of the measurement can be determined without dismantling the fuel assembly. Accordingly, by comparing the amounts of the gaseous fission products, the failed fuel rod can be detected.

  12. Development of national immunoassay reagent programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sufi, S.B.; Micallef, J.V.; Ahsan, R.; Goncharov, N.P.

    1992-01-01

    Despite the existence of networks of fully equipped laboratories with well-trained staff, the availability of immunodiagnostic services in developing countries is often limited by the high cost of imported kits. There are a number of ways of tackling this problem, ranging from bulk purchase of kits or reagents to local development and production of assay systems. Argentina/Chile, China, Cuba/Mexico, and Thailand are amongst the countries which have established local immunoassay reagent programmes to manufacture low cost, high quality immunoassay reagents. Kits from these projects are now beginning to become available, and it is hoped that they will promote national diagnostic services and research, as well as stimulating the development of reagent programmes for other analytes. (author). 4 refs, 1 tab

  13. Studies on direct and indirect electrochemical immunoassays

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Eileen

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches to electrochemical immunoassay are reported. The first approach was an indirect method, involving an electroactive, enzyme-catalysed, substrate to product reaction. Conditions were optimised for the amperometric detection of para-aminophenol, the electroactive product of the alkaline phosphatase catalysed hydrolysis of a new substrate, p-aminophenylphosphate, after separation by HPLC. The second approach involved the direct electrochemical detection of an immunoglo...

  14. Why rooting fails

    OpenAIRE

    Creutz, Michael

    2007-01-01

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four "tastes." The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  15. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogure, Sumio; Seya, Toru; Watanabe, Masaaki.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To enhance the reliability of a failed fuel detector which detects radioactivity of nuclear fission products leaked out from fuel elements in cooling water. Constitution: Collected specimen is introduced into a separator and co-existing material considered to be an impediment is separated and removed by ion exchange resins, after which this specimen is introduced into a container housing therein a detector to systematically measure radioactivity. Thereby, it is possible to detect a signal lesser in variation in background, and inspection work also becomes simple. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Flotation Immunoassay: Masking the Signal from Free Reporters in Sandwich Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Hagström, Anna E V; Kim, Jinsu; Garvey, Gavin; Paterson, Andrew; Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Kourentzi, Katerina; Conrad, Jacinta C; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we demonstrate that signal-masking reagents together with appropriate capture antibody carriers can eliminate the washing steps in sandwich immunoassays. A flotation immunoassay (FI) platform was developed with horseradish peroxidase chemiluminescence as the reporter system, the dye Brilliant Blue FCF as the signal-masking reagent, and buoyant silica micro-bubbles as the capture antibody carriers. Only reporters captured on micro-bubbles float above the dye and become visible in an analyte-dependent manner. These FIs are capable of detecting proteins down to attomole levels and as few as 10(6) virus particles. This signal-masking strategy represents a novel approach to simple, sensitive and quantitative immunoassays in both laboratory and point-of-care settings.

  17. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Hayashida, Yoshihisa; Niidome, Jiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent intrusion of background neutrons to neutron detectors thereby improve the S/N ratio of the detectors in the failed fuel detection device of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: Neutrons from the reactor core pass through the gaps around the penetration holes in which the primary pipeways pass through the concrete shielding walls and pass through the gaps between the thermal shielding members and the neutron moderating shielding members of the failed fuel detection device and then intrude into the neutron detectors. In view of the above, inner neutron moderating shielding members and movable or resilient neutron shielding members are disposed to the inside of the neutron moderating shielding member. Graphite or carbon hydrides such as paraffin or synthetic resin with a large neutron moderation effect are used as the outer moderating shielding member and materials such as boron or carbon are used for the inner members. As a result, the background neutrons are shielded by the inner neutron moderating shielding members and the resilient neutron shielding members, by which the S/N ratio of the neutron detectors can be increased to 2 - 4 times. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Failing by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Rita Gunther

    2011-04-01

    It's hardly news that business leaders work in increasingly uncertain environments, where failures are bound to be more common than successes. Yet if you ask executives how well, on a scale of one to 10, their organizations learn from failure, you'll often get a sheepish "Two-or maybe three" in response. Such organizations are missing a big opportunity: Failure may be inevitable but, if managed well, can be very useful. A certain amount of failure can help you keep your options open, find out what doesn't work, create the conditions to attract resources and attention, make room for new leaders, and develop intuition and skill. The key to reaping these benefits is to foster "intelligent failure" throughout your organization. McGrath describes several principles that can help you put intelligent failure to work. You should decide what success and failure would look like before you start a project. Document your initial assumptions, test and revise them as you go, and convert them into knowledge. Fail fast-the longer something takes, the less you'll learn-and fail cheaply, to contain your downside risk. Limit the number of uncertainties in new projects, and build a culture that tolerates, and sometimes even celebrates, failure. Finally, codify and share what you learn. These principles won't give you a means of avoiding all failures down the road-that's simply not realistic. They will help you use small losses to attain bigger wins over time.

  19. Log-binomial models: exploring failed convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tyler; Eliasziw, Misha; Fick, Gordon Hilton

    2013-12-13

    Relative risk is a summary metric that is commonly used in epidemiological investigations. Increasingly, epidemiologists are using log-binomial models to study the impact of a set of predictor variables on a single binary outcome, as they naturally offer relative risks. However, standard statistical software may report failed convergence when attempting to fit log-binomial models in certain settings. The methods that have been proposed in the literature for dealing with failed convergence use approximate solutions to avoid the issue. This research looks directly at the log-likelihood function for the simplest log-binomial model where failed convergence has been observed, a model with a single linear predictor with three levels. The possible causes of failed convergence are explored and potential solutions are presented for some cases. Among the principal causes is a failure of the fitting algorithm to converge despite the log-likelihood function having a single finite maximum. Despite these limitations, log-binomial models are a viable option for epidemiologists wishing to describe the relationship between a set of predictors and a binary outcome where relative risk is the desired summary measure. Epidemiologists are encouraged to continue to use log-binomial models and advocate for improvements to the fitting algorithms to promote the widespread use of log-binomial models.

  20. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Koichi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability of detecting the failure of a fuel rod by imparting a wire disconnection detecting function to a central electrode at the center of a failure mode thereto. Constitution: A wire disconnection detecting terminal is provided at the terminal opposite to the signal output terminal of a central electrode in a failed fuel detector used for detecting the failure of a fuel rod in an atomic power plant using liquid metal as a coolant, and a voltage monitor for monitoring the terminal voltage is connected to the terminal. The disconnection of the central electrode is detected by the failure of the output of the voltage monitor, and an alarm is thus generated. (Aizawa, K.)

  1. Massively multi-parametric immunoassays using ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, S.D.; Ornatsky, O.; Bandura, D.R.; Baranov, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes as tags in immunoassays, and their determination by ICPMS, is poised to have a huge impact on multi-parametric bioanalysis. A new technology, which we term 'mass cytometry', enables high throughput, highly multiplexed individual cell analysis. Preliminary results for T-cell immunophenotyping in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), agonist influence on concomitant phosphorylation pathways, and sub-classification of acute myeloid leukemia patients' samples will be presented. The significance of individual cell analysis is demonstrated by the identification of populations of rogue cells in PBMC samples through the use of multidimensional neural network cluster analysis. (author)

  2. Gliadin Detection in Food by Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gordon; Sporns, Peter; Hsieh, Y.-H. Peggy

    Immunoassays are very sensitive and efficient tests that are commonly used to identify a specific protein. Examples of applications in the food industry include identification of proteins expressed in genetically modified foods, allergens, or proteins associated with a disease, including celiac disease. This genetic disease is associated with Europeans and affects about one in every 200 people in North America. These individuals react immunologically to wheat proteins, and consequently their own immune systems attack and damage their intestines. This disease can be managed if wheat proteins, specifically "gliadins," are avoided in foods.

  3. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention concerns a failed fuel detection device for a nuclear reactor, such as an FBR type reactor, using electroconductive coolants. A sampling port is disposed at the upper portion of the fuel assembly so as to cover the assembly, so that coolants in the fuel assembly are sampled to improve a device for detecting fuel failure. That is, when coolants in the fuel assembly are sampled from the sampling port, the flow of electroconductive coolants in an sampling tube is detected by a flowmeter, to control an electromagnetic pump. The flow of electroconductive coolants is stopped against the waterhead pressure and dynamic pressure of the conductive coolants, and a predetermined amount of the coolants is pumped up to the sampling tank. Gas is supplied to the pumped up coolants so that fissile products are transferred from the coolants to a gas phase. Radiation in the gas in a gas recycling system is measured to detect presence of fuel failure. (I.S.)

  4. Fluorescence immunoassay for detecting periodontal bacterial pathogens in plaque.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, L F; Anderson, L; Sandberg, G P; Aeppli, D M; Shelburne, C E

    1991-01-01

    A particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay has been modified into a bacterial concentration fluorescence immunoassay (BCFIA) to rapidly detect periodontopathic bacteria in human plaque samples. The BCFIA utilizes fluorescently tagged monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the lipopolysaccharide of selected gram-negative plaque bacteria. Microorganisms closely associated with periodontal disease that can be identified in plaque with the BCFIA include Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bac...

  5. Review of the biochemical basis of enzyme immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, W.

    1982-01-01

    The ever increasing number of radioimmunological determination poses problems allied with the handling of radioactive substances. In recent years various non-radioactive methods have been developed, among which the enzyme immunoassay is already in routine use. Homogeneous and heterogeneous enzyme immunoassays are described. Criteria for enzymes, substrates and enzyme-substrate reactions are listed. (orig.) [de

  6. Fake news? Biotin interference in thyroid immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Viktoria F; Mann, Ulrike; Nassour, Ayham; Alexander Mann, W

    2018-05-29

    We report on a 47 year old male patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) presenting in our outpatient neurology clinic in Frankfurt/Main for therapy evaluation. Before change of treatment laboratory investigations were performed. Thyroid function tests (TFTs) with a streptavidin/biotin based immunoassay revealed severe hyperthyroidism with positive thyroid autoantibodies suggestive for Graves' disease. Clinical presentation and thyroid sonography were unremarkable. Due to the discordance between clinical presentation and TFTs, we repeated medical history, in which the patient reported taking high-doses of biotin (300 mg/day) for MS. Recent studies with patients suffering from primary and secondary progressive MS, indicated promising effects of high-dose biotin on MS-related disability. In immunoassays relaying on streptavidin-biotin interaction, biotin intake can cause falsely high or low results. Two weeks after withdrawing biotin, biotin/streptavidin dependant assays showed no longer the biochemical picture of severe hyperthyroidism. Biotin intake should be paused for at least two to five days prior to the use of biotin/streptavidin dependant assays. Alternatively, non-biotin/streptavidin dependant assays (radioimmunoassay, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) may be used. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Chemiluminescence immunoassay for prostate-specific antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuefeng; Liu Yibing; Jia Juanjuan; Xu Wenge; Li Ziying; Chen Yongli; Han Shiquan

    2008-01-01

    The chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) for serum total prostate-specific antigen (T-PSA) was developed. The reaction of luminol with hydrogen peroxide was introduced into this chemiluminescence system. The detection limit is established as 0.12 μg/L (n=10, mean of zero standard + 2SD) and the analytical recovery of PSA is 83.8%-118.7%. The intra-assay and inter-assay CVs vary from 4.4%-5.0% and 6.2%-11.7%, respectively. The experimental correlation coefficient of dilution is found to be 0.999. Compared with immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) kits, the correlative equation is y=1.07x+0.68, and correlation coefficient r=0.97. The standard range for the method is 1.5-80 μg/L, and it presents good linearity. (authors)

  8. Method for repairing failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Taketomi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To repair fuel elements that became failed during burnup in a reactor or during handling. Method: After the surface in the vicinity of a failed part of a fuel element is cleaned, a socket made of a shape-memory alloy having a ring form or a horseshoe form made by cutting a part of the ring form is inserted into the failed position according to the position of the failed fuel element. The shape memory alloy socket remembers a slightly larger inside diameter in its original phase (high-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube and also a slightly larger inside diameter of the socket in the martensite phase (low-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube, such that the socket can easily be inserted into the failed position. The socket, inserted into the failed part of the cladding tube, is heated by a heating jig. The socket recovers the original phase, and the shape also tends to recover a smaller diameter than the outside diameter of the cladding tube that has been remembered, and accordingly the failed part of the cladding tube is fastened with a great force and the failed part is fully closed with the socket, thus keeping radioactive materials from going out. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Can LC and LC-MS ever replace immunoassays?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G. Cross

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunoassays have been the technology of choice for the analysis of biomolecules for many decades across a wide range of applications in research, diagnostics and infectious disease monitoring. There are good reasons for the wide adoption of immunoassays but even such a well established and characterised technique has limitations and as such investigators are looking at alternative technologies. One such alternative is liquid chromatography (LC and, more specifically, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS. This article will review both immunoassay and LC and LC-MS technologies and methodologies and discuss the advantages and limitations of both approaches. In addition, the next developments that will need to occur before there is widespread adoption of LC and LC-MS technology preferentially over immunoassays will be examined.

  10. Detection of narcotics with an immunoassay film badge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukens, H.R.

    1993-01-01

    Efficient personnel performance, a major requirement for a safe nuclear industry, is jeopardized where personnel use narcotics. However, detection of narcotics at nuclear plants is a challenge. The unique specificity and sensitivity of an immunoassay has been implemented in the form of a small, dry immunoassay film badge (IFB) for the detection of vapors emitted by narcotics. The device is suitable as an area monitor, and its characteristics are suitable for use as a breath monitor for the detection of drug use

  11. Status of immunoassay as an analytical tool in environmental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Emon, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Immunoassay methods were initially applied in clinical situations where their sensitivity and selectivity were utilized for diagnostic purposes. In the 1970s, pesticide chemists realized the potential benefits of immunoassay methods for compounds difficult to analyze by gas chromatography. This transition of the technology has extended to the analysis of soil, water, food and other matrices of environmental and human exposure significance particularly for compounds difficult to analyze by chromatographic methods. The utility of radioimmunoassays and enzyme immunoassays for environmental investigations was recognized in the 1980s by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) with the initiation of an immunoassay development programme. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (PDA) have investigated immunoassays for the detection of residues in food both from an inspection and a contamination prevention perspective. Environmental immunoassays are providing rapid screening information as well as quantitative information to fulfill rigorous data quality objectives for monitoring programmes

  12. Management of failed spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based on an intent-to-treat analysis. Of these, 10 ... testing the level of a spinal block, nor is there an algorithm on how ... scenarios of failed spinal anaesthesia was distributed to 51 government hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (SA).

  13. DECOFF Probabilities of Failed Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gintautas, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    A statistical procedure of estimation of Probabilities of Failed Operations is described and exemplified using ECMWF weather forecasts and SIMO output from Rotor Lift test case models. Also safety factor influence is investigated. DECOFF statistical method is benchmarked against standard Alpha-factor...

  14. Potential applications of immunoassays in studies of flatfish recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Robert J.

    The fisheries recruitment-stock problem, a lack of correlation between measures of reproductive output of the parent stock and recruitment to the fishery, has several potential biotic and abiotic causes. Immunoassays may be useful in examining several aspects of this and several other problems in flatfish ecology: stock identification, parasitism and disease, and trophic interactions. Given stage-specific antisera capable of recognozing antigenic moieties of, for instance, eggs, larvae, or newly-settled juveniles, it is possible to screen stomach contents of many putative predators ( e.g., shrimp or crabs) rapidly for the presence and amounts of platfish prey. This trophic application of immunological methods has great promise for measuring loss of potential recruits to predation. All immunoassays are limited by the quality of antisera used and the researcher's ability to interpret quantitative data in an ecologically meaningful way. Key references for applications of immunoassays in fish-related questions are provided with recommendations for their utilization.

  15. Rapid detection of fungal alpha-amylase in the work environment with a lateral flow immunoassay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanovic, J.; Koets, M.; Sander, I.; Wouters, I.; Meijster, T.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Amerongen, van A.; Doekes, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background Occupational allergen exposure assessment usually requires airborne dust sampling at the worksite followed by dust extraction and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) analysis at the laboratory. Use of semiquantitative lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) may allow a more rapid detection procedure with

  16. Preparation by irradiation of a solid support for enzyme immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1984-01-01

    Reagents (immobilized anti-α-fetoprotein discs) having a porous structure were prepared for enzyme immunoassay of α-fetoprotein by radiation polymerization at low temperatures. Discs were attached to sticks for easy handling. The activity (determined by absorbance at 492 nm) of the discs varied with the hydrophilic properties and size of the discs. The discs are sufficiently sensitive and precise for enzyme immunoassay of α-fetoprotein. Anti-AFP dissolved in PBS solution was mixed with a monomer solution of hydroxyethyl methacrylate and hydroxypropyl methacrylate. The mixture was frozen to -78 0 C and gamma irradiated. (Auth.)

  17. Multiplex Immunoassay Profiling of Hormones Involved in Metabolic Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Laurie; Guest, Paul C

    2018-01-01

    Multiplex immunoassays are used for rapid profiling of biomarker proteins and small molecules in biological fluids. The advantages over single immunoassays include lower sample consumption, cost, and labor. This chapter details a protocol to develop a 5-plex assay for glucagon-like peptide 1, growth hormone, insulin, leptin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone on the Luminex ® platform. The results of the analysis of insulin in normal control subjects are given due to the important role of this hormone in nutritional programming diseases.

  18. Diggers failing to become diggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars

    Mining has in recent years emerged as a national discourse in Australia as the combined result of the mining boom and national anxieties over the GFC featured prominently in references to Australia as a failed competitive state (the folding of manufacturing, where the closure of car factories pla...... to the broader issue of how mining relates to the question of the society Australia wants to be – on the scale from ecological sanctuary to global quarry....

  19. Biosensor immunoassay for flumequine in broiler serum and muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, W.; Gercek, H.; Cazemier, G.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2007-01-01

    Flumequine (Flu) is one of the fluoroquinolones most frequently applied for the treatment of broilers in The Netherlands. For the detection of residues of Flu in blood serum of broilers, a biosensor immunoassay (BIA) was developed which was fast (7.5 min per sample) and specific (no cross-reactivity

  20. Feasibility of a simple microsieve-based immunoassay platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweitzig, D.R.; Tibbe, Arjan G.J.; Nguyen, A.T.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Kopnitsky, M.J.; Cichonski, K.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic properties of silicon microsieves, such as an optically flat surface, high overall porosity, and low flow resistance have led to an increasing number of biotechnology applications. In this report, the feasibility of creating a microsieve-based immunoassay platform was explored.

  1. Feasibility of a simple microsieve-based immunoassay platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweitzig, Daniel R.; Tibbe, Arjan G.; Nguyen, Ai T.; Rijn, van Cees J.M.; Kopnitsky, Mark J.; Cichonski, Kathleen; Terstappen, Leon W.M.M.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic properties of silicon microsieves, such as an optically flat surface, high overall porosity, and low flow resistance have led to an increasing number of biotechnology applications. In this report, the feasibility of creating a microsieve-based immunoassay platform was explored.

  2. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  3. IMMUNOASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION OF UROKINASE RECEPTOR FORMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    amounts of uPAR forms in a sample with data indicative of the presence of the cancer disease. The method can be used for staging, prognosis or diagnosis of prostate cancer. Two novel monoclonal antibodies and a kit and immunoassays for detecting at least one uPAR form(s) are also described in the present...

  4. Rapid micromotor-based naked-eye immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ávila, Berta Esteban-Fernández; Zhao, Mingjiao; Campuzano, Susana; Ricci, Francesco; Pingarrón, José M; Mascini, Marcello; Wang, Joseph

    2017-05-15

    A dynamic micromotor-based immunoassay, exemplified by cortisol detection, based on the use of tubular micromotors functionalized with a specific antibody is described. The use of antibody-functionalized micromotors offers huge acceleration of both direct and competitive cortisol immunoassays, along with greatly enhanced sensitivity of direct and competitive immunoassays. The dramatically improved speed and sensitivity reflect the greatly increased likelihood of antibody-cortisol contacts and fluid mixing associated with the dynamic movement of these microtube motors and corresponding bubble generation that lead to a highly efficient and rapid recognition process. Rapid naked-eye detection of cortisol in the sample is achieved in connection to use of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tag and TMB/H 2 O 2 system. Key parameters of the competitive immunoassay (e.g., incubation time and reaction volume) were optimized. This fast visual micromotor-based sensing approach enables "on the move" specific detection of the target cortisol down to 0.1μgmL -1 in just 2min, using ultrasmall (50µL) sample volumes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct salivary cortisol radio-immunoassay determination. Clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, C.; Cherfan, J.; Kurtz, F.; Vignon, F.; Schlienger, J.L.; Chabrier, G.

    1987-01-01

    Salivary cortisol levels reflect the biologically active free fraction of blood cortisol. The authors describe the results obtained with the aim of a radio-immunoassay commercial serum cortisol kit, without prealable extraction in different physiological and pathological situations. Salivary cortisol determination appears performant both in nycthemeral studies and in stimulation or freination tests [fr

  6. Evaluation of Six Different Immunoassays for Serum Thyrotropin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Donghong; Lu Hankui; Gao Yunchao; Ge Wenli; Xiong Jiang; Liu Qiaoping; Gu Qing

    2010-01-01

    To analyzes the discrepancy and association among six different thyrotropin (TSH) immunoassay methods and to study their impact on the clinical diagnoses of thyroid diseases, the 150 serum samples from three groups consisting of hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and healthy subjects, 50 samples in each group were included in this study. The serum TSH levels were measured simultaneously by radioimmunoassay (RIA), immunoradiometric assay (IRMA), three-type chemilumiminescence immunoassay (CLIA) and electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). The results showed that individual serum TSH level varied significantly from one assay to another. There was no correlation between TSH RIA and other five assays in groups of hyperthyroidism and healthy subjects(P>0.05). The correlations between TSH IRMA and four automatic assays in hyperthyroidism group were relatively low (r= 0.38∼0.41). However, among the four automatic assays, TSH levels were well correlated (r= 0.92∼0.99). For clinical diagnoses, TSH RIA alone was not useful in the differentiation of hyperthyroidism and normal subjects, and TSH IRMA was misleading in some hyperthyroidism. There were no significant differences for four TSH automatic immunoassays in differential diagnoses of thyroid diseases. (authors)

  7. Where genetic algorithms excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, E B; Boneh, D; Garrett, C

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the performance of a genetic algorithm (GA) we call Culling, and a variety of other algorithms, on a problem we refer to as the Additive Search Problem (ASP). We show that the problem of learning the Ising perceptron is reducible to a noisy version of ASP. Noisy ASP is the first problem we are aware of where a genetic-type algorithm bests all known competitors. We generalize ASP to k-ASP to study whether GAs will achieve "implicit parallelism" in a problem with many more schemata. GAs fail to achieve this implicit parallelism, but we describe an algorithm we call Explicitly Parallel Search that succeeds. We also compute the optimal culling point for selective breeding, which turns out to be independent of the fitness function or the population distribution. We also analyze a mean field theoretic algorithm performing similarly to Culling on many problems. These results provide insight into when and how GAs can beat competing methods.

  8. Comparison of capillary electrophoresis-based immunoassay with fluorescence polarization immunoassay for the immunodetermination of methamphetamine using various methamphetamine antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J; Kim, C; Choi, M J

    1998-11-01

    An accurate and simple immunoassay using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was performed for the detection of methamphetamine (MA) in urine. The CE-LIF was conducted with an untreated fused-silica column using antiserum and a tracer of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled MA. This CE-LIF system was compared with fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) in a TDx analyzer in the photo-check mode using the same FITC-labeled tracer and the same antiserum. Various antibodies, not only those prepared by our own immunogens but also those from commercial sources, were screened and characterized in both assay systems with regard to sensitivity, precision, and cross-reactivity. Both systems satisfied analytical precision and gave similar cross-reactivity patterns. However, the CE-LIF-based immunoassay was approximately one order superior to FPIA in sensitivity, requiring less volume of sample, antiserum, and tracer for the assay. Considering that the FPIA system is well known to be a useful tool for screening antibodies and detecting drugs, the CE-LIF-based immunoassay system, which is seemingly more advantageous than the FPIA system, appears to have great power for the characterization of antibodies and for the detection of MA in urine.

  9. Method of detecting failed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Hideaki; Suzumura, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the settlement of the temperature of an adequate filling high temperature pure water by detecting the outlet temperature of a high temperature pure water filling tube to a fuel assembly to control the heating of the pure water and detecting the failed fuel due to the sampling of the pure water. Method: A temperature sensor is provided at a water tube connected to a sipping cap for filling high temperature pure water to detect the temperature of the high temperature pure water at the outlet of the tube, and the temperature is confirmed by a temperature indicator. A heater is controlled on the basis of this confirmation, an adequate high temperature pure water is filled in the fuel assembly, and the pure water is replaced with coolant. Then, it is sampled to settle the adequate temperature of the high temperature coolant used for detecting the failure of the fuel assembly. As a result, the sipping effect does not decrease, and the failed fuel can be precisely detected. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. Detector for failed fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masaru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide automatic monitor for the separation or reactor water and sampling water, in a failed fuel element detector using a sipping chamber. Constitution: A positional detector for the exact mounting of a sipping chamber on a channel box and a level detector for the detection of complete discharge of cooling water in the sipping chamber are provided in the sipping chamber. The positional detector is contacted to the upper end of the channel box and operated when the sipping chamber is correctly mounted to the fuel assemblies. The level detector comprises a float and a limit switch and it is operated when the water in the sipping chamber is discharged by a predetermined amount. Isolation of reactor water and sampling water are automatically monitored by the signal from these two detectors. (Ikeda, J.)

  11. Why good projects fail anyway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Nadim F; Ashkenas, Ronald N

    2003-09-01

    Big projects fail at an astonishing rate--more than half the time, by some estimates. It's not hard to understand why. Complicated long-term projects are customarily developed by a series of teams working along parallel tracks. If managers fail to anticipate everything that might fall through the cracks, those tracks will not converge successfully at the end to reach the goal. Take a companywide CRM project. Traditionally, one team might analyze customers, another select the software, a third develop training programs, and so forth. When the project's finally complete, though, it may turn out that the salespeople won't enter in the requisite data because they don't understand why they need to. This very problem has, in fact, derailed many CRM programs at major organizations. There is a way to uncover unanticipated problems while the project is still in development. The key is to inject into the overall plan a series of miniprojects, or "rapid-results initiatives," which each have as their goal a miniature version of the overall goal. In the CRM project, a single team might be charged with increasing the revenues of one sales group in one region by 25% within four months. To reach that goal, team members would have to draw on the work of all the parallel teams. But in just four months, they would discover the salespeople's resistance and probably other unforeseen issues, such as, perhaps, the need to divvy up commissions for joint-selling efforts. The World Bank has used rapid-results initiatives to great effect to keep a sweeping 16-year project on track and deliver visible results years ahead of schedule. In taking an in-depth look at this project, and others, the authors show why this approach is so effective and how the initiatives are managed in conjunction with more traditional project activities.

  12. Algorithming the Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Martina; Uprichard, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Imagine sailing across the ocean. The sun is shining, vastness all around you. And suddenly [BOOM] you’ve hit an invisible wall. Welcome to the Truman Show! Ever since Eli Pariser published his thoughts on a potential filter bubble, this movie scenario seems to have become reality, just with slight...... changes: it’s not the ocean, it’s the internet we’re talking about, and it’s not a TV show producer, but algorithms that constitute a sort of invisible wall. Building on this assumption, most research is trying to ‘tame the algorithmic tiger’. While this is a valuable and often inspiring approach, we...

  13. Design and Fabrication of a PDMS Microchip Based Immunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Wanjun; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication process of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchip for on-chip multiplex immunoassay application. The microchip consists of a PDMS microfluidic channel layer and a micro pneumatic valve control layer. By selectively pressurizing the pneumatic microvalves, immuno reagents were controlled to flow and react in certain fluidic channel sites. Cross contamination was prevented by tightly closed valves. Our design was proposed to utilize PDMS micro channel surface as the solid phase immunoassay substrate and simultaneously detect four targets antigens on chip. Experiment result shows that 20psi valve pressure is sufficient to tightly close a 200µm wide micro channel with flow rate up to 20µl/min.

  14. Microfluidic "Pouch" Chips for Immunoassays and Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Michael G; Liu, Changchun; Qiu, Xianbo; Chen, Dafeng; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic cassettes ("chips") for processing and analysis of clinical specimens and other sample types facilitate point-of-care (POC) immunoassays and nucleic acid based amplification tests. These single-use test chips can be self-contained and made amenable to autonomous operation-reducing or eliminating supporting instrumentation-by incorporating laminated, pliable "pouch" and membrane structures for fluid storage, pumping, mixing, and flow control. Materials and methods for integrating flexible pouch compartments and diaphragm valves into hard plastic (e.g., acrylic and polycarbonate) microfluidic "chips" for reagent storage, fluid actuation, and flow control are described. We review several versions of these pouch chips for immunoassay and nucleic acid amplification tests, and describe related fabrication techniques. These protocols thus offer a "toolbox" of methods for storage, pumping, and flow control functions in microfluidic devices.

  15. Evaluation of four immunoassays for diagnosis of brucellosis in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peraza, C.; Valdes, O.; Fonseca, N.; Garcia, M.; Alvarez, M.; Izquierdo, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Four immunoassays (two indirect and two competitive ones) were evaluated by samples from areas free of disease, free by vaccination and affected areas using as reference techniques the Bengal Rose Tests, the Antigen in Buffered Plate Tests and the Complement Fixation Reaction Test. The evaluated samples demonstrated that the competitive assays (ELISAC-1 and ELISAC-2) detected less false positives than the indirect ones (ELISAI-1 and ELISAI-2). Of the competitive ELISAS, version 2 presented better sensitivity and specificity results in affected areas for 95% confidence: 80.9 - 96.9% and 97.5 - 99.4% respectively with positive predictive value in the range of 76 to 94% and negative predictive one between 98.1 and 99.7%. It was concluded that this assay can be used for brucellosis control because it gives higher assurance than the other evaluated immunoassays and it can discriminate infected from vaccinated animals. (author)

  16. Label-Free Electrochemical Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madasamy Thangamuthu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is one of the most expressed proteins in blood during acute phase inflammation, and its minute level increase has also been recognized for the clinical diagnosis of cardio vascular diseases. Unfortunately, the available commercial immunoassays are labour intensive, require large sample volumes, and have practical limitations, such as low stability and high production costs. Hence, we have developed a simple, cost effective, and label-free electrochemical immunoassay for the measurement of CRP in a drop of serum sample using an immunosensor strip made up of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPE modified with anti-CRP functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. The measurement relies on the decrease of the oxidation current of the redox indicator Fe3+/Fe2+, resulting from the immunoreaction between CRP and anti-CRP. Under optimal conditions, the present immunoassay measures CRP in a linear range from 0.4–200 nM (0.047–23.6 µg mL−1, with a detection limit of 0.15 nM (17 ng mL−1, S/N = 3 and sensitivity of 90.7 nA nM−1, in addition to a good reproducibility and storage stability. The analytical applicability of the presented immunoassay is verified by CRP measurements in human blood serum samples. This work provides the basis for a low-priced, safe, and easy-to-use point-of-care immunosensor assay to measure CRP at clinically relevant concentrations.

  17. Determination of digoxin by enzyme immunoassay and radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Braeuer, H.; Foerster, G.; Reinhardt, M.

    1978-01-01

    The results of parallel determinations of digoxin in the sera of non selected patients (n=104) by enzyme immunoassay (EMIT.EIA) and radioimmunoassay (J-125 labeled RIA) were compared with each other. The determinations revealed considerably different concentrations; the values determined by EIA were statistical lower (for EIA 1,09+'0,99ng/ml, for RIA 1,34+'1,01ng/ml, p [de

  18. Towards the development of a radioenzyme-immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuurs, A.H.W.M.; Waart, M. v. d.

    1976-01-01

    We have tried to develop a very sensitive enzyme-immunoassay. For this purpose, a very sensitive radiochemical enzyme assay was used. HCG was chosen as test model and AChE as labelling enzyme. The test appeared to be much more sensitive than the normal enzymeimmunoassay. And, in comparison with RIA, it was about as sensitive but less time-consuming, and it makes use, in principle, of stable reagents. (orig./GSE) [de

  19. History of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry-based immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesen, Charlotte; Waentig, Larissa; Panne, Ulrich; Jakubowski, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of biomolecules requires highly sensitive and selective detection methods capable of tolerating a complex, biological matrix. First applications of biomolecule detection by ICP-MS relied on the use of heteroelements as a label for quantification. However, the combination of immunoassays and ICP-MS facilitates multiparametric analyses through elemental tagging, and provides a powerful alternative to common bioanalytical methods. This approach extends the detection of biomarkers in clinical diagnosis, and has the potential to provide a deeper understanding of the investigated biological system. The results might lead to the detection of diseases at an early stage, or guide treatment plans. Immunoassays are well accepted and established for diagnostic purposes, albeit ICP-MS is scarcely applied for the detection of immune-based assays. However, the screening of biomarkers demands high throughput and multiplex/multiparametric techniques, considering the variety of analytes to be queried. Finally, quantitative information on the expression level of biomarkers is highly desirable to identify abnormalities in a given organism. Thus, it is the aim of this review to introduce the fundamentals, and to discuss the enormous strength of ICP-MS for the detection of different immunoassays on the basis of selected applications, with a special focus on LA‐ICP‐MS. - Highlights: ► We discuss the fundamentals of elemental tagging for ICP‐MS applications. ► We propose a definition for the expressions “label” and “tag”. ► We highlight LA‐ICP‐MS‐based heteroelement detection. ► We give an historic overview on ICP-MS and LA‐ICP‐MS-based immunoassays. ► In a personal outlook, we discuss future improvements realistically attainable.

  20. Abbott prism: a multichannel heterogeneous chemiluminescence immunoassay analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, O S; Zurek, T F; Tryba, J; Hanna, C F; Hollar, R; Pepe, C; Genger, K; Brentz, C; Murphy, B; Abunimeh, N

    1991-09-01

    We describe a multichannel heterogeneous immunoassay analyzer in which a sample is split between disposable reaction trays in a group of linear tracks. The system's pipettor uses noninvasive sensing of the sample volume and disposable pipet tips. Each assay track has (a) a conveyor belt for moving reaction trays to predetermined functional stations, (b) temperature-controlled tunnels, (c) noncontact transfer of the reaction mixture between incubation and detection wells, and (d) single-photon counting to detect a chemiluminescence (CL) signal from the captured immunochemical product. A novel disposable reaction tray, with separate reaction and detection wells and self-contained fluid removal, is used in conjunction with the transfer device on the track to produce a carryover-free system. The linear immunoassay track has nine predetermined positions for performing individual assay steps. Assay step sequence and timing is selected by changing the location of the assay modules between these predetermined positions. The assay methodology, a combination of microparticle capture and direct detection of a CL signal on a porous matrix, offers excellent sensitivity, specificity, and ease of automation. Immunoassay configurations have been tested for hepatitis B surface antigen and for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus I and II, and human T-cell leukemia virus I and II.

  1. Development of immunoassays for detecting clothianidin residue in agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Sheng, Enze; Cong, Lujing; Wang, Minghua

    2013-04-17

    Two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on polyclonal antibodies (PcAbs) for clothianidin are described: colorimetric detection format (ELISA) and pattern of chemiluminescent assay (CLEIA). Clothianidin hapten was synthesized and conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) to produce immunogen and coating antigen. Anticlothianidin PcAbs were obtained from immunized New Zealand white rabbits. Under optimal conditions, the half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) and the limit of detection (LOD, IC₂₀) of clothianidin were 0.046 and 0.0028 mg/L for the ELISA and 0.015 and 0.0014 mg/L for the CLEIA, respectively. There were no obvious cross-reactivities of the antibodies with its analogues except for dinotefuran. Recoveries of 76.4-116.4% for the immunoassays were achieved from spiked samples. The results of immunoassays for the spiked and authentic samples were largely consistent with gas chromatography. Therefore, the proposed immunoassays would be convenient and satisfactory analytical methods for the monitoring of clothianidin in agricultural products.

  2. Current status and future developments in radiolabelled immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used extensively in medical practice and their use in RIA or IRMA usually represent a small proportion of the total. Radiolabelled immunoassays based on 125 I constitute a simple didactic, cost effective and robust technology which is still regarded as the reference method in many clinical applications. The IAEA has implemented many successful programmes using the ''bulk reagent'' approach, involving 68 countries in all the different regions. The main achievements have been in technology transfer with self sufficiency in production for some countries; training of large numbers of staff; quality control and quality assurance schemes; devolution of screening programmes for neonatal congenital hypothryoidism. Alternatives to the use of radioisotopic tracers are constrained by many factors and are often only available in restricted commercial packages. They are often not suitable for technology transfer programmes and often lack any didactic component in addition to a relative high cost. The production of radiolabels using 125 I is both simple and adaptable. In addition expertise in their preparation and purification is widespread even in developing countries. Together with the ease of producing antibodies, the facts have made 125 I-radiolabelled immunoassays ideal for investigative procedures for many research activities (30,31) particularly in the medical context where radioisotopes are commonly used. In conclusion, even a superficial examination of public health statistics for various countries throughout the continents indicates a need for a simple, inexpensive and robust analytical tool. In this light, there is a predicted continuing role for radiolabelled immunoassays. (author)

  3. Simple patterned nanofiber scaffolds and its enhanced performance in immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available Cancer has become the leading cause of death worldwide; early diagnosis and treatment of cancers is critical for the survival of the patients. The concentration of cancer markers in easy-to-access biological fluids can provide great assistance in screening for occult primary cancers, distinguishing malignant from benign findings, determining prognosis and prediction for cancer patients. The multiplex detection technology of a panel of cancer markers can greatly increase the accuracy of disease diagnosis. Herein, we briefly fabricate a high-throughput micro-immunoassay based on the electrospun polystyrene (PS substrates to improve detection sensitivity. The immunoassay was evaluated by analyzing three different cancer biomarkers (AFP, CEA, VEGF. For AFP, CEA, VEGF immunofluorescence assay, the LOD of assay conducted on electrospun PS substrates before or after plasma and the conventional PS substrates were 0.42, 0.10, 1.12 ng/mL, 0.57, 0.09, 1.24 ng/mL, and 159.75, 26.19, 385.59 pg/mL, respectively (P < 0.05. Due to the high porosity and large surface area-to-volume ratio which is the foremost merit of nanostructures, and the plasma treatment which make the hydrophobic PS nanofibers hydropholic, the nanofibers substrates showed sufficient retention of immunoassay functionality and high potential for capture molecules immobilization. Consequently, the immunofluorescence assay conducted on electrospun PS substrates could significantly enhance the sensitivity and limits of detection.

  4. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-10

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm's efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank's performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  5. Alternative confidence measure for local matching stereo algorithms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndhlovu, T

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a confidence measure applied to individual disparity estimates in local matching stereo correspondence algorithms. It aims at identifying textureless areas, where most local matching algorithms fail. The confidence measure works...

  6. Implementation of a rapid HIT immunoassay at a university hospital - Retrospective analysis of HIT laboratory orders in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Anne; Heimerl, Susanne; Oertli, Linnéa; Wilczek, Wolf; Greinacher, Andreas; Spannagl, Michael; Herr, Wolfgang; Hart, Christina

    2017-10-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare cause of thrombocytopenia and a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction. Clinical overdiagnosis of HIT results in costly laboratory tests and anticoagulation. Criteria and algorithms for diagnosis are established, but their translation into clinical practice is still challenging. In a retrospective approach we studied all HIT related laboratory test requests within four years and evaluated data before (1st period, 24month) and after (2nd period, 24month) replacing particle gel immunoassay (PaGIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). HIT was confirmed by heparin-induced platelet activation (HIPA) test. Clinical pretest probability for HIT using an implemented simplified 4Ts score and platelet count were evaluated. Costs for laboratory tests and alternative anticoagulation were calculated. In 1850 patients with suspected HIT, 2327 laboratory orders were performed. In 87.2% of these orders an intermediate/high simplified 4Ts score was found. Thrombocytopenia was present in 87.1%. After replacing PaGIA and ELISA by CLIA the number of immunological and functional laboratory tests was reduced by 38.2%. The number of positive HIT immunoassays declined from 22.6% to 6.0%, while the number of positive HIPA tests among positive immunological tests increased by 19%. Altogether, acute HIT was confirmed in 59 patients. A decline in the use of alternative anticoagulants was observed in the 2nd period. Our study shows that in a university hospital setting HIT is well-known, but diagnosis requires a precise laboratory confirmation. Replacing PaGIA and ELISA by CLIA did not influence laboratory order behavior but results in reduced overall costs for laboratory diagnostics and alternative anticoagulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sound algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    De Götzen , Amalia; Mion , Luca; Tache , Olivier

    2007-01-01

    International audience; We call sound algorithms the categories of algorithms that deal with digital sound signal. Sound algorithms appeared in the very infancy of computer. Sound algorithms present strong specificities that are the consequence of two dual considerations: the properties of the digital sound signal itself and its uses, and the properties of auditory perception.

  8. Genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  9. Vitamin B(12) Immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010: Effects of High Excess Concentration of Serum Vitamin B(12) in CKD Patients on Parenteral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Surupa; Chaudhuri, Subimal

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin B(12) being water soluble is excreted in the urine when administered in excess. The probability of finding an abnormally excess serum concentration would be almost surreal. We report a peculiar clinical situation that may impact the vitamin B(12) immunoassay on the Roche Elecsys 2010 due to excess analyte concentration. In separate episodes (Feb and June 2010), the Biochemistry laboratory of a tertiary-care hospital, Kolkata, India, encountered two critically ill patients with background chronic kidney disease (CKD), low urine output, and on cyanocoabalamin supplementation, who had serum vitamin B(12) concentrations far exceeding expected values; even post dialysis. The B(12) assays (pmol/l) were performed using electrochemiluminiscence immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010, the assay validity confirmed by concomitant quality control runs. The immunoassays failed to deliver results, flagged with "signal level below limit". Biotin therapy was ruled out as a possible interferent. In the first episode, re-assay of a repeat draw yielded same outcome; outsourcing on Immulite provided concentration of >738 pmol/l. Serial dilution gave result of >29520 pmol/l on Elecsys 2010. In the second, we gained from past experience. Vitamin B(12) concentration >59040 pmol/l was conveyed to the treating nephrologist the very day. The B(12) immunoassay on the Elecsys 2010 employs sequential incubation steps for competitive binding that is compromised in the event of abnormally excess B(12) concentration in patient sera akin to the prozone effect. This knowledge may be beneficial while assaying sera of CKD patients to avoid financial loss due unnecessary repeats and delay in turnaround time.

  10. Micromotor-based lab-on-chip immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Miguel; Orozco, Jahir; Guix, Maria; Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Escarpa, Alberto; Merkoçi, Arben; Wang, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the first example of using self-propelled antibody-functionalized synthetic catalytic microengines for capturing and transporting target proteins between the different reservoirs of a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device. A new catalytic polymer/Ni/Pt microtube engine, containing carboxy moieties on its mixed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/COOH-PEDOT polymeric outermost layer, is further functionalized with the antibody receptor to selectively recognize and capture the target protein. The new motor-based microchip immunoassay operations are carried out without any bulk fluid flow, replacing the common washing steps in antibody-based protein bioassays with the active transport of the captured protein throughout the different reservoirs, where each step of the immunoassay takes place. A first microchip format involving an `on-the-fly' double-antibody sandwich assay (DASA) is used for demonstrating the selective capture of the target protein, in the presence of excess of non-target proteins. A secondary antibody tagged with a polymeric-sphere tracer allows the direct visualization of the binding events. In a second approach the immuno-nanomotor captures and transports the microsphere-tagged antigen through a microchannel network. An anti-protein-A modified microengine is finally used to demonstrate the selective capture, transport and convenient label-free optical detection of a Staphylococcus aureus target bacteria (containing proteinA in its cell wall) in the presence of a large excess of non-target (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells. The resulting nanomotor-based microchip immunoassay offers considerable potential for diverse applications in clinical diagnostics, environmental and security monitoring fields.Here we describe the first example of using self-propelled antibody-functionalized synthetic catalytic microengines for capturing and transporting target proteins between the different reservoirs of a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device. A new catalytic

  11. An optimal inspection strategy for randomly failing equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelbi, Anis; Ait-Kadi, Daoud

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of generating optimal inspection strategies for randomly failing equipment where imminent failure is not obvious and can only be detected through inspection. Inspections are carried out following a condition-based procedure. The equipment is replaced if it has failed or if it shows imminent signs of failure. The latter state is indicated by measuring certain predetermined control parameters during inspection. Costs are associated with inspection, idle time and preventive or corrective actions. An optimal inspection strategy is defined as the inspection sequence minimizing the expected total cost per time unit over an infinite span. A mathematical model and a numerical algorithm are developed to generate an optimal inspection sequence. As a practical example, the model is applied to provide a machine tool operator with a time sequence for inspecting the cutting tool. The tool life time distribution and the trend of one control parameter defining its actual condition are supposed to be known

  12. Chimeric recombinant antibody fragments in cardiac troponin I immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytiä, Heidi; Heikkilä, Taina; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine; Kekki, Henna; Hedberg, Pirjo; Puolakanaho, Tarja; Lövgren, Timo; Pettersson, Kim

    2015-03-01

    To introduce a novel nanoparticle-based immunoassay for cardiac troponin I (cTnI) utilizing chimeric antibody fragments and to demonstrate that removal of antibody Fc-part and antibody chimerization decrease matrix related interferences. A sandwich-type immunoassay for cTnI based on recombinant chimeric (mouse variable/human constant) antigen binding (cFab) antibodies and intrinsically fluorescent nanoparticles was developed. To test whether using chimeric antibody fragments helps to avoid matrix related interferences, samples (n=39) with known amounts of triglycerides, bilirubin, rheumatoid factor (RF) or human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) were measured with the novel assay, along with a previously published nanoparticle-based research assay with the same antibody epitopes. The limit of detection (LoD) was 3.30ng/L. Within-laboratory precision for 29ng/L and 2819ng/L cTnI were 13.7% and 15.9%, respectively. Regression analysis with Siemens ADVIA Centaur® yielded a slope (95% confidence intervals) of 0.18 (0.17-1.19) and a y-intercept of 1.94 (-1.28-3.91) ng/L. When compared to a previously published nanoparticle-based assay, the novel assay showed substantially reduced interference in the tested interference prone samples, 15.4 vs. 51.3%. A rheumatoid factor containing sample was decreased from 241ng/L to immunoassay for the detection of cTnI and decreased matrix related interferences, thus resulting in a lower number of falsely elevated cTnI-values. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fast and sensitive detection of enteropathogenic Yersinia by immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Jérôme; Savin, Cyril; Lamourette, Patricia; Devilliers, Karine; Volland, Hervé; Carniel, Elisabeth; Créminon, Christophe; Simon, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the two Yersinia species that are enteropathogenic for humans, are distributed worldwide and frequently cause diarrhea in inhabitants of temperate and cold countries. Y. enterocolitica is a major cause of foodborne disease resulting from consumption of contaminated pork meat and is further associated with substantial economic cost. However, investigation of enteropathogenic Yersinia species is infrequently performed routinely in clinical laboratories because of their specific growth characteristics, which make difficult their isolation from stool samples. Moreover, current isolation procedures are time-consuming and expensive, thus leading to underestimates of the incidence of enteric yersiniosis, inappropriate prescriptions of antibiotic treatments, and unnecessary appendectomies. The main objective of the study was to develop fast, sensitive, specific, and easy-to-use immunoassays, useful for both human and veterinary diagnosis. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against Y. enterocolitica bioserotypes 2/O:9 and 4/O:3 and Y. pseudotuberculosis serotypes I and III were produced. Pairs of MAbs were selected by testing their specificity and affinity for enteropathogenic Yersinia and other commonly found enterobacteria. Pairs of MAbs were selected to develop highly sensitive enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) and lateral flow immunoassays (LFIs or dipsticks) convenient for the purpose of rapid diagnosis. The limit of detection of the EIAs ranged from 3.2 × 10(3) CFU/ml to 8.8 × 10(4) CFU/ml for pathogenic serotypes I and III of Y. pseudotuberculosis and pathogenic bioserotypes 2/O:9 and 4/O:3 of Y. enterocolitica and for the LFIs ranged from 10(5) CFU/ml to 10(6) CFU/ml. A similar limit of detection was observed for artificially contaminated human feces. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Tumor specific lung cancer diagnostics with multiplexed FRET immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, D.; Hill, D.; Löhmannsröben, H.-G.; Thomas, E.; Lavigne, A.; Darbouret, B.; Bois, E.; Charbonnière, L. J.; Ziessel, R. F.; Hildebrandt, N.

    2010-02-01

    An optical multiplexed homogeneous (liquid phase) immunoassay based on FRET from a terbium complex to eight different fluorescent dyes is presented. We achieved highly sensitive parallel detection of four different lung cancer specific tumor markers (CEA, NSE, SCC and CYFRA21-1) within a single assay and show a proof-of-principle for 5- fold multiplexing. The method is well suited for fast and low-cost miniaturized point-of-care testing as well as for highthroughput screening in a broad range of in-vitro diagnostic applications.

  15. Linkage of biomolecules to solid phases for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Topics covered by this lecture include a brief review of the principal methods of linkage of biomolecules to solid phase matrices. Copies of the key self explanatory slides are presented as figures together with reprints of two publications by the author dealing with a preferred chemistry for the covalent linkage of antibodies to hydroxyl and amino functional groups and the effects of changes in solid phase matrix and antibody coupling chemistry on the performance of a typical excess reagent immunoassay for thyroid stimulating hormone

  16. On-Chip Immunoassay for Determination of Urinary Albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Songjaroen, Temsiri; Maturos, Thitima; Lomas, Tanom; Sappat, Assawapong; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2009-01-01

    An immunoassay performed on a portable microfluidic device was evaluated for the determination of urinary albumin. An increase in absorbance at 500 nm resulting from immunoagglutination was monitored directly on the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip using a portable miniature fibre-optic spectrometer. A calibration curve was linear up to 10 mg L–1 (r2 = 0.993), with a detection limit of 0.81 mg L–1 (S/N = 3). The proposed system showed good precision, with relative standard deviations (...

  17. Analytical evaluation of the novel Lumipulse G BRAHMS procalcitonin immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Ruzzenente, Orazio; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate the analytical performance of the novel Lumipulse G1200 BRAHMS procalcitonin (PCT) immunoassay. Design and methods: This analytical evaluation encompassed the calculation of the limit of blank (LOB), limit of detection (LOD), functional sensitivity, intra- and inter-assay imprecision, confirmation of linearity and a comparison with the Vidas BRAHMS PCT assay. Results: The LOB, LOD and functional sensitivity were 0.0010 ng/mL, 0.0016 ng/mL and ...

  18. Fail-safe computer-based plant protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    A fail-safe mode of operation for computers used in nuclear reactor protection systems was first evolved in the UK for application to a sodium cooled fast reactor. The fail-safe properties of both the hardware and the software were achieved by permanently connecting test signals to some of the multiplexed inputs. This results in an unambiguous data pattern, each time the inputs are sequentially scanned by the multiplexer. The ''test inputs'' simulate transient excursions beyond defined safe limits. The alternating response of the trip algorithms to the ''out-of-limits'' test signals and the normal plant measurements is recognised by hardwired pattern recognition logic external to the computer system. For more general application to plant protection systems, a ''Test Signal Generator'' (TSG) is used to compute and generate test signals derived from prevailing operational conditions. The TSG, from its knowledge of the sensitivity of the trip algorithm to each of the input variables, generates a ''test disturbance'' which is superimposed upon each variable in turn, to simulate a transient excursion beyond the safe limits. The ''tripped'' status yielded by the trip algorithm when using data from a ''disturbed'' input forms part of a pattern determined by the order in which the disturbances are applied to the multiplexer inputs. The data pattern formed by the interleaved test disturbances is again recognised by logic external to the protection system's computers. This fail-safe mode of operation of computer-based protection systems provides a powerful defence against common-mode failure. It also reduces the importance of software verification in the licensing procedure. (author)

  19. Algorithmic cryptanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Joux, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Illustrating the power of algorithms, Algorithmic Cryptanalysis describes algorithmic methods with cryptographically relevant examples. Focusing on both private- and public-key cryptographic algorithms, it presents each algorithm either as a textual description, in pseudo-code, or in a C code program.Divided into three parts, the book begins with a short introduction to cryptography and a background chapter on elementary number theory and algebra. It then moves on to algorithms, with each chapter in this section dedicated to a single topic and often illustrated with simple cryptographic applic

  20. Comparative determination of phenytoin by spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, enzyme immunoassay, and radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.; Ibanez, J.; DiCesare, J.L.; Adams, R.F.; Malkus, H.

    1978-01-01

    Sera from patients being treated with phenytoin were analyzed for the drug by spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, radioimmunoasay, enzyme immunoassay, and liquid chromatography. The assay values obtained were intercompared statistically. Enzyme immunoassay and liquid chromatography appear to be attractive alternatives to the more traditional methods of spectrophotometry and gas chromatography. Our radioimmunoassay data correlated poorly with results by the four other methods

  1. Determining total thyroxine with the aid of the homogeneous enzyme immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, W.

    1978-01-01

    Total thyrozine values obtained with the aid of the homogeneous enzyme immunoassay are compared with those delivered by the RIA and the efficiency of the EMIT technique is evaluated. Some results obtained via Enzymun-T4, a heterologous enzyme immunoassay, are also given. (VJ) 891 VJ [de

  2. Evaluation of six immunoassays for detection of dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin M and G antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groen (Jan); P. Koraka (Penelope); J. Velzing (Jans); C. Copra (Cederick); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe performance of six commercially available immunoassay systems for the detection of dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies in serum was evaluated. These included two IgM and IgG enzyme immunoassays (EIA) from MRL Laboratories and PanBio, a rapid

  3. Trends in interfacial design for surface plasmon resonance based immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi; Miura, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have become a promising tool in sensor technology for biomedical, food, environmental, industrial and homeland security applications. SPR is a surface sensitive optical technique, suitable for real-time and label-free analysis of biorecognition events at functional transducer surfaces. Fabrication of highly active and robust sensing surfaces is an important part in immunoassays because the quality, quantity, chemistry and topography of the interfacial biomembranes play a major role in immunosensor performance. Eventually, a variety of immobilization methods such as physical adsorption, covalent coupling, Langmuir-Blodgett film, polymer thin film, self-assembly, sol-gel, etc, have been introduced over the years for the immobilization of biomolecules (antibody or antigen) on the transducer surfaces. The selection of an immobilization method for an immunoassay is governed by several factors such as nature and stability of the biomolecules, target analyte, application, detection principle, mode of signal transduction, matrix complexity, etc. This paper provides an overview of the various surface modification methods for SPR based immunosensor fabrication. The preparation, structure and application of different functional interfacial surfaces have been discussed along with a brief introduction to the SPR technology, biomolecules and detection principles. (review article)

  4. Aequorin fusion proteins as bioluminescent tracers for competitive immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Deo, Sapna K.; Dikici, Emre; Roda, Aldo; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-06-01

    The use of bio- and chemiluminescence for the development of quantitative binding assays offers undoubted advantages over other detection systems, such as spectrophotometry, fluorescence, or radioactivity. Indeed, bio- and chemiluminescence detection provides similar, or even better, sensitivity and detectability than radioisotopes, while avoiding the problems of health hazards, waste disposal, and instability associated with the use of radioisotopes. Among bioluminescent labels, the calcium-activated photoprotein aequorin, originally isolated from Aequorea victoria and today available as a recombinant product, is characterized by very high detectability, down to attomole levels. It has been used as a bioluminescent label for developing a variety of highly sensitive immunoassays, using various analyte-aequorin conjugation strategies. When the analyte is a protein or a peptide, genetic engineering techniques can be used to produce protein fusions where the analyte is in-frame fused with aequorin, thus producing homogeneous one-to-one conjugation products, available in virtually unlimited amount. Various assays were developed using this strategy: a short review of the most interesting applications is presented, as well as the cloning, purification and initial characterization of an endothelin-1-aequorin conjugate suitable for developing a competitive immunoassay for endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, involved in hypertension.

  5. Determination of phospholipid transfer proteins in rat tissues by immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teerlink, T.

    1983-01-01

    Several quantitative immunoassays have been developed for two phospholipid transfer proteins from rat liver, i.e. the phosphatidylcholine transfer protein and the non-specific lipid transfer protein. The development of a double-antibody radioimmunoassay for the phosphatidylcholine transfer protein is described. The transfer protein was labelled with iodine-125 by the mild glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase method. Although less than one tyrosine residue per molecule of transfer protein was labelled, only 20% of the labelled transfer protein was immunoprecipitable. This value could be increased to 80% by purifying the labelled protein by affinity chromatography on a column of anti-phosphatidylcholine transfer protein-IgG coupled to Sepharose 4B. The radioimmunoassay was used to determine the levels of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein in homogenates and 105 000 xg supernatants from various rat tissues as well as several Morris hepatomas. An enzyme immunoassay for the non-specific lipid transfer protein is also described. The antiserum that was raised especially by the author was cross-reactive with the non-specific lipid transfer protein present in 105 000 xg supernatants from human, mouse and bovine liver. The non-specific lipid transfer protein lost its immunoreactivity upon labelling with iodine-125 using different labelling techniques. Therefore, a regular radioimmunoassay could not be developed. The results of these different assays were compared. (Auth.)

  6. Trends in interfacial design for surface plasmon resonance based immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka, 816-8580 (Japan); Miura, Norio [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka, 816-8580 (Japan)

    2007-12-07

    Immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have become a promising tool in sensor technology for biomedical, food, environmental, industrial and homeland security applications. SPR is a surface sensitive optical technique, suitable for real-time and label-free analysis of biorecognition events at functional transducer surfaces. Fabrication of highly active and robust sensing surfaces is an important part in immunoassays because the quality, quantity, chemistry and topography of the interfacial biomembranes play a major role in immunosensor performance. Eventually, a variety of immobilization methods such as physical adsorption, covalent coupling, Langmuir-Blodgett film, polymer thin film, self-assembly, sol-gel, etc, have been introduced over the years for the immobilization of biomolecules (antibody or antigen) on the transducer surfaces. The selection of an immobilization method for an immunoassay is governed by several factors such as nature and stability of the biomolecules, target analyte, application, detection principle, mode of signal transduction, matrix complexity, etc. This paper provides an overview of the various surface modification methods for SPR based immunosensor fabrication. The preparation, structure and application of different functional interfacial surfaces have been discussed along with a brief introduction to the SPR technology, biomolecules and detection principles. (review article)

  7. Multiplex detection of plant pathogens using a microsphere immunoassay technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratthaphol Charlermroj

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens are a serious problem for seed export, plant disease control and plant quarantine. Rapid and accurate screening tests are urgently required to protect and prevent plant diseases spreading worldwide. A novel multiplex detection method was developed based on microsphere immunoassays to simultaneously detect four important plant pathogens: a fruit blotch bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac, chilli vein-banding mottle virus (CVbMV, potyvirus, watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, tospovirus serogroup IV and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV, tospovirus. An antibody for each plant pathogen was linked on a fluorescence-coded magnetic microsphere set which was used to capture corresponding pathogen. The presence of pathogens was detected by R-phycoerythrin (RPE-labeled antibodies specific to the pathogens. The assay conditions were optimized by identifying appropriate antibody pairs, blocking buffer, concentration of RPE-labeled antibodies and assay time. Once conditions were optimized, the assay was able to detect all four plant pathogens precisely and accurately with substantially higher sensitivity than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA when spiked in buffer and in healthy watermelon leaf extract. The assay time of the microsphere immunoassay (1 hour was much shorter than that of ELISA (4 hours. This system was also shown to be capable of detecting the pathogens in naturally infected plant samples and is a major advancement in plant pathogen detection.

  8. Multiplex detection of plant pathogens using a microsphere immunoassay technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Kumpoosiri, Mallika; Warin, Nuchnard; Oplatowska, Michalina; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Grant, Irene R; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Elliott, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens are a serious problem for seed export, plant disease control and plant quarantine. Rapid and accurate screening tests are urgently required to protect and prevent plant diseases spreading worldwide. A novel multiplex detection method was developed based on microsphere immunoassays to simultaneously detect four important plant pathogens: a fruit blotch bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), chilli vein-banding mottle virus (CVbMV, potyvirus), watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, tospovirus serogroup IV) and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV, tospovirus). An antibody for each plant pathogen was linked on a fluorescence-coded magnetic microsphere set which was used to capture corresponding pathogen. The presence of pathogens was detected by R-phycoerythrin (RPE)-labeled antibodies specific to the pathogens. The assay conditions were optimized by identifying appropriate antibody pairs, blocking buffer, concentration of RPE-labeled antibodies and assay time. Once conditions were optimized, the assay was able to detect all four plant pathogens precisely and accurately with substantially higher sensitivity than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) when spiked in buffer and in healthy watermelon leaf extract. The assay time of the microsphere immunoassay (1 hour) was much shorter than that of ELISA (4 hours). This system was also shown to be capable of detecting the pathogens in naturally infected plant samples and is a major advancement in plant pathogen detection.

  9. Coping Styles of Failing Brunei Vocational Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundia, Lawrence; Salleh, Sallimah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of two types of underachieving students (n = 246) (active failing (AF) and passive failing (PF)) in Brunei vocational and technical education (VTE) institutions and their patterns of coping. Design/methodology/approach: The field survey method was used to directly reach many…

  10. When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaschke, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Review of: James R. Taylor and Elizabeth J. Van Every / When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. (New York: Routledge, 2014. 220 pp. ISBN: 978 0415741668)......Review of: James R. Taylor and Elizabeth J. Van Every / When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. (New York: Routledge, 2014. 220 pp. ISBN: 978 0415741668)...

  11. Neglected City Narratives And Failed Rebranding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Locmele, Gunta

    2017-01-01

    Rīga, Latvia went through a failed rebranding process as the forerunner of its status as a European Capital of Culture (2014). The same thing happened in Aarhus, Denmark. Aarhus will be a European Capital of Culture (2017) and leading to this, it went through a failed rebranding process. Based on...

  12. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  13. Development of a novel ultrasensitive enzyme immunoassay for human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Satoshi; Katakami, Hideki; Inoue, Shinobu; Sawada, Hirotake; Hashida, Seiichi

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel, ultrasensitive enzyme immunoassay (immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay) for determination of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody concentrations in serum samples from patients with type 2 diabetes. We developed an immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and measured glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody from 22 patients with type 1 diabetes, 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 32 healthy controls. A conventional ELISA kit identified 10 patients with type 1 diabetes and one patient with type 2 diabetes as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody positive, whereas 15 patients with type 1 diabetes and six patients with type 2 diabetes were identified as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody positive using immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay. Immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay is a highly sensitive and specific assay for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and might be clinically useful for diabetic onset prediction and early diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Is journalism failing on climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    How can we build a reliable and affordable energy supply based on renewables? How rapidly do we need to cut greenhouse gas emissions to keep climate change within manageable bounds? What does it take to maintain a stable common currency of different nations? These are just a few examples of questions that are critical for our future and that require an understanding of complex systems—the energy system, the climate system, the financial system. Finding sound answers to these questions requires sophisticated scientific analysis and expert knowledge; a lay person's intuition will clearly not suffice. Yet, decisions in a democracy are (and should be!) taken by politicians and the voting public who are not usually scientific experts. Hence the well-being of our societies—and even more so the living conditions of future generations, which are defined by the decisions we take today—depends on the wider public being well informed about the state of scientific knowledge and discourse. The media are the most important means by which lay people obtain their information about science. Good science journalism is therefore a decisive factor for the long-term success of modern society. Good science journalism clearly must be critical journalism, and it requires journalists who know what is what, who can put things into a perspective, and who are able to make well-informed judgements. After all, the role of science journalism is not simply to act as a 'translator' who conveys the findings of scientists in a language understandable to lay people. Rather, good science journalism will provide the public with a realistic impression of what is well established in science and what are current 'hot topics', uncertainties and controversies. It will also discuss the methods and social context of the scientific endeavour. There is ample evidence that in the area of climate science, journalism too often is failing to deliver this realistic picture to its audience, despite many good

  15. Algorithmic mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Hougardy, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Algorithms play an increasingly important role in nearly all fields of mathematics. This book allows readers to develop basic mathematical abilities, in particular those concerning the design and analysis of algorithms as well as their implementation. It presents not only fundamental algorithms like the sieve of Eratosthenes, the Euclidean algorithm, sorting algorithms, algorithms on graphs, and Gaussian elimination, but also discusses elementary data structures, basic graph theory, and numerical questions. In addition, it provides an introduction to programming and demonstrates in detail how to implement algorithms in C++. This textbook is suitable for students who are new to the subject and covers a basic mathematical lecture course, complementing traditional courses on analysis and linear algebra. Both authors have given this "Algorithmic Mathematics" course at the University of Bonn several times in recent years.

  16. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TESTING OF THREE IMMUNOASSAY TEST KITS FOR ANTHRAX, BOTULINUM TOXIN AND RICIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunoassay test kits are based on immunoassay methods, where specific antibodies are used to detect and measure the contaminants of interest. Immunoassay test kits rely on the reaction of a contaminant or antigen with a selective antibody to give a product that can be measures....

  17. Total algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tel, G.

    We define the notion of total algorithms for networks of processes. A total algorithm enforces that a "decision" is taken by a subset of the processes, and that participation of all processes is required to reach this decision. Total algorithms are an important building block in the design of

  18. Smoothed Analysis of Local Search Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Bodo; Dehne, Frank; Sack, Jörg-Rüdiger; Stege, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed analysis is a method for analyzing the performance of algorithms for which classical worst-case analysis fails to explain the performance observed in practice. Smoothed analysis has been applied to explain the performance of a variety of algorithms in the last years. One particular class of

  19. Lateral Flow Immunoassays for Ebola Virus Disease Detection in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Jill C; Pettitt, James; George, Josiah S; Fakoli, Lawrence S; Taweh, Fahn M; Bateman, Stacey L; Bennett, Richard S; Norris, Sarah L; Spinnler, David A; Pimentel, Guillermo; Sahr, Phillip K; Bolay, Fatorma K; Schoepp, Randal J

    2016-10-15

    Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIs) are point-of-care diagnostic assays that are designed for single use outside a formal laboratory, with in-home pregnancy tests the best-known example of these tests. Although the LFI has some limitations over more-complex immunoassay procedures, such as reduced sensitivity and the potential for false-positive results when using complex sample matrices, the assay has the benefits of a rapid time to result and ease of use. These benefits make it an attractive option for obtaining rapid results in an austere environment. In an outbreak of any magnitude, a field-based rapid diagnostic assay would allow proper patient transport and for safe burials to be conducted without the delay caused by transport of samples between remote villages and testing facilities. Use of such point-of-care instruments in the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa would have distinct advantages in control and prevention of local outbreaks, but proper understanding of the technology and interpretation of results are important. In this study, a LFI, originally developed by the Naval Medical Research Center for Ebola virus environmental testing, was evaluated for its ability to detect the virus in clinical samples in Liberia. Clinical blood and plasma samples and post mortem oral swabs submitted to the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research, the National Public Health Reference Laboratory for EVD testing, were tested and compared to results of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), using assays targeting Ebola virus glycoprotein and nucleoprotein. The LFI findings correlated well with those of the real-time RT-PCR assays used as benchmarks. Rapid antigen-detection tests such as LFIs are attractive alternatives to traditional immunoassays but have reduced sensitivity and specificity, resulting in increases in false-positive and false-negative results. An understanding of the strengths, weaknesses, and

  20. Failed fuel action plan guidelines: Special report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a generic guideline that can be used to formulate a failed fuel action plan (FFAP) for specific application by a utility. This document is intended to be part of a comprehensive fuel reliability monitoring, management, and improvement program. The utilities may utilize this document as one resource in developing a failed fuel action plan. This document is not intended to be used as a failed fuel action plan standard. This document is intended to provide guidance on: management responsibilities; fuel performance parameters; cost/benefit analysis; action levels; long-term improvement methods; and data collection, analysis, and trending. 3 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Failed fuel detection and location of LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimoto, Yasuhide; Hukuda, Tooru; Nakamoto, Koichiro

    1974-01-01

    This is a summary report on Failed Fuel Detection and Location Methods of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors, and describes an outline of related research and development conducted by PNC. (auth.)

  2. Breaking the Failed-State Cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haims, Marla C; Gompert, David C; Treverton, Gregory F; Stearns, Brooke K

    2008-01-01

    In their research and field experience, the authors have observed a wide gulf separating the treatment of the security problems of failed states from the treatment of those states economic problems...

  3. Clinical development of placental malaria vaccines and immunoassays harmonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chêne, Arnaud; Houard, Sophie; Nielsen, Morten A

    2016-01-01

    Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection constitutes a major health problem manifesting as severe disease and anaemia in the mother, impaired fetal development, low birth weight or spontaneous abortion. Prevention of placental malaria currently relies on two key strategies...... that are losing efficacy due to spread of resistance: long-lasting insecticide-treated nets and intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy. A placental malaria vaccine would be an attractive, cost-effective complement to the existing control tools. Two placental malaria vaccine candidates are currently...... in Phase Ia/b clinical trials. During two workshops hosted by the European Vaccine Initiative, one in Paris in April 2014 and the other in Brussels in November 2014, the main actors in placental malaria vaccine research discussed the harmonization of clinical development plans and of the immunoassays...

  4. Development of an Ultrasensitive Immunoassay for Detecting Tartrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanlai Xu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an ultrasensitive indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of tartrazine. Two carboxylated analogues of tartrazine with different spacer lengths, and one derivative from commercial tartrazine after a little chemical modification, were synthesized as haptens in order to produce antibodies specific to tartrazine. The effect of sulfonic acid groups on the hapten structure of tartrazine was also studied carefully for the first time. A most specific monoclonal antibody against tartrazine was created and exhibited an IC50 value of 0.105 ng/mL and a limit of detection of 0.014 ng/mL, with no cross-reactivity to other structurally-related pigments. The established immunoassay was applied to the determination of tartrazine in fortified samples of orange juice and in real positive samples of carbonated beverages.

  5. Integrated immunoassay using tuneable surface acoustic waves and lensfree detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Zhang, Yi; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2011-08-21

    The diagnosis of infectious diseases in the Developing World is technologically challenging requiring complex biological assays with a high analytical performance, at minimal cost. By using an opto-acoustic immunoassay technology, integrating components commonly used in mobile phone technologies, including surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducers to provide pressure driven flow and a CMOS camera to enable lensfree detection technique, we demonstrate the potential to produce such an assay. To achieve this, antibody functionalised microparticles were manipulated on a low-cost disposable cartridge using the surface acoustic waves and were then detected optically. Our results show that the biomarker, interferon-γ, used for the diagnosis of diseases such as latent tuberculosis, can be detected at pM concentrations, within a few minutes (giving high sensitivity at a minimal cost). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  6. Plasma myelin basic protein assay using Gilford enzyme immunoassay cuvettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groome, N P

    1981-10-01

    The assay of myelin basic protein in body fluids has potential clinical importance as a routine indicator of demyelination. Preliminary details of a competitive enzyme immunoassay for this protein have previously been published by the author (Groome, N. P. (1980) J. Neurochem. 35, 1409-1417). The present paper now describes the adaptation of this assay for use on human plasma and various aspects of routine data processing. A commercially available cuvette system was found to have advantages over microtitre plates but required a permuted arrangement of sample replicates for consistent results. For dose interpolation, the standard curve could be fitted to a three parameter non-linear equation by regression analysis or linearised by the logit/log transformation.

  7. A redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and application in immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ru-Jia; Ma, Wei; Peng, Mao-Pan; Bai, Zhi-Shan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-31

    A novel redox-mediated chromogenic reaction was demonstrated based on the reaction between HAuCl4 and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), which generate various color responses from red to green in the resulting solutions. Various redox substance could be used to mediate the reaction and trigger a distinct color response. We established a sensitive hydrogen peroxide colorimetric sensor based on the redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and depicted the application both in detection of enzyme and in an immunoassay. Combining the traditional chromogenic reagent with gold nanoparticles, our assay has the advantage in short response time (within three minutes), high sensitivity (10(-12) g mL(-1) for HBsAg) and stability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Development of an ultrasensitive immunoassay for detecting tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuokun; Song, Shanshan; Xu, Liguang; Kuang, Hua; Guo, Shidong; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-06-25

    We have developed an ultrasensitive indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of tartrazine. Two carboxylated analogues of tartrazine with different spacer lengths, and one derivative from commercial tartrazine after a little chemical modification, were synthesized as haptens in order to produce antibodies specific to tartrazine. The effect of sulfonic acid groups on the hapten structure of tartrazine was also studied carefully for the first time. A most specific monoclonal antibody against tartrazine was created and exhibited an IC50 value of 0.105 ng/mL and a limit of detection of 0.014 ng/mL, with no cross-reactivity to other structurally-related pigments. The established immunoassay was applied to the determination of tartrazine in fortified samples of orange juice and in real positive samples of carbonated beverages.

  9. On-Chip Immunoassay for Determination of Urinary Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisorn Tuantranont

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An immunoassay performed on a portable microfluidic device was evaluated for the determination of urinary albumin. An increase in absorbance at 500 nm resulting from immunoagglutination was monitored directly on the poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS microchip using a portable miniature fibre-optic spectrometer. A calibration curve was linear up to 10 mg L–1 (r2 = 0.993, with a detection limit of 0.81 mg L–1 (S/N = 3. The proposed system showed good precision, with relative standard deviations (RSDs of 5.1%, when evaluated with 10 mg L–1 albumin (n = 10. Determination of urinary albumin with the proposed system gave results highly similar to those determined by the conventional spectrophotometric method using immunoturbidimetric detection (r2 = 0.995; n = 15.

  10. Performance of immunoassay kits for site characterization and remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, L.C.; Palausky, A.; Counts, R.W.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting efforts to identify, validate and implement the use of effective, low-cost alternatives to currently used analytical methods for environmental management. As part of that program, we have evaluated the performances of a number of immunoassay (IA) kits with specificities for environmental contaminants of concern to the DOE. The studies were done in the laboratory using both spiked and field test samples. The analyte specificity and manufacturers of the kits evaluated were the following: mercury, BioNebraska; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), EnSys and Millipore; petroleum fuel hydrocarbons, Millipore and Ohmicron; and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), Ohmicron and Millipore. The kits were used in either a semiquantitative or quantitative format according to the preference of the manufacturers

  11. Streptavidin-functionalized capillary immune microreactor for highly efficient chemiluminescent immunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhanjun [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); College of Chemistry and Engineering, Yangzhou University, 88 South University Avenue, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Zong Chen [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ju Huangxian, E-mail: hxju@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yan Feng, E-mail: yanfeng2007@sohu.com [Jiangsu Institute of Cancer Prevention and Cure, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2011-11-07

    Highlights: {yields} A novel capillary immune microreactor was proposed for highly efficient flow-through chemiluminescent immunoassay. {yields} The microreactor was prepared by functionalizing capillary inner wall with streptavidin for capture of biotinylated antibody. {yields} The proposed immunoassay method showed wide dynamic range, good reproducibility, stability and practicality. {yields} The microreactor was low-cost and disposable, and possessed several advantages over the conventional immunoreactors. - Abstract: A streptavidin functionalized capillary immune microreactor was designed for highly efficient flow-through chemiluminescent (CL) immunoassay. The functionalized capillary could be used as both a support for highly efficient immobilization of antibody and a flow cell for flow-through immunoassay. The functionalized inner wall and the capture process were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Compared to conventional packed tube or thin-layer cell immunoreactor, the proposed microreactor showed remarkable properties such as lower cost, simpler fabrication, better practicality and wider dynamic range for fast CL immunoassay with good reproducibility and stability. Using {alpha}-fetoprotein as model analyte, the highly efficient CL flow-through immunoassay system showed a linear range of 3 orders of magnitude from 0.5 to 200 ng mL{sup -1} and a low detection limit of 0.1 ng mL{sup -1}. The capillary immune microreactor could make up the shortcoming of conventional CL immunoreactors and provided a promising alternative for highly efficient flow-injection immunoassay.

  12. Nanobody medicated immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarker alpha-fetoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; He, Qing-hua; Xu, Yang; Fu, Jin-heng; Li, Yan-ping; Tu, Zhui; Wang, Dan; Shu, Mei; Qiu, Yu-lou; Yang, Hong-wei; Liu, Yuan-yuan

    2016-01-15

    Immunoassay for cancer biomarkers plays an important role in cancer prevention and early diagnosis. To the development of immunoassay, the quality and stability of applied antibody is one of the key points to obtain reliability and high sensitivity for immunoassay. The main purpose of this study was to develop a novel immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) based on nanobody against AFP. Two nanobodies which bind to AFP were selected from a phage display nanobody library by biopanning strategy. The prepared nanobodies are clonable, thermally stable and applied in both sandwich enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) and immuno-PCR assay for ultrasensitive detection of AFP. The limit detection of sandwich ELISA setup with optimized nanobodies was 0.48ng mL(-1), and the half of saturation concentration (SC50) value was 6.68±0.56ng mL(-1). These nanobodies were also used to develop an immuno-PCR assay for ultrasensitive detection of AFP, its limit detection values was 0.005ng mL(-1), and the linear range was 0.01-10,000ng mL(-1). These established immunoassays based on nanobodies were highly specific to AFP and with negligible cross reactivity with other tested caner biomarkers. Furthermore, this novel concept of nanobodies mediated immunoassay may provide potential applications in a general method for the ultrasensitive detection of various cancer biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reliability testing of failed fuel location system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental reliability tests performed in order to prove the reliability parameters for Failed Fuel Location System (FFLS), equipment used to detect in which channel of a particular heat transport loop a fuel failure is located, and to find in which channel what particular bundle pair is failed. To do so, D20 samples from each reactor channel are sequentially monitored to detect a comparatively high level of delayed neutron activity. 15 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Why Companies Fail? The Boiling Frog Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcan, Rasim

    2018-01-01

    Why nations fail? An answer is given by Acemoglu and Robinson (2012) by pointing out the importance of institutions for an economy that leads to innovations for economic growth. Christensen (2012) asks a similar question for a firm and diagnoses why companies fail. In this study, I relate Acemoglu and Robinson (2012) with Christensen (2012) in order to better understand how to make companies more prosperous, more powerful, healthier, and live longer via innovations.

  15. DOES GARP REALLY FAIL MISERABLY? A RESPONSE TO STOCKMAN ET AL. (2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman et al. (2006) found that ecological niche models built using DesktopGARP 'failed miserably' to predict trapdoor spider (genus Promyrmekiaphila) distributions in California. This apparent failure of GARP (Genetic Algorithm for Rule-Set Production) was actually a failure ...

  16. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics*

    OpenAIRE

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent ...

  17. Method of detecting a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumi; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To improve detection accuracy of a failed fuel by eliminating a coolant temperature distribution in a fuel assembly. Structure: A failed fuel is detected from contents of nuclear fission products in a coolant by shutting off an upper portion of a fuel assembly provided in the coolant and by sampling the coolant in the fuel assembly. Temperature distribution in the fuel assembly is eliminated, by injecting the higher temperature coolant than that of the coolant inside and outside the fuel assembly when sampling, and thereby replacing the existing coolant in the fuel assembly for the higher temperature coolant. The failed fuel is detected from contents of the fission products existing in the coolant, by sampling the higher temperature coolant of the fuel assembly after a temperature passed. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Weeded Out? Gendered Responses to Failing Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Tanya; Penner, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    Although women graduate from college at higher rates than men, they remain underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. This study examines whether women react to failing a STEM weed-out course by switching to a non-STEM major and graduating with a bachelor's degree in a non-STEM field. While competitive courses designed to weed out potential STEM majors are often invoked in discussions around why students exit the STEM pipeline, relatively little is known about how women and men react to failing these courses. We use detailed individual-level data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS) Postsecondary Transcript Study (PETS): 1988-2000 to show that women who failed an introductory calculus course are substantially less likely to earn a bachelor's degree in STEM. In doing so, we provide evidence that weed-out course failure might help us to better understand why women are less likely to earn degrees.

  19. Correlations between calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and cyclosporine metabolites concentrations in kidney transplant recipients: Implications for immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj Anker; Karamperis, Nikolaos; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille Bundgaard

    2006-01-01

    by inhibiting the enzyme calcineurin phosphatase. Determination of the enzyme's activity is one of the most promising pharmacodynamic markers. It is unknown how calcineurin phosphatase inhibition correlates with various cyclosporine monitoring assays and what is the potential impact of metabolites...... by the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) and by the polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay (pFPIA). Calcineurin phosphatase activity was measured by its ability to dephosphorylate a previously phosphorylated 19-amino acid peptide. We found that calcineurin phosphatase inhibition...

  20. Correlations between calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and cyclosporine metabolites concentrations in kidney transplant recipients: implications for immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamperis, N; Koefoed-Nielsen, PB; Brahe, P

    2006-01-01

    by inhibiting the enzyme calcineurin phosphatase. Determination of the enzyme's activity is one of the most promising pharmacodynamic markers. It is unknown how calcineurin phosphatase inhibition correlates with various cyclosporine monitoring assays and what is the potential impact of metabolites...... by the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) and by the polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay (pFPIA). Calcineurin phosphatase activity was measured by its ability to dephosphorylate a previously phosphorylated 19-amino acid peptide. We found that calcineurin phosphatase inhibition...

  1. Control of (pre-analytical aspects in immunoassay measurements of metabolic hormones in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Bielohuby

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of circulating hormones by immunoassay remains a cornerstone in preclinical endocrine research. For scientists conducting and interpreting immunoassay measurements of rodent samples, the paramount aim usually is to obtain reliable and meaningful measurement data in order to draw conclusions on biological processes. However, the biological variability between samples is not the only variable affecting the readout of an immunoassay measurement and a considerable amount of unwanted or unintended variability can be quickly introduced during the pre-analytical and analytical phase. This review aims to increase the awareness for the factors ‘pre-analytical’ and ‘analytical’ variability particularly in the context of immunoassay measurement of circulating metabolic hormones in rodent samples. In addition, guidance is provided how to gain control over these variables and how to avoid common pitfalls associated with sample collection, processing, storage and measurement. Furthermore, recommendations are given on how to perform a basic validation of novel single and multiplex immunoassays for the measurement of metabolic hormones in rodents. Finally, practical examples from immunoassay measurements of plasma insulin in mice address the factors ‘sampling site and inhalation anesthesia’ as frequent sources of introducing an unwanted variability during the pre-analytical phase. The knowledge about the influence of both types of variability on the immunoassay measurement of circulating hormones as well as strategies to control these variables are crucial, on the one hand, for planning and realization of metabolic rodent studies and, on the other hand, for the generation and interpretation of meaningful immunoassay data from rodent samples.

  2. A study using an isotope probe comparing immunoassay with serology in detection of Brucella Abortus antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, J.G.; Redington, F.; Stephenson, M.

    1986-01-01

    We report a comparison of radio-immunoassay with conventional serology in the detection of brucella abortus antibody from three laboratories. Overall agreement by Chi squared analysis is 5%. There are significant differences between laboratories and a significant number of sero negative suspect sera (from 20% - 60%) were positive by ratio-immunoassay test. We suspect that conventional serology under-reports the incidence of antibody to brucella abortus. (author)

  3. Why did the League of Nations fail?

    OpenAIRE

    Jari Eloranta

    2011-01-01

    Why did the League of Nations ultimately fail to achieve widespread disarmament, its most fundamental goal? This article shows that the failure of the League of Nations had two important dimensions: (1) the failure to provide adequate security guarantees for its members (like an alliance); (2) the failure of this organization to achieve the disarmament goals it set out in the 1920s and 1930s. Thus, it was doomed from the outset to fail, due to built-in institutional contradictions. It can als...

  4. Analytical evaluation of the novel Lumipulse G BRAHMS procalcitonin immunoassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Ruzzenente

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate the analytical performance of the novel Lumipulse G1200 BRAHMS procalcitonin (PCT immunoassay. Design and methods: This analytical evaluation encompassed the calculation of the limit of blank (LOB, limit of detection (LOD, functional sensitivity, intra- and inter-assay imprecision, confirmation of linearity and a comparison with the Vidas BRAHMS PCT assay. Results: The LOB, LOD and functional sensitivity were 0.0010 ng/mL, 0.0016 ng/mL and 0.008 ng/mL, respectively. The total analytical imprecision was found to be 2.1% and the linearity was excellent (r=1.00 in the range of concentrations between 0.006–75.5 ng/mL. The correlation coefficient with Vidas BRAHMS PCT was 0.995 and the equation of the Passing and Bablok regression analysis was [Lumipulse G BRAHMS PCT]=0.76×[Vidas BRAHMS PCT]+0.04. The mean overall bias of Lumipulse G BRAHMS PCT versus Vidas BRAHMS PCT was −3.03 ng/mL (95% confidence interval [CI]: −4.32 to −1.74 ng/mL, whereas the mean bias in samples with PCT concentration between 0–10 ng/mL was −0.49 ng/mL (95% CI: −0.77 to −0.24 ng/mL. The diagnostic agreement was 100% at 0.5 ng/mL, 97% at 2.0 ng/mL and 95% at 10 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusions: These results attest that Lumipulse G BRAHMS PCT exhibits excellent analytical performance, among the best of the methods currently available on the diagnostic market. However, the significant bias compared to the Vidas BRAHMS PCT suggests that the methods cannot be used interchangeably. Keywords: Sepsis, Infection, Procalcitonin, Immunoassay

  5. Catch and measure-mass spectrometry-based immunoassays in biomarker research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Frederik; van den Berg, Bart H J; Planatscher, Hannes; Pynn, Christopher J; Joos, Thomas O; Poetz, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    Mass spectrometry-based (MS) methods are effective tools for discovering protein biomarker candidates that can differentiate between physiological and pathophysiological states. Promising candidates are validated in studies comprising large patient cohorts. Here, targeted protein analytics are used to increase sample throughput. Methods involving antibodies, such as sandwich immunoassays or Western blots, are commonly applied at this stage. Highly-specific and sensitive mass spectrometry-based immunoassays that have been established in recent years offer a suitable alternative to sandwich immunoassays for quantifying proteins. Mass Spectrometric ImmunoAssays (MSIA) and Stable Isotope Standards and Capture by Anti-Peptide Antibodies (SISCAPA/iMALDI) are two prominent types of MS-based immunoassays in which the capture is done either at the protein or the peptide level. We present an overview of these emerging types of immunoassays and discuss their suitability for the discovery and validation of protein biomarkers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. © 2013.

  6. Effective gasoline site assessment using the D TECH trademark BTEX immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudak, R.T.; Melby, J.M.; Stave, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    The application of immunoassay to environmental testing can greatly aid in assessing sites for various contaminants including PCB, TNT, RDX, PAH and BTEX. Immunoassay offers several benefits to site assessment: it is accurate, reproducible and relatively inexpensive compared to instrumental analysis. In addition, because of its ease-of-use, this technique is ideal for the field and requires minimal user training. To demonstrate not only the effectiveness of the BTEX immunoassay, but also the reliability of the field results, a gasoline contaminated site was assessed comparing the BTEX immunoassay to gas chromatography. All sampling and site related activities were executed in accordance to the USEPA SW-846 guidelines. Three (3) analyses were performed on each sample. One immunoassay analysis was performed in the field by an individual who received two (2) hours of training prior to the start of the study. A technician familiar with the immunoassay ran the second analysis in a laboratory. Finally, an independent GC laboratory certified for BTEX method 8020 and 602 performed the GC analyses. One hundred one (101) samples were analyzed: thirty-nine (39) samples were water, the other sixty-two (62) were soils ranging from clay to silt. The results and costs of the methods are compared

  7. Unaware person recognition from the body when face identification fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Allyson; Phillips, P Jonathon; Natu, Vaidehi; An, Xiaobo; O'Toole, Alice J

    2013-11-01

    How does one recognize a person when face identification fails? Here, we show that people rely on the body but are unaware of doing so. State-of-the-art face-recognition algorithms were used to select images of people with almost no useful identity information in the face. Recognition of the face alone in these cases was near chance level, but recognition of the person was accurate. Accuracy in identifying the person without the face was identical to that in identifying the whole person. Paradoxically, people reported relying heavily on facial features over noninternal face and body features in making their identity decisions. Eye movements indicated otherwise, with gaze duration and fixations shifting adaptively toward the body and away from the face when the body was a better indicator of identity than the face. This shift occurred with no cost to accuracy or response time. Human identity processing may be partially inaccessible to conscious awareness.

  8. Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ideals of OBE? K Lombard, M Grosser. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Education Vol. 28 (4) 2008: pp. 561-580. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  9. The Significance of Isolated Reactive Treponemal Enzyme Immunoassay in the Diagnosis of Early Syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Rachel J; Hathorn, Emma; Manavi, Kaveh

    2016-06-01

    The Treponemal test algorithm for syphilis screening is widely used. A diagnostic challenge between identifying early syphilis versus a false positive signal occurs in cases where the treponemal enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is reactive and confirmatory T. pallidum particle agglutination assay is negative. We investigated the diagnostic outcome of isolated reactive EIA in patients attending a sexual health clinic. Results of syphilis serology tests carried out at Birmingham Whittall Street Clinic between August 10, 2010, and November 31, 2014, were reviewed. Cases with isolated EIA were routinely invited for repeat syphilis serology. Outcomes of patients with isolated EIA were reviewed and the proportion with confirmed positive syphilis serology on their repeat test identified. The number of isolated EIA cases needed to retest to identify 1 case of early syphilis was calculated. A total of 121,724 syphilis screening tests were performed. Among the 1561 individual patients with reactive EIA sera, 316 (20% of total reactive tests) had isolated reactive EIA. Repeat syphilis serology results of 163 patients were reviewed; 106 patients remained with isolated reactive EIA, 50 had negative EIA test and 7 (4.3%) had confirmed reactive EIA. Of the 7 patients, 2 had evidence of early syphilis infection. The number of isolated EIA needed to retest to identify 1 case of early syphilis was 81.5 (95% confidence interval, 22.9-671.4). Routine recall of patients with isolated EIA sera is not warranted. Risk of acquisition or presence of early syphilis should be assessed independently and irrespective of a negative syphilis screening test or isolated EIA.

  10. Underachievement, Failing Youth and Moral Panics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emma

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers contemporary "moral panics" around the underachievement of boys in school examinations in the UK and America. In the UK, in particular, the underachievement of boys is central to current "crisis accounts" about falling standards and failing pupils. "Underachievement" is a familiar word to those…

  11. The Art of Saving a Failing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Les

    2012-01-01

    While the debate continues over whether to close failing schools or attempt fixing them, the author asserts that the solution most often lies in assigning strong leaders to them who will take definite and immediate action. Reviewing his own success turning around schools, he says creating a sense of urgency, unloading poor performing staff, and…

  12. Examination of a failed fifth wheel coupling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fernandes, PJL

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Examination of a fifth wheel coupling which had failed in service showed that it had been modified and that the operating handle had been moved from its original design position. This modification completely eliminated the safety device designed...

  13. Merger incentives and the failing firm defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouckaert, J.M.C.; Kort, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The merger incentives between profitable firms differ fundamentally from the incentives of a profitable firm to merge with a failing firm. We investigate these incentives under different modes of price competition and Cournot behavior. Our main finding is that firms strictly prefer exit of the

  14. Systems with randomly failing repairable components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Kiureghian, Armen; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Song, Junho

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form expressions are derived for the steady-state availability, mean rate of failure, mean duration of downtime and reliability of a general system with randomly and independently failing repairable components. Component failures are assumed to be homogeneous Poisson events in time and rep...

  15. I Failed the edTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranishi, Adam; Oyler, Celia

    2017-01-01

    In this article, co-written by a teacher and a professor, the authors examine possible explanations for why Adam (first author), a New York City public school special educator, failed the edTPA, a teacher performance assessment required by all candidates for state certification. Adam completed a yearlong teaching residency where he was the special…

  16. Nanoparticle-based immunosensors and immunoassays for aflatoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xu; Niessner, Reinhard [Institute of Hydrochemistry and Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Technische Universität München, Marchioninistrasse 17, D-81377 München (Germany); Tang, Dianping [Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection for Food Safety, MOE & Fujian Province, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Knopp, Dietmar, E-mail: dietmar.knopp@ch.tum.de [Institute of Hydrochemistry and Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Technische Universität München, Marchioninistrasse 17, D-81377 München (Germany)

    2016-03-17

    Aflatoxins are naturally existing mycotoxins produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, present in a wide range of food and feed products. Because of their extremely high toxicity and carcinogenicity, strict control of maximum residue levels of aflatoxins in foodstuff is set by many countries. In daily routine, different chromatographic methods are used almost exclusively. As supplement, in several companies enzyme immunoassay-based sample testing as primary screening is performed. Recently, nanomaterials such as noble metal nanoparticles, magnetic particles, carbon nanomaterials, quantum dots, and silica nanomaterials are increasingly utilized for aflatoxin determination to improve the sensitivity and simplify the detection. They are employed either as supports for the immobilization of biomolecules or as electroactive or optical labels for signal transduction and amplification. Several nanoparticle-based electrochemical, piezoelectric, optical, and immunodipstick assays for aflatoxins have been developed. In this review, we summarize these recent advances and illustrate novel concepts and promising applications in the field of food safety. - Highlights: • Novel concepts and promising applications of nanoparticle-based immunological methods for the determination of aflatoxins. • Inclusion of most important nanomaterials and hybrid nanostructures. • Inclusion of electrochemical, optical and mass-sensitive biosensors as well as optical and immunochromatographic assays.

  17. The microassay on a card: A rugged, portable immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, David

    1991-01-01

    The Microassay on a Card (MAC) is a portable, hand-held, non-instrumental immunoassay that can test for the presence of a wide variety of substances in the environment. The MAC is a simple device to use. A drop of test solution is placed on one side of the card and within five minutes a color is developed on the other side in proportion to the amount of substance in the test solution, with sensitivity approaching 10 ng/ml. The MAC is self-contained and self-timed; no reagents or timing is necessary. The MAC may be configured with multiple wells to provide simultaneous testing for multiple species. As envisioned, the MAC will be employed first as an on-site screen for drugs of abuse in urine or saliva. If the MAC can be used as a screen of saliva for drugs of abuse, it could be applied to driving while intoxicated, use of drugs on the job, or testing of the identity of seized materials. With appropriate modifications, the MAC also could be used to test for environmental toxins or pollutants.

  18. Basic and clinical investigation of T3 immunoassay kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Junji; Nakajima, Akiko; Morita, Rikushi; Endo, Keigo; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    1976-01-01

    T 3 immunoassay kit was investigated basically and clinically. A good result was obtained at the prescribed incubation temperature and for 16 hours of incubation time. Moreover, it was thought to be possible that incubation time could be shortened to 1 - 4 hours at 37 0 C. Specificity of antibody was good. Recovery of added T 3 was 100+-5 (S.D.) % on an average and parallel of dilution curve of high T 3 serum was also good. Variation coefficient of accuracy of this kit was 1.5 - 2.1 % and that of reproducibility was 1.3 - 6.6 %. Mild hemolysis did not affect measurement value. Serum T 3 level in normals, untreated patients with Basedow's disease and patients with primary hypothyroidism was 142+-21 ng/100 ml, 452+-156 ng/100 ml and 67+-17 ng/100 ml, respectively. Serum T 3 level in patients with Hashimoto's disease was distributed to a wide extent, but that of patients with goiter and simple goiter ranged within normal range. On the other side, serum T 3 level of normal pregnant woman was high and that of patients with anorexia nervosa showed low level. From the above mentioned results, it was concluded that this kit was simple in method and good in sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility and it was also useful for clinical applications. (M. Tsunoda)

  19. Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus mycotoxins: immunogen synthesis and immunoassay development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, M; Gray, G; Kavanagh, K; Lewis, C; Doyle, S

    2004-02-01

    Immunological detection of secreted low molecular weight toxins represents a potentially novel means of diagnosing infection by the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. Two such metabolites, gliotoxin and helvolic acid, were selected and conjugated to thyroglobulin for antisera generation in rabbits. Gliotoxin was initially activated using N-[p-maleimidophenyl] isocyanate (PMPI) and subsequently conjugated to S-acetyl thioglycolic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide-activated thyroglobulin, whereas helvolic acid was activated with N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) in the presence of thyroglobulin prior to immunisation. To facilitate subsequent antisera evaluation, both toxins were similarly conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA). Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation-Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed covalent attachment of toxins to BSA in the ratios of 15 and 2.4 mol per mol BSA for gliotoxin and helvolic acid, respectively. Resultant high titer antisera were capable of detecting both BSA-conjugated toxins (inhibitory concentration (IC)(50): 4-5 microg/ml). Free toxins were also detectable by competitive immunoassay, whereby 10 microg/ml free gliotoxin (30 microM) and helvolic acid (17 microM), respectively, inhibited antibody binding to cognate toxin-BSA previously immobilised on microwells. This work confirms that sensitive and specific antisera can be raised against fungal toxins and may have an application in diagnosing fungal infection.

  20. Enzyme immunoassay for DDT analysis in Lebanese soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashour, I.; Dagher, S.; Shammas, G.; Sukkariyah, B.; Kawar, N.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique in estimating pesticide residue in soils is a faster, less expensive and easier method to use than the gas chromatography (GC) analysis technique..In the test, DDT pesticide residues in the simple compete with enzyme (horseradish peroxidase)-labeled DDT for a limited number of antibody binding sites on the inside surfaces of the test wells; the envirologix plate kit was tested for the measurement of total DDT in virgin and fortified (0-1000 ng g exp-1) soil samples of different properties from Lebanon. Extraction of DDT from soil was done by shaking the samples for 16 hours on a mechanical shaker with 90% methanol without any clean-up steps. Then the samples were allowed to stand for 30 minutes and an aliquot was taken from the clear supernatant. The DDT in the extract was measured in triplicate by GC and ELISA. The results indicated that the two techniques were highly correlated (r2 =0.9671-0.9973). Differences in soils physical and chemical properties did not accuracy of the detection limits of ELISA when compared to GC-ECD results. Immunoassay technique is a suitable method for rapid and accurate measurement of DDT residue in mineral Lebanese soils

  1. Sensitive, Fast, and Specific Immunoassays for Methyltestosterone Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Kong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA and an immunochromatographic strip assay using a highly specific monoclonal antibody, were developed to detect methyltestosterone (MT residues in animal feed. The optimized icELISA had a half-inhibition concentration value of 0.26 ng/mL and a limit of detection value of 0.045 ng/mL. There was no cross-reactivity with eight analogues, revealing high specificity for MT. Based on icELISA results, the recovery rate of MT in animal feed was 82.4%–100.6%. The results were in accordance with those obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The developed immunochromatographic strip assay, as the first report for MT detection, had a visual cut-off value of 1 ng/mL in PBS, 2.5 ng/g in fish feed, and 2.5 ng/g in pig feed. Therefore, these immunoassays are useful and fast tools for MT residue detection in animal feed.

  2. Evidence for carcinoembryonic antigen using radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kungda Gao, L.

    1980-01-01

    A commercially available radioimmunoassay for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was initially compared with an enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Considerable differences were found between the individual value. For three patients suffering from carcinomas of the digestive tract a better indication of the disease was given in the RIA than in the EIA. A further 110 patients with various illnesses were examined for serum CEA-levels using RIA. A method for measuring CEA in feces by RIA was developed. The normal range lies below 300 ng/ml. This assay could be of significance for the early recognition of colo-rectal carcinoma. In part II of this dissertation CEA was isolated from colo-rectal carcinomas using three different gel filtration media. It was only possible to obtain almost pure CEA (24 μg CEA per μg protein) by one of the methods. Six guinea pigs were immunized with the isolated CEA and all developed antibodies. The isolated CEA was labelled with 125 I and an own RIA saturation sequence and double antibody separation was developed. One of the antisera was able to distinguish without overlap 7 healthy patients from 7 suffering from colo-rectal carcinomas in non-extracted serum. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Graphene-based chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer for homogeneous immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Seok; Joung, Hyou-Arm; Kim, Min-Gon; Park, Chan Beum

    2012-04-24

    We report on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) between graphene nanosheets and chemiluminescent donors. In contrast to fluorescence resonance energy transfer, CRET occurs via nonradiative dipole-dipole transfer of energy from a chemiluminescent donor to a suitable acceptor molecule without an external excitation source. We designed a graphene-based CRET platform for homogeneous immunoassay of C-reactive protein (CRP), a key marker for human inflammation and cardiovascular diseases, using a luminol/hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence (CL) reaction catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase. According to our results, anti-CRP antibody conjugated to graphene nanosheets enabled the capture of CRP at the concentration above 1.6 ng mL(-1). In the CRET platform, graphene played a key role as an energy acceptor, which was more efficient than graphene oxide, while luminol served as a donor to graphene, triggering the CRET phenomenon between luminol and graphene. The graphene-based CRET platform was successfully applied to the detection of CRP in human serum samples in the range observed during acute inflammatory stress.

  4. Significance of isolated reactive treponemal chemiluminescence immunoassay results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Michael G; Robertson, Peter W; Post, Jeffrey J

    2013-05-01

    Isolated reactive serum treponemal chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA) specimens cause clinical uncertainty. Sera were screened by CIA, and reactive samples underwent reflex testing with rapid plasma reagin (RPR), Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA), and fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA Abs) assays. Samples reactive only on the CIA were deemed "isolated" reactive CIA samples. We undertook detailed review of a subset of subjects with isolated reactive CIA specimens. Of 28 261 specimens, 1171 (4.1%) were reactive on CIA, of which 133 (11.3%) had isolated CIA reactivity. Most subjects (66 of 82 [80.5%]) with isolated reactive CIA specimens were from high-prevalence populations. We found evidence of CIA, TPPA, and FTA Abs seroreversion. The median chemiluminescent signal-to-cutoff ratio was similar for isolated reactive CIA sera and sera that were reactive on either FTA Abs or TPPA assays (2.19 vs 2.32; P = .15) but lower than for sera reactive on both FTA Abs and TPPA assays (12.37; P < .001) or for sera reactive on RPR assays (25.53; P < .001). A total of 11 of 20 patients (55%) with an isolated reactive CIA specimen who underwent medical record review had previous or subsequent evidence of syphilis infection. Isolated reactive CIA specimens may represent true T. pallidum infection and may be found after seroreversion of traditional treponemal assays.

  5. Serum gastrin: interests and limitations of radio-immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougier, P.; Linhart, N.; Bok, B.

    1980-01-01

    Radio-immunoassay of serum gastrin may now be carried out in all laboratories of radio-immunology. Comparison of two commercial kits A: Schwartz-Mann and B: CEA-SORIN according to criteria of specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility within and between systems, shows that they both permit the detection of pathological hypergastrinemias (Zollinger Ellison and atropic gastritis). Both kits have an identical intrasystem coefficient of variation (10 p. cent and 7 p. cent fort A, 5 p. cent and 8 p. cent for B) on the other hand, the inter-system coefficient of variation is better for kit B (22.4 p. cent and 37 p. cent for kit A, and 11.5 p. cent and 14.2 p. cent for kit B). The normal values for each kit are quite different: 97 . 64 pg.ml -1 for A and 51 . 23 pg.ml -1 for B preventing one from comparing estimations carried out with two different kits [fr

  6. Establishment of carcinoembryonic antigen working standard for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ligen; Sun Youxiang; Jiao Yan

    2001-01-01

    The author is to prepare the working standard of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) for immunoassay and determine its potency. CEA solution of 320 μg/L was prepared from purified CEA solution of 4.6 mg/L and 1% human albumin solution buffered with 50 mmol/L sodium phosphate, pH7.4. This solution was distributed in an aliquot of 0.5 mL (160 ng per ampoule) and lyophilized. The potency of CEA working standard, in terms of present standard of CEA RIA and IRMA kits made by Chinese manufacturers and in terms of 1st IRP CEA HUMAN 73/601 supplied by WHO, has been determined. Mean immunological potency of the working standard is 163 ng per ampoule with confident limit of 159-168 ng per ampoule at 95% probability level. Test of parallelism of dose-response curve for the working standard to that for 1st IRP CEA HUMAN 73/601 has been passed. CEA working standard is suitable to the kits standard for CEA radioimmunoassay and immunoradiometric assay

  7. Designing novel nano-immunoassays: antibody orientation versus sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puertas, S; Moros, M; Fernandez-Pacheco, R; Ibarra, M R; Grazu, V; De la Fuente, J M, E-mail: vgrazu@unizar.e, E-mail: jmfuente@unizar.e [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Campus RIo Ebro, EdifIcio I-D, Mariano Esquillor, s/n, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-12-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for their application in quantitative and highly sensitive biosensors. Their use as labels of biological recognition events and their detection by means of some magnetic method constitute a very promising strategy for quantitative high-sensitive lateral-flow assays. In this paper, we report the importance of nanoparticle functionalization for the improvement of sensitivity for a lateral-flow immunoassay. More precisely, we have found that immobilization of IgG anti-hCG through its polysaccharide moieties on MNPs allows more successful recognition of the hCG hormone. Although we have used the detection of hCG as a model in this work, the strategy of binding antibodies to MNPs through its sugar chains reported here is applicable to other antibodies. It has huge potential as it will be very useful for the development of quantitative and high-sensitive lateral-flow assays for its use on human and veterinary, medicine, food and beverage manufacturing, pharmaceutical, medical biologics and personal care product production, environmental remediation, etc.

  8. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer as an Antibody Substitution in Pseudo-immunoassays for Chemical Contaminants in Food and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaochao; Luo, Jiaxun; Li, Chenglong; Ma, Mingfang; Yu, Wenbo; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhanhui

    2018-03-21

    The chemical contaminants in food and the environment are quite harmful to food safety and human health. Rapid, accurate, and cheap detection can effectively control the potential risks derived from these chemical contaminants. Among all detection methods, the immunoassay based on the specific interaction of antibody-analyte is one of the most widely used techniques in the field. However, biological antibodies employed in the immunoassay usually cannot tolerate extreme conditions, resulting in an unstable state in both physical and chemical profiles. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are a class of polymers with specific molecular recognition abilities, which are highly robust, showing excellent operational stability under a wide variety of conditions. Recently, MIPs have been used in biomimetic immunoassays for chemical contaminants as an antibody substitute in food and the environment. Here, we reviewed these applications of MIPs incorporated in different analytical platforms, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescent immunoassay, chemiluminescent immunoassay, electrochemical immunoassay, microfluidic paper-based immunoassay, and homogeneous immunoassay, and discussed current challenges and future trends in the use of MIPs in biomimetic immunoassays.

  9. A method of failed fuel detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To keep the coolant fed to a fuel assembly at a level below the temperature of existing coolant to detect a failed fuel with high accuracy without using a heater. Structure: When a coolant in a coolant pool disposed at the upper part of a reactor container is fed by a coolant feed system into a fuel assembly through a cap to fill therewith and exchange while forming a boundary layer between said coolant and the existing coolant, the temperature distribution of the feed coolant is heated by fuel rods so that the upper part is low whereas the lower part is high. Then, the lower coolant is upwardly moved by the agitating action and fission products leaked through a failed opening at the lower part of the fuel assembly and easily extracted by the sampling system. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Method for detecting a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method for the detection of failed fuel by pouring hot water, in which pouring speed of liquid to be poured and temperature of the liquid are controlled to prevent the leakage of the liquid. Constitution: The method comprises blocking the top of a fuel assembly arranged in coolant to stop a flow of coolant, pouring a liquid higher in temperature than that of coolant into the fuel assembly, sampling the liquid poured, and measuring the concentration of radioactivity of coolant already subjected to sampling to detect a failed fuel. At this time, controlling is made so that the pouring speed of the poured liquid is set to about 25 l/min, and an increased portion of temperature from the temperature of liquid to the temperature of coolant is set to a level less than about 15 0 C. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, D. R.

    1993-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power- gener-ating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive compo-nents are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in serv-ice. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress- corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor.

  12. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power-generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with an analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  13. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1992-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (a) intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (b) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressure water reactor, (c) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (d) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  14. Laparoscopic revision of failed antireflux operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, F M; Bloomston, M; Zervos, E; Muench, J; Albrink, M H; Murr, M; Rosemurgy, A S

    2001-01-01

    A small number of patients fail fundoplication and require reoperation. Laparoscopic techniques have been applied to reoperative fundoplications. We reviewed our experience with reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication. Reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication was undertaken in 28 patients, 19 F and 9 M, of mean age 56 years +/- 12. Previous antireflux procedures included 19 open and 12 laparoscopic antireflux operations. Symptoms were heartburn (90%), dysphagia (35%), and atypical symptoms (30%%). The mean interval from antireflux procedure to revision was 13 months +/- 4.2. The mean DeMeester score was 78+/-32 (normal 14.7). Eighteen patients (64%) had hiatal breakdown, 17 (60%) had wrap failure, 2 (7%) had slipped Nissen, 3 (11%) had paraesophageal hernias, and 1 (3%) had an excessively tight wrap. Twenty-five revisions were completed laparoscopically, while 3 patients required conversion to the open technique. Complications occurred in 9 of 17 (53%) patients failing previous open fundoplications and in 4 of 12 patients (33%) failing previous laparoscopic fundoplications and included 15 gastrotomies and 1 esophagotomy, all repaired laparoscopically, 3 postoperative gastric leaks, and 4 pneumothoraces requiring tube thoracostomy. No deaths occurred. Median length of stay was 5 days (range 2-90 days). At a mean follow-up of 20 months +/- 17, 2 patients (7%) have failed revision of their fundoplications, with the rest of the patients being essentially asymptomatic (93%). The results achieved with reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication are similar to those of primary laparoscopic fundoplications. Laparoscopic reoperations, particularly of primary open fundoplication, can be technically challenging and fraught with complications. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Analytical evaluation of the novel Lumipulse G BRAHMS procalcitonin immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzenente, Orazio; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the analytical performance of the novel Lumipulse G1200 BRAHMS procalcitonin (PCT) immunoassay. This analytical evaluation encompassed the calculation of the limit of blank (LOB), limit of detection (LOD), functional sensitivity, intra- and inter-assay imprecision, confirmation of linearity and a comparison with the Vidas BRAHMS PCT assay. The LOB, LOD and functional sensitivity were 0.0010 ng/mL, 0.0016 ng/mL and 0.008 ng/mL, respectively. The total analytical imprecision was found to be 2.1% and the linearity was excellent (r=1.00) in the range of concentrations between 0.006-75.5 ng/mL. The correlation coefficient with Vidas BRAHMS PCT was 0.995 and the equation of the Passing and Bablok regression analysis was [Lumipulse G BRAHMS PCT]=0.76×[Vidas BRAHMS PCT]+0.04. The mean overall bias of Lumipulse G BRAHMS PCT versus Vidas BRAHMS PCT was -3.03 ng/mL (95% confidence interval [CI]: -4.32 to -1.74 ng/mL), whereas the mean bias in samples with PCT concentration between 0-10 ng/mL was -0.49 ng/mL (95% CI: -0.77 to -0.24 ng/mL). The diagnostic agreement was 100% at 0.5 ng/mL, 97% at 2.0 ng/mL and 95% at 10 ng/mL, respectively. These results attest that Lumipulse G BRAHMS PCT exhibits excellent analytical performance, among the best of the methods currently available on the diagnostic market. However, the significant bias compared to the Vidas BRAHMS PCT suggests that the methods cannot be used interchangeably.

  16. Revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Bin; Yokota, Atsushi; Gill, Harpreet S; El Rassi, George; McFarland, Edward G

    2005-09-01

    With the failure of thermal capsulorrhaphy for shoulder instability, there have been concerns with capsular thinning and capsular necrosis affecting revision surgery. To report the findings at revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy and to evaluate the technical effects on subsequent revision capsular plication. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fourteen patients underwent arthroscopic evaluation and open reconstruction for a failed thermal capsulorrhaphy. The cause of the failure, the quality of the capsule, and the ability to suture the capsule were recorded. The patients were evaluated at follow-up for failure, which was defined as recurrent subluxations or dislocations. The origin of the instability was traumatic (n = 6) or atraumatic (n = 8). At revision surgery in the traumatic group, 4 patients sustained failure of the Bankart repair with capsular laxity, and the others experienced capsular laxity alone. In the atraumatic group, all patients experienced capsular laxity as the cause of failure. Of the 14 patients, the capsule quality was judged to be thin in 5 patients and ablated in 1 patient. A glenoid-based capsular shift could be accomplished in all 14 patients. At follow-up (mean, 35.4 months; range, 22 to 48 months), 1 patient underwent revision surgery and 1 patient had a subluxation, resulting in a failure rate of 14%. Recurrent capsular laxity after failed thermal capsular shrinkage is common and frequently associated with capsular thinning. In most instances, the capsule quality does not appear to technically affect the revision procedure.

  17. Algorithmic alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1987-11-01

    A large variety of Monte Carlo algorithms are being used for lattice gauge simulations. For purely bosonic theories, present approaches are generally adequate; nevertheless, overrelaxation techniques promise savings by a factor of about three in computer time. For fermionic fields the situation is more difficult and less clear. Algorithms which involve an extrapolation to a vanishing step size are all quite closely related. Methods which do not require such an approximation tend to require computer time which grows as the square of the volume of the system. Recent developments combining global accept/reject stages with Langevin or microcanonical updatings promise to reduce this growth to V/sup 4/3/

  18. Combinatorial algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, T C

    2002-01-01

    Newly enlarged, updated second edition of a valuable text presents algorithms for shortest paths, maximum flows, dynamic programming and backtracking. Also discusses binary trees, heuristic and near optimums, matrix multiplication, and NP-complete problems. 153 black-and-white illus. 23 tables.Newly enlarged, updated second edition of a valuable, widely used text presents algorithms for shortest paths, maximum flows, dynamic programming and backtracking. Also discussed are binary trees, heuristic and near optimums, matrix multiplication, and NP-complete problems. New to this edition: Chapter 9

  19. Why did occidental modernity fail in the Arab Middle East: the failed modern state?

    OpenAIRE

    Sardar, Aziz

    2011-01-01

    This thesis asks a straightforward but nevertheless a complex question, that is: Why did modernity fail in the Arab Middle East? The notion of modernity in this thesis signifies the occidental modernity which reached the region in many different forms and through various channels. This occidental modernity had an impact on many areas and changed the societies and politics of the region. But these changes stopped short of reaching modernity, in other words it failed to change the society from ...

  20. Highly sensitive immunoassay based on E. coli with autodisplayed Z-domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, Joachim; Park, Min; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2010-01-01

    The Z-domain of protein A has been known to bind specifically to the F c region of antibodies (IgGs). In this work, the Z-domain of protein A was expressed on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli by using 'Autodisplay' technology as a fusion protein of autotransport domain. The E. coli with autodisplayed Z-domain was applied to the sandwich-type immunoassay as a solid-support of detection-antibodies against a target analyte. For the feasibility demonstration of the E. coli based immunoassay, C-reactive protein (CRP) assay was carried out by using E. coli with autodisplayed Z-domain. The limit of detection (LOD) and binding capacity of the E. coli based immunoassay were estimated to be far more sensitive than the conventional ELISA. Such a far higher sensitivity of E. coli based immunoassay than conventional ELISA was explained by the orientation control of immobilized antibodies and the mobility of E. coli in assay matrix. From the test results of 45 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients' serum and 15 healthy samples, a cut-off value was established to have optimal sensitivity and selectivity values for RA. The CRP test result of each individual sample was compared with ELISA which is the reference method for RA diagnosis. From this work, the E. coli with Z-domain was proved to be feasible for the medical diagnosis based on sandwich-type immunoassay.

  1. Sensitivity-Enhancement of FRET Immunoassays by Multiple-Antibody Conjugation on Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annio, Giacomo; Jennings, Travis; Tagit, Oya; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2018-05-23

    Quantum dots (QDs) are not only advantageous for color-tuning, improved brightness, and high stability, but their nanoparticle surfaces also allow for the attachment of many biomolecules. Because IgG antibodies (ABs) are in the same size range of biocompatible QDs and the AB orientation after conjugation to the QD is often random, it is difficult to predict if few or many ABs per QD will lead to an efficient AB-QD conjugate. This is particularly true for homogeneous Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sandwich immunoassays, for which the ABs on the QD must bind a biomarker that needs to bind a second AB-FRET-conjugate. Here, we investigate the performance of Tb-to-QD FRET immunoassays against total prostate specific antigen (TPSA) by changing the number of ABs per QD while leaving all the other assay components unchanged. We first characterize the AB-QD conjugation by various spectroscopic, microscopic, and chromatographic techniques and then quantify the TPSA immunoassay performance regarding sensitivity, limit of detection, and dynamic range. Our results show that an increasing conjugation ratio leads to significantly enhanced FRET immunoassays. These findings will be highly important for developing QD-based immunoassays in which the concentrations of both ABs and QDs can significantly influence the assay performance.

  2. A Learning Algorithm based on High School Teaching Wisdom

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Ninan Sajeeth

    2010-01-01

    A learning algorithm based on primary school teaching and learning is presented. The methodology is to continuously evaluate a student and to give them training on the examples for which they repeatedly fail, until, they can correctly answer all types of questions. This incremental learning procedure produces better learning curves by demanding the student to optimally dedicate their learning time on the failed examples. When used in machine learning, the algorithm is found to train a machine...

  3. Autodriver algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bourmistrova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The autodriver algorithm is an intelligent method to eliminate the need of steering by a driver on a well-defined road. The proposed method performs best on a four-wheel steering (4WS vehicle, though it is also applicable to two-wheel-steering (TWS vehicles. The algorithm is based on coinciding the actual vehicle center of rotation and road center of curvature, by adjusting the kinematic center of rotation. The road center of curvature is assumed prior information for a given road, while the dynamic center of rotation is the output of dynamic equations of motion of the vehicle using steering angle and velocity measurements as inputs. We use kinematic condition of steering to set the steering angles in such a way that the kinematic center of rotation of the vehicle sits at a desired point. At low speeds the ideal and actual paths of the vehicle are very close. With increase of forward speed the road and tire characteristics, along with the motion dynamics of the vehicle cause the vehicle to turn about time-varying points. By adjusting the steering angles, our algorithm controls the dynamic turning center of the vehicle so that it coincides with the road curvature center, hence keeping the vehicle on a given road autonomously. The position and orientation errors are used as feedback signals in a closed loop control to adjust the steering angles. The application of the presented autodriver algorithm demonstrates reliable performance under different driving conditions.

  4. When Gravity Fails: Local Search Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeremy; Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Local search algorithms for combinatorial search problems frequently encounter a sequence of states in which it is impossible to improve the value of the objective function; moves through these regions, called {\\em plateau moves), dominate the time spent in local search. We analyze and characterize {\\em plateaus) for three different classes of randomly generated Boolean Satisfiability problems. We identify several interesting features of plateaus that impact the performance of local search algorithms. We show that local minima tend to be small but occasionally may be very large. We also show that local minima can be escaped without unsatisfying a large number of clauses, but that systematically searching for an escape route may be computationally expensive if the local minimum is large. We show that plateaus with exits, called benches, tend to be much larger than minima, and that some benches have very few exit states which local search can use to escape. We show that the solutions (i.e. global minima) of randomly generated problem instances form clusters, which behave similarly to local minima. We revisit several enhancements of local search algorithms and explain their performance in light of our results. Finally we discuss strategies for creating the next generation of local search algorithms.

  5. Radiological evaluation of failed total hip replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raspa, V.; Aldrovandi, S.; Pompei, G.

    1988-01-01

    The retrospective study of 50 operated cases of cemented total hip replacement and a review of the literature enabled the authors to define the radiological features of the above-mentioned condition. These features include one or more of the following signs: calcar reabsorption, lacunar erosions, modified relatioships between the prosthesis components, sepsis and loosening, periarticular calcifications dislocation and fracture of prosthesis components. Careful evaluation of these radiological features is extremely important for both an early diagnosis of failed total hip replacement and the choice of an adequate surgical treatment

  6. Why Do Large Infrastructure Projects Often Fail?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik

    The paper reports, in a systematic manner, the views of a group of experienced practitioners on why large infrastructure projects often fail. The views, centering on the role played by the Owner (the Client or Buyer), can be summarized as follows:The owner should be aware of the need of clarity...... when it comes to own priorities, requirements, decision making authority, and risk allocation, and such clarity together with measures intended to secure a cooperative spirit, including a balanced sharing of risk and conflict resolution schemes that secure a quick resolution of conflicts, are central...... elements in securing successful projects....

  7. The Failed Image and the Possessed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This article asks if the recurrent queries regarding the value of images in visual anthropology could find new answers by exploring responses to visual media in neo-orthodox Islam. It proposes that the visual display of the photographic image shares a curious resemblance to the bodies of people...... possessed by invisible spirits called jinn. The image as a failed example or model of reality works like the possessed body as an amplifier of invisibility pointing towards that which cannot be seen, depicted visually, or represented in writing. This suggests a negative epistemology in which images obtain...

  8. Distribution of Phytophthora spp. in Field Soils Determined by Immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S A; Madden, L V; Schmitthenner, A F

    1997-01-01

    ABSTRACT Populations of Phytophthora spp. were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in field soils used for pepper and soybean production in Ohio. Soybean fields were sampled extensively (64 fields, n = 6 samples per field over 2 years) and intensively (4 fields, n = 64 samples per field in 1 year) to assess heterogeneity of P. sojae populations. Four pepper fields (n = 64), three of which had a history of Phytophthora blight (caused by P. capsici), also were sampled intensively during a 6-month period. Mean (m), variance (v), and measures of aggregation (e.g., variance-to-mean ratio [v/m]) of immunoassay values, translated to Phytophthora antigen units (PAU), were related to the disease history in each of the pepper and soybean fields. Mean PAU values for fields in which Phytophthora root rot (soybean) or blight (pepper) had been moderate to severe were higher than in fields in which disease incidence had been low or not observed. A detection threshold value of 11.3 PAU was calculated with values for 64 samples from one pepper field, all of which tested negative for Phytophthora by bioassay and ELISA. Seven of the eight intensively sampled fields contained at least some detectable Phytophthora propagules, with the percentage of positive samples ranging from 1.6 to 73.4. Mean PAU values ranged from 1 to 84 (extensive soybean field sampling), 6 to 24 (intensive soybean field sampling), and 4 to 30 (intensive pepper field sampling); however, variances ranged from 0 to 7,774 (extensive sampling), 30 to 848 (intensive soybean field sampling), and 5 to 2,401 (intensive pepper field sampling). Heterogeneity of PAU was high in most individual soybean and pepper fields, with values of v/m greater than 1, and log(v) increasing with log(m), with a slope of about 2.0. Spatial autocorrelation coefficients were not significant, indicating there was no relationship of PAU values in neighboring sampling units (i.e., field locations) of the intensively sampled

  9. Negative interference by rheumatoid factor in alpha-fetoprotein chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Bi, Xiaohui; Xu, Lei; Li, Yirong

    2017-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid factor causes positive interference in multiple immunoassays. Recently, negative interference has also been found in immunoassays in the presence of rheumatoid factor. The chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay is widely used to determine serum alpha-fetoprotein. However, it is not clear whether the presence of rheumatoid factor in the serum causes interference in the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein. Methods Serum alpha-fetoprotein was determined using the ARCHITECT alpha-fetoprotein assay. The estimation of alpha-fetoprotein recovery was carried out in samples prepared by diluting high-concentration alpha-fetoprotein serum with rheumatoid factor-positive or rheumatoid factor-negative serum. Paramagnetic microparticles coated with hepatitis B surface antigen-anti-HBs complexes were used to remove rheumatoid factor from the serum. Results The average recovery of alpha-fetoprotein was 88.4% and 93.8% in the rheumatoid factor-positive and rheumatoid factor-negative serum samples, respectively. The recovery of alpha-fetoprotein was significantly lower in the rheumatoid factor-positive serum samples than in the rheumatoid factor-negative serum samples. In two of five rheumatoid factor-positive samples, a large difference was found (9.8%) between the average alpha-fetoprotein recoveries in the serially diluted and initial recoveries. Fourteen rheumatoid factor-positive serum samples were pretreated with hepatitis B surface antigen-anti-HBs complex-coated paramagnetic microparticles. The alpha-fetoprotein concentrations measured in the pretreated samples increased significantly. Conclusions It was concluded that the alpha-fetoprotein chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay is susceptible to interference by rheumatoid factor, leading to significantly lower results. Eliminating the incidence of negative interference from rheumatoid factor should be an important goal for immunoassay providers. In the meantime

  10. Alkaline phosphatase-fused repebody as a new format of immuno-reagent for an immunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyo-Deok; Lee, Joong-jae [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yu Jung [Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hantschel, Oliver [School of Life Sciences, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Lee, Seung-Goo [Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Sung, E-mail: hskim76@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Enzyme-linked immunoassays based on an antibody-antigen interaction are widely used in biological and medical sciences. However, the conjugation of an enzyme to antibodies needs an additional chemical process, usually resulting in randomly cross-linked molecules and a loss of the binding affinity and enzyme activity. Herein, we present the development of an alkaline phosphatase-fused repebody as a new format of immuno-reagent for immunoassays. A repebody specifically binding to human TNF-α (hTNF-α) was selected through a phage display, and its binding affinity was increased up to 49 nM using a modular engineering approach. A monomeric alkaline phosphatase (mAP), which was previously isolated from a metagenome library, was genetically fused to the repebody as a signal generator, and the resulting repebody-mAP fusion protein was used for direct and sandwich immunoassays of hTNF-α. We demonstrate the utility and potential of the repebody-mAP fusion protein as an immuno-reagent by showing the sensitivity of 216 pg mL{sup −1} for hTNF-α in a sandwich immunoassay. Furthermore, this repebody-mAP fusion protein enabled the detection of hTNF-α spiked in a serum-supplemented medium with high accuracy and reproducibility. It is thus expected that a mAP-fused repebody can be broadly used as an immuno-reagent in immunoassays. - Highlights: • A human TNF-α (hTNF-α)-specific repebody was selected using a phage display. • A monomeric alkaline phosphatase (mAP) was genetically fused to the repebody. • mAP-fused repebody enabled detection of hTNF-α with high sensitivity and accuracy. • mAP-fused repebody can be widely used as a new immuno-reagent in immunoassays.

  11. BIOTIN INTERFERENCE WITH ROUTINE CLINICAL IMMUNOASSAYS: UNDERSTAND THE CAUSES AND MITIGATE THE RISKS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinghe, Shanika; Meah, Farah; Singh, Vinita; Basit, Arshi; Emanuele, Nicholas; Emanuele, Mary Ann; Mazhari, Alaleh; Holmes, Earle W

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this report are to review the mechanisms of biotin interference with streptavidin/biotin-based immunoassays, identify automated immunoassay systems vulnerable to biotin interference, describe how to estimate and minimize the risk of biotin interference in vulnerable assays, and review the literature pertaining to biotin interference in endocrine function tests. The data in the manufacturer's "Instructions for Use" for each of the methods utilized by seven immunoassay system were evaluated. We also conducted a systematic search of PubMed/MEDLINE for articles containing terms associated with biotin interference. Available original reports and case series were reviewed. Abstracts from recent scientific meetings were also identified and reviewed. The recent, marked, increase in the use of over-the-counter, high-dose biotin supplements has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of reports of analytical interference by exogenous biotin in the immunoassays used to evaluate endocrine function. Since immunoassay methods of similar design are also used for the diagnosis and management of anemia, malignancies, autoimmune and infectious diseases, cardiac damage, etc., biotin-related analytical interference is a problem that touches every area of internal medicine. It is important for healthcare personnel to become more aware of immunoassay methods that are vulnerable to biotin interference and to consider biotin supplements as potential sources of falsely increased or decreased test results, especially in cases where a lab result does not correlate with the clinical scenario. FDA = U.S. Food & Drug Administration FT3 = free tri-iodothyronine FT4 = free thyroxine IFUs = instructions for use LH = luteinizing hormone PTH = parathyroid hormone SA/B = streptavidin/biotin TFT = thyroid function test TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone.

  12. Activity assays and immunoassays for plasma Renin and prorenin: information provided and precautions necessary for accurate measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Duncan J; Nussberger, Juerg; Stowasser, Michael

    2009-01-01

    into focus the differences in information provided by activity assays and immunoassays for renin and prorenin measurement and has drawn attention to the need for precautions to ensure their accurate measurement. CONTENT: Renin activity assays and immunoassays provide related but different information...... provided by these assays and of the precautions necessary to ensure their accuracy....

  13. Patients with a failed renal transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcén, R; Teruel Briones, J L

    2011-03-01

    Despite the advances in the care of recipients and in immunosuppression, long-term graft survival has experienced little improvement in the last 10 years. An important number of recipients present progressive loss of graft function and have to be readmitted on dialysis therapy. Before starting dialysis, these patients are re-exposed to the complications of chronic renal failure but there are no specific guidelines for their treatment. The Kidney Disease Quality Initiative Advisory Board clinical practice guidelines given for the non-transplant chronic kidney disease patients have been recommended for ameliorating their clinical situation and the rate of progression of graft failure. The time when dialysis has to be restarted and the type of dialysis procedure, hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, are under discusion. But there is no evidence about the superiority of either type of dialysis procedure. Systematic graft nephrectomy has been considered to improve the inflammatory status of the patients with a failed graft which could contribute to a worse control of some complications such as anemia and to the increased rates of cardiovascular mortality. As in the patients with primary end-stage renal disease, retransplantation is the best treatment for a patient with a failed graft. Due to the shortage of organs for transplantation the number of patients who are retransplanted has remained stable. Recurrent diseases such as glomerulonephritis, lyphoproliferative diseases, BK virus nephopathy and previous non-adherence to the treatment do not necessarily preclude retransplantation.

  14. Algorithmic Self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markham, Annette

    This paper takes an actor network theory approach to explore some of the ways that algorithms co-construct identity and relational meaning in contemporary use of social media. Based on intensive interviews with participants as well as activity logging and data tracking, the author presents a richly...... layered set of accounts to help build our understanding of how individuals relate to their devices, search systems, and social network sites. This work extends critical analyses of the power of algorithms in implicating the social self by offering narrative accounts from multiple perspectives. It also...... contributes an innovative method for blending actor network theory with symbolic interaction to grapple with the complexity of everyday sensemaking practices within networked global information flows....

  15. Study on the determination of human placental lactogen (HPL) using an enzyme-immunoassay. Comparison with a commercial radio-immunoassay in the course of normal pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.

    1982-01-01

    A novel enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) for determining human placental lactogen (HPL) was studied for its practicability and quality. The precision of the system in series was tested by using a serum taken each in the 19th, 29th and 40th pregnancy week. A normal range graph between the 10th and the 40th pregnancy week (10 sera per pregnancy week) was established from 310 sera of normal-course pregnancies. The graph practically agreed with the known RIA-established graphs. When comparing with a radio-immunoassay for HPL of routine application and known quality criteria, r=0.93 indicated a close correlation of the values found. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Electrochemical immunoassay using magnetic beads for the determination of zearalenone in baby food: an anticipated analytical tool for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás, Miriam; López, Miguel Angel; Escarpa, Alberto

    2009-10-27

    In this work, electrochemical immunoassay involving magnetic beads to determine zearalenone in selected food samples has been developed. The immunoassay scheme has been based on a direct competitive immunoassay method in which antibody-coated magnetic beads were employed as the immobilisation support and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used as enzymatic label. Amperometric detection has been achieved through the addition of hydrogen peroxide substrate and hydroquinone as mediator. Analytical performance of the electrochemical immunoassay has been evaluated by analysis of maize certified reference material (CRM) and selected baby food samples. A detection limit (LOD) of 0.011 microg L(-1) and EC(50) 0.079 microg L(-1) were obtained allowing the assessment of the detection of zearalenone mycotoxin. In addition, an excellent accuracy with a high recovery yield ranging between 95 and 108% has been obtained. The analytical features have shown the proposed electrochemical immunoassay to be a very powerful and timely screening tool for the food safety scene.

  17. Detection method of a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke; Utamura, Motoaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To divide a tank arrangement into a heating tank for the exclusive use of heating and a mixing tank for the exclusive use of mixing to thereby minimize the purifying amount of reactor water pumped from the interior of reactor and to considerably minimize the capacity of a purifier. Structure: In a detection method of a failed fuel comprising stopping a flow of coolant within fuel assemblies arranged in the coolant in a reactor container, sampling said coolant within the fuel assemblies, and detecting a radioactivity level of sampling liquid, the improvement of the method comprising the steps of heating a part of said coolant removed from the interior of said reactor container, mixing said heated coolant into the remainder of said removed coolant, pouring said mixed liquid into said fuel assemblies, and after a lapse of given time, sampling the liquid poured into said fuel assemblies. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. Method and device for detecting failed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shozo; Suzumura, Takeshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To shorten the time required for inspecting a failed fuel by providing a first outlet for exhausting cleaning liquid to a sampling pipe and a second outlet for exhausting sampled coolant, thereby safely setting a collecting means to the first outlet. Constitution: A sampling pipe is inserted into a fuel assembly loaded within a reactor core, and coolant flow is thus prevented from passing through the fuel assembly interior. Then, with the coolant flow stopped, it is allowed to stand for a predetermined time. Subsequently, cleaning liquid is supplied into the sampling tube and the interior of the sampling pipe is cleaned. Thereafter, the sampling liquid that was in the sampling pipe is exhausted from the first outlet of the sampling pipe. Then, the coolant in the fuel assembly is supplied from the second outlet of the sampling pipe to a collecting means. (Aizawa, K.)

  19. Failed pelvic pouch substituted by continent ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasmuth, H H; Tranø, G; Wibe, A; Endreseth, B H; Rydning, A; Myrvold, H E

    2010-07-01

    The long-term failure rate of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is 10-15%. When salvage surgery is unsuccessful, most surgeons prefer pouch excision with conventional ileostomy, thus sacrificing 40-50 cm of ileum. Conversion of a pelvic pouch to a continent ileostomy (CI, Kock pouch) is an alternative that preserves both the ileal surface and pouch properties. The aim of the study was to evaluate clinical outcome after the construction of a CI following a failed IPAA. During 1984-2007, 317 patients were operated with IPAA at St Olavs Hospital and evaluated for failure, treatment and outcome. Seven patients with IPAA failure had CI. Four patients with IPAA failure referred from other hospitals underwent conversion to CI and are included in the final analysis. Seven patients had a CI constructed from the transposing pelvic pouch and four had the pelvic pouch removed and a new continent pouch constructed from the distal ileum. Median follow up after conversion to CI was 7 years (0-17 years). Two CI had to be removed due to fistulae. One patient needed a revision of the nipple valve due to pouch loosening. At the end of follow-up, 8 of the 11 patients were fully continent. One patient with Crohn's disease had minor leakage. In patients with pelvic pouch failure, the possibility of conversion to CI should be presented to the patient as an alternative to pouch excision and permanent ileostomy. The advantage is the continence and possibly a better body image. Construction of a CI on a new ileal segment may be considered, but the consequences of additional small bowel loss and risk of malnutrition if the Kock pouch fails should be appraised.

  20. Abnormal mitochondrial respiration in failed human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, V G; Todor, A V; Silverman, N; Goldstein, S; Sabbah, H N

    2000-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is associated with morphologic abnormalities of cardiac mitochondria including hyperplasia, reduced organelle size and compromised structural integrity. In this study, we examined whether functional abnormalities of mitochondrial respiration are also present in myocardium of patients with advanced HF. Mitochondrial respiration was examined using a Clark electrode in an oxygraph cell containing saponin-skinned muscle bundles obtained from myocardium of failed explanted human hearts due to ischemic (ICM, n=9) or idiopathic dilated (IDC, n=9) cardiomyopathy. Myocardial specimens from five normal donor hearts served as controls (CON). Basal respiratory rate, respiratory rate after addition of the substrates glutamate and malate (V(SUB)), state 3 respiration (after addition of ADP, V(ADP)) and respiration after the addition of atractyloside (V(AT)) were measured in scar-free muscle bundles obtained from the subendocardial (ENDO) and subepicardial (EPI) thirds of the left ventricular (LV) free wall, interventricular septum and right ventricular (RV) free wall. There were no differences in basal and substrate-supported respiration between CON and HF regardless of etiology. V(ADP)was significantly depressed both in ICM and IDC compared to CON in all the regions studied. The respiratory control ratio, V(ADP)/V(AT), was also significantly decreased in HF compared to CON. In both ICM and IDC, V(ADP)was significantly lower in ENDO compared to EPI. The results indicate that mitochondrial respiration is abnormal in the failing human heart. The findings support the concept of low myocardial energy production in HF via oxidative phosphorylation, an abnormality with a potentially impact on global cardiac performance. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Etiologic analysis of 100 anatomically failed dacryocystorhinostomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Tarjani Vivek; Mohammed, Faraz Ali; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Naik, Milind N

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the etiological factors contributing to the failure of a dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). Patients and methods Retrospective review was performed in 100 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with anatomically failed DCR at presentation to a tertiary care hospital over a 5-year period from 2010 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed for demographic data, type of past surgery, preoperative endoscopic findings, previous use of adjuvants such as intubation and mitomycin C, and intraoperative notes during the re-revision. The potential etiological factors for failure were noted. Results Of the 100 patients with failed DCRs, the primary surgery was an external DCR in 73 and endoscopic DCR in 27 patients. Six patients in each group had multiple revisions. The mean ages at presentation in the external and endoscopic groups were 39.41 years and 37.19 years, respectively. All patients presented with epiphora. The most common causes of failure were inadequate osteotomy (69.8% in the external group and 85.1% in the endoscopic group, P=0.19) followed by inadequate or inappropriate sac marsupialization (60.2% in the external group and 77.7% in the endoscopic group, P=0.16) and cicatricial closure of the ostium (50.6% in the external group and 55.5% in the endoscopic group, P=0.83). The least common causes such as ostium granulomas and paradoxical middle turbinate (1.37%, n=1) were noted in the external group only. Conclusion Inadequate osteotomy, incomplete sac marsupialization, and cicatricial closure of the ostium were the most common causes of failure and did not significantly differ in the external and endoscopic groups. Meticulous evaluation to identify causative factors for failure and addressing them are crucial for subsequent successful outcomes. PMID:27555748

  2. Comparison of enzyme immunoassays for the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, K.; Kelly, L.; Gall, D.; Balsevicius, S.; Bosse, J.; Kelly, W.; Nicoletti, P.

    1998-01-01

    The indirect enzyme immunoassay for measurement of bovine antibody to Brucella abortus was tested on 15,716 Canadian sera to assess the specificity. These sera were also tested by the buffered plate antigen test. Two ELISA formats were used for assessment of data: the targeting procedure using a positive control serum allowed to develop to an optical density of 1.0 and the use of a positive control serum to determine relative positivity at a set time. Two different cut-off values were also assessed for each assay. A total of 763 sera gave reactions above established cut-off values in the ELISA while 216 were positive in the buffered plate antigen test (BPAT). A modification of the indirect ELISA employed divalent cation chelating agents (EDTA/EGTA) incorporated into the serum incubation stage to eliminate some non-specific reactions. This method was applied only to the 763 indirect ELISA reactor sera and it eliminated all but 93 or 37, depending on the cut-off selected, of the reactions. Sensitivity was assessed by testing 424 sera from Brucella abortus culture positive cattle. The indirect ELISA classified all 424 sera as positive by either method of data handling and with or without addition of EDTA/EGTA for a specificity estimate of 100%. In the BPAT, 412 sera gave a positive agglutination reaction. Ten percent of the 15,716 sera were randomly selected and tested by two different competitive ELISAs and by the complement fixation test (CFT). One competitive ELISA used Brucella abortus O-polysaccharide as the antigen and an enzyme conjugated monoclonal antibody to the O-polysaccharide for competition and detection. Of the sera tested, 34 gave false positive reactions. On a retest, the false positive reactions were reduced to 2. The second competitive ELISA used lipopolysaccharide as the antigen, a different monoclonal antibody but also specific for the O-polysaccharide for competition and commercially available goat anti-mouse IgG enzyme conjugate for detection

  3. Parallel algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Casanova, Henri; Robert, Yves

    2008-01-01

    ""…The authors of the present book, who have extensive credentials in both research and instruction in the area of parallelism, present a sound, principled treatment of parallel algorithms. … This book is very well written and extremely well designed from an instructional point of view. … The authors have created an instructive and fascinating text. The book will serve researchers as well as instructors who need a solid, readable text for a course on parallelism in computing. Indeed, for anyone who wants an understandable text from which to acquire a current, rigorous, and broad vi

  4. Algorithm 865

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavson, Fred G.; Reid, John K.; Wasniewski, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    We present subroutines for the Cholesky factorization of a positive-definite symmetric matrix and for solving corresponding sets of linear equations. They exploit cache memory by using the block hybrid format proposed by the authors in a companion article. The matrix is packed into n(n + 1)/2 real...... variables, and the speed is usually better than that of the LAPACK algorithm that uses full storage (n2 variables). Included are subroutines for rearranging a matrix whose upper or lower-triangular part is packed by columns to this format and for the inverse rearrangement. Also included is a kernel...

  5. Closed External Fixation for Failing or Failed Femoral Shaft Plating in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbar, Adil; Witwit, Ibrahim; Al-Algawy, Alaa A Hussein

    2017-08-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are one of the common injuries that is treated by open reduction, with internal fixation by plate and screws or intramedullary nailing, which can achieve a high union rate. To evaluate the outcome of using closed external fixation to augment a failing plate; with signs of screw loosening and increasing bone/plate gap; a failed plate; broken plate; screws completely out of bone with redisplacement of fracture. A retrospective study on 18 patients, aged between 17-42 years, who presented between 6-18 weeks after initial surgical fixation, with pain, difficulty in limb function, deformity and abnormal movement at fracture site, was done. X-Rays showed plating failure with acceptable amount of callus, which unfortunately had refractured. Cases associated with infection and no radiological evidence of callus formation were excluded from this study. Closed reduction was done by manipulation, then fracture fixation by AO external fixator. The patients were encouraged for full weight bearing as early as possible with dynamization later on. Of the 18 patients who underwent external fixation after close reduction, 15 cases showed bone healing in a period between 11-18 weeks (mean of 14.27 weeks) with good alignment (Radiologically). Removal of external fixator was done followed by physical therapy thereafter. Closed external fixation for treatment of failing or failed femoral plating, achieves good success rate and has less complications, is a short time procedure, especially in a hospital with limited resources.

  6. Radio-immunoassays for glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, C; Holst, J J

    1987-01-01

    Gene-sequencing studies have shown that the glucagon precursor contains two additional glucagon-like sequences, the so-called glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We developed radio-immunoassays against synthetic peptides corresponding to these sequences. Antisera were raised in rabb...

  7. Direct biosensor immunoassays for the detection of nonmilk proteins in milk powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, W.; Olieman, K.; Cazemier, G.; Verheijen, R.

    2001-01-01

    The low prices of some nonmilk proteins make them attractive as potential adulterants in dairy products. An optical biosensor (BIACORE 3000) was used to develop a direct and combined biosensor immunoassay (BIA) for the simultaneous detection of soy, pea, and soluble wheat proteins in milk powders.

  8. Single biosensor immunoassay for the detection of five aminoglycosides in reconstituted skimmed milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, W.; Cazemier, G.; Koets, M.; Amerongen, van A.

    2003-01-01

    The application of an optical biosensor (Biacore 3000), with four flow channels (Fcs), in combination with a mixture of four specific antibodies resulted in a competitive inhibition biosensor immunoassay (BIA) for the simultaneous detection of the five relevant aminoglycosides in reconstituted

  9. Multiplex immunoassays for quantification of cytokines, growth factors, and other proteins in stem cell communication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valeková, Ivona; Kupcová Skalníková, Helena; Jarkovská, Karla; Motlík, Jan; Kovářová, Hana

    -, č. 1212 (2015), s. 39-63 ISSN 1940 -6029 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : multiplex immunoassays * antibody microarray * luminex xMAP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Serum sample containing endogenous antibodies interfering with multiple hormone immunoassays. Laboratory strategies to detect interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena García-González

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Endogenous antibodies (EA may interfere with immunoassays, causing erroneous results for hormone analyses. As (in most cases this interference arises from the assay format and most immunoassays, even from different manufacturers, are constructed in a similar way, it is possible for a single type of EA to interfere with different immunoassays. Here we describe the case of a patient whose serum sample contains EA that interfere several hormones tests. We also discuss the strategies deployed to detect interference. Subjects and methods: Over a period of four years, a 30-year-old man was subjected to a plethora of laboratory and imaging diagnostic procedures as a consequence of elevated hormone results, mainly of pituitary origin, which did not correlate with the overall clinical picture. Results: Once analytical interference was suspected, the best laboratory approaches to investigate it were sample reanalysis on an alternative platform and sample incubation with antibody blocking tubes. Construction of an in-house ‘nonsense’ sandwich assay was also a valuable strategy to confirm interference. In contrast, serial sample dilutions were of no value in our case, while polyethylene glycol (PEG precipitation gave inconclusive results, probably due to the use of inappropriate PEG concentrations for several of the tests assayed. Conclusions: Clinicians and laboratorians must be aware of the drawbacks of immunometric assays, and alert to the possibility of EA interference when results do not fit the clinical pattern. Keywords: Endogenous antibodies, Immunoassay, Interference, Pituitary hormones, Case report

  11. An enzyme immunoassay to quantify neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, W.J.A. van; Rosengren, L.E.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Neurofilament light chain is a component of the axonal cytoskeleton. The concentration of the neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid may reflect axonal damage or the extent of white matter damage. In this study we describe a sensitive immunoassay for the detection of neurofilament light

  12. Automation on an Open-Access Platform of Alzheimer's Disease Biomarker Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Benjamin; Dedeene, Lieselot; Stoops, Erik; Demeyer, Leentje; Francois, Cindy; Lefever, Stefanie; De Schaepdryver, Maxim; Brix, Britta; Vandenberghe, Rik; Tournoy, Jos; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Poesen, Koen

    2018-04-01

    The lack of (inter-)laboratory standardization has hampered the application of universal cutoff values for Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and their transfer to general clinical practice. The automation of the AD biomarker immunoassays is suggested to generate more robust results than using manual testing. Open-access platforms will facilitate the integration of automation for novel biomarkers, allowing the introduction of the protein profiling concept. A feasibility study was performed on an automated open-access platform of the commercial immunoassays for the 42-amino-acid isoform of amyloid-β (Aβ 1-42 ), Aβ 1-40 , and total tau in CSF. Automated Aβ 1-42 , Aβ 1-40 , and tau immunoassays were performed within predefined acceptance criteria for bias and imprecision. Similar accuracy was obtained for ready-to-use calibrators as for reconstituted lyophilized kit calibrators. When compared with the addition of a standard curve in each test run, the use of a master calibrator curve, determined before and applied to each batch analysis as the standard curve, yielded an acceptable overall bias of -2.6% and -0.9% for Aβ 1-42 and Aβ 1-40 , respectively, with an imprecision profile of 6.2% and 8.4%, respectively. Our findings show that transfer of commercial manual immunoassays to fully automated open-access platforms is feasible, as it performs according to universal acceptance criteria.

  13. IMMUNOASSAY METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The journal article describes the use of a prototype immunoassay method for the determination of pentacholorphenol (PCP) in soil and sediment. PCP was used as a pesticide and wood preservative and is not currently available to the general public. The paper stresses the importan...

  14. Monoclonal antibody-based broad-specificity immunoassay for monitoring organophosphorus pesticides in environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extensive use of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) in agriculture and domestic settings can result in widespread water contamination. The development of easy-to-use and rapid-screening immunoassay methods in a class-selective manner is a topic of considerable environmental interest. In this wo...

  15. Heparin interferes with the radioenzymatic and homogeneous enzyme immunoassays for aminoglycosides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogstad, D.J.; Granich, G.G.; Murray, P.R.; Pfaller, M.A.; Valdes, R.

    1981-01-01

    Heparin interferes with measurement of aminoglycosides in serum by biological, radioenzymatic, and homogeneous enzyme immunoassay techniques, but not with radioimmunoassay. At concentrations greater than or equal to 10 5 and greater than or equal to 3 X 10 6 USP units/L, respectively, it interferes with the radioenzymatic assay by inhibiting the gentamicin 3-acetyltransferase and kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase enzymes used in the assay. It interferes with the homogeneous enzyme immunoassays for gentamicin and tobramycin (at concentrations greater than or equal to 10 5 and greater than or equal to10 4 USP units/L, respectively), but not with the commercially available homogeneous enzyme immunoassays for other drugs. Heparin interference with the homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for aminoglycosides requires both the heparin polyanion and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase bound to a cationic aminoglycoside. This interference can be reproduced with dextran sulfate (but not dextran), and does not occur with free enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) alone. Heparin interference with these two assays and at concentrations that may be present in intravenous infusions or in seriously underfilled blood-collection tubes is described

  16. An ultrasensitive chemiluminescence immunoassay of chloramphenicol based on gold nanoparticles and magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Haiyang; Yu, Xuezhi; Zhu, Jinghui; Wang, Xia; Wang, Zhanhui; Niu, Lanlan; Wu, Xiaoping; Shen, Jianzhong

    2013-05-01

    A competitive, direct, chemiluminescent immunoassay based on a magnetic beads (MBs) separation and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) labelling technique to detect chloramphenicol (CAP) has been developed. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labelled anti-CAP monoclonal antibody conjugated with AuNPs and antigen-immobilized MBs were prepared. After optimization parameters of immunocomplex MBs, the IC50 values of chemiluminescence magnetic nanoparticles immunoassay (CL-MBs-nano-immunoassay) were 0.017 µg L(-1) for extract method I and 0.17 µg L(-1) for extract method II. The immunoassay with two extract methods was applied to detect CAP in milk. Comparison of these two extract methods showed that extract method I was advantageous in better sensitivity, in which the sensitivity was 10 times compared to that of extract method II, while extract method II was superior in simple operation, suitable for high throughout screen. The recoveries were 86.7-98.0% (extract method I) and 80.0-103.0% (extract method II), and the coefficients of variation (CVs) were all recovery with both extract methods and high correlation with traditional ELISA kit in milk system confirmed that the immunomagnetic assay based on AuNPs exhibited promising potential in rapid field screening for trace CAP analysis. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. An Inexpensive, Fast and Sensitive Quantitative Lateral Flow Magneto-Immunoassay for Total Prostate Specific Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Barnett

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe the detection characteristics of a device the Resonant Coil Magnetometer (RCM to quantify paramagnetic particles (PMPs in immunochromatographic (lateral flow assays. Lateral flow assays were developed using PMPs for the measurement of total prostate specific antigen (PSA in serum samples. A detection limit of 0.8 ng/mL was achieved for total PSA using the RCM and is at clinically significant concentrations. Comparison of data obtained in a pilot study from the analysis of serum samples with commercially available immunoassays shows good agreement. The development of a quantitative magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format for total PSA suggests the potential of the RCM to operate with many immunoassay formats. The RCM has the potential to be modified to quantify multiple analytes in this format. This research shows promise for the development of an inexpensive device capable of quantifying multiple analytes at the point-of-care using a magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format.

  18. Immunoassay: Principles, development and potential applications in the applied plant sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, P J

    1986-02-01

    The article briefly discusses the general principles of, and the methods involved in, immunoassay, and their development. Emplasis is placed on radioimmunoassay (RIA) and to a lesser extent, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The practical applications, with special reference to the citrus and subtropical fruit industries are discussed.

  19. Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in turkey samples: evaluation of two automated enzyme immunoassays and conventional microbiological techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borck, Birgitte; Stryhn, H.; Ersboll, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and specificity of two automated enzyme immunoassays (EIA), EiaFoss and Minividas, and a conventional microbiological culture technique for detecting thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in turkey samples. Methods and Results: A total of 286 samples (faecal, meat...

  20. Ervaringen met een solid phase enzyme immunoassay voor het aantonen van gonorroe bij promiscue vrouwen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulsen; J.van*; Michel; M.F.*; Strik; R.van*; Joost; T.H.van*; Stolz; E.*; Eijk; R.V.W.van

    1985-01-01

    De Gonozyme test (Abbott Laboratories), een nieuwe enzyme immunoassay (EIA) voor het aantonen van Neisseria gonorrhoeae werd geevalueerd in een grote groep promiscue vrouwen. Als de EIA werd uitgevoerd met materiaal afkomstig van de cervix, bedroeg de prevalentie van gonorroe 8,2%. Vergeleken

  1. Sensitive and rapid immunoassay for parathyroid hormone using magnetic particle labels and magnetic actuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittmer, W.U.; Kievit, de P.; Prins, M.W.J.; Vissers, J.L.M.; Mersch, M.E.C.; Martens, M.F.W.C.

    2008-01-01

    A rapid method for the sensitive detection of proteins using actuated magnetic particle labels, which are measured with a giant magneto-resistive (GMR) biosensor, is described. The technique involves a 1-step sandwich immunoassay with no fluid replacement steps. The various assay binding reactions

  2. A review of promising new immunoassay technology for monitoring forest herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles K. McMahon

    1993-01-01

    Rising costs of classical instrumental methods of chemical analysis coupled with an increasing need for environmental monitoring has lead to the development of highly sensitive, low-cost immunochemical methods of analysis for the detection of environmental contaminants. These methods known simply as immunoassays are chemical assays which use antibodies as reagents. A...

  3. Optimized Lateral Flow Immunoassay Reader for the Detection of Infectious Diseases in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilavaki, Evdokia; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2017-11-20

    Detection and control of infectious diseases is a major problem, especially in developing countries. Lateral flow immunoassays can be used with great success for the detection of infectious diseases. However, for the quantification of their results an electronic reader is required. This paper presents an optimized handheld electronic reader for developing countries. It features a potentially low-cost, low-power, battery-operated device with no added optical accessories. The operation of this proof of concept device is based on measuring the reflected light from the lateral flow immunoassay and translating it into the concentration of the specific analyte of interest. Characterization of the surface of the lateral flow immunoassay has been performed in order to accurately model its response to the incident light. Ray trace simulations have been performed to optimize the system and achieve maximum sensitivity by placing all the components in optimum positions. A microcontroller enables all the signal processing to be performed on the device and a Bluetooth module allows transmission of the results wirelessly to a mobile phone app. Its performance has been validated using lateral flow immunoassays with influenza A nucleoprotein in the concentration range of 0.5 ng/mL to 200 ng/mL.

  4. Optimized Lateral Flow Immunoassay Reader for the Detection of Infectious Diseases in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evdokia Pilavaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection and control of infectious diseases is a major problem, especially in developing countries. Lateral flow immunoassays can be used with great success for the detection of infectious diseases. However, for the quantification of their results an electronic reader is required. This paper presents an optimized handheld electronic reader for developing countries. It features a potentially low-cost, low-power, battery-operated device with no added optical accessories. The operation of this proof of concept device is based on measuring the reflected light from the lateral flow immunoassay and translating it into the concentration of the specific analyte of interest. Characterization of the surface of the lateral flow immunoassay has been performed in order to accurately model its response to the incident light. Ray trace simulations have been performed to optimize the system and achieve maximum sensitivity by placing all the components in optimum positions. A microcontroller enables all the signal processing to be performed on the device and a Bluetooth module allows transmission of the results wirelessly to a mobile phone app. Its performance has been validated using lateral flow immunoassays with influenza A nucleoprotein in the concentration range of 0.5 ng/mL to 200 ng/mL.

  5. Management of the athlete with a failed shoulder instability procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwathmey, F Winston; Warner, Jon J P

    2013-10-01

    The athlete with a failed instability procedure requires a thoughtful and systematic approach to achieve a good outcome. Goals of treatment should be defined and realistic expectations should be set. Revision stabilization has a high rate of recurrent instability, low rates of return to play, and low clinical outcome scores. Fundamental to successful revision surgery is choosing the correct procedure. The decision is straightforward in athletes with clear factors that predict recurrence (significant glenoid bone loss, engaging Hill-Sachs lesions) because only a bony procedure can restore the articular arc of the glenoid. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repair may be appropriate in those athletes who have an obvious Bankart tear and no bone loss after a traumatic reinjury. The challenge for the shoulder surgeon is identifying the best surgery for the athlete who does not have such clear-cut indications. Each factor that has the potential to lead to a poor outcome needs to be collected and calculated. Patient factors (age, laxity, type and level of sport), injury factors (mechanism of injury, capsulolabral injury, glenoid bone loss, Hill-Sachs lesion), and technical factors (previous surgery performed, integrity of repair, scarring) must be integrated into the treatment algorithm. Based on this collection of factors, the shoulder surgeon should be prepared to provide the athlete with the surgery that provides the best chance to return to playing sports and the lowest risk of recurrent instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays: applications, fundamentals, and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremy Daniel Driskell

    2006-01-01

    Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive immunoassay requiring less time than its predecessors. This dissertation is organized into six sections. The first section includes a literature review of the previous work that led to this dissertation. A general overview of the different approaches to immunoassays is given, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Included is a detailed review of binding kinetics, which is central for decreasing assay times. Next, the theoretical underpinnings of SERS is reviewed at its current level of understanding. Past work has argued that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the enhancing substrate influences the SERS signal; therefore, the SPR of the extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) utilized in our SERS-based immunoassay is discussed. Four original research chapters follow the Introduction, each presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 2 modifies a SERS-based immunoassay previously developed in our group, extending it to the low-level detection of viral pathogens and demonstrating its versatility in terms of analyte type, Chapter 3 investigates the influence of ERL size, material composition, and separation distance between the ERLs and capture substrate on the SERS signal. This chapter links SPR with SERS enhancement factors and is consistent with many of the results from theoretical treatments

  7. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays. Applications, fundamentals, and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driskell, Jeremy Daniel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive immunoassay requiring less time than its predecessors. This dissertation is organized into six sections. The first section includes a literature review of the previous work that led to this dissertation. A general overview of the different approaches to immunoassays is given, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Included is a detailed review of binding kinetics, which is central for decreasing assay times. Next, the theoretical underpinnings of SERS is reviewed at its current level of understanding. Past work has argued that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the enhancing substrate influences the SERS signal; therefore, the SPR of the extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) utilized in our SERS-based immunoassay is discussed. Four original research chapters follow the Introduction, each presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 2 modifies a SERS-based immunoassay previously developed in our group, extending it to the low-level detection of viral pathogens and demonstrating its versatility in terms of analyte type, Chapter 3 investigates the influence of ERL size, material composition, and separation distance between the ERLs and capture substrate on the SERS signal. This chapter links SPR with SERS enhancement factors and is consistent with many of the results from theoretical treatments

  8. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Failed lots/rework procedure. 983.52 Section 983.52..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.52 Failed lots/rework procedure. (a) Substandard pistachios... committee may establish, with the Secretary's approval, appropriate rework procedures. (b) Failed lot...

  9. 77 FR 9846 - Source of Income From Qualified Fails Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... temporary regulations noted that no trading practice existed at that time for fails charges on securities other than Treasuries, but that if a fails charge trading practice pertaining to other securities was... sources within the United States, and the income from the qualified fails charge is treated as effectively...

  10. Outcomes of reintervention after failed urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerhult, Teresa Olsen; Lindqvist, Klas; Peeker, Ralph; Grenabo, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Urethroplasty is a procedure that has a high success rate. However, there exists a small subgroup of patients who require multiple procedures to achieve an acceptable result. This study analyses the outcomes of a series of patients with failed urethroplasty. This is a retrospective review of 82 failures out of 407 patients who underwent urethroplasty due to urethral stricture during the period 1999-2013. Failure was defined as the need for an additional surgical procedure. Of the failures, 26 patients had penile strictures and 56 had bulbar strictures. Meatal strictures were not included. The redo procedures included one or multiple direct vision internal urethrotomies, dilatations or new urethroplasties, all with a long follow-up time. The patients underwent one to seven redo surgeries (mean 2.4 procedures per patient). In the present series of patients, endourological procedures cured 34% (28/82) of the patients. Ten patients underwent multiple redo urethroplasties until a satisfactory outcome was achieved; the penile strictures were the most difficult to cure. In patients with bulbar strictures, excision with anastomosis and substitution urethroplasty were equally successful. Nevertheless, 18 patients were defined as treatment failures. Of these patients, nine ended up with clean intermittent self-dilatation as a final solution, five had perineal urethrostomy and four are awaiting a new reintervention. Complicated cases need centralized professional care. Despite the possibility of needing multiple reinterventions, the majority of patients undergoing urethroplasty have a good chance of successful treatment.

  11. Why SDI failed: A different perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codevilla, A.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional wisdom is wrong. SDI did not fail simply because science could not supply the means to build an anti-missile shield. Rather, it floundered on a combination of unsatisfiable technical requirements and technical boondoggles, charges the author. Rather than building on current technology and doing what could be done with what was at hand, those who shaped SDI policy - both military and civilian - insisted on virtually starting over. He also charges they were either passionately against building anti-missile weapons or lacking in intellectual self-confidence and interest with regard to the subject. Work on using modern optics and computers for anti-missile purposes began in the late 1970s, and the technology already was in use in intelligence satellites - a fact either unknown or ignored by most SDI officials. As a result of the conflicting interests among officials and the organizational structure they put into place, the author says the SDI program could not possibly develop any weapon, even if the people involved wanted to, which they did not

  12. The British Model in Britain: Failing slowly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Steve

    2006-01-01

    In 1990, Britain reorganised its electricity industry to run on competitive lines. The British reforms are widely regarded as successful and the model used provides the basis for reforms of electricity industries worldwide. The main reason for this perception of success is major reductions in the real price of electricity with no reduction in service quality. This paper examines whether the reputation of the British reforms is justified. It concludes that the reputation is not justified and that serious fundamental problems are beginning to emerge. The central question is: have the British reforms resulted in the creation of efficient wholesale and retail markets? On this criterion, the reforms have failed. The wholesale market is dominated by obscure long-term contracts, privileged access to the market and self-dealing within integrated generator/retailers, leaving the spot markets with minimal liquidity and unreliable prices. The failure to develop an efficient wholesale market places the onus on consumers to impose competitive forces on electricity companies by switching regularly. Small consumers will not do this and they are paying too much for their power. For the future, there is a serious risk that the electricity industry will become a weakly regulated oligopoly with a veneer of competition

  13. Proposed scheduling algorithm for deployment of fail-safe cloud services

    OpenAIRE

    Kollberg, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The cloud is a fairly new concept in computer science, altough almost everyone has been or is in contact with it on a regular basis. As more and more systems and applications are migrating from the desktop and into the cloud, keeping a high availability in cloud services is becoming increasingly important. Seeing that the cloud users are dependant on the cloud services being online and accessable via the Internet, creating fault tolerant cloud systems is key to keeping the cloud stable and tr...

  14. When the Ostrich-Algorithm Fails: Blanking Method Affects Spike Train Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Joseph

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern electroceuticals are bound to employ the usage of electrical high frequency (130–180 Hz stimulation carried out under closed loop control, most prominent in the case of movement disorders. However, particular challenges are faced when electrical recordings of neuronal tissue are carried out during high frequency electrical stimulation, both in-vivo and in-vitro. This stimulation produces undesired artifacts and can render the recorded signal only partially useful. The extent of these artifacts is often reduced by temporarily grounding the recording input during stimulation pulses. In the following study, we quantify the effects of this method, “blanking,” on the spike count and spike train statistics. Starting from a theoretical standpoint, we calculate a loss in the absolute number of action potentials, depending on: width of the blanking window, frequency of stimulation, and intrinsic neuronal activity. These calculations were then corroborated by actual high signal to noise ratio (SNR single cell recordings. We state that, for clinically relevant frequencies of 130 Hz (used for movement disorders and realistic blanking windows of 2 ms, up to 27% of actual existing spikes are lost. We strongly advice cautioned use of the blanking method when spike rate quantification is attempted.Impact statementBlanking (artifact removal by temporarily grounding input, depending on recording parameters, can lead to significant spike loss. Very careful use of blanking circuits is advised.

  15. When the Ostrich-Algorithm Fails: Blanking Method Affects Spike Train Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Kevin; Mottaghi, Soheil; Christ, Olaf; Feuerstein, Thomas J; Hofmann, Ulrich G

    2018-01-01

    Modern electroceuticals are bound to employ the usage of electrical high frequency (130-180 Hz) stimulation carried out under closed loop control, most prominent in the case of movement disorders. However, particular challenges are faced when electrical recordings of neuronal tissue are carried out during high frequency electrical stimulation, both in-vivo and in-vitro . This stimulation produces undesired artifacts and can render the recorded signal only partially useful. The extent of these artifacts is often reduced by temporarily grounding the recording input during stimulation pulses. In the following study, we quantify the effects of this method, "blanking," on the spike count and spike train statistics. Starting from a theoretical standpoint, we calculate a loss in the absolute number of action potentials, depending on: width of the blanking window, frequency of stimulation, and intrinsic neuronal activity. These calculations were then corroborated by actual high signal to noise ratio (SNR) single cell recordings. We state that, for clinically relevant frequencies of 130 Hz (used for movement disorders) and realistic blanking windows of 2 ms, up to 27% of actual existing spikes are lost. We strongly advice cautioned use of the blanking method when spike rate quantification is attempted. Blanking (artifact removal by temporarily grounding input), depending on recording parameters, can lead to significant spike loss. Very careful use of blanking circuits is advised.

  16. False biochemical diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in streptavidin-biotin-based immunoassays: the problem of biotin intake and related interferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piketty, Marie-Liesse; Polak, Michel; Flechtner, Isabelle; Gonzales-Briceño, Laura; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2017-05-01

    Immunoassays are now commonly used for hormone measurement, in high throughput analytical platforms. Immunoassays are generally robust to interference. However, endogenous analytical error may occur in some patients; this may be encountered in biotin supplementation or in the presence of anti-streptavidin antibody, in immunoassays involving streptavidin-biotin interaction. In these cases, the interference may induce both false positive and false negative results, and simulate a seemingly coherent hormonal profile. It is to be feared that this type of errors will be more frequently observed. This review underlines the importance of keeping close interactions between biologists and clinicians to be able to correlate the hormonal assay results with the clinical picture.

  17. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-11-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent the rapid oxygen desaturation seen in pregnant women by advocating nasal oxygenation and mask ventilation immediately after induction; limiting intubation attempts to two; and consideration of early release of cricoid pressure if difficulties are encountered. Algorithm 2 summarises the management after declaring failed tracheal intubation with clear decision points, and encourages early insertion of a (preferably second-generation) supraglottic airway device if appropriate. Algorithm 3 covers the management of the 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' situation and emergency front-of-neck airway access, including the necessity for timely perimortem caesarean section if maternal oxygenation cannot be achieved. Table 1 gives a structure for assessing the individual factors relevant in the decision to awaken or proceed should intubation fail, which include: urgency related to maternal or fetal factors; seniority of the anaesthetist; obesity of the patient; surgical complexity; aspiration risk; potential difficulty with provision of alternative anaesthesia; and post-induction airway device and airway patency. This decision should be considered by the team in advance of performing a general anaesthetic to make a provisional plan should failed intubation occur. The table is also intended to be used as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion and learning regarding the complex nature of decision-making when faced with a failed intubation. Table 2 gives practical considerations of how to

  18. Failing States or Failing Models?: Accounting for the Incidence of State Collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Doornbos

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the notion and phenomenon of .failingÿ states - states deemed incapable to fulfil the basic tasks of providing security for their populace -, has been rapidly drawing attention. I will start off with a closer look at the inci- dence of fragile states and state failure, more specifically of state collapse. Connected with this, I will raise the question of differential degrees of propensity to failure and collapse among contemporary state systems, and to point to apparent region...

  19. 4D monitoring of actively failing rockslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Nick; Williams, Jack; Hardy, Richard; Brain, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the conditions which promote rockfall to collapse relies upon detailed monitoring, ideally before, during and immediately after failure. With standard repeat surveys it is common that surveys do not coincide with or capture precursors, or that surveys are widely spaced relative to the timing and duration of driving forces such as storms. As a result gaining insight into the controls on failure and the timescales over which precursors operate remains difficult to establish with certainty, and establishing direct links between environmental conditions and rock-falls, or sequences of events prior to rockfall, remain difficult to define. To address this, we present analysis of a high-frequency 3D laser scan dataset captured using a new permanently installed system developed to constantly monitor actively failing rock slopes. The system is based around a time of flight laser scanner, integrated with and remotely controlled by dedicated controls and analysis software. The system is configured to capture data at 0.1 m spacing across > 22,000 m3 at up to 30 minute intervals. Here we present results captured with this system over a period of 9 months, spanning spring to winter 2015. Our analysis is focussed upon improving the understanding of the nature of small (volumetric measurement of rock face erosion. The results hold implications for understanding of rockfall mechanics, but also for how actively eroding surfaces can be monitored at high temporal frequency. Whilst high frequency data is ideal for describing processes that evolve rapidly through time, the cumulative errors that accumulate when monitored changes are dominated by inverse power-law distributed volumes are significant. To conclude we consider the benefits of defining survey frequency on the basis of the changes being detected relative to the accumulation of errors that inevitably arises when comparing high numbers of sequential surveys.

  20. Disorganized junior doctors fail the MRCP (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian G; Khan, Khalid M; Hussain, Walayat; Tweed, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Career progression during undergraduate and early postgraduate years is currently determined by successfully passing examinations. Both academic factors (secondary school examination results, learning style and training opportunities) and non-academic factors (maturity, ethnic origin, gender and motivation) have been identified as predicting examination outcome. Few studies have examined organization skills. Disorganized medical students are more likely to perform poorly in end-of-year examinations but this observation has not been examined in junior doctors. This study asked whether organization skills relate to examination outcome amongst junior doctors taking the clinical Part II examination for the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills). The study was conducted prospectively at four consecutive clinical courses that provided clinical teaching and practice to prepare trainees for the examination. Arrival time at registration for the course was the chosen surrogate for organization skills. Trainees were advised that they should arrive promptly at 8.00 a.m. for registration and it was explained that the course would start at 8.30 a.m. Recorded arrival times were compared with the pass lists published by the Royal College of Physicians. The mean arrival time was 8.17 a.m. A total of 81 doctors (53.3%) passed the examination with a mean arrival time of 8.14 a.m. However, 71 doctors failed the exam and arrived, on average, six minutes later than doctors who passed (p?=?0.006). Better-prepared junior doctors were more likely to pass the final examination. Arriving on time represents a composite of several skills involved in the planning of appropriate travel arrangements and is therefore a valid marker of organization skills and preparation. This novel study has shown that good time-keeping skills are positively associated with examination outcome.

  1. Why Lumbar Artificial Disk Replacements (LADRs) Fail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettine, Kenneth; Ryu, Robert; Techy, Fernando

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected data. To determine why artificial disk replacements (ADRs) fail by examining results of 91 patients in FDA studies performed at a single investigational device exemption (IDE) site with minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients following lumbar ADR generally achieve their 24-month follow-up results at 3 months postoperatively. Every patient undergoing ADR at 1 IDE site by 2 surgeons was evaluated for clinical success. Failure was defined as <50% improvement in ODI and VAS or any additional surgery at index or adjacent spine motion segment. Three ADRs were evaluated: Maverick, 25 patients; Charité, 31 patients; and Kineflex, 35 patients. All procedures were 1-level operations performed at L4-L5 or L5-S1. Demographics and inclusion/exclusion criteria were similar and will be discussed. Overall clinical failure occurred in 26% (24 of 91 patients) at 2-year follow-up. Clinical failure occurred in: 28% (Maverick) (7 of 25 patients), 39% (Charité) (12 of 31 patients), and 14% (Kineflex) (5 of 35 patients). Causes of failure included facet pathology, 50% of failure patients (12 of 24). Implant complications occurred in 5% of total patients and 21% of failure patients (5 of 24). Only 5 patients went from a success to failure after 3 months. Only 1 patient went from a failure to success after a facet rhizotomy 1 year after ADR. Seventy-four percent of patients after ADR met strict clinical success after 2-year follow-up. The clinical success versus failure rate did not change from their 3-month follow-up in 85 of the 91 patients (93%). Overall clinical success may be improved most by patient selection and implant type.

  2. Imaging studies for failed back surgery syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosnard, G.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Sarrazin, J.L.; Soulie, D.

    1995-01-01

    In patients with failed back surgery syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be the best first-line imaging study because it simplifies the diagnosis. This update is based on over 600 cases. MRI shows the scar tissue at the surgical site, persistent evidence of disk herniation for several weeks after surgery, and evidence of local and regional edema in one-fourth of cases. The edema is most marked between two months and two years after the operation and can misleadingly suggest discitis. MRI is the best investigation for detecting recurrent herniation at the same vertebral level or another level. Herniated disk material is seen as a mass that does not enhance after gadolinium, in contrast to the vascularized scar tissue. Free fragments are often clearly visible within the scar tissue. Fragments that migrate to the epidural space can give rise to granulomatous reactions. Scar tissue can be seen in the epidural space and within the disk; it can show enhancement after gadolinium for several years. The scar can be atrophic or hypertrophic and can encase or impinge on the dural sac and nerve roots. Pathological fibrosis cannot be differentiated from ordinary scar tissue. Arachnoiditis causing adherence of the nerve roots to the dura mater or to each other occurs in 5 % to 10 % of cases. Nerve root enhancement after gadolinium is seen in three-fourths of cases. Bone lesions are common, especially some time after surgery; they are usually accompanied with other lesions. Hematomas are seen in less than 10 % of cases. Infections are similarly rare (0.25 % each for discitis and epiduritis). The diagnosis of discitis is difficult and requires percutaneous biopsy of the disk, especially when MRI shows fluid within the disk, with decreased signal intensity on T2 images, and non enhancement after intravenous gadolinium. (authors). 19 refs., 7 figs

  3. Algorithmic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, W.

    1990-12-13

    In this paper complex adaptive systems are defined by a self- referential loop in which objects encode functions that act back on these objects. A model for this loop is presented. It uses a simple recursive formal language, derived from the lambda-calculus, to provide a semantics that maps character strings into functions that manipulate symbols on strings. The interaction between two functions, or algorithms, is defined naturally within the language through function composition, and results in the production of a new function. An iterated map acting on sets of functions and a corresponding graph representation are defined. Their properties are useful to discuss the behavior of a fixed size ensemble of randomly interacting functions. This function gas'', or Turning gas'', is studied under various conditions, and evolves cooperative interaction patterns of considerable intricacy. These patterns adapt under the influence of perturbations consisting in the addition of new random functions to the system. Different organizations emerge depending on the availability of self-replicators.

  4. Phase matching in quantum searching and the improved Grover algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Guilu; Li Yansong; Xiao Li; Tu Changcun; Sun Yang

    2004-01-01

    The authors briefly introduced some of our recent work related to the phase matching condition in quantum searching algorithms and the improved Grover algorithm. When one replaces the two phase inversions in the Grover algorithm with arbitrary phase rotations, the modified algorithm usually fails in searching the marked state unless a phase matching condition is satisfied between the two phases. the Grover algorithm is not 100% in success rate, an improved Grover algorithm with zero-failure rate is given by replacing the phase inversions with angles that depends on the size of the database. Other aspects of the Grover algorithm such as the SO(3) picture of quantum searching, the dominant gate imperfections in the Grover algorithm are also mentioned. (author)

  5. In vitro conditions modify immunoassayability of bovine pituitary prolactin and growth hormone: insights into their secretory granule storage forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenson, M.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The amount of immunoassayable intracellular bovine (b) PRL and GH varies depending on treatment conditions. The present studies were designed to characterize the mechanisms involved and to compare immunoassayability of both hormones under similar conditions. Pituitary homogenate and secretory granule hormones displayed both time- and temperature-dependent increases when incubated at pH 10.5 with reduced glutathione. Changes in immunoassayability seem to reflect conversion from poorly immunoactive tissue hormone oligomers to monomeric hormone. The data indicate that oligomeric bPRL is stabilized primarily by intermolecular disulfide bonds, although it is also susceptible to urea, SDS, and EDTA; granule thiols may also influence the conversion to monomer. The storage form of bGH appears to be stabilized differently. Maneuvers demonstrated in these studies to influence immunoassayability correlate very well with their previously established effects on hormone release and secretion, strengthening the likelihood that a functional link exists between assayability and secretion

  6. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: PCP IMMUNOASSAY TECHNOLOGIES - PENTA RISC BY ENSYS INC., PENTA RAPID BY OHMICRON CORP., ENVIROGARD BY MILLIPORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this demonstration were to test these field screening technologies for accuracy and precision in detecting Pentachlorophenol (PCP) levels in soil and water by comparing their results with those of a confirmatory laboratory. The three immunoassay technologies ...

  7. Probability of failure of the watershed algorithm for peak detection in comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vivó-Truyols, G.; Janssen, H.-G.

    2010-01-01

    The watershed algorithm is the most common method used for peak detection and integration In two-dimensional chromatography However, the retention time variability in the second dimension may render the algorithm to fail A study calculating the probabilities of failure of the watershed algorithm was

  8. Machine-learning-assisted materials discovery using failed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccuglia, Paul; Elbert, Katherine C.; Adler, Philip D. F.; Falk, Casey; Wenny, Malia B.; Mollo, Aurelio; Zeller, Matthias; Friedler, Sorelle A.; Schrier, Joshua; Norquist, Alexander J.

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid materials such as organically templated metal oxides, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and organohalide perovskites have been studied for decades, and hydrothermal and (non-aqueous) solvothermal syntheses have produced thousands of new materials that collectively contain nearly all the metals in the periodic table. Nevertheless, the formation of these compounds is not fully understood, and development of new compounds relies primarily on exploratory syntheses. Simulation- and data-driven approaches (promoted by efforts such as the Materials Genome Initiative) provide an alternative to experimental trial-and-error. Three major strategies are: simulation-based predictions of physical properties (for example, charge mobility, photovoltaic properties, gas adsorption capacity or lithium-ion intercalation) to identify promising target candidates for synthetic efforts; determination of the structure-property relationship from large bodies of experimental data, enabled by integration with high-throughput synthesis and measurement tools; and clustering on the basis of similar crystallographic structure (for example, zeolite structure classification or gas adsorption properties). Here we demonstrate an alternative approach that uses machine-learning algorithms trained on reaction data to predict reaction outcomes for the crystallization of templated vanadium selenites. We used information on ‘dark’ reactions—failed or unsuccessful hydrothermal syntheses—collected from archived laboratory notebooks from our laboratory, and added physicochemical property descriptions to the raw notebook information using cheminformatics techniques. We used the resulting data to train a machine-learning model to predict reaction success. When carrying out hydrothermal synthesis experiments using previously untested, commercially available organic building blocks, our machine-learning model outperformed traditional human strategies, and successfully predicted

  9. IFSA: a microfluidic chip-platform for frit-based immunoassay protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlawatsch, Nadine; Bangert, Michael; Miethe, Peter; Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2013-03-01

    Point-of-care diagnostics (POC) is one of the key application fields for lab-on-a-chip devices. While in recent years much of the work has concentrated on integrating complex molecular diagnostic assays onto a microfluidic device, there is a need to also put comparatively simple immunoassay-type protocols on a microfluidic platform. In this paper, we present the development of a microfluidic cartridge using an immunofiltration approach. In this method, the sandwich immunoassay takes place in a porous frit on which the antibodies have immobilized. The device is designed to be able to handle three samples in parallel and up to four analytical targets per sample. In order to meet the critical cost targets for the diagnostic market, the microfluidic chip has been designed and manufactured using high-volume manufacturing technologies in mind. Validation experiments show comparable sensitivities in comparison with conventional immunofiltration kits.

  10. A competitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay for rapid and sensitive determination of enrofloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Wu, Yongjun; Yu, Songcheng; Zhang, Huili; Zhang, Hongquan; Qu, Lingbo; Harrington, Peter de B.

    With alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-adamantane (AMPPD) system as the chemiluminescence (CL) detection system, a highly sensitive, specific and simple competitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) was developed for the measurement of enrofloxacin (ENR). The physicochemical parameters, such as the chemiluminescent assay mediums, the dilution buffer of ENR-McAb, the volume of dilution buffer, the monoclonal antibody concentration, the incubation time, and other relevant variables of the immunoassay have been optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the detection linear range of 350-1000 pg/mL and the detection limit of 0.24 ng/mL were provided by the proposed method. The relative standard deviations were less than 15% for both intra and inter-assay precision. This method has been successfully applied to determine ENR in spiked samples with the recovery of 103%-96%. It showed that CLEIA was a good potential method in the analysis of residues of veterinary drugs after treatment of related diseases.

  11. Microfluidic Platform for Enzyme-Linked and Magnetic Particle-Based Immunoassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota G. Pijanowska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents design and testing of a microfluidic platform for immunoassay. The method is based on sandwiched ELISA, whereby the primary antibody is immobilized on nitrocelluose and, subsequently, magnetic beads are used as a label to detect the analyte. The chip takes approximately 2 h and 15 min to complete the assay. A Hall Effect sensor using 0.35-μm BioMEMS TSMC technology (Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Bio-Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems was fabricated to sense the magnetic field from the beads. Furthermore, florescence detection and absorbance measurements from the chip demonstrate successful immunoassay on the chip. In addition, investigation also covers the Hall Effect simulations, mechanical modeling of the bead–protein complex, testing of the microfluidic platform with magnetic beads averaging 10 nm, and measurements with an inductor-based system.

  12. A sandwich immunoassay for human prolyl 4-hydroxylase using monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shinichi

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody was used in a sandwich enzyme immunoassay and in a radioimmunoassay for human serum immunoreactive prolyl 4-hydroxylase. The enzyme immunoassay utilized a monoclonal antibody as a solid phase and horseradish peroxidase-labeled rabbit antibody to human prolyl 4-hydroxylase as a conjugate. Sensitivity was 0.1 ng of enzyme per tube. With a conjugate purified by an enzyme-bound affinity column, sensitivity was increased to 0.01 ng per tube, and linearity was obtained between 0.01 to 30 ng per tube. The radioimmunoassay used a 125 I-labeled rabbit antibody (IgG) as the conjugate. Sensitivity of this technique was 0.4 ng of enzyme per tube. (Auth.)

  13. On-chip signal amplification of magnetic bead-based immunoassay by aviating magnetic bead chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Uddin M; Jin, Gyeong Jun; Eom, Kyu Shik; Kim, Min Ho; Shim, Joon S

    2017-11-06

    In this work, a Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) platform is used to electromagnetically actuate magnetic bead chains for an enhanced immunoassay. Custom-made electromagnets generate a magnetic field to form, rotate, lift and lower the magnetic bead chains (MBCs). The cost-effective, disposable LOC platform was made with a polymer substrate and an on-chip electrochemical sensor patterned via the screen-printing process. The movement of the MBCs is controlled to improve the electrochemical signal up to 230% when detecting beta-type human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). Thus, the proposed on-chip MBC-based immunoassay is applicable for rapid, qualitative electrochemical point-of-care (POC) analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative studies on the determination of alphafetoprotein by enzyme immunoassay and by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, G.; Linneke, P.; Voss, P.; Jeske, W.

    1987-01-01

    Alphafetoprotein (AFP) was determined in serum of pregnant women in the tenth till sixteenth week of pregnancy by means of two enzyme immunoassays (Enzymun-Test AFP, Boehringer Mannheim, FRG and AFP EIA 'Dessau' 1000, Research Institute for Vaccine Dessau, GDR) and a radioimmunoassay (Radioimmunoassay Kit, AFP-PR, CIS, France). Parallel determinations in sera of 438 patients, who had come to surveillance for the first consultation were estimated. A comparison between the methods showed a good correlation. (author)

  15. Multiplex dipstick immunoassay for semi-quantitative determination of Fusarium mycotoxins in cereals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattanzio, Veronica M.T.; Nivarlet, Noan; Lippolis, Vincenzo; Gatta, Stefania Della; Huet, Anne-Catherine; Delahaut, Philippe; Granier, Benoit; Visconti, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed a rapid method based on a multiplex dipstick immunoassay. ► The assay allowed the determination of major Fusarium toxins in wheat, oats, maize. ► We obtained cut off levels close to EU regulatory levels. - Abstract: A multiplex dipstick immunoassay based method for the simultaneous determination of major Fusarium toxins, namely zearalenone, T-2 and HT-2 toxins, deoxynivalenol and fumonisins in wheat, oats and maize has been developed. The dipstick format was based on an indirect competitive approach. Four test lines (mycotoxin–BSA conjugates) and one control line were located on the strip membrane. Labelled antibodies were freeze-dried within the microwell. Two matrix-related sample preparation protocols have been developed for wheat/oats (not containing fumonisins) and maize (containing fumonisins) respectively. The use of a methanol/water mixture for sample preparation allowed recoveries in the range 73–109% for all mycotoxins in all tested cereals, with relative standard deviation less than 10%. The optimized immunoassay was able to detect target mycotoxins at cut off levels equal to 80% of EU maximum permitted levels, i.e. 280, 400, 1400 and 3200 μg kg −1 , respectively, for zearalenone, T-2/HT-2 toxins, deoxynivalenol and fumonisins in maize, and 80, 400 and 1400 μg kg −1 , respectively, for zearalenone, T-2/HT-2 toxins and deoxynivalenol in wheat and oats. Analysis of naturally contaminated samples resulted in a good agreement between multiplex dipstick and validated confirmatory LC–MS/MS. The percentage of false positive results was less than or equal to 13%, whereas no false negative results were obtained. Data on the presence/absence of 6 mycotoxins at levels close to EU regulatory levels were obtained within 30 min. The proposed immunoassay protocol is rapid, inexpensive, easy-to-use and fit for purpose of rapid screening of mycotoxins in cereals.

  16. Development of a prototype lateral flow immunoassay (LFI for the rapid diagnosis of melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L Houghton

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. Isolation of B. pseudomallei from clinical samples is the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of melioidosis; results can take 3-7 days to produce. Alternatively, antibody-based tests have low specificity due to a high percentage of seropositive individuals in endemic areas. There is a clear need to develop a rapid point-of-care antigen detection assay for the diagnosis of melioidosis. Previously, we employed In vivo Microbial Antigen Discovery (InMAD to identify potential B. pseudomallei diagnostic biomarkers. The B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS and numerous protein antigens were identified as potential candidates. Here, we describe the development of a diagnostic immunoassay based on the detection of CPS. Following production of a CPS-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb, an antigen-capture immunoassay was developed to determine the concentration of CPS within a panel of melioidosis patient serum and urine samples. The same mAb was used to produce a prototype Active Melioidosis Detect Lateral Flow Immunoassay (AMD LFI; the limit of detection of the LFI for CPS is comparable to the antigen-capture immunoassay (∼0.2 ng/ml. The analytical reactivity (inclusivity of the AMD LFI was 98.7% (76/77 when tested against a large panel of B. pseudomallei isolates. Analytical specificity (cross-reactivity testing determined that 97.2% of B. pseudomallei near neighbor species (35/36 were not reactive. The non-reactive B. pseudomallei strain and the reactive near neighbor strain can be explained through genetic sequence analysis. Importantly, we show the AMD LFI is capable of detecting CPS in a variety of patient samples. The LFI is currently being evaluated in Thailand and Australia; the focus is to optimize and validate testing procedures on melioidosis patient samples prior to initiation of a large, multisite pre-clinical evaluation.

  17. Multiplex dipstick immunoassay for semi-quantitative determination of Fusarium mycotoxins in cereals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lattanzio, Veronica M.T., E-mail: veronica.lattanzio@ispa.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA-CNR), Via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari (Italy); Nivarlet, Noan [UNISENSOR S.A., Zoning industriel du Dossay, Rue du Dossay no 3, B-4020 Liege (Belgium); Lippolis, Vincenzo; Gatta, Stefania Della [National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA-CNR), Via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari (Italy); Huet, Anne-Catherine; Delahaut, Philippe [Centre d' Economie Rurale (CER Groupe), Rue du Point du Jour no 8, B-6900 Marloie (Belgium); Granier, Benoit [UNISENSOR S.A., Zoning industriel du Dossay, Rue du Dossay no 3, B-4020 Liege (Belgium); Visconti, Angelo [National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA-CNR), Via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed a rapid method based on a multiplex dipstick immunoassay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assay allowed the determination of major Fusarium toxins in wheat, oats, maize. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained cut off levels close to EU regulatory levels. - Abstract: A multiplex dipstick immunoassay based method for the simultaneous determination of major Fusarium toxins, namely zearalenone, T-2 and HT-2 toxins, deoxynivalenol and fumonisins in wheat, oats and maize has been developed. The dipstick format was based on an indirect competitive approach. Four test lines (mycotoxin-BSA conjugates) and one control line were located on the strip membrane. Labelled antibodies were freeze-dried within the microwell. Two matrix-related sample preparation protocols have been developed for wheat/oats (not containing fumonisins) and maize (containing fumonisins) respectively. The use of a methanol/water mixture for sample preparation allowed recoveries in the range 73-109% for all mycotoxins in all tested cereals, with relative standard deviation less than 10%. The optimized immunoassay was able to detect target mycotoxins at cut off levels equal to 80% of EU maximum permitted levels, i.e. 280, 400, 1400 and 3200 {mu}g kg{sup -1}, respectively, for zearalenone, T-2/HT-2 toxins, deoxynivalenol and fumonisins in maize, and 80, 400 and 1400 {mu}g kg{sup -1}, respectively, for zearalenone, T-2/HT-2 toxins and deoxynivalenol in wheat and oats. Analysis of naturally contaminated samples resulted in a good agreement between multiplex dipstick and validated confirmatory LC-MS/MS. The percentage of false positive results was less than or equal to 13%, whereas no false negative results were obtained. Data on the presence/absence of 6 mycotoxins at levels close to EU regulatory levels were obtained within 30 min. The proposed immunoassay protocol is rapid, inexpensive, easy-to-use and fit for purpose of rapid screening of mycotoxins

  18. In-electrode vs. on-electrode: ultrasensitive Faraday cage-type electrochemiluminescence immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Sha, Yuhong; Hu, Yufang; Wang, Sui

    2016-03-28

    A new-concept of an "in-electrode" Faraday cage-type electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) method for the ultrasensitive detection of neurotensin (NT) was reported with capture antibody (Ab1)-nanoFe3O4@graphene (GO) and detector antibody (Ab2)&N-(4-aminobutyl)-N-ethylisoluminol (ABEI)@GO, which led to about 1000-fold improvement in sensitivity by extending the Helmholtz plane (OHP) of the proposed electrode assembly effectively.

  19. Competitive enzyme immunoassay for human chorionic somatomammotropin using the avidin-biotin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappuoli, R.; Leoncini, P.; Tarli, P.; Neri, P.

    1981-01-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (HCS) is determined by an enzyme immunoassay where HCS competes with biotin-labeled HCS for insolubilized anti-HCS antibodies. Enzyme-labeled avidin is then used to reveal the amount of bound HCS. The system proves to be sensitive (1 ng/ml of HCS can be detected) and results agree with radioimmunoassay determinations (correlation coefficient = 0.979). Kinetics of the avidin-biotin reaction and coating of polystyrene wells are also investigated

  20. Evaluation of automated enzyme immunoassays for five anticonvulsants and theophylline adapted to a centrifugal analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, N; Godolphin, W; Campbell, D J

    1979-05-01

    We report a clinical evaluation of the enzyme immunoassay (EMIT) performed with the GEMSAEC centrifugal analyzer as compared to gas-liquid and liquid chromatography for anticonvulsant drugs and theophylline, respectively. A good correlation was obtained for all drugs, although some difficulties were experienced with one lot of reagent for ethosuximide. The analyzer has an economic advantage if many samples are being analyzed for few drugs in each sample.

  1. Deoxynivalenol-mimic nanobody isolated from a naïve phage display nanobody library and its application in immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu-Lou; He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang; Bhunia, Arun K; Tu, Zhui; Chen, Bo; Liu, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-08-05

    In this study, using mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) as a model hapten, we developed a nanobody-based environmental friendly immunoassay for sensitive detection of DON. Two nanobodies (N-28 and N-31) which bind to anti-DON monoclonal antibody (MAb) were isolated from a naive phage display library. These nanobodies are clonable, thermally stable and mycotoxin-free products and can be served as coating antigen mimetics in heterologous immunoassay. The half inhibition concentration (IC50) of the immunoassay developed with N-28 and N-31 was 8.77 ± 0.41 ng mL(-1) and 19.97 ± 0.84 ng mL(-1), respectively, which were 18- and 8-fold more sensitive than the conventional coating antigen (DON-BSA) based immunoassay. In order to better understand the molecular mechanism of antigen mimicry by nanobody, the 3D structure of "nanobody (N-28) - anti-DON MAb" complex was presented and verified by molecular modeling and alanine-scanning mutagenesis. The results showed that hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction formed between Thr 102 - Ser 106 of N-28 and CDR H3 residues of anti-DON antibody may contribute to their binding. This novel concept of enhancing sensitivity of immunoassay for DON based on nanobody may provide potential applications in a general method for immunoassay of various food chemical contaminants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A fast universal immobilization of immunoglobulin G at 4 °C for the development of array-based immunoassays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Lin Guo

    Full Text Available To maintain the antibody activity and enhance performance of array-based immunoassays, protein G was used to allow a shorter duration of immunoglobulin G immobilization at 4 °C, with the antibody placed in the appropriate orientation. The multiplexed detection of six pain-related message molecules (PRMMs was used as examples for the development of array-based immunoassays: substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and β-endorphin. Protein G- and non-protein G-coated slides were tested. Compared to non-protein G immunoassays, protein G shortened the antibody immobilization time at 4 °C from overnight to 2 hours. Only protein G-facilitated immunoassays succeeded in simultaneously detecting all six PRMMs with high specificity. Dose-response curves showed that the limits of detection of the protein G-multiplexed immunoassays for the PRMMs was approximately 164, 167, 120, 60, 80, and 92 pg/ml, respectively. Thus, protein G effectively shortens the duration of antibody immobilization at 4 °C, allowing the use of sensitive array-based immunoassays for the simultaneous detection of PRMMs.

  3. Comparison of turnaround time and total cost of HIV testing before and after implementation of the 2014 CDC/APHL Laboratory Testing Algorithm for diagnosis of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Derrick J; Yao, Joseph D

    2017-06-01

    Updated recommendations for HIV diagnostic laboratory testing published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories incorporate 4th generation HIV immunoassays, which are capable of identifying HIV infection prior to seroconversion. The purpose of this study was to compare turnaround time and cost between 3rd and 4th generation HIV immunoassay-based testing algorithms for initially reactive results. The clinical microbiology laboratory database at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN was queried for 3rd generation (from November 2012 to May 2014) and 4th generation (from May 2014 to November 2015) HIV immunoassay results. All results from downstream supplemental testing were recorded. Turnaround time (defined as the time of initial sample receipt in the laboratory to the time the final supplemental test in the algorithm was resulted) and cost (based on 2016 Medicare reimbursement rates) were assessed. A total of 76,454 and 78,998 initial tests were performed during the study period using the 3rd generation and 4th generation HIV immunoassays, respectively. There were 516 (0.7%) and 581 (0.7%) total initially reactive results, respectively. Of these, 304 (58.9%) and 457 (78.7%) were positive by supplemental testing. There were 10 (0.01%) cases of acute HIV infection identified with the 4th generation algorithm. The most frequent tests performed to confirm an HIV-positive case using the 3rd generation algorithm, which were reactive initial immunoassay and positive HIV-1 Western blot, took a median time of 1.1 days to complete at a cost of $45.00. In contrast, the most frequent tests performed to confirm an HIV-positive case using the 4th generation algorithm, which included a reactive initial immunoassay and positive HIV-1/-2 antibody differentiation immunoassay for HIV-1, took a median time of 0.4 days and cost $63.25. Overall median turnaround time was 2.2 and 1.5 days, and overall median cost was $63.90 and $72.50 for

  4. Development of failed fuel detection system for PWR (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Churl Kew; Kang, Hee Dong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Cho, Byung Sub; Yoon, Byeong Joo; Yoon, Jae Seong

    1987-12-01

    Ultrasonic transducers satisfying the conditions for failed fuel rod detection for failed fuel rod detection have been designed and built. And performance tests for them have been carried out. Ultrasonic signal processing units, a manipulator guiding the ultrasonic probe through the fuel assembly lanes and its control units have been constructed. The performance of the system has been verified experimentally to be successful in failed fuel rod detection. (Author)

  5. Rescue of failed filtering blebs with ab interno trephination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihadeh, Wisam A; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of ab interno automated trephination as a technique for rescuing failed mature filtering blebs. A retrospective chart review of 40 failed blebs of 38 patients who had a posttrephination follow-up period of at least 3 months was done. With success defined as intraocular pressure (IOP) control with other modalities of management. Complications were few. We believe that ab interno trephination is an excellent option for rescuing selected failed filtering blebs.

  6. The failing firm defence: merger policy and entry

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Robin; Weeds, Helen

    2003-01-01

    This Paper considers the 'failing firm defence'. Under this principle, found in most antitrust jurisdictions, a merger that would otherwise be blocked due to its adverse effect on competition is permitted when the firm to be acquired is a failing firm, and an alternative, less detrimental merger is unavailable. Competition authorities have shown considerable reluctance to accept the failing firm defence, and it has been successfully used in just a handful of cases. The Paper considers the def...

  7. Interior's Climate Science Centers: Focus or Fail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udall, B.

    2012-12-01

    After a whirlwind two years of impressive and critical infrastructure building, the Department of Interior's Climate Science Centers are now in a position to either succeed or fail. The CSCs have a number of difficult structural problems including too many constituencies relative to the available resources, an uneasy relationship among many of the constituencies including the DOI agencies themselves, a need to do science in a new, difficult and non-traditional way, and a short timeframe to produce useful products. The CSCs have built a broad and impressive network of scientists and stakeholders. These entities include science providers of the universities and the USGS, and decision makers from the states, tribes, DOI land managers and other federal agencies and NGOs. Rather than try to support all of these constituencies the CSCs would be better served by refocusing on a core mission of supporting DOI climate related decision making. The CSCs were designed to service the climate science needs of DOI agencies, many of which lost their scientific capabilities in the 1990s due to a well-intentioned but ultimately harmful re-organization at DOI involving the now defunct National Biological Survey. Many of these agencies would like to have their own scientists, have an uneasy relationship with the nominal DOI science provider, the USGS, and don't communicate effectively among themselves. The CSCs must not succumb to pursuing science in either the traditional mode of the USGS or in the traditional mode of the universities, or worse, both of them. These scientific partners will need to be flexible, learn how to collaborate and should expect to see fewer resources. Useful CSC processes and outputs should start with the recommendations of the 2009 NRC Report Informing Decisions in a Changing Climate: (1) begin with users' needs; (2) give priority to process over products; (3) link information producers and users; (4) build connections across disciplines and organizations

  8. Diagnostic effectiveness of immunoassays systems for hepatitis C virus in samples from multi-transfusion patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivero Jimenez, Rene A; Merlin Linares, Julio C; Blanco de Armas, Madelin; Navea Leyva, Leonor M

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (CHV) blood-transmission is a health problem in Cuba and in the world. Some types of diagnostic immunoassays have been developed for the blood certification and in general have a high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in healthy donors. However, its behavior in samples from multi-transfusion patients could by less effective. To assess the diagnostic effectiveness of the UMELISA HCV third generation Cuban immunoassay (TecnoSUMA, S.A. La Habana), Cuba) in samples from multi-transfusion patients, in parallel, 335 sera from patients were processed by UBI HCV EIA 4.0 (United Biomedical, EE.UU) and UMELISA HCV third generation, and the samples with incongruous results were verified by PCR COBAS AmpliScreen HCV Test, v2 system (Roche, EE.UU.) Comparing the UMELISA HCV third generation system with the UBI HCV EIA 4.0 it was achieved a Sd of 95,8% CI(95%): 92,5-99,15 and a Ed of 100% CI (95%): 99,7-100, with IY: 0,96 (0,93-0,99) with k: 0,0582 ID (95%): 0,9276-0,9888, p = 0,000. Both immunoassay systems were satisfactory for immunodiagnosis of multi-transfusion patients

  9. Detection of alpha-fetoprotein in magnetic immunoassay of thin channels using biofunctional nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H. Y.; Gao, B. Z.; Yang, S. F.; Li, C. S.; Fuh, C. Bor

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the use of fluorescent biofunctional nanoparticles (10-30 nm) to detect alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in a thin-channel magnetic immunoassay. We used an AFP model biomarker and s-shaped deposition zones to test the proposed detection method. The results show that the detection using fluorescent biofunctional nanoparticle has a higher throughput than that of functional microparticle used in previous experiments on affinity reactions. The proposed method takes about 3 min (versus 150 min of previous method) to detect 100 samples. The proposed method is useful for screening biomarkers in clinical applications, and can reduce the run time for sandwich immunoassays to less than 20 min. The detection limits (0.06 pg/ml) and linear ranges (0.068 pg/ml-0.68 ng/ml) of AFP using fluorescent biofunctional nanoparticles are the same as those of using functional microparticles within experimental errors. This detection limit is substantially lower and the linear range is considerably wider than those of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and other methods in sandwich immunoassay methods. The differences between this method and an ELISA in AFP measurements of serum samples were less than 12 %. The proposed method provides simple, fast, and sensitive detection with a high throughput for biomarkers.

  10. Targeted selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometric immunoassay for insulin-like growth factor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E Niederkofler

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 is an important biomarker of human growth disorders that is routinely analyzed in clinical laboratories. Mass spectrometry-based workflows offer a viable alternative to standard IGF1 immunoassays, which utilize various pre-analytical preparation strategies. In this work we developed an assay that incorporates a novel sample preparation method for dissociating IGF1 from its binding proteins. The workflow also includes an immunoaffinity step using antibody-derivatized pipette tips, followed by elution, trypsin digestion, and LC-MS/MS separation and detection of the signature peptides in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM mode. The resulting quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA exhibited good linearity in the range of 1 to 1,500 ng/mL IGF1, intra- and inter-assay precision with CVs of less than 10%, and lowest limits of detection of 1 ng/mL. The linearity and recovery characteristics of the assay were also established, and the new method compared to a commercially available immunoassay using a large cohort of human serum samples. The IGF1 SRM MSIA is well suited for use in clinical laboratories.

  11. Magnetofluorescent nanocomposites and quantum dots used for optimal application in magnetic fluorescence-linked immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H Y; Li, S Y; Fuh, C Bor

    2018-03-01

    Magnetofluorescent nanocomposites with optimal magnetic and fluorescent properties were prepared and characterized by combining magnetic nanoparticles (iron oxide@polymethyl methacrylate) with fluorescent nanoparticles (rhodamine 6G@mSiO 2 ). Experimental parameters were optimized to produce nanocomposites with high magnetic susceptibility and fluorescence intensity. The detection of a model biomarker (alpha-fetoprotein) was used to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the magnetofluorescent nanocomposites combined with quantum dots and using magnetic fluorescence-linked immunoassay. The magnetofluorescent nanocomposites enable efficient mixing, fast re-concentration, and nanoparticle quantization for optimal reactions. Biofunctional quantum dots were used to confirm the alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) content in sandwich immunoassay after mixing and washing. The analysis time was only one third that required in ELISA. The detection limit was 0.2 pg mL -1 , and the linear range was 0.68 pg mL -1 -6.8 ng mL -1 . This detection limit is lower, and the linear range is wider than those of ELISA and other methods. The measurements made using the proposed method differed by less than 13% from those obtained using ELISA for four AFP concentrations (0.03, 0.15, 0.75, and 3.75 ng mL -1 ). The proposed method has a considerable potential for biomarker detection in various analytical and biomedical applications. Graphical abstract Magnetofluorescent nanocomposites combined with fluorescent quantum dots were used in magnetic fluorescence-linked immunoassay.

  12. Evaluation of field test kits including immunoassays for the detection of contaminants in soil and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, L.C.; Smith, R.R.; Counts, R.W.; Stewart, J.H.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Effective field test methods are needed for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation. Useful field methods should be rapid, analyte-specific, cost-effective and accurate in the concentration range at which the analyte is regulated. In this study, field test kits for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), mercury, lead and nitrate were evaluated with reference to these criteria. PCBs and mercury, in soils, were analyzed by immunoassay. Ionic lead and nitrate, in water, were measured chemically using test strips. Except for lead, each analyte was measured in both spiked and actual field samples. Twenty to 40 samples per day can be analyzed with the immunoassays and even more with the strip tests. The sensitivity of the immunoassays is in the 1-3 ppM range. Nitrate was consistently detected at ≥5 ppM; lead ions at ≥20 ppM. Results obtained using these methods compared favorably with those obtained by standard laboratory methods. In addition to being useful field screening methods, these kits can be used in the laboratory to sort out negative samples and/or to define proper dilutions for positive samples requiring further analysis

  13. Comparison of pre-processing methods for multiplex bead-based immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Tanja K; Schillert, Arne; Ziegler, Andreas; Lüking, Angelika; Zucht, Hans-Dieter; Schulz-Knappe, Peter

    2016-08-11

    High throughput protein expression studies can be performed using bead-based protein immunoassays, such as the Luminex® xMAP® technology. Technical variability is inherent to these experiments and may lead to systematic bias and reduced power. To reduce technical variability, data pre-processing is performed. However, no recommendations exist for the pre-processing of Luminex® xMAP® data. We compared 37 different data pre-processing combinations of transformation and normalization methods in 42 samples on 384 analytes obtained from a multiplex immunoassay based on the Luminex® xMAP® technology. We evaluated the performance of each pre-processing approach with 6 different performance criteria. Three performance criteria were plots. All plots were evaluated by 15 independent and blinded readers. Four different combinations of transformation and normalization methods performed well as pre-processing procedure for this bead-based protein immunoassay. The following combinations of transformation and normalization were suitable for pre-processing Luminex® xMAP® data in this study: weighted Box-Cox followed by quantile or robust spline normalization (rsn), asinh transformation followed by loess normalization and Box-Cox followed by rsn.

  14. Development and analytical performance of a new ARCHITECT automated dipeptidyl peptidase-4 immunoassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Hemken

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 may be a suitable biomarker to identify people with severe asthma who have greater activation of the interleukin-13 (IL-13 pathway and may therefore benefit from IL-13-targeted treatments. We report the analytical performance of an Investigational Use Only immunoassay and provide data on the biological range of DPP-4 concentrations. Methods: We assessed assay performance, utilising analyses of precision, linearity and sensitivity; interference from common endogenous assay interferents, and from asthma and anti-diabetic medications, were also assessed. The assay was used to measure the range of serum DPP-4 concentrations in healthy volunteers and subjects with diabetes and severe, uncontrolled asthma. Results: The total precision of DPP-4 concentration measurement (determined using percentage coefficient of variation was ≤5% over 20 days. Dilution analysis yielded linear results from 30 to 1305 ng/mL; the limit of quantitation was 19.2 ng/mL. No notable endogenous or drug interferences were observed at the expected therapeutic concentration. Median DPP-4 concentrations in healthy volunteers and subjects with asthma or Type 1 diabetes were assessed, with concentrations remaining similar in subjects with diabetes and asthma across different demographics. Conclusion: These analyses indicate that the ARCHITECT DPP-4 Immunoassay is a reliable and robust method for measuring serum DPP-4 concentration. Keywords: Asthma, Automated immunoassay, Biomarker, Dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IL-13

  15. Which amphetamine-type stimulants can be detected by oral fluid immunoassays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Daniele Z; Boehl, Paula O; Comiran, Eloisa; Prusch, Débora S; Zancanaro, Ivomar; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Pechansky, Flavio; Duarte, Paulina C A V; De Boni, Raquel B; Fröehlich, Pedro E; Limberger, Renata P

    2012-02-01

    The use of oral fluid for monitoring drug consumption on roads has many advantages over conventional biological fluids; therefore, several immunoassays have been developed for this purpose. In this work, the ability of 3 commercial immunoassays to detect amphetamine-type stimulants (ATSs) in oral fluid was assessed. In addition, it was reviewed the main controlled ATSs available worldwide, as well as the oral fluid immunological screening tests that have been used for identifying ATSs in drivers. The analytical specificity of amphetamine direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), methamphetamine direct ELISA (Immunalysis Corporation), and Oral-View saliva multidrug of abuse test (Alfa Scientific Designs) was evaluated using ATS-spiked oral fluid. Legislation and published articles that report the use of immunological screening tests to detect ATS consumption in conductors were reviewed, including the kit's technical information, project reports, police and drug databases. Even at high concentrations, the tested assays were not able to detect methylphenidate, fenproporex, or diethylpropion, controlled ATSs legally marketed in many countries. This evidences the need to develop new kits that enable one to control the misuse of prescription ATSs on roads through oral fluid immunoassays.

  16. Factitious Graves' Disease Due to Biotin Immunoassay Interference-A Case and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Marianne S; Sehgal, Shekhar; Du Toit, Stephen; Yarndley, Tania; Conaglen, John V

    2016-09-01

    Biotin (vitamin B7) is an essential co-factor for four carboxylases involved in fatty acid metabolism, leucine degradation, and gluconeogenesis. The recommended daily intake (RDI) of biotin is approximately 30 μg per day. Low-moderate dose biotin is a common component of multivitamin preparations, and high-dose biotin (10 000 times RDI) has been reported to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis. Biotin is also a component of immunoassays, and supplementation may cause interference in both thyroid and non-thyroid immunoassays. To assess whether biotin ingestion caused abnormal thyroid function tests (TFTs) in a patient through assay interference. We report a patient with biotin-associated abnormal TFTs and a systematic review of the literature. A tertiary endocrine service in Hamilton, New Zealand. The patient had markedly abnormal TFTs that did not match the clinical context. After biotin cessation, TFTs normalized far more rapidly than possible given the half-life of T4, consistent with assay interference by biotin. Multiple other analytes also tested abnormal in the presence of biotin. Biotin ingested in moderate to high doses can cause immunoassay interference. Depending on the assay format, biotin interference can result in either falsely high or low values. Interference is not limited to thyroid tests and has the potential to affect a wide range of analytes. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this interaction to prevent misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment.

  17. Discordant Analytical Results Caused by Biotin Interference on Diagnostic Immunoassays in a Pediatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mahesheema; Rajapakshe, Deepthi; Cao, Liyun; Devaraj, Sridevi

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies have reported that biotin interferes with certain immunoassays. In this study, we evaluated the analytical interference of biotin on immunoassays that use streptavidin-biotin in our pediatric hospital. We tested the effect of different concentrations of biotin (1.5-200 ng/ml) on TSH, Prolactin, Ferritin, CK-MB, β-hCG, Troponin I, LH, FSH, Cortisol, Anti-HAV antibody (IgG and IgM), assays on Ortho Clinical Diagnostic Vitros 5600 Analyzer. Biotin (up to 200 ng/mL) did not significantly affect Troponin I and HAV assays. Biotin (up to 12.5 ng/ml) resulted in biotin >6.25 ng/mL significantly affected TSH (>20% bias) assay. Prolactin was significantly affected even at low levels (Biotin 1.5 ng/mL). Thus, we recommend educating physicians about biotin interference in common immunoassays and adding an electronic disclaimer. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  18. A Switchable Linker-Based Immunoassay for Ultrasensitive Visible Detection of Salmonella in Tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jungwoo; Kim, Eunghee; You, Young Sang; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Lim, Seokwon; Choi, Young Jin

    2017-10-01

    On-site detection for sensitive identification of foodborne pathogens on fresh produce with minimal use of specialized instrumentation is crucial to the food industry. A switchable linker (SL)-based immunoassay was designed for ultrasensitive on-site detection of Salmonella in tomato samples. The assay is based on large-scale aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), induced by a quantitative relationship among the biotinylated Salmonella polyclonal antibody (b-Ab) used as the SL, the functionalized GNPs, and Salmonella. Important factors such as the concentration of SLs, time required for large-scale aggregation, and selectivity of b-Ab were optimized to minimize the detection time (within 45 min with gentle agitation) and achieve the lowest limit of detection (LOD; 10 CFU/g in tomato samples) possible. This SL-based immunoassay with its relatively low LOD and short detection time may meet the need for rapid, simple, on-site analysis of pathogens in fresh produce. The novel switchable linker-based immunoassay is a rapid, specific, and sensitive method that has potential applications for routine diagnostics of Salmonella in tomato products. These advantages make it a practical approach for general use in the processing industry to detect Salmonella rapidly and to implement appropriate regulatory procedures. Furthermore, it could be applied to other fresh products including cantaloupe, strawberry, and cucumbers. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  19. Chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay based on magnetic nanoparticles for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma marker glypican-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Yun Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Glypican-3 (GPC3 is reported as a great promising tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC diagnosis. Highly sensitive and accurate analysis of serum GPC3 (sGPC3, in combination with or instead of traditional HCC marker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, is essential for early diagnosis of HCC. Biomaterial-functionalized magnetic particles have been utilized as solid supports with good biological compatibility for sensitive immunoassay. Here, the magnetic nanoparticles (MnPs and magnetic microparticles (MmPs with carboxyl groups were further modified with streptavidin, and applied for the development of chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA. After comparing between MnPs- and MmPs-based CLEIA, MnPs-based CLEIA was proved to be a better method with less assay time, greater sensitivity, better linearity and longer chemiluminescence platform. MnPs-based CLEIA was applied for detection of sGPC3 in normal liver, hepatocirrhosis, secondary liver cancer and HCC serum samples. The results indicated that sGPC3 was effective in diagnosis of HCC with high performance. Keywords: Magnetic nanoparticle, Magnetic microparticle, Chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay, Glypican-3, Hepatocellular carcinoma

  20. A Novel Colorimetric Immunoassay Utilizing the Peroxidase Mimicking Activity of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Gyu Park

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple colorimetric immunoassay system, based on the peroxidase mimicking activity of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, has been developed to detect clinically important antigenic molecules. MNPs with ca. 10 nm in diameter were synthesized and conjugated with specific antibodies against target molecules, such as rotaviruses and breast cancer cells. Conjugation of the MNPs with antibodies (MNP-Abs enabled specific recognition of the corresponding target antigenic molecules through the generation of color signals arising from the colorimetric reaction between the selected peroxidase substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB and H2O2. Based on the MNP-promoted colorimetric reaction, the target molecules were detected and quantified by measuring absorbance intensities corresponding to the oxidized form of TMB. Owing to the higher stabilities and economic feasibilities of MNPs as compared to horseradish peroxidase (HRP, the new colorimetric system employing MNP-Abs has the potential of serving as a potent immunoassay that should substitute for conventional HRP-based immunoassays. The strategy employed to develop the new methodology has the potential of being extended to the construction of simple diagnostic systems for a variety of biomolecules related to human cancers and infectious diseases, particularly in the realm of point-of-care applications.

  1. Wind reconstruction algorithm for Viking Lander 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynkäänniemi, Tuomas; Kemppinen, Osku; Harri, Ari-Matti; Schmidt, Walter

    2017-06-01

    The wind measurement sensors of Viking Lander 1 (VL1) were only fully operational for the first 45 sols of the mission. We have developed an algorithm for reconstructing the wind measurement data after the wind measurement sensor failures. The algorithm for wind reconstruction enables the processing of wind data during the complete VL1 mission. The heater element of the quadrant sensor, which provided auxiliary measurement for wind direction, failed during the 45th sol of the VL1 mission. Additionally, one of the wind sensors of VL1 broke down during sol 378. Regardless of the failures, it was still possible to reconstruct the wind measurement data, because the failed components of the sensors did not prevent the determination of the wind direction and speed, as some of the components of the wind measurement setup remained intact for the complete mission. This article concentrates on presenting the wind reconstruction algorithm and methods for validating the operation of the algorithm. The algorithm enables the reconstruction of wind measurements for the complete VL1 mission. The amount of available sols is extended from 350 to 2245 sols.

  2. Wind reconstruction algorithm for Viking Lander 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kynkäänniemi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The wind measurement sensors of Viking Lander 1 (VL1 were only fully operational for the first 45 sols of the mission. We have developed an algorithm for reconstructing the wind measurement data after the wind measurement sensor failures. The algorithm for wind reconstruction enables the processing of wind data during the complete VL1 mission. The heater element of the quadrant sensor, which provided auxiliary measurement for wind direction, failed during the 45th sol of the VL1 mission. Additionally, one of the wind sensors of VL1 broke down during sol 378. Regardless of the failures, it was still possible to reconstruct the wind measurement data, because the failed components of the sensors did not prevent the determination of the wind direction and speed, as some of the components of the wind measurement setup remained intact for the complete mission. This article concentrates on presenting the wind reconstruction algorithm and methods for validating the operation of the algorithm. The algorithm enables the reconstruction of wind measurements for the complete VL1 mission. The amount of available sols is extended from 350 to 2245 sols.

  3. The tradition algorithm approach underestimates the prevalence of serodiagnosis of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are three algorithms for screening of syphilis: traditional algorithm, reverse algorithm and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC algorithm. To date, there is not a generally recognized diagnostic algorithm. When syphilis meets HIV, the situation is even more complex. To evaluate their screening performance and impact on the seroprevalence of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals, we conducted a cross-sectional study included 865 serum samples from HIV-infected patients in a tertiary hospital. Every sample (one per patient was tested with toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST, T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA, and Treponema pallidum enzyme immunoassay (TP-EIA according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results of syphilis serological testing were interpreted following different algorithms respectively. We directly compared the traditional syphilis screening algorithm with the reverse syphilis screening algorithm in this unique population. The reverse algorithm achieved remarkable higher seroprevalence of syphilis than the traditional algorithm (24.9% vs. 14.2%, p < 0.0001. Compared to the reverse algorithm, the traditional algorithm also had a missed serodiagnosis rate of 42.8%. The total percentages of agreement and corresponding kappa values of tradition and ECDC algorithm compared with those of reverse algorithm were as follows: 89.4%,0.668; 99.8%, 0.994. There was a very good strength of agreement between the reverse and the ECDC algorithm. Our results supported the reverse (or ECDC algorithm in screening of syphilis in HIV-infected populations. In addition, our study demonstrated that screening of HIV-populations using different algorithms may result in a statistically different seroprevalence of syphilis.

  4. The tradition algorithm approach underestimates the prevalence of serodiagnosis of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Peng, Xiuming; Xie, Tiansheng; Jin, Changzhong; Liu, Fumin; Wu, Nanping

    2017-07-01

    Currently, there are three algorithms for screening of syphilis: traditional algorithm, reverse algorithm and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) algorithm. To date, there is not a generally recognized diagnostic algorithm. When syphilis meets HIV, the situation is even more complex. To evaluate their screening performance and impact on the seroprevalence of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals, we conducted a cross-sectional study included 865 serum samples from HIV-infected patients in a tertiary hospital. Every sample (one per patient) was tested with toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA), and Treponema pallidum enzyme immunoassay (TP-EIA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results of syphilis serological testing were interpreted following different algorithms respectively. We directly compared the traditional syphilis screening algorithm with the reverse syphilis screening algorithm in this unique population. The reverse algorithm achieved remarkable higher seroprevalence of syphilis than the traditional algorithm (24.9% vs. 14.2%, p algorithm, the traditional algorithm also had a missed serodiagnosis rate of 42.8%. The total percentages of agreement and corresponding kappa values of tradition and ECDC algorithm compared with those of reverse algorithm were as follows: 89.4%,0.668; 99.8%, 0.994. There was a very good strength of agreement between the reverse and the ECDC algorithm. Our results supported the reverse (or ECDC) algorithm in screening of syphilis in HIV-infected populations. In addition, our study demonstrated that screening of HIV-populations using different algorithms may result in a statistically different seroprevalence of syphilis.

  5. Pseudo-deterministic Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Goldwasser , Shafi

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this talk we describe a new type of probabilistic algorithm which we call Bellagio Algorithms: a randomized algorithm which is guaranteed to run in expected polynomial time, and to produce a correct and unique solution with high probability. These algorithms are pseudo-deterministic: they can not be distinguished from deterministic algorithms in polynomial time by a probabilistic polynomial time observer with black box access to the algorithm. We show a necessary an...

  6. Advanced life support for cardiac arrest beyond the algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Søren Steemann; Isbye, Dan Lou; Pfeiffer, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In an advanced emergency medical service all parts of the advanced life support (ALS) algorithm can be provided. This evidence-based algorithm outlines resuscitative efforts for the first 10-15 minutes after cardiac arrest, whereafter the algorithm repeats itself. Restoration of spontaneous...... circulation fails in most cases, but in some circumstances the patient may benefit from additional interventional approaches, in which case transport to hospital with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation is indicated. This paper has summarized treatments outside the ALS algorithm, which may be beneficial...

  7. 7 CFR 983.152 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Failed lots/rework procedure. 983.152 Section 983.152..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.152 Failed lots/rework procedure. (a) Inshell rework procedure for aflatoxin. If inshell rework is selected as a remedy to meet the aflatoxin regulations of this...

  8. Ultrasonics aids the identification of failed fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Over a number of years Brown Boveri Reaktor of West Germany has developed and commercialized an ultrasonic failed fuel rod detection system. Sipping has up to now been the standard technique for failed fuel detection, but sipping can only indicate whether or not an assembly contains defective rods; the BBR system can tell which rod is defective. (author)

  9. Comparison of two inductive learning methods: A case study in failed fuel identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Lee, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Two inductive learning methods, the ID3 and Rg algorithms, are studied as a means for systematically and automatically constructing the knowledge base of expert systems. Both inductive learning methods are general-purpose and use information entropy as a discriminatory measure in order to group objects of a common class. ID3 constructs a knowledge base by building decision trees that discriminate objects of a data set as a function of their class. Rg constructs a knowledge base by grouping objects of the same class into patterns or clusters. The two inductive methods are applied to the construction of a knowledge base for failed fuel identification in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. Through analysis of the knowledge bases generated, the ID3 and Rg algorithms are compared for their knowledge representation, data overfitting, feature space partition, feature selection, and search procedure

  10. Comparison of two inductive learning methods: A case study in failed fuel identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifman, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Lee, J.C. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1992-05-01

    Two inductive learning methods, the ID3 and Rg algorithms, are studied as a means for systematically and automatically constructing the knowledge base of expert systems. Both inductive learning methods are general-purpose and use information entropy as a discriminatory measure in order to group objects of a common class. ID3 constructs a knowledge base by building decision trees that discriminate objects of a data set as a function of their class. Rg constructs a knowledge base by grouping objects of the same class into patterns or clusters. The two inductive methods are applied to the construction of a knowledge base for failed fuel identification in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. Through analysis of the knowledge bases generated, the ID3 and Rg algorithms are compared for their knowledge representation, data overfitting, feature space partition, feature selection, and search procedure.

  11. Comparison of two inductive learning methods: A case study in failed fuel identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifman, J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Lee, J.C. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Two inductive learning methods, the ID3 and Rg algorithms, are studied as a means for systematically and automatically constructing the knowledge base of expert systems. Both inductive learning methods are general-purpose and use information entropy as a discriminatory measure in order to group objects of a common class. ID3 constructs a knowledge base by building decision trees that discriminate objects of a data set as a function of their class. Rg constructs a knowledge base by grouping objects of the same class into patterns or clusters. The two inductive methods are applied to the construction of a knowledge base for failed fuel identification in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. Through analysis of the knowledge bases generated, the ID3 and Rg algorithms are compared for their knowledge representation, data overfitting, feature space partition, feature selection, and search procedure.

  12. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  13. Validation of an enzyme-immunoassay for the non-invasive monitoring of faecal testosterone metabolites in male cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribbenow, Susanne; Wachter, Bettina; Ludwig, Carsten; Weigold, Annika; Dehnhard, Martin

    2016-03-01

    In mammals, the sex hormone testosterone is the major endocrine variable to objectify testicular activity and thus reproductive function in males. Testosterone is involved in the development and function of male reproductive physiology and sex-related behaviour. The development of a reliable androgen enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) to monitor faecal testosterone metabolites (fTM) is a powerful tool to non-invasively assess the gonadal status of males. We validated an epiandrosterone EIA for male cheetahs by performing a testosterone radiometabolism study followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses and excluding possible cross-reactivities with androgenic metabolites not derived from testosterone metabolism. The physiological and biological relevance of the epiandrosterone EIA was validated by demonstrating (1) a significant increase in fTM concentrations within one day in response to a testosterone injection, (2) a significant increase in fTM concentrations within one day in response to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) injection, which failed following a placebo injection, and (3) significant differences in fTM concentrations between adult male and adult female cheetahs and between adult and juvenile male cheetahs of a free-ranging population. Finally, we demonstrated stability of fTM concentrations measured in faecal samples exposed to ambient temperatures up to 72h. Our results clearly demonstrate that the epiandrosterone EIA is a reliable non-invasive method to monitor testicular activity in male cheetahs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    大矢, 健一

    2013-01-01

    Hamiltonian Algorithm (HA) is an algorithm for searching solutions is optimization problems. This paper introduces a sound synthesis technique using Hamiltonian Algorithm and shows a simple example. "Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis" uses phase transition effect in HA. Because of this transition effect, totally new waveforms are produced.

  15. Progressive geometric algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; de Berg, M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; ten Brink, Alex P.; Buchin, K.A.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  16. Progressive geometric algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; Berg, de M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; Brink, ten A.P.; Buchin, K.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  17. Electrochemical immunoassay using magnetic beads for the determination of zearalenone in baby food: An anticipated analytical tool for food safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervas, Miriam; Lopez, Miguel Angel; Escarpa, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    In this work, electrochemical immunoassay involving magnetic beads to determine zearalenone in selected food samples has been developed. The immunoassay scheme has been based on a direct competitive immunoassay method in which antibody-coated magnetic beads were employed as the immobilisation support and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used as enzymatic label. Amperometric detection has been achieved through the addition of hydrogen peroxide substrate and hydroquinone as mediator. Analytical performance of the electrochemical immunoassay has been evaluated by analysis of maize certified reference material (CRM) and selected baby food samples. A detection limit (LOD) of 0.011 μg L -1 and EC 50 0.079 μg L -1 were obtained allowing the assessment of the detection of zearalenone mycotoxin. In addition, an excellent accuracy with a high recovery yield ranging between 95 and 108% has been obtained. The analytical features have shown the proposed electrochemical immunoassay to be a very powerful and timely screening tool for the food safety scene.

  18. Immunoassay for Capsular Antigen of Bacillus anthracis Enables Rapid Diagnosis in a Rabbit Model of Inhalational Anthrax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcellene A Gates-Hollingsworth

    Full Text Available Inhalational anthrax is a serious biothreat. Effective antibiotic treatment of inhalational anthrax requires early diagnosis; the further the disease has progressed, the less the likelihood for cure. Current means for diagnosis such as blood culture require several days to a result and require advanced laboratory infrastructure. An alternative approach to diagnosis is detection of a Bacillus anthracis antigen that is shed into blood and can be detected by rapid immunoassay. The goal of the study was to evaluate detection of poly-γ-D-glutamic acid (PGA, the capsular antigen of B. anthracis, as a biomarker surrogate for blood culture in a rabbit model of inhalational anthrax. The mean time to a positive blood culture was 26 ± 5.7 h (mean ± standard deviation, whereas the mean time to a positive ELISA was 22 ± 4.2 h; P = 0.005 in comparison with blood culture. A lateral flow immunoassay was constructed for detection of PGA in plasma at concentrations of less than 1 ng PGA/ml. Use of the lateral flow immunoassay for detection of PGA in the rabbit model found that antigen was detected somewhat earlier than the earliest time point at which the blood culture became positive. The low cost, ease of use, and rapid time to result of the lateral flow immunoassay format make an immunoassay for PGA a viable surrogate for blood culture for detection of infection in individuals who have a likelihood of exposure to B. anthracis.

  19. The management of isolated positive syphilis enzyme immunoassay results in HIV-negative patients attending a sexual health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Nicola; Adebayo, Michael; Smit, Erasmus; Radcliffe, Keith

    2016-08-01

    An unconfirmed positive treponemal enzyme immunoassay (enzyme immunoassay positive, Treponema pallidum particle agglutination negative and rapid plasma reagin negative) presents a clinical challenge to distinguish early syphilis infection from false-positive results. These cases are referred for syphilis line assay (INNO-LIA) and recalled for repeat syphilis serology. We performed a retrospective audit to establish the proportion of HIV-negative cases with unconfirmed positive enzyme immunoassay results, the proportion of these cases that received an INNO-LIA test and repeat syphilis serology testing and reviewed the clinical outcomes; 0.35% (80/22687) cases had an unconfirmed positive treponemal enzyme immunoassay result. Repeat syphilis serology was performed in 80% (64/80) cases, but no additional cases of syphilis were identified. Eighty-eight per cent (70/80) received an INNO-LIA test; 14% (5/37) unconfirmed enzyme immunoassay-positive cases with no prior history of syphilis were confirmed on INNO-LIA assay, supporting a diagnosis of latent syphilis. As a confirmatory treponemal test, the INNO-LIA assay may be more useful than repeat syphilis serological testing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Electrochemical immunoassay using magnetic beads for the determination of zearalenone in baby food: An anticipated analytical tool for food safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hervas, Miriam; Lopez, Miguel Angel [Departamento Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Alcala, Ctra. Madrid-Barcelona, Km. 33600, E-28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Escarpa, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.escarpa@uah.es [Departamento Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Alcala, Ctra. Madrid-Barcelona, Km. 33600, E-28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-10-27

    In this work, electrochemical immunoassay involving magnetic beads to determine zearalenone in selected food samples has been developed. The immunoassay scheme has been based on a direct competitive immunoassay method in which antibody-coated magnetic beads were employed as the immobilisation support and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used as enzymatic label. Amperometric detection has been achieved through the addition of hydrogen peroxide substrate and hydroquinone as mediator. Analytical performance of the electrochemical immunoassay has been evaluated by analysis of maize certified reference material (CRM) and selected baby food samples. A detection limit (LOD) of 0.011 {mu}g L{sup -1} and EC{sub 50} 0.079 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained allowing the assessment of the detection of zearalenone mycotoxin. In addition, an excellent accuracy with a high recovery yield ranging between 95 and 108% has been obtained. The analytical features have shown the proposed electrochemical immunoassay to be a very powerful and timely screening tool for the food safety scene.

  1. The Algorithmic Imaginary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, Taina

    2017-01-01

    the notion of the algorithmic imaginary. It is argued that the algorithmic imaginary – ways of thinking about what algorithms are, what they should be and how they function – is not just productive of different moods and sensations but plays a generative role in moulding the Facebook algorithm itself...... of algorithms affect people's use of these platforms, if at all? To help answer these questions, this article examines people's personal stories about the Facebook algorithm through tweets and interviews with 25 ordinary users. To understand the spaces where people and algorithms meet, this article develops...

  2. The BR eigenvalue algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.; Howell, G.W. [Florida Inst. of Tech., Melbourne, FL (United States). Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Watkins, D.S. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Pure and Applied Mathematics

    1997-11-01

    The BR algorithm, a new method for calculating the eigenvalues of an upper Hessenberg matrix, is introduced. It is a bulge-chasing algorithm like the QR algorithm, but, unlike the QR algorithm, it is well adapted to computing the eigenvalues of the narrowband, nearly tridiagonal matrices generated by the look-ahead Lanczos process. This paper describes the BR algorithm and gives numerical evidence that it works well in conjunction with the Lanczos process. On the biggest problems run so far, the BR algorithm beats the QR algorithm by a factor of 30--60 in computing time and a factor of over 100 in matrix storage space.

  3. False-positive ethyl glucuronide immunoassay screening caused by a propyl alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Torsten; Grüner, Joachim; Schröfel, Stefanie; Stemmerich, Karsten

    2012-11-30

    Urine ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is considered as a specific marker of recent ethanol consumption. We describe false-positive DRI(®) EIA EtG enzyme immunoassay results caused by propyl glucuronides in urine after using a propanol-based hand sanitizer. EtG screening was done with the DRI(®) EIA EtG assay (Microgenics), using a cut-off of 0.5 mg/L as recommended by the manufacturer and of 0.1 mg/L as demanded by the German Regulations for Reissuing Drivers Licenses. Confirmatory EtG analysis was done with the ClinMass(®) EtG LC-MS/MS testkit (Recipe), extended by the mass transitions 235.1→75.1, 235.1→85.1, and 235.1→113.1 for the detection of the 1- and 2-propyl glucuronides. Self-experiments were done by staff members of our lab (n=7), using 3 mL Sterillium(®) Classic Pure (30 g/100 g 1-propanol and 45 g/100 g 2-propanol) for hand sanitation every quarter of an hour for 8 h according to DIN EN 1500:2011-05 with and without an exhauster and by passive inhalation of the sanitizer vapor. Spot urine samples were taken immediately before and up to 24 h after the first sanitizer use. False-positive immunoassay results of up to 4 mg/L or 2.3 mg/g creatinine were obtained after normal use of the sanitizer and also after passive inhalation of the sanitizer vapor (up to 0.89 mg/L or 0.61 mg/g). Immunoassay results were positive even after 4-fold use of the sanitizer (up to 0.14 mg/L or 0.38 mg/g) and up to 6 h after the last sanitizer contact (maximum 0.63 mg/L and 0.33 mg/g for sanitizer users and 0.25 mg/g after passive inhalation). Spiking of EtG-free urine with 1-propyl glucuronide (Athena Environmental Sciences) between 0.05 and 10 mg/L clearly demonstrated a cross reaction of the immunoassay of approx. 10% as compared to EtG. LC-MS/MS of urines with a positive immunoassay EtG result did not show EtG signals, but distinct signals of 1-propyl glucuronide (n-propyl glucuronide) and 2-propyl glucuronide (iso-propyl glucuronide). An exhauster effectively prevented

  4. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Botchu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  5. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchu, Rajesh; Khan, Aman; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam

    2012-01-01

    USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  6. Development of nanobody-based flow injection chemiluminescence immunoassay for sensitive detection of human prealbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Sun, Yanyan; Kang, Xuejun; Wan, Yakun

    2014-11-15

    Nanobodies, derived from camelid heavy-chain antibodies, have novel and impactful applications in clinical diagnostics. Our objective is to develop a nanobody-based chemiluminescence immunoassay for sensitive detection of human prealbumin (PA). In this context, a phage display nanobody library is constructed via immunizing dromedary camel with human prealbumin. Three nanobodies have been identified by five successive bio-panning steps. Based on their high expression level and good affinity, two out of three are chosen for further study. Magnetic beads (MBs) were functionalized with PEI by acylamide bond formed between the carboxyl group on the surface of the MB. Then, an anti-PA nanobody (Nb1) can be effectively immobilized onto the surface of the functionalized MB using glutaradehyde as the link. The modified MBs with Nb1 can specifically capture the target PA and reacted with silica nanoparticles with co-immobilized HRP and anti-PA nanobody (Nb2). The concentration of PA was detected by flow injection chemiluminescence. When using MB/PEI as the carrier of anti-PA Nb1, the CL signal significantly increased to 4-fold compared with the signal using MB without PEI modification. The CL signal was further amplified to 5-fold when Si/Nb2 was used as the signal probe. Under optimized conditions, the present immunoassay exhibited a wide quantitative range from 0.05 to 1000 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.01 μg L(-1). The sensitivity of the proposed immunoassay offers great promises in providing a sensitive, specific, time saving, and potential method for detecting PA in clinical settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural basis for the high specificity of a Trypanosoma congolense immunoassay targeting glycosomal aldolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joar Pinto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Animal African trypanosomosis (AAT is a neglected tropical disease which imposes a heavy burden on the livestock industry in Sub-Saharan Africa. Its causative agents are Trypanosoma parasites, with T. congolense and T. vivax being responsible for the majority of the cases. Recently, we identified a Nanobody (Nb474 that was employed to develop a homologous sandwich ELISA targeting T. congolense fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (TcoALD. Despite the high sequence identity between trypanosomatid aldolases, the Nb474-based immunoassay is highly specific for T. congolense detection. The results presented in this paper yield insights into the molecular principles underlying the assay's high specificity.The structure of the Nb474-TcoALD complex was determined via X-ray crystallography. Together with analytical gel filtration, the structure reveals that a single TcoALD tetramer contains four binding sites for Nb474. Through a comparison with the crystal structures of two other trypanosomatid aldolases, TcoALD residues Ala77 and Leu106 were identified as hot spots for specificity. Via ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR, we demonstrate that mutation of these residues does not abolish TcoALD recognition by Nb474, but does lead to a lack of detection in the Nb474-based homologous sandwich immunoassay.The results show that the high specificity of the Nb474-based immunoassay is not determined by the initial recognition event between Nb474 and TcoALD, but rather by its homologous sandwich design. This (i provides insights into the optimal set-up of the assay, (ii may be of great significance for field applications as it could explain the potential detection escape of certain T. congolense strains, and (iii may be of general interest to those developing similar assays.

  8. Comparison of Immunoassay methods for T3, T4 and TSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Rodríguez, Celia A.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of T3, T4 and TSH have been considered very important in the diagnosis and monitoring of thyroid diseases both overt and subclinical. These subclinical diseases are actively seeking for years, both in healthy patients and hospitalized for other illnesses; and in the population over 35 years, especially women, in health checkups. The active search for these diseases requires the use of rapid and reliable techniques; that can be developed massively, with good level of detectability and comparable. The overall objective is to present the evaluation of different immunoassay techniques with respect to the RIA and IRMA: ELISA, chemiluminescence, Amplified Chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence Immunofluorescence. Compare including automatic methods and analyze the cost and feasibility of them for laboratory immunoassay. ELISA colorimetric technique for dosing was comparable to RIA T4, not for T3. Chemiluminescence (AMERLITE) compared to dosing RIA and IRMA T4 to TSH proved to be valid for both. Amplified Chemiluminescence (Immulite) compared to IRMA for TSH was no significant difference. Electrochemiluminescence (Elecsys 2010) compared to T3 and T4 RIA and IRMA for TSH, no significant differences for T4 and TSH; but no variation to T3. Immunofluorescence (AIA-600) used to compare with RIA for T3 and T4, and TSH IRMA, no significant differences for the measured analytes. Benchmarking of automatic methods suggests that the most thrifty of trials is Immunofluorescence the AIA-600, regarding calibration and control, programming time, randomization and the ability to save the value of the fluorescence deferred calculations for tests without valid at the time of realizing calibration. Analyzing the cost and feasibility of these methods for laboratory immunoassay, we must consider that their characteristics electrochemiluminescence is the fastest, but its price is prohibitive for our health systems. The AIA-600 appears to be the method of choice for its

  9. A competitive immunoassay for sensitive detection of small molecules chloramphenicol based on luminol functionalized silver nanoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuxia; He, Yi; Jiang, Jie; Cui, Hua

    2014-02-17

    Chloramphenicol (CHL) as a broad-spectrum antibiotic has a broad action spectrum against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as anaerobes. The use of CHL is strictly restricted in poultry because of its toxic effect. However, CHL is still illegally used in animal farming because of its accessibility and low cost. Therefore, sensitive methods are highly desired for the determination of CHL in foodstuffs. The immunoassays based on labeling as an important tool have been reported for the detection of CHL residues in food-producing animals. However, most of the labeling procedures require multi-step reactions and purifications and thus they are complicated and time-consuming. Recently, in our previous work, luminol functionalized silver nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized, which exhibits higher CL efficiency than luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles. In this work, the new luminol functionalized silver nanoparticles have been used for the labeling of small molecules CHL for the first time and a competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay has been developed for the detection of CHL. Owing to the amplification of silver nanoparticles, high sensitivity for CHL could be achieved with a low detection limit of 7.6×10(-9) g mL(-1) and a wide linear dynamic range of 1.0×10(-8)-1.0×10(-6) g mL(-1). This method has also been successfully applied to determine CHL in milk and honey samples with a good recoveries (92% and 102%, 99% and 107% respectively), indicating that the method is feasible for the determination of CHL in real milk and honey samples. The labeling procedure is simple, convenient and fast, superior to previously reported labeling procedures. The immunoassay is also simple, fast, sensitive and selective. It is of application potential for the determination of CHL in foodstuffs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Accuracy of immunoassay and mass spectrometry urinary free cortisol in the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, G; Careaga, M; Hanzu, F A; Patrascioiu, I; Ríos, P; Mora, M; Morales-Romero, B; Jiménez, W; Halperin, I; Casals, G

    2016-10-01

    Urinary free cortisol (UFC) determination by highly specific methods as mass spectrometry instead of commercially available antibody-based immunoassays is increasingly recommended. However, clinical comparisons of both analytical approaches in the screening of Cushing's syndrome (CS) are not available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of mass spectrometry versus immunoassay measurements of 24 h-UFC in the screening of CS. Cross-sectional study of 33 histologically confirmed CS patients: 25 Cushing's disease, 5 adrenal CS and 3 ectopic CS; 92 non-CS patients; and 35 healthy controls. UFC by immunoassay (UFCxIA) and mass spectrometry (UFCxMS), urinary free cortisone (UFCo) and UFC:UFCo ratio were measured, together with creatinine-corrected values. Sensitivity, specificity, AUC and Landis and Koch concordance index were determined. AUC for UFCxIA and UFCxMS were 0.77 (CI 0.68-0.87) and 0.77 (CI 0.67-0.87) respectively, with a kappa coefficient 0.60 and strong Landis and Koch concordance index. The best calculated cutoff values were 359 nmol/24 h for UFCxIA (78 % sensitivity, 62 % specificity) and 258.1 nmol/24 h for UCFxMS (53 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity). The upper limit of UFCxIA and UCFxMS reference ranges were 344.7 and 169.5 nmol/24 h respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for CS diagnosis at these cutpoints were 84 and 56 % for UFCxIA and 81 and 54 % for UFCxMS. According to our data, both methods present a very similar diagnostic value. However, results suggest that lower cutoff points for mass spectrometry may be necessary in order to improve clinical sensitivity.

  11. Design of novel hybrid organic-inorganic nanostructured biomaterials for immunoassay applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, G [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, PO Box 486, 31270.901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barbosa-Stancioli, E F [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, PO Box 486, 31270.901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Piscitelli Mansur, A A [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Vasconcelos, W L [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mansur, H S [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymer chemically crosslinked network to be tested as solid support on bovine herpesvirus immunoassay. Hybrids were synthesized by reacting PVA with three different alkoxysilanes modifying chemical groups: tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). PVA-derived hybrids were also modified by chemically crosslinking with glutaraldehyde (GA) during the synthesis reaction. In order to investigate the structure in the nanometer-scale, PVA-derived hybrids were characterized by using small-angle x-ray scattering synchrotron radiation (SAXS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). PVA hybrids' chemical functionalities and their interaction with herpesviruses were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The bioactivity assays were tested through enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SAXS results have indicated nano-ordered disperse domains for PVA hybrids with different x-ray scattering patterns for PVA polymer and PVA-derived hybrids. FTIR spectra have shown major vibration bands associated with organic-inorganic chemical groups present in the PVA, PVA-derived by silane modifier and PVA chemically crosslinked by GA. The immunoassay results have shown that PVA hybrids with chemically functionalized structures regulated to some extent the specific bioimmobilization of herpesvirus onto solid phase. We think that it is due to the overall balance of forces associated with van der Waals interaction, hydrophilic and hydrophobic forces and steric hindrance acting at the surface. PVA and PVA-derived hybrid materials were successfully produced with GA crosslinking in a nanometer-scale network. Also, such a PVA-based material could be advantageously used in immunoassays with enhanced specificity for diagnosis.

  12. Evaluation of the Lumipulse G TP-N Chemiluminescent Immunoassay as a Syphilis Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Daniel A; Loeffelholz, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    A syphilis diagnosis is often aided by the detection of treponemal and nontreponemal antibodies. Automated treponemal antibody detection systems enable high-volume clinical laboratories to perform syphilis screening at a faster pace with lower labor costs. The Lumipulse G TP-N chemiluminescent immunoassay is an automated system that qualitatively detects IgG and IgM antibodies against Treponema pallidum antigens in human serum and plasma. To assess performance characteristics and workflow efficiency, the Lumipulse G TP-N assay was compared to the Bioplex 2200 Syphilis IgG multiplex flow immunoassay. Among the 4,134 routine and HIV samples tested by the two automated assays, the percentage of agreement was excellent at 99.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.6% to 99.2%; κ, 0.89), with the Lumipulse G TP-N having a shorter time to first and subsequent results. All specimens with reactive syphilis screening results were further tested by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TP·PA) testing ( n = 231). The results from the RPR-reactive samples ( n = 82) showed complete concordance with the two automated assays, while the TP·PA assay displayed some discrepancies. The positive percent agreement (PPA) and negative percent agreement (NPA) between the TP·PA test and the Lumipulse G TP-N test were 98.9% and 77.3%, respectively. The Bioplex 2200 Syphilis IgG immunoassay displayed a similar PPA (100%) but a substantially lower NPA (15.9%). Patient chart reviews of discrepant results suggested that the Lumipulse G TP-N assay produced 27 fewer falsely reactive results and can reduce the amount of additional confirmatory RPR and TP·PA testing needed. The analogous performance characteristics of the two automated systems indicate that the Lumipulse G TP-N assay is suitable for high-throughput syphilis screening. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Evaluation of Beckman Coulter DxI 800 immunoassay system using clinically oriented performance goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Neval; Schryver, Patricia G; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Baumann, Nikola A; Block, Darci R; Budd, Jeffrey R; Gaston, S J Stephen; Klee, George G

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of 24 immunoassays using the Beckman Coulter DxI 800 immunoassay systems at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN for trueness, precision, detection limits, linearity, and consistency (across instruments and reagent lots). Clinically oriented performance goals were defined using the following methods: trueness-published desirable accuracy limits, precision-published desirable biologic variation; detection limits - 0.1 percentile of patient test values, linearity - 50% of total error, and consistency-percentage test values crossing key decision points. Local data were collected for precision, linearity, and consistency. Data were provided by Beckman Coulter, Inc. for trueness and detection limits. All evaluated assays except total thyroxine were within the proposed goals for trueness. Most of the assays met the proposed goals for precision (86% of intra-assay results and 75% of inter-assay results). Five assays had more than 15% of the test results below the minimum detection limits. Carcinoembryonic antigen, total thyroxine and free triiodothyronine exceeded the proposed goals of ±6.3%, ±5% and ±5.7% for dilution linearity. All evaluated assays were within the proposed goals for instrument consistency. Lot-to-lot consistency results for cortisol, ferritin and total thyroxine exceeded the proposed goals of 3.3%, 11.4% and 7% at one medical decision level, while vitamin B12 exceeded the proposed goals of 5.2% and 3.8% at two decision levels. The Beckman Coulter DxI 800 immunoassay system meets most of these proposed goals, even though these clinically focused performance goals represent relatively stringent limits. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of novel hybrid organic-inorganic nanostructured biomaterials for immunoassay applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, G [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, PO Box 486, 31270.901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barbosa-Stancioli, E F [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, PO Box 486, 31270.901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Piscitelli Mansur, A A [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Vasconcelos, W L [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mansur, H S [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymer chemically crosslinked network to be tested as solid support on bovine herpesvirus immunoassay. Hybrids were synthesized by reacting PVA with three different alkoxysilanes modifying chemical groups: tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). PVA-derived hybrids were also modified by chemically crosslinking with glutaraldehyde (GA) during the synthesis reaction. In order to investigate the structure in the nanometer-scale, PVA-derived hybrids were characterized by using small-angle x-ray scattering synchrotron radiation (SAXS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). PVA hybrids' chemical functionalities and their interaction with herpesviruses were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The bioactivity assays were tested through enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SAXS results have indicated nano-ordered disperse domains for PVA hybrids with different x-ray scattering patterns for PVA polymer and PVA-derived hybrids. FTIR spectra have shown major vibration bands associated with organic-inorganic chemical groups present in the PVA, PVA-derived by silane modifier and PVA chemically crosslinked by GA. The immunoassay results have shown that PVA hybrids with chemically functionalized structures regulated to some extent the specific bioimmobilization of herpesvirus onto solid phase. We think that it is due to the overall balance of forces associated with van der Waals interaction, hydrophilic and hydrophobic forces and steric hindrance acting at the surface. PVA and PVA-derived hybrid materials were successfully produced with GA crosslinking in a nanometer-scale network. Also, such a PVA-based material could be advantageously used in immunoassays with enhanced specificity for diagnosis.

  15. Childhood obesity: parents fail to recognise, general practitioners fail to act.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, A

    2012-01-01

    General Practitioners (GPs) have an important role to play in recognition of and intervention against childhood obesity in Ireland. Data were collected prospectively on a cohort of children aged 4-14 and their parents (n = 101 pairs) who attended consecutively to a semi-rural group general practice. Parents estimated their child\\'s weight status. Actual weight status was determined for both parent and child using the United States Centres\\' for Disease Control\\'s BMI-for-age references. 15 (14.9%) of the children and 49 (51.6%) of the parents were overweight or obese. While 71 (95.5%) of normal weight status children were correctly identified, parents showed poor concordance in identifying their children as overweight 2 (18.2%) or obese 0 (0%). BMI was only evidently recorded in the clinical records of 1 out of 15 cases of overweight children identified. With parents failing to recognise childhood obesity, GPs have a responsibility in tackling this problem at a family level.

  16. Earthquake recurrence models fail when earthquakes fail to reset the stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormann, Thessa; Wiemer, Stefan; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Parkfield's regularly occurring M6 mainshocks, about every 25 years, have over two decades stoked seismologists' hopes to successfully predict an earthquake of significant size. However, with the longest known inter-event time of 38 years, the latest M6 in the series (28 Sep 2004) did not conform to any of the applied forecast models, questioning once more the predictability of earthquakes in general. Our study investigates the spatial pattern of b-values along the Parkfield segment through the seismic cycle and documents a stably stressed structure. The forecasted rate of M6 earthquakes based on Parkfield's microseismicity b-values corresponds well to observed rates. We interpret the observed b-value stability in terms of the evolution of the stress field in that area: the M6 Parkfield earthquakes do not fully unload the stress on the fault, explaining why time recurrent models fail. We present the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake as counter example, which did release a significant portion of the stress along its fault segment and yields a substantial change in b-values.

  17. Algorithmically specialized parallel computers

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Lawrence; Gannon, Dennis B

    1985-01-01

    Algorithmically Specialized Parallel Computers focuses on the concept and characteristics of an algorithmically specialized computer.This book discusses the algorithmically specialized computers, algorithmic specialization using VLSI, and innovative architectures. The architectures and algorithms for digital signal, speech, and image processing and specialized architectures for numerical computations are also elaborated. Other topics include the model for analyzing generalized inter-processor, pipelined architecture for search tree maintenance, and specialized computer organization for raster

  18. Good performance of an immunoassay based method for nevirapine measurements in human breast milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Theilgaard, Zahra Persson; Chiduo, Mercy

    2011-01-01

    from HIV-uninfected women. Clinical samples from HIV-infected women receiving a single-dose of nevirapine were analyzed. Results: Precision and accuracy were evaluated with two concentrations of quality control materials analyzed in three replicates on four different days and was......, requires complicated extraction techniques. The ARK method employs an immunoassay technology and requires a small sample volume (40 μL) and no pre-treatment of the samples. Methods: Commercial enzyme and antibody were used and calibration standards and quality controls were prepared from pooled breast milk...

  19. The Use of Recombinant Hemagglutinine Protein of Rinderpest Virus in Enzyme Immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    BULUT, Hakan; BOLAT, Yusuf

    2003-01-01

    In this study, Rinderpest virus (RPV) recombinant hemagglutinine protein (rH) fused with protein A region of Staphylococcus aureus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by IgG affinity chromatography. rH protein was also used to establish enzyme immunoassay. Therefore, to prevent IgG binding to the protein A the wells coated with the rH proteins were blocked by human serum. Afterwards, RPV antigens were added to the wells to evaluate this assay. To this end, serum from mice immunized...

  20. Solid-Phase Immunoassay of Polystyrene-Encapsulated Semiconductor Coreshells for Cardiac Marker Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghee Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A solid-phase immunoassay of polystyrene-encapsulated semiconductor nanoparticles was demonstrated for cardiac troponin I (cTnI detection. CdSe/ZnS coreshells were encapsulated with a carboxyl-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticle to capture the target antibody through a covalent bonding and to eliminate the photoblinking and toxicity of semiconductor luminescent immunosensor. The polystyrene-encapsulated CdSe/ZnS fluorophores on surface-modified glass chip identified cTnI antigens at the level of ~ng/mL. It was an initial demonstration of diagnostic chip for monitoring a cardiovascular disease.

  1. Upconverting nanophosphors as reporters in a highly sensitive heterogeneous immunoassay for cardiac troponin I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirkka, Nina, E-mail: nkelon@utu.fi; Lyytikäinen, Annika; Savukoski, Tanja; Soukka, Tero

    2016-06-21

    Photon upconverting nanophosphors (UCNPs) have a unique capability to produce anti-Stokes emission at visible wavelengths via sequential multiphoton absorption upon infrared excitation. Since the anti-Stokes emission can be easily spectrally resolved from the Stokes' shifted autofluorescence, the upconversion luminescence (UCL) is a highly attractive reporter technology for optical biosensors and biomolecular binding assays – potentially enabling unprecedented sensitivity in separation-based solid-phase immunoassays. UCL technology has not previously been applied in sensitive detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), which requires highly sensitive detection to enable accurate and timely diagnosis of myocardial infarction. We have developed an UCL-based immunoassay for cTnI using NaYF{sub 4}: Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} UCNPs as reporters. Biotinylated anti-cTnI monoclonal antibody (Mab) and Fab fragment immobilized to streptavidin-coated wells were used to capture cTnI. Captured cTnI was detected from dry well surface after a 15 min incubation with poly(acrylic acid) coated UCNPs conjugated to second anti-cTnI Mab. UCL was measured with a dedicated UCL microplate reader. The UCL-based immunoassay allowed sensitive detection of cTnI. The limit of detection was 3.14 ng L{sup −1}. The calibration curve was linear up to cTnI concentration 50,000 ng L{sup −1}. Plasma recoveries of added cTnI were 92–117%. Obtained cTnI concentrations from five normal plasma samples were 4.13–10.7 ng L{sup −1} (median 5.06 ng L{sup −1}). There is yet significant potential for even further improved limit of detection by reducing non-specifically bound fraction of the Mab-conjugated UCNPs. The assay background with zero calibrator was over 40-fold compared to the background obtained from wells where the reporter conjugate had been excluded. - Highlights: • Detection of attomole analyte quantity in microwell using upconversion luminescence. • Upconverting

  2. Results of the HPL determination using a new enzymatic immunoassay - comparison with a commercial radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leis, D.; Schneider, B.; Keller, A.; Braun, S.

    1982-01-01

    An enzymatic immunoassay recently developed by the firm Organon, Oss, Netherlands, to determine HPL in the serum of pregnant women was compared to a widely used radioimmunoassay marketed by the firm Amersham-Buchler, Braunschweig. The values determined showed a good correlation. The accuracy of measurement was within the generally accepted range for immunological assays of this kind. The assay procedures are comparable with regard to the expenditure of time and work. A great advantage of the EIA is due to the absence of radioactive substances, which permits this test to be performed in any laboratory equipped with a centrifuge and photometer. (orig.) [de

  3. Dot immunoassay for the simultaneous determination of postvaccination immunity against pertussis, diphtheria, and tetanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khramtsov, Pavel; Bochkova, Maria; Timganova, Valeria; Zamorina, Svetlana; Rayev, Mikhail

    2017-06-01

    A dot immunoassay for simultaneous semiquantitative detection of IgG against tetanus toxoid (Ttx) and diphtheria toxoid (Dtx) and qualitative detection of anti-Bordetella pertussis IgGs in human blood serum using carbon nanoparticles functionalized with streptococcal protein G was developed. Inactivated B. pertussis cells in suspension form were used as an antigen in the immunoassay. Pertussis, tetanus, and diphtheria antigens were separately spotted onto nitrocellulose strips, and then the immunostrips were successively incubated with blood sera and a suspension of carbon nanoparticles. The immunostrips were then scanned with a flatbed scanner, and the images obtained were processed with ImageJ. One hundred fifty-five venous blood serum samples from children vaccinated with diphtheria, tetanus, and whole-cell pertussis (DTwP) vaccine were tested in comparison with a conventional ELISA and agglutination test. The total time required for analysis of 32 serum samples was less than 3 h. Comparison between the results of the dot immunoassay and the corresponding ELISA/agglutination test revealed a high level of agreement (Cohen's kappa between 0.765 and 0.813). The lower limit of quantification was 0.06 IU/ml for anti-Ttx and anti-Dtx. The intra-assay coefficients of variation were less than 15% for anti-Ttx and anti-Dtx and less than 10% for anti-pertussis. The diagnostic sensitivity of detection of the antibody protection level was 93.5% for anti-Ttx [95% confidence interval (CI) 83.5-97.9%], 92.4% for anti-Dtx (95% CI 80.9297.5%), and 90.2% for anti-pertussis (95% CI 75.9-96.8%). The diagnostic specificity was 90.9% for anti-Ttx (95% CI 57.1-99.5%), 85% for anti-Dtx (95% CI 61.1-96.0%), and 89.3% for anti-pertussis (95%CI 80.8-94.5%). The dot immunoassay developed does not require expensive reading equipment, and allows detection of antibodies against three antigens in a single analysis. The immunostrips can be stored for a long time without changes in the

  4. A competitive enzyme immunoassay for the quantitative detection of cocaine from banknotes and latent fingermarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Susan; Garcia Calavia, Paula; Hardwick, Sheila; Hudson, Simon; Wolff, Kim; Russell, David A

    2015-05-01

    A sensitive and versatile competitive enzyme immunoassay (cEIA) has been developed for the quantitative detection of cocaine in complex forensic samples. Polyclonal anti-cocaine antibody was purified from serum and deposited onto microtiter plates. The concentration of the cocaine antibody adsorbed onto the plates, and the dilution of the cocaine-HRP hapten were both studied to achieve an optimised immunoassay. The method was successfully used to quantify cocaine in extracts taken from both paper currency and latent fingermarks. The limit of detection (LOD) of 0.162ngmL(-1) achieved with the assay compares favourably to that of conventional chromatography-mass spectroscopy techniques, with an appropriate sensitivity for the quantification of cocaine at the low concentrations present in some forensic samples. The cEIA was directly compared to LC-MS for the analysis of ten UK banknote samples. The results obtained from both techniques were statistically similar, suggesting that the immunoassay was unaffected by cross-reactivity with potentially interfering compounds. The cEIA was used also for the detection of cocaine in extracts from latent fingermarks. The results obtained were compared to the cocaine concentrations detected in oral fluid sampled from the same individual. Using the cEIA, we have shown, for the first time, that endogeneously excreted cocaine can be detected and quantified from a single latent fingermark. Additionally, it has been shown that the presence of cocaine, at similar concentrations, in more than one latent fingermark from the same individual can be linked with those concentrations found in oral fluid. These results show that detection of drugs in latent fingermarks could directly indicate whether an individual has consumed the drug. The specificity and feasibility of measuring low concentrations of cocaine in complex forensic samples demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the assay. The immunoassay presents a simple and cost

  5. Radio-immunoassay of plasma arginine vasopressin in man. Comparison of two methods of extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, J.P.; Dumoulin, G.; Henriet, M.T.; Baulay, A.; Berthelay, S.

    1987-01-01

    Two methods of extraction, prior to radio-immunoassay (RIA) of human plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) were tested: ethanol extraction (ETH), chromatography with ODS-Silice (ODS-Sil). Recovery of 125 I AVP was higher when using ODS-Sil than when using ETH. Recovery of standard AVP was found to be more efficient and reproducible for ODS-Sil. However, the RIA used, performed after chromatography with ODS-Sil, is not enough sensitive to detect low concentrations but is able to detect high concentrations and physiological variations of plasma AVP [fr

  6. A direct radio-immunoassay for plasma aldosterone: significance of endogenous cortisol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, A.J.M. de; Hofman, J.A.; Hendriks, Th.; Rosmalen, F.M.A.; Ross, H.A.; Benraad, Th.J.

    1980-01-01

    A direct radio-immunoassay for plasma aldosterone was developed, using a highly specific antiserum raised in sheep. An excellent correlation was observed between its results and the levels measured after extraction and chromatography. The necessity of including a blocking agent to inhibit the binding of aldosterone to plasma proteins was investigated. It was found that in low-cortisol ( 10 μg/100 ml) the final assay result was independent of the presence of ANS. The effect of cortisol was interpreted in terms of its influence on aldosterone binding to plasma proteins in the absence of a blocking agent. (Auth.)

  7. Synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-protein conjugates for preparation and immunoassay of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, Andrey N; Kostyanko, Mikhail V; Cherno, Sergey V; Vasilchenko, Ilya L

    2002-04-01

    The method is described dealing with the synthesis of conjugates protein-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), highly soluble in water, stable without special stabilizers and containing the minimum quantity of cross-linked products. The reaction of protein with PAH containing an aldehyde group, has been carried out in an alkaline solution, and stabilization of the conjugate has been achieved by reduction with sodium borohydride in the presence of a compound blocking the formation of an insoluble polymeric fraction. The efficiency of synthesized conjugates for the induction and immunoassay of Abs to PAH for benzo[a]pyrene is shown.

  8. Enzyme immunoassay of oestrogen receptors in needle biopsies from human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, U; Andersen, J; Poulsen, H S

    1991-01-01

    For quantitative assessments of sex hormone receptors in liver tissue, ligand binding assays are inconvenient, as they require large biopsies (0.5-1.0 g). The present study shows that it is possible to measure oestrogen receptors (ER) quantitatively in needle biopsy specimens as small as 10 mg...... by modifications of a commercial enzyme immunoassay employing monoclonal antibodies. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and the dextran charcoal method served as reference methods. A consecutive series of needle biopsies from patients suspected of liver disease were investigated. The biopsies (n = 37) had a median...

  9. Modified Mathieu repair for failed surgery for hypospadias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.Z.M. Anwar

    Received 24 June 2014; received in revised form 3 August 2014; accepted 31 August ... Objectives: To present our experience with the use of modified Mathieu urethroplasty for failed hypospadias ... Overall success was achieved in 31/38.

  10. Perceived adherence barriers among patients failing second-line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived adherence barriers among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy in Khayelitsha, South Africa. W Barnett, G Patten, B Kerschberger, K Conradie, DB Garone, G van Cutsem, CJ Colvin ...

  11. Securing Failed Inner-City Communities: The Military's Role

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khan, Oral

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the threat to internal security posed by violent gangs. This threat was found to be particularly acute in inner-city communities that have over time devolved to a status that the author classified as failed communities...

  12. What if the Doha Round Fails? Implications for Canadian Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Gifford, Michael N.; McCalla, Alex F.; Meilke, Karl D.

    2008-01-01

    Many commentators assume that the WTO Doha Round negotiations have already failed and that this failure will not matter for Canadian agriculture. Neither view is correct. Most countries appear willing to make the effort needed to bring the negotiations to a make or break point in early 2008. If the Doha Round does eventually fail, an important opportunity to make the agricultural trading system significantly less distorted, more open and fair will have been lost. For Canadian agriculture, the...

  13. National intelligence estimates and the Failed State Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Across 177 countries around the world, the Failed State Index, a measure of state vulnerability, was reliably negatively associated with the estimates of national intelligence. Psychometric analysis of the Failed State Index, compounded of 12 social, economic, and political indicators, suggested factorial unidimensionality of this index. The observed correspondence of higher national intelligence figures to lower state vulnerability might arise through these two macro-level variables possibly being proxies of even more pervasive historical and societal background variables that affect both.

  14. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng....../L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flash lamp and the LED based system and discussed temporal, spatial, and spectral features of the LED...... excitation for time-resolved fluorimetry. Optimization of the suggested key parameters of the LED promises significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and hence of the sensitivity of immunoassay systems....

  15. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Petersen, Paul Michael; Pedersen, Christian

    2016-09-19

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng/L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flash lamp and the LED based system and discussed temporal, spatial, and spectral features of the LED excitation for time-resolved fluorimetry. Optimization of the suggested key parameters of the LED promises significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and hence of the sensitivity of immunoassay systems.

  16. Dual-Mode SERS-Fluorescence Immunoassay Using Graphene Quantum Dot Labeling on One-Dimensional Aligned Magnetoplasmonic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fengming; Zhou, Hongjian; Tan, Tran Van; Kim, Jeonghyo; Koh, Kwangnak; Lee, Jaebeom

    2015-06-10

    A novel dual-mode immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence was designed using graphene quantum dot (GQD) labels to detect a tuberculosis (TB) antigen, CFP-10, via a newly developed sensing platform of linearly aligned magnetoplasmonic (MagPlas) nanoparticles (NPs). The GQDs were excellent bilabeling materials for simultaneous Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL). The one-dimensional (1D) alignment of MagPlas NPs simplified the immunoassay process and enabled fast, enhanced signal transduction. With a sandwich-type immunoassay using dual-mode nanoprobes, both SERS signals and fluorescence images were recognized in a highly sensitive and selective manner with a detection limit of 0.0511 pg mL(-1).

  17. The fabrication of magnetic particle-based chemiluminescence immunoassay for human epididymis protein-4 detection in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Fu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic particles have a significant influence on the immunoassay detection and cancer therapy. Herein, the chemiluminescence immunoassay combined with the magnetic particles (MPCLIA was presented for the clinical determination and analysis of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4 in the human serum. Under the optimized experiment conditions, the secure MPCLIA method can detect HE4 in the broader range of 0–1000 pmol/L, with a lower detection limit of 1.35 pmol/L. The satisfactory recovery rate of the method in the serum ranged from 83.62% to 105.10%, which was well within the requirement of clinical analysis. Moreover, the results showed the good correlation with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9589. This proposed method has been successfully applied to the clinical determination of HE4 in the human serum. Keywords: Chemiluminescence immunoassay, Magnetic particles, Human epididymis protein 4

  18. Failing the market, failing deliberative democracy: How scaling up corporate carbon reporting proliferates information asymmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Lippert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate carbon footprint data has become ubiquitous. This data is also highly promissory. But as this paper argues, such data fails both consumers and citizens. The governance of climate change seemingly requires a strong foundation of data on emission sources. Economists approach climate change as a market failure, where the optimisation of the atmosphere is to be evidence based and data driven. Citizens or consumers, state or private agents of control, all require deep access to information to judge emission realities. Whether we are interested in state-led or in neoliberal ‘solutions’ for either democratic participatory decision-making or for preventing market failure, companies’ emissions need to be known. This paper draws on 20 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a Fortune 50 company’s environmental accounting unit to show how carbon reporting interferes with information symmetry requirements, which further troubles possibilities for contesting data. A material-semiotic analysis of the data practices and infrastructures employed in the context of corporate emissions disclosure details the situated political economies of data labour along the data processing chain. The explicit consideration of how information asymmetries are socially and computationally shaped, how contexts are shifted and how data is systematically straightened out informs a reflexive engagement with Big Data. The paper argues that attempts to automatise environmental accounting’s veracity management by means of computing metadata or to ensure that data quality meets requirements through third-party control are not satisfactory. The crossover of Big Data with corporate environmental governance does not promise to trouble the political economy that hitherto sustained unsustainability.

  19. Quantum Computation and Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biham, O.; Biron, D.; Biham, E.; Grassi, M.; Lidar, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    It is now firmly established that quantum algorithms provide a substantial speedup over classical algorithms for a variety of problems, including the factorization of large numbers and the search for a marked element in an unsorted database. In this talk I will review the principles of quantum algorithms, the basic quantum gates and their operation. The combination of superposition and interference, that makes these algorithms efficient, will be discussed. In particular, Grover's search algorithm will be presented as an example. I will show that the time evolution of the amplitudes in Grover's algorithm can be found exactly using recursion equations, for any initial amplitude distribution

  20. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays

    OpenAIRE

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Petersen, Paul Michael; Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng/L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flas...

  1. Detection of Avian Influenza Virus by Fluorescent DNA Barcode-based Immunoassay with Sensitivity Comparable to PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Cuong; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Bang, Dang Duong

    2010-01-01

    involves the sandwiching of the target AIV between magnetic immunoprobes and barcode-carrying immunoprobes. Because each barcode-carrying immunoprobe is functionalized with a multitude of fluorophore-DNA barcode strands, many DNA barcodes are released for each positive binding event resulting......In this paper, a coupling of fluorophore-DNA barcode and bead-based immunoassay for detecting avian influenza virus (AIV) with PCR-like sensitivity is reported. The assay is based on the use of sandwich immunoassay and fluorophore-tagged oligonucleotides as representative barcodes. The detection...

  2. Rapid screening of aflatoxin B1 in beer by fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglazova, N V; Eremin, S A

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript describes the development of a sensitive, fast and easily-performed fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) for the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in various beer samples, both lager and dark. The highest sensitivity was determined for six poly- and monoclonal antibodies selective towards aflatoxins. The sample pretreatment design was emphasized since beer samples are characterized by extremely diverse matrices. Herein, the choice of sorbent for effective removal of matrix interferences prior to analysis was crucial. The samples were diluted with a borate buffer solution containing 1% PEG 6000 and passed through the clean-up column packed with NH2-derivated silica. This sample pretreatment technique was perfectly suitable for the FPIA of lager beer samples, but for dark beer and ale it did not suffice. An artificial matrix was constructed to plot a calibration curve and quantify the results of the latter samples. The developed immunoassay was characterized by a limit of detection of 1 ng mL(-1). Apparent recovery values of 89-114% for lager and 80-125% for dark beer were established. The FPIA data for AFB1 was characterized by elevated linear regression coefficients, 0.9953 for spiked lager and 0.9895 for dark beer samples respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A harmonized immunoassay with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis in egg allergen determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimata, Masaomi; Okada, Hideki; Kurihara, Kei; Sugimoto, Tsukasa; Honjoh, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Kazuhiko; Yano, Takeo; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Shoji, Masahiro

    2018-01-01

    Food allergy is a serious health issue worldwide. Implementing allergen labeling regulations is extremely challenging for regulators, food manufacturers, and analytical kit manufacturers. Here we have developed an "amino acid sequence immunoassay" approach to ELISA. The new ELISA comprises of a monoclonal antibody generated via an analyte specific peptide antigen and sodium lauryl sulfate/sulfite solution. This combination enables the antibody to access the epitope site in unfolded analyte protein. The newly developed ELISA recovered 87.1%-106.4% ovalbumin from ovalbumin-incurred model processed foods, thereby demonstrating its applicability as practical egg allergen determination. Furthermore, the comparison of LC-MS/MS and the new ELISA, which targets the amino acid sequence conforming to the LC-MS/MS detection peptide, showed a good agreement. Consequently the harmonization of two methods was demonstrated. The complementary use of the new ELISA and LC-MS analysis can offer a wide range of practical benefits in terms of easiness, cost, accuracy, and efficiency in food allergen analysis. In addition, the new assay is attractive in respect to its easy antigen preparation and predetermined specificity. Graphical abstract The ELISA composing of the monoclonal antibody targeting the amino acid sequence conformed to LC-MS detection peptide, and the protein conformation unfolding reagent was developed. In ovalbumin determination, the developed ELISA showed a good agreement with LC-MS analysis. Consequently the harmonization of immunoassay with LC-MS analysis by using common target amino acid sequence was demonstrated.

  4. Plasma exchange to remove HIT antibodies: dissociation between enzyme-immunoassay and platelet activation test reactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Sheppard, Jo-Ann I; Chu, F Victor; Kapoor, Anil; Crowther, Mark A; Gangji, Azim

    2015-01-01

    Repeated therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) has been advocated to remove heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) IgG antibodies before cardiac/vascular surgery in patients who have serologically-confirmed acute or subacute HIT; for this situation, a negative platelet activation assay (eg, platelet serotonin-release assay [SRA]) has been recommended as the target serological end point to permit safe surgery. We compared reactivities in the SRA and an anti-PF4/heparin IgG-specific enzyme immunoassay (EIA), testing serial serum samples in a patient with recent (subacute) HIT who underwent serial TPE precardiac surgery, as well as for 15 other serially-diluted HIT sera. We observed that post-TPE/diluted HIT sera-when first testing SRA-negative-continue to test strongly positive by EIA-IgG. This dissociation between the platelet activation assay and a PF4-dependent immunoassay for HIT antibodies indicates that patients with subacute HIT undergoing repeated TPE before heparin reexposure should be tested by serial platelet activation assays even when their EIAs remain strongly positive. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Simplified immunoassay for rapid Dengue serotype diagnosis, revealing insensitivity to non-specific binding interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C.C.L. Loureiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proof of concept of an immunoassay, which is easy to implement, for rapid Dengue virus (DENV serotype diagnosis, in the early infection stage, is reported. The four-layer assay is immobilized onto a thin gold film and relies on a low cost, disposable polymer biochip for optical surface plasmon resonance sensing and detection. The protocol comprises Neutravidin-Biotin mediated monoclonal antibody (MAB attachment as the functionalized sensing element. Formation of the MAB-DENV complex results in a pronounced thickness change that is optically recorded in real time, employing a microfluidic set-up. Virus presence is confirmed by atomic force microscopy from the same sample. Serum samples were collected from a patient in acute febrile state. Simultaneous serological analysis by means of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, independently, confirmed presence of DENV2 and DENV3. The protocol proved applicable in presence of strong non-specific binding interference that originates from, and is caused by, various blood, serum and other body fluid constituents. False positive indications for both, negative serum and blood control samples were not observed. The achievable limit of detection was estimated to be 2×104 particles/ml. Eventually, the method can be modified towards detection of other viruses by using the same protocol. Keywords: Immuno-assay, Dengue virus detection, Non-specific binding

  6. Enhanced Plasmonic Biosensors of Hybrid Gold Nanoparticle-Graphene Oxide-Based Label-Free Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Chen, Chi-Chu; Yang, Cheng-Du; Kao, Yu-Sheng; Wu, Wei-Ren

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we propose a modified gold nanoparticle-graphene oxide sheet (AuNP-GO) nanocomposite to detect two different interactions between proteins and hybrid nanocomposites for use in biomedical applications. GO sheets have high bioaffinity, which facilitates the attachment of biomolecules to carboxyl groups and has led to its use in the development of sensing mechanisms. When GO sheets are decorated with AuNPs, they introduce localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the resonance energy transfer of spectral changes. Our results suggest a promising future for AuNP-GO-based label-free immunoassays to detect disease biomarkers and rapidly diagnose infectious diseases. The results showed the detection of antiBSA in 10 ng/ml of hCG non-specific interfering protein with dynamic responses ranging from 1.45 nM to 145 fM, and a LOD of 145 fM. Considering the wide range of potential applications of GO sheets as a host material for a variety of nanoparticles, the approach developed here may be beneficial for the future integration of nanoparticles with GO nanosheets for blood sensing. The excellent anti-interference characteristics allow for the use of the biosensor in clinical analysis and point-of-care testing (POCT) diagnostics of rapid immunoassay products, and it may also be a potential tool for the measurement of biomarkers in human serum.

  7. Highly sensitive immunoassay of protein molecules based on single nanoparticle fluorescence detection in a nanowell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joo; Lakshmana, Sudheendra; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2011-03-01

    A nanoarray based-single molecule detection system was developed for detecting proteins with extremely high sensitivity. The nanoarray was able to effectively trap nanoparticles conjugated with biological sample into nanowells by integrating with an electrophoretic particle entrapment system (EPES). The nanoarray/EPES is superior to other biosensor using immunoassays in terms of saving the amounts of biological solution and enhancing kinetics of antibody binding due to reduced steric hindrance from the neighboring biological molecules. The nanoarray patterned onto a layer of PMMA and LOL on conductive and transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass slide by using e-beam lithography. The suspension of 500 nm-fluorescent (green emission)-carboxylated polystyrene (PS) particles coated with protein-A followed by BDE 47 polyclonal antibody was added to the chip that was connected to the positive voltage. The droplet was covered by another ITO-coated-glass slide and connected to a ground terminal. After trapping the particles into the nanowells, the solution of different concentrations of anti-rabbit- IgG labeled with Alexa 532 was added for an immunoassay. A single molecule detection system could quantify the anti-rabbit IgG down to atto-mole level by counting photons emitted from the fluorescent dye bound to a single nanoparticle in a nanowell.

  8. Characterization of hapten-protein conjugates: antibody generation and immunoassay development for chlorophenoxyacetic acid pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boro, Robin C; Singh, K Vikas; Suri, C Raman

    2009-01-01

    The generation of specific and sensitive antibodies against small molecules is greatly dependent upon the characteristics of the hapten-protein conjugates. In this study, we report a new fluorescence-based method for the characterization of hapten-protein conjugates. The method is based on an effect promoted by hapten-protein conjugation density upon the fluorescence intensity of the intrinsic tryptophan chromophore molecules of the protein. The proposed methodology is applied to quantify the hapten-protein conjugation density for two different chlorophenoxyacetic acid pesticides, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid (2,4-DB), coupled to carrier protein. Highly sensitive anti-2,4-D and anti-2,4-DB antibodies were obtained using these well-characterized hapten-protein conjugates. The generated antibodies were used in an immunoassay format demonstrating inhibitory concentration (IC50) values equal to 30 and 7 ng/mL for 2,4-D and 2,4-DB, respectively. Linearity was observed in the concentration range between 0.1-500 nglmL with LODs around 4 and 3 ng/mL for 2,4-D and 2,4-DB, respectively, in standard water samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the extent of hapten-protein conjugation to produce specific antibodies for immunoassay development against pesticides.

  9. Myeloma-Derived Light Chain Paired with a Diagnostic Monoclonal Antibody Hinders Immunoassay Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Bailin; Tieman, Bryan; Moore, Jeffrey; Pan, You; Muerhoff, A Scott

    2017-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used as the capture and detection reagents in diagnostic immunoassays. In the past, myeloma fusion partners expressing endogenous heavy and/or light chains were often used to generate hybridoma cell lines. As a result, mixed populations of antibodies were produced that can cause inaccurate test results, poor antibody stability, and significant lot-to-lot variability. We describe one such scenario where the P3U1 (P3X63Ag8U.1) myeloma fusion partner was used in the generation of a hybridoma producing protein induced vitamin K absence/antagonist-II (PIVKA II) antibody. The hybridoma produces three subpopulations of immunoglobulin as determined by ion exchange (IEx) chromatography that exhibit varying degrees of immunoreactivity (0%, 50%, or 100%) to the target antigen as determined by Surface Plasmon Resonance. To produce an antibody with the highest possible sensitivity and specificity, the antigen-specific heavy and light chain variable domains (VH and VL) were cloned from the hybridoma and tethered to murine IgG1 and kappa scaffolds. The resulting recombinant antibody was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and is compatible for use in a diagnostic immunoassay.

  10. New antibody and immunoassay pretreatment strategy to screen polychlorinated biphenyls in Korean transformer oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakado, Shingo; Ohmura, Naoya; Park, Seok-Un; Lee, Seung-Min; Glass, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Development and modifications are described that expand the application of an immunoassay from the detection of Kanechlors (Japanese technical PCBs mixtures) to the detection of Aroclors (U. S. technical PCB mixtures, used in Korea) in contaminated Korean transformer oil. The first necessary modification was the development of a new antibody with a reactivity profile favorable for Aroclors. The second modification was the addition of a second column to the solid-phase extraction method to reduce assay interference caused by the Korean oil matrix. The matrix interference is suspected to be caused by the presence of synthetic oils (or similar materials) present as contaminants. The modified assay was validated by comparison to high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis, and was shown to be tolerant of up to 10% of several common synthetic insulating oils. Finally the screening performance of the modified assay was evaluated using 500 used transformer oil samples of Korean origin, and was shown to have good performance in terms of false positive and false negative rates. This report provides evidence for the first establishment of immunoassay screening for Aroclor based PCB contamination in Korean transformer oil.

  11. A summary report on the 23rd quality control survey for immunoassays in Japan, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of the survey is to improve the quality of in vitro tests and this report is its summary of immunoassays (the old name: RI in vitro tests) conducted in 2001. The survey was performed in 143 facilities out of 1,655 in Japan, which involved 20 national and public university hospitals, 16 private university hospitals, 21 national and public hospitals, 26 private hospitals, 41 hygiene test institutes and 19 reagent manufacturers. Tests examined were on 6 substances related to functions of pituitary, 5 of thyroid, 1 of parathyroid, 4 of gastro-intestine and pancreas, 5 of gonad and placenta, 4 of adrenal, 1 of renal-blood pressure regulation, on IgE, on digoxin and on 12 tumor-related substances. Tests were done on 2-3 samples supplied from the Committee and the mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation were calculated for one way analysis of variance of within- and between-kit. Methods included those (65.4% vs 62.7% in 2000) with non-radioisotope like enzyme immunoassay (non-RI) and with radioisotopes like radioimmunoassay (RI). Dissociation between manufacturers of non-RI values without a common standard substance and between non-RI and RI values even with the same antibody was noted: the Committee considered these problems as their future task. (K.H.)

  12. Photoelectrochemical detection of enzymatically generated CdS nanoparticles: Application to development of immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Javier; Saa, Laura; Grinyte, Ruta; Pavlov, Valeri

    2016-03-15

    We report an innovative photoelectrochemical process (PEC) based on graphite electrode modified with electroactive polyvinylpyridine bearing osmium complex (Os-PVP). The system relies on the in situ enzymatic generation of CdS quantum dots (QDs). Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) catalyzes the hydrolisis of sodium thiophosphate (TP) to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) which in the presence Cd(2+) ions yields CdS semiconductor nanoparticles (SNPs). Irradiation of SNPs with the standard laboratory UV-illuminator (wavelength of 365 nm) results in photooxidation of 1-thioglycerol (TG) mediated by Os-PVP complex on the surface of graphite electrode at applied potential of 0.31 V vs. Ag/AgCl. A novel immunoassay based on specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) combined with the PEC methodology was developed. Having selected the affinity interaction between bovine serum albumine (BSA) with anti-BSA antibody (AB) as a model system, we built the PEC immunoassay for AB. The new assay displays a linear range up to 20 ngmL(-1) and a detection limit (DL) of 2 ngmL(-1) (S/N=3) which is lower 5 times that of the traditional chromogenic ELISA test employing p-nitro-phenyl phosphate (pNPP). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a simple extraction procedure for chlorpyrifos determination in food samples by immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaldón, J A; Maquieira, A; Puchades, R

    2007-02-28

    The suitability of immunoassay methodology for rapid and accurate determination of chlorpyrifos in vegetables was tested. The optimised ELISA detection limit was 0.32ng/ml, with a working range from 0.69 to 6.21ng/ml and an immunoassay test-mid point (IC(50)) of 2.08ng/ml. A rapid sample preparation procedure considering different parameters such as the amount of sample, volume of extractant, extraction time and dilution factor was optimised. The developed direct extraction (DE) and multiresidue (ME) standard procedures were performed in different fortified fresh and processed vegetable samples (tomato, bonnet pepper, bean, pea, asparagus, broccoli, watermelon, melon, lettuce, cucumber, celery and red pepper). Recoveries were in all cases in the whole range 85.2-108.9% for both DE and ME extracts. Also, the comparison of the results obtained by both immunochemical and chromatographic methods for spiked fruits and vegetables were good with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.97.

  14. Dog cloning with in vivo matured oocytes obtained using electric chemiluminescence immunoassay-predicted ovulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghoon; Zhao, Minghui; No, Jingu; Nam, Yoonseok; Im, Gi-Sun; Hur, Tai-Young

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive immunoassay (RIA) is a traditional serum hormone assay method, but the application of the method in reproductive studies is limited by the associated radioactivity. The aim of present study was to evaluate the reliability of RIA and to compare its canine serum progesterone concentration determination accuracy to that of the electric chemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLI). In vivo matured oocytes were utilized for canine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and serum progesterone levels were assessed to accurately determine ovulation and oocyte maturation. Canine serum progesterone concentrations during both proestrus and estrus were analyzed by RIA and ECLI to determine the ovulation day. Although both methods detected similar progesterone levels before ovulation, the mean progesterone concentration determined using ECLI was significantly higher than of RIA three days before ovulation. Following ovulation, oocytes were collected by surgery, and a lower percentage of mature oocytes were observed using ECLI (39%) as compared to RIA (67%) if 4-8ng/ml of progesterone were used for determination of ovulation. A high percentage of mature oocytes was observed using ECLI when 6-15 ng/mL of progesterone was used for ovulation determination. To determine whether ECLI could be used for canine cloning, six canines were selected as oocyte donors, and two puppies were obtained after SCNT and embryo transfer. In conclusion, compared to the traditional RIA method, the ECLI method is a safe and reliable method for canine cloning.

  15. Screening for cocaine on Euro banknotes by a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelshafi, Nahla A; Panne, Ulrich; Schneider, Rudolf J

    2017-04-01

    This study focused on quantitative detection of cocaine on Euro banknotes in Germany. A sensitive direct competitive immunoassay was developed and optimized with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5.6ng/L. Exhaustive cocaine extraction by solvent was tested using different methanol concentrations and buffered solutions. Cross-reactivity studies were performed to determine the degree of interference of cocaine metabolites with the immunoassay. Sixty-five Euro banknotes obtained from different districts in Berlin were evaluated. A 100% contamination frequency with cocaine was detected. A comparison between the amount of cocaine extracted by cotton swabbing of one square centimeter of the banknote showed a good correlation for lower contamination levels. This assay showed high sensitivity of detecting pg of cocaine per 1cm 2 of one banknote by swabbing 1cm 2 : 0, 14, and 21pg/cm 2 . Moreover, three notes of different denominations revealed high cocaine concentration; 1.1mg/note, and twice 55µg/note. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation and comparison of radio-, fluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunoassays for serum thyroxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, L.A.; Gau, N.; Fearn, J.; Steain, E.A.; Chen, I.W.; Maxon, H.; Volle, C.

    1981-01-01

    We have compared three analytical systems for the measurement of serum thyroxine: enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA), fluorescent immunoassay (FIA) and a radioimmunoassay (RIA). These were evaluated with respect to their precision, accuracy, analytical sensitivity and sample throughput. The RIA is more sensitive than the EIA (10 μg/L vs. 35 μg/L). Both systems have excellent precision (X=86 μg/L, C.V.sub(RIA)=C.V.sub(EIA)=4.6 percent). Both the EIA and RIA demonstrate good accuracy with recovery of between 97-98 percent of added thyroxine. The FIA has an apparent sensitiviity between that of the RIA and EIA (25 μg/L), but a precision consistently lower than the other two systems (C.V. =7.4 percent, X=86 μg/L). Patients' results by RIA compared well with those from EIA (r=0.91,P 0.05). Although not fully automated, the EIA performed on the Abbott ABA-100 analyzer has a sample throughput equal to the automated RIA system (Micromedic, Concept 4)

  17. Alkaline phosphatase labeled SERS active sandwich immunoassay for detection of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Akif Goktug; Buyukgoz, Guluzar Gorkem; Soforoglu, Mehmet; Tamer, Ugur; Suludere, Zekiye; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a sandwich immunoassay method utilizing enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) on 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (BCIP) for Escherichia coli (E. coli) detection was developed using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). For this purpose, spherical magnetic gold coated core-shell nanoparticles (MNPs-Au) and rod shape gold nanoparticles (Au-NRs) were synthesized and modified for immunomagnetic separation (IMS) of E. coli from the solution. In order to specify the developed method to ALP activity, Au-NRs were labeled with this enzyme. After successful construction of the immunoassay, BCIP substrate was added to produce the SERS-active product; 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indole (BCI). A good linearity (R2 = 0.992) was established between the specific SERS intensity of BCI at 600 cm- 1 and logarithmic E. coli concentration in the range of 1.7 × 101-1.7 × 106 cfu mL- 1. LOD and LOQ values were also calculated and found to be 10 cfu mL- 1 and 30 cfu mL- 1, respectively.

  18. Comparison of immunoassays for differentiation of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapper, Paul E.; Valley, Pam J.; Cleator, Gerham M.; Mandall, D.; Qutub, Mohammed O.

    2006-01-01

    To asses the commercial available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for differentiation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (Hs-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) antibodies. The study was performed between January 1997 to November 2002 in the Division ofVirology,Department of Pathological Sciences, Central Manchester Healthcare Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. Assays based upon type-specific glycoprotein G-1 (gG-1) for HSV-1, and glycoprotein G-2 (gG-2) from HSV-2 were evaluated to differentiate between HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies. Using 5 different ELISA tests, 2 panels of serum samples were tested. Panel one consisted of 88 sera, selected from the serum bank of the Clinical Virology Laboratory, Manchester Royal Infirmary; panel 2 comprised of 90 sera selected from samples collected from Bangladeshi female commercial workers.The data of this study showed that a high rate of gG-1 based immunoassays ranged from 87.9-100% for sensitivity and 51.5-100% specificity. Although there are several immunoassays were claimed to differentiate between HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies, selection of these assays should be carefully interpreted with the overall clinical framework provided by detailed sexual history and genital examination. (author)

  19. [Membrane-filtration immunoassay: reagents, methods and the diagnostic and technical means for detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khramov, E N; Osin, N S; Pomelova, V G; Vikha, I V; Bychenkova, T A; Smirnova, V G; Grakina, G I; Kas'ianova, T A

    1999-01-01

    The comprehensive development of dot-EIA made at the State Research Institute of Biological Instrument-Making Industry has provided devices KIMF-02 and KIMF-03), a base of chemical reagents, immunoassays, test systems for detection of a wide range of causative agents of viral and bacterial infections, that of serodiagnosis of their related diseases. The KIMF-02 kit has undergone engineering and medical tests and recommended for the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation to produce them in stock. The kit includes all required for analysis even in an ill-equipped laboratory, a set of attached agents ensures a valid visual recording of results. The developed procedures and test systems allow the immunoassay to be as sensitive as TIFA; however, they are laborious and much simpler in design. The simple and rapid procedures of dot-EIA are recommended for incorporation into the a package of laboratory methods for verification of the accumulation of virus-specific antigens in various biological substrata, environmental samples, for control of the activity of antigens and antibodies used in serological tests, for detection of specific antigens in the clinical samples, and for serodiagnosis of infections.

  20. Development of a mass spectrometry immunoassay for unambiguous detection of egg allergen traces in wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilolli, Rosa; Chaudhari, Ravindra; Palmisano, Francesco; Monaci, Linda

    2017-02-01

    A mass spectrometry immunoassay (MSIA) specifically designed for the detection of egg allergens in wines is described. MSIA is based on an immunoaffinity enrichment procedure combined with targeted MS/MS detection of selected egg peptide markers. Polyclonal antibodies raised against native ovalbumin, chosen as the target protein tracing for egg powder, were immobilized onto low backpressure monolithic MSIA customized disposable tips. Ovalbumin-free wine samples were fortified with standard protein at different concentrations in the low microgram-per-milliliter range. A simple protocol was devised consisting of a 1:4 dilution of the wine sample with a basic solution for pH adjustment, followed by a semi-automated purification/enrichment step on MSIA customized disposable tips fitted on a multichannel electronic pipette. Among the main figures of merit, LOD and LOQ values as low as 0.01 and 0.03 μg/mL, respectively, and within-day precision of 18% should be noticed. Noteworthy, the developed assay outperformed current MS-based methods for the detection of allergenic protein in wine matrices, thanks to the immunoaffinity enrichment. In addition, compared to other immunoassays, the present approach boasts the unquestionable advantage of providing an unambiguous identification of the target protein by simultaneous detection of three unique peptide markers each giving three specific MS/MS transitions.

  1. Enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Dinesen, B; Deckert, M

    1985-01-01

    variation of the 24 h urine albumin excretion of different days was high in patients with incipient diabetic nephropathy (51.5%) and was only slightly reduced by taking the variation of creatinine excretion into account (39.5%). No correlation was found between albumin excretion, and HbA1c or urine glucose...

  2. Immunoassay technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodearl, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    For quantitatively assaying antigen in a fluid, a mixture thereof with further antigen, labelled for example by substitution or addition of a radioactive molecule is caused to flow along a paper wick or other carrier on which antibodies to the antigen have been immobilised, e.g. by activating the paper by application of cyanogen bromide, then bringing it into contact with a solution of the antibodies. The paper wick or other carrier is developed by causing a glycerol/water solution to rise through the wick by capillary action, and there is measured the distance travelled along the wick by the labelled antigen. (author)

  3. Correlation of antinuclear antibody immunofluorescence patterns with immune profile using line immunoassay in the Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wendy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunity status, individual response to disease and types of antibodies produced are well known to vary from person to person, place to place and probably from population to population. A broad spectrum of specific auto antibodies that have so far been associated with specific rheumatic diseases, as noted in Western literature, has been well taken as a reference standard all over the world. There is neither research work nor any data correlating the auto antibodies and their antinuclear antibody (ANA patterns with the immunoprofile in the Indian population to date. Aims: To understand a definite association between ANA patterns and specific antibodies in the serum in the Indian study population and to document similarities / differences with the West. Settings and Design: This prospective and retrospective double blind study was undertaken on the South Indian population referred for ANA testing by Indirect Immunofluorescence method and by immunoline methods. Materials and Methods: Serum samples of patients from a random South Indian population who sought medical help for rheumatic disease were subjected for ANA testing by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF method and line immunoassay during the study period of 27 months. Serum samples were processed in dilution of 1:100 using HEp - 2010 / liver biochip (Monkey (EUROIMMUN AG. The serum samples which were further processed for line immunoassay were treated in 1:100 dilution on nylon strips coated with recombinant and purified antigens as discrete lines with plastic backing (EUROIMMUN AG coated with antigens nRNP / Sm, Sm, SSA, Ro-52, SSB, Scl-70, PM-Scl, PCNA, Jo-1, CENP-B, dsDNA, nucleosomes, histones, ribosomal protein-P, anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA-M2 along with a control band. The analysis was done by comparing the intensity of the reaction with positive control line by image analysis. Results: The antinuclear antibody indirect immunofluorescence (ANA - IIF patterns obtained

  4. Pareto Principle in Datamining: an Above-Average Fencing Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Macek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper formulates a new datamining problem: which subset of input space has the relatively highest output where the minimal size of this subset is given. This can be useful where usual datamining methods fail because of error distribution asymmetry. The paper provides a novel algorithm for this datamining problem, and compares it with clustering of above-average individuals.

  5. Clinical validation of a point-of-care multiplexed in vitro immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies (the MSD influenza test) in four hospitals in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, H Rogier; Kinh, Nguyen van; Tuan, Ha Manh; Tuan, Tran Anh; Minh, Ngo Ngoc Quang; Bryant, Juliet E; Hang, Vu thi Ty; Uyen, Le thi Tham; Thinh, Le Quoc; Anh, Tran thi Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Trung, Nguyen Vu; Taylor, Walter; Merson, Laura; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Farrar, Jeremy; Wolbers, Marcel; Chau, Nguyen van Vinh; de Jong, Menno D

    2012-05-01

    Point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tests for influenza can considerably shorten the time to clinical decision making. An investigational POC test based on a multiplexed immunoassay was developed by Meso Scale Diagnostics, LLC (MSD), with the objective to make a more sensitive rapid test that can also subtype influenza A viruses (1977 H1, H3, and H5). Between February and November 2010, we conducted a prospective multicenter study at four hospitals in Vietnam and compared the performance of this test to that of the WHO/CDC real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) on nasal and throat swab specimens from patients presenting with influenza-like illness. Five hundred sixty-three adults and children with a median age of 25 months were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of the test with combined results from nasal and throat swab samples were 74.0% (131/177) and 99.7% (351/352), respectively, compared to RT-PCR. The POC test was as sensitive for influenza virus B as for influenza virus A (74.4% [64/86] versus 73.6% [67/91]). The positivity rate was associated with lower cycle threshold values (a marker for higher viral loads), sample type (73.6% for nasal swab versus 52.4% for throat swab), and younger age. A total of 210 (18.7%) out of 1,126 MSD tests failed, and for 34 (6%) of patients, both test samples failed (these were excluded from the performance analysis). Subtyping could be assessed only for influenza virus A/H3N2, as 1977 H1N1 was not circulating at the time and no H5N1-infected patients were enrolled, and was successful only in 9/54 patients infected with H3 influenza virus who had a positive POC test result for influenza virus A. This novel POC test provided highly sensitive detection of influenza viruses A and B compared to the reported sensitivities of other rapid tests. However, 18.7% of tests failed for technical reasons and subtyping for H3 was poor. Drawbacks to the technology include the requirement for a dedicated reader instrument and the need for

  6. Fermion cluster algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekharan, Shailesh

    2000-01-01

    Cluster algorithms have been recently used to eliminate sign problems that plague Monte-Carlo methods in a variety of systems. In particular such algorithms can also be used to solve sign problems associated with the permutation of fermion world lines. This solution leads to the possibility of designing fermion cluster algorithms in certain cases. Using the example of free non-relativistic fermions we discuss the ideas underlying the algorithm

  7. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  8. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV's) in S area. The FESV's are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request

  9. Successive approximation algorithm for cancellation of artifacts in DSA images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funakami, Raiko; Hiroshima, Kyoichi; Nishino, Junji

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for cancellation of artifacts in DSA images. We have already proposed an automatic registration method based on the detection of local movements. When motion of the object is large, it is difficult to estimate the exact movement, and the cancellation of artifacts may therefore fail. The algorithm we propose here is based on a simple rigid model. We present the results of applying the proposed method to a series of experimental X-ray images, as well as the results of applying the algorithm as preprocessing for a registration method based on local movement. (author)

  10. A decoupled power flow algorithm using particle swarm optimization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharjee, P.; Goswami, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    A robust, nondivergent power flow method has been developed using the particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique. The decoupling properties between the power system quantities have been exploited in developing the power flow algorithm. The speed of the power flow algorithm has been improved using a simple perturbation technique. The basic power flow algorithm and the improvement scheme have been designed to retain the simplicity of the evolutionary approach. The power flow is rugged, can determine the critical loading conditions and also can handle the flexible alternating current transmission system (FACTS) devices efficiently. Test results on standard test systems show that the proposed method can find the solution when the standard power flows fail.

  11. A verified LLL algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Divasón, Jose; Joosten, Sebastiaan; Thiemann, René; Yamada, Akihisa

    2018-01-01

    The Lenstra-Lenstra-Lovász basis reduction algorithm, also known as LLL algorithm, is an algorithm to find a basis with short, nearly orthogonal vectors of an integer lattice. Thereby, it can also be seen as an approximation to solve the shortest vector problem (SVP), which is an NP-hard problem,

  12. Diagnosing acute HIV infection: The performance of quantitative HIV-1 RNA testing (viral load) in the 2014 laboratory testing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiu; Cohen, Stephanie E; Westheimer, Emily; Gay, Cynthia L; Hall, Laura; Rose, Charles; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Gose, Severin; Fu, Jie; Peters, Philip J

    2017-08-01

    New recommendations for laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection in the United States were published in 2014. The updated testing algorithm includes a qualitative HIV-1 RNA assay to resolve discordant immunoassay results and to identify acute HIV-1 infection (AHI). The qualitative HIV-1 RNA assay is not widely available; therefore, we evaluated the performance of a more widely available quantitative HIV-1 RNA assay, viral load, for diagnosing AHI. We determined that quantitative viral loads consistently distinguished AHI from a false-positive immunoassay result. Among 100 study participants with AHI and a viral load result, the estimated geometric mean viral load was 1,377,793copies/mL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Help in the Choice of Automated or Semiautomated Immunoassays for Serological Diagnosis of Toxoplasmosis: Evaluation of Nine Immunoassays by the French National Reference Center for Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, O; Cimon, B; L'Ollivier, C; Fricker-Hidalgo, H; Godineau, N; Houze, S; Paris, L; Pelloux, H; Villena, I; Candolfi, E

    2016-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis, a benign infection, is asymptomatic or paucisymptomatic in over 80% of cases, except in immunocompetent patients suffering from ocular toxoplasmosis or in immunocompromised patients with opportunistic or congenital toxoplasmosis. Diagnosis is based mainly on serology testing. Thus, we compared the performance of the nine most commonly used commercial automated or semiautomated immunoassays for IgG and IgM Toxoplasma gondii antibody detection, that is, the Advia Centaur, Architect, AxSYM, Elecsys, Enzygnost, Liaison, Platelia, VIDAS, and VIDIA assays. The assays were conducted on four panels of serum samples derived during routine testing from patients with an interfering disease and who exhibited a low IgG antibody level in one of two clinical settings, namely, acute or chronic toxoplasmosis. As a result, IgG sensitivities ranged from 97.1% to 100%, and IgG specificities ranged from 99.5% to 100%. For IgG quantification, strong differences in IgG titers (expressed in IU/ml) were noted depending on the assay used. IgM sensitivities ranged from 65% to 97.9%, and IgM specificities ranged from 92.6% to 100%. For defining the best serological strategies to be implemented, it appears crucial to compare the diagnostic performance of the different tests with respect to their specificity and sensitivity in detecting the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. [Fractographic analysis of clinically failed anterior all ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Qian; Zhou, Min-bo; Zhang, Xin-ping; Zhao, Ke

    2012-04-01

    To identify the site of crack initiation and propagation path of clinically failed all ceramic crowns by fractographic analysis. Three clinically failed anterior IPS Empress II crowns and two anterior In-Ceram alumina crowns were retrieved. Fracture surfaces were examined using both optical stereo and scanning electron microscopy. Fractographic theory and fracture mechanics principles were applied to disclose the damage characteristics and fracture mode. All the crowns failed by cohesive failure within the veneer on the labial surface. Critical crack originated at the incisal contact area and propagated gingivally. Porosity was found within the veneer because of slurry preparation and the sintering of veneer powder. Cohesive failure within the veneer is the main failure mode of all ceramic crown. Veneer becomes vulnerable when flaws are present. To reduce the chances of chipping, multi-point occlusal contacts are recommended, and layering and sintering technique of veneering layer should also be improved.

  15. Fail-safe reactivity compensation method for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Erik T.; Angelo, Peter L.; Aase, Scott B.

    2018-01-23

    The present invention relates generally to the field of compensation methods for nuclear reactors and, in particular to a method for fail-safe reactivity compensation in solution-type nuclear reactors. In one embodiment, the fail-safe reactivity compensation method of the present invention augments other control methods for a nuclear reactor. In still another embodiment, the fail-safe reactivity compensation method of the present invention permits one to control a nuclear reaction in a nuclear reactor through a method that does not rely on moving components into or out of a reactor core, nor does the method of the present invention rely on the constant repositioning of control rods within a nuclear reactor in order to maintain a critical state.

  16. Nature-inspired optimization algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2014-01-01

    Nature-Inspired Optimization Algorithms provides a systematic introduction to all major nature-inspired algorithms for optimization. The book's unified approach, balancing algorithm introduction, theoretical background and practical implementation, complements extensive literature with well-chosen case studies to illustrate how these algorithms work. Topics include particle swarm optimization, ant and bee algorithms, simulated annealing, cuckoo search, firefly algorithm, bat algorithm, flower algorithm, harmony search, algorithm analysis, constraint handling, hybrid methods, parameter tuning

  17. VISUALIZATION OF PAGERANK ALGORITHM

    OpenAIRE

    Perhaj, Ervin

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the thesis is to develop a web application that help users understand the functioning of the PageRank algorithm. The thesis consists of two parts. First we develop an algorithm to calculate PageRank values of web pages. The input of algorithm is a list of web pages and links between them. The user enters the list through the web interface. From the data the algorithm calculates PageRank value for each page. The algorithm repeats the process, until the difference of PageRank va...

  18. Parallel sorting algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Akl, Selim G

    1985-01-01

    Parallel Sorting Algorithms explains how to use parallel algorithms to sort a sequence of items on a variety of parallel computers. The book reviews the sorting problem, the parallel models of computation, parallel algorithms, and the lower bounds on the parallel sorting problems. The text also presents twenty different algorithms, such as linear arrays, mesh-connected computers, cube-connected computers. Another example where algorithm can be applied is on the shared-memory SIMD (single instruction stream multiple data stream) computers in which the whole sequence to be sorted can fit in the

  19. Nanobody-based electrochemical immunoassay for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin by detecting the enzymatic formation of polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Min; Li, Guanghui; Li, Min; Zhou, Zikai; Liu, Hong; Lei, Hongtao; Shen, Yanfei; Wan, Yakun

    2015-01-01

    We describe an electrochemical immunoassay for the Cry1Ab toxin that is produced by Bacillus thuringiensis. It is making use of a nanobody (a heavy-chain only antibody) that was selected from an immune phage displayed library. A biotinylated primary nanobody and a HRP-conjugated secondary nanobody were applied in a sandwich immunoassay where horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used to produce polyaniline (PANI) from aniline. PANI can be easily detected by differential pulse voltammetry at a working voltage as low as 40 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) which makes the assay fairly selective. This immunoassay for Cry1Ab has an analytical range from 0.1 to 1000 ng∙mL -1 and a 0.07 ng∙mL -1 lower limit of detection. The average recoveries of the toxin from spiked samples are in the range from 102 to 114 %, with a relative standard deviation of <7.5 %. The results demonstrated that the assay represented an attractive alternative to existing immunoassays in enabling affordable, sensitive, robust and specific determination of this toxin. (author)

  20. Tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) immunoassay as an in vitro alternative assay for identity and confirmation of potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei M; Kairo, Satnam K; Corbel, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) currently can only be standardised by delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions in sensitised guinea pigs. An in vitro dot blot immunoassay was developed for both identity and confirmation of potency estimation of PPD. Polyclonal antibodies (mainly IgG) were generated and immunoreacted with human, bovine and, to lesser extent, avian PPD preparations. Combining size exclusion chromatography (FPLC-SEC) and dot blot immunoassay, the results showed that PPD preparations were mixtures of very heterogeneous tuberculoproteins ranging in size from very large aggregates to very small degraded molecules. All individual fractions of PPD separated by size were immunoreactive, although those of the largest molecular sizes appeared the most immunoreactive in this in vitro dot blot immunoassay. This method is very sensitive and specific to tuberculoproteins and can be an in vitro alternative for the in vivo intradermal skin assay which uses guinea pigs for identity of PPD preparations. Although the capacity of PPD to elicit cell-mediated immune responses on intradermal testing has to be confirmed by in vivo assay, the dot blot immunoassay offers a rapid, sensitive and animal-free alternative to in vivo testing for confirming the identity of PPD preparations with appropriate potencies. This alternative assay would be particularly useful for national regulatory laboratories for confirming the data of manufacturers and thus reducing the use of animals.

  1. Detection of hidden hazelnut protein in food by IgY-based indirect competitive enzyme-immunoassay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, S.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Kemmers - Voncken, A.E.M.; Smits, N.G.E.; Haasnoot, W.; Banks, J.; Reece, P.; Danks, C.; Tomkies, V.; Immer, U.; Schmitt, K.; Krska, R.

    2004-01-01

    The development of an indirect competitive enzyme-immunoassay for the detection of hidden hazelnut protein in complex food matrices is described. A sensitive and selective polyclonal antibody was raised by immunisation of laying hens with protein extracts from roasted hazelnuts. In contrast to

  2. Plasmon enhanced fluoro-immunoassay using egg yolk antibodies for ultra-sensitive detection of herbicide diuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Kukkar, Manil; Ganguli, Ashok K; Bhasin, Aman; Suri, C Raman

    2013-08-07

    Plasmon enhanced fluorescence immunoassay (PEFI) format has been reported in developing a sensitive heterogeneous fluoroimmunoassay for monitoring the phenylurea herbicide diuron. Computer-assisted molecular modeling was carried out to study the conformational and electrostatic effects of synthesized hapten for producing highly specific egg yolk antibody against a phenyl urea herbicide diuron. The generated antibodies were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate at different molar ratios and used as tracer in the developed fluorescence based immunoassay. The sensitivity of the assay format was enhanced by using silver nanoparticles tagged with bovine serum albumin as a new blocking reagent in the developed PEFI format. Enhancer treatment on the developed immunoassay showed a significant improvement of fluorescence signal intensity with approximately 10 fold increase in assay sensitivity. The immunoassay has a detection limit of 0.01 ng mL(-1) with good signal precision (~2%) in the optimum working concentration range between 1 pg mL(-1) to 10 μg mL(-1) of diuron. These findings facilitate high throughput fluorescence-based processes that could be useful in biology, drug discovery and compound screening applications.

  3. Evaluation of a fluorescence polarographic immunoassay with increased sensitivity for measurement of low concentrations of tobramycin in serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; de Graaf, A I; de Goede, P

    The limits of quantitation of the assay of tobramycin in serum by the fluorescence polarization immunoassay system marketed by Abbott Laboratories (TDxFLx system) are 0.1 and 10.0 mg/L. For some pharmacokinetic studies, however, a more sensitive analysis is needed. The sensitivity of the TDxFLx

  4. Development of a nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay for simultaneous detection of Listeria spp. and Listeriamonocytogenes in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blazkova, M.; Koets, M.; Rauch, P.; Amerongen, van A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay (NALFIA) for the assessment of listeria contamination. The detection procedure starts with enrichment of sample in Half Fraser broth (24 h). Following isolation of DNA, a duplex PCR is performed with two labelled primer sets, one generic and

  5. Fabrication and characterization of tosyl-activated magnetic and nonmagnetic monodisperse microspheres for use in microfluic-based ferritin immunoassay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reymond, F.; Vollet, Ch.; Plichta, Zdeněk; Horák, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2013), s. 532-542 ISSN 8756-7938 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12053; GA ČR GAP503/10/0664 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 246513 - NADINE Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : biosensors * electrochemistry * immunoassays Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  6. Strip-based immunoassay for the simultaneous detection of the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and thiamethoxam in agricultural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    A semiquantitative strip immunoassay was developed for the rapid detection of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam in agricultural products using specific nanocolloidal gold-labeled monoclonal antibodies. The conjugates of imidacloprid-BSA and thiamethoxam-BSA and goat anti-mouse IgG were coated on the ni...

  7. Evaluation of two automated enzyme-immunoassays for detection of thermophilic campylobacters in faecal samples from cattle and swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Nielsen, E.M.; Stryhn, H.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of two enzyme-immunoassays (EIA) for the detection of naturally occurring, thermophilic Campylobacter spp. found in faecal samples from cattle (n = 21 and n = 26) and swine (n = 43) relative to the standard culture method, and also assuming that none of the tests...

  8. Quantification of patient specific assay interference in different formats of enzyme linked immunoassays for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grebenchtchikov, N.J.; Geurts-Moespot, A.; Heijmen, L.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Thijs, A.M.J.; Span, P.N.; Sweep, F.C.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundThe use of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for clinical purposes has significantly increased in recent years, and so has the need to monitor antibody concentrations. This may be achieved using the well-established enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) methods; however, these assays are

  9. Quantification of patient-specific assay interference in different formats of enzyme-linked immunoassays for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grebenchtchikov, Nicolai; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke J.; Heijmen, Linda; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Herpen, Carla M. L.; Thijs, Annemarie M. J.; Span, Paul N.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for clinical purposes has significantly increased in recent years, and so has the need to monitor antibody concentrations. This may be achieved using the well-established enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) methods; however, these assays are subject to a

  10. Development of a Nanobody-Based Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Detection of Human Norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerflinger, Sylvie Y; Tabatabai, Julia; Schnitzler, Paul; Farah, Carlo; Rameil, Steffen; Sander, Peter; Koromyslova, Anna; Hansman, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis. These viruses are usually detected by molecular methods, including reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Human noroviruses are genetically and antigenically diverse, with two main genogroups that are further subdivided into over 40 different genotypes. During the past decade, genogroup 2 genotype 4 (GII.4) has dominated in most countries, but recently, viruses belonging to GII.17 have increased in prevalence in a number of countries. A number of commercially available ELISAs and lateral flow immunoassays were found to have lower sensitivities to the GII.17 viruses, indicating that the antibodies used in these methods may not have a high level of cross-reactivity. In this study, we developed a rapid Nanobody-based lateral flow immunoassay (Nano-immunochromatography [Nano-IC]) for the detection of human norovirus in clinical specimens. The Nano-IC assay detected virions from two GII.4 norovirus clusters, which included the current dominant strain and a novel variant strain. The Nano-IC method had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 86% for outbreak specimens. Norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs) representing four genotypes (GII.4, GII.10, GII.12, and GII.17) could be detected by this method, demonstrating the potential in clinical screening. However, further modifications to the Nano-IC method are needed in order to improve this sensitivity, which may be achieved by the addition of other broadly reactive Nanobodies to the system. IMPORTANCE We previously identified a Nanobody (termed Nano-85) that bound to a highly conserved region on the norovirus capsid. In this study, the Nanobody was biotinylated and gold conjugated for a lateral flow immunoassay (termed Nano-IC). We showed that the Nano-IC assay was capable of detecting at least four antigenically distinct GII genotypes, including the newly emerging GII.17. In the clinical setting, the

  11. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Non-Competitive Immunoassay for Specific Detection of Nodularin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Akter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nodularin (NOD is a cyclic penta-peptide hepatotoxin mainly produced by Nodularia spumigena, reported from the brackish water bodies of various parts of the world. It can accumulate in the food chain and, for safety reasons, levels of NOD not only in water bodies but also in food matrices are of interest. Here, we report on a non-competitive immunoassay for the specific detection of NOD. A phage display technique was utilized to interrogate a synthetic antibody phage library for binders recognizing NOD bound to an anti-ADDA (3-Amino-9-methoxy-2,6,8-trimethyl-10-phenyldeca-4(E,6(E-dienoic acid monoclonal antibody (Mab. One of the obtained immunocomplex binders, designated SA32C11, showed very high specificity towards nodularin-R (NOD-R over to the tested 10 different microcystins (microcystin-LR, -dmLR, -RR, -dmRR, -YR, -LY, -LF, -LW, -LA, -WR. It was expressed in Escherichia coli as a single chain antibody fragment (scFv fusion protein and used to establish a time-resolved fluorometry-based assay in combination with the anti-ADDA Mab. The detection limit (blank + 3SD of the immunoassay, with a total assay time of 1 h 10 min, is 0.03 µg/L of NOD-R. This represents the most sensitive immunoassay method for the specific detection of NOD reported so far. The assay was tested for its performance to detect NOD using spiked (0.1 to 3 µg/L of NOD-R water samples including brackish sea and coastal water and the recovery ranged from 79 to 127%. Furthermore, a panel of environmental samples, including water from different sources, fish and other marine tissue specimens, were analyzed for NOD using the assay. The assay has potential as a rapid screening tool for the analysis of a large number of water samples for the presence of NOD. It can also find applications in the analysis of the bioaccumulation of NOD in marine organisms and in the food chain.

  12. Sequential injection chemiluminescence immunoassay for nonionic surfactants by using magnetic microbeads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiq; Nakajima, Hizuru; Soh, Nobuaki; Nakano, Koji; Masadome, Takashi; Nagata, Kazumi; Sakamoto, Kazuhira; Imato, Toshihiko

    2007-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive immunoassay based on a sequential injection analysis (SIA) using magnetic microbeads for the determination of alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APnEOs) is described. An SIA system was constructed from a syringe pump, a switching valve, a flow-through type immunoreaction cell equipped with a photon counting unit and a neodymium magnet. Magnetic beads, to which an anti-APnEOs monoclonal antibody was immobilized, were used as a solid support in an immunoassay. The introduction, trapping and release of the magnetic beads in and from the immunoreaction cell were controlled by means of a neodymium magnet and adjusting the flow of a carrier solution. The immunoassay was based on an indirect competitive immunoreaction of an anti-APnEOs monoclonal antibody immobilized on the magnetic beads with a sample APnEOs and a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled APnEOs in the same sample solution, and was based on the subsequent chemiluminscence reaction of HRP on the magnetic microbeads with a luminol solution containing hydrogen peroxide and p-iodophenol. The anti-APnEOs antibody was immobilized on the magnetic microbeads by coupling the antibody with the magnetic beads after activation of a carboxylate moiety on the surface of the magnetic beads that had been coated with a polylactic acid film. The antibody immobilized magnetic beads were introduced in the immunoreaction cell and trapped in it by the neodymium magnet, which was equipped beneath the immunoreaction cell. An APnEOs sample solution containing the HRP-labeled APnEOs at a constant concentration, and a luminol solution containing hydrogen peroxide and p-iodophenol were sequentially introduced into the immunoreaction cell, according to an SIA programmed sequence. Chemiluminescence emission was monitored by means of a photon counting unit located at the upper side of the immunoreaction cell by collecting the emitted light with a lens. A typical sigmoidal calibration curve was obtained, when the logarithm

  13. Assessing the potential cost of a failed Doha round

    OpenAIRE

    Antoine Bouet

    2010-01-01

    This study offers new conclusions on the economic cost of a failed Doha Development Agenda (DDA). We assess potential outcome of the Doha Round as well as four protectionist scenarios using the MIRAGE Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model. In a scenario where applied tariffs of World Trade Organization (WTO) economies would go up to currently bound tariff rates, world trade would decrease by 7.7 % and world welfare by US$353 billion. The economic cost of a failed DDA is here evaluated by...

  14. Failed State and the Mandate of Peacekeeping Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Eka Nizmi, Yusnarida

    2011-01-01

    By 1990, Somalia had become a good example of what was becoming known as a “failed state”- a people without a government strong enough to govern the country or represent it in International organizations; a country whose poverty, disorganization, refugee flows, political instability, and random warfare had the potential to spread across borders and threaten the stability of other states and the peace of the region.[1] At the end of the cold war there were several such failed states in Africa,...

  15. Modified Clipped LMS Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfizad Mojtaba

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new algorithm is proposed for updating the weights of an adaptive filter. The proposed algorithm is a modification of an existing method, namely, the clipped LMS, and uses a three-level quantization ( scheme that involves the threshold clipping of the input signals in the filter weight update formula. Mathematical analysis shows the convergence of the filter weights to the optimum Wiener filter weights. Also, it can be proved that the proposed modified clipped LMS (MCLMS algorithm has better tracking than the LMS algorithm. In addition, this algorithm has reduced computational complexity relative to the unmodified one. By using a suitable threshold, it is possible to increase the tracking capability of the MCLMS algorithm compared to the LMS algorithm, but this causes slower convergence. Computer simulations confirm the mathematical analysis presented.

  16. Rapid Salmonella detection in experimentally inoculated equine faecal and veterinary hospital environmental samples using commercially available lateral flow immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, B A; Noyes, N R; Bolte, D S; Hyatt, D R; van Metre, D C; Morley, P S

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is the most commonly reported cause of outbreaks of nosocomial infections in large animal veterinary teaching hospitals and the closure of equine hospitals. Rapid detection may facilitate effective control practices in equine populations. Shipping and laboratory testing typically require ≥48 h to obtain results. Lateral flow immunoassays developed for use in food-safety microbiology provide an alternative that has not been evaluated for use with faeces or environmental samples. We aimed to identify enrichment methods that would allow commercially available rapid Salmonella detection systems (lateral flow immunoassays) to be used in clinical practice with equine faecal and environmental samples, providing test results in 18-24 h. In vitro experiment. Equine faecal and environmental samples were inoculated with known quantities of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium and cultured using 2 different enrichment techniques for faeces and 4 enrichment techniques for environmental samples. Samples were tested blindly using 2 different lateral flow immunoassays and plated on agar media for confirmatory testing. In general, commercial lateral flow immunoassays resulted in fewer false-negative test results with enrichment of 1 g faecal samples in tetrathionate for 18 h, while all environmental sample enrichment techniques resulted in similar detection rates. The limit of detection from spiked samples, ∼4 colony-forming units/g, was similar for all methods evaluated. The lateral flow immunoassays evaluated could reliably detect S. enterica within 18 h, indicating that they may be useful for rapid point-of-care testing in equine practice applications. Additional evaluation is needed using samples from naturally infected cases and the environment to gain an accurate estimate of test sensitivity and specificity and to substantiate further the true value of these tests in clinical practice. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Modification of a deoxynivalenol-antigen-mimicking nanobody to improve immunoassay sensitivity by site-saturation mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu-Lou; He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    A nanobody (N-28) which can act as a deoxynivalenol (DON) antigen has been generated, and its residues Thr102-Ser106 were identified to bind with anti-DON monoclonal antibody by alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Site-saturation mutagenesis was used to analyze the plasticity of five residues and to improve the sensitivity of the N-28-based immunoassay. After mutagenesis, three mutants were selected by phage immunoassay and were sequenced. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of the immunoassay based on mutants N-28-T102Y, N-28-V103L, and N-28-Y105F were 24.49 ± 1.0, 51.83 ± 2.5, and 35.65 ± 1.6 ng/mL, respectively, showing the assay was, respectively, 3.2, 1.5, and 2.2 times more sensitive than the wild-type-based assay. The best mutant, N-28-T102Y, was used to develop a competitive phage ELISA to detect DON in cereals with high specificity and accuracy. In addition, the structural properties of N-28-T102Y and N-28 were investigated, revealing that the affinity of N-28-T102Y decreased because of increased steric hindrance with the large side chain. The lower-binding-affinity antigen mimetic may contribute to the improvement of the sensitivity of competitive immunoassays. These results demonstrate that nanobodies would be a favorable tool for engineering. Moreover, our results have laid a solid foundation for site-saturation mutagenesis of antigen-mimicking nanobodies to improve immunoassay sensitivity for small molecules.

  18. Comparison of infrared-excited up-converting phosphors and europium nanoparticles as labels in a two-site immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukonaho, Telle; Rantanen, Terhi; Jaemsen, Laura; Kuningas, Katri; Paekkilae, Henna; Loevgren, Timo; Soukka, Tero

    2007-01-01

    Research in the field of immunoassays and labels used in the detection has been recently focused on particulate reporters, which possess very high specific activity that excludes the label as a sensitivity limiting factor. However, the large size and shape of the particulate labels may produce additional problems to immunoassay performance. The aim of this work was to study with two identical non-competitive two-site immunoassays whether up-converting phosphor (UCP) particles are comparable in performance with europium(III) chelate-dyed nanoparticles as particulate labels. In addition we strived to verify the common assumption of the photostability of up-converting phosphor particles supporting their potential applicability in imaging. Detection limits in two-site immunoassay for free prostate-specific antigen (free-PSA) were 0.53 ng L -1 and 1.3 ng L -1 using two different up-converting phosphors and 0.16 ng L -1 using europium(III) nanoparticle. Large size distribution and non-specific binding of up-converting phosphor particles caused assay variation in low analyte concentrations and limited the analytical detection limit. The non-specific binding was the major factor limiting the analytical sensitivity of the immunoassay. The results suggests the need for nanoscaled and uniformely sized UCP-particles to increace the sensitivity and applicability of up-converting phosphor particles. Anti-Stokes photoluminescence of up-converting phosphor particles did not photobleach when measured repeatedly, on the contrary, the time-resolved fluorescence of europium nanoparticles photobleached relatively rapidly

  19. Development of Fully Automated Low-Cost Immunoassay System for Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guochun; Das, Champak; Ledden, Bradley; Sun, Qian; Nguyen, Chien

    2017-10-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) automation for routine operation in a small research environment would be very attractive. A portable fully automated low-cost immunoassay system was designed, developed, and evaluated with several protein analytes. It features disposable capillary columns as the reaction sites and uses real-time calibration for improved accuracy. It reduces the overall assay time to less than 75 min with the ability of easy adaptation of new testing targets. The running cost is extremely low due to the nature of automation, as well as reduced material requirements. Details about system configuration, components selection, disposable fabrication, system assembly, and operation are reported. The performance of the system was initially established with a rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) assay, and an example of assay adaptation with an interleukin 6 (IL6) assay is shown. This system is ideal for research use, but could work for broader testing applications with further optimization.

  20. Homogenous 96-plex PEA immunoassay exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity, and excellent scalability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assarsson, Erika; Lundberg, Martin; Holmquist, Göran

    2014-01-01

    reporters, shown potential to relieve the shortcomings of antibodies and their inherent cross-reactivity in multiplex protein quantification applications. The aim of the present study was to develop a robust 96-plex immunoassay based on the proximity extension assay (PEA) for improved high throughput...... detection of protein biomarkers. This was enabled by: (1) a modified design leading to a reduced number of pipetting steps compared to the existing PEA protocol, as well as improved intra-assay precision; (2) a new enzymatic system that uses a hyper-thermostabile enzyme, Pwo, for uniting the two probes......, such as serum and plasma, and also in xenografted mice and resuspended dried blood spots, consuming only 1 µL sample per test. All-in-all, the development of the current multiplex technique is a step toward robust high throughput protein marker discovery and research....

  1. Development of a highly sensitive and specific immunoassay for enrofloxacin based on heterologous coating haptens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanhui; Zhang, Huiyan; Ni, Hengjia; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-04-11

    In the paper, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent immunoassay (ELISA) for detection of enrofloxacin was described using one new derivative of enrofloxacin as coating hapten, resulting in surprisingly high sensitivity and specificity. Incorporation of aminobutyric acid (AA) in the new derivative of enrofloxacin had decreased the IC50 of the ELISA for enrofloxacin from 1.3 μg L(-1) to as low as 0.07 μg L(-1). The assay showed neglect cross-reactivity for other fluoroquinolones but ofloxacin (8.23%), marbofloxacin (8.97%) and pefloxacin (7.29%). Analysis of enrofloxacin fortified chicken muscle showed average recoveries from 81 to 115%. The high sensitivity and specificity of the assay makes it a suitable screening method for the determination of low levels of enrofloxacin in chicken muscle without clean-up step. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization of condition for conjugation of enrofloxacin to enzymes in chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Songcheng; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Hongquan; Qu, Lingbo; Wu, Yongjun

    2014-06-01

    In this study, in order to find out a proper method for conjugation of enrofloxacin to label enzymes, two methods were compared and carbodiimide condensation was proved to be better. The results showed that the binding ratio of enrofloxacin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was 8:1 and that of enrofloxacin and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was 5:1. This indicated that conjugate synthesized by carbodiimide condensation was fit for chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA). Furthermore, data revealed that dialysis time was an important parameter for conjugation and 6 days was best. Buffer to dilute conjugate had little effect on CLEIA. The storage condition for conjugates was also studied and it was shown that the conjugate was stable at 4 °C with no additive up to 30 days. These data were valuable for establishing CLEIA to quantify enrofloxacin.

  3. Detection of Pesticides and Pesticide Metabolites Using the Cross Reactivity of Enzyme Immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay is an important environmental analysis method that may be used to identify many pesticide analytes in water samples. Because of similarities in chemical structure between various members of a pesticide class, there often may be an unwanted response that is characterized by a percentage of cross reactivity. Also, there may be cross reactivity caused by degradation products of the target analyte that may be present in the sample. In this paper, the concept of cross reactivity caused by degradation products or by nontarget analytes is explored as a tool for identification of metabolites or structurally similar compounds not previously known to be present in water samples. Two examples are examined in this paper from various water quality studies. They are alachlor and its metabolite, alachlor ethane sulfonic acid, and atrazine and its class members, prometryn and propazine. A method for using cross reactivity for the detection of these compounds is explained in this paper.

  4. Vertical microreactor stack consist of poly-(tetrafluoroethylene) microfluidics for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukita, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Saki; Utsumi, Yuichi; Takeo, Masahiro; Negoro, Seiji; Kataoka, Chiwa

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the first application of high-aspect ratio PTFE microstruscute, which fabricated by synchrotron radiation induced photo-evaporation process, to enzyme-linked immunosorvent assay. The advantages of PTFE microstructure for the development of lab-on-a-chip due to the extremely high-aspect ratio microstructure and chemical stability of PTFE is discussed. The results of immunoassay shows the successful detection of analyte (mouse IgG) with detection range with 0-100ng/ml. This result suggests the successful immobilization of antibody (anti-mouse IgG goat antibody) onto the x-ray exposed surface of PTFE microstructure and successful demonstration of antigen-antibody reaction in the PTFE high-aspect ratio microstructure. We also demonstrated the detection of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB). As the result of demonstration, we successfully detected PCB with ranging analyte concentration of 0.1-10 ng/ml. (author)

  5. Rapid bead-based immunoassay for measurement of mannose-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, J T; Garred, P

    2009-01-01

    have been developed more automated platforms for MBL analysis is urgently needed. To pursue this, we set out to develop a flexible bead-based MBL immunoassay. Serum was obtained from 98 healthy individuals and 50 patients investigated for possible immunodeficiencies. We used the Luminex xMAP bead array...... coefficient were found be 7.88% and 5.70%, respectively. A close correlation between the new assay and a reference MBL measurement ELISA was found (rho 0.9381, P bead-based assay was less sensitive to interfering anti-murine antibodies in the blood samples than when the antibodies employed were...... used in the reference polystyrene-based ELISA. The new assay could be performed in 3 h with less than 25 microl serum required of each sample. These results show that MBL can be measured readily using a bead-based platform, which may form an efficient basis for a multiplex approach to measure different...

  6. Mapping of Epitopes Occurring in Bovine α(s1)-Casein Variants by Peptide Microarray Immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisson, Maria; Erhardt, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E epitope mapping of milk proteins reveals important information about their immunologic properties. Genetic variants of αS1-casein, one of the major allergens in bovine milk, are until now not considered when discussing the allergenic potential. Here we describe the complete procedure to assess the allergenicity of αS1-casein variants B and C, which are frequent in most breeds, starting from milk with identification and purification of casein variants by isoelectric focusing (IEF) and anion-exchange chromatography, followed by in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of the casein variants, identification of the resulting peptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), in silico analysis of the variant-specific peptides as allergenic epitopes, and determination of their IgE-binding properties by microarray immunoassay with cow's milk allergic human sera.

  7. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein Using Colloidal Semiconducting Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Hänninen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides the typical short-lived fluorescence with decay times in the nanosecond range, colloidal II/VI semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in buffer also possess a long-lived fluorescence component with decay times in the microsecond range. Here, the signal intensity of the long-lived luminescence at microsecond range is shown to increase 1,000-fold for CdTe nanoparticles in PBS buffer. This long-lived fluorescence can be conveniently employed for time-gated fluorescence detection, which allows for improved signal-to-noise ratio and thus the use of low concentrations of nanoparticles. The detection principle is demonstrated with a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP using CdSe-ZnS nanoparticles and green light excitation.

  8. Synthesis-based approach toward direct sandwich immunoassay for ciguatoxin CTX3C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Hiroki; Hirama, Masahiro; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo; Maruyama, Megumi; Uehara, Hisatoshi; Nagumo, Yoko

    2003-06-25

    Ciguatoxins are the major causative toxins of ciguatera seafood poisoning. Limited availability of ciguatoxins has hampered the development of a reliable and specific immunoassay for detecting these toxins in contaminated fish. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific against both ends of ciguatoxin CTX3C were prepared by immunization of mice with protein conjugates of rationally designed synthetic haptens, 3 and 4, in place of the natural toxin. Haptenic groups that possess a surface area larger than 400 A(2) were required to produce mAbs that can bind strongly to CTX3C itself. A direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using these mAbs was established to detect CTX3C at the ppb level with no cross-reactivity against other related marine toxins, including brevetoxin A, brevetoxin B, okadaic acid, or maitotoxin.

  9. Enzymatic amplification of a flow-injected thermometric enzyme-linked immunoassay for human insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, M; Lindbladh, C; Li, H; Mosbach, K; Danielsson, B

    1993-08-01

    A flow-injected thermometric enzyme linked immunoassay for human insulin which employs the lactate dehydrogenase/lactate oxidase (LDH/LOD) substrate recycling system for signal amplification is described. The system is composed of two columns, an immunosorbent column containing immobilized anti-insulin antibodies for sensing and a recycling column containing immobilized LDH/LOD/Catalase for detection. The effect of flow rates, conjugate concentrations, and chromatographic support material upon the sensitivity of the assay are investigated. The assay has a detection limit of 0.025 microgram/ml and a linear range from 0.05 to 2 micrograms/ml. This corresponds to a 10-fold increase in sensitivity over the unamplified system. A recombinant human insulin-proinsulin conjugate was also tested. The results show that enzymatic amplification can be employed to increase the sensitivity and reproducibility of flow injection assay-based biosensors. The implications of these results upon on-line analysis are discussed.

  10. Developments of sensitive immunoassays for detection of antibodies against hepatitis B surface antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionescu-Matiu, I; Sanchez, Y; Dreesman, G R [Baylor Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Coll. of Medicine; Fields, H A [Centers for Disease Control, Public Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services, Phoenix, AZ (USA)

    1983-01-01

    Three micro solid phase immunoassays (a micro-SPRIA and two ELISA techniques) were developed and tested for the detection of anti-HBs antibodies. Two different crosslinkers (glutaraldehyde and N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate) were used to couple a goat anti-mouse IgG reagent to alkaline phosphatase for use as enzyme-labeled probes in the two ELISA tests. With the latter cross-linker, a defined conjugate with a 1 : 1 antibody-enzyme molar ratio was obtained. The sensitivities of micro-SPRIA and the two types of ELISA were compared to that of the commercial solid phase radioimmunoassay AUSAB test. All three microtests were significantly more sensitive than the AUSAB test. The ELISA using the glutaraldehyde cross-linked conjugate was 3-5 times less sensitive than micro-SPRIA, while the ELISA using the disulfide-linked conjugate was 2.6-4.0 times more sensitive than micro-SPRIA.

  11. Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, I; Weldingh, K; Leyten, EM

    2004-01-01

    Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.Brock I, Weldingh K, Leyten EM, Arend SM, Ravn P, Andersen P. Department of Infectious Disease Immunology, Statens Serum Institute, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. The currently used...... method for immunological detection of tuberculosis infection, the tuberculin skin test, has low specificity. Antigens specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to replace purified protein derivative are therefore urgently needed. We have performed a rigorous assessment of the diagnostic potential of four...... recently identified antigens (Rv2653, Rv2654, Rv3873, and Rv3878) from genomic regions that are lacking from the Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine strains as well as from the most common nontuberculous mycobacteria. The fine specificity of potential epitopes in these molecules...

  12. Estrogen receptor determination in endometrial carcinoma: ligand binding assay versus enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J

    1995-01-01

    We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA......, and cytosolic progesterone receptors (PR) measured by LBA were also studied. While ERc concentrations determined by LBA and EIA were highly correlated (r: 0.94), ERc values detected by LBA were approximately twice those found by EIA (median values of ERc: 155 vs. 64 fmol/mg cytosol protein, DCC vs. EIA......). The percentages of ERc positive tumors were 89% by LBA and 77% by EIA. The median fraction of total ER present as ERn was 63%. PR levels correlated positively with ERn concentrations (r: 0.73). We explore possible reasons why greater concentrations of ERc are determined by estradiol binding than by the ER-EIA kit...

  13. Concordance Between Different Amyloid Immunoassays and Visual Amyloid Positron Emission Tomographic Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelidze, Shorena; Pannee, Josef; Mikulskis, Alvydas; Chiao, Ping; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2017-12-01

    Visual assessment of amyloid positron emission tomographic (PET) images has been approved by regulatory authorities for clinical use. Several immunoassays have been developed to measure β-amyloid (Aβ) 42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The agreement between CSF Aβ42 measures from different immunoassays and visual PET readings may influence the use of CSF biomarkers and/or amyloid PET assessment in clinical practice and trials. To determine the concordance between CSF Aβ42 levels measured using 5 different immunoassays and visual amyloid PET analysis. The study included 262 patients with mild cognitive impairment or subjective cognitive decline from the Swedish BioFINDER (Biomarkers for Identifying Neurodegenerative Disorders Early and Reliably) cohort (recruited from September 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014) who had undergone flutemetamol F 18 ([18F]flutemetamol)-labeled PET. Levels of CSF Aβ42 were analyzed using the classic INNOTEST and the newer modified INNOTEST, fully automated Lumipulse (FL), EUROIMMUN (EI), and Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) assays. Concentrations of CSF Aβ were assessed using an antibody-independent mass spectrometry-based reference measurement procedure. The concordance of CSF Aβ42 levels and Aβ42:Aβ40 and Aβ42:tau ratios with visual [18F]flutemetamol PET status. Of 262 participants (mean [SD] age, 70.9 [5.5] years), 108 were women (41.2%) and 154 were men (58.8%). The mass spectrometry-derived Aβ42 values showed higher correlations with the modified Aβ42-INNOTEST (r = 0.97), Aβ42-FL (r = 0.93), Aβ42-EI (r = 0.93), and Aβ42-MSD (r = 0.95) assays compared with the classic Aβ42-INNOTEST assay (r = 0.88; P ≤ .01). The signal in the classic Aβ42-INNOTEST assay was partly quenched by recombinant Aβ1-40 peptide. However, the classic Aβ42-INNOTEST assay showed better concordance with visual [18F]flutemetamol PET status (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 0.92) compared with the

  14. Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, I; Weldingh, K; Leyten, EM

    2004-01-01

    Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.Brock I, Weldingh K, Leyten EM, Arend SM, Ravn P, Andersen P. Department of Infectious Disease Immunology, Statens Serum Institute, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. The currently used...... method for immunological detection of tuberculosis infection, the tuberculin skin test, has low specificity. Antigens specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to replace purified protein derivative are therefore urgently needed. We have performed a rigorous assessment of the diagnostic potential of four...... selected and combined the specific peptide stretches from the four proteins not recognized by M. bovis BCG-vaccinated individuals. These peptide stretches were tested with peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with microscopy- or culture-confirmed tuberculosis and from healthy M. bovis...

  15. A Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay Method for the Measurement of Compound W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biao; Yu, Huixin; Bao, Jiandong; Zhang, Manda; Green, William L; Wu, Sing-Yung

    2018-01-01

    Using compound W (a 3,3'-diiodothyronine sulfate [T 2 S] immuno-crossreactive material)-specific polyclonal antibodies and homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay assay techniques (AlphaLISA) to establish an indirect competitive compound W (ICW) quantitative detection method. Photosensitive particles (donor beads) coated with compound W or T 2 S and rabbit anti-W antibody were incubated with biotinylated goat anti-rabbit antibody. This constitutes a detection system with streptavidin-coated acceptor particle. We have optimized the test conditions and evaluated the detection performance. The sensitivity of the method was 5 pg/mL, and the detection range was 5 to 10 000 pg/mL. The intra-assay coefficient of variation averages W levels in extracts of maternal serum samples. This may have clinical application to screen congenital hypothyroidism in utero.

  16. A reactor/separator device for use in automated solid phase immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, P.R.; Ordonez, K.P.; Siewers, I.J.

    1979-01-01

    A reactor/separator device is described for use in automated solid phase immunoassay, including radioimmunoassays. The device is a column fitted at the bottom portion with a water impermeable disc which can hold, for example, immunoabsorbents, immobilized antisera or ion exchange resins. When the contents of the column supported by the disc are brought into contact with an aqueous phase containing reagents or reactants, a chemical reaction is initiated. After the reaction, centrifugally applied pressure forces the aqueous phase through the filter disc making it water permeable and separating a desired component for subsequent analysis. The reactor/separator device of the present invention permits kinetic solid phase assays (non-equilibrium conditions) to be carried out which would be difficult to perform by other conventional methods. (author)

  17. Analytical validation of Gentian NGAL particle-enhanced enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Luca Salvagno

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was designed to validate the analytical performance of the new Gentian particle-enhanced enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA for measuring neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL in serum samples. Design and methods: Analytical validation of the Gentian NGAL assay was carried out on a Roche Cobas c501 and was based on assessment of limit of blank (LOB, limit of detection (LOD, functional sensitivity, imprecision, linearity and concordance with the BioPorto NGAL test. Results: The LOB and LOD of Gentian NGAL were found to be 3.8 ng/mL and 6.3 ng/mL, respectively. An analytical coefficient of variation (CV of 20% corresponded to a NGAL value of 10 ng/mL. The intra-assay and inter-assay imprecision (CV was between 0.4 and 5.2% and 0.6 and 7.1% and the total imprecision (CV was 3.7%. The linearity was optimal at NGAL concentrations between 37 and 1420 ng/mL (r=1.00; p<0.001. An excellent correlation was observed between values measured with Gentian NGAL and BioPorto NGAL in 74 routine serum samples (r=0.993. The mean percentage bias of the Gentian assay versus the Bioporto assay was +3.1% (95% CI, +1.6% to +4.5%. Conclusions: These results show that Gentian NGAL may be a viable option to other commercial immunoassays for both routine and urgent assessment of serum NGAL. Keywords: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL, Analytical validation, Acute kidney injury

  18. Development and statistical assessment of a paper-based immunoassay for detection of tumor markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzu-Nascimento, Thiago [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Morbioli, Giorgio Gianini [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Milan, Luis Aparecido [Departamento de Estatística, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Donofrio, Fabiana Cristina [Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78557-267, Sinop, MT (Brazil); Mestriner, Carlos Alberto [Wama Produtos para Laboratório Ltda, 13560-971, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Carrilho, Emanuel, E-mail: emanuel@iqsc.usp.br [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Paper-based assays are an attractive low-cost option for clinical chemistry testing, due to characteristics such as short time of analysis, low consumption of samples and reagents, and high portability of assays. However, little attention has been given to the evaluation of the performance of these simple tests, which should include the use of a statistical approach to define the choice of best cut-off value for the test. The choice of the cut-off value impacts on the sensitivity and specificity of the bioassay. Here, we developed a paper-based immunoassay for the detection of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and performed a statistical assessment to establish the assay's cut-off value using the Youden's J index (68.28 A.U.), what allowed for a gain in sensibility (0.86) and specificity (1.0). We also discuss about the importance of defining a gray zone as a safety margin for test (±12% over the cut-off value), eliminating all false positives and false negatives outcomes and avoiding misleading results. The test accuracy was calculated as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, presenting a value of 0.97, what classifies this test as highly accurate. We propose here a low-cost method capable of detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum samples, highlighting the importance of statistical tools to evaluate a new low-cost diagnostic method. - Highlights: • A paper-based sandwich immunoassay protocol for detection of tumor markers. • A statistical approach to define cut-off values and measuring test's sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. • A simple way to create a gray zone, avoiding false positive and false negative outcomes.

  19. System-on-fluidics immunoassay device integrating wireless radio-frequency-identification sensor chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Oonishi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kazuki; Shiratori, Akiko; Funaoka, Sohei; Fukushima, Masao

    2014-09-01

    A simple and sensitive point-of-care-test (POCT) device for chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay was devised and tested. The device consists of a plastic flow-channel reactor and two wireless-communication sensor chips, namely, a photo-sensor chip and a temperature-sensor chip. In the flow-channel reactor, a target antigen is captured by an antibody immobilized on the inner wall of the flow-channel and detected with enzyme labeled antibody by using CL substrate. The CL signal corresponding to the amount of antigen is measured by a newly developed radio-frequency-identification (RFID) sensor, which enables batteryless operation and wireless data communication with an external reader. As for the POCT device, its usage environment, especially temperature, varies for each measurement. Hence, temperature compensation is a key issue in regard to eliminating dark-signal fluctuation, which is a major factor in deterioration of the precision of the POCT device. A two-stage temperature-compensation scheme was adopted. As for the first stage, the signals of two photodiodes, one with an open window and one with a sealed window, integrated on the photo-sensor chip are differentiated to delete the dark signal. As for the second stage, the differentiated signal fluctuation caused by a temperature variation is compensated by using the other sensor chip (equipped with a temperature sensor). The dark-level fluctuation caused by temperature was reduced from 0.24 to 0.02 pA/°C. The POCT device was evaluated as a CL immunoassay of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). The flow rate of the CL reagent in the flow channel was optimized. As a result, the detection limit of the POCT device was 0.08 ng/ml (i.e., 0.4 μIU/ml). Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Nanoparticle-Lectin Immunoassay Improves Discrimination of Serum CA125 from Malignant and Benign Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidwani, Kamlesh; Huhtinen, Kaisa; Kekki, Henna; van Vliet, Sandra; Hynninen, Johanna; Koivuviita, Niina; Perheentupa, Antti; Poutanen, Matti; Auranen, Annika; Grenman, Seija; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Carpen, Olli; van Kooyk, Yvette; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of serum cancer antigen 125 (CA125) is the standard approach for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) diagnostics and follow-up. However, the clinical specificity is not optimal because increased values are also detected in healthy controls and in benign diseases. CA125 is known to be differentially glycosylated in EOC, potentially offering a way to construct CA125 assays with improved cancer specificity. Our goal was to identify carbohydrate-reactive lectins for discriminating between CA125 originating from EOC and noncancerous sources. CA125 from the OVCAR-3 cancer cell line, placental homogenate, and ascites fluid from patients with cirrhosis were captured on anti-CA125 antibody immobilized on microtitration wells. A panel of lectins, each coated onto fluorescent europium-chelate-doped 97-nm nanoparticles (Eu(+3)-NPs), was tested for detection of the immobilized CA125. Serum samples from high-grade serous EOC or patients with endometriosis and healthy controls were analyzed. By using macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL)-coated Eu(+3)-NPs, an analytically sensitive CA125 assay (CA125(MGL)) was achieved that specifically recognized the CA125 isoform produced by EOC, whereas the recognition of CA125 from nonmalignant conditions was reduced. Serum CA125(MGL) measurement better discriminated patients with EOC from endometriosis compared to conventional immunoassay. The discrimination was particularly improved for marginally increased CA125 values and for earlier detection of EOC progression. The new CA125(MGL) assay concept could help reduce the false-positive rates of conventional CA125 immunoassays. The improved analytical specificity of this test approach is dependent on a discriminating lectin immobilized in large numbers on Eu(+3)-NPs, providing both an avidity effect and signal amplification. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  1. Design of a surface plasmon resonance immunoassay for therapeutic drug monitoring of amikacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losoya-Leal, Adrian; Estevez, M-Carmen; Martínez-Chapa, Sergio O; Lechuga, Laura M

    2015-08-15

    The therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of pharmaceutical drugs with narrow therapeutic ranges is of great importance in the clinical setting. It provides useful information towards the enhancement of drug therapies, aiding in dosage control and toxicity risk management. Amikacin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly used in neonatal therapies that is indicated for TDM due to the toxicity risks inherent in its use. Current techniques for TDM such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are costly, time consuming, and cannot be performed at the site of action. Over the last decades, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have become increasingly popular in clinical diagnostics due to their ability to detect biomolecular interactions in real-time. We present an SPR-based competitive immunoassay for the detection of the antibiotic amikacin, suitable for TDM in both adults and neonates. We have obtained high specificity and sensitivity levels with an IC50 value of 1.4ng/mL and a limit of detection of 0.13ng/mL, which comfortably comply with the drug's therapeutic range. Simple dilution of serum can therefore be sufficient to analyze low-volume real samples from neonates, increasing the potential of the methodology for TDM. Compared to current TDM conventional methods, this SPR-based immunoassay can provide advantages such as simplicity, potential portability, and label-free measurements with the possibility of high throughput. This work is the foundation towards the development of an integrated, simple use, highly sensitive, fast, and point-of-care sensing platform for the opportune TDM of antibiotics and other drugs in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mobile Phone Ratiometric Imaging Enables Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Lateral Flow Immunoassays without External Optical Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kamal G; Singh, Vidhi; Kauffman, Peter C; Abe, Koji; Yager, Paul

    2018-05-14

    Paper-based diagnostic tests based on the lateral flow immunoassay concept promise low-cost, point-of-care detection of infectious diseases, but such assays suffer from poor limits of detection. One factor that contributes to poor analytical performance is a reliance on low-contrast chromophoric optical labels such as gold nanoparticles. Previous attempts to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostics include replacing chromophoric labels with enzymes, fluorophores, or phosphors at the expense of increased fluidic complexity or the need for device readers with costly optoelectronics. Several groups, including our own, have proposed mobile phones as suitable point-of-care readers due to their low cost, ease of use, and ubiquity. However, extant mobile phone fluorescence readers require costly optical filters and were typically validated with only one camera sensor module, which is inappropriate for potential point-of-care use. In response, we propose to couple low-cost ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with long Stokes-shift quantum dots to enable ratiometric mobile phone fluorescence measurements without optical filters. Ratiometric imaging with unmodified smartphone cameras improves the contrast and attenuates the impact of excitation intensity variability by 15×. Practical application was shown with a lateral flow immunoassay for influenza A with nucleoproteins spiked into simulated nasal matrix. Limits of detection of 1.5 and 2.6 fmol were attained on two mobile phones, which are comparable to a gel imager (1.9 fmol), 10× better than imaging gold nanoparticles on a scanner (18 fmol), and >2 orders of magnitude better than gold nanoparticle-labeled assays imaged with mobile phones. Use of the proposed filter-free mobile phone imaging scheme is a first step toward enabling a new generation of highly sensitive, point-of-care fluorescence assays.

  3. Development of monoclonal antibody-based immunoassays for the analysis of bisphenol A in canned vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, María J; D'Arienzo, Pasquale; Manclús, Juan J; Montoya, Angel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and highly sensitive immunoassays (ELISAs) to bisphenol A (BPA), a well-known endocrine disruptor able to migrate from the internal coating of cans to food contained inside, particularly vegetables. To produce MAbs to BPA, four synthetic compounds were conjugated to proteins and used as immunizing haptens in mice. By applying hybridoma technology, several MAbs were produced and selected. These antibodies were characterized in the conjugate-coated and in the antibody-coated formats, using both homologous and heterologous conjugates. Three indirect ELISA based on the MAbs showing the highest affinity to BPA were selected. The limit of detection of the most sensitive ELISA was 0.22 nM (0.05 ng/mL), with an I₅₀ value of around 1 nM (0.23 ng/mL). An homologous ELISA based on the MAb BPAB-11 was applied to the simple, direct determination of BPA in the liquid portion of canned artichoke, peas, and sweet corn. Only sample dilution in an appropriate saline buffer was required to minimize matrix effects and to enter the ELISA working range. Recovery and precision of the method were evaluated by spiking the liquid portion of these cans with BPA at 20, 50, and 100 ng/mL. Coefficients of variation were below 20% in most cases. With regard to recovery, the analytical data obtained were also acceptable. This immunoassay has therefore proved its potential as a new tool for the rapid, sensitive and accurate determination of BPA in canned food.

  4. A Portable Immunoassay Platform for Multiplexed Detection of Biotoxins in Clinical and Environmental Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chung-Yan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Piccini, Matthew Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Schaff, Ulrich Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandstone Diagnostics, Livermore, CA (United States); Stanker, Larry H. [US Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA (United States). Western Regional Research Center, Foodborne Contaminants Research Unit; Cheng, Luisa W. [US Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA (United States). Western Regional Research Center, Foodborne Contaminants Research Unit; Ravichandran, Easwaran [Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (United States); Singh, Bal-Ram [Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (United States); Sommer, Greg J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandstone Diagnostics, Livermore, CA (United States); Singh, Anup K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cases of attempted bioterrorism events using biotoxins have highlighted the urgent need for tools capable of rapid screening of suspect samples in the field (e.g., mailroom and public events). We present a portable microfluidic device capable of analyzing environmental (e.g., white powder), food (e.g., milk) and clinical (e.g., blood) samples for multiplexed detection of biotoxins. The device is rapid (<15-30 min sample-to-answer), sensitive (< 0.08 pg/mL detection limit for botulinum toxin), multiplexed (up to 64 parallel assays) and capable of analyzing small volume samples (< 20 μL total sample input). The immunoassay approach (SpinDx) is based on binding of toxins in a sample to antibody-laden capture particles followed by sedimentation of particles through a density-media in a microfluidic disk and quantification using a laser-induced fluorescence detector. A direct, blinded comparison with a gold standard ELISA revealed a 5-fold more sensitive detection limit for botulinum toxin while requiring 250-fold less sample volume and a 30 minute assay time with a near unity correlation. A key advantage of the technique is its compatibility with a variety of sample matrices with no additional sample preparation required. Ultrasensitive quantification has been demonstrated from direct analysis of multiple clinical, environmental and food samples, including white powder, whole blood, saliva, salad dressing, whole milk, peanut butter, half and half, honey, and canned meat. We believe that this device can met an urgent need in screening both potentially exposed people as well as suspicious samples in mail-rooms, airports, public sporting venues and emergency rooms. The general-purpose immunodiagnostics device can also find applications in screening of infectious and systemic diseases or serve as a lab device for conducting rapid immunoassays.

  5. Why Young People Fail To Get and Hold Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Dept. of Labor, Albany.

    This booklet provides advice to young people seeking their first jobs on how to avoid the pitfalls that have caused others to lose jobs or fail to be hired. Topics discussed in short, one-page sections include appearance, attitude and behavior, ignorance of labor market facts, misrepresentation, sensitivity about a physical defect, unrealistic…

  6. Post-deportation risks for failed asylum seekers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Alpes

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available What happens to people who are deported after their asylum applications have failed? Many who are deported are at risk of harm when they return to their country of origin but there is little monitoring done of deportation outcomes.

  7. Fail forward: Mitigating failure in energy research and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Almost three quarters of all innovation projects disappoint or fail. Instead of 'wasting' human and financial resources on energy projects that end up being terminated or ineffectual, this study offers a potential antidote coined the 'Origins of Failure in Energy Innovation' (OFEI) model. Based o...

  8. Winning Connections? Special Interests and the Sale of Failed Banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Igan (Deniz); T. Lambert (Thomas); W.B. Wagner (Wolf); Q. Zhang (Quxian)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWe study how lobbying affects the resolution of failed banks, using a sample of FDIC auctions between 2007 and 2014. We show that bidding banks that lobby regulators have a higher probability of winning an auction. In addition, the FDIC incurs higher costs in such auctions, amounting to

  9. ISAT promises fail-safe computer-based reactor protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    AEA Technology's ISAT system is a multiplexed microprocessor-based reactor protection system which has very extensive self-monitoring capabilities and is inherently fail safe. It provides a way of addressing software reliability problems that have tended to hamper widespread introduction of computer-based reactor protection. (author)

  10. The ugly twins: Failed global sourcing projects and their substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiele, Holger; Horn, Philipp; Horn, Philipp; Werner, Welf

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the paper and literature addressed: Analyzing the impact of failed global sourcing projects on the entire commodity group and exploring isomorphism as potential antecedent to the observed phenomenon. The paper is embedded in the global sourcing literature, as well as isomorphism and total

  11. Delay factors in failed construction projects in southwestern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out with a view to showing the contribution of delay factors in the overall consideration of failed construction projects in south western Nigeria. This is considered necessary because the traditional view of construction project failure as consisting mainly of structural or functional failures tends to excuse ...

  12. Failed total carpometacarpal joint prosthesis of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Homilius, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis. T...... in eight of 10 patients, but the mean Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores, self-reported pinch-grip-related function, and pain were comparable with our earlier published results with the Elektra carpometacarpal total joint prosthesis.......Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis....... The male:female ratio was 1:4 and the mean duration of observation 32 months (range 6-52). In three patients the revised implant was a MOJE uncemented carpometacarpal joint prosthesis and in seven patients an Elektra uncemented one. At follow-up grip strength was reduced to less than 90% of the other hand...

  13. Plasma Brightenings in a Failed Solar Filament Eruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D., E-mail: yingli@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-03-20

    Failed filament eruptions are solar eruptions that are not associated with coronal mass ejections. In a failed filament eruption, the filament materials usually show some ascending and falling motions as well as generating bright EUV emissions. Here we report a failed filament eruption (SOL2016-07-22) that occurred in a quiet-Sun region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . In this event, the filament spreads out but gets confined by the surrounding magnetic field. When interacting with the ambient magnetic field, the filament material brightens up and flows along the magnetic field lines through the corona to the chromosphere. We find that some materials slide down along the lifting magnetic structure containing the filament and impact the chromosphere, and through kinetic energy dissipation, cause two ribbon-like brightenings in a wide temperature range. There is evidence suggesting that magnetic reconnection occurs between the filament magnetic structure and the surrounding magnetic fields where filament plasma is heated to coronal temperatures. In addition, thread-like brightenings show up on top of the erupting magnetic fields at low temperatures, which might be produced by an energy imbalance from a fast drop of radiative cooling due to plasma rarefaction. Thus, this single event of a failed filament eruption shows the existence of a variety of plasma brightenings that may be caused by completely different heating mechanisms.

  14. The SVZ method: Why it works and why it fails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, B.; Whitenton, J.B.; Durand, L.

    1983-01-01

    We show in the context of potential theory, first, why the SVZ procedure for calculating hadronic masses succeeds phenomenologically: it provides a semiclassical interpolating formula which correctly relates input masses to output masses; and second, why it fails theoretically: the potential (or QCD) parameters derived from fits to masses are necessarily different from the true parameters. (orig.)

  15. 14C release from failed spent fuel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.

    1989-01-01

    Partially failed containers may provide a meaningful barrier to the release of gaseous 14 CO 2 . A modeling approach is outlined and sample calculations are provided that show the effect on release due to a limited perforation area, to decreasing temperature, and to partial occlusion of the perforated area by corrosion products. 5 refs., 4 tabs

  16. Counselor Liability for Failing to Report Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Samuel

    1983-01-01

    Describes the laws regarding counselor liability for failure to report child abuse and state laws designating mandated reporters of suspected child abuse. Notes how the law protects mandated reporters. Discusses criminal penalties for those who fail to report suspected abuse. (RC)

  17. BENEFITS OF SHIRODKAR STITCH IN WOMEN WITH FAILED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... This is a case series presentation of 14 cases where Shirodkar stitch was inserted after failed McDonald stitch. The patients were either self referrals or from Obstetricians in Eastern Africa region. All the patients were able to carry the pregnancies to term and were delivered by Caesarean section.

  18. 14C release from failed spent fuel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.

    1990-01-01

    Partially failed containers may provide a meaningful barrier to the release of gaseous radionuclides. A modeling approach is outlined and sample calculations are provided that show the effects on release due to a limited perforation area, to decreasing temperature, and to the partial occlusion of the perforated area by corrosion products. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Solutions for Failing High Schools: Converging Visions and Promising Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legters, Nettie; Balfanz, Robert; McPartland, James

    Promising solutions to the failings of traditional comprehensive high schools were reviewed to identify basic principles and strategies for improving high schools nationwide. Selected research studies, policy documents, and promising high school programs were reviewed. The review revealed the following principles for helping high schools better…

  20. Organization Theory: Bright Prospects for a Permanently Failing Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.M.A.R. Heugens (Pursey)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOrganization theory is a paradoxical field of scientific inquiry. It has struggled for more than fifty years to develop a unified theory of organizational effectiveness under girded by a coherent set of assumptions, and it has thus far failed to produce one. Yet, by other standards it is

  1. Fail-safe first wall for preclusion of little leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibui, Masanao; Nakahira, Masataka; Tada, Eisuke; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    1994-05-01

    Leakages although excluded by design measures would occur most probably in highly stressed areas, weldments and locations without possibility to classify the state by in-service inspection. In a water-cooled first wall, allowable leak rate of water is generally very small, and therefore, locating of the leak portion under highly activated environment will be very difficult and be time-consuming. The double-wall concept is promising for the ITER first wall, because it can be made fail-safe by the application of the leak-before-break and the multiple load path concepts, and because it has a potential capability to solve the little leak problem. When the fail safe strength is well defined, subcritical crack growth in the damaged wall can be permitted. This will enable to detect stable leakage of coolant without deteriorating plasma operation. The paper deals with the little leak problem and presents method for evaluating small leak rate of a liquid coolant from crack-like defects. The fail-safe first wall with the double-wall concept is also proposed for preclusion of little leakage and its fail-safety is discussed. (author)

  2. Why does Centralisation fail to internalise Policy Externalities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Dur (Robert); H.J. Roelfsema (Hein)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCentralisation of political decision making often fails to produce the desired results. For instance, it is frequently argued that decision making within the European Union results in overspending and overregulation in some policy areas, while too low spending and too little regulation

  3. Characteristics of failed fertilized oocytes in patients with severe obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E A Pigarova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по статье: Machtinger R, Combelles CM, Missmer SA, Correia KF, Fox JH, Racowsky C. The association between severe obesity and characteristics of failed fertilized oocytes. Hum Reprod. 2012 Nov;27(11:3198-207.

  4. "Badminton Player-Coach" Interactions between Failing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascret, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical education teachers often use the player-coach dyad in individual opposition sports so that students can obtain information on their actions and then better regulate them. This type of work also develops methodological and social skills. However, the task of observing a partner often poses problems for failing students, who…

  5. Semioptimal practicable algorithmic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2011-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling (AC) of spins applies entropy manipulation algorithms in open spin systems in order to cool spins far beyond Shannon's entropy bound. Algorithmic cooling of nuclear spins was demonstrated experimentally and may contribute to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Several cooling algorithms were suggested in recent years, including practicable algorithmic cooling (PAC) and exhaustive AC. Practicable algorithms have simple implementations, yet their level of cooling is far from optimal; exhaustive algorithms, on the other hand, cool much better, and some even reach (asymptotically) an optimal level of cooling, but they are not practicable. We introduce here semioptimal practicable AC (SOPAC), wherein a few cycles (typically two to six) are performed at each recursive level. Two classes of SOPAC algorithms are proposed and analyzed. Both attain cooling levels significantly better than PAC and are much more efficient than the exhaustive algorithms. These algorithms are shown to bridge the gap between PAC and exhaustive AC. In addition, we calculated the number of spins required by SOPAC in order to purify qubits for quantum computation. As few as 12 and 7 spins are required (in an ideal scenario) to yield a mildly pure spin (60% polarized) from initial polarizations of 1% and 10%, respectively. In the latter case, about five more spins are sufficient to produce a highly pure spin (99.99% polarized), which could be relevant for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  6. Introduction to Evolutionary Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Xinjie

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are becoming increasingly attractive for researchers from various disciplines, such as operations research, computer science, industrial engineering, electrical engineering, social science, economics, etc. This book presents an insightful, comprehensive, and up-to-date treatment of EAs, such as genetic algorithms, differential evolution, evolution strategy, constraint optimization, multimodal optimization, multiobjective optimization, combinatorial optimization, evolvable hardware, estimation of distribution algorithms, ant colony optimization, particle swarm opti

  7. Recursive forgetting algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkum, Jens; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Holst, Jan

    1992-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, a general forgetting algorithm is formulated and analysed. It contains most existing forgetting schemes as special cases. Conditions are given ensuring that the basic convergence properties will hold. In the second part of the paper, the results are applied...... to a specific algorithm with selective forgetting. Here, the forgetting is non-uniform in time and space. The theoretical analysis is supported by a simulation example demonstrating the practical performance of this algorithm...

  8. Explaining algorithms using metaphors

    CERN Document Server

    Forišek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    There is a significant difference between designing a new algorithm, proving its correctness, and teaching it to an audience. When teaching algorithms, the teacher's main goal should be to convey the underlying ideas and to help the students form correct mental models related to the algorithm. This process can often be facilitated by using suitable metaphors. This work provides a set of novel metaphors identified and developed as suitable tools for teaching many of the 'classic textbook' algorithms taught in undergraduate courses worldwide. Each chapter provides exercises and didactic notes fo

  9. Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dickenstein, Alicia; Sommese, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been a burgeoning of activity in the design and implementation of algorithms for algebraic geometric computation. Some of these algorithms were originally designed for abstract algebraic geometry, but now are of interest for use in applications and some of these algorithms were originally designed for applications, but now are of interest for use in abstract algebraic geometry. The workshop on Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry that was held in the framework of the IMA Annual Program Year in Applications of Algebraic Geometry by the Institute for Mathematics and Its

  10. Shadow algorithms data miner

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Digital shadow generation continues to be an important aspect of visualization and visual effects in film, games, simulations, and scientific applications. This resource offers a thorough picture of the motivations, complexities, and categorized algorithms available to generate digital shadows. From general fundamentals to specific applications, it addresses shadow algorithms and how to manage huge data sets from a shadow perspective. The book also examines the use of shadow algorithms in industrial applications, in terms of what algorithms are used and what software is applicable.

  11. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  12. Quick fuzzy backpropagation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikov, A; Stoeva, S

    2001-03-01

    A modification of the fuzzy backpropagation (FBP) algorithm called QuickFBP algorithm is proposed, where the computation of the net function is significantly quicker. It is proved that the FBP algorithm is of exponential time complexity, while the QuickFBP algorithm is of polynomial time complexity. Convergence conditions of the QuickFBP, resp. the FBP algorithm are defined and proved for: (1) single output neural networks in case of training patterns with different targets; and (2) multiple output neural networks in case of training patterns with equivalued target vector. They support the automation of the weights training process (quasi-unsupervised learning) establishing the target value(s) depending on the network's input values. In these cases the simulation results confirm the convergence of both algorithms. An example with a large-sized neural network illustrates the significantly greater training speed of the QuickFBP rather than the FBP algorithm. The adaptation of an interactive web system to users on the basis of the QuickFBP algorithm is presented. Since the QuickFBP algorithm ensures quasi-unsupervised learning, this implies its broad applicability in areas of adaptive and adaptable interactive systems, data mining, etc. applications.

  13. Portfolios of quantum algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, S M; Hogg, T; Huberman, B A

    2001-12-17

    Quantum computation holds promise for the solution of many intractable problems. However, since many quantum algorithms are stochastic in nature they can find the solution of hard problems only probabilistically. Thus the efficiency of the algorithms has to be characterized by both the expected time to completion and the associated variance. In order to minimize both the running time and its uncertainty, we show that portfolios of quantum algorithms analogous to those of finance can outperform single algorithms when applied to the NP-complete problems such as 3-satisfiability.

  14. Algorithm 426 : Merge sort algorithm [M1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, C.

    1972-01-01

    Sorting by means of a two-way merge has a reputation of requiring a clerically complicated and cumbersome program. This ALGOL 60 procedure demonstrates that, using recursion, an elegant and efficient algorithm can be designed, the correctness of which is easily proved [2]. Sorting n objects gives

  15. Looked-but-failed-to-see-errors in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Mai-Britt; Jørgensen, N O

    2003-01-01

    Danish studies of traffic accidents at priority intersections have shown a particular type of accidents. In these accidents a car driver supposed to give way has collided with a bicycle rider on the priority road. Often the involved car drivers have maintained that they did not see the bicycle...... looking in the direction where the other parties were but have not seen (i.e. perceived the presence of) the other road user. This paper describes two studies approaching this problem.One study is based on 10 self-reported near accidents. It does show that "looked-but-failed-to-see" events do occur...... until immediately before the collision even though the bicycle must have been clearly visible.Similar types of accidents have been the subject of studies elsewhere. In literature they are labelled "looked-but-failed-to-see", because it seems clear that in many cases the car drivers have actually been...

  16. Development of failed element monitoring system for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yupu; Liu Haojie

    2005-01-01

    Aiming at the existent problems of failed element monitoring system in the PWR, the detector, the spiral tube, the neutron-moderator and the shielding of neutron bas improved on in this task. These improvements decrease the backgrounds effectively, raise the work stability of the detectors and resolve the failed element error action problem which can not be resolved for the long time, and the detecting sensitivity is raise ten times. The γ-ray detector is arranged spiral with outside, so the γ-rays with shorter half-life can be detected. The structure of gross gamma detection station has improved, so the solid angle is expanded, the transmissivity of γ-rays and β-rays are increased, and the ratio of signal to background is raised. The measurement instrument has been intellectualized. This system is above criticism for the users in operation. (authors)

  17. Optical flow optimization using parallel genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Romero, Olmo; Botella, Guillermo; Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Meyer Base, Uwe

    2011-06-01

    A new approach to optimize the parameters of a gradient-based optical flow model using a parallel genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed. The main characteristics of the optical flow algorithm are its bio-inspiration and robustness against contrast, static patterns and noise, besides working consistently with several optical illusions where other algorithms fail. This model depends on many parameters which conform the number of channels, the orientations required, the length and shape of the kernel functions used in the convolution stage, among many more. The GA is used to find a set of parameters which improve the accuracy of the optical flow on inputs where the ground-truth data is available. This set of parameters helps to understand which of them are better suited for each type of inputs and can be used to estimate the parameters of the optical flow algorithm when used with videos that share similar characteristics. The proposed implementation takes into account the embarrassingly parallel nature of the GA and uses the OpenMP Application Programming Interface (API) to speedup the process of estimating an optimal set of parameters. The information obtained in this work can be used to dynamically reconfigure systems, with potential applications in robotics, medical imaging and tracking.

  18. The potential cost of a failed doha round:

    OpenAIRE

    Bouet, Antoine; Debucquet, David Laborde

    2009-01-01

    "In times of economic turmoil, countries might decide to increase current tariff rates to protect domestic industries or raise revenues in order to finance domestic programs. Using the highest applied or bound rate imposed by countries from 1995 to 2008 as an indicator, this study presents several scenarios regarding the economic costs of a failed Doha Round and a subsequent rush into protectionism. For example, in a scenario where the applied tariffs of major economies would go all the way u...

  19. 'HAs fail to consult Irish people in UK'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-10

    Health authorities are failing to consult local people on their health needs, a conference on the mental health of Irish people living in the UK heard last week. Consulting Irish people was often only 'symbolic', despite the requirements of the NHS and Community Care Act, conference Chair Padraic Kenna, Director of Innisfree Housing Association, told delegates. 'The Irish caught the boat in the 1950s only to miss the boat ever since,' he said.

  20. Trending a New Normal: Is Nigeria becoming a failed Nation?

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Olusegun Stober

    2017-01-01

    Judging from every economic parameter, Nigeria will suggest being a failed nation. Not so long ago international investors identified Nigeria as one of the world’s most promising investment opportunities, but things have changed drastically in the meantime. The slump in the price of crude oil has hit Nigerian economy hard, the twin curses of insecurity and corruption have not gone away either. The Nigerian currency - naira has also lost its value by 170% from its value in 2015. The question m...

  1. Can the failing firm defence rule be counterproductive?

    OpenAIRE

    Helder Vasconcelos

    2013-01-01

    The present paper investigates the role of the failing firm defence (FFD) concept in the merger control process within a Cournot setting where (i) endogenous mergers are motivated by prospective efficiency gains and (ii) mergers must be submitted to an antitrust authority that might demand partial divestiture for approval. The findings show that when the FFD concept is one of the tools available for controlling the merger process, firms can strategically embark on a merger that makes other fi...

  2. Failed medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Causes and surgical strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Ramirez-Fuentes, Cristina; Leal Blanquet, Joan; Gelber, Pablo-Eduardo; Monllau García, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common clinical problem encountered by orthopedic surgeons specializing in the knee. For patients with chronic lateral patellar instability, the standard surgical approach is to stabilize the patella through a medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Foreseeably, an increasing number of revision surgeries of the reconstructed MPFL will be seen in upcoming years. In this paper, the causes of failed MPFL reconstruction are analyzed: (1) incorrect surgical ...

  3. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN FAILED BACK SURGERY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    SEN, KK; SINGH, AMARJIT

    1999-01-01

    The failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a severe, long-lasting, disabling and relatively frequent (5-10%) complication of lumbosacral spine surgery. Wrong level surgery, inadequate surgical techniques, vertebral instability, recurrent disc herniation, and lumbosacral fibrosis are the most frequent causes of FBSS. The results after repeated surgery on recurrent disc herniations are comparable to those after the first intervention, whereas repeated surgery for fibrosis gives only 30-35% succ...

  4. Failed back surgery syndrome: review and new hypotheses

    OpenAIRE

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli,Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Bruno Bordoni,1,2 Fabiola Marelli2 1Department of Cardiology, Foundation Don Carlo Gnocchi, IRCCS, Institute of Hospitalization and Care, S Maria Nascente, Milan, 2School CRESO, Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, Ancona, Italy Abstract: Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a term used to define an unsatisfactory outcome of a patient who underwent spinal surgery, irrespective of type or intervention area, with persistent pain in the lumbosacral region with or ...

  5. Last bank standing : what do I gain if you fail?

    OpenAIRE

    Perotti, E.C.; Suarez, J.

    2001-01-01

    Banks are highly leveraged institutions, potentially attracted to speculative lending even without deposit insurance. A counterbalancing incentive to lend prudently is the risk of loss of charter value, which depends on future rents. We show in a dynamic model that current concentration does not reduce speculative lending, and may in fact increase it. In contrast, a policy of temporary increases in market concentration after a bank failure, by promoting a takeover of failed banks by a solvent...

  6. Composite Differential Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential search algorithm (DS is a relatively new evolutionary algorithm inspired by the Brownian-like random-walk movement which is used by an organism to migrate. It has been verified to be more effective than ABC, JDE, JADE, SADE, EPSDE, GSA, PSO2011, and CMA-ES. In this paper, we propose four improved solution search algorithms, namely “DS/rand/1,” “DS/rand/2,” “DS/current to rand/1,” and “DS/current to rand/2” to search the new space and enhance the convergence rate for the global optimization problem. In order to verify the performance of different solution search methods, 23 benchmark functions are employed. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm performs better than, or at least comparable to, the original algorithm when considering the quality of the solution obtained. However, these schemes cannot still achieve the best solution for all functions. In order to further enhance the convergence rate and the diversity of the algorithm, a composite differential search algorithm (CDS is proposed in this paper. This new algorithm combines three new proposed search schemes including “DS/rand/1,” “DS/rand/2,” and “DS/current to rand/1” with three control parameters using a random method to generate the offspring. Experiment results show that CDS has a faster convergence rate and better search ability based on the 23 benchmark functions.

  7. Algorithms and Their Explanations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benini, M.; Gobbo, F.; Beckmann, A.; Csuhaj-Varjú, E.; Meer, K.

    2014-01-01

    By analysing the explanation of the classical heapsort algorithm via the method of levels of abstraction mainly due to Floridi, we give a concrete and precise example of how to deal with algorithmic knowledge. To do so, we introduce a concept already implicit in the method, the ‘gradient of

  8. Finite lattice extrapolation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, M.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-08-01

    Two algorithms for sequence extrapolation, due to von den Broeck and Schwartz and Bulirsch and Stoer are reviewed and critically compared. Applications to three states and six states quantum chains and to the (2+1)D Ising model show that the algorithm of Bulirsch and Stoer is superior, in particular if only very few finite lattice data are available. (orig.)

  9. Recursive automatic classification algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, E V; Dorofeyuk, A A

    1982-03-01

    A variational statement of the automatic classification problem is given. The dependence of the form of the optimal partition surface on the form of the classification objective functional is investigated. A recursive algorithm is proposed for maximising a functional of reasonably general form. The convergence problem is analysed in connection with the proposed algorithm. 8 references.

  10. Graph Colouring Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husfeldt, Thore

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to graph colouring algorithms. The focus is on vertex-colouring algorithms that work for general classes of graphs with worst-case performance guarantees in a sequential model of computation. The presentation aims to demonstrate the breadth of available...

  11. 8. Algorithm Design Techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 8. Algorithms - Algorithm Design Techniques. R K Shyamasundar. Series Article Volume 2 ... Author Affiliations. R K Shyamasundar1. Computer Science Group, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  12. Hip arthroplasty in failed intertrochanteric fractures in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javahir A Pachore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Failed intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients are surgical challenge with limited options. Hip arthroplasty is a good salvage procedure even though it involves technical issues such as implant removal, bone loss, poor bone quality, trochanteric nonunion and difficulty of surgical exposure. Materials and Methods: 30 patients of failed intertrochanteric fractures where hip arthroplasty was done between May 2008 and December 2011 were included in study. 13 were males and 17 were females with average age of 67.3 years. There were 2 cemented bipolar arthroplasties, 19 uncemented bipolar, 4 cemented total hip arthroplasty and 5 uncemented total hip arthroplasties. 16 patients had a trochanteric nonunion, which was treated by tension band principles. Total hip was considered where there was acetabular damage due to the penetration of implant. Results: The average followup was 20 months (range 6-48 months. Patients were followed up from 6 to 48 months with average followup of 20 months. None of the patients were lost to followup. There was no dislocation. All patients were ambulatory at the final followup. Conclusion: A predictable functional outcome can be achieved by hip arthroplasty in elderly patients with failed intertrochanteric fractures. Though technically demanding, properly performed hip arthroplasty can be a good salvage option for this patient group.

  13. Failed tracheal intubation using a laryngoscope and intubating laryngeal mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T; Hirose, T; Shingu, K

    2000-04-01

    To report unexpected failed tracheal intubation using a laryngoscope and an intubating laryngeal mask, and difficult ventilation via a facemask, laryngeal mask and intubating laryngeal mask, in a patient with an unrecognized lingual tonsillar hypertrophy. A 63-yr-old woman, who had undergone clipping of an aneurysm seven weeks previously, was scheduled for ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. At the previous surgery, there had been no difficulty in ventilation or in tracheal intubation. Her trachea remained intubated nasally for 11 days after surgery. Preoperatively, her consciousness was impaired. There were no restrictions in head and neck movements or mouth opening. The thyromental distance was 7 cm. After induction of anesthesia, manual ventilation via a facemask with a Guedel airway was suboptimal and the chest expanded insufficiently. At laryngoscopy using a Macintosh or McCoy device, only the tip of the epiglottis, but not the glottis, could be seen, and tracheal intubation failed. There was a partial obstruction during manual ventilation through either the intubating laryngeal mask or conventional laryngeal mask; intubation through each device failed. Digital examination of the pharynx, after removal of the laryngeal mask, indicated a mass occupying the vallecula. Lingual tonsillar hypertrophy (1 x 1 x 2 cm) was found to be the cause of the failure. Awake fibrescope-aided tracheal intubation was accomplished. Unexpected lingual tonsillar hypertrophy can cause both ventilation and tracheal intubation difficult, and neither the laryngeal mask nor intubating laryngeal mask may be helpful in the circumstances.

  14. Failed magnetic resonance imaging examinations due to claustrophobia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarji, S.A.; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Kumar, G.; Tan, A.H.; Narayanan, P.

    1998-01-01

    A recognised cause of incomplete or cancelled MRI examinations is anxiety and claustrophobic symptoms in patients undergoing MR scanning. This appears to be a problem in many MRI centres in Western Europe and North America, where it is said to be costly in terms of loss of valuable scan time, and has led to researchers suggesting several anxiety reducing approaches for MRI. To determine the incidence of failed MRI examination among our patients and if there are any associations with a patient's sex, age and education level, we studied claustrophobia that led to premature termination of the MRI examination in the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) in 3324 patients over 28 months. The incidence of failed MRI examinations due to claustrophobia in the UMMC was found to be only 0.54%. There are associations between claustrophobia in MRI with the patients' sex, age and level of education. The majority of those affected were male patients and young patients in the 25-45-year age group. The patients' education level appears to be the strongest association with failed MRI examinations due to claustrophobia, where the majority of the affected were highly educated individuals. Claustrophobia in MRI is more of a problem among the educated individuals or patients from a higher socio-economic group, which may explain the higher incidence in Western European and North American patients. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  15. Management of the failed posterior/multidirectional instability patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Brian; Ghodadra, Neil; Romeo, Anthony A; Provencher, Matthew T

    2010-09-01

    Although the results of operative treatment of posterior and multidirectional instability (P-MDI) of the shoulder have improved, they are not as reliable as those treated for anterior instability of the shoulder. This may be attributed to the complexities in the classification, etiology, and physical examination of a patient with suspected posterior and multidirectional instability. Failure to address the primary and concurrent lesion adequately and the development of pain and/or stiffness are contributing factors to the failure of P-MDI procedures. Other pitfalls include errors in history and physical examination, failure to recognize concomitant pathology, and problems with the surgical technique or implant failure. Patulous capsular tissues and glenoid version also play in role management of failed P-MDI patients. With an improved understanding of pertinent clinical complaints and physical examination findings and the advent of arthroscopic techniques and improved implants, successful strategies for the nonoperative and operative management of the patient after a failed posterior or multidirectional instability surgery may be elucidated. This article highlights the common presentation, physical findings, and radiographic workup in a patient that presents after a failed P-MDI repair and offers strategies for revision surgical repair.

  16. Detection device for the failed position in fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Kensuke; Nomura, Teiji; Hiruta, Koji

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To detect the failed position of a fuel assembly with ease and safety. Constitution: A fuel assembly is tightly closed in a sipper tube equipped with a gas supply tube and a gas exhaust tube at the upper portion and a purified water injection tube and a draining tube at the lower end. Then, water in the sipper tube is drained to the lower portion of the fuel assembly by the pressure of gases while opening the gas supply tube and the draining tube, and closing the exhaust tube and the injection tube. Then, after closing the gas supply tube and the draining tube while opening theexhaust tube and the injection tube, purified water is injected into the sipper tube from the injection tube to an optional height till the fuel assembly is immersed. Then, after leaving for a predetermined of time, water is sampled and the radioactive material density therein is measured. By changing the injection level of the purified water, since the radioactive material density changes at the failed position, the failed position can be detected with ease. (Sekiya, K.)

  17. Dynamics of serum testosterone during the menstrual cycle evaluated by daily measurements with an ID-LC-MS/MS method and a 2nd generation automated immunoassay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, Hong N.; Sluss, Patrick M.; Blincko, Stuart; Knol, Dirk L.; Blankenstein, Marinus A.; Heijboer, Annemieke C.

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone concentrations in normally cycling women are assumed to be elevated around the time of ovulation. The clinical relevance of changing testosterone concentrations during the menstrual cycle, however, is unclear. Poor performance of current direct immunoassays for testosterone at low

  18. Development and validation of a direct sandwich chemiluminescence immunoassay for measuring DNA adducts of benzo[a]pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Kovács, Katalin; Kaila, Stella

    2012-01-01

    We have developed and validated a sandwich chemiluminescence immunoassay (SCIA) which measures polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts combining high throughput and adequate sensitivity, appropriate for evaluation of adduct levels in human population studies. Fragmented DNA is incubated...

  19. Our Treatment Approaches in Severe Maxillofacial Injuries Occurring After Failed Suicide Attempts Using Long-Barreled Guns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuker, Ismail; Şimşek, Tekin; Keles, Musa Kemal; Yosma, Engin; Aksakal, Ibrahim Alper; Demir, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    Maxillofacial traumas with long-barreled guns may sometimes cause catastrophic results by means of smashing in facial structures. In these patients, reconstruction strategies of both fragmented/lost soft and hard tissues still remain controversial. In their clinic, the authors treated 5 patients with severely injured face after failed suicide attempt between 2008 and 2013. In this study, the authors aimed to present their clinical experiences on these severely injured maxillofacial gunshot traumas and offer a treatment algorithm to gain a result as possible as satisfactory in terms of functionality and appearance.

  20. Geometric approximation algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Har-Peled, Sariel

    2011-01-01

    Exact algorithms for dealing with geometric objects are complicated, hard to implement in practice, and slow. Over the last 20 years a theory of geometric approximation algorithms has emerged. These algorithms tend to be simple, fast, and more robust than their exact counterparts. This book is the first to cover geometric approximation algorithms in detail. In addition, more traditional computational geometry techniques that are widely used in developing such algorithms, like sampling, linear programming, etc., are also surveyed. Other topics covered include approximate nearest-neighbor search, shape approximation, coresets, dimension reduction, and embeddings. The topics covered are relatively independent and are supplemented by exercises. Close to 200 color figures are included in the text to illustrate proofs and ideas.