WorldWideScience

Sample records for immune-mediated demyelinating disease

  1. Membrane attack complex of complement is not essential for immune mediated demyelination in experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Giang T; Hodgkinson, Suzanne J; Carter, Nicole M; Killingsworth, Murray; Nomura, Masaru; Verma, Nirupama D; Plain, Karren M; Boyd, Rochelle; Hall, Bruce M

    2010-12-15

    Antibody deposition and complement activation, especially membrane attack complex (MAC) formation are considered central for immune mediated demyelination. To examine the role of MAC in immune mediated demyelination, we studied experimental allergic neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats deficient in complement component 6 (C6) that cannot form MAC. A C6 deficient Lewis (Lewis/C6-) strain of rats was bred by backcrossing the defective C6 gene, from PVG/C6- rats, onto the Lewis background. Lewis/C6- rats had the same C6 gene deletion as PVG/C6- rats and their sera did not support immune mediated haemolysis unless C6 was added. Active EAN was induced in Lewis and Lewis/C6- rats by immunization with bovine peripheral nerve myelin in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and Lewis/C6- rats had delayed clinical EAN compared to the Lewis rats. Peripheral nerve demyelination in Lewis/C6- was also delayed but was similar in extent at the peak of disease. Compared to Lewis, Lewis/C6- nerves had no MAC deposition, reduced macrophage infiltrate and IL-17A, but similar T cell infiltrate and Th1 cytokine mRNA expression. ICAM-1 and P-selectin mRNA expression and immunostaining on vascular endothelium were delayed in Lewis C6- compared to Lewis rats' nerves. This study found that MAC was not required for immune mediated demyelination; but that MAC enhanced early symptoms and early demyelination in EAN, either by direct lysis or by sub-lytic induction of vascular endothelial expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of the 2012 revised diagnostic definitions for paediatric multiple sclerosis and immune-mediated central nervous system demyelination disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, E. Danielle; Neuteboom, Rinze F.; Ketelslegers, Immy A.; Boon, Maartje; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.

    Background Recently, the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group (IPMSSG) definitions for the diagnosis of immune-mediated acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the central nervous system, including paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS), have been revised. Objective To evaluate the

  3. Helminthic therapy: using worms to treat immune-mediated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David E; Weinstock, Joel V

    2009-01-01

    There is an epidemic of immune-mediated disease in highly-developed industrialized countries. Such diseases, like inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis and asthma increase in prevalence as populations adopt modern hygienic practices. These practices prevent exposure to parasitic worms (helminths). Epidemiologic studies suggest that people who carry helminths have less immune-mediated disease. Mice colonized with helminths are protected from disease in models of colitis, encephalitis, Type 1 diabetes and asthma. Clinical trials show that exposure to helminths reduce disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. This chapter reviews some of the work showing that colonization with helminths alters immune responses, against dysregulated inflammation. These helminth-host immune interactions have potentially important implications for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases.

  4. Immune-mediated diseases and microbial exposure in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Bønnelykke, K; Stokholm, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The non-communicable disease pandemic includes immune-mediated diseases such as asthma and allergy, which are likely originating in early life where the immature immune system is prone to alterations caused by the exposome. The timing of exposure seems critical for the developing immune system...

  5. Demyelinating diseases in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Hirofumi; Fujihara, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The present review aims to discuss the recent advances in inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system in Asia. Prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Asia is lower than that in Western countries, although it has been increasing recently. Meanwhile, there seems to be no major difference in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) prevalence in various regions or ethnicities. Thus, the ratios of NMO/NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD) to MS are higher in Asia as compared with Western countries, indicating that the differential diagnosis between NMO/NMOSD and MS is a major challenge in Asia. Although the detection of aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-antibody is critical in distinguishing NMO/NMOSD from MS, some patients with NMO/NMOSD phenotype are seronegative for AQP4-antibody, and a fraction of those patients possess autoantibody against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. The clinical profile of Asian MS seems to be essentially similar to that in Western MS after careful exclusion of NMO/NMOSD, although some unique genetic and/or environmental factors may modify the disease in Asians. MS prevalence has been low but is increasing in Asia. In contrast, NMO/NMOSD prevalence seems relatively constant in the world. Asian MS is not fundamentally different from Western MS, but some genetic and/or environmental differences may cause some features unique to Asian patients.

  6. Narcolepsy as an Immune-Mediated Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto K. De la Herrán-Arita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagonic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. This disease is secondary to the specific loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. An autoimmune basis for the disease has long been suspected based on its strong association with the genetic marker DQB1*06:02, and current studies greatly support this hypothesis. Narcolepsy with hypocretin deficiency is associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA and T cell receptor (TCR polymorphisms, suggesting that an autoimmune process targets a peptide unique to hypocretin-producing neurons via specific HLA-peptide-TCR interactions. This concept has gained a lot of notoriety after the increase of childhood narcolepsy in 2010 following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1 in China and vaccination with Pandemrix, an adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine that was used in Scandinavia. The surge of narcolepsy cases subsequent to influenza A H1N1 infection and H1N1 vaccination suggests that processes such as molecular mimicry or bystander activation might be crucial for disease development.

  7. Cancer as an immune-mediated disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurin MR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael R ShurinDepartments of Pathology and Immunology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The link between oncology and immunology has a long history and its development is forced by the necessity to develop innovative and highly efficient modalities for immunological destruction of malignant cells. The limited efficacy of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation also exemplify these issues, as these treatments do not eliminate all cancerous cells, do not address the immunosuppressive nature of the disease and can further impair the patient's immune response weakening patient's resistance to the cancer. Multidisciplinary analysis of the interaction between the immune system and cancer in preclinical and clinical settings suggests that the immune system is closely intertwined with both cancer pathogenesis and treatment. On the one hand, cancer is a manifestation of malfunctions in immunity, as malignant cells manage to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. Chronic infections and inflammation associated with limited or polarized immune responses also contribute to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The tumor immunoenvironment represents specific conditions and elements that support cancerous cell survival, proliferation and spreading. On the other hand, the specificity and strength of antitumor immunity is a powerful and efficient tool that can be used to recognize and destroy neoplastic cells or their supporting microenvironment. Understanding the role of the immune system in controlling and supporting tumor initiation, formation, growth and progression has crucial implications for cancer therapy and will therefore guide the future development of cancer immunotherapy and its combination with conventional therapies to achieve optimal antitumor effects in patients with different types of cancer.Keywords: tumor immunology and immunotherapy, tumor immunoenvironment, cancer, immunosuppression

  8. Immune-mediated rippling muscle disease and myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Mariela; Gonorazky, Hernan; Chaves, Marcelo; Fulgenzi, Ernesto; Figueredo, Alejandra; Christiansen, Silvia; Cristiano, Edgardo; Bertini, Enrico S; Rugiero, Marcelo

    2016-10-15

    Cases of acquired rippling muscle disease in association with myasthenia gravis have been reported. We present three patients with iRMD (immune-mediated rippling muscle disease) and AChR-antibody positive myasthenia gravis. None of them had thymus pathology. They presented exercise-induced muscle rippling combined with generalized myasthenia gravis. One of them had muscle biopsy showing a myopathic pattern and a patchy immunostaining with caveolin antibodies. They were successfully treated steroids and azathioprine. The immune nature of this association is supported by the response to immunotherapies and the positivity of AChR-antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Immune-Mediated Inner Ear Disease: Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penêda, José Ferreira; Lima, Nuno Barros; Monteiro, Francisco; Silva, Joana Vilela; Gama, Rita; Condé, Artur

    2018-03-07

    Immune Mediated Inner Ear Disease (IMIED) is a rare form of sensorineural bilateral hearing loss, usually progressing in weeks to months and responsive to immunosuppressive treatment. Despite recent advances, there is no consensus on diagnosis and optimal treatment. A review of articles on IMIED from the last 10 years was conducted using PubMed ® database. IMIED is a rare disease, mostly affecting middle aged women. It may be a primary ear disease or secondary to autoimmune systemic disease. A dual immune response (both cellular and humoral) seems to be involved. Cochlin may be the inner ear protein targeted in this disease. Distinction from other (core common) forms of neurosensory hearing loss is a challenge. Physical examination is mandatory for exclusion of other causes of hearing loss; audiometry identifies characteristic hearing curves. Laboratory and imaging studies are controversial since no diagnostic marker is available. Despite recent research, IMIED diagnosis remains exclusive. Steroids are the mainstay treatment; other therapies need further investigation. For refractory cases, cochlear implantation is an option and with good relative outcome. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Abundant genetic overlap between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases indicates shared molecular genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole A Andreassen

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals, applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG, low density lipoproteins (LDL, high density lipoproteins (HDL] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis. We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88, LDL (n = 87 and HDL (n = 52. Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2 and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1. We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents.

  11. Shared genetics in coeliac disease and other immune-mediated diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez-Achury, J.; Coutinho de Almeida, R.; Wijmenga, C.

    Gutierrez-Achury J, Coutinho de Almeida R, Wijmenga C (University Medical Centre Groningen and University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; University of Brasilia School of Health Sciences, Brasilia, DF, Brazil). Shared genetics in coeliac disease and other immune-mediated diseases

  12. The Role of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Immune-Mediated Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meifang; Zhang, Cai

    2017-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently identified group of innate immune cells lacking antigen-specific receptors that can mediate immune responses and regulate tissue homeostasis and inflammation. ILCs comprise group 1 ILCs, group 2 ILCs, and group 3 ILCs. These ILCs usually localize at mucosal surfaces and combat pathogens by the rapid release of certain cytokines. However, the uncontrolled activation of ILCs can also lead to damaging inflammation, especially in the gut, lung, and skin. Although the physiological and pathogenic roles of ILCs in liver diseases have been attracting increasing attention recently, there has been no systematic review regarding the roles of ILCs in immune-mediated liver diseases. Here, we review the relationships between the ILC subsets and their functions in immune-mediated liver diseases, and discuss their therapeutic potential based on current knowledge about the functional roles of these cells in liver diseases. PMID:28659927

  13. Reuma.pt contribution to the knowledge of immune-mediated systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria José; Canhão, Helena; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Oliveira Ramos, Filipa; Ponte, Cristina; Duarte, Cátia; Barcelos, Anabela; Martins, Fernando; Melo Gomes, José António

    2017-01-01

    Patient registries are key instruments aimed at a better understanding of the natural history of diseases, at assessing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions, as well as identifying rare events or outcomes that are not captured in clinical trials. However, the potential of registries goes far beyond these aspects. For example, registries promote the standardization of clinical practice, can also provide information on domains that are not routinely collected in clinical practice and can support decision-making. Being aware of the importance of registries, the Portuguese Society of Rheumatology developed the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register- Reuma.pt - which proved to be an innovative instrument essential to a better understanding of systemic immune-mediated rheumatic diseases. To describe the contribution of Reuma.pt to the knowledge of systemic immune-mediated rheumatic diseases. Reuma.pt is widely implemented, with 77 centres actively contributing to the recruitment and follow-up of patients. Reuma.pt follows in a standardized way patients with the following systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (n=6218), psoriatic arthritis (n=1498), spondyloarthritis (n=2529), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (n =1561), autoinflammatory syndromes (n=122), systemic lupus erythematosus (n =1718), systemic sclerosis (n=180) and vasculitis (n=221). This platform is intended for use as an electronic medical record, provides standardized assessment of patients and support to the clinical decision, thereby contributing to a better quality of care of rheumatic patients. The research based on Reuma.pt identified genetic determinants of susceptibility and response to therapy, characterized in detail systemic rheumatic diseases and their long-term impact, critically appraised the performance of instruments for monitoring the disease activity, established the effectiveness and safety of biologic therapies and identified predictors of response, and

  14. Anti-thymocyte serum as part of an immunosuppressive regimen in treating haematological immune-mediated diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuq, B; Blois, S L; Mathews, K A

    2017-06-01

    To report the outcomes associated with the use of rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum in dogs with haematological immune-mediated diseases. Medical records from 2000 to 2016 of patients diagnosed with immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia and myelofibrosis were reviewed. All dogs had a severe or refractory disease and received rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum. Lymphocyte counts were used to monitor the immediate anti-thymocyte effect of therapy; long-term patient outcome was recorded. A total of 10 dogs were included. All dogs except one had a notable decrease in their lymphocyte count after rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum; four of nine had a decrease to less than 10% of the initial lymphocyte count and one dog reached 10·8%. All dogs were discharged from the hospital following their treatment. The dog with no alteration of lymphocyte count following therapy with rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum had refractory immune mediated haemolytic anemia and was euthanised within two weeks. All other cases achieved clinical remission with immunosuppressive therapy eventually being tapered (3 of 10) or discontinued (6 of 10). Rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum therapy might be of interest as an adjunctive therapy in refractory immune-mediated diseases and suppressed lymphocyte counts in most dogs. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  15. Immune-mediated neuropathy with Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takaaki; Arai, Ayako; Yokota, Takanori; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Miura, Osamu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T/NK- cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) developed acute-onset weakness. A nerve conduction study showed a conduction block in both the proximal and most distal segments. Although the patient's neuropathy transiently responded to intravenous immunoglobulin, it was progressive for at least 25 days until the start of prednisolone (PSL) administration, after which it remarkably improved. The neuropathy further improved after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The present patient's clinical course is not consistent with that of typical Guillain-Barré syndrome. This case suggests that EBV-T/NK-LPD can cause progressive immune-mediated neuropathy as a result of chronic EBV antigen presentation and can be treated with PSL and BMT.

  16. Coexistence of Cushing syndrome from functional adrenal adenoma and Addison disease from immune-mediated adrenalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Randall; Jimenez, Rafael E; Farrar, William; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Leonard; Schwartz, Frank L

    2012-06-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an incidental adrenal adenoma and physical examination findings that included moderate obesity, a slight cervicothoracic fat pad ("buffalo hump"), increased supraclavicular fat pads, and white abdominal striae. Biochemical workup revealed elevated levels of 24-hour urinary free cortisol but normal serum morning cortisol and suppressed levels of corticotropin, suggestive of adrenal-dependent Cushing syndrome. The resected adrenal gland revealed macronodular cortical hyperplasia with a dominant nodule. Other findings included an absent cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation, presence of serum anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies, and mononuclear cell infiltration--consistent with adrenalitis. The findings represent, to the authors' knowledge, the first known case of a patient with coexistent functional cortisol-secreting macronodular adrenal tumor resulting in Cushing syndrome and immune-mediated adrenalitis resulting in Addison disease.

  17. Demyelinating diseases and potential repair strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, C.; Spies, M.; Sasaki, M.; Vogt, PM; Kocsis, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Demyelination is associated with a number of neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury and nerve compression. MS lesions often show axon loss and therefore reparative therapeutic goals include remyelination and neuroprotection of vulnerable axons. Experimental cellular transplantation has proven successful in a number of demyelination and injury models to remyelinate and improve functional outcome. Here we discuss the remyelination and neuroprotective potential of several myelin-forming cells types and their behavior in different demyelination and injury models. Better understanding of these models and current cell-based strategies for remyelination and neuroprotection offer exciting opportunities to develop strategies for clinical studies. PMID:17408905

  18. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Kostianovsky

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts.

  19. Steroid sparing regimens for management of oral immune-mediated diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated mucocutaneous disease may present oral symptoms as a first sign of the disease. The primary etiology could be the cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against epithelial or connective tissue, in a chronic and recurrent pattern. Lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid are the most frequent immunologically mediated mucocutaneous diseases. More often than not, patients present with complaints of blisters, oral ulcers, pain, burning sensation, and bleeding from the various oral sites. Steroids, whether topical or systemic, are the treatment of choice as they have both anti-inflammatory and immune-suppressant properties; however, challenges in the treatment of autoimmune diseases are the complexity of symptoms, the need to manage long-term medications for preserving organ function, and the long-term adverse effects of steroids. In such situations steroid sparing agents, such as, tacrolimus, dapsone, azathioprine, cyclosporine, and so on, may be helpful. Here an attempt is made to review various treatment regimens that could be used as alternatives to steroids for management of such diseases.

  20. Acne: a new model of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiga, E; Verdelli, A; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Caproni, M; Fabbri, P

    2015-04-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the sebaceous-pilosebaceous unit. Interestingly, inflammation can be detected by histopathological examination and immuohistochemical analysis even in the apparently non-inflammatory acneic lesions, such as comedones. In the last years, it has been clearly demonstrated that acne development is linked to the combination of predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers, among which a prominent role is played by the follicular colonization by Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). P. acnes displays several activities able to promote the development of acne skin lesions, including the promotion of follicular hyperkeratinisation, the induction of sebogenesis, and the stimulation of an inflammatory response by the secretion of proinflammatory molecules and by the activation of innate immunity, that is followed by a P. acnes-specific adaptive immune response. In addition, P. acnes-independent inflammation mediated by androgens or by a neurogenic activation, followed by the secretion in the skin of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides, can occur in acne lesions. In conclusion, acne can be considered as a model of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease, characterized by an innate immune response that is not able to control P. acnes followed by a Th1-mediated adaptive immune response, that becomes self-maintaining independently from P. acnes itself.

  1. Month of birth, vitamin D and risk of immune-mediated disease: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disanto Giulio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A season of birth effect in immune-mediated diseases (ID such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes has been consistently reported. We aimed to investigate whether season of birth influences the risk of rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and systemic lupus erythematosus in addition to multiple sclerosis, and to explore the correlation between the risk of ID and predicted ultraviolet B (UVB light exposure and vitamin D status during gestation. Methods The monthly distribution of births of patients with ID from the UK (n = 115,172 was compared to that of the general population using the Cosinor test. Predicted UVB radiation and vitamin D status in different time windows during pregnancy were calculated for each month of birth and correlated with risk of ID using the Spearman's correlation coefficient. Results The distributions of ID births significantly differed from that of the general population (P = 5e-12 with a peak in April (odds ratio = 1.045, 95% confidence interval = 1.024, 1.067, P P P = 0.00005 and third trimester vitamin D status (Spearman's rho = -0.44, P = 0.0003. Conclusions The risk of different ID in the UK is significantly influenced by the season of birth, suggesting the presence of a shared seasonal risk factor or factors predisposing to ID. Gestational UVB and vitamin D exposure may be implicated in the aetiology of ID.

  2. Demyelinating disease masquerading as a surgical problem: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awang Saufi M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report three cases of demyelinating disease with tumor-like presentation. This information is particularly important to both neurosurgeons and neurologists who should be aware that inflammatory demyelinating diseases can present as a mass lesion, which is indistinguishable from a tumor, both clinically and radiologically, especially when there is no evidence of temporal dissemination of this disease. Case presentation The first patient was a 42-year-old Malay woman who developed subacute onset of progressive quadriparesis with urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging of her spine showed an intramedullary lesion at the C5-C7 level. She was operated on and biopsy was suggestive of a demyelinating disease. Retrospective history discovered two episodes of acute onset of neurological deficits with partial recovery and magnetic resonance imaging of her brain revealed demyelinating plaques in the centrum semiovale. The second patient was a 16-year-old Malay boy who presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. A computed tomography brain scan revealed obstructive hydrocephalus with a lesion adjacent to the fourth ventricle. An external ventricular drainage was inserted. Subsequently, a stereotactic biopsy was taken and histopathology was reported as demyelination. Retrospective history revealed similar episodes with full recovery in between episodes. The third case was a 28-year-old Malay man who presented with acute bilateral visual loss and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging of his brain showed a large mass lesion in the right temporoparietal region. Biopsy was consistent with demyelinating disease. Reexamination of the patient revealed bilateral papillitis and not papilledema. Visual evoked potential was prolonged bilaterally. In all three cases, lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid study was not carried out due to lack of patient consent. Conclusions These cases illustrate the importance of

  3. Association of the STAT4 gene with increased susceptibility for some immune-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, A; Varadé, J; Márquez, A; Cénit, M C; Espino, L; Perdigones, N; Santiago, J L; Fernández-Arquero, M; de la Calle, H; Arroyo, R; Mendoza, J L; Fernández-Gutiérrez, B; de la Concha, E G; Urcelay, E

    2008-09-01

    The STAT4 gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the signaling pathways of several cytokines, including interleukin-12 (IL-12), the type I interferons, and IL-23. Recently, the association of a STAT4 haplotype marked by rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus was reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of this STAT4 tagging polymorphism in other immune-mediated diseases. The study group comprised 2,776 consecutively recruited Spanish individuals: 575 with RA, 440 with multiple sclerosis, 700 with inflammatory bowel disease, 311 with type 1 diabetes, and 723 ethnically matched healthy control subjects. The STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 was genotyped using a predesigned TaqMan assay. Allele and genotype frequencies in patients and control subjects were compared by chi-square test. The association of STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with RA was validated in patients of Spanish origin (for T versus G, P = 1.2 x 10(-6), odds ratio [OR] 1.59, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.31-1.92), and the association was described for the first time in both clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (for T versus G, P = 0.006, OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.07-1.55), and in type 1 diabetes mellitus (for T versus G, P = 0.008, OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.07-1.71). In contrast, the genotypic distribution of this polymorphism showed no difference between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy control subjects (for T versus G, P = 0.83, OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.82-1.28). The STAT4 gene is emerging as a novel common risk factor for diverse complex diseases.

  4. Monocyte scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis: the dynamics of monocyte migration in immune-mediated inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier M Thurlings

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are principal drivers of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a prototype immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Conceivably, synovial macrophages are continuously replaced by circulating monocytes in RA. Animal studies from the 1960s suggested that macrophage replacement by monocytes is a slow process in chronic inflammatory lesions. Translation of these data into the human condition has been hampered by the lack of available techniques to analyze monocyte migration in man.We developed a technique that enabled us to analyze the migration of labelled autologous monocytes in RA patients using single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT. We isolated CD14+ monocytes by CliniMACS in 8 patients and labeled these with technetium-99m (99mTc-HMPAO. Monocytes were re-infused into the same patient. Using SPECT we calculated that a very small but specific fraction of 3.4 x 10(-3 (0.95-5.1 x 10(-3 % of re-infused monocytes migrated to the inflamed joints, being detectable within one hour after re-infusion.The results indicate monocytes migrate continuously into the inflamed synovial tissue of RA patients, but at a slow macrophage-replacement rate. This suggests that the rapid decrease in synovial macrophages that occurs after antirheumatic treatment might rather be explained by an alteration in macrophage retention than in monocyte influx and that RA might be particularly sensitive to treatments targeting inflammatory cell retention.

  5. Risk of venous thromboembolism in people admitted to hospital with selected immune-mediated diseases: record-linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handel Adam E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a common complication during and after a hospital admission. Although it is mainly considered a complication of surgery, it often occurs in people who have not undergone surgery, with recent evidence suggesting that immune-mediated diseases may play a role in VTE risk. We, therefore, decided to study the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE in people admitted to hospital with a range of immune-mediated diseases. Methods We analysed databases of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and death certificates for the Oxford Record Linkage Study area (ORLS1:1968 to 1998 and ORLS2:1999 to 2008 and the whole of England (1999 to 2008. Rate ratios for VTE were determined, comparing immune-mediated disease cohorts with comparison cohorts. Results Significantly elevated risks of VTE were found, in all three populations studied, in people with a hospital record of admission for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, chronic active hepatitis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, myxoedema, pemphigus/pemphigoid, polyarteritis nodosa, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Rate ratios were considerably higher for some of these diseases than others: for example, for systemic lupus erythematosus the rate ratios were 3.61 (2.36 to 5.31 in the ORLS1 population, 4.60 (3.19 to 6.43 in ORLS2 and 3.71 (3.43 to 4.02 in the England dataset. Conclusions People admitted to hospital with immune-mediated diseases may be at an increased risk of subsequent VTE. Our findings need independent confirmation or refutation; but, if confirmed, there may be a role for thromboprophylaxis in some patients with these diseases.

  6. Multidisciplinary Management of Spondyloarthritis-Related Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, Fernando; Olivieri, Ignazio; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Ayala, Fabio; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Bianchi, Luca; Cimino, Luca; Costanzo, Antonio; Cristaudo, Antonio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Daperno, Marco; Fostini, Anna Chiara; Galeazzi, Mauro; Gilio, Michele; Gionchetti, Paolo; Gisondi, Paolo; Lubrano, Ennio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Offidani, Annamaria; Orlando, Ambrogio; Pugliese, Daniela; Salvarani, Carlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Vecchi, Maurizio; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2018-04-01

    Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) are chronic autoimmune conditions that share common pathophysiologic mechanisms. The optimal management of patients with IMIDs remains challenging because the coexistence of different conditions requires the intervention of several specialists. The aim of this study was to develop a series of statements defining overarching principles that guide the implementation of a multidisciplinary approach for the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA)-related IMIDs including SpA, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and uveitis. A Delphi consensus-based approach was used to identify a core set of statements. The process included development of initial questions by a steering committee, an exhaustive search of the literature using complementary approaches to identify potential statements and two Delphi voting rounds for finalization of the statements. Consensus was achieved on the related nature of IMIDs, the existence of a high prevalence of multiple IMIDs in a single patient and the fact that a multidisciplinary approach can result in a more extensive evaluation and comprehensive approach to treatment. The goals of a multidisciplinary team should be to increase diagnosis of concomitant IMIDs, improve the decision-making process, and increase patient satisfaction and adherence. Early referral and diagnosis, early recognition of concomitant IMIDs and optimizing treatment to improve patient quality of life are some of the advantages of using multidisciplinary teams. To be effective, a multidisciplinary team should be equipped with the appropriate tools for diagnosis and follow-up, and at a minimum the multidisciplinary team should include a dermatologist, gastroenterologist and rheumatologist; providing psychologic support via a psychologist and involving an ophthalmologist, general practitioners and nurses in multidisciplinary care is also important. The present Delphi consensus identified a set of

  7. The Economic Impact of Biosimilars on Chronic Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentek, Marta; Zrubka, Zsombor; Gulacsi, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    Biological drugs represent highly effective but costly treatments for chronic immunemediated inflammatory diseases posing substantial burden on health care budgets. Introduction of biosimilars since 2013 has brought forward the potential of market competition, and as a societal benefit, the hope of increased access at a lower cost. We aim to provide a descriptive review on economic aspects and market changes related to the introduction of biosimilar drugs. Our focus is on chronic immune-mediated inflammatory conditions in rheumatology, gastroenterology and dermatology. Based on available literature data, we discuss the determinants of access to biological treatment, summarize the available health economic evidences with special focus on cost-utility and budget impact analyses. Market penetration of biosimilars and their overall impact on biological markets are analyzed. Biosimilar markets are country specific due to differences in the regulatory and reimbursement systems. Cost-utility analyses suggest, that given the lower price of biosimilars, formerly established biological treatment sequence practices and the eligibility criteria for biological treatment deserve reconsideration. Budget impact analyses forecasted significant budget savings in various diagnoses and countries, providing opportunity for the treatment of more patients. Biosimilars may contribute to better patient-access and provide savings to governments. To increase their acceptability, further clinical evidences and real world experiences are needed, as well as education of physicians and patients. The high biosimilar penetration rates in Norway, Denmark and Poland suggest that policies which support interchanging from the reference product may be important drivers of biosimilar uptake. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Immune mediated liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capacity. Direct damage and immune-mediated liver injury are two major factors involved in this process. Increasing evidence has suggested the essential role of immune-mediated liver injury in the pathogenesis of liver failure. Here, we review the evolved concepts concerning the mechanisms of immune-mediated liver injury in liver failure from human and animal studies. Both innate and adaptive immunity, especially the interaction of various immune cells and molecules as well as death receptor signaling system are discussed. In addition, we highlight the concept of "immune coagulation", which has been shown to be related to the disease progression and liver injury exacerbation in HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  9. An Occult Malignancy Behind a Demyelinating Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saberio Lo Presti MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 38-year-old man presenting with bilateral lower extremity weakness and paresthesias that progressed during a 4-month period to severe polyneuropathy forcing the patient to be bed bound. Throughout his multiple hospitalizations, he was treated erroneously for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, without significant improvement in his symptoms. In addition, he developed hepatosplenomegaly (organomegaly; endocrinopathies such as diabetes mellitus, central hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism; monoclonal spike evidenced in the serum electrophoresis; and hyperpigmentation of skin, altogether consistent with POEMS syndrome. During his last hospitalization he developed excruciating pain on his left hip, and imaging revealed the presence of a 9 × 6 cm osteolytic mass with sclerotic rim in the left acetabulum. Biopsy of the mass confirmed an isolated IgG lambda plasmacytoma. The patient received radiation to his left acetabular lesion followed by left hip replacement. Subsequently, the patient underwent autologous bone marrow transplant. Eighteen months after his initial presentation, he had satisfactory clinical response and is functional without significant limitations. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to an underlying plasma cell disorder, which can oftentimes be overlooked and misdiagnosed. The median age of presentation is 51 years, and only 31% of the cases occur in fairly young patients under the age of 45 as evidenced in this case. As clinicians, we should be aware of the constellation of features associated with POEMS syndrome and be able to recognize them promptly.

  10. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these r......Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed...... in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more...... that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non...

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the context of CNS demyelinating diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system demyelinating diseases are a group of disorders with different etiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions that are associated with loss of myelin and eventually axonal damage. In this group the most studied ones are multiple sclerosis (MS, neuromyelitis optic (NMO and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM. The cerebrospinal fluid is essential to differentiate between these different syndromes and to define multiple sclerosis, helping to assess the probability of Clinical Isolated Syndrome turn into multiple sclerosis.

  12. Autoimmune Demyelinating Polyneuropathy as a Manifestation of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Adult Cord Blood Transplantation in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrick Hogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated demyelinating disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a rare entity with unclear etiology. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP has been reported after related and adult unrelated allogeneic stem cell transplantation but no such case has been reported after unrelated cord blood transplantation. We hereby present the first case of AIDP after double umbilical cord blood transplantation (DUCBT. A 55-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL received a cord blood transplant for relapsed refractory disease with high risk cytogenetics. On day 221, patient presented with skin rash, tingling in both lower extremites, and ascending paralysis that progressed rapidly over the course of 2 days. The workup resulted in a diagnosis of AIDP and administration of intravenous immunoglobulins plus steroids was initiated. Motor and sensory powers were fully recovered and his chronic GVHD was managed for several months with single agent sirolimus.

  13. Adherence to systemic therapies for immune-mediated inflammatory diseases in Lebanon: a physicians' survey from three medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammoury, Alfred; Okais, Jad; Hobeika, Mireille; Sayegh, Raymond B; Shayto, Rani H; Sharara, Ala I

    2017-01-01

    Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) are chronic conditions that may cause tissue damage and disability, reduced quality of life and increased mortality. Various treatments have been developed for IMIDs, including immune modulators and targeted biologic agents. However, adherence remains suboptimal. An adherence survey was used to evaluate physicians' beliefs about adherence to medication in IMID and to evaluate if and how they manage adherence. The survey was distributed to 100 randomly selected physicians from three different specialties. Results were analyzed by four academic experts commissioned to develop an action plan to address practical and perceptual barriers to adherence, integrating it into treatment goals to maximize outcomes in IMID, thereby elevating local standards of care. Eighty-two physicians participated in this study and completed the questionnaire. Most defined adherence as compliance with prescribed treatment. Although the majority of surveyed physicians (74%) did not systematically measure adherence in their practice, 54% identified adherence as a treatment goal of equal or greater importance to therapeutic endpoints. Lack of time and specialized nursing support was reported as an important barrier to measuring adherence. The expert panel identified four key areas for action: 360° education (patient-nurse-physician), patient-physician communication, patient perception and concerns, and market access/cost. An action plan was developed centered on education and awareness, enhanced benefit-risk communication, development of adherence assessment tools and promotion of patient support programs. Nonadherence to medication is a commonly underestimated problem with important consequences. A customized target-based strategy to address the root causes of non-adherence is essential in the management of chronic immune-mediated diseases.

  14. Citation classics in central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee-Eun; Park, Kang M; Kim, Yerim; Yoon, Dae Y; Bae, Jong S

    2017-06-01

    To identify and analyze the characteristics of the most influential articles about central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory demyelinating disease. The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science database and the 2014 Journal Citation Reports Science Edition were used to retrieve the top 100 cited articles on CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease. The citation numbers, journals, years of publication, authorships, article types, subjects and main issues were analyzed. For neuromyelitis optica (NMO), articles that were cited more than 100 times were regarded as a citation classic and described separately. The top 100 cited articles were published between 1972 and 2011 in 13 journals. The highest number of articles ( n  = 24) was published in Brain, followed by The New England Journal of Medicine ( n  = 21). The average number of citations was 664 (range 330-3,897), and 64% of the articles were from the United States and the United Kingdom. The majority of the top 100 cited articles were related to multiple sclerosis ( n  = 87), and only a few articles reported on other topics such as NMO ( n  = 9), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis ( n  = 2) and optic neuritis ( n  = 2). Among the top 100 cited articles, 77% were original articles. Forty-one citation classics were found for NMO. Our study provides a historical perspective on the research progress on CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease and may serve as a guide for important advances and trends in the field for associated researchers.

  15. [Demyelinating disease and vaccination of the human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Soria, M Josefa; Hernández-González, Amalia; Carrasco-García de León, Sira; del Real-Francia, M Ángeles; Gallardo-Alcañiz, M José; López-Gómez, José L

    2011-04-16

    Primary prevention by prophylactic vaccination against the major cause of cervical cancer, the carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, is now available worldwide. Postlicensure adverse neurological effects have been described. The studies realized after the license are descriptive and limited by the difficulty to obtain the information, despite most of the statistical indexes show that the adverse effects by the vaccine of the HPV are not upper compared with other vaccines, the substimation must be considered. We describe the cases of four young women that developed demyelinating disease after the vaccination of the HPV, with a rank of time between the administration of the dose and the development of the clinical of seven days to a month, with similar symptoms with the successive doses. We have described six episodes coinciding after the vaccination. Have been described seizures, autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barre syndrome, transverse myelitis, or motor neuron disease, probably adverse effects following immunization by HPV vaccine. So we suggest that vaccine may trigger an immunological mechanism leading to demyelinating events, perhaps in predisposed young.

  16. Imaging of demyelinating and degenerative diseases of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drayer, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    The emergence of cross-sectional brain imaging in the past decade has greatly expanded the role of imaging as a primary diagnostic modality for demyelinating and degenerative brain disorders. To remain an effective neurologic consultant, the radiologist must better understand the neuropathology and functional significance of these disorders. MR imaging has become the dominant imaging modality for multiple sclerosis and all demyelinating and dysmyelinating disorders. Detection is most sensitive with intermediate and T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. Although increased signal intensity in the white matter is a sensitive but nonspecific finding, a knowledge of the patient's history and disease pathoanatomy greatly improves diagnostic specificity. Since an increasing proportion of the population is over 65 years of age, the distinction of normal versus pathologic aging becomes critical. The role of imaging in dementing illness is to distinguish primary degenerative dementia from normal aging changes, vascular medullary artery distribution disease, microangiopathic leukoencephalopathy, communicating hydrocephalus, and mass lesions. The role of MR imaging, including brain iron mapping, is analyzed in bradykinetic, choreiform, and dystonic disorders. The complications of chronic ethanol abuse, including vermian atrophy, central pontine myelinolysis, and Wernicke encephalopathy, are also reviewed

  17. Serum C-reactive protein concentrations in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers with immune-mediated rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Hanna Dorotea; Hillström, Anna; Kånåhols, Malin; Hagman, Ragnvi; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene

    2017-04-17

    Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (NSDTRs) are a dog breed often affected by immune-mediated rheumatic disease (IMRD), a disorder characterised by chronic stiffness and joint pain. Most, but not all, dogs with IMRD, have antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which are also commonly present in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The clinical and diagnostic findings of IMRD indicate that it is an SLE-related disorder. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein, is a quantitative marker of inflammation for many diseases and is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammation in both humans and dogs. However, in human SLE, CRP concentrations are often elevated but correlate poorly with disease activity; they can be low in individual patients with active disease. The aim of the study was to investigate CRP in a group of NSDTRs with the SLE-related disorder IMRD. The hypothesis was that CRP concentrations would be increased in dogs with IMRD compared to healthy dogs, but that the increase would be mild. Serum CRP concentrations were measured in 18 IMRD-affected NSDTRs and 19 healthy control NSDTRs using two different canine-specific CRP assays. Dogs with IMRD and ANA had higher CRP concentrations than the control dogs, but the concentrations were below the clinical decision limit for systemic inflammation for most of the IMRD dogs. These results indicate that CRP concentrations were increased in dogs with IMRD and ANA, but the increase was mild, similar to what has been observed in human SLE.

  18. Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Associations With Immune-Mediated Disease and Infection in Childhood: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. Doherty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex sugars found in breastmilk, human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs, may assist in early-life immune programming and prevention against infectious diseases. This study aimed to systematically review the associations between maternal levels of HMOs and development of immune-mediated or infectious diseases in the offspring. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched (last search on 22 February 2018 according to a predetermined search strategy. Original studies published in English examining the effect of HMOs on immune-mediated and infectious disease were eligible for inclusion. Of 847 identified records, 10 articles from 6 original studies were included, with study quality ranging from low to high. Of three studies to examine allergic disease outcomes, one reported a protective effect against cow’s milk allergy (CMA by 18 months of age associated with lower lacto-N-fucopentaose (LNFP III concentrations (OR: 6.7, 95% CI 2.0–22. Another study found higher relative abundance of fucosyloligosaccharides was associated with reduced diarrhea incidence by 2 years, due to (i stable toxin-E. coli infection (p = 0.04 and (ii “all causes” (p = 0.042. Higher LNFP-II concentrations were associated with (i reduced cases of gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections at 6 weeks (p = 0.004, p = 0.010 and 12 weeks (p = 0.038, p = 0.038 and (ii reduced HIV transmission (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.21–0.97 and mortality risk among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants (HR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.14–0.74 by 24 months. Due to heterogeneity of the outcomes reported, pooling of results was not possible. There was limited evidence that low concentrations of LNFP-III are associated with CMA and that higher fucosyloligosaccharide levels protect infants against infectious disease. Further research is needed.

  19. Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Associations With Immune-Mediated Disease and Infection in Childhood: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Alice M; Lodge, Caroline J; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Dai, Xin; Bode, Lars; Lowe, Adrian J

    2018-01-01

    Complex sugars found in breastmilk, human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), may assist in early-life immune programming and prevention against infectious diseases. This study aimed to systematically review the associations between maternal levels of HMOs and development of immune-mediated or infectious diseases in the offspring. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched (last search on 22 February 2018) according to a predetermined search strategy. Original studies published in English examining the effect of HMOs on immune-mediated and infectious disease were eligible for inclusion. Of 847 identified records, 10 articles from 6 original studies were included, with study quality ranging from low to high. Of three studies to examine allergic disease outcomes, one reported a protective effect against cow's milk allergy (CMA) by 18 months of age associated with lower lacto- N -fucopentaose (LNFP) III concentrations (OR: 6.7, 95% CI 2.0-22). Another study found higher relative abundance of fucosyloligosaccharides was associated with reduced diarrhea incidence by 2 years, due to (i) stable toxin- E. coli infection ( p  = 0.04) and (ii) "all causes" ( p  = 0.042). Higher LNFP-II concentrations were associated with (i) reduced cases of gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections at 6 weeks ( p  = 0.004, p  = 0.010) and 12 weeks ( p  = 0.038, p  = 0.038) and (ii) reduced HIV transmission (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.21-0.97) and mortality risk among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants (HR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.14-0.74) by 24 months. Due to heterogeneity of the outcomes reported, pooling of results was not possible. There was limited evidence that low concentrations of LNFP-III are associated with CMA and that higher fucosyloligosaccharide levels protect infants against infectious disease. Further research is needed.

  20. Adherence to systemic therapies for immune-mediated inflammatory diseases in Lebanon: a physicians’ survey from three medical specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammoury A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Alfred Ammoury,1 Jad Okais,2 Mireille Hobeika,3 Raymond B Sayegh,4 Rani H Shayto,5 Ala I Sharara5 1Division of Dermatology, St George Hospital University Medical Center, 2Division of Rheumatology, St Joseph University, 3AbbVie Levant, 4Division of Gastroenterology, St Joseph University, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon Background: Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs are chronic conditions that may cause tissue damage and disability, reduced quality of life and increased mortality. Various treatments have been developed for IMIDs, including immune modulators and targeted biologic agents. However, adherence remains suboptimal. Methods: An adherence survey was used to evaluate physicians’ beliefs about adherence to medication in IMID and to evaluate if and how they manage adherence. The survey was distributed to 100 randomly selected physicians from three different specialties. Results were analyzed by four academic experts commissioned to develop an action plan to address practical and perceptual barriers to adherence, integrating it into treatment goals to maximize outcomes in IMID, thereby elevating local standards of care. Results: Eighty-two physicians participated in this study and completed the questionnaire. Most defined adherence as compliance with prescribed treatment. Although the majority of surveyed physicians (74% did not systematically measure adherence in their practice, 54% identified adherence as a treatment goal of equal or greater importance to therapeutic endpoints. Lack of time and specialized nursing support was reported as an important barrier to measuring adherence. The expert panel identified four key areas for action: 360° education (patient–nurse–physician, patient–physician communication, patient perception and concerns, and market access/cost. An action plan was developed centered on education and awareness

  1. The association of fatigue, pain, depression and anxiety with work and activity impairment in immune mediated inflammatory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray W Enns

    Full Text Available Impairment in work function is a frequent outcome in patients with chronic conditions such as immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID, depression and anxiety disorders. The personal and economic costs of work impairment in these disorders are immense. Symptoms of pain, fatigue, depression and anxiety are potentially remediable forms of distress that may contribute to work impairment in chronic health conditions such as IMID. The present study evaluated the association between pain [Medical Outcomes Study Pain Effects Scale], fatigue [Daily Fatigue Impact Scale], depression and anxiety [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale] and work impairment [Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Scale] in four patient populations: multiple sclerosis (n = 255, inflammatory bowel disease (n = 248, rheumatoid arthritis (n = 154 and a depression and anxiety group (n = 307, using quantile regression, controlling for the effects of sociodemographic factors, physical disability, and cognitive deficits. Each of pain, depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and fatigue individually showed significant associations with work absenteeism, presenteeism, and general activity impairment (quantile regression standardized estimates ranging from 0.3 to 1.0. When the distress variables were entered concurrently into the regression models, fatigue was a significant predictor of work and activity impairment in all models (quantile regression standardized estimates ranging from 0.2 to 0.5. These findings have important clinical implications for understanding the determinants of work impairment and for improving work-related outcomes in chronic disease.

  2. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Lage, Kasper; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Tatar, Diana; Benita, Yair

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these risk variants. It has previously been observed that different genes harboring causal mutations for the same Mendelian disease often physically interact. We sought to evaluate the degree to which this is true of genes within strongly associated loci in complex disease. Using sets of loci defined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more densely connected than chance expectation. To confirm biological relevance, we show that the components of the networks tend to be expressed in similar tissues relevant to the phenotypes in question, suggesting the network indicates common underlying processes perturbed by risk loci. Furthermore, we show that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non-immune traits to assess its applicability to complex traits in general. We find that genes in loci associated to height and lipid levels assemble into significantly connected networks but did not detect excess connectivity among Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) loci beyond chance. Taken together, our results constitute evidence that, for many of the complex diseases studied here, common genetic associations implicate regions encoding proteins that physically interact in a preferential manner, in

  3. The role of basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 in the immune system and immune-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinghua; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Qianjin

    2017-07-01

    Basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 (also known as NFIL3) has been implicated in the molecular and cellular mechanisms of functions and activities in mammals. The interactions between E4BP4 and major regulators of cellular processes have triggered significant interest in the roles of E4BP4 in the pathogenesis of certain chronic diseases. Indeed, novel discoveries have been emerging to illustrate the involvement of E4BP4 in multiple disorders. It is recognized that E4BP4 is extensively involved in some immune-mediated diseases, but the mechanisms of E4BP4 involvement in these complex diseases remain poorly defined. Here we review the regulatory mechanisms of E4BP4 engaging in not only the biological function but also the development of immune-mediated diseases, paving the way for future therapies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Could Sodium Chloride be an Environmental Trigger for Immune-Mediated Diseases? An Overview of the Experimental and Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussirot, Eric; Béreau, Matthieu; Vauchy, Charline; Saas, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases (IMDs) are complex chronic inflammatory diseases involving genetic and environmental factors. Salt intake has been proposed as a diet factor that can influence the immune response. Indeed, experimental data report the influence of sodium chloride on the differentiation of naive CD4 + T cells into IL-17 secreting T helper (Th) cells (Th17 cells), by a mechanism involving the serum glucocorticoid kinase-1 (SGK1) that promotes the expression of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R). The IL-23/IL-23R is critical for pathogenic inflammatory Th17 cell differentiation. Experimental data in murine models of arthritis, colitis and encephalomyelitis corroborate these findings. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge on the effects of sodium chloride on innate and adaptive immunity. We also performed a systematic literature review for clinical studies examining the relationships between salt consumption and the development or the activity/severity of the most common IMDs mediated by the IL-23/Th17 pathway, i.e., rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Crohn's disease (CD). Nine studies were found, 4 in RA, 4 in MS and 1 in CD. An association was found between developments of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) positive RA in smokers and salt intake, but these results were not confirmed in another study. For MS, no association was observed in pediatric subjects while in adult patients, a link was found between salt intake and disease activity. However, this result was not confirmed in another study. These conflicting results highlight the fact that further evaluation in human IMDs is required. Moreover, physicians need to develop clinical trials with diet interventions to evaluate the impact of low salt intake on disease activity/severity of IMDs.

  5. Could Sodium Chloride be an Environmental Trigger for Immune-Mediated Diseases? An Overview of the Experimental and Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Toussirot

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases (IMDs are complex chronic inflammatory diseases involving genetic and environmental factors. Salt intake has been proposed as a diet factor that can influence the immune response. Indeed, experimental data report the influence of sodium chloride on the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into IL-17 secreting T helper (Th cells (Th17 cells, by a mechanism involving the serum glucocorticoid kinase-1 (SGK1 that promotes the expression of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R. The IL-23/IL-23R is critical for pathogenic inflammatory Th17 cell differentiation. Experimental data in murine models of arthritis, colitis and encephalomyelitis corroborate these findings. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge on the effects of sodium chloride on innate and adaptive immunity. We also performed a systematic literature review for clinical studies examining the relationships between salt consumption and the development or the activity/severity of the most common IMDs mediated by the IL-23/Th17 pathway, i.e., rheumatoid arthritis (RA, multiple sclerosis (MS, and Crohn's disease (CD. Nine studies were found, 4 in RA, 4 in MS and 1 in CD. An association was found between developments of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA positive RA in smokers and salt intake, but these results were not confirmed in another study. For MS, no association was observed in pediatric subjects while in adult patients, a link was found between salt intake and disease activity. However, this result was not confirmed in another study. These conflicting results highlight the fact that further evaluation in human IMDs is required. Moreover, physicians need to develop clinical trials with diet interventions to evaluate the impact of low salt intake on disease activity/severity of IMDs.

  6. Biosimilars for Immune-Mediated Chronic Diseases in Primary Care: What a Practicing Physician Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R; Bagel, Jerry; Namak, Shahla

    2018-05-01

    The introduction of biologics has revolutionized the treatment of immune-mediated diseases, but high cost and limited patient access remain hurdles, and some physicians are concerned that biosimilars are not similar enough. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe biosimilar safety, efficacy, nomenclature, extrapolation and interchangeability. In the United States, the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act created an abbreviated pathway for licensing of a biologic that is biosimilar to another licensed product (i.e., the reference product). This approval pathway differs from that of generic small-molecule drugs because biologics are too complex to be perfectly duplicated, and follows a process designed to demonstrate that any differences between the biosimilar and its reference product have no significant impact on safety and efficacy. The US approval process requires extensive analytical assessments, animal studies and clinical trials, assuring that biosimilar products provide clinical results similar to those of the reference product. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Early-Onset Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Mimicking Immune-Mediated Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietse A. Wiels

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesThe objective of this study is to explore the clinical, radiological, and pathological manifestations of a rare subtype of prion disease and their implication for differential diagnosis in case of an early onset neuropsychiatric deterioration.MethodsWe discuss a patients’ clinical history, as well as the string of investigations and symptomatological evolution that finally led to a pathological diagnosis.ResultsOur patient had the extremely rare VV1 type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. We explain the differential diagnosis of progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus and its implications for treatment.ConclusionsCJD, especially the VV1 subtype, can present at an early age with an insidious psychiatric onset. Classical findings of prion disease—14-3-3 protein, PSWC on electroencephalography, and magnetic resonance imaging patterns—are not always present. The presence of neural autoantibodies does not always implicate pathogenicity in the presence of other neurological/neurodegenerative conditions.

  8. A 17 year-old girl with a demyelinating disease requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsenos Chrysostomos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demyelinating diseases cause destruction of the myelin sheath, while axons are relatively spared. Pathologically, demyelination can be the result of an inflammatory process, viral infection, acquired metabolic derangement and ischemic insult. Three diseases that can cause inflammatory demyelination of the CNS are: Multiple sclerosis (MS, Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM and Acute hemorrhagic leucoencephalitis. Differentiation is not always easy and there is considerable overlaping. Data about adults with acute demyelination requiring ICU admission is limited. Case presentation A 17 year old Greek female was hospitalised in the ICU because of acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She had a history of febrile disease one month before, acute onset of paraplegia, diplopia, progressive arm weakness and dyspnea. Her consciousness was not impaired. A demyelinating central nervous system (CNS disease, possibly post infectious encephalomyelitis (ADEM was the underlying condition. The MRI of the brain disclosed diffused expanded cerebral lesions involving the optic nerve, basal ganglia cerebellum, pons and medulla oblongata. There was also extended involvement of the cervical and thoracic part of the spinal cord. CSF leukocyte count was elevated with lymphocyte predominance. The patient required mechanical ventilation for two months. Then she was transferred to a rehabilitation centre. Three years later she remains paraplegic. Since then she has not suffered any other demyelination attack. Conclusions Demyelinating diseases can cause acute respiratory failure when the spinal cord is affected. Severe forms of these diseases, making necessary ICU admission, is less frequently reported. Intensivists should be aware of the features of these rare diseases.

  9. Sympathetic Nerve Hyperactivity in the Spleen: Causal for Nonpathogenic-Driven Chronic Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L. Bellinger

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs is a descriptive term coined for an eclectic group of diseases or conditions that share common inflammatory pathways, and for which there is no definitive etiology. IMIDs affect the elderly most severely, with many older individuals having two or more IMIDs. These diseases include, but are not limited to, type-1 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, chronic pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and autoimmunity, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Sjőgren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. These diseases are ostensibly unrelated mechanistically, but increase in frequency with age and share chronic systemic inflammation, implicating major roles for the spleen. Chronic systemic and regional inflammation underlies the disease manifestations of IMIDs. Regional inflammation and immune dysfunction promotes targeted end organ tissue damage, whereas systemic inflammation increases morbidity and mortality by affecting multiple organ systems. Chronic inflammation and skewed dysregulated cell-mediated immune responses drive many of these age-related medical disorders. IMIDs are commonly autoimmune-mediated or suspected to be autoimmune diseases. Another shared feature is dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA axis. Here, we focus on dysautonomia. In many IMIDs, dysautonomia manifests as an imbalance in activity/reactivity of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. These major autonomic pathways are essential for allostasis of the immune system, and regulating inflammatory processes and innate and adaptive immunity. Pathology in ANS is a hallmark and causal feature of all IMIDs. Chronic systemic inflammation comorbid with stress pathway dysregulation implicate neural-immune cross-talk in the etiology and pathophysiology of IMIDs

  10. Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira Canellas, A. [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit (I.D.I.), Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Rovira Gols, A. [Parc Tauli University Institute - UAB, UDIAT, Diagnostic Centre, Sabadell (Spain); Rio Izquierdo, J.; Tintore Subirana, M.; Montalban Gairin, X. [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Neuroimmunology Unit, Department of Neurology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases (IIDDs) include a broad spectrum of central nervous system disorders that can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, imaging, laboratory and pathological findings. However, there can be a considerable overlap between at least some of these disorders, leading to misdiagnoses or diagnostic uncertainty. The relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are the most common IIDDs. Other MS phenotypes include those with a progressive course from onset (primary progressive and progressive relapsing) or with a benign course continuing for years after onset (benign MS). Uncommon forms of IIDDs can be classified clinically into: (1) fulminant or acute IIDDs, such as the Marburg variant of MS, Balo's concentric sclerosis, Schilder's disease, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis; (2) monosymptomatic IIDDs, such as those involving the spinal cord (transverse myelitis), optic nerve (optic neuritis) or brainstem and cerebellum; and (3) IIDDs with a restricted topographical distribution, including Devic's neuromyelitis optica, recurrent optic neuritis and relapsing transverse myelitis. Other forms of IIDD, which are classified clinically and radiologically as pseudotumoral, can have different forms of presentation and clinical courses. Although some of these uncommon IIDDs are variants of MS, others probably correspond to different entities. MR imaging of the brain and spine is the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing these disorders, and together with the clinical and laboratory findings can accurately classify them. Precise classification of these disorders may have relevant prognostic and treatment implications, and might be helpful in distinguishing them from tumoral or infectious lesions, avoiding unnecessary aggressive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  11. Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira Canellas, A.; Rovira Gols, A.; Rio Izquierdo, J.; Tintore Subirana, M.; Montalban Gairin, X.

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases (IIDDs) include a broad spectrum of central nervous system disorders that can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, imaging, laboratory and pathological findings. However, there can be a considerable overlap between at least some of these disorders, leading to misdiagnoses or diagnostic uncertainty. The relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are the most common IIDDs. Other MS phenotypes include those with a progressive course from onset (primary progressive and progressive relapsing) or with a benign course continuing for years after onset (benign MS). Uncommon forms of IIDDs can be classified clinically into: (1) fulminant or acute IIDDs, such as the Marburg variant of MS, Balo's concentric sclerosis, Schilder's disease, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis; (2) monosymptomatic IIDDs, such as those involving the spinal cord (transverse myelitis), optic nerve (optic neuritis) or brainstem and cerebellum; and (3) IIDDs with a restricted topographical distribution, including Devic's neuromyelitis optica, recurrent optic neuritis and relapsing transverse myelitis. Other forms of IIDD, which are classified clinically and radiologically as pseudotumoral, can have different forms of presentation and clinical courses. Although some of these uncommon IIDDs are variants of MS, others probably correspond to different entities. MR imaging of the brain and spine is the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing these disorders, and together with the clinical and laboratory findings can accurately classify them. Precise classification of these disorders may have relevant prognostic and treatment implications, and might be helpful in distinguishing them from tumoral or infectious lesions, avoiding unnecessary aggressive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  12. Pain and spinal cord imaging measures in children with demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Barakat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a significant problem in diseases affecting the spinal cord, including demyelinating disease. To date, studies have examined the reliability of clinical measures for assessing and classifying the severity of spinal cord injury (SCI and also to evaluate SCI-related pain. Most of this research has focused on adult populations and patients with traumatic injuries. Little research exists regarding pediatric spinal cord demyelinating disease. One reason for this is the lack of reliable and useful approaches to measuring spinal cord changes since currently used diagnostic imaging has limited specificity for quantitative measures of demyelination. No single imaging technique demonstrates sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity to myelin, and strong correlation with clinical measures. However, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI measures are considered promising in providing increasingly useful and specific information on spinal cord damage. Findings from these quantitative imaging modalities correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. These techniques may be of potential use for defining the evolution of the disease state, how it may affect specific spinal cord pathways, and contribute to the management of pediatric demyelination syndromes. Since pain is a major presenting symptom in patients with transverse myelitis, the disease is an ideal model to evaluate imaging methods to define these regional changes within the spinal cord. In this review we summarize (1 pediatric demyelinating conditions affecting the spinal cord; (2 their distinguishing features; and (3 current diagnostic and classification methods with particular focus on pain pathways. We also focus on concepts that are essential in developing strategies for the detection, monitoring, treatment and repair of pediatric myelitis.

  13. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  14. Prognosis in canine idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Canine idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (iIMHA) is one of the most frequently occurring immune-mediated diseases in dogs. A gel-based Coombs' test was shown to perform equally well as a classical Coombs' test. Since the gel-based Coombs' test can be commercially produced and is easy and

  15. Vitamin D supplementation and disease activity in patients with immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, André Silva; Freitas, Thiago Quadrante; Bernardo, Wanderley M; Pereira, Rosa Maria R

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D serum levels and the presence and activity of rheumatic conditions have been associated. However, many studies are merely observational, and the existent randomized clinical trials were never systematically analyzed. Therefore, this study aims to provide a systematic review and meta-analysis of such a topic. MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, COCHRANE, and CINAHL were explored to identify randomized trials that investigated clinical repercussions of vitamin D (or analogs) supplementation for at least 3 months in rheumatic diseases. Standardized clinical and/or laboratorial outcomes related to disease activity were analyzed according to each disease before and after supplementation. Database searches rendered 668 results; 9 were included-5 on rheumatoid arthritis, 3 on systemic lupus erythematosus, and 1 on systemic sclerosis. Seven of the studies were meta-analyzed. After vitamin D supplementation, rheumatoid arthritis recurrence decreased; however, not significantly (risk difference = -0.10, 95% CI = -0.21, 0.00, P = .05). No statistical significance was observed regarding visual analog scale (mean difference = 2.79, 95% CI = -1.87, 7.44, P = .24) and disease activity score28 (mean difference = -0.31, 95% CI = -0.86, 0.25, P = .28). Regarding systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-dsDNA positivity was significantly reduced (risk difference = -0.10, 95% CI = -0.18, -0.03; P = .005). Vitamin D supplementation reduced anti-dsDNA positivity on systemic lupus erythematosus and could possibly reduce rheumatoid arthritis recurrence, although novel randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm and extend the benefits of this hormone in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases.

  16. Insight into Genotype-Phenotype Associations through eQTL Mapping in Multiple Cell Types in Health and Immune-Mediated Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Peters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have transformed our understanding of the genetics of complex traits such as autoimmune diseases, but how risk variants contribute to pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Identifying genetic variants that affect gene expression (expression quantitative trait loci, or eQTLs is crucial to addressing this. eQTLs vary between tissues and following in vitro cellular activation, but have not been examined in the context of human inflammatory diseases. We performed eQTL mapping in five primary immune cell types from patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (n = 91, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (n = 46 and healthy controls (n = 43, revealing eQTLs present only in the context of active inflammatory disease. Moreover, we show that following treatment a proportion of these eQTLs disappear. Through joint analysis of expression data from multiple cell types, we reveal that previous estimates of eQTL immune cell-type specificity are likely to have been exaggerated. Finally, by analysing gene expression data from multiple cell types, we find eQTLs not previously identified by database mining at 34 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci. In summary, this parallel eQTL analysis in multiple leucocyte subsets from patients with active disease provides new insights into the genetic basis of immune-mediated diseases.

  17. IL-1 signal affects both protection and pathogenesis of virus-induced chronic CNS demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Byung S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theiler’s virus infection induces chronic demyelinating disease in mice and has been investigated as an infectious model for multiple sclerosis (MS. IL-1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of both the autoimmune disease model (EAE and this viral model for MS. However, IL-1 is known to play an important protective role against certain viral infections. Therefore, it is unclear whether IL-1-mediated signaling plays a protective or pathogenic role in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. Methods Female C57BL/6 mice and B6.129S7-Il1r1tm1Imx/J mice (IL-1R KO were infected with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (1 x 106 PFU. Differences in the development of demyelinating disease and changes in the histopathology were compared. Viral persistence, cytokine production, and immune responses in the CNS of infected mice were analyzed using quantitative PCR, ELISA, and flow cytometry. Results Administration of IL-1β, thereby rending resistant B6 mice susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelinating disease, induced a high level of Th17 response. Interestingly, infection of TMEV into IL-1R-deficient resistant C57BL/6 (B6 mice also induced TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. High viral persistence was found in the late stage of viral infection in IL-1R-deficient mice, although there were few differences in the initial anti-viral immune responses and viral persistent levels between the WT B6 and IL-1R-deficiecent mice. The initial type I IFN responses and the expression of PDL-1 and Tim-3 were higher in the CNS of TMEV-infected IL-1R-deficient mice, leading to deficiencies in T cell function that permit viral persistence. Conclusions These results suggest that the presence of high IL-1 level exerts the pathogenic role by elevating pathogenic Th17 responses, whereas the lack of IL-1 signals promotes viral persistence in the spinal cord due to insufficient T cell activation by elevating the production of

  18. Gluten-free diet does not influence the occurrence and the Th1/Th17-Th2 nature of immune-mediated diseases in patients with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatore, Nicola; Rispo, Antonio; Capone, Pietro; Donetto, Sara; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Gerbino, Nicolò; Rea, Matilde; Caporaso, Nicola; Tortora, Raffaella

    2016-07-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is the most common Th1-mediated enteropathy, frequently associated with other immune-mediated disorders (IMD). To evaluate: (1) the prevalence of IMD at the time of and after CD diagnosis; (2) a possible change in immune response to gluten free diet (GFD); (3) the potential role of GFD in reducing and/or preventing IMD in CD. Prospective study including all consecutive adult CD patients who underwent investigations for Th1-Th17/Th2-IMD at the time of CD diagnosis and after a 5-year follow-up period. 1255 CD were enrolled. Of these, 257 patients (20.5%) showed IMD at the time of CD diagnosis, with 58.4% presenting a Th1/Th17-IMD. After a 5-year follow-up period, 682 patients (54.3%) showed new IMD despite GFD. Of these, 57.3% presented a Th1/Th17-IMD and 42.7% a Th2-IMD (p=0.8). When compared the prevalence of each type of IMD before and after CD diagnosis, we did not identify any significant "switch" from Th1/Th17- to Th2-IMD or vice versa. The number of patients with Th1/Th17- and/or Th2-IMD increased during the GFD period (20.5% vs 54.3%; p<0.01; OR 1.9). The prevalence of IMD at the time of CD diagnosis is high and it seems to increase in the follow-up period despite GFD. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Ulrich

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy

  20. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy generation".

  1. Transcriptional Changes in Canine Distemper Virus-Induced Demyelinating Leukoencephalitis Favor a Biphasic Mode of Demyelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms “viral replication” and “humoral immune response” as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to “metabolite and energy

  2. Absence of Multiple Sclerosis and Demyelinating Diseases among Lacandonians, a Pure Amerindian Ethnic Group in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Flores

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a highly polymorphic disease characterized by different neurologic signs and symptoms. In MS, racial and genetic factors may play an important role in the geographic distribution of this disease. Studies have reported the presence of several protective alleles against the development of autoimmune disorders. In the case of MS, however, they help define MS as a complex disease, and confirm the importance of environmental agents as an independent variable not associated with ethnicity. We carried out an on-site epidemiological study to confirm the absence of MS or NMO among Lacandonians, a pure Amerindian ethnic group in Mexico. We administered a structured interview to 5,372 Lacandonians to assess by family background any clinical data consistent with the presence of a prior demyelinating event. Every participating subject underwent a comprehensive neurological examination by a group of three members of the research team with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of demyelinating disorders to detect clinical signs compatible with a demyelinating disease. We did not find any clinical signs compatible with multiple sclerosis among study participants.

  3. The IL23R R381Q gene variant protects against immune-mediated diseases by impairing IL-23-induced Th17 effector response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Meglio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available IL-23 and Th17 cells are key players in tissue immunosurveillance and are implicated in human immune-mediated diseases. Genome-wide association studies have shown that the IL23R R381Q gene variant protects against psoriasis, Crohn's disease and ankylosing spondylitis. We investigated the immunological consequences of the protective IL23R R381Q gene variant in healthy donors. The IL23R R381Q gene variant had no major effect on Th17 cell differentiation as the frequency of circulating Th17 cells was similar in carriers of the IL23R protective (A and common (G allele. Accordingly, Th17 cells generated from A and G donors produced similar amounts of Th17 cytokines. However, IL-23-mediated Th17 cell effector function was impaired, as Th17 cells from A allele carriers had significantly reduced IL-23-induced IL-17A production and STAT3 phosphorylation compared to G allele carriers. Our functional analysis of a human disease-associated gene variant demonstrates that IL23R R381Q exerts its protective effects through selective attenuation of IL-23-induced Th17 cell effector function without interfering with Th17 differentiation, and highlights its importance in the protection against IL-23-induced tissue pathologies.

  4. The IL23R R381Q gene variant protects against immune-mediated diseases by impairing IL-23-induced Th17 effector response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meglio, Paola; Di Cesare, Antonella; Laggner, Ute; Chu, Chung-Ching; Napolitano, Luca; Villanova, Federica; Tosi, Isabella; Capon, Francesca; Trembath, Richard C; Peris, Ketty; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-22

    IL-23 and Th17 cells are key players in tissue immunosurveillance and are implicated in human immune-mediated diseases. Genome-wide association studies have shown that the IL23R R381Q gene variant protects against psoriasis, Crohn's disease and ankylosing spondylitis. We investigated the immunological consequences of the protective IL23R R381Q gene variant in healthy donors. The IL23R R381Q gene variant had no major effect on Th17 cell differentiation as the frequency of circulating Th17 cells was similar in carriers of the IL23R protective (A) and common (G) allele. Accordingly, Th17 cells generated from A and G donors produced similar amounts of Th17 cytokines. However, IL-23-mediated Th17 cell effector function was impaired, as Th17 cells from A allele carriers had significantly reduced IL-23-induced IL-17A production and STAT3 phosphorylation compared to G allele carriers. Our functional analysis of a human disease-associated gene variant demonstrates that IL23R R381Q exerts its protective effects through selective attenuation of IL-23-induced Th17 cell effector function without interfering with Th17 differentiation, and highlights its importance in the protection against IL-23-induced tissue pathologies.

  5. Risk of subsequent coronary heart disease in patients hospitalized for immune-mediated diseases: a nationwide follow-up study from Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Zöller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Certain immune-mediated diseases (IMDs, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, have been linked to cardiovascular disorders. We examined whether there is an association between 32 different IMDs and risk of subsequent hospitalization for coronary heart disease (CHD related to coronary atherosclerosis in a nationwide follow up study in Sweden. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All individuals in Sweden hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an IMD (n = 336,479 without previous or coexisting CHD, between January 1, 1964 and December 31 2008, were followed for first hospitalization for CHD. The reference population was the total population of Sweden. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs for CHD were calculated. Overall risk of CHD during the first year after hospitalization for an IMD was 2.92 (95% CI 2.84-2.99. Twenty-seven of the 32 IMDs studied were associated with an increased risk of CHD during the first year after hospitalization. The overall risk of CHD decreased over time, from 1.75 after 1-5 years (95% CI 1.73-1.78, to 1.43 after 5-10 years (95% CI 1.41-1.46 and 1.28 after 10+ years (95% CI 1.26-1.30. Females generally had higher SIRs than males. The IMDs for which the SIRs of CDH were highest during the first year after hospitalization included chorea minor 6.98 (95% CI 1.32-20.65, systemic lupus erythematosus 4.94 (95% CI 4.15-5.83, rheumatic fever 4.65 (95% CI 3.53-6.01, Hashimoto's thyroiditis 4.30 (95% CI 3.87-4.75, polymyositis/dermatomyositis 3.81 (95% CI 2.62-5.35, polyarteritis nodosa 3.81 (95% CI 2.72-5.19, rheumatoid arthritis 3.72 (95% CI 3.56-3.88, systemic sclerosis 3.44 (95% CI 2.86-4.09, primary biliary cirrhosis 3.32 (95% CI 2.34-4.58, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia 3.17 (95% CI 2.16-4.47. CONCLUSIONS: Most IMDs are associated with increased risk of CHD in the first year after hospital admission. Our findings suggest that many hospitalized IMDs are tightly linked to coronary atherosclerosis.

  6. Drug utilization of biological drugs in the treatment of chronic Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs: an observational study on Italian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Faccendini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug utilization of biological drugs in the treatment of chronic Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs: an observational study on Italian patientsObjectives:The aim of this analysis was to provide an estimate of drug utilization indicators (dose escalation and dose tapering related to biologic drugs in the chronic treatment of adult patients with Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs.Methods:We conducted an observational retrospective cohort analysis using the Policlinico di Tor Vergata (PTV database. We considered all biologic drugs dispensed by the PTV hospital pharmacy between January 2010 and December 2015:abatacept, adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab (originator and biosimilar, tocilizumab, and ustekinumab were included. Drug dose escalation and dose tapering were calculated and compared with their Defined Daily Dose (DDD.Results:A total of 1803 patients with IMID and biologic drug prescription were analyzed (male: 51.2%. The majority of patients were in the class 36-50 years (n = 612. The median follow-up was 33.8 months (IQR 14.43-56.20. Dermatology was the ward with the largest number of patients (n = 882; 48.9%, followed by rheumatology (n = 619; 34.3% and gastroenterology (n = 302; 16.8%. Dose escalation was observed in 406 patients (22.5%. Infliximab biosimilar (n = 51 was the biological drug with the highest dose escalation rate (86.3%, followed by infliximab originator (n = 28; 60.3% and ustekinumab (37.8%. Etanercept was the biological drug with the lowest dose escalation rate (7.4%, followed by golimumab (12.2% and adalimumab (13.8%. In 677 patients (37.5% a dose tapering was observed. Etanercept showed the highest rate of patients with dose tapering (41.6%, followed by adalimumab (33.6%.Conclusions:The results of this analysis show that dose modification is quite common in PTV clinical practice. Considering the strong focus on the pharmaceutical expenditure and the need of cost containment

  7. Extrapolation in the development of paediatric medicines: examples from approvals for biological treatments for paediatric chronic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, Anna M; Distlerová, Dorota; Musaus, Joachim; Olski, Thorsten M; Dunder, Kristina; Salmonson, Tomas; Mentzer, Dirk; Müller-Berghaus, Jan; Hemmings, Robert; Veselý, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The European Union (EU) Paediatric Regulation requires that all new medicinal products applying for a marketing authorisation (MA) in the EU provide a paediatric investigation plan (PIP) covering a clinical and non-clinical trial programme relating to the use in the paediatric population, unless a waiver applies. Conducting trials in children is challenging on many levels, including ethical and practical issues, which may affect the availability of the clinical evidence. In scientifically justified cases, extrapolation of data from other populations can be an option to gather evidence supporting the benefit-risk assessment of the medicinal product for paediatric use. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is working on providing a framework for extrapolation that is scientifically valid, reliable and adequate to support MA of medicines for children. It is expected that the extrapolation framework together with therapeutic area guidelines and individual case studies will support future PIPs. Extrapolation has already been employed in several paediatric development programmes including biological treatment for immune-mediated diseases. This article reviews extrapolation strategies from MA applications for products for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, paediatric psoriasis and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease. It also provides a summary of extrapolation advice expressed in relevant EMA guidelines and initiatives supporting the use of alternative approaches in paediatric medicine development. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Demyelinating syndrome in SLE: review of different disease subtypes and report of a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chessa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Demyelinating syndrome (DS is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE (1% with high clinical heterogeneity and potentially severe prognosis. It can represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. A recent study described 5 different patterns of demyelinating disease presentation, characterised by specific clinical, laboratory and brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities: 1 neuromyelitis optica; 2 neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders; 3 DS prevalently involving the brain; 4 DS prevalently involving the brainstem; 5 clinically isolated syndrome. In this review we briefly discuss typical characteristics of each DS presentation in SLE and we describe 5 illustrative clinical cases, one for each subset of DS, considering both diagnostic and therapeutic options.

  9. CD8+ T cells in inflammatory demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Hanne A; Millward, Jason M; Owens, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    We review the contribution made by CD8+ T cells to inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and discuss their role in the animal model Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that the inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17...... are differentially regulated in CNS-infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in EAE, and that CD8+ T cells regulate disease. In MS, CD8+ T cells appear to play a role in promotion of disease, so cytokine regulation is likely different in CD8+ T cells in MS and EAE...

  10. A Comparative Clinicopathologic Study of Collagenous Gastritis in Children and Adults: The Same Disorder With Associated Immune-mediated Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changqing; Park, Jason Y; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Arnold, Christina A; McDonald, Oliver G; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Salaria, Safia N; Limketkai, Berkeley N; McGrath, Kevin M; Musahl, Tina; Singhi, Aatur D

    2015-06-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition characterized by surface epithelial damage, subepithelial collagen deposition, and a lamina propria inflammatory infiltrate. Previous studies have proposed 2 clinicopathologic subtypes: (1) children (18 y of age or younger) presenting with severe anemia, nodular gastric mucosa, and isolated gastric disease; and (2) adults with chronic watery diarrhea that is associated with diffuse collagenous involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. However, notable exceptions exist. In fact, broad variability in clinical presentation, etiology, treatment and disease course has been reported. To better define the clinicopathologic features of collagenous gastritis, we have collected 10 pediatric and 21 adult cases and describe their clinical, endoscopic, pathologic, and follow-up findings. Both children and adults presented with similar clinical symptoms such as anemia (50%, 35%, respectively), epigastric/abdominal pain (50%, 45%), and diarrhea (40%, 55%). Concomitant immune disorders were identified in 2 (20%) children and 3 (14%) adults. Further, 7 of 17 (41%) adults were taking medications associated with other immune-related gastrointestinal diseases including olmesartan and antidepressants. Histologically, there were no differences between children and adults with collagenous gastritis in the location of gastric involvement, mean collagenous layer thickness, and prominence of eosinophils (P>0.05). Extragastric collagenous involvement was also seen with comparable frequencies in each cohort (44%, 59%). Follow-up information was available for 22 of 31 (71%) patients and ranged from 2 to 122 months (mean, 33.6 mo). Despite medical management in most cases, persistence of symptoms or collagenous gastritis on subsequent biopsies was seen in 100% of children and 82% of adults. Of note, treatment for 1 adult patient involved cessation of olmesartan resulting in resolution of both symptoms and subepithelial collagen deposition on subsequent

  11. Discovery of innovative therapies for rare immune-mediated inflammatory diseases via off-label prescription of biologics: the case of IL-6 receptor blockade in Castleman’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eMusters

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biologics have revolutionized the field of clinical immunology and proven to be both effective and safe in common immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, and various haematological disorders. However, in patients with rare, severe IMIDs failing on standard therapies it is virtually impossible to conduct randomized controlled trials. Therefore, biologics are usually prescribed off-label in these often severely ill patients. Unfortunately, off-label prescription is sometimes hampered in these diseases due to a lack of reimbursement that is often based on a presumed lack of evidence for effectiveness. In the present article will discuss that off-label prescription of biologics can be a good way to discover new treatments for rare diseases. This will be ilustrated using a case of multicentric Castleman’s disease, an immune-mediated lymphoproliferative disorder, in which off-label tocilizumab (humanized anti-IL-6 receptor blocking antibody treatment resulted in remarkable clinical improvement. Furthermore, we will give recommendations for monitoring efficacy and safety of biologic treatment in rare IMIDs, including the use of registries. In conclusion, we put forward that innovative treatments for rare IMIDs can be discovered via off-label prescription of biologicals, provided that this is based on rational arguments including knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease.

  12. Diffusion abnormality maps in demyelinating disease: Correlations with clinical scores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onu, Mihaela; Roceanu, Adina; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Bendic, Robert; Tarta, Eugen; Preoteasa, Florentin; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been explored as a noninvasive tool to assess pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the correlation between classical MRI measures and physical disability is modest in MS. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI technique holds particular promise in this regard. The present study shows brain regions where FA and individual diffusivities abnormalities are present and check their correlations with physical disability clinical scores. Methods: Eight patients and 12 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR-DTI acquisitions, a Genesis Signa 1.5T MR system, an EP/SE scanning sequence, 25 gradient directions were used. Results: Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) group comparisons showed reduced FA and increased individual diffusivities in several brain regions in patients. Significant correlations were found between FA and: EDSS, 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25FW score; between λ 2 and: P100 (r and l), 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25FW; between λ 3 and: 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25FW score. Conclusions: Fractional anisotropy and individual radial diffusivities proved to be important markers of motor disabilities in MS patients when the disease duration mean and the disability scores values range are relatively high.

  13. CSF free light chain identification of demyelinating disease: comparison with oligoclonal banding and other CSF indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtner, Kari M; Shosha, Eslam; Bryant, Sandra C; Andreguetto, Bruna D; Murray, David L; Pittock, Sean J; Willrich, Maria Alice V

    2018-02-19

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) used in immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) index testing and oligoclonal bands (OCBs) are common laboratory tests used in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. The measurement of CSF free light chains (FLC) could pose as an alternative to the labor-intensive isoelectric-focusing (IEF) gels used for OCBs. A total of 325 residual paired CSF and serum specimens were obtained after physician-ordered OCB IEF testing. CSF kappa (cKFLC) and lambda FLC (cLFLC), albumin and total IgG were measured. Calculations were performed based on combinations of analytes: CSF sum of kappa and lambda ([cKFLC+cLFLC]), kappa-index (K-index) ([cKFLC/sKFLC]/[CSF albumin/serum albumin]), kappa intrathecal fraction (KFLCIF) {([cKFLC/sKFLC]-[0.9358×CSF albumin/serum albumin]^[0.6687×sKFLC]/cKFLC)} and IgG-index ([CSF IgG/CSF albumin]/[serum IgG/serum albumin]). Patients were categorized as: demyelination (n=67), autoimmunity (n=53), non-inflammatory (n=50), inflammation (n=38), degeneration (n=28), peripheral neuropathy (n=24), infection (n=13), cancer (n=11), neuromyelitis optica (n=10) and others (n=31). cKFLC measurement used alone at a cutoff of 0.0611 mg/dL showed >90% agreement to OCBs, similar or better performance than all other calculations, reducing the number of analytes and variables. When cases of demyelinating disease were reviewed, cKFLC measurements showed 86% clinical sensitivity/77% specificity. cKFLC alone demonstrates comparable performance to OCBs along with increased sensitivity for demyelinating diseases. Replacing OCB with cKFLC would alleviate the need for serum and CSF IgG and albumin and calculated conversions. cKFLC can overcome challenges associated with performance, interpretation, and cost of traditional OCBs, reducing costs and maintaining sensitivity and specificity supporting MS diagnosis.

  14. Physiological Dynamics in Demyelinating Diseases: Unraveling Complex Relationships through Computer Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S. Coggan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intense research, few treatments are available for most neurological disorders. Demyelinating diseases are no exception. This is perhaps not surprising considering the multifactorial nature of these diseases, which involve complex interactions between immune system cells, glia and neurons. In the case of multiple sclerosis, for example, there is no unanimity among researchers about the cause or even which system or cell type could be ground zero. This situation precludes the development and strategic application of mechanism-based therapies. We will discuss how computational modeling applied to questions at different biological levels can help link together disparate observations and decipher complex mechanisms whose solutions are not amenable to simple reductionism. By making testable predictions and revealing critical gaps in existing knowledge, such models can help direct research and will provide a rigorous framework in which to integrate new data as they are collected. Nowadays, there is no shortage of data; the challenge is to make sense of it all. In that respect, computational modeling is an invaluable tool that could, ultimately, transform how we understand, diagnose, and treat demyelinating diseases.

  15. Occipital neuralgia associates with high cervical spinal cord lesions in idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoon, Narayan R; Watson, James C; Boes, Christopher J; Kantarci, Orhun H

    2018-01-01

    Background The association of trigeminal neuralgia with pontine lesions has been well documented in multiple sclerosis, and we tested the hypothesis that occipital neuralgia in multiple sclerosis is associated with high cervical spinal cord lesions. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 29 patients diagnosed with both occipital neuralgia and demyelinating disease by a neurologist from January 2001 to December 2014. We collected data on demographics, clinical findings, presence of C2-3 demyelinating lesions, and treatment responses. Results The patients with both occipital neuralgia and multiple sclerosis were typically female (76%) and had a later onset (age > 40) of occipital neuralgia (72%). Eighteen patients (64%) had the presence of C2-3 lesions and the majority had unilateral symptoms (83%) or episodic pain (78%). All patients with documented sensory loss (3/3) had C2-3 lesions. Most patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (6/8) had C2-3 lesions. Of the eight patients with C2-3 lesions and imaging at onset of occipital neuralgia, five (62.5%) had evidence of active demyelination. None of the patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (3/3) responded to occipital nerve blocks or high dose intravenous steroids, whereas all of the other phenotypes with long term follow-up (eight patients) had good responses. Conclusions A cervical spine MRI should be considered in all patients presenting with occipital neuralgia. In patients with multiple sclerosis, clinical features in occipital neuralgia that were predictive of the presence of a C2-3 lesion were unilateral episodic symptoms, sensory loss, later onset of occipital neuralgia, and progressive multiple sclerosis phenotype. Clinical phenotype predicted response to treatment.

  16. Persistence with golimumab in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: a systematic review of real-world evidence in rheumatoid arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedbom A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Axel Svedbom,1 Chiara Storck,2 Sumesh Kachroo,3 Marinella Govoni,4 Ahmed Khalifa5 1Real World Strategy and Analytics, Mapi Group, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Real World Strategy and Analytics, Mapi Group, Munich, Germany; 3Center for Observational and Real-World Evidence (CORE, Merck & Co, Kenilworth, NJ, USA; 4MSD Italy, Rome, Italy; 5Medical Affairs Immunology, MSD Switzerland, Luzern, Switzerland Purpose: In immune-mediated rheumatic diseases (IMRDs, persistence to treatment may be used as a surrogate marker for long-term treatment success. In previous comparisons of persistence to tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNFis, a paucity of data for subcutaneous (SC golimumab was identified. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of persistence to SC golimumab in clinical practice and contextualize these data with five-year persistence estimates from long-term open-label extension (OLE trials of SC TNFis in IMRDs.Patients and methods: PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings from European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR, American College of Rheumatology (ACR, and International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR were searched. All studies on patients treated with SC golimumab for IMRD were included if they reported data on the persistence to golimumab.Results: Of 376 available references identified through the searches, 12 studies with a total of 4,910 patients met the inclusion criteria. Furthermore, nine OLE trials were available. Among the included studies from clinical practice, at six months, one year, two years, and three years, the proportion of patients persistent to treatment ranged from 63% to 91%, 47% to 80%, 40% to 77%, and 32% to 67%, respectively. In the four studies that included comparisons to other biologics, golimumab was either statistically noninferior or statistically superior to other treatments, an observation that was supported by indirect comparisons of unadjusted point

  17. Risk of subsequent ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients hospitalized for immune-mediated diseases: a nationwide follow-up study from Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zöller Bengt

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain immune-mediated diseases (IMDs have been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disorders. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there is an association between 32 different IMDs and first hospitalization for ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Methods All individuals in Sweden hospitalized with a main diagnosis of IMD (without previous or coexisting stroke, between January 1, 1987 and December 31, 2008 (n = 216,291, were followed for first hospitalization for ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. The reference population was the total population of Sweden. Adjusted standardized incidence ratios (SIRs for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were calculated. Results Totally 20 and 15 of the 32 IMDs studied, respectively, were associated with an increased risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke during the follow-up. The overall risks of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke during the first year after hospitalization for IMD were 2.02 (95% CI 1.90–2.14 and 2.65 (95% CI 2.27–3.08, respectively. The overall risk of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke decreased over time, to 1.50 (95% CI 1.46–1.55 and 1.83 (95% CI 1.69–1.98, respectively, after 1–5 years, and 1.29 (95% CI 1.23–1.35 and 1.47 (95% CI 1.31–1.65, respectively, after 10+ years. The risk of hemorrhagic stroke was ≥2 during the first year after hospitalization for seven IMDs: ankylosing spondylitis (SIR = 8.11, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (SIR = 8.60, polymyalgia rheumatica (SIR = 2.06, psoriasis (SIR = 2.88, rheumatoid arthritis (SIR = 3.27, systemic lupus erythematosus (SIR = 8.65, and Wegener´s granulomatosis (SIR = 5.83. The risk of ischemic stroke was ≥2 during the first year after hospitalization for twelve IMDs: Addison’s disease (SIR = 2.71, Crohn´s disease (SIR = 2.15, Grave´s disease (SIR = 2.15, Hashimoto´s thyroiditis (SIR = 2.99, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (SIR = 2

  18. Helminths as governors of immune-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David E; Summers, Robert W; Weinstock, Joel V

    2007-04-01

    Immune-mediated diseases (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, multiple sclerosis and autoimmune diabetes) are increasing in prevalence and emerge as populations adopt meticulously hygienic lifestyles. This change in lifestyles precludes exposure to helminths (parasitic worms). Loss of natural helminth exposure removes a previously universal Th2 and regulatory immune biasing imparted by these organisms. Helminths protect animals from developing immune-mediated diseases (colitis, reactive airway disease, encephalitis and diabetes). Clinical trials show that exposure to helminths can reduce disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. This paper summarises work by multiple groups demonstrating that colonization with helminths alters immune reactivity and protects against disease from dysregulated inflammation.

  19. Association between Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis and early demyelination and oligodendrocyte dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xia Dong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The APPSwe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model is an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model exhibiting symptoms of dementia, and is commonly used to explore pathological changes in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Previous clinical autopsy and imaging studies suggest that Alzheimer’s disease patients have white matter and oligodendrocyte damage, but the underlying mechanisms of these have not been revealed. Therefore, the present study used APP/PS1 mice to assess cognitive change, myelin loss, and corresponding changes in oligodendrocytes, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Morris water maze tests were performed to evaluate cognitive change in APP/PS1 mice and normal C57BL/6 mice aged 3 and 6 months. Luxol fast blue staining of the corpus callosum and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR for myelin basic protein (MBP mRNA were carried out to quantify myelin damage. Immunohistochemistry staining for NG2 and qRT-PCR for monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 (MCT1 mRNA were conducted to assess corresponding changes in oligodendrocytes. Our results demonstrate that compared with C57BL/6 mice, there was a downregulation of MBP mRNA in APP/PS1 mice aged 3 months. This became more obvious in APP/PS1 mice aged 6 months accompanied by other abnormalities such as prolonged escape latency in the Morris water maze test, shrinkage of the corpus callosum, upregulation of NG2-immunoreactive cells, and downregulation of MCT1 mRNA. These findings indicate that the involvement of early demyelination at 3 months and the oligodendrocyte dysfunction at 6 months in APP/PS1 mice are in association with Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis.

  20. Imaging of demyelinating and neoplastic diseases of the spinal cord; Bildgebung bei demyelinisierenden und tumoroesen Erkrankungen des Rueckenmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Mang, C. [Institut fuer CT und MRT Gaenserndorf, Gaenserndorf (Austria)

    2010-12-15

    The clinical symptoms of myelopathy are variable and non-specific. Demyelinating as well as neoplastic spinal cord diseases can cause paresthesia, progressive sensomotoric deficits and bowel and bladder dysfunction. Imaging of the spine, especially with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is an essential component in the diagnostic assessment of myelopathy and makes a substantial contribution to achieving the correct diagnosis. Although intramedullary neoplasms are far less common than demyelinating spinal cord diseases, radiologists should be familiar with the three most common entities, astrocytoma, ependymoma and hemangioblastoma, which represent over 70% of all spinal cord neoplasms. An early diagnosis and therapy is essential with neoplastic and demyelinating spinal cord diseases to hold residual neurological deficits as low as possible. (orig.) [German] Die klinische Symptomatik von Myelopathien ist aeusserst variabel und unspezifisch. Sowohl demyelinisierende als auch tumoroese Rueckenmarkerkrankungen koennen Paraesthesien, progrediente sensomotorische Ausfaelle und eine Sphinkterdysfunktion hervorrufen. Bildgebende Untersuchungen, und hier allen voran die MRT, sind ein unerlaesslicher Bestandteil zur Abklaerung von Myelopathien und tragen wesentlich zur korrekten Diagnose bei. Intramedullaere Tumoren sind zwar weitaus seltener als demyelinisierende Rueckenmarkerkrankungen, dennoch sollte der Radiologe mit den Bildmerkmalen der 3 haeufigsten Tumorarten, dem Astrozytom, Ependymom und Haemangioblastom vertraut sein, die ueber 70% aller Rueckenmarktumoren verursachen. Eine moeglichst fruehe Diagnostik und Therapie sind bei tumoroesen und demyelinisierenden Rueckenmarkerkrankungen essenziell, um bleibende neurologische Defizite moeglichst gering zu halten. (orig.)

  1. Constitutive expression of a costimulatory ligand on antigen-presenting cells in the nervous system drives demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Brisebois, Marcel; Tran, Elise

    2003-01-01

    that transgenic mice constitutively expressing the costimulatory ligand B7.2/CD86 on microglia in the central nervous system (CNS) and on related cells in the proximal peripheral nervous tissue spontaneously develop autoimmune demyelinating disease. Disease-affected nervous tissue in transgenic mice showed...... recipients but not into non-transgenic recipients. These data provide evidence that B7/CD28 interactions within the nervous tissue are critical determinants of disease development. Our findings have important implications for understanding the etiology of nervous system autoimmune diseases such as multiple...

  2. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling...... multiple sclerosis (MS) have been described as a rare AE. During about 10-year use of anti TNF-alpha, the Danish Medicines Agency has recorded eight cases of MS like AEs. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of demyelinizing AEs both in the central and peripheral nervous system after...... treatment with anti TNF-alpha in a cohort of patients from a large rheumatologic outpatient clinic in Copenhagen. In a 4-year period from January 2008 to December 2011, approximately 550 patients annually were undergoing treatment with anti TNF-alpha inhibitors in our department. We collected data on all...

  3. Estudo epidemiológico das doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas na cavidade oral An epidemiological study of immune-mediated skin diseases affecting the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyntia Helena Pereira de Carvalho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: As doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas compõem diversas patologias que apresentam formas variadas de manifestação no organismo. OBJETIVO: Foi proposição desta pesquisa, estabelecer a prevalência das principais doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas que apresentam manifestação oral. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados laudos histopatológicos de 10.292 casos arquivados no Serviço de Anatomia Patológica da Disciplina de Patologia Oral da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, no período de 1988 a 2009. Dos casos diagnosticados como algum tipo de doença em estudo, coletaram-se dados clínicos como sexo, idade, raça, sítio anatômico e sintomatologia das doenças. RESULTADOS: Do total de casos registrados, no serviço supracitado, 82 (0,8% corresponderam a doenças dermato lógicas imunologicamente mediadas com manifestação na cavidade oral. As doenças encontradas neste estudo foram: líquen plano oral, pênfigo vulgar e penfigoide benigno das membranas mucosas, sendo o líquen plano oral a lesão mais prevalente, representando 68,05% dos casos analisados, dos quais 64,3% apresentavam-se em mu lheres, sendo a mucosa jugal o sítio anatômico mais acometido (46,8%. CONCLUSÃO: A ocorrência de doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas que apresentam manifestação oral ainda é um fato incomum, semelhante ao observado na maioria das regiões mundiais. No entanto, a busca pelo diagnóstico precoce é um requisito essencial para a condução do tratamento dessas doenças, tendo em vista o possível comprometimento sistêmico do organismo nos pacientes.BACKGROUND: Immune-mediated skin diseases encompass a variety of pathologies that present in different forms in the body. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence of the principal immune-mediated skin diseases affecting the oral cavity. METHODS: A total of 10,292 histopathology reports stored in the archives of the

  4. Demyelinating disease in patients with myasthenia gravis Doenças desmielinizantes em pacientes com miastenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Bernardi Bichuetti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is an autoimmune disease characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness, caused by impaired neuromuscular transmission. Patients with MG can present other autoimmune diseases in association, commonly hypo or hyperthyroidism. The association of MG to demyelinating disease is rare and has been described before. We report on three Brazilian patients with MG that presented distinct demyelinating diseases, two monophasic and one recurrent neuromyelitis optica, several years after the diagnosis of MG, and discuss their clinical courses.Miastenia gravis (MG é doença autoimune caracterizada por episódios de fraqueza muscular alternados com melhora, causada por bloqueio da junção neuromuscular. Pacientes com MG podem apresentar outras doenças autoimunes, comumente hipo ou hipertiroidismo, e a associação de MG com doenças desmielinizantes é raramente descrita. Relatamos três pacientes brasileiros com MG que desenvolveram doenças desmielinizantes, dois monofásicos e um neuromielite óptica recorrente, vários anos após o diagnóstico de MG e discutimos seus cursos clínicos.

  5. Lipocalin 2 is a novel immune mediator of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis pathogenesis and is modulated in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Jennifer L; Zarruk, Juan G; Arbour, Nathalie; Prat, Alexandre; Yong, V Wee; Jacques, Francois H; Akira, Shizuo; David, Samuel

    2012-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a widely used animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). EAE pathogenesis involves various cell types, cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Given the complexity of the inflammatory response in EAE, it is likely that many immune mediators still remain to be discovered. To identify novel immune mediators of EAE pathogenesis, we performed an Affymetrix gene array screen on the spinal cords of mice at the onset stage of disease. This screening identified the gene encoding lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) as being significantly upregulated. Lcn2 is a multi-functional protein that plays a role in glial activation, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) stabilization, and cellular iron flux. As many of these processes have been implicated in EAE, we characterized the expression and role of Lcn2 in this disease in C57BL/6 mice. We show that Lcn2 is significantly upregulated in the spinal cord throughout EAE and is expressed predominantly by monocytes and reactive astrocytes. The Lcn2 receptor, 24p3R, is also expressed on monocytes, macrophages/microglia, and astrocytes in EAE. In addition, we show that EAE severity is increased in Lcn2(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type controls. Finally, we demonstrate that elevated levels of Lcn2 are detected in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in MS and in immune cells in CNS lesions in MS tissue sections. These data indicate that Lcn2 is a modulator of EAE pathogenesis and suggest that it may also play a role in MS. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Disease Type- and Status-Specific Alteration of CSF Metabolome Coordinated with Clinical Parameters in Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases of CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Jin Park

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IDDs are a group of disorders with different aetiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions. These disorders include multiple sclerosis (MS, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD, and idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM. Differential diagnosis of the CNS IDDs still remains challenging due to frequent overlap of clinical and radiological manifestation, leading to increased demands for new biomarker discovery. Since cerebrospinal fluid (CSF metabolites may reflect the status of CNS tissues and provide an interfacial linkage between blood and CNS tissues, we explored multi-component biomarker for different IDDs from CSF samples using gas chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling coupled to multiplex bioinformatics approach. We successfully constructed the single model with multiple metabolite variables in coordinated regression with clinical characteristics, expanded disability status scale, oligoclonal bands, and protein levels. The multi-composite biomarker simultaneously discriminated four different immune statuses (a total of 145 samples; 54 MS, 49 NMOSD, 30 ITM, and 12 normal controls. Furthermore, systematic characterization of transitional metabolic modulation identified relapse-associated metabolites and proposed insights into the disease network underlying type-specific metabolic dysfunctionality. The comparative analysis revealed the lipids, 1-monopalmitin and 1-monostearin were common indicative for MS, NMOSD, and ITM whereas fatty acids were specific for the relapse identified in all types of IDDs.

  7. Correlation between spinal cord MRI and clinical features in patients with demyelinating disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Gatzonis, S.; Gouliamos, A.; Trakadas, S.; Kalovidouris, A.; Sgouropoulos, P.; Vlachos, L.; Papavasiliou, C.

    1994-01-01

    Localisation of spinal cord lesions by MRI was correlated with neurological symptoms and signs in 16 patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of multiple sclerosis. There was good correspondence between spinal cord lesions and motor tract signs. On the other hand, superficial or deep sensory disturbances correlated with spinal cord lesions in only about a quarter of the patients. MRI of the spinal cord appeared to explain the myelopathy in 11 patients, while in 3 there was strong clinical evidence of more extensive demyelinating lesions. In 7 of the 16 patients MRI of the brain was normal. (orig.)

  8. Immune-mediated statin myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Priyadarshini; Oddis, Chester V; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Statin-induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is associated with a unique clinical 5 phenotype of severe proximal muscle weakness during or after exposure to statins in patients with high creatine kinase (CK) levels. Electromyography (EMG) and muscle biopsy reveal features of a necrotizing myopathy and the anti-HMGCR autoantibody is frequently detected. Treatment requires a combination of statin discontinuation as well as immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapy. HLA typing (HLADRB1*1101) is strongly associated with anti-10 HMGCR autoantibody positivity in statin-exposed patients. It is well documented that statin triggers autoimmune disease in those with a genetic susceptibility. With the commercial availability of an accurate ELISA test, the natural history of the disease and its phenotypic features are becoming increasingly understood.

  9. Shared Genetic Basis for Type 1 Diabetes, Islet Autoantibodies, and Autoantibodies Associated With Other Immune-Mediated Diseases in Families With Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, Caroline Anna; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    ) in autoimmune gastritis, transglutaminase (TGA) in celiac disease, and 21-hydroxylase (21-OHA) in autoimmune hypoadrenalism. In addition to the MHC region, we identify SNPs in five susceptibility loci (IFIH1, PTPN22, SH2B3, BACH2, and CTLA4) as significantly associated with more than one autoantibody at a false...

  10. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Peripheral Immune Mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Steffen; Pipper, Christian; Skogstrand, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to examine if 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was related to the peripheral immunological and inflammatory signature both at birth, and in newly diagnosed patients with childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their healthy controls; (2) Methods: The birth cohort consisted of 470...... patients and 500 healthy controls. Dried blood samples were collected from the neonates in the period 1981–1999. The newly diagnosed cohort consisted of 460 patients and 453 siblings. Serum samples were collected in the period 1997–2005. A variety of peripheral immune mediators were measured and compared...... to total 25(OH)D levels (25(OH)D2 + 25(OH)D3). For each immune mediator, the relative change (RC) in the mean level was modeled by robust log-normal regression and correction for multiple testing was performed; (3) Results: Two associations were identified; there was a negative association between 25(OH...

  11. Measurement of soluble CD59 in CSF in demyelinating disease: Evidence for an intrathecal source of soluble CD59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelek, Wioleta M; Watkins, Lewis M; Howell, Owain W; Evans, Rhian; Loveless, Sam; Robertson, Neil P; Beenes, Marijke; Willems, Loek; Brandwijk, Ricardo; Morgan, B Paul

    2018-02-01

    CD59, a broadly expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, is the principal cell inhibitor of complement membrane attack on cells. In the demyelinating disorders, multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), elevated complement protein levels, including soluble CD59 (sCD59), were reported in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We compared sCD59 levels in CSF and matched plasma in controls and patients with MS, NMOSD and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and investigated the source of CSF sCD59 and whether it was microparticle associated. sCD59 was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; Hycult; HK374-02). Patient and control CSF was subjected to western blotting to characterise anti-CD59-reactive materials. CD59 was localised by immunostaining and in situ hybridisation. CSF sCD59 levels were double those in plasma (CSF, 30.2 ng/mL; plasma, 16.3 ng/mL). Plasma but not CSF sCD59 levels differentiated MS from NMOSD, MS from CIS and NMOSD/CIS from controls. Elimination of microparticles confirmed that CSF sCD59 was not membrane anchored. CSF levels of sCD59 are not a biomarker of demyelinating diseases. High levels of sCD59 in CSF relative to plasma suggest an intrathecal source; CD59 expression in brain parenchyma was low, but expression was strong on choroid plexus (CP) epithelium, immediately adjacent the CSF, suggesting that this is the likely source.

  12. Optimizing the management of neuromyelitis optica and spectrum disorders in resource poor settings: Experience from the Mangalore demyelinating disease registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekha Pandit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In resource-poor settings, the management of neuromyelitis optica (NMO and NMO spectrum (NMOS disorders is limited because of delayed diagnosis and financial constraints. Aim: To device a cost-effective strategy for the management of NMO and related disorders in India. Materials and Methods: A cost-effective and disease-specific protocol was used for evaluating the course and treatment outcome of 70 consecutive patients. Results: Forty-five patients (65% had a relapse from the onset and included NMO (n = 20, recurrent transverse myelitis (RTM; n = 10, and recurrent optic neuritis (ROPN; n = 15. In 38 (84.4% patients presenting after multiple attacks, the diagnosis was made clinically. Only 7 patients with a relapsing course were seen at the onset and included ROPN (n = 5, NMO (n = 1, and RTM (n = 1. They had a second attack after a median interval of 1 ± 0.9 years, which was captured through our dedicated review process. Twenty-five patients had isolated longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, of which 20 (80% remained ambulant at follow-up of 3 ± 1.9 years. Twelve patients (17% with median expanded disability status scale (EDSS of 8.5 at entry had a fatal outcome. Serum NMO-IgG testing was done in selected patients, and it was positive in 7 of 18 patients (39%. Irrespective of the NMO-IgG status, the treatment compliant patients (44.4% showed significant improvement in EDSS (P ≤ 0.001. Conclusions : Early clinical diagnosis and treatment compliance were important for good outcome. Isolated LETM was most likely a post-infectious demyelinating disorder in our set-up. NMO and NMOS disorders contributed to 14.9% (45/303 of all demyelinating disorders in our registry.

  13. Immune mediated disorders in women with a fragile X expansion and FXTAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalnapurkar, Isha; Rafika, Nuva; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Premutation alleles in fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) can cause the late-onset neurodegenerative disorder, fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and/or the fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency in approximately 20% of heterozygotes. Heterozygotes of the FMR1 premutation have a higher incidence of immune mediated disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disorder, especially when accompanied by FXTAS motor signs. We describe the time course of symptoms of immune mediated disorders and the subsequent development of FXTAS in four women with an FMR1 CGG expansion, including three with the premutation and one with a gray zone expansion. These patients developed an immune mediated disorder followed by neurological symptoms that become consistent with FXTAS. In all patients we observed a pattern involving an initial appearance of disease symptoms-often after a period of heightened stress (depression, anxiety, divorce, general surgery) followed by the onset of tremor and/or ataxia. Immune mediated diseases are associated with the manifestations of FXTAS temporally, although further studies are needed to clarify this association. If a cause and effect relationship can be established, treatment of pre-existing immune mediated disorders may benefit patients with pathogenic FMR1 mutations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Demyelinating Disease following Anti-TNFa Treatment: A Causal or Coincidental Association? Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andreadou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNFa are an established therapeutic option for several autoimmune and inflammatory bowel diseases. Despite their clinical effectiveness, neurological adverse events have been reported and literature data suggest a potential role of anti-TNFa in the induction of demyelination of the CNS. We present four patients treated with anti-TNFa who developed symptoms suggestive of CNS demyelination. The first patient, a 17-year-old male who received etanercept for psoriatic arthritis for eight months, presented with dysesthesias up to T4 level. The second patient, a 30-year-old male treated with adalimumab for three years due to ankylosing spondylitis, presented with right unilateral tinnitus. The third case, a 47-year-old female, received etanercept for four years because of psoriatic arthritis and developed persistent headache and left-sided face and head numbness. Finally, the fourth patient, a 57-years-old female treated with etanercept for six years due to ankylosing spondylitis, presented with difficulty in speech, swallowing, and ptosis of the right corner of the mouth. In all cases, brain MRI showed lesions suggestive of demyelination, while positive oligoclonal bands were detected in the CSF. Anti-TNFa treatments were discontinued and patients showed clinical improvement with pulsed intravenous corticosteroid therapy. CNS demyelination following anti-TNFa treatment represents a relatively rare but potential serious complication. Close follow-up and MRI monitoring of these patients is mandatory to elucidate whether the clinical manifestations represent adverse events occurring during anti-TNFa therapy or a first demyelinating episode.

  15. TLR3 signaling is either protective or pathogenic for the development of Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease depending on the time of viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Young-Hee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3-mediated signaling plays an important role in the induction of innate cytokine responses to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV infection. In addition, cytokine levels produced after TMEV infection are significantly higher in the glial cells of susceptible SJL mice compared to those of resistant C57BL/6 mice. However, it is not known whether TLR3-mediated signaling plays a protective or pathogenic role in the development of demyelinating disease. Methods SJL/J and B6;129S-Tlr3tm1Flv/J (TLR3KO-B6 mice, and TLR3KO-SJL mice that TLR3KO-B6 mice were backcrossed to SJL/J mice for 6 generations were infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (2 × 105 PFU with or without treatment with 50 μg of poly IC. Cytokine production and immune responses in the CNS and periphery of infected mice were analyzed. Results We investigated the role of TLR3-mediated signaling in the protection and pathogenesis of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. TLR3KO-B6 mice did not develop demyelinating disease although they displayed elevated viral loads in the CNS. However, TLR3KO-SJL mice displayed increased viral loads and cellular infiltration in the CNS, accompanied by exacerbated development of demyelinating disease, compared to the normal littermate mice. Late, but not early, anti-viral CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in the CNS were compromised in TLR3KO-SJL mice. However, activation of TLR3 with poly IC prior to viral infection also exacerbated disease development, whereas such activation after viral infection restrained disease development. Activation of TLR3 signaling prior to viral infection hindered the induction of protective IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations. In contrast, activation of these signals after viral infection improved the induction of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, poly IC-pretreated mice displayed elevated PDL-1 and

  16. Mast Cells and Innate Lymphoid Cells: Underappreciated Players in CNS Autoimmune Demyelinating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Melissa A; Weinberg, Rebecca B

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and its mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are autoimmune CNS inflammatory diseases. As a result of a breakdown in the relatively impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB) in affected individuals, myelin-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells gain entry into the immune privileged CNS and initiate myelin, oligodendrocyte, and nerve axon destruction. However, despite the absolute requirement for T cells, there is increasing evidence that innate immune cells also play critical amplifying roles in disease pathogenesis. By modulating the character and magnitude of the myelin-reactive T cell response and regulating BBB integrity, innate cells affect both disease initiation and progression. Two classes of innate cells, mast cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), have been best studied in models of allergic and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. Yet, there is emerging evidence that these cell types also exert a profound influence in CNS inflammatory disease. Both cell types are residents within the meninges and can be activated early in disease to express a wide variety of disease-modifying cytokines and chemokines. In this review, we discuss how mast cells and ILCs can have either disease-promoting or -protecting effects on MS and other CNS inflammatory diseases and how sex hormones may influence this outcome. These observations suggest that targeting these cells and their unique mediators can be exploited therapeutically.

  17. Genetics of immune-mediated disorders : from genome-wide association to molecular mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified not only hundreds of susceptibility loci to immune-mediated diseases but also pinpointed causal amino-acid variants of HLA genes that contribute to many autoimmune reactions. Majority of non-HLA genetic variants are located within non-coding regulatory

  18. Role of Th1 and Th2 cells in autoimmune demyelinating disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerken, L.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that Th1 cells play an important role in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), whereas Th2 cells contribute to recovery from disease. A maj or determinant in the development of Th1 and Th2 cells is the type of

  19. Antibody response against gastrointestinal antigens in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banati, M; Csecsei, P; Koszegi, E

    2013-01-01

    TG), intrinsic factor (IF), parietal cells (PC) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) were screened in the sera of 45 patients with AQP4-seropositive neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum diseases (NMO/NMO-SD), 17 patients with AQP4-seronegative NMO, 85 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis...

  20. Human Gut-Derived Commensal Bacteria Suppress CNS Inflammatory and Demyelinating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalam, Ashutosh; Shahi, Shailesh K; Luckey, David; Karau, Melissa; Marietta, Eric; Luo, Ningling; Choung, Rok Seon; Ju, Josephine; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Gibson-Corley, Katherine; Patel, Robin; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella; Taneja, Veena; Murray, Joseph

    2017-08-08

    The human gut is colonized by a large number of microorganisms (∼10 13 bacteria) that support various physiologic functions. A perturbation in the healthy gut microbiome might lead to the development of inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Therefore, gut commensals might provide promising therapeutic options for treating MS and other diseases. We report the identification of human gut-derived commensal bacteria, Prevotella histicola, which can suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II transgenic mouse model. P. histicola suppresses disease through the modulation of systemic immune responses. P. histicola challenge led to a decrease in pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cells and an increase in the frequencies of CD4 + FoxP3 + regulatory T cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells, and suppressive macrophages. Our study provides evidence that the administration of gut commensals may regulate a systemic immune response and may, therefore, have a possible role in treatment strategies for MS. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gliopathy of Demyelinating And Non-Demyelinating Strains Of Mouse Hepatitis Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Charles Kenyon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Demyelination in the central nervous system induced by neurovirulent strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein, but it is not clear whether the mechanism of this disease pathology involves direct viral infection of oligodendrocytes. Detailed studies of glial cell tropism of MHV are presented, demonstrating that direct MHV infection of oligodendrocytes differs between demyelinating (RSA59 and non-demyelinating (RSMHV2 viral strains both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that direct injury of mature oligodendrocytes is an important mechanism of virus-induced demyelination. In vivo, RSA59 infection was identified in spinal cord gray and white matter, but infected oligodendrocytes were restricted to white matter. In contrast, RSMHV2 infection was restricted to gray matter neurons and was not localized to oligodendrocytes. In vitro, RSA59 can infect both oligodendrocyte precursors and differentiated oligodendrocytes, whereas RSMHV2 can infect oligodendrocyte precursors but not differentiated oligodendrocytes. Viral spreading through axonal means to white matter and release of the demyelinating strain MHV at the nerve end is critical for oligodendrocytes infection and subsequent demyelination. Understanding the mechanisms by which known viruses effect demyelination in this animal model has important therapeutic implications in the treatment of human demyelinating disease.

  2. Houttuynia cordata modulates oral innate immune mediators: potential role of herbal plant on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satthakarn, S; Chung, W O; Promsong, A; Nittayananta, W

    2015-05-01

    Epithelial cells play an active role in oral innate immunity by producing various immune mediators. Houttuynia cordata Thunb (H. cordata), a herbal plant found in Asia, possesses many activities. However, its impacts on oral innate immunity have never been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of H. cordata extract on the expression of innate immune mediators produced by oral epithelial cells. Primary gingival epithelial cells (GECs) were treated with various concentrations of the extract for 18 h. The gene expression of hBD2, SLPI, cytokines, and chemokines was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The secreted proteins in the culture supernatants were detected by ELISA or Luminex assay. Cytotoxicity of the extract was assessed using CellTiter-Blue Assay. H. cordata significantly induced the expression of hBD2, SLPI, IL-8, and CCL20 in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. The secreted hBD2 and SLPI proteins were modulated, and the levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-γ were significantly induced by the extract. Our data indicated that H. cordata can modulate oral innate immune mediators. These findings may lead to the development of new topical agents from H. cordata for the prevention and treatment of immune-mediated oral diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Principles and approaches to the treatment of immune-mediated movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Dale, Russell C

    2018-03-01

    Immune mediated movement disorders include movement disorders in the context of autoimmune encephalitis such as anti-NMDAR encephalitis, post-infectious autoimmune movement disorders such as Sydenham chorea, paraneoplastic autoimmune movement disorders such as opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome, and infection triggered conditions such as paediatric acute neuropsychiatric syndrome. This review focuses on the approach to treatment of immune mediated movement disorders, which requires an understanding of the immunopathogenesis, whether the disease is destructive or 'altering', and the natural history of disease. Factors that can influence outcome include the severity of disease, the delay before starting therapy, use of multimodal therapy and whether the course is monophasic or relapsing. Although the four main conditions listed above have different pathophysiological processes, there are general themes that broadly apply including: early diagnosis and treatment is better, minimise the severity of disease, escalate treatment if the patient is not responding to initial treatments, and minimise relapse. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Patients with neuromyelitis optica have a more severe disease than patients with relapsingremitting multiple sclerosis, including higher risk of dying of a demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Bernardi Bichuetti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although neuromyelitis optica (NMO is known to be a more severe disease than relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, few studies comparing both conditions in a single center have been done. Methods: Comparison of our previously published cohort of 41 NMO patients with 177 RRMS patients followed in the same center, from 1994 to 2007. Results: Mean age of onset was 32.6 for NMO and 30.2 for RRMS (p=0.2062 with mean disease duration of 7.4 years for NMO and 10.3 years for RRMS. Patients with NMO had a higher annualized relapse rate (1.0 versus 0.8, p=0.0013 and progression index (0.9 versus 0.6, p≪0.0001, with more patients reaching expanded disability status scale (EDSS 6.0 (39 versus 17%, p=0.0036. The odds ratio for reaching EDSS 6.0 and being deceased due to NMO in comparison to RRMS were, respectively, 3.14 and 12.15. Conclusion: Patients with NMO have a more severe disease than patients with RRMS, including higher risk of dying of a demyelinating disease.

  5. Aggravating Impact of Nanoparticles on Immune-Mediated Pulmonary Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichiro Inoue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the adverse health effects of nanoparticles have been proposed and are being clarified, their aggravating effects on pre-existing pathological conditions have not been fully investigated. In this review, we provide insights into the immunotoxicity of both airborne and engineered nanoparticles as an exacerbating factor on hypersusceptible subjects, especially those with immune-mediated pulmonary inflammation, using our in vivo experimental model. First, we exhibit the effects of nanoparticles on pulmonary inflammation induced by bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide: LPS as a disease model in innate immunity, and demonstrate that nanoparticles instilled through both an intratracheal tube and an inhalation system can exacerbate the lung inflammation. Second, we introduce the effects of nanoparticles on allergic pulmonary inflammation as a disease model in adaptive immunity, and show that repetitive pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles has aggravating effects on allergic inflammation, including adjuvant effects on Th2-milieu. Third, we show that very small nanoparticle exposure exacerbates emphysematous pulmonary inflammation, which is concomitant with enhanced lung expression of proinflammatory molecules (including those that are innate immunity related. Taken together, nanoparticle exposure may synergistically facilitate pathological pulmonary inflammation via both innate and adaptive immunological impairment.

  6. Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Gérard; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired polyneuropathy presumably of immunological origin. It is characterized by a progressive or a relapsing course with predominant motor deficit. The diagnosis rests on the association of non-length-dependent predominantly motor...

  7. Hypothalamic demyelination causing panhypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Douglas, Julia; Burgess, John; Dreyer, Michael

    2018-05-01

    Hypothalamic involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is rare and endocrinopathies involving the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in patients with demyelinating conditions have rarely been reported. We present two cases of MS/NMOSD with associated hypothalamic-pituitary involvement and subsequent hypopituitarism, including the first report of a patient with hypothalamic demyelination causing panhypopituitarism. Differential diagnoses, including alemtuzumab-related and primary pituitary pathology are discussed. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. A Mechanism of Virus-Induced Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Das Sarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin forms an insulating sheath surrounding axons in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is essential for rapid propagation of neuronal action potentials. Demyelination is an acquired disorder in which normally formed myelin degenerates, exposing axons to the extracellular environment. The result is dysfunction of normal neuron-to-neuron communication and in many cases, varying degrees of axonal degeneration. Numerous central nervous system demyelinating disorders exist, including multiple sclerosis. Although demyelination is the major manifestation of most of the demyelinating diseases, recent studies have clearly documented concomitant axonal loss to varying degrees resulting in long-term disability. Axonal injury may occur secondary to myelin damage (outside-in model or myelin damage may occur secondary to axonal injury (inside-out model. Viral induced demyelination models, has provided unique imminent into the cellular mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we will discuss potential cellular and molecular mechanism of central nervous system axonal loss and demyelination in a viral induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

  9. Demyelination versus remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramow, Stephan; Frischer, Josa M; Lassmann, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The causes of incomplete remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis are unknown, as are the pathological correlates of the different clinical characteristics of patients with primary and secondary progressive disease. We analysed brains and spinal cords from 51 patients with progressive...... multiple sclerosis by planimetry. Thirteen patients with primary progressive disease were compared with 34 with secondary progressive disease. In patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, we found larger brain plaques, more demyelination in total and higher brain loads of active demyelination...... compared with patients with primary progressive disease. In addition, the brain density of plaques with high-grade inflammation and active demyelination was highest in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and remained ~18% higher than in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after adjustments...

  10. 22q11.2q13 duplication including SOX10 causes sex-reversal and peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falah, Nadia; Posey, Jennifer E; Thorson, Willa; Benke, Paul; Tekin, Mustafa; Tarshish, Brocha; Lupski, James R; Harel, Tamar

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosis of genetic syndromes may be difficult when specific components of a disorder manifest at a later age. We present a follow up of a previous report [Seeherunvong et al., (2004); AJMGA 127: 149-151], of an individual with 22q duplication and sex-reversal syndrome. The subject's phenotype evolved to include peripheral and central demyelination, Waardenburg syndrome type IV, and Hirschsprung disease (PCWH; MIM 609136). DNA microarray analysis defined the duplication at 22q11.2q13, including SOX10. Sequencing of the coding region of SOX10 did not reveal any mutations. Our data suggest that SOX10 duplication can cause disorders of sex development and PCWH, supporting the hypothesis that SOX10 toxic gain of function rather than dominant negative activity underlies PCWH. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Alemtuzumab in the treatment of IVIG-dependent chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marsh, E A

    2010-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an idiopathic immune mediated neuropathy causing demyelination and conduction block thought to occur as the result of an aberrant autoimmune response resulting in peripheral nerve inflammation mediated by T cells and humoral factors. Diagnosis commonly prompts initial treatment with steroids or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) on which 5-35% subsequently become dependent to maintain function. Despite a number of small scale trials, the role for alternative long-term immunosuppression remains unclear. Alemtuzumab is a humanised monoclonal antibody targeting the CD52 antigen present on the surface of lymphocytes and monocytes. A single intravenous infusion results in rapid and profound lymphopoenia lasting >12 months. We report its use and clinical outcome in a small series of patients with severe IVIG-dependent CIDP. Seven patients (4 Males; 3 Females) who had failed to respond to conventional immunosuppression were treated in 5 centres receiving 9 courses of alemtuzumab (dose range 60-150 mg). Following treatment, mean monthly IVIG use fell 26% from 202 to 149 g and IVIG administration frequency from 22 to 136 days. Two patients had prolonged remission, two patients had a partial response and no clear benefit was observed in the remaining three patients (2 Males, 1 Females). Responding patients had a younger age at onset (19.5 years) and shorter disease duration than non-responders. Three patients developed autoimmune disease following treatment. Alemtuzumab may offer an alternative treatment for a subset of early onset IVIG dependent CIDP patients failing conventional immunosuppressive agents, but concerns about toxicity may limit its use.

  12. Immune-mediated neuropathies our experience over 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy is the term applied to a spectrum of peripheral nerve disorders where immune dysregulation plays a role. Therefore, they are treatable. We analyzed the cases seen in the past 3 years by us and evaluated the clinical, laboratory, and outcome parameters in these patients. Patients and Methods: Consecutive patients seen by the authors and diagnosed as immune-mediated neuropathy were analyzed for etiology, pathology, and outcome assessed. Results: A total of sixty patients, 31 acute and 29 chronic neuropathies, were identified. Their subtypes treatment and outcome assessed. Males were significantly more in both acute and chronic cases. Miller Fisher 4, AMAN 1, paraplegic type 1, motor dominant type 19, Sensory-motor 1, MADSAM 3, Bifacial 2. Nonsystemic vasculitis was seen in 16 out of 29 chronic neuropathy and HIV, POEMS, and diabetes mellitus one each. Discussion: There is a spectrum of immune-mediated neuropathy which varies in clinical course, response to treatment, etc., Small percentage of uncommon cases are seen. In this group, mortality was nil and morbidity was minimal. Conclusion: Immune-mediated neuropathies are treatable and hence should be diagnosed early for good quality outcome.

  13. Aquaporin-4 Immuneglobulin G testing in 36 consecutive Jamaican patients with inflammatory central nervous system demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri Sandy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies of neuromyelitis optica (NMO in Jamaica are lacking. Here we reviewed the clinical records of 700 patients undergoing neurological evaluation at the Kingston Public Hospital, the largest tertiary institution in Jamaica over a 4 month period. We investigated the diagnostic utility of Aquaporin-4 ImmuneglobulinG (AQP4-IgG testing in 36 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of an inflammatory demyelinating disorder (IDD of the central nervous system (CNS. Patients were classified into 3 categories: i NMO, n=10; ii multiple sclerosis (MS, n=14 and iii unclassified IDD (n=12. All sera were tested for AQP-IgG status by cell binding assay (Euroimmun. No MS cases were positive. Ninety per cent of NMO cases were positive. Four of 12 patients with unclassified IDD tested positive for AQP4-IgG. AQP4-IgG seropositivity was associated with a lower socioeconomic status, higher EDSS (P=0.04 and lower pulmonary function than the seronegative cases (P=0.007. Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity may account for a significant proportion of Jamaican CNS IDDs.

  14. Aggregation of MBP in chronic demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Kati; Einstein, Ofira; Friedman-Levi, Yael; Binyamin, Orli; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Gabizon, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    Misfolding of key disease proteins to an insoluble state is associated with most neurodegenerative conditions, such as prion, Parkinson, and Alzheimer's diseases. In this work, and by studying animal models of multiple sclerosis, we asked whether this is also the case for myelin basic protein (MBP) in the late and neurodegenerative phases of demyelinating diseases. To this effect, we tested whether MBP, an essential myelin component, present prion-like properties in animal models of MS, as is the case for Cuprizone-induced chronic demyelination or chronic phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show here that while total levels of MBP were not reduced following extensive demyelination, part of these molecules accumulated thereafter as aggregates inside oligodendrocytes or around neuronal cells. In chronic EAE, MBP precipitated concomitantly with Tau, a marker of diverse neurodegenerative conditions, including MS. Most important, analysis of fractions from Triton X-100 floatation gradients suggest that the lipid composition of brain membranes in chronic EAE differs significantly from that of naïve mice, an effect which may relate to oxidative insults and subsequently prevent the appropriate insertion and compaction of new MBP in the myelin sheath, thereby causing its misfolding and aggregation. Prion-like aggregation of MBP following chronic demyelination may result from an aberrant lipid composition accompanying this pathological status. Such aggregation of MBP may contribute to neuronal damage that occurs in the progressive phase of MS.

  15. Immune-Mediated Neutropenia and Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis: An Unusual Hematological Association with IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-In Kim

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are well described in the literature. However, the combination of immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia has only been reported once in association with IBD. A case is reported of immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in a patient with ulcerative colitis during a relapse. No obvious causes of these hematological abnormalities were found in the patient despite an exhaustive search. An immune-mediated process was confirmed by positive antineutrophil antibody and platelet-associated antibody in the patient’s serum, and the demonstration of binding of the patient’s immunoglobulin G to autologous neutrophils. The patient was treated with high-dose steroid, intravenous gamma-globulin and eventually splenectomy. The platelet count subsequently normalized; although the severe neutropenia recurred, it has subsequently improved without further treatment. Although a definitive cause-effect relationship cannot be established, the immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia may be an unusual hematological manifestation associated with ulcerative colitis.

  16. Immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia : possible association with Ancylostoma caninum infection in three dogs : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Lobetti

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA may be primary or secondary. In primary IMHA, no underlying cause can be found, whereas secondary IMHA is triggered by an underlying cause, such as neoplasia, infectious diseases, or drugs. This paper describes 3 dogs with typical signs of IMHA that was possibly associated with the intestinal parasite Ancylostoma caninum. As intestinal helminths can be difficult to diagnose on faecal examination, it would be pertinent to performmultiple faecal examinations on any animal that has IMHA with no apparent underlying cause, as part of the therapy.

  17. Statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy: biology and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Basharat, Pari

    2017-04-01

    In the last 6 years, our understanding of statin-associated myopathy expanded to include not only a toxic myopathy with limited and reversible side-effects but also an autoimmune variety in which statins likely induce an autoimmune myopathy that is both associated with a specific autoantibody and responsive to immunosuppression and immune modulation. This review widens the reader's understanding of statin myopathy to include an autoimmune process. Statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy provides an example of an environmental trigger (statins) directly implicated in an autoimmune disease associated with a genetic predisposition as well as potential risk factors including concomitant diseases and specific statins. Given a median exposure to statins of 38 months, providers should be aware that anti-3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) myopathy may occur even after several years of statin exposure. It is important for the reader to understand the clinical presentation of statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy and the difference in its clinical presentation to that of statins as direct myotoxins. Prompt recognition of such an entity allows the clinician to immediately stop the offending agent if it has not already been discontinued as well as to recognize that statin rechallenge is not a likely option, and that prompt treatment with immunosuppression and/or immunomodulation is usually of enormous benefit to the patient in restoring muscle strength and physical function. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  18. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia associated with angiostrongylus vasorum infection in a jack russell terrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JO'Neill Emma

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A twenty-month-old Jack Russell terrier was presented with a four-day history of thrombocytopenia, echymotic inguinal haemorrhages, coughing and reduced exercise tolerance. Clinical examination revealed several petechial haemorrhages on the gingivae and small echymotic haemorrhages in the inguinal region, along with mild bilateral epistaxis. Haematology confirmed a platelet count of 1.0 × 10/L. Thoracic radiographs revealed a wide-spread mixed alveolar-interstitial lung pattern, apparent throughout the entire lungfield, but particularly marked within the left lung lobes. A presumptive diagnosis of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia was made and the dog was treated with vincristine and immunosuppressive doses of prednisolone. Initially anaemia developed following gastrointestinal haemorrhage; however, after symptomatic treatment the dog showed a marked clinical improvement. Evaluation for an underlying cause of the disease revealed Angiostrongylus vasorum L1 larvae on faecal analysis and treatment with fenbendazole was commenced. The dog made a full clinical recovery with all treatment was withdrawn within five weeks of diagnosis. This is the second report of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia associated with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection and it is the first to be successfully managed. The report highlights that Angiostrongylus vasorum should be considered in young dogs presented with thrombocytopenia.

  19. Spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging of a tumefactive demyelinating lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, M.; Meltzer, D.E.; Cha, S. [MRI Department, Department of Radiology, New York University Medical Center, Schwartz Building, Basement HCC, 530 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions can present with features similar, clinically and radiologically, to those of brain tumours. Proton MR spectroscopy has been increasingly used to characterize intracranial pathology. As the underlying pathophysiology of neoplasms is different from that of demyelinating disease, one may expect the metabolic composition of neoplasms to be significantly different from that of demyelinating lesions. We report a 49-year-old woman in whom the neurologic and radiologic findings were highly suggestive of a high-grade brain tumor, and the spectroscopic features were sufficiently similar to that of a tumor to convince the neurosurgeon to operate. This case emphasizes the need for caution when confronted with a patient who presents with a differential diagnosis of demyelinating lesion versus neoplasm. (orig.)

  20. The impact of post-genomics approaches in neurodegenerative demyelinating diseases: the case of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Margarita; Mateos-Hernandez, Lourdes; de la Fuente, Jose

    2018-03-14

    Why an autoimmune disease that is the main cause of the acute neuromuscular paralysis worldwide has not yet a well-characterized cause or an effective treatment? The existence of different clinical variants for the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) coupled with the fact that a high number of pathogens can cause an infection that sometimes, but not always, precedes the development of the syndrome, confers a high degree of uncertainty for both prognosis and treatment. In the post-genomic era, the development of omics technologies for the high-throughput analysis of biological molecules is allowing the characterization of biological systems in a degree of depth unimaginable before. In this context, this work summarize the application of post-genomics technologies to the study of GBS. We performed a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature to outline the state of the art with regard the application of post-genomics technologies to the study of GBS. The quality of retrieved papers was assessed using standard tools and thirty-four were included in the review. To date, transcriptomics and proteomics have been the unique post-genomics approaches applied to GBS study. Most of these studies have been performed on cerebrospinal fluid samples and only few studies have been conducted with other samples such as serum, Schwann cells and human peripheral nerve. In the post-genomics era, transcriptomics and proteomics have shown the possibilities that omics technologies can offer for a better understanding of the immunological and pathological mechanisms involved in GBS and the identification of potential biomarkers, but these results have only shown the tip of the iceberg and there is still a long way to exploit the full potential that post-genomics approaches could offer to the study of the GBS. The integration of different omics datasets through a systems biology approach could allow network-based analyses to describe the complexity and

  1. Suppression of immune-mediated liver injury after vaccination with attenuated pathogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yunhua; Wang, Ying; Xu, Lingyun

    2007-05-15

    Cell vaccination via immunization with attenuated pathogenic cells is an effective preventive method that has been successfully applied in several animal models of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis (CIH) is a commonly used experimental model to study immune-mediated liver injury. Multiple cell types including T lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of CIH. In this study, we used attenuated spleen lymphocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes as vaccines to investigate whether they could induce protective immune responses to prevent mice from developing CIH. We found that mice receiving such vaccination before CIH induction developed much milder diseases, exhibited a lower level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) released into their plasma and had less inflammatory lesions in their livers. Such CIH-suppression is dose- and frequency-dependent. The suppressive effect was associated with inhibition of several major inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

  2. Azathioprine reduces the risk of audiometric relapse in immune-mediated hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Castro, Nieves; Gavilanes-Plasencia, Javier; Ramírez-Camacho, Rafael; García-Fernández, Alfredo; García-Berrocal, José Ramón

    2018-03-01

    Current schemes for treatment of immune-mediated hearing loss with sporadic short-course, low-dose corticosteroids, are insufficient. To determine the role of azathioprine in the control of auditory impairment, a longitudinal, observational, descriptive study was performed with 20 patients treated with azathioprine (1.5-2.5mg/kg/day into two doses) for 1year. The loss of 10dB on two consecutive frequencies or 15dB on an isolated frequency was considered as relapse. The mean age of the patients was 52.50years (95%CI: 46.91-58.17), half were women. Bilateral affectation was 65%. 75% had organ specific disease and 25% had systemic autoimmune disease. The difference between baseline PTA (46.49dB; DS18.90) and PTA at 12months (45.47dB; DS18.88) did not reach statistical significance (P=.799). There was a moderate positive correlation between female sex and the presence of systemic disease (R=.577). By applying Student's t for paired data, a significant difference (P=.042) was obtained between the PTA in frequencies up to 1000 Hz (PTA125-1000Hz). The relative incidence rate of relapse per year was .52 relapses/year (95%CI: .19-1.14]). The median time to audiometric relapse-free was 9.70months (DS1.03). Azathioprine maintains the hearing threshold, decreases the risk of relapse, and slows down the rate at which patients relapse, altering the course of immune-mediated inner ear disease. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class......Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can...... be classified according to previously suggested radiologic characteristics and how this classification relates to prognosis. Searching the databases of eight tertiary referral centres we identified 90 adult patients (61 women, 29 men; mean age 34 years) with ≥1 AIIDL. We collected their demographic, clinical...

  4. The Prevalence of Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibody in Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases Presented to a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia: Presentation and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There have been inconsistent reports on the prevalence and pathogenicity of anti-Aquaporin 4 (AQP4 in patients presented with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IIDDs. Objective. To estimate the prevalence of anti-AQP4 antibody in patients with IIDDs presented to University Malaya Medical Centre in terms of patients’ clinical and radiological presentations and prognoses. Methods. Retrospective data review of IIDDs patients presented from 2005 to 2015. Patients were classified into classical multiple sclerosis (CMS, opticospinal (OS presentation, optic neuritis (ON, transverse myelitis (TM, brainstem syndrome (BS, and tumefactive MS. Anti-Aquaporin 4 antibody was tested using the Indirect Immunofluorescence Test (IIFT cell-based assay. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS version 20. Results. Anti-AQP4 antibody was detected in 53% of patients presented with IIDDs. CMS was more common in the seronegative group, 27/47 (57.45%; p<0.001. Conversely, OS involvement was more common in the seropositive group, 26/53 (49.06%; p<0.001. Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs on MRI were also more common in the seropositive group, 29/40 (72.50%; p=0.004. Only 2/40 (5.00% had MRI evidence of patchy or multiple short-segment spinal cord lesions in the AQP4-positive group (p=0.003. The relapse rate and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS were also higher in the seropositive group (5.43 versus 3.17, p=0.005; 4.07 versus 2.51, p=0.006, resp.. Typical clinical presentations that defined NMO were also seen in the seronegative patients, but in a lower frequency. Conclusion. Our cohort of patients had a higher prevalence of seropositivity of anti-AQP4 antibody as compared to those in Western countries. This was also associated with a more typical presentation of opticospinal involvement with LESCLs on MRI, a higher rate of relapse, and EDSS.

  5. Immune-mediated animal models of Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2014-01-01

    An autoimmune diathesis has been proposed in Tourette syndrome (TS) and related neuropsychiatric disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism and anorexia nervosa. Environmental triggers including infection and xenobiotics are hypothesized to lead to the production of brain-directed autoantibodies in a subset of genetically susceptible individuals. Although much work has focused on Group A Streptococcus (GAS), the role of this common childhood infection remains controversial. Animal model studies based on immune and autoantibody findings in TS have demonstrated immunoglobulin (Ig) deposits and stereotypic movements and related behavioral disturbances reminiscent of TS following exposure to GAS and other activators of host anti-microbial responses, soluble immune mediators and anti-GAS or anti-neuronal antibodies. Demonstration of the ability to recreate these abnormalities through passive transfer of serum IgG from GAS-immunized mice into naïve mice and abrogation of this activity through depletion of IgG has provided compelling evidence in support of the autoimmune hypothesis. Immunologically-based animal models of TS are a potent tool for dissecting the pathogenesis of this serious neuropsychiatric syndrome. PMID:23313649

  6. The Role of Histone Demethylase Jmjd3 in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0055 TITLE: The Role of Histone Demethylase Jmjd3 in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yi...Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0055 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Yi Zhang 5d... anemia (AA) is a condition of bone marrow failure (BMF) characterized by blood pancytopenia and BM hypoplasia. In most cases, AA is an immune-mediated

  7. The Protective Effects of Extra Virgin Olive Oil on Immune-mediated Inflammatory Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Rosa; Estruch, Ramon; Sacanella, Emilio

    2018-01-01

    The increasing interest in the Mediterranean diet (MeDiet) hinges on the relevant role it plays in inflammatory diseases. Several clinical, epidemiological and experimental evidences suggest that consumption of the MeDiet reduces the incidence of certain pathologies related to oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and immune system diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). These reductions can be partially attributed to extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) consumption which has been described as a key bioactive food because of its high nutritional quality and its particular composition of fatty acids, vitamins and polyphenols. Indeed, the beneficial effects of EVOO have been linked to its fatty acid composition, which is very rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and has moderate saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The current knowledge available on the beneficial effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds, specifically its biological properties and antioxidant capacity against immune-mediated inflammatory responses (atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, obesity, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease or neurodegenerative disease, among others) in addition to its potential clinical applications. The increasing body of studies carried out provides compelling evidence that olive polyphenols are potential candidates to combat chronic inflammatory states. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, H K; Das, D; Doley, R; Sahu, P P

    2016-03-02

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  10. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  11. Analysis of relationship between demyelinating lesions and myelin basic protein in pancreatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Boru

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic encephalopathy (PE is one of the severe complications of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. Early diagnosis mostly depends on the history of disease as well as clinical symptoms and signs. PE progresses rapidly and is often complicated by multiple organ dysfunction, and it may finally develop into multiple organ failure with a high fatality rate if not treated in time. It is currently known that demyelination is one of the important pathological features of this disease, with fat-soluble demyelination of cerebral gray matter and white matter, as well as inflammatory changes such as hemorrhage and edema. The target antigen of demyelinating lesions, however, is myelin basic protein (MBP. This paper reviews the changes in MBP levels in the demyelinating lesions of the central nervous system among PE patients, with the purpose of providing clues for the early diagnosis and prognostic study of demyelinating lesions in PE.

  12. Blood-brain barrier hyperpermeability precedes demyelination in the cuprizone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, Stefan A; Düking, Tim; Spieth, Lena; Winchenbach, Jan; Stumpf, Sina K; Gerndt, Nina; Kusch, Kathrin; Ruhwedel, Torben; Möbius, Wiebke; Saher, Gesine

    2017-12-01

    In neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis, the physiological function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is perturbed, particularly in demyelinating lesions and supposedly secondary to acute demyelinating pathology. Using the toxic non-inflammatory cuprizone model of demyelination, we demonstrate, however, that the onset of persistent BBB impairment precedes demyelination. In addition to a direct effect of cuprizone on endothelial cells, a plethora of inflammatory mediators, which are mainly of astroglial origin during the initial disease phase, likely contribute to the destabilization of endothelial barrier function in vivo. Our study reveals that, at different time points of pathology and in different CNS regions, the level of gliosis correlates with the extent of BBB hyperpermeability and edema. Furthermore, in mutant mice with abolished type 3 CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR3) signaling, inflammatory responses are dampened and BBB dysfunction ameliorated. Together, these data have implications for understanding the role of BBB permeability in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease.

  13. Influence of type I IFN signaling on anti-MOG antibody-mediated demyelination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Carsten Tue; Khorooshi, Reza M. H.; Asgari, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibodies with specificity for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) are implicated in multiple sclerosis and related diseases. The pathogenic importance of anti-MOG antibody in primary demyelinating pathology remains poorly characterized. Objective The objective of this study...... is to investigate whether administration of anti-MOG antibody would be sufficient for demyelination and to determine if type I interferon (IFN) signaling plays a similar role in anti-MOG antibody-mediated pathology, as has been shown for neuromyelitis optica-like pathology. Methods Purified IgG2a monoclonal anti...... demyelination in wild-type and IFNAR1-KO mice. Conclusions Anti-MOG antibody and complement was sufficient to induce callosal demyelination, and pathology was dependent on type I IFN. Induction of EAE in IFNAR1-KO mice overcame the dependence on type I IFN for anti-MOG and complement-mediated demyelination....

  14. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  15. Lack of collagen XVIII/endostatin exacerbates immune-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Yuki; Okude, Takashi; Shirai, Ryota; Sato, Ikumi; Kimura, Ryota; Ogawa, Makoto; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Yokosuka, Osamu; Kalluri, Raghu; Ueda, Shiro

    2010-09-01

    Collagen XVIII is a component of the highly specialized extracellular matrix associated with basement membranes of epithelia and endothelia. In the normal kidney, collagen XVIII is distributed throughout glomerular and tubular basement membranes, mesangial matrix, and Bowman's capsule. Proteolytic cleavage within its C-terminal domain releases the fragment endostatin, which has antiangiogenic properties. Because damage to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) accompanies immune-mediated renal injury, we investigated the role of collagen XVIII/endostatin in this disorder. We induced anti-GBM glomerulonephritis in collagen XVIII alpha1-null and wild-type mice and compared the resulting matrix accumulation, inflammation, and capillary rarefaction. Anti-GBM disease upregulated collagen XVIII/endostatin expression within the GBM and Bowman's capsule of wild-type mice. Collagen XVIII/endostatin-deficient mice developed more severe glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury than wild-type mice. Collagen XVIII/endostatin deficiency altered matrix remodeling, enhanced the inflammatory response, and promoted capillary rarefaction and vascular endothelial cell damage, but did not affect endothelial proliferation. Supplementing collagen XVIII-deficient mice with exogenous endostatin did not affect the progression of anti-GBM disease. Taken together, these results suggest that collagen XVIII/endostatin preserves the integrity of the extracellular matrix and capillaries in the kidney, protecting against progressive glomerulonephritis.

  16. Alteration of synaptic connectivity of oligodendrocyte precursor cells following demyelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahel, Aurélia; Ortiz, Fernando C.; Kerninon, Christophe; Maldonado, Paloma P.; Angulo, María Cecilia; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are a major source of remyelinating oligodendrocytes in demyelinating diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While OPCs are innervated by unmyelinated axons in the normal brain, the fate of such synaptic contacts after demyelination is still unclear. By combining electrophysiology and immunostainings in different transgenic mice expressing fluorescent reporters, we studied the synaptic innervation of OPCs in the model of lysolecithin (LPC)-induced demyelination of corpus callosum. Synaptic innervation of reactivated OPCs in the lesion was revealed by the presence of AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, VGluT1+ axon-OPC contacts in 3D confocal reconstructions and synaptic junctions observed by electron microscopy. Moreover, 3D confocal reconstructions of VGluT1 and NG2 immunolabeling showed the existence of glutamatergic axon-OPC contacts in post-mortem MS lesions. Interestingly, patch-clamp recordings in LPC-induced lesions demonstrated a drastic decrease in spontaneous synaptic activity of OPCs early after demyelination that was not caused by an impaired conduction of compound action potentials. A reduction in synaptic connectivity was confirmed by the lack of VGluT1+ axon-OPC contacts in virtually all rapidly proliferating OPCs stained with EdU (50-ethynyl-20-deoxyuridine). At the end of the massive proliferation phase in lesions, the proportion of innervated OPCs rapidly recovers, although the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents did not reach control levels. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that newly-generated OPCs do not receive synaptic inputs during their active proliferation after demyelination, but gain synapses during the remyelination process. Hence, glutamatergic synaptic inputs may contribute to inhibit OPC proliferation and might have a physiopathological relevance in demyelinating disorders. PMID:25852473

  17. Neuromyelitis optica-IgG testing in an Indian cohort with neuromyelitis optica and related demyelinating disorders: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan Unni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system with a predilection for the optic nerves and the spinal cord. Immunopathological evidence suggests that the target antigen of the disease is aquaporin-4. An IgG antibody against this protein has been explored as a molecular marker for the disease and as a diagnostic tool due to its high sensitivity and specificity in various populations. Objective: To assess the value of NMO-IgG testing in Indian patients with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features consistent with NMO and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features consistent with NMO, LETM, and MS were tested for serum NMO-IgG. Of these patients, 22 patients satisfied revised (2006 Wingerchuk criteria for NMO (excluding NMO-IgG status and 11 patients had LETM. Twelve patients satisfied the revised (2010 McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS. Results: Of the 21 patients, satisfying the criteria for NMO and for whom the test results were available, 17 were positive for NMO-IgG (80.9%, and of the 11 patients having LETM, 6 (54.5% were positive for NMO-IgG. In one patient with NMO, the test result was not available. None of the 12 patients satisfying McDonald criteria for MS showed NMO-IgG seropositivity. Conclusion: Our study suggests that it is worthwhile to pursue NMO-IgG testing as a diagnostic tool for patients with clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI features consistent with NMO and LETM in the Indian population.

  18. Nodular Scleritis Associated with Herpes Zoster Virus: An Infectious and Immune-Mediated Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Loureiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe a case of anterior nodular scleritis, preceded by an anterior hypertensive uveitis, which was primarily caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV. Case Report. A 54-year-old woman presented with anterior uveitis of the right eye presumably caused by herpetic viral disease and was successfully treated. Two months later, she developed a nodular scleritis and started oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory without effect. A complete laboratory workup revealed positivity for HLA-B27; the infectious workup was negative. Therapy was changed to oral prednisolone and an incomplete improvement occurred. Therefore, a diagnostic anterior paracentesis was performed and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis revealed VZV. She was treated with valacyclovir and the oral prednisolone began to decrease; however, a marked worsening of the scleritis occurred with the reduction of the daily dose; subsequently, methotrexate was introduced allowing the suspension of the prednisolone and led to clinical resolution of the scleritis. Conclusion. This report of anterior nodular scleritis caused by VZV argues in favor of an underlying immune-mediated component, requiring immunosuppressive therapy for clinical resolution. The PCR analysis of the aqueous humor was revealed to be a valuable technique and should be considered in cases of scleritis with poor response to treatment.

  19. Immune-mediated keratoconjunctivitis sicca in dogs: current perspectives on management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodi PL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pier Luigi Dodi Department of Veterinary Medicine Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy Abstract: Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS is a frequent canine ophthalmic disease, resulting from the deficiency of one or more elements in the precorneal tear film. There are different known causes of KCS in dogs, including congenital, metabolic, infectious, drug induced, neurogenic, radiation, iatrogenic, idiopathic, and immune mediated, though the last one is the most prevalent form in dogs. Initially, clinical signs of KCS include blepharospasm caused by ocular pain, mucoid to mucopurulent ocular discharge, and conjunctival hyperemia; secondary bacterial infection may also occur, with chronicity, corneal epithelial hyperplasia, pigmentation, neovascularization, and corneal ulceration. The diagnosis of KCS is based on the presence of consistent clinical signs and measurement of decreased aqueous tear production using the Schirmer tear test. Therapy is based on administering the following topical drugs: ocular lubricant, mucolytics, antibiotics, corticosteroids, pilocarpine, and immunomodulators. These last drugs (eg, cyclosporine, pimecrolimus, and tacrolimus have immunosuppressive activity and stimulate tear production. Furthermore, the nerve growth factor is a new subject matter of the research. Although these therapies are advantageous, stimulation of natural tear production seems to provide the highest recovery in clinical signs and prevention of vision loss. The goal of the following article is to describe the recent developments about KCS in dogs emphasizing the use of new therapies. Keywords: dogs, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, treatment, NGF

  20. [Local demyelination in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R

    2013-02-01

    It is well known that the demyelination of peripheral nerves can be diffuse or local. Pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflamentary demyelination polyneurophathy is based on diffuse demyelination. Local demyelination occured by conduction block with electoneuromyographic (ENMG) researches. It is the main characteristic of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Generally it is considered, that conduction block is not usual for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). More over, its existance excludes this diagnosis. The article discribes 3 cases of ALS with conduction block verified with ENMG researches. Article also deals with pathogenetic mechanisms of conduction block in ALS and MMN. In addition it observes the issues of differential diagnosis between ALS and MMW.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin analysis in neuropediatric patients: establishment of a new cut off-value for the identification of inflammatory-immune mediated processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Molero-Luis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A high level of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF neopterin is a marker of central nervous system inflammatory-immune mediated processes. We aimed to assess data from 606 neuropediatric patients, describing the clinical and biochemical features of those neurological disorders presenting CSF neopterin values above a new cut-off value that was defined in our laboratory. METHODS: To establish the new CSF neopterin cut-off value, we studied two groups of patients: Group 1 comprised 68 patients with meningoencephalitis, and Group 2 comprised 52 children with a confirmed peripheral infection and no central nervous system involvement. We studied 606 CSF samples from neuropediatric patients who were classified into 3 groups: genetic diagnosis (A, acquired/unknown etiologic neurologic diseases (B and inflammatory-immune mediated processes (C. RESULTS: The CSF neopterin cut-off value was 61 nmol/L. Out of 606 cases, 56 presented a CSF neopterin level above this value. Group C had significantly higher CSF neopterin, protein and leukocyte values than the other groups. Sixteen of twenty-three patients in this group had a CSF neopterin level above the cut-off, whereas three and seven patients presented increased leukocyte and protein values, respectively. A significant association was found among CSF neopterin, proteins and leukocytes in the 606 patients. White matter disturbances were associated with high CSF neopterin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Although children with inflammatory-immune mediated processes presented higher CSF neopterin values, patients with other neurological disorders also showed increased CSF neopterin concentrations. These results stress the importance of CSF neopterin analysis for the identification of inflammatory-immune mediated processes.

  2. Is distal motor and/or sensory demyelination a distinctive feature of anti-MAG neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Ribrag, Vincent; Adams, David; Brisset, Marion; Vignon, Marguerite; Baron, Marine; Malphettes, Marion; Theaudin, Marie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    To report the frequency of the different patterns of sensory and motor electrophysiological demyelination distribution in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy in comparison with patients with IgM neuropathy without MAG reactivity (IgM-NP). Thirty-five anti-MAG patients at early disease stage (20.1 months) were compared to 23 patients with IgM-NP; 21 CIDP patients and 13 patients with CMT1a neuropathy were used as gold standard neuropathies with multifocal and homogeneous demyelination, respectively. In all groups, standard motor and sensory electrophysiological parameters, terminal latency index and modified F ratio were investigated. Motor electrophysiological demyelination was divided in four profiles: distal, homogeneous, proximal, and proximo-distal. Distal sensory and sensorimotor demyelination were evaluated. Anti-MAG neuropathy is a demyelinating neuropathy in 91 % of cases. In the upper limbs, reduced TLI is more frequent in anti-MAG neuropathy, compared to IgM-NP. But, predominant distal demyelination of the median nerve is encountered in only 43 % of anti-MAG neuropathy and is also common in IgM-NP (35 %). Homogeneous demyelination was the second most frequent pattern (31 %). Concordance of electrophysiological profiles across motor nerves trunks is low and median nerve is the main site of distal motor conduction slowing. Reduced sensory conduction velocities occurs in 14 % of patients without evidence of predominant distal slowing. Simultaneous sensory and motor distal slowing was more common in the median nerve of anti-MAG neuropathy than IgM-NP. Electrophysiological distal motor demyelination and sensory demyelination are not a distinctive feature of anti-MAG reactivity. In anti-MAG neuropathy it is mainly found in the median nerve suggesting a frequent nerve compression at wrist.

  3. A case of non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia treated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 12-year-old female Shih Tzu dog was referred with diarrhea. Hematological examination indicated severe nonregenerative anemia. Bone marrow aspiration smears and core biopsy specimens revealed normal bone marrow. Based on those results, non-regenerative immune mediated anemia was diagnosed. The dog ...

  4. High intravascular tissue factor expression in dogs with idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.; Brinkhof, B.; Teske, E.; Rothuizen, J.; Dekker, A.; Penning, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    A high mortality occurs in dogs with idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA) during the first 2 weeks after the diagnosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response and coagulation abnormalities in dogs with IMHA in relation to the prognosis and to establish the

  5. Effects of aquatic exercises in a rat model of brainstem demyelination with ethidium bromide on the beam walking test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Cíntia Cristina Souza; Bondan, Eduardo Fernandes; Alouche, Sandra Regina

    2009-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with varied levels of disability. The impact of early physiotherapeutic interventions in the disease progression is unknown. We used an experimental model of demyelination with the gliotoxic agent ethidium bromide and early aquatic exercises to evaluate the motor performance of the animals. We quantified the number of footsteps and errors during the beam walking test. The demyelinated animals walked fewer steps with a greater number of errors than the control group. The demyelinated animals that performed aquatic exercises presented a better motor performance than those that did not exercise. Therefore aquatic exercising was beneficial to the motor performance of rats in this experimental model of demyelination.

  6. Treatment of immune-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy with GAD antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malter, M P; Frisch, C; Zeitler, H; Surges, R; Urbach, H; Helmstaedter, C; Elger, C E; Bien, C G

    2015-08-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy with antibodies (abs) against the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 isoform (GAD-TLE) is known as an immune-mediated neurological syndrome. Here we evaluate the therapy response to various immunotherapies and epilepsy surgery in this syndrome. All patients with GAD-TLE and follow-up data and stored serum and CSF samples, identified and treated at the Bonn centre from 2002 to 2010, were studied retrospectively. Seizure freedom for ≥1 year and reduction of ≥50%, i.e. therapy response, were assessed. GAD-ab titres and neuropsychological performances were documented prior and after individual interventions. Thirteen patients with GAD-TLE were identified with the following seizure responses: corticosteroids (5 responders out of 11 treated patients); i.v. immunoglobulins (1/5), apheresis therapy (1/8); and natalizumab (1/1), selective amygdala-hippocampectomy (2/3). None of the patients achieved sustained seizure freedom apart from one patient. This patient was on antiepileptic drug treatment after discontinuation of immunotherapy. The seizure response to immunotherapies in patients with GAD-TLE was poor. Corticosteroids were the most effective regarding seizure response. Especially the poor effects of apheresis therapies support the idea that GAD-abs are not directly pathogenic. None of three patients was seizure-free after temporal lobe surgery suggesting that GAD-TLE patients respond worse than others to this type of intervention. Our results reflect the chronic course of the disease with low likelihood for patients with GAD-TLE to attain long-term seizure freedom. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiology of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy abroad and in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Popova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current article provides an overview of the results of epidemiological studies of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP in Russia and abroad. It is shown that the prevalence of CIDP is different in countries, due to the use of different diagnostic criteria. It should be noted that the reliability of epidemiological prevalence and incidence is affected by difficulties of diagnosis of atypical forms of the disease.

  8. Interleukin-10 overexpression promotes Fas-ligand-dependent chronic macrophage-mediated demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dru S Dace

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Demyelinating polyneuropathy is a debilitating, poorly understood disease that can exist in acute (Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic forms. Interleukin-10 (IL-10, although traditionally considered an anti-inflammatory cytokine, has also been implicated in promoting abnormal angiogenesis in the eye and in the pathobiology of autoimmune diseases such as lupus and encephalomyelitis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overexpression of IL-10 in a transgenic mouse model leads to macrophage-mediated demyelinating polyneuropathy. IL-10 upregulates ICAM-1 within neural tissues, promoting massive macrophage influx, inflammation-induced demyelination, and subsequent loss of neural tissue resulting in muscle weakness and paralysis. The primary insult is to perineural myelin followed by secondary axonal loss. Infiltrating macrophages within the peripheral nerves demonstrate a highly pro-inflammatory signature. Macrophages are central players in the pathophysiology, as in vivo depletion of macrophages using clodronate liposomes reverses the phenotype, including progressive nerve loss and paralysis. Macrophage-mediate demyelination is dependent on Fas-ligand (FasL-mediated Schwann cell death. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings mimic the human disease chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP and may also promote further understanding of the pathobiology of related conditions such as acute idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP or Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  9. Diagnostic criteria of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, I; Hellman, M A; Steiner, I

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of co-association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) has long been a focus of interest as well as of clinical significance. As CIDP is a potentially treatable condition, it is diagnosis in the context of DM is of great importance. However, diagnostic criteria to identify CIDP in patients with diabetes are not available. We propose a diagnostic tool that should help clinicians to decide what is the probability that a patient with diabetes might have CIDP. We list several clinical, electrophysiological, and laboratory parameters that, when combined, have the power of discriminating an immune-mediated neuropathy in patients with DM. By summing the points assigned to each of these parameters, we define four levels of probability for a patient with diabetes to have CIDP. To analyze the validity of the diagnostic toll, we applied it in three different patient populations: (i) Patients with diabetes with peripheral neuropathy, (ii) Patients with CIDP without DM, and (iii) Patients with diabetes with CIDP. The scores of patients with diabetes without CIDP ranged from -7 to 2, while those of patients with DM-CIDP ranged from 2 to 20. The scores of non-diabetic patients with CIDP were similar to those of patients with DM-CIDP and ranged from 6 to 16. The mean score of patients with DM-CIDP was 9.083, while the score of patients with CIDP was 11.16 and that of patients with diabetic polyneuropathy was -3.59. These results show that this diagnostic tool is able to identify patients with diabetes with overlapping CIDP. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Central Nervous System Demyelination and Remyelination is Independent from Systemic Cholesterol Level in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, Barbara B; Sun, Wenhui; Brogden, Graham; Sun, Yanyong; Kammeyer, Patricia; Kalkuhl, Arno; Colbatzky, Florian; Deschl, Ulrich; Naim, Hassan Y; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    High dietary fat and/or cholesterol intake is a risk factor for multiple diseases and has been debated for multiple sclerosis. However, cholesterol biosynthesis is a key pathway during myelination and disturbances are described in demyelinating diseases. To address the possible interaction of dyslipidemia and demyelination, cholesterol biosynthesis gene expression, composition of the body's major lipid repositories and Paigen diet-induced, systemic hypercholesterolemia were examined in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME) using histology, immunohistochemistry, serum clinical chemistry, microarrays and high-performance thin layer chromatography. TME-virus (TMEV)-infected mice showed progressive loss of motor performance and demyelinating leukomyelitis. Gene expression associated with cholesterol biosynthesis was overall down-regulated in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. Spinal cord levels of galactocerebroside and sphingomyelin were reduced on day 196 post TMEV infection. Paigen diet induced serum hypercholesterolemia and hepatic lipidosis. However, high dietary fat and cholesterol intake led to no significant differences in clinical course, inflammatory response, astrocytosis, and the amount of demyelination and remyelination in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. The results suggest that down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis is a transcriptional marker for demyelination, quantitative loss of myelin-specific lipids, but not cholesterol occurs late in chronic demyelination, and serum hypercholesterolemia exhibited no significant effect on TMEV infection. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  11. Spinal cord demyelination combined with hyperhomocysteinemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao MM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Meimei Hao, Yan Zhang, Shuangxing Hou, Yanling Chen, Ming Shi, Gang Zhao, Yanchun Deng Department of Neurology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy has been recognized as an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease. Here we report a patient who suffered from spinal cord demyelination combined with HHcy. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of acute myelitis. However, hormone therapy was ineffective. Further investigations revealed that he had HHcy and a homozygous mutation of the gene encoding methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR c.677C>T, which is a key enzyme involved in homocysteine metabolism. In view of these findings, we treated the patient with B vitamins and his symptoms gradually improved. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging performed 3 months after onset showed near recovery of the lesion. To our knowledge, similar reports are rare. Keywords: demyelination, hyperhomocysteinemia, homocysteine, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, methylation

  12. Leptin as immune mediator: Interaction between neuroendocrine and immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Initially described as an anti-obesity hormone, leptin has subsequently been shown to exert pleiotropic effects, being also able to influence haematopoiesis, thermogenesis, reproduction, angiogenesis, and more importantly immune homeostasis. As a cytokine, leptin can affect both innate and adaptive immunity, by inducing a pro-inflammatory response and thus playing a key role in the regulation of the pathogenesis of several autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances on the role of leptin as immune-modulator in mammals and we also provide an overview on its main functions in non-mammalian vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extra pontine osmotic demyelination syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunga, Pervaiz M; Farooq, Omar; Dar, Mohd I; Dar, Ishrat H; Rashid, Samia; Rather, Abdul Q; Basu, Javid A; Ashraf, Mohammed; Bhat, Jahangeer A

    2015-01-01

    The osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) has been identified as a complication of the rapid correction of hyponatremia for decades. However, in recent years, a variety of other medical conditions have been associated with the development of ODS, independent of changes in serum sodium which cause a rapid changes in osmolality of the interstitial (extracellular) compartment of the brain leading to dehydration of energy-depleted cells with subsequent axonal damage that occurs in characteristic areas. Slow correction of the serum sodium concentration and additional administration of corticosteroids seems to be a major prevention step in ODS patients. In the current report we aimed to share a rare case which we observed in our hospital. A 65 year old female admitted as altered sensorium with history of vomiting, diarrhea was managed with intravenous fluids for 2 days at a peripheral health centre. Patient was referred to our centre with encephalopathy, evaluated and found to have hyponatremia and hypokalemia rest of biochemical parameters and septic profile were normal. Patient's electrolyte disturbances were managed as per guidelines but encephalopathy persisted. Supportive treatment was continued and patient was discharged after 2 wks of stay in hospital after gaining full sensorium and neurological functions.

  14. Vesicular trafficking of immune mediators in human eosinophils revealed by immunoelectron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Rossana C.N., E-mail: rossana.melo@ufjf.edu.br [Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, ICB, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, UFJF, Rua José Lourenço Kelmer, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, CLS 943, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Weller, Peter F. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, CLS 943, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Electron microscopy (EM)-based techniques are mostly responsible for our current view of cell morphology at the subcellular level and continue to play an essential role in biological research. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, EM has helped to understand how cells package and release mediators involved in immune responses. Ultrastructural investigations of human eosinophils enabled visualization of secretory processes in detail and identification of a robust, vesicular trafficking essential for the secretion of immune mediators via a non-classical secretory pathway associated with secretory (specific) granules. This vesicular system is mainly organized as large tubular-vesicular carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles – EoSVs) actively formed in response to cell activation and provides a sophisticated structural mechanism for delivery of granule-stored mediators. In this review, we highlight the application of EM techniques to recognize pools of immune mediators at vesicular compartments and to understand the complex secretory pathway within human eosinophils involved in inflammatory and allergic responses. - Highlights: • Application of EM to understand the complex secretory pathway in human eosinophils. • EM techniques reveal an active vesicular system associated with secretory granules. • Tubular vesicles are involved in the transport of granule-derived immune mediators.

  15. Vesicular trafficking of immune mediators in human eosinophils revealed by immunoelectron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Rossana C.N.; Weller, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM)-based techniques are mostly responsible for our current view of cell morphology at the subcellular level and continue to play an essential role in biological research. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, EM has helped to understand how cells package and release mediators involved in immune responses. Ultrastructural investigations of human eosinophils enabled visualization of secretory processes in detail and identification of a robust, vesicular trafficking essential for the secretion of immune mediators via a non-classical secretory pathway associated with secretory (specific) granules. This vesicular system is mainly organized as large tubular-vesicular carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles – EoSVs) actively formed in response to cell activation and provides a sophisticated structural mechanism for delivery of granule-stored mediators. In this review, we highlight the application of EM techniques to recognize pools of immune mediators at vesicular compartments and to understand the complex secretory pathway within human eosinophils involved in inflammatory and allergic responses. - Highlights: • Application of EM to understand the complex secretory pathway in human eosinophils. • EM techniques reveal an active vesicular system associated with secretory granules. • Tubular vesicles are involved in the transport of granule-derived immune mediators.

  16. Acute putaminal necrosis and white matter demyelination in a child with subnormal copper metabolism in Wilson disease: MR imaging and spectroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Yu.; Chin, Shy-Chy; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chu, Hsin; Zimmerman, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) that manifests solely with acute and severe neurological damage in the absence of hepatic disease and Kayser-Fleischer ring of the cornea is rare and difficult to diagnose at the acute setting. This report describes unusual diffusion and proton spectroscopic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in a 12-year-old boy with WD who presented with hemichorea and subnormal copper metabolism. The MR imaging findings of lactate accumulation, decrease of N-acerylaspartate/creatinine (NAA/Cr) ratio and markedly increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the asymmetrical edematous putaminal lesions in the early stage were suggestive of acute necrosis with anaerobic metabolism of glucose leading to poor clinical outcome at follow-up. (orig.)

  17. Acute putaminal necrosis and white matter demyelination in a child with subnormal copper metabolism in Wilson disease: MR imaging and spectroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [National Taiwan University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Taipei (Taiwan); Tri-Service General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Chen, Cheng-Yu.; Chin, Shy-Chy; Hsueh, Chun-Jen [Tri-Service General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Liu, Yi-Jui [Feng Chia University, Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Taichung (Taiwan); Chu, Hsin [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Taipei (Taiwan); Zimmerman, Robert A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Wilson disease (WD) that manifests solely with acute and severe neurological damage in the absence of hepatic disease and Kayser-Fleischer ring of the cornea is rare and difficult to diagnose at the acute setting. This report describes unusual diffusion and proton spectroscopic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in a 12-year-old boy with WD who presented with hemichorea and subnormal copper metabolism. The MR imaging findings of lactate accumulation, decrease of N-acerylaspartate/creatinine (NAA/Cr) ratio and markedly increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the asymmetrical edematous putaminal lesions in the early stage were suggestive of acute necrosis with anaerobic metabolism of glucose leading to poor clinical outcome at follow-up. (orig.)

  18. Dietary cholesterol promotes repair of demyelinated lesions in the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, Stefan A; Gerndt, Nina; Winchenbach, Jan; Stumpf, Sina K; Hosang, Leon; Odoardi, Francesca; Ruhwedel, Torben; Böhler, Carolin; Barrette, Benoit; Stassart, Ruth; Liebetanz, David; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Edgar, Julia M; Saher, Gesine

    2017-01-24

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder in which remyelination failure contributes to persistent disability. Cholesterol is rate-limiting for myelin biogenesis in the developing CNS; however, whether cholesterol insufficiency contributes to remyelination failure in MS, is unclear. Here, we show the relationship between cholesterol, myelination and neurological parameters in mouse models of demyelination and remyelination. In the cuprizone model, acute disease reduces serum cholesterol levels that can be restored by dietary cholesterol. Concomitant with blood-brain barrier impairment, supplemented cholesterol directly supports oligodendrocyte precursor proliferation and differentiation, and restores the balance of growth factors, creating a permissive environment for repair. This leads to attenuated axon damage, enhanced remyelination and improved motor learning. Remarkably, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, cholesterol supplementation does not exacerbate disease expression. These findings emphasize the safety of dietary cholesterol in inflammatory diseases and point to a previously unrecognized role of cholesterol in promoting repair after demyelinating episodes.

  19. Genetic Associations in Acquired Immune-Mediated Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes: Insights in Aplastic Anemia and Chronic Idiopathic Neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudi, Irene; Papadaki, Helen A.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing interest on the field of autoimmune diseases has unveiled a plethora of genetic factors that predispose to these diseases. However, in immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes, such as acquired aplastic anemia and chronic idiopathic neutropenia, in which the pathophysiology results from a myelosuppressive bone marrow microenvironment mainly due to the presence of activated T lymphocytes, leading to the accelerated apoptotic death of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, such genetic associations have been very limited. Various alleles and haplotypes of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules have been implicated in the predisposition of developing the above diseases, as well as polymorphisms of inhibitory cytokines such as interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β1 along with polymorphisms on molecules of the immune system including the T-bet transcription factor and signal transducers and activators of transcription. In some cases, specific polymorphisms have been implicated in the outcome of treatment on those patients. PMID:22956967

  20. A rare presentation of atypical demyelination: tumefactive multiple sclerosis causing Gerstmann’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are a rare manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Differential diagnosis of such space occupying lesions may not be straightforward and sometimes necessitate brain biopsy. Impaired cognition is the second most common clinical manifestation of tumefactive MS; however complex cognitive syndromes are unusual. Case presentation We report the case of a 30 year old woman who presented with Gerstmann’s syndrome. MRI revealed a large heterogeneous contrast enhancing lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. Intravenous corticosteroids did not stop disease progression. A tumour or cerebral lymphoma was suspected, however brain biopsy confirmed inflammatory demyelination. Following diagnosis of tumefactive MS treatment with natalizumab effectively suppressed disease activity. Conclusions The case highlights the need for clinicians, radiologists and surgeons to appreciate the heterogeneous presentation of tumefactive MS. Early brain biopsy facilitates rapid diagnosis and management. Treatment with natalizumab may be useful in cases of tumefactive demyelination where additional evidence supports a diagnosis of relapsing MS. PMID:24694183

  1. A Case of Paraneoplastic Demyelinating Motor Polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Mostoufizadeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is commonly accompanied by cancer but demyelinating ones are not commonly reported. We report the clinical, neurophysiological, and biological characteristics of an 82-year-old patient who presented with a demyelinating motor neuropathy and high titre of anti-ganglioside antibodies associated with oesophageal cancer. The neurological course worsened rapidly despite immunotherapy, leading to a bedridden status. We propose to suspect a paraneoplastic origin in older patients or when the clinical course progresses rapidly within a few weeks or months.

  2. Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy : Immunoglobulin And Immune Complex Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shripad A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM and immune complexes IgG (IcG were measured in 58 cases of acute inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, popularly known as Guillian Barre′ syndrome, and in 30 healthy controls using single radial immunodiffusion assay. Immunoglobulin and immune complex levels were significantly elevated in patients as compared to controls. The increased levels of immunoglobulins and immune complexes may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease and provide rationale for therapeutic plasmapheresis.

  3. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing...... only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn). Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) knockout (KO) of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast...

  4. Creatine Enhances Mitochondrial-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Survival After Demyelinating Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Kelly A; Chapey, Kristen S; Nanescu, Sonia E; Huang, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-08

    Chronic oligodendrocyte loss, which occurs in the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS), contributes to axonal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Current therapies are able to reduce MS severity, but do not prevent transition into the progressive phase of the disease, which is characterized by chronic neurodegeneration. Therefore, pharmacological compounds that promote oligodendrocyte survival could be beneficial for neuroprotection in MS. Here, we investigated the role of creatine, an organic acid involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) buffering, in oligodendrocyte function. We found that creatine increased mitochondrial ATP production directly in oligodendrocyte lineage cell cultures and exerted robust protection on oligodendrocytes by preventing cell death in both naive and lipopolysaccharide-treated mixed glia. Moreover, lysolecithin-mediated demyelination in mice deficient in the creatine-synthesizing enzyme guanidinoacetate-methyltransferase ( Gamt ) did not affect oligodendrocyte precursor cell recruitment, but resulted in exacerbated apoptosis of regenerated oligodendrocytes in central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Remarkably, creatine administration into Gamt -deficient and wild-type mice with demyelinating injury reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, thereby increasing oligodendrocyte density and myelin basic protein staining in CNS lesions. We found that creatine did not affect the recruitment of macrophages/microglia into lesions, suggesting that creatine affects oligodendrocyte survival independently of inflammation. Together, our results demonstrate a novel function for creatine in promoting oligodendrocyte viability during CNS remyelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We report that creatine enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and protects against caspase-dependent oligodendrocyte apoptosis during CNS remyelination. This work has important implications for the development of therapeutic targets for diseases characterized by

  5. Extracellular Calcium Dictates Onset, Severity, and Recovery of Diarrhea in a Child with Immune-Mediated Enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathan Fraebel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea causes monovalent and divalent ion losses that can influence clinical outcome. Unlike the losses of monovalent ions, such as Na+, K+, Cl−, and HCO3−, which are generally large in quantity (osmoles and therefore determine the severity of diarrhea, the losses of divalent ions are relatively small in osmoles and are often overlooked during diarrheal treatment. Studies now suggest that despite divalent ions being small in osmoles, their effects are large due to the presence of divalent ion-sensing receptors and their amplifying effects in the gut. As a result, losses of these divalent ions without prompt replacement could also significantly affect the onset, severity, and/or recovery of diarrheal disease. Herein, we report a case of a malnourished child with an immune-mediated enteropathy who developed episodes of “breakthrough” diarrhea with concurrent hypocalcemia while on appropriate immunotherapy. Interestingly, during these periods of diarrhea, stool volume fluctuated with levels of blood Ca2+. When Ca2+ was low, diarrhea occurred; when Ca2+ levels normalized with replacement, diarrhea stopped. Based on this and other observations, a broader question arises as to whether the Ca2+ lost in diarrhea should be replaced promptly in these patients.

  6. Golimumab as Rescue Therapy for Refractory Immune-Mediated Uveitis: A Three-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cordero-Coma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate, in three Spanish tertiary referral centres, the short-term safety and efficacy of golimumab (GLM for treatment of immune-mediated uveitis resistant to previous immunosuppressive therapy. Methods. Nonrandomized retrospective interventional case series. Thirteen patients with different types of uveitis that were resistant to treatment with at least 2 previous immunosuppressors were included in this study. All included patients were treated with GLM (50 mg every four weeks during at least 6 months. Clinical evaluation and treatment-related side effects were assessed at least four times in all included patients. Results. Eight men and 5 women (22 affected eyes with a median age of 30 years (range 20–38 and active immune-mediated uveitides were studied. GLM was used in combination with conventional immunosuppressors in 7 patients (53.8%. GLM therapy achieved complete control of inflammation in 12/13 patients (92.3% after six months of treatment. There was a statistically significant improvement in mean BCVA (0.60 versus 0.68, P=0.009 and mean 1 mm central retinal thickness (317 versus 261.2 μ, P=0.05 at the six-month endpoint when compared to basal values. No major systemic adverse effects associated with GLM therapy were observed. Conclusions. GLM is a new and promising therapeutic option for patients with severe and refractory uveitis.

  7. Analysis of audiometric relapse-free survival in patients with immune-mediated hearing loss exclusively treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Castro, Nieves; García-Chilleron, Raimon; Gavilanes-Plasencia, Javier; Ramírez-Camacho, Rafael; García-Fernández, Alfredo; García-Berrocal, José Ramón

    2017-10-12

    To describe the results in terms of audiometric relapse-free survival and relapse rate in immunomediated hearing loss patients treated exclusively with corticosteroids. Retrospective study of patients with audiometric relapses, monitored from 1995 to 2014, in two centres of the Community of Madrid. We evaluated 31 patients with a mean age of 48.52 years (14.67 SD), of which 61.3% were women. Most hearing loss was fluctuating (48.4%). Only 16.1% of patients had systemic autoimmune disease. There is a moderate positive correlation between the sex variable and the systemic involvement variable (Spearman's correlation coefficient=0.356): specifically, between being female and systemic disease. The relative incidence rate of relapse in the first year was 2.01 relapses/year with a 95% CI (1.32 to 2.92). The mean survival time of the event (audiometric relapse) was 5.25 months (SD 0.756). With multivariate analysis, the only variable that achieved statistical significance was age, with a hazard ratio of 1.032 (95% CI; 1.001-1.063, P=.043). Immune-mediated disease of the inner ear is a chronic disease with relapses. Half of the patients with immunomediated hearing loss treated exclusively with corticosteroids relapse before 6 months of follow-up. In addition, if a patient has not relapsed, they are more likely to relapse as each year passes. Analysis of the of audiometric relapse- free survival will enable the effect of future treatments to be compared and their capacity to reduce the rhythm of relapses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro analysis of the oligodendrocyte lineage in mice during demyelination and remyelination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.; Friedrich, V.L. Jr.; Holmes, K.V.; Dubois-Dalcq, M.

    1990-01-01

    A demyelinating disease induced in C57B1/6N mice by intracranial injection of a coronavirus (murine hepatitis virus strain A59) is followed by functional recovery and efficient CNS myelin repair. To study the biological properties of the cells involved in this repair process, glial cells were isolated and cultured from spinal cords of these young adult mice during demyelination and remyelination. Using three-color immunofluorescence combined with [3H]thymidine autoradiography, we have analyzed the antigenic phenotype and mitotic potential of individual glial cells. We identified oligodendrocytes with an antibody to galactocerebroside, astrocytes with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein, and oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A) progenitor cells with the O4 antibody. Cultures from demyelinated tissue differed in several ways from those of age-matched controls: first, the total number of O-2A lineage cells was strikingly increased; second, the O-2A population consisted of a higher proportion of O4-positive astrocytes and cells of mixed oligodendrocyte-astrocyte phenotype; and third, all the cell types within the O-2A lineage showed enhanced proliferation. This proliferation was not further enhanced by adding PDGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the defined medium. However, bFGF and IGF-I seemed to influence the fate of O-2A lineage cells in cultures of demyelinated tissue. Basic FGF decreased the percentage of cells expressing galactocerebroside. In contrast, IGF-I increased the relative proportion of oligodendrocytes. Thus, O-2A lineage cells from adult mice display greater phenotypic plasticity and enhanced mitotic potential in response to an episode of demyelination. These properties may be linked to the efficient remyelination achieved in this demyelinating disease

  9. Treatments for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP): an overview of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Lunn, Michael Pt; Hughes, Richard Ac; van Schaik, Ivo N.; Frost, Chris; Chalk, Colin H.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic progressive or relapsing and remitting disease that usually causes weakness and sensory loss. The symptoms are due to autoimmune inflammation of peripheral nerves. CIPD affects about 2 to 3 per 100,000 of the population.

  10. Bioluminescence Imaging of Olig2-Neural Stem Cells Reveals Improved Engraftment in a Demyelination Mouse Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; van Dam, Go; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2009-01-01

    A major issue in the potential application of neural stem cell (NSC)-based cell replacement therapy for demyelinating diseases is the question of the survival, functional behavior, and stability of implanted NSC-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) over an extended period. To address this

  11. CD8 T cells primed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue induce immune-mediated cholangitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Daniel; Eickmeier, Ira; Kühl, Anja A; Hamann, Alf; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schott, Eckart

    2014-02-01

    The pathogenesis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains poorly understood. Since PSC predominantly occurs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmunity triggered by activated T cells migrating from the gut to the liver is a possible mechanism. We hypothesized that T cells primed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) by a specific antigen migrate to the liver and cause cholangitis when they recognize the same antigen on cholangiocytes. We induced ovalbumin-dependent colitis in mice that express ovalbumin in biliary epithelia (ASBT-OVA mice) and crossed ASBT-OVA mice with mice that express ovalbumin in enterocytes (iFABP-OVA mice). We analyzed T-cell activation in the GALT and crossreactivity to the same antigen in the liver as well as the effects of colitis per se on antigen-presentation and T-cell activation in the liver. Intrarectal application of ovalbumin followed by transfer of CD8 OT-I T cells led to antigen-dependent colitis. CD8 T cells primed in the GALT acquired effector function and the capability to migrate to the liver, where they caused cholangitis in a strictly antigen-dependent manner. Likewise, cholangitis developed in mice expressing ovalbumin simultaneously in biliary epithelia and enterocytes after transfer of OT-I T cells. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis led to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in the portal venous blood, induced activation of resident liver dendritic cells, and promoted the induction of T-cell-dependent cholangitis. Our data strengthen the notion that immune-mediated cholangitis is caused by T cells primed in the GALT and provide the first link between colitis and cholangitis in an antigen-dependent mouse model. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. Good agreement of conventional and gel-based direct agglutination test in immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.; Teske, E.; van Leeuwen, M.W.; Day, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare a gel-based test with the traditional direct agglutination test (DAT) for the diagnosis of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA). Methods Canine (n = 247) and feline (n = 74) blood samples were submitted for DAT testing to two

  13. Reliability and responsiveness of a graduated tuning fork in immune mediated polyneuropathies. The Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar); P.I.M. Schmitz (Paul); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the Rydel-Seiffer (RS) graduated tuning fork was evaluated in 113 patients with a clinically stable immune mediated polyneuropathy (83 patients who had had Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) in the past, 22 with

  14. Acute Demyelination in a Person with Amphetamine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Weis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 31-year-old woman, admitted to the hospital for chest pain, dying a few days later from septic multiorgan failure, and showing at autopsy foci of acute demyelination in the occipital lobe. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of amphetamine in the demyelinated area, which might be considered as the pathogenic agent, since other causes for demyelination could be excluded. This case represents the first report showing a demyelinating process due to a street drug.

  15. Interferon beta-1a in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: case report Interferon beta en polineuropatía crónica inflamatoria desmienlinizante: caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Maria Villa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an acquired immune-mediated neuropathy. It presents with a course of progression which may be slow and steady or step-wise or relapsing. Sensory ataxic polyneuropathy may be the only clinical manifestation of this disease. Treatment with interferon beta1a (INF beta1a has been tried with different results in patients who were refractory to other, more conventional, immunomodulatory therapies. Here we report on a patient who had a relapsing form of pure sensory ataxic CIDP and who failed to respond to intravenous human immunoglobulin. He was put on INF beta1a for 3 years. During this period he suffered no relapses while his condition stabilized.La polineuropatía crónica inflamatoria desmielinizante (PCID es una neuropatía inmuno-mediada, que presenta un curso clínico primariamente progresivo o en forma de recaídas. Las manifestaciones sensoriales pueden ser su unica forma de expresión clínica. El tratamiento con interferon beta 1a (IFN beta1a ha sido ensayado en varias oportunidades, con diferentes respuestas terapéuticas, en pacientes refractarios a las terapias inmunomoduladoras convencionales. Nosotros comunicamos un paciente con una forma ataxica recurrente de PCID, que no respondió al tratamiento con inmunoglobulina endovenosa. Posteriormente fue tratado con IFN beta 1 a por tres años. Durante el período de seguimiento no mostró nuevas recaídas y su cuadro neurológico se estabilizó.

  16. Demyelinating polyneuropathy with focally folded myelin sheaths in a family of Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaesebrouck, An E; Couturier, Jérôme; Cauzinille, Laurent; Mizisin, Andrew P; Shelton, G Diane; Granger, Nicolas

    2008-12-15

    A spontaneous demyelinating polyneuropathy in two young Miniature Schnauzer dogs was characterized clinically, electrophysiologically and histopathologically. Both dogs were related and a third dog, belonging to the same family, had similar clinical signs. On presentation, clinical signs were restricted to respiratory dysfunction. Electrophysiological tests showed a dramatic decrease in both motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities. Microscopic examination of peripheral nerve biopsies (light and electron microscopy, teased nerve fibers), showed that this neuropathy was characterized by segmental demyelination and focally folded myelin sheaths. Various clinical syndromes associated with tomacula or focal thickening of the myelin sheath of the peripheral nerves have been described in humans and shown to be caused by gene mutations affecting the myelin proteins, such as the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies or the demyelinating forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In animals, a tomaculous neuropathy has been reported in cattle and chickens but not in carnivores. Here we report a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy with tomacula in two Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

  17. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Membrane bound mucins are up-regulated and aberrantly glycosylated during malignant transformation in many cancer cells. This results in a negatively charged glycoprotein coat which may protect cancer cells from immune surveillance. However, only limited data have so far demonstrated the critical steps in glycan elongation that make aberrantly glycosylated mucins affect the interaction between cancer cells and cytotoxic effector cells of the immune system. Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr, STn (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc-Ser/Thr, T (Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr, and ST (NeuAcα2-6Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr antigens are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn. Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN knockout (KO of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps, as demonstrated for glycan elongation beyond Tn and STn, can be important for fine tuning of the immune escape mechanisms in cancer cells.

  18. Diagnostic algorithm for relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Mankad, Kshitij; Chong, W K; Barkhof, Frederik; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Ciccarelli, Olga; Hemingway, Cheryl

    2017-07-18

    To establish whether children with relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes (RDS) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Ab) show distinctive clinical and radiologic features and to generate a diagnostic algorithm for the main RDS for clinical use. A panel reviewed the clinical characteristics, MOG-Ab and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) Ab, intrathecal oligoclonal bands, and Epstein-Barr virus serology results of 110 children with RDS. A neuroradiologist blinded to the diagnosis scored the MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and serologic tests results were compared. The findings showed that 56.4% of children were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), 25.4% with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), 12.7% with multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis (MDEM), and 5.5% with relapsing optic neuritis (RON). Blinded analysis defined baseline MRI as typical of MS in 93.5% of children with MS. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presentation was seen only in the non-MS group. Of NMOSD cases, 30.7% were AQP4-Ab positive. MOG-Ab were found in 83.3% of AQP4-Ab-negative NMOSD, 100% of MDEM, and 33.3% of RON. Children with MOG-Ab were younger, were less likely to present with area postrema syndrome, and had lower disability, longer time to relapse, and more cerebellar peduncle lesions than children with AQP4-Ab NMOSD. A diagnostic algorithm applicable to any episode of CNS demyelination leads to 4 main phenotypes: MS, AQP4-Ab NMOSD, MOG-Ab-associated disease, and antibody-negative RDS. Children with MS and AQP4-Ab NMOSD showed features typical of adult cases. Because MOG-Ab-positive children showed notable and distinctive clinical and MRI features, they were grouped into a unified phenotype (MOG-Ab-associated disease), included in a new diagnostic algorithm. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Corpus callosum demyelination associated with acquired stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Barbara McElwee; Guitar, Barry; Solomon, Andrew

    2018-04-21

    Compared with developmental stuttering, adult onset acquired stuttering is rare. However, several case reports describe acquired stuttering and an association with callosal pathology. Interestingly, these cases share a neuroanatomical localisation also demonstrated in developmental stuttering. We present a case of adult onset acquired stuttering associated with inflammatory demyelination within the corpus callosum. This patient's disfluency improved after the initiation of immunomodulatory therapy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes of progenitor and stem cells: molecular analysis of cytotoxic T cell clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Tiu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The unique structure of the T cell receptor (TCR enables molecular identification of individual T cell clones and provides an unique opportunity for the design of molecular diagnostic tests based on the structure of the rearranged TCR chain e.g., using the TCR CDR3 region. Initially, clonal T cell malignancies, including T cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia (T-LGL, mucosis fungoides and peripheral T cell lymphoma were targets for the TCR-based analytic assays such as detection of clonality by T-gamma rearrangement using y-chain-specific PCR or Southern Blotting. Study of these disorders facilitated further analytic concepts and application of rational methods of TCR analysis to investigations of polyclonal T cell-mediated diseases. In hematology, such conditions include graft versus host disease (GvHD and immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes. In aplastic anemia (AA, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS or paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH, cytotoxic T cell responses may be directed against certain antigens located on stem or more lineage-restricted progenitor cells in single lineage cytopenias. The nature of the antigenic targets driving polyclonal CTL responses remains unclear. Novel methods of TCR repertoire analysis, include VB flow cytometry, peptide-specific tetramer staining, in vitro stimulation assays and TCR CDR3-specific PCR. Such PCR assay can be either VB family-specific or multiplexed for all VB families. Amplified products can be characterized and quantitated to facilitate detection of the most immunodominant clonotypes. Such clonotypes may serve as markers for the global polyclonal T cell response. Identification of these clonotypes can be performed in blood and tissue biopsy material by various methods. Once immunodominant clonotypes corresponding to pathogenic CTL clones are identified they can serve as surrogate markers for the activity of the pathophysiologic process or even indicate the presence of specific

  1. Microglial recruitment, activation, and proliferation in response to primary demyelination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remington, Leah T; Babcock, Alicia A; Zehntner, Simone P

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized the cellular response to demyelination/remyelination in the central nervous system using the toxin cuprizone, which causes reproducible demyelination in the corpus callosum. Microglia were distinguished from macrophages by relative CD45 expression (CD45(dim)) using flow cyto...

  2. Beneficial effects of minocycline on cuprizone induced cortical demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripuletz, Thomas; Miller, Elvira; Moharregh-Khiabani, Darius; Blank, Alexander; Pul, Refik; Gudi, Viktoria; Trebst, Corinna; Stangel, Martin

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of minocycline to influence cuprizone induced demyelination in the grey and white matter. To induce demyelination C57BL/6 mice were fed with cuprizone for up to 6 weeks and were analysed at different timepoints (week 0, 4, 5, 6). Mice treated with minocycline had less demyelination of the cortex and corpus callosum compared with sham treated animals. In the cortex decreased numbers of activated and proliferating microglia were found after 6 weeks of cuprizone feeding, while there were no significant effects for microglial infiltration of the corpus callosum. In addition to the beneficial effects on demyelination, minocycline prevented from motor coordination disturbance as shown in the beam walking test. For astrogliosis and the numbers of OPC and oligodendrocytes no treatment effects were found. In summary, minocycline treatment diminished the course of demyelination in the grey and white matter and prevented disturbances in motor coordination.

  3. A longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microbiota and vaginal immune mediators in women from sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jespers, V.; Kyongo, J.; Joseph, S.; Hardy, L.; Cools, P.; Crucitti, T.; Mwaura, M.; Ndayisaba, G.; Delany-Moretlwe, S.; Buyze, J.; Vanham, G.; van de Wijgert, JHHM

    2017-01-01

    In cross-sectional studies increased vaginal bacterial diversity has been associated with vaginal inflammation which can be detrimental for health. We describe longitudinal changes at 5 visits over 8 weeks in vaginal microbiota and immune mediators in African women. Women (N = 40) with a normal Nugent score at all visits had a stable lactobacilli dominated microbiota with prevailing Lactobacillus iners. Presence of prostate-specific antigen (proxy for recent sex) and being amenorrhoeic (due t...

  4. Building an immune-mediated coagulopathy consensus: early recognition and evaluation to enhance post-surgical patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voils Stacy A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Topical hemostats, fibrin sealants, and surgical adhesives are regularly used in a variety of surgical procedures involving multiple disciplines. Generally, these adjuncts to surgical hemostasis are valuable means for improving wound visualization, reducing blood loss or adding tissue adherence; however, some of these agents are responsible for under-recognized adverse reactions and outcomes. Bovine thrombin, for example, is a topical hemostat with a long history of clinical application that is widely used alone or in combination with other hemostatic agents. Hematologists and coagulation experts are aware that these agents can lead to development of an immune-mediated coagulopathy (IMC. A paucity of data on the incidence of IMC contributes to under-recognition and leaves many surgeons unaware that this clinical entity, originating from normal immune responses to foreign antigen exposure, requires enhanced post-operative vigilance and judicious clinical judgment to achieve best outcomes. Postoperative bleeding may result from issues such as loosened ties or clips or the occurrence of a coagulopathy due to hemodilution, vitamin K deficiency, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC or post-transfusion, post-shock coagulopathic states. Other causes, such as liver disease, may be ruled out by a careful patient history and common pre-operative liver function tests. Less common are coagulopathies secondary to pathologic immune responses. Such coagulopathies include those that may result from inherent patient problems such as patients with an immune dysfunction related to systemic lupus erythrematosus (SLE or lymphoma that can invoke antibodies against native coagulation factors. Medical interventions may also provoke antibody formation in the form of self-directed anti-coagulation factor antibodies, that result in problematic bleeding; it is these iatrogenic post-operative coagulopathies, including those associated with bovine thrombin

  5. Treatment with metallothionein prevents demyelination and axonal damage and increases oligodendrocyte precursors and tissue repair during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan

    2003-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE and MS are characterized by significant inflammation, demyelination, neuroglial damage, and cell death. Metallothionein-I and -II (MT-I + II) are antiinflammatory an......)beta, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), NT-4/5, and nerve growth factor (NGF). These beneficial effects of Zn-MT-II treatment could not be attributable to its zinc content per se. The present results support further the use of Zn-MT-II as a safe and successful therapy for multiple sclerosis....

  6. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with hypertrophy of the cauda equina and concomitant demyelinating white matter lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Staebler, A.; Reiser, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) is thought to almost exclusively affect the peripheral nervous system. We report the case of a 48-year-old patient with a longstanding history of HMSN type I who developed signs and symptoms of a cauda equina compression and of a central nervous system relapsing-remitting demyelinating white matter disease. Gross enlargement of the cauda equina fibers was detected by MR imaging of the lumbar spine. Cranial MR imaging revealed demyelinating white matter lesions. This case suggests that peripheral neuropathic mechanisms may also affect the central myelin in HMSN type I

  7. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with hypertrophy of the cauda equina and concomitant demyelinating white matter lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Staebler, A.; Reiser, M. [Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Helmchen, C. [Univ. Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Neurologie; Fassmann, F. [Zentrum fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) is thought to almost exclusively affect the peripheral nervous system. We report the case of a 48-year-old patient with a longstanding history of HMSN type I who developed signs and symptoms of a cauda equina compression and of a central nervous system relapsing-remitting demyelinating white matter disease. Gross enlargement of the cauda equina fibers was detected by MR imaging of the lumbar spine. Cranial MR imaging revealed demyelinating white matter lesions. This case suggests that peripheral neuropathic mechanisms may also affect the central myelin in HMSN type I.

  8. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  9. Isolated Extrapontine Myelinolysis of Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Yılmaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS has been identified as a complication of the rapid correction of hyponatremia for decades (King and Rosner, 2010. However, in recent years, a variety of other medical conditions have been associated with the development of ODS, independent of changes in serum sodium which cause a rapid changes in osmolality of the interstitial (extracellular compartment of the brain leading to dehydration of energy-depleted cells with subsequent axonal damage that occurs in characteristic areas (King and Rosner, 2010. Slow correction of the serum sodium concentration and additional administration of corticosteroids seems to be a major prevention step in ODS patients. In the current report we aimed to share a rare case which we observed in our clinic.

  10. Inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor with hemorrhage masquerading high grade cerebral neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agrawal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Demyelinating pseudotumors are rare, benign, solitary intracranial space occupying lesions which masquerade cerebral neoplasms. Contrast MRI shows open ring enhancement which is fairly specific for this entity. Advanced MRI techniques like MR spectroscopy and magnetizing transfer techniques can help differentiating these lesions. NAA/Cr ratio is significantly elevated in central regions of demyelinating pseudotumors than in gliomas and other lesions. Presence of abundant foamy macrophages, lymphoid inflammatory infiltrates around blood vessels, sheets of gemistocytic astrocytes with well-developed processes, well defined border of the lesion absence of neovascularity and necrosis should help us diagnose demyelinating pseudotumor fairly confidently on histopathology.

  11. Cervical spinal demyelination with ethidium bromide impairs respiratory (phrenic) activity and forelimb motor behavior in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Punzo, Antonio M.; Duncan, Ian D.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Johnson, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Although respiratory complications are a major cause of morbidity/mortality in many neural injuries or diseases, little is known concerning mechanisms whereby deficient myelin impairs breathing, or how patients compensate for such changes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that respiratory and forelimb motor function are impaired in a rat model of focal dorsolateral spinal demyelination (ethidium bromide, EB). Ventilation, phrenic nerve activity and horizontal ladder walking were performed 7-14 days post-C2 injection of EB or vehicle (SHAM). EB caused dorsolateral demyelination at C2-C3 followed by signficant spontaneous remyelination at 14 days post-EB. Although ventilation did not differ between groups, ipsilateral integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude was significantly reduced versus SHAM during chemoreceptor activation at 7 days post-EB but recovered by 14 days. The ratio of ipsi- to contralateral phrenic nerve amplitude correlated with cross-sectional lesion area. This ratio was significantly reduced 7 days post-EB versus SHAM during baseline conditions, and versus SHAM and 14 day groups during chemoreceptor activation. Limb function ipsilateral to EB was impaired 7 days post-EB and partially recovered by 14 days post-EB. EB provides a reversible model of focal, spinal demyelination, and may be a useful model to study mechanisms of functional impairment and recovery via motor plasticity, or the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions to reduce severity or duration of disease. PMID:23159317

  12. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preisinger Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV. Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift.

  13. Open-ring enhancement sign in diagnosing demyelinating pseudotumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Liting; Wang Zhiping; Wang Linyou

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe open-ring enhancement sign on MRI of demyelinating pseudotumor. Methods: Contrast-enhanced MRI of histologically confirmed demyelinating pseudotumors (14 patients) and astrocytomas (21) was reviewed. Results: Of the 14 cases of demyelinating pseudotumor, open-ring enhancement pattern was observed in 6; closed ring enhancement in 2; nodular enhancement in 3; patchy enhancement in 1; slight enhancement in 1; and no enhancement in 1. Of the 21 cases of astrocytoma, there was complete ring or lace-like enhancement in 13, no contrast enhancement in 6, patchy enhancement in 2, and none with open-ring enhancement pattern. Conclusion: Open-ring enhancement is a valuable sign in differential diagnosis between demyelinating pseudotumor and astrocytoma. (authors)

  14. Central canal ependymal cells proliferate extensively in response to traumatic spinal cord injury but not demyelinating lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Lacroix

    Full Text Available The adult mammalian spinal cord has limited regenerative capacity in settings such as spinal cord injury (SCI and multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent studies have revealed that ependymal cells lining the central canal possess latent neural stem cell potential, undergoing proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation following experimental SCI. To determine whether reactive ependymal cells are a realistic endogenous cell population to target in order to promote spinal cord repair, we assessed the spatiotemporal dynamics of ependymal cell proliferation for up to 35 days in three models of spinal pathologies: contusion SCI using the Infinite Horizon impactor, focal demyelination by intraspinal injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, and autoimmune-mediated multi-focal demyelination using the active experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of MS. Contusion SCI at the T9-10 thoracic level stimulated a robust, long-lasting and long-distance wave of ependymal proliferation that peaked at 3 days in the lesion segment, 14 days in the rostral segment, and was still detectable at the cervical level, where it peaked at 21 days. This proliferative wave was suppressed distal to the contusion. Unlike SCI, neither chemical- nor autoimmune-mediated demyelination triggered ependymal cell proliferation at any time point, despite the occurrence of demyelination (LPC and EAE, remyelination (LPC and significant locomotor defects (EAE. Thus, traumatic SCI induces widespread and enduring activation of reactive ependymal cells, identifying them as a robust cell population to target for therapeutic manipulation after contusion; conversely, neither demyelination, remyelination nor autoimmunity appears sufficient to trigger proliferation of quiescent ependymal cells in models of MS-like demyelinating diseases.

  15. Oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines contribute to demyelination and axonal damage in a cerebellar culture model of neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Penta, Alessandra; Moreno, Beatriz; Reix, Stephanie; Fernandez-Diez, Begoña; Villanueva, Maite; Errea, Oihana; Escala, Nagore; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Comella, Joan X; Villoslada, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Demyelination and axonal damage are critical processes in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines elicited by inflammation mediates tissue damage. To monitor the demyelination and axonal injury associated with microglia activation we employed a model using cerebellar organotypic cultures stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Microglia activated by LPS released pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα), and increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This activation was associated with demyelination and axonal damage in cerebellar cultures. Axonal damage, as revealed by the presence of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments, mitochondrial accumulation in axonal spheroids, and axonal transection, was associated with stronger iNOS expression and concomitant increases in ROS. Moreover, we analyzed the contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in demyelination and axonal degeneration using the iNOS inhibitor ethyl pyruvate, a free-scavenger and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol, as well as via blockage of pro-inflammatory cytokines using a Fc-TNFR1 construct. We found that blocking microglia activation with ethyl pyruvate or allopurinol significantly decreased axonal damage, and to a lesser extent, demyelination. Blocking TNFα significantly decreased demyelination but did not prevented axonal damage. Moreover, the most common therapy for MS, interferon-beta, was used as an example of an immunomodulator compound that can be tested in this model. In vitro, interferon-beta treatment decreased oxidative stress (iNOS and ROS levels) and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS stimulation, reducing axonal damage. The model of neuroinflammation using cerebellar culture stimulated with endotoxin mimicked myelin and axonal damage mediated by the combination of oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines

  16. Oxidative Stress and Proinflammatory Cytokines Contribute to Demyelination and Axonal Damage in a Cerebellar Culture Model of Neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Penta, Alessandra; Moreno, Beatriz; Reix, Stephanie; Fernandez-Diez, Begoña; Villanueva, Maite; Errea, Oihana; Escala, Nagore; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Comella, Joan X.; Villoslada, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Background Demyelination and axonal damage are critical processes in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines elicited by inflammation mediates tissue damage. Methods/Principal Findings To monitor the demyelination and axonal injury associated with microglia activation we employed a model using cerebellar organotypic cultures stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Microglia activated by LPS released pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα), and increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This activation was associated with demyelination and axonal damage in cerebellar cultures. Axonal damage, as revealed by the presence of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments, mitochondrial accumulation in axonal spheroids, and axonal transection, was associated with stronger iNOS expression and concomitant increases in ROS. Moreover, we analyzed the contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in demyelination and axonal degeneration using the iNOS inhibitor ethyl pyruvate, a free-scavenger and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol, as well as via blockage of pro-inflammatory cytokines using a Fc-TNFR1 construct. We found that blocking microglia activation with ethyl pyruvate or allopurinol significantly decreased axonal damage, and to a lesser extent, demyelination. Blocking TNFα significantly decreased demyelination but did not prevented axonal damage. Moreover, the most common therapy for MS, interferon-beta, was used as an example of an immunomodulator compound that can be tested in this model. In vitro, interferon-beta treatment decreased oxidative stress (iNOS and ROS levels) and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS stimulation, reducing axonal damage. Conclusion The model of neuroinflammation using cerebellar culture stimulated with endotoxin mimicked myelin and axonal damage mediated by the combination of

  17. A Case Of Infectious Mononucleosis With Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somani S K

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo neuropathy (AIDP, following infectious mononucleosis. A 12 year old girl presented with acute flaccid quadriplegia with bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy and enlarged tonsils six weeks after a febrile illness. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed albuminocytological dissociation and electrophysiology showed evidence of axonal-demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Heterophile antibody test was positive and lymph node biopsy showed non -specific reactive hyperplasia. She was managed conservatively with good outcome.

  18. Rasch-built Overall Disability Scale (R-ODS) for immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nes, S I; Vanhoutte, E K; van Doorn, P A; Hermans, M; Bakkers, M; Kuitwaard, K; Faber, C G; Merkies, I S J

    2011-01-25

    To develop a patient-based, linearly weighted scale that captures activity and social participation limitations in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and gammopathy-related polyneuropathy (MGUSP). A preliminary Rasch-built Overall Disability Scale (R-ODS) containing 146 activity and participation items was constructed, based on the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, literature search, and patient interviews. The preliminary R-ODS was assessed twice (interval: 2-4 weeks; test-retest reliability studies) in 294 patients who experienced GBS in the past (n = 174) or currently have stable CIDP (n = 80) or MGUSP (n = 40). Data were analyzed using the Rasch unidimensional measurement model (RUMM2020). The preliminary R-ODS did not meet the Rasch model expectations. Based on disordered thresholds, misfit statistics, item bias, and local dependency, items were systematically removed to improve the model fit, regularly controlling the class intervals and model statistics. Finally, we succeeded in constructing a 24-item scale that fulfilled all Rasch requirements. "Reading a newspaper/book" and "eating" were the 2 easiest items; "standing for hours" and "running" were the most difficult ones. Good validity and reliability were obtained. The R-ODS is a linearly weighted scale that specifically captures activity and social participation limitations in patients with GBS, CIDP, and MGUSP. Compared to the Overall Disability Sum Score, the R-ODS represents a wider range of item difficulties, thereby better targeting patients with different ability levels. If responsive, the R-ODS will be valuable for future clinical trials and follow-up studies in these conditions.

  19. The use of the rapid osmotic fragility test as an additional test to diagnose canine immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paes, Geert; Paepe, Dominique; Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing canine immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA) is often challenging because all currently available tests have their limitations. Dogs with IMHA often have an increased erythrocyte osmotic fragility (OF), a characteristic that is sometimes used in the diagnosis of IMHA...... hyperlipemic dogs (group 3), 10 dogs with lymphoma (group 4), 8 dogs with an infection (group 5) and 13 healthy dogs (group 6) were included. In all dogs, blood smear examination, in-saline auto-agglutination test, Coombs' test, COFT and ROFT were performed. In the COFT, OF5, OF50 and OF90 were defined...

  20. Cellular sources and targets of IFN-γ-mediated protection against viral demyelination and neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Paul D.; McGavern, Dorian B.; Pease, Larry R.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2017-01-01

    IFN-γ is an anti-viral and immunomodulatory cytokine critical for resistance to multiple pathogens. Using mice with targeted disruption of the gene for IFN-γ, we previously demonstrated that this cytokine is critical for resistance to viral persistence and demyelination in the Theiler’s virus model of multiple sclerosis. During viral infections, IFN-γ is produced by natural killer (NK) cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; however, the proportions of lymphocyte subsets responding to virus infection influences the contributions to IFN-γ-mediated protection. To determine the lymphocyte subsets that produce IFN-γ to maintain resistance, we used adoptive transfer strategies to generate mice with lymphocyte-specific deficiencies in IFN-γ-production. We demonstrate that IFN-γ production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets is critical for resistance to Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelination and neurological disease, and that CD4+ T cells make a greater contribution to IFN-γ-mediated protection. To determine the cellular targets of IFN-γ-mediated responses, we used adoptive transfer studies and bone marrow chimerism to generate mice in which either hematopoietic or somatic cells lacked the ability to express IFN-γ receptor. We demonstrate that IFN-γ receptor must be present on central nervous system glia, but not bone marrow-derived lymphocytes, in order to maintain resistance to TMEV-induced demyelination. PMID:11857334

  1. Pancreatic Tissue Transplanted in TheraCyte Encapsulation Devices Is Protected and Prevents Hyperglycemia in a Mouse Model of Immune-Mediated Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, Tobias; Schneider, Darius; Cheng, Yang; Kadoya, Kuniko; Brandon, Eugene P; Martinson, Laura; von Herrath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by destruction of glucose-responsive insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells and exhibits immune infiltration of pancreatic islets, where CD8 lymphocytes are most prominent. Curative transplantation of pancreatic islets is seriously hampered by the persistence of autoreactive immune cells that require high doses of immunosuppressive drugs. An elegant approach to confer graft protection while obviating the need for immunosuppression is the use of encapsulation devices that allow for the transfer of oxygen and nutrients, yet prevent immune cells from making direct contact with the islet grafts. Here we demonstrate that macroencapsulation devices (TheraCyte) loaded with neonatal pancreatic tissue and transplanted into RIP-LCMV.GP mice prevented disease onset in a model of virus-induced diabetes mellitus. Histological analyses revealed that insulin-producing cells survived within the device in animal models of diabetes. Our results demonstrate that these encapsulation devices can protect from an immune-mediated attack and can contain a sufficient amount of insulin-producing cells to prevent overt hyperglycemia.

  2. Pervasive Sharing of Genetic Effects in Autoimmune Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotsapas, Chris; Voight, Benjamin F.; Rossin, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiologic...

  3. Effects of Food Additives on Immune Cells As Contributors to Body Weight Gain and Immune-Mediated Metabolic Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula Neto, Heitor A; Ausina, Priscila; Gomez, Lilian S; Leandro, João G B; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Food additives are compounds used in order to improve food palatability, texture, and shelf life. Despite a significant effort to assure safety of use, toxicological analysis of these substances, generally, rely on their direct toxicity to target organs (liver and kidney) or their genotoxic effects. Much less attention is paid to the effects of these compounds on cells of the immune system. This is of relevance given that metabolic dysregulation and obesity have a strong immune-mediated component. Obese individuals present a state of chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to the establishment of insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities known as the metabolic syndrome. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are currently recognized as worldwide epidemics that pose a profound socioeconomic impact and represent a concern to public health. Cells of the immune system contribute to both the maintenance of "lean homeostasis" and the metabolic dysregulation observed in obese individuals. Although much attention has been drawn in the past decades to obesity and metabolic syndrome as a result of ingesting highly processed food containing large amounts of fat and simple sugars, mounting evidence suggest that food additives may also be important contributors to metabolic derangement. Herein, we review pieces of evidence from the literature showing that food additives have relevant effects on cells of the immune system that could contribute to immune-mediated metabolic dysregulation. Considering their potential to predispose individuals to develop obesity and metabolic syndrome, their use should be taken with caution or maybe revisited.

  4. Effects of Food Additives on Immune Cells As Contributors to Body Weight Gain and Immune-Mediated Metabolic Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor A. Paula Neto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Food additives are compounds used in order to improve food palatability, texture, and shelf life. Despite a significant effort to assure safety of use, toxicological analysis of these substances, generally, rely on their direct toxicity to target organs (liver and kidney or their genotoxic effects. Much less attention is paid to the effects of these compounds on cells of the immune system. This is of relevance given that metabolic dysregulation and obesity have a strong immune-mediated component. Obese individuals present a state of chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to the establishment of insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities known as the metabolic syndrome. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are currently recognized as worldwide epidemics that pose a profound socioeconomic impact and represent a concern to public health. Cells of the immune system contribute to both the maintenance of “lean homeostasis” and the metabolic dysregulation observed in obese individuals. Although much attention has been drawn in the past decades to obesity and metabolic syndrome as a result of ingesting highly processed food containing large amounts of fat and simple sugars, mounting evidence suggest that food additives may also be important contributors to metabolic derangement. Herein, we review pieces of evidence from the literature showing that food additives have relevant effects on cells of the immune system that could contribute to immune-mediated metabolic dysregulation. Considering their potential to predispose individuals to develop obesity and metabolic syndrome, their use should be taken with caution or maybe revisited.

  5. Influence of maternal age, gestational age and fetal gender on expression of immune mediators in amniotic fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissenbacher Tobias

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in cytokine and immune mediator expression patterns in amniotic fluid due to gestational age, maternal age and fetal gender were investigated. Findings Amniotic fluid samples were obtained from 192 women, 82 with a mid-trimester amniocentesis (median gestational age 17 weeks and 110 with a caesarean section not in labor (median gestational age 39 weeks. Amniotic fluid was screened by commercial ELISAs for the TH1/TH2/TH17 cytokines and immune mediators IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, TNF alpha, GRO-alpha, MIP1alpha, MIP1beta, Histone, and IP10. Analysis was by Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. None of the 15 examined cytokines revealed any differences in expression patterns regarding fetal gender. Significant differences were found in IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, TNF- alpha, GRO-alpha and MIP1-beta with respect to gestational age and in GRO-alpha regarding maternal age. Conclusion Cytokines utilized as biomarkers in the diagnosis of intrauterine infections are not influenced in their expression pattern by fetal gender but may vary with respect to maternal age and gestational age.

  6. Immune mediators of sea-cucumber Holothuria tubulosa (Echinodermata) as source of novel antimicrobial and anti-staphylococcal biofilm agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Domenico; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Russo, Debora; Vazzana, Mirella; Vitale, Maria; Arizza, Vincenzo

    2013-06-24

    The present study aims to investigate coelomocytes, immune mediators cells in the echinoderm Holothuria tubulosa, as an unusual source of antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents. The activity of the 5kDa peptide fraction of the cytosol from H. tubulosa coelomocytes (5-HCC) was tested against a reference group of Gram-negative and Gram-positive human pathogens. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 125 to 500 mg/ml were determined against tested strains. The observed biological activity of 5-HCC could be due to two novel peptides, identified by capillary RP-HPLC/nESI-MS/MS, which present the common chemical-physical characteristics of antimicrobial peptides. Such peptides were chemically synthesized and their antimicrobial activity was tested. The synthetic peptides showed broad-spectrum activity at 12.5 mg/ml against the majority of the tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains, and they were also able to inhibit biofilm formation in a significant percentage at a concentration of 3.1 mg/ml against staphylococcal and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.The immune mediators in H. tubulosa are a source of novel antimicrobial peptides for the development of new agents against biofilm bacterial communities that are often intrinsically resistant to conventional antibiotics.

  7. [Disease concept, etiology and mechanisms of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system(CNS). MS is assumed to be caused by a complex interplay between genes and environments. Autoimmune mechanisms targeting CNS myelin has long been proposed, yet it has not been proved. Th17 cells producing interleukin-17 and Th1 cells producing interferon-gamma are postulated to play major roles in initiating inflammation while regulatory T cell functions are dampened. The forth nationwide survey of MS in Japan revealed that MS prevalence showed four-folds increase over 30 years and the increase was especially prominent in female. Thus, westernized life style and improved sanitation are suspected to increase MS susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies in Western MS patients disclosed more than 100 disease-susceptibility genes, most of which are immune-related genes. It therefore supports immune-mediated mechanisms to be operative. Detailed magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed an early atrophy of the cerebral gray matter where T cell infiltration is pathologically scarce. Therefore, neurodegenerative process also takes place in the early course beside neuroinflammation.

  8. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  9. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  10. [Correlation between demyelinating lesions and executive function decline in a sample of Mexican patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrete Cortez, V R; Duriez-Sotelo, E; Carrillo-Mora, P; Pérez-Zuno, J A

    2013-09-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is characterised by several neurological symptoms including cognitive impairment, which has recently been the subject of considerable study. At present, evidence pointing to a correlation between lesion characteristics and specific cognitive impairment is not conclusive. To investigate the presence of a correlation between the characteristics of demyelinating lesions and performance of basic executive functions in a sample of MS patients. We included 21 adult patients with scores of 0 to 5 on the Kurtzke scale and no exacerbations of the disease in at least 3 months prior to the evaluation date. They completed the Stroop test and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The location of the lesions was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed by a blinded expert in neuroimaging. Demyelinating lesions were more frequently located in the frontal and occipital lobes. The Stroop test showed that as cognitive demand increased on each of the sections in the test, reaction time and number of errors increased. On the WCST, 33.33% of patients registered as having moderate cognitive impairment. No correlation could be found between demyelinating lesion characteristics (location, size, and number) and patients' scores on the tests. Explanations of the causes of cognitive impairment in MS should examine a variety of biological, psychological, and social factors instead of focusing solely on demyelinating lesions. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. A Patient with Grave's Disease and Tuberculous Lymphadenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, M F; Chowdhury, M H; Khan, A H; Rahman, M; Barman, T K; Chowdhury, M J

    2016-04-01

    Immune reactivity between Mycobacteria and human antigens can play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We report a case of Graves's disease and tuberculous lymphadenitis to explain the mechanism of correlation between immune-mediated diseases and tuberculosis and to raise awareness of the importance of screening for TB in this context, especially in endemic country. Screening for latent TB at immune mediated disease diagnosis and regular timely screening thereafter may be beneficial.

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute demyelinating myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecca, Chiara; Cereda, Carlo; Tschuor, Silvia; Staedler, Claudio; Nadarajah, Navarajah; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Gobbi, Claudio; Wetzel, Stephan; Santini, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a reference MRI technique for the evaluation of neurological disorders. Few publications have investigated the application of DWI for inflammatory demyelinating lesions. The purpose of the study was to describe diffusion-weighted imaging characteristics of acute, spinal demyelinating lesions. Six consecutive patients (two males, four females; aged 28-64 years) with acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions were studied in a prospective case series design from June 2009 to October 2010. We performed magnetic resonance imaging studies from 2 to 14 days from symptom onset on the patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (n = 3) or clinically isolated syndrome (n = 3). Main outcome measures were diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient pattern (ADC) of acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions. All spinal lesions showed a restricted diffusion pattern (DWI+/ADC-) with a 24% median ADC signal decrease. A good correlation between clinical presentation and lesion site was observed. Acute demyelinating spinal cord lesions show a uniform restricted diffusion pattern. Clinicians and neuro-radiologists should be aware that this pattern is not necessarily confirmatory for an ischaemic aetiology. (orig.)

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute demyelinating myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecca, Chiara; Cereda, Carlo; Tschuor, Silvia; Staedler, Claudio; Nadarajah, Navarajah; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Gobbi, Claudio [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Neurologia e Neuroradiologia, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Lugano (Switzerland); Wetzel, Stephan [Swiss Neuro Institute (SNI), Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Hirslanden Klinik Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Santini, Francesco [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-06-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a reference MRI technique for the evaluation of neurological disorders. Few publications have investigated the application of DWI for inflammatory demyelinating lesions. The purpose of the study was to describe diffusion-weighted imaging characteristics of acute, spinal demyelinating lesions. Six consecutive patients (two males, four females; aged 28-64 years) with acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions were studied in a prospective case series design from June 2009 to October 2010. We performed magnetic resonance imaging studies from 2 to 14 days from symptom onset on the patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (n = 3) or clinically isolated syndrome (n = 3). Main outcome measures were diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient pattern (ADC) of acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions. All spinal lesions showed a restricted diffusion pattern (DWI+/ADC-) with a 24% median ADC signal decrease. A good correlation between clinical presentation and lesion site was observed. Acute demyelinating spinal cord lesions show a uniform restricted diffusion pattern. Clinicians and neuro-radiologists should be aware that this pattern is not necessarily confirmatory for an ischaemic aetiology. (orig.)

  14. 2,3,7,8-TCDD enhances the sensitivity of mice to concanavalin A immune-mediated liver injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullerton, Aaron M., E-mail: fuller22@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, 1129 Farm Lane, Room 215, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Roth, Robert A., E-mail: rothr@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Food Safety and Toxicology Building, 1129 Farm Lane, Room 221, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Ganey, Patricia E., E-mail: ganey@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Food Safety and Toxicology Building, 1129 Farm Lane, Room 214, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Inflammation plays a major role in immune-mediated liver injury, and exposure to environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to alter the inflammatory response as well as affect immune cell activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD pretreatment exacerbates hepatotoxicity in a murine model of immune-mediated liver injury induced by concanavalin A (Con A) administration. Mice were pretreated with 30 μg/kg TCDD or vehicle control on day zero and then given either Con A or saline intravenously on day four. Mice treated with TCDD did not develop liver injury; however, TCDD pretreatment increased liver injury resulting from moderate doses of Con A (4–10 mg/kg). TCDD-pretreated mice had altered plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, including interferon gamma (IFNγ), and TCDD/Con A-induced hepatotoxicity was attenuated in IFNγ knockout mice. At various times after treatment, intrahepatic immune cells were isolated, and expression of cell activation markers as well as cytolytic proteins was determined. TCDD pretreatment increased the proportion of activated natural killer T (NKT) cells and the percent of cells expressing Fas ligand (FasL) after Con A administration. In addition FasL knockout mice and mice treated with CD18 antiserum were both protected from TCDD/Con A-induced hepatotoxicity, suggesting a requirement for direct cell–cell interaction between effector immune cells and parenchymal cell targets in the development of liver injury from TCDD/Con A treatment. In summary, exposure to TCDD increased NKT cell activation and exacerbated immune-mediated liver injury induced by Con A through a mechanism involving IFNγ and FasL expression. -- Highlights: ► TCDD pretreatment sensitizes mice to Con A-induced hepatotoxicity. ► TCDD pretreatment increased concentration of IFNγ in plasma after Con A. ► Con A-induced activation of NKT cells was increased by TCDD pretreatment. ► Fas

  15. 2,3,7,8-TCDD enhances the sensitivity of mice to concanavalin A immune-mediated liver injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton, Aaron M.; Roth, Robert A.; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a major role in immune-mediated liver injury, and exposure to environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to alter the inflammatory response as well as affect immune cell activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD pretreatment exacerbates hepatotoxicity in a murine model of immune-mediated liver injury induced by concanavalin A (Con A) administration. Mice were pretreated with 30 μg/kg TCDD or vehicle control on day zero and then given either Con A or saline intravenously on day four. Mice treated with TCDD did not develop liver injury; however, TCDD pretreatment increased liver injury resulting from moderate doses of Con A (4–10 mg/kg). TCDD-pretreated mice had altered plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, including interferon gamma (IFNγ), and TCDD/Con A-induced hepatotoxicity was attenuated in IFNγ knockout mice. At various times after treatment, intrahepatic immune cells were isolated, and expression of cell activation markers as well as cytolytic proteins was determined. TCDD pretreatment increased the proportion of activated natural killer T (NKT) cells and the percent of cells expressing Fas ligand (FasL) after Con A administration. In addition FasL knockout mice and mice treated with CD18 antiserum were both protected from TCDD/Con A-induced hepatotoxicity, suggesting a requirement for direct cell–cell interaction between effector immune cells and parenchymal cell targets in the development of liver injury from TCDD/Con A treatment. In summary, exposure to TCDD increased NKT cell activation and exacerbated immune-mediated liver injury induced by Con A through a mechanism involving IFNγ and FasL expression. -- Highlights: ► TCDD pretreatment sensitizes mice to Con A-induced hepatotoxicity. ► TCDD pretreatment increased concentration of IFNγ in plasma after Con A. ► Con A-induced activation of NKT cells was increased by TCDD pretreatment. ► Fas

  16. B Cell, Th17, and Neutrophil Related Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine/Chemokines Are Elevated in MOG Antibody Associated Demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Kothur

    Full Text Available Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG Ab associated demyelination represents a subgroup of autoimmune demyelination that is separate from multiple sclerosis and aquaporin 4 IgG-positive NMO, and can have a relapsing course. Unlike NMO and MS, there is a paucity of literature on immunopathology and CSF cytokine/chemokines in MOG Ab associated demyelination.To study the differences in immunopathogenesis based on cytokine/chemokine profile in MOG Ab-positive (POS and -negative (NEG groups.We measured 34 cytokines/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay in CSF collected from paediatric patients with serum MOG Ab POS [acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM = 8, transverse myelitis (TM = 2 n = 10] and serum MOG Ab NEG (ADEM = 5, TM = 4, n = 9 demyelination. We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls.The CSF cytokine and chemokine levels were higher in both MOG Ab POS and MOG Ab NEG demyelination groups compared to controls. The CSF in MOG Ab POS patients showed predominant elevation of B cell related cytokines/chemokines (CXCL13, APRIL, BAFF and CCL19 as well as some of Th17 related cytokines (IL-6 AND G-CSF compared to MOG Ab NEG group (all p<0.01. In addition, patients with elevated CSF MOG antibodies had higher CSF CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, IL-17A and G-CSF than patients without CSF MOG antibodies.Our findings suggest that MOG Ab POS patients have a more pronounced CNS inflammatory response with elevation of predominant humoral associated cytokines/chemokines, as well as some Th 17 and neutrophil related cytokines/chemokines suggesting a differential inflammatory pathogenesis associated with MOG antibody seropositivity. This cytokine/chemokine profiling provides new insight into disease pathogenesis, and improves our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. In addition, some of these molecules may represent potential immunomodulatory targets.

  17. Modern MRI tools for the characterization of acute demyelinating lesions: value of chemical shift and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueker, W.; Mehnert, F.; Mader, I.; Naegele, T.; Ruff, J.; Gaertner, S.

    2004-01-01

    Acute demyelinating lesions occur in various inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Apart from multiple sclerosis, most cases can be attributed to an overshooting immunological response to infectious agents called acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). ADEM, which is mostly characterized by a monophasic course, has a multiphasic variant (MDEM). The early application of corticosteroids has been shown to be beneficial for the outcome; thus, an early diagnosis is highly desirable. Furthermore, the differential diagnosis ruling out neoplastic disorders may be difficult using conventional MRI alone. The potential diagnostic value of advanced MR techniques such as chemical shift imaging (CSI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was investigated in a patient with MDEM, who had a new lesion in continuity with the initial disease manifestation. CSI was performed at 1.5 T with a long echo time of 135 ms for the evaluation of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) and with short TE of 30 ms for macromolecules (mm) and myo-Inositol (mI). DWI was performed using a single-shot isotropic EPI sequence. Whereas acute and chronic areas of demyelination were neither distinguishable on T2- nor on contrast-enhanced T1-weigted images, CSI and DWI revealed different metabolite concentrations and diffusion characteristics within the composite lesion, clearly separating acute from chronic areas of demyelination. In conclusion, the addition of CSI and DWI may add to the diagnostic power of MRI in the setting of demyelinating disorders by identifying areas of acute and chronic demyelination, even in the absence of contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  18. Good agreement of conventional and gel-based direct agglutination test in immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piek Christine J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare a gel-based test with the traditional direct agglutination test (DAT for the diagnosis of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA. Methods Canine (n = 247 and feline (n = 74 blood samples were submitted for DAT testing to two laboratories. A subset of canine samples was categorized as having idiopathic IMHA, secondary IMHA, or no IMHA. Results The kappa values for agreement between the tests were in one laboratory 0.86 for canine and 0.58 for feline samples, and in the other 0.48 for canine samples. The lower agreement in the second laboratory was caused by a high number of positive canine DATs for which the gel test was negative. This group included significantly more dogs with secondary IMHA. Conclusions The gel test might be used as a screening test for idiopathic IMHA and is less often positive in secondary IMHA than the DAT.

  19. An Evaluation of Twenty Years of EU Framework Programme-funded Immune-mediated Inflammatory Translational Research in Non-human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Geraldine Haanstra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ageing western societies are facing an increasing prevalence of chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases for which often no effective treatments exist, resulting in increasing health care expenditure. Despite high investments in drug development, the number of promising new drug candidates decreases. We propose that preclinical research in non-human primate can help to bridge the gap between drug discovery and drug prescription.Translational research covers various stages of drug development of which pre-clinical efficacy tests in valid animal models is usually the last stage. Pre-clinical research in non-human primates may be essential in the evaluation of new drugs or therapies when a relevant rodent model is not available. Non-human primate models for life-threatening or severely debilitating diseases in humans are available at the Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC. These have been instrumental in translational research for several decades.In order to stimulate European health research and innovation from bench to bedside, the European Commission (EC has invested heavily in access to non-human primate research for more than 20 years. BPRC has hosted European users in a series of transnational access programs covering a wide range of research areas with the common theme being immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present an overview of the results and give an account of the studies performed as part of European Union Framework Programme (EU FP-funded translational non-human primate research performed at the BPRC. The data illustrate value of translational non-human primate research for the development of new therapies and emphasize the importance of EU FP funding

  20. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A; Raddatz, Barbara B; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease.

  1. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractPatients with a chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) may respond to treatment with corticosteroids and to plasmapheresis, which was demonstrated in controlled clinical studies. In an uncontrolled study it was found that 13/17 CIDP patients had a rapid and

  2. Cutaneous Alternaria infectoria infection in a dog in association with therapeutic immunosuppression for the management of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dedola, C.; Stuart, A.P.G.; Ridyard, A.E.; Else, R.W.; Van den Broek, T.; Choi, J.S.; de Hoog, G.S.; Thoday, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    A 4-year-old, ovariohysterectomized, English springer spaniel on immunosuppressive therapy was re-examined for the review of its immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia and the recent development of skin lesions. For the 3 months since hospital discharge, the dog had been receiving 1.3 mg/kg prednisolone

  3. Spontaneous, Immune-Mediated Gastric Inflammation in SAMP1/YitFc Mice, a Model of Crohn’s-Like Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Brian K.; Pastorelli, Luca; Brogi, Marco; Garg, Rekha R.; McBride, James A.; Rowlett, Robert M.; Arrieta, Marie C.; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Keller, Erik J.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Mize, James R.; Cominelli, Fabio; Meddings, Jonathan B.; Pizarro, Theresa T.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Crohn’s disease (CD) can develop in any region of the gastrointestinal tract, including the stomach. The etiology and pathogenesis of Crohn’s gastritis are poorly understood, treatment approaches are limited, and there are not many suitable animal models for study. We characterized the features and mechanisms of chronic gastritis in SAMP1/YitFc (SAMP) mice, a spontaneous model of CD-like ileitis, along with possible therapeutic approaches. Methods Stomachs from specific pathogen-free and germ-free SAMP and AKR mice (controls) were evaluated histologically; the presence of Helicobacter spp. was tested in fecal pellets by PCR analysis. In vivo gastric permeability was quantified by fractional excretion of sucrose and epithelial tight junction protein expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis. The effects of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or corticosteroids were measured and the ability of pathogenic immune cells to mediate gastritis was assessed in adoptive transfer experiments. Results SAMP mice developed Helicobacter-negative gastritis, characterized by aggregates of mononuclear cells, diffuse accumulation of neutrophils, and disruption of epithelial architecture; SAMP mice also had increased in gastric permeability compared with controls, without alterations in expression of tight junction proteins. The gastritis and associated permeability defect observed in SAMP mice were independent of bacterial colonization and reduced by administration of corticosteroids but not a PPI. CD4+ T cells isolated from draining mesenteric lymph nodes of SAMP mice were sufficient to induce gastritis in recipient SCID mice. Conclusions In SAMP mice, gastritis develops spontaneously and has many features of CD-like ileitis. These mice are a useful model to study Helicobacter-negative, immune-mediated Crohn’s gastritis. PMID:21704001

  4. Anti-HMGCR antibodies as a biomarker for immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies: A history of statins and experience from a large international multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, Lucile; Allenbach, Yves; Benveniste, Olivier; Boyer, Olivier; Bossuyt, Xavier; Bentow, Chelsea; Phillips, Joe; Mammen, Andrew; Van Damme, Philip; Westhovens, René; Ghirardello, Anna; Doria, Andrea; Choi, May Y; Fritzler, Marvin J; Schmeling, Heinrike; Muro, Yoshinao; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Ortiz-Villalvazo, Miguel A; Bizzaro, Nicola; Infantino, Maria; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Peng, Qinglin; Wang, Guochun; Vencovský, Jiří; Klein, Martin; Krystufkova, Olga; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Hue, Sophie; Belmondo, Thibaut; Danko, Katalin; Mahler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In an effort to find naturally occurring substances that reduce cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), statins were first discovered by Endo in 1972. With the widespread prescription and use of statins to decrease morbidity from myocardial infarction and stroke, it was noted that approximately 5% of all statin users experienced muscle pain and weakness during treatment. In a smaller proportion of patients, the myopathy progressed to severe morbidity marked by proximal weakness and severe muscle wasting. Remarkably, Mammen and colleagues were the first to discover that the molecular target of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is an autoantibody target in patients that develop an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). These observations have been confirmed in a number of studies but, until today, a multi-center, international study of IMNM, related idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), other auto-inflammatory conditions and controls has not been published. Accordingly, an international, multi-center study investigated the utility of anti-HMGCR antibodies in the diagnosis of statin-associated IMNM in comparison to different forms of IIM and controls. This study included samples from patients with different forms of IIM (n=1250) and patients with other diseases (n=656) that were collected from twelve sites and tested for anti-HMGCR antibodies by ELISA. This study confirmed that anti-HMGCR autoantibodies, when found in conjunction with statin use, characterize a subset of IIM who are older and have necrosis on muscle biopsy. Taken together, the data to date indicates that testing for anti-HMGCR antibodies is important in the differential diagnosis of IIM and might be considered for future classification criteria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Acutely damaged axons are remyelinated in multiple sclerosis and experimental models of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Verena; van der Meer, Franziska; Wrzos, Claudia; Scheidt, Uta; Bahn, Erik; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang; Junker, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Remyelination is in the center of new therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis to resolve and improve disease symptoms and protect axons from further damage. Although remyelination is considered beneficial in the long term, it is not known, whether this is also the case early in lesion formation. Additionally, the precise timing of acute axonal damage and remyelination has not been assessed so far. To shed light onto the interrelation between axons and the myelin sheath during de- and remyelination, we employed cuprizone- and focal lysolecithin-induced demyelination and performed time course experiments assessing the evolution of early and late stage remyelination and axonal damage. We observed damaged axons with signs of remyelination after cuprizone diet cessation and lysolecithin injection. Similar observations were made in early multiple sclerosis lesions. To assess the correlation of remyelination and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis lesions, we took advantage of a cohort of patients with early and late stage remyelinated lesions and assessed the number of APP- and SMI32- positive damaged axons and the density of SMI31-positive and silver impregnated preserved axons. Early de- and remyelinating lesions did not differ with respect to axonal density and axonal damage, but we observed a lower axonal density in late stage demyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions than in remyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions. Our findings suggest that remyelination may not only be protective over a long period of time, but may play an important role in the immediate axonal recuperation after a demyelinating insult. © 2017 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine Expression Profile in Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Serena; Zanotta, Nunzia; Sartori, Arianna; Bratina, Alessio; Manganotti, Paolo; Trevisan, Giusto; Comar, Manola

    2018-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis in patients with particular neurologic disorders is a powerful tool to evaluate specific central nervous system inflammatory markers for diagnostic needs, because CSF represents the specific immune micro-environment to the central nervous system. CSF samples from 49 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and non-inflammatory neurologic disorders (NIND) as controls were submitted to protein expression profiles of 47 inflammatory biomarkers by multiplex Luminex bead assay to investigate possible differences in the inflammatory process for MS and CIDP. Our results showed differences in CSF cytokine levels in MS and CIDP; in particular, IL12 (p40) was significantly highly expressed in MS in comparison with CIDP and NIND, while SDF-1α and SCGF-β were significantly highly expressed in CIDP cohort when compared to MS and NIND. IL-9, IL-13, and IL-17 had higher expression levels in NIND if compared with the other groups. Our study showed that, despite some common pathogenic mechanisms, central and peripheral nervous system demyelinating diseases, such as MS and CIDP, differ in some specific inflammatory soluble proteins in CSF, underlining differences in the immune response involved in those autoimmune diseases.

  7. Maternal Immune-Mediated Conditions, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and Developmental Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, Kristen; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2014-01-01

    The maternal immune system may play a role in offspring neurodevelopment. We examined whether maternal autoimmune disease, asthma, and allergy were associated with child autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delay without autism (DD) using 560 ASD cases, 391 typically developing controls, and 168 DD cases from the CHildhood Autism Risk…

  8. Novel Association Between Immune-Mediated Susceptibility Loci and Persistent Autoantibody Positivity in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, Caroline A; Onengut, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    Islet autoantibodies detected at disease onset in patients with type 1 diabetes are signs of an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells. To further investigate the genetic determinants of autoantibody positivity, we performed dense immune-focused genotyping on the Immunochip array...... and tested for association with seven disease-specific autoantibodies in a large cross-sectional cohort of 6,160 type 1 diabetes-affected siblings. The genetic association with positivity for GAD autoantibodies (GADAs), IA2 antigen (IA-2A), zinc transporter 8, thyroid peroxidase, gastric parietal cells (PCAs...... and constitute candidates for early screening. Major susceptibility loci for islet autoantibodies are separate from type 1 diabetes risk, which may have consequences for intervention strategies to reduce autoimmunity....

  9. Extensive immune-mediated hippocampal damage in mice surviving infection with neuroadapted Sindbis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Griffin, Diane E.

    2003-01-01

    Viral infections of the central nervous system and immune responses to these infections cause a variety of neurological diseases. Infection of weanling mice with Sindbis virus causes acute nonfatal encephalomyelitis followed by clearance of infectious virus, but persistence of viral RNA. Infection with a neuroadapted strain of Sindbis virus (NSV) causes fatal encephalomyelitis, but passive transfer of immune serum after infection protects from fatal disease and infectious virus is cleared. To determine whether persistent NSV RNA is associated with neurological damage, we examined the brains of recovered mice and found progressive loss of the hippocampal gyrus, adjacent white matter, and deep cerebral cortex associated with mononuclear cell infiltration. Mice deficient in CD4 + T cells showed less tissue loss, while mice lacking CD8 + T cells showed lesions comparable to those in immunocompetent mice. Mice deficient in both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells developed severe tissue loss similar to immunocompetent mice and this was associated with extensive infiltration of macrophages. The number of CD4 + cells and macrophage/microglial cells, but not CD8 + cells, infiltrating the hippocampal gyrus was correlated with the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling positive pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that CD4 + T cells can promote progressive neuronal death and tissue injury, despite clearance of infectious virus

  10. Quercetin treatment regulates the Na+,K+-ATPase activity, peripheral cholinergic enzymes, and oxidative stress in a rat model of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fabiano B; Gutierres, Jessié M; Beckmann, Diego; Santos, Rosmarini P; Thomé, Gustavo R; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Stefanello, Naiara; Andrades, Amanda; Aiello, Graciane; Ripplinger, Angel; Lucio, Bruna M; Ineu, Rafael; Mazzanti, Alexandre; Morsch, Vera; Schetinger, Maria Rosa; Andrade, Cinthia M

    2018-07-01

    Quercetin is reported to exert a plethora of health benefits through many different mechanisms of action. This versatility and presence in the human diet has attracted the attention of the scientific community, resulting in a huge output of in vitro and in vivo (preclinical) studies. Therefore, we hypothesized that quercetin can protect Na + ,K + -ATPase activity in the central nervous system, reestablish the peripheral cholinesterases activities, and reduce oxidative stress during demyelination events in rats. In line with this expectation, our study aims to find out how quercetin acts on the Na + ,K + -ATPase activity in the central nervous system, peripheral cholinesterases, and stress oxidative markers in an experimental model of demyelinating disease. Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: vehicle, quercetin, ethidium bromide (EB), and EB plus quercetin groups. The animals were treated once a day with vehicle (ethanol 20%) or quercetin 50 mg/kg for 7 (demyelination phase, by gavage) or 21 days (remyelination phase) after EB (0.1%, 10 μL) injection (intrapontine).The encephalon was removed, and the pons, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum were dissected to verify the Na + ,K + -ATPase activity. Our results showed that quercetin protected against reduction in Na + ,K + -ATPase in the pons and cerebellum in the demyelination phase, and it increased the activity of this enzyme in the remyelination phase. During the demyelination, quercetin promoted the increase in acetylcholinesterase activity in whole blood and lymphocytes induced by EB, and it reduced the increase in acetylcholinesterase activity in lymphocytes in the remyelination phase. On day 7, EB increased the superoxide dismutase and decreased catalase activities, as well as increased the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels. Taken together, these results indicated that quercetin regulates the Na + ,K + -ATPase activity, affects the alterations of redox state

  11. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Heart in the Setting of Autoimmune Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J. Lindley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is caused by the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA which lead to allograft injury in part via complement activation. The inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (IDP are inflammatory disorders of the nervous system, involving both cellular and humoral immune mechanisms directed against myelin. Case Report. A 58-year-old man five years after heart transplant presented with progressive dyspnea, imbalance, dysphagia, and weakness. Nerve conduction studies and electromyogram were consistent with IDP. Plasmapheresis and high-dose steroids resulted in improvement in neurologic symptoms. Within two weeks, he was readmitted with anasarca and acute renal failure, requiring intravenous furosemide and inotropic support. Echocardiogram and right heart catheterization revealed reduced cardiac function and elevated filling pressures. DSA was positive against HLA DR53, and endomyocardial biopsy revealed grade 1R chronic inflammation, with strong capillary endothelial immunostaining for C4d. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG were initiated. His anasarca and renal failure subsequently resolved, echocardiogram showed improved function off inotropes, and anti-DR53 MFI was reduced by 57%. Conclusions. This is an example of a single immune-mediated process causing concurrent IDP and AMR. The improvement in cardiac function and neurologic symptoms with plasmapheresis, IVIG, and high-dose steroids argues for a unifying antibody-mediated mechanism.

  12. Effects of therapeutic plasma exchange on serum immunoglobulin concentrations in a dog with refractory immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagnelli, Alyssa M; Walton, Stuart A; Liu, Chin-Chi; Acierno, Mark J

    2018-05-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 9-year-old 8.3-kg (18.3-lb) neutered male Miniature Schnauzer was referred for diagnosis and treatment of a sudden onset of lethargy, anorexia, vomiting, and pallor. CLINICAL FINDINGS On physical examination, the dog was lethargic with pale mucous membranes and a capillary refill time ≥ 2 seconds. Skin and sclera were mildly icteric. Signs of pain were elicited during abdominal palpation, and an enlarged spleen was noted. Results of agglutination testing and cytologic findings were consistent with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA). No contributing factors for development of IMHA were identified. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Initial treatment included management with immunosuppressant medications. Three packed RBC transfusions were administered, but clinical signs continued to progress. Therefore, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was performed 5 and 9 days after admission. Following each TPE procedure, the dog had an appreciable clinical improvement and decrease in RBC autoagglutination, and the Hct stabilized. Serum IgG and IgM concentrations were measured during and after both TPE procedures. Despite anticoagulative treatment, the dog developed a thrombus in the splenic vein, necessitating a splenectomy. CLINICAL RELEVANCE The decrease and rebound in serum IgG and IgM concentrations following TPE provided evidence that TPE may have the same immunomodulatory effects in dogs as have been proposed to occur in people. Further, findings suggested that TPE may be a useful alternative in dogs with refractory IMHA when traditional treatments fail.

  13. Optimization of the THP-1 activation assay to detect pharmaceuticals with potential to cause immune mediated drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Daniele; Galbiati, Valentina; Gatti, Nicolò; Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L; Corsini, Emanuela

    2015-10-01

    Despite important impacts of systemic hypersensitivity induced by pharmaceuticals, for such endpoint no reliable preclinical approaches are available. We previously established an in vitro test to identify contact and respiratory allergens based on interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in THP-1 cells. Here, we challenged it for identification of pharmaceuticals associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions, with the idea that drug sensitizers share common mechanisms of cell activation. Cells were exposed to drugs associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions (streptozotocin, sulfamethoxazole, neomycin, probenecid, clonidine, procainamide, ofloxacin, methyl salicylate), while metformin was used as negative drug. Differently to chemicals, drugs tested were well tolerated, except clonidine and probenecid, with no signs of cytotoxicity up to 1-2mg/ml. THP-1 activation assay was adjusted, and conditions, that allow identification of all sensitizing drugs tested, were established. Next, using streptozotocin and selective inhibitors of PKC-β and p38 MAPK, two pathways involved in chemical allergen-induced cell activation, we tested the hypothesis that similar pathways were also involved in drug-induced IL-8 production and CD86 upregulation. Results indicated that drugs and chemical allergens share similar activation pathways. Finally, we made a structure-activity hypothesis related to hypersensitivity reactions, trying to individuate structural requisite that can be involved in immune mediated adverse reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cytokines in the host response to Candida vaginitis: Identifying a role for non-classical immune mediators, S100 alarmins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Junko; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), caused by Candida albicans, affects a significant number of women during their reproductive years. More than two decades of research have been focused on the mechanisms associated with susceptibility or resistance to symptomatic infection. Adaptive immunity by Th1-type CD4+ T cells and downstream cytokine responses are considered the predominant host defense mechanisms against mucosal Candida infections. However, numerous clinical and animal studies have indicated no or limited protective role of cells and cytokines of the Th1 or Th2 lineage against vaginal infection. The role for Th17 is only now begun to be investigated in-depth for VVC with results already showing significant controversy. On the other hand, a clinical live-challenge study and an established animal model have shown that a symptomatic condition is intimately associated with the vaginal infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) but with no effect on vaginal fungal burden. Subsequent studies identified S100A8 and S100A9 Alarmins as key chemotactic mediators of the acute PMN response. These chemotactic danger signals appear to be secreted by vaginal epithelial cells upon interaction and early adherence of Candida. Thus, instead of a putative immunodeficiency against Candida involving classical immune cells and cytokines of the adaptive response, the pathological inflammation in VVC is now considered a consequence of a non-productive innate response initiated by non-classical immune mediators. PMID:22182685

  15. Rickettsial retinitis: Direct bacterial infection or an immune-mediated response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Chawla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious retinitis postfebrile illness is known to be caused by chikungunya, dengue, West Nile virus, Bartonella, Lyme's disease, Rift Valley fever, rickettsia, Herpes viruses etc. Rickettsia is Gram-negative bacteria transmitted by arthropods vectors. Ocular involvement is common including conjunctivitis, keratitis, anterior uveitis, panuveitis, retinitis, retinal vascular changes, and optic nerve involvement. Retinitis lesions in rickettsia can occur because of an immunological response to the bacteria or because of direct invasion and proliferation of bacteria in the inner retina. We report such a case of bilateral rickettsial retinitis proven by serology which worsened on systemic steroids and responded dramatically to therapy with oral doxycycline and steroid taper. We thus believe that direct bacterial invasion plays a major role in the pathogenesis of rickettsial retinitis.

  16. Impact of the Gut Microbiota on Intestinal Immunity Mediated by Tryptophan Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Xu, Kang; Liu, Hongnan; Liu, Gang; Bai, Miaomiao; Peng, Can; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2018-01-01

    The gut microbiota influences the health of the host, especially with regard to gut immune homeostasis and the intestinal immune response. In addition to serving as a nutrient enhancer, L-tryptophan (Trp) plays crucial roles in the balance between intestinal immune tolerance and gut microbiota maintenance. Recent discoveries have underscored that changes in the microbiota modulate the host immune system by modulating Trp metabolism. Moreover, Trp, endogenous Trp metabolites (kynurenines, serotonin, and melatonin), and bacterial Trp metabolites (indole, indolic acid, skatole, and tryptamine) have profound effects on gut microbial composition, microbial metabolism, the host's immune system, the host-microbiome interface, and host immune system–intestinal microbiota interactions. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the regulation of intestinal immunity by Trp metabolites (as ligands of AhR), which is beneficial for immune homeostasis. Among Trp metabolites, AhR ligands consist of endogenous metabolites, including kynurenine, kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, and cinnabarinic acid, and bacterial metabolites, including indole, indole propionic acid, indole acetic acid, skatole, and tryptamine. Additional factors, such as aging, stress, probiotics, and diseases (spondyloarthritis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer), which are associated with variability in Trp metabolism, can influence Trp–microbiome–immune system interactions in the gut and also play roles in regulating gut immunity. This review clarifies how the gut microbiota regulates Trp metabolism and identifies the underlying molecular mechanisms of these interactions. Increased mechanistic insight into how the microbiota modulates the intestinal immune system through Trp metabolism may allow for the identification of innovative microbiota-based diagnostics, as well as appropriate nutritional supplementation of Trp to prevent or alleviate intestinal inflammation

  17. Clinical Significance of A Waves in Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarasimhan, Sindhuja; Venkatraman, Chandramouleeswaran; Vellaichamy, Kannan; Ranganathan, Lakshminarasimhan

    2018-05-25

    A wave is a late response recognized during recording of F waves. Though they might be seen in healthy subjects, their presence assumes significance in a patient presenting with polyradiculoneuropathy. In this prospective study, 75 patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) were enrolled. They were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of A waves. Clinical features, electrophysiological parameters and extent of clinical recovery in short-term follow-up were analyzed. A waves were present in 49 out of 75 patients (65%). Most common pattern observed was multiple A waves. Prevalence of A waves was more in lower limb nerves than upper limb nerves. Occurrence of A waves correlated with the presence of conduction block. Patients with A waves had higher Hughes grade (P = 0.003) and lower Medical Research Council sum score at 6 weeks of follow-up (P = 0.04) as compared to patients without A waves. A waves are common in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy form of Guillain Barre syndrome and are considered as a marker of demyelination. Long-term follow-up studies are required to ascertain their significance in prognostication and assessing recovery.

  18. Function of endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase in innate immunity-mediated programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohong; Caplan, Jeffrey; Mamillapalli, Padmavathi; Czymmek, Kirk; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) initiated at the pathogen-infected sites during the plant innate immune response is thought to prevent the development of disease. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of an ER-localized type IIB Ca2+-ATPase (NbCA1) that function as a regulator of PCD. Silencing of NbCA1 accelerates viral immune receptor N- and fungal-immune receptor Cf9-mediated PCD, as well as non-host pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and the general elicitor cryptogein-induced cell death. The accelerated PCD rescues loss-of-resistance phenotype of Rar1, HSP90-silenced plants, but not SGT1-silenced plants. Using a genetically encoded calcium sensor, we show that downregulation of NbCA1 results in the modulation of intracellular calcium signalling in response to cryptogein elicitor. We further show that NbCAM1 and NbrbohB function as downstream calcium decoders in N-immune receptor-mediated PCD. Our results indicate that ER-Ca2+-ATPase is a component of the calcium efflux pathway that controls PCD during an innate immune response. PMID:20075858

  19. Treatment of pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: Challenges, controversies, and questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an uncommon acquired disorder of unknown cause, presumed to have an immunological basis. We report 20 patients seen at Children′s Hospital Los Angeles over a period of 10 years. The outcome of our patients was favorable in a vast majority with good response to various treatments instituted. However, residual neurologic deficit was common. The choice of treatment modality was empirical and selected by the treating neurologist. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and corticosteroids were most commonly utilized for treatment. Plasmapheresis, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and abatacept were added if the patients were refractory to IVIG or became corticosteroid dependent. The spectrum of disease severity ranged from a single monophasic episode, to multiphasic with infrequent relapses with good response to IVIG, to progressive disease refractory to multiple therapies.

  20. Neuroprotective role of quercetin in locomotor activities and cholinergic neurotransmission in rats experimentally demyelinated with ethidium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Diego V; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Mazzanti, Cinthia M; Dos Santos, Rosmarini P; Andrades, Amanda O; Aiello, Graciane; Rippilinger, Angel; Graça, Dominguita L; Abdalla, Fátima H; Oliveira, Lizielle S; Gutierres, Jessié M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Mazzanti, Alexandre

    2014-05-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the flavonoid quercetin can prevent alterations in the behavioral tests and of cholinergic neurotransmission in rats submitted to the ethidium bromide (EB) experimental demyelination model during events of demyelination and remyelination. Wistar rats were randomly distributed into four groups (20 animals per group): Control (pontine saline injection and treatment with ethanol), Querc (pontine saline injection and treatment with quercetin), EB (pontine 0.1% EB injection and treatment with ethanol), and EB+Querc (pontine 0.1% EB injection and treatment with quercetin). The groups Querc and Querc+EB were treated once daily with quercetin (50mg/kg) diluted in 25% ethanol solution (1ml/kg) and the animals of the control and EB groups were treated once daily with 25% ethanol solution (1ml/kg). Two stages were observed: phase of demyelination (peak on day 7) and phase of remyelination (peak on day 21 post-injection). Behavioral tests (beam walking, foot fault and inclined plane test), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and lipid peroxidation in pons, cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex were measured. The quercetin promoted earlier locomotor recovery, suggesting that there was demyelination prevention or further remyelination velocity as well as it was able to prevent the inhibition of AChE activity and the increase of lipidic peroxidation, suggesting that this compound can protect cholinergic neurotransmission. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the neuroprotective role of quercetin and the importance of an antioxidant diet in humans to provide benefits in neurodegenerative diseases such as MS. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Differential local tissue permissiveness influences the final fate of GPR17-expressing oligodendrocyte precursors in two distinct models of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, Giusy T; Marangon, Davide; Negri, Camilla; Menichetti, Gianluca; Fumagalli, Marta; Gelosa, Paolo; Dimou, Leda; Furlan, Roberto; Lecca, Davide; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2018-05-01

    Promoting remyelination is recognized as a novel strategy to foster repair in neurodegenerative demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In this respect, the receptor GPR17, recently emerged as a new target for remyelination, is expressed by early oligodendrocyte precursors (OPCs) and after a certain differentiation stage it has to be downregulated to allow progression to mature myelinating oligodendrocytes. Here, we took advantage of the first inducible GPR17 reporter mouse line (GPR17-iCreER T2 xCAG-eGFP mice) allowing to follow the final fate of GPR17 + cells by tamoxifen-induced GFP-labeling to unveil the destiny of these cells in two demyelination models: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), characterized by marked immune cell activation and inflammation, and cuprizone induced demyelination, where myelin dysfunction is achieved by a toxic insult. In both models, demyelination induced a strong increase of fluorescent GFP + cells at damaged areas. However, only in the cuprizone model reacting GFP + cells terminally differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes, thus contributing to remyelination. In EAE, GFP + cells were blocked at immature stages and never became myelinating oligodendrocytes. We suggest these strikingly distinct fates be due to different permissiveness of the local CNS environment. Based on previously reported GPR17 activation by emergency signals (e.g., Stromal Derived Factor-1), we propose that a marked inflammatory milieu, such as that reproduced in EAE, induces GPR17 overactivation resulting in impaired downregulation, untimely and prolonged permanence in OPCs, leading, in turn, to differentiation blockade. Combined treatments with remyelinating agents and anti-inflammatory drugs may represent new potential adequate strategies to halt neurodegeneration and foster recovery. © 2018 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Changes in Vaginal Microbiota and Immune Mediators in HIV-1-Seronegative Kenyan Women Initiating Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxby, Alison C; Fredricks, David N; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Ásbjörnsdóttir, Kristjana; Masese, Linnet; Fiedler, Tina L; De Rosa, Stephen; Jaoko, Walter; Kiarie, James N; Overbaugh, Julie; McClelland, R Scott

    2016-04-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is associated with HIV acquisition. We studied changes in vaginal microbiota and inflammatory milieu after DMPA initiation. In a cohort of HIV-negative Kenyan women, we collected monthly vaginal swabs over 1 year before and after DMPA. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we compared quantities of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, Lactobacillus iners, Gardnerella vaginalis, and total bacterial load (16S ribosomal RNA gene levels). Six vaginal immune mediators were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Trends in the detection and quantity of bacteria were estimated by logistic and linear mixed-effects regression. From 2010 to 2012, 15 HIV-seronegative women initiated DMPA, contributing 85 visits (median, 6 visits/woman; range, 3-8 visits/woman). The median time of DMPA-exposed follow-up was 8.4 months (range, 1.5-11.6 months). Seven women (46%) had bacterial vaginosis within 70 days before DMPA start. L. iners was detected in 13 women (87%) before DMPA start, but other lactobacilli were rarely detected. Gardnerella vaginalis decreased by 0.21 log10 copies per swab per month after DMPA exposure (P = 0.01). Total bacterial load decreased by 0.08 log10 copies per swab per month of DMPA (P = 0.02). Sustained decreases in interleukin (IL)-6 (P = 0.03), IL-8 (P = 0.04), and IL-1 receptor antagonist (P vaginal bacterial concentrations and levels of inflammatory mediators. Further studies are warranted to outline components of the vaginal microbiota influenced by DMPA use and impact on HIV susceptibility.

  3. Immune mediated liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capac...

  4. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy in Children: A Review of Clinical Characteristics and Recommendations for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Karimi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP is an acquired and autoimmune neuropathy, characterized by a chronic, rapidly progressive, symmetric weakness. In children, abnormal gait is as a first symptom of muscle weakness. Evidence Acquisition: The diagnosis of CIDP is on the basis of clinical characteristics, electrodiagnostic that shows the severity of the disease, lumbar puncture and spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Results: The first-line treatments in childhood CIDP are intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG, corticosteroids, and plasmapheresis. Response to first-line therapies is usually satisfactory; nevertheless, recommendations regarding the choice of second-line therapy can only be prepared on the basis of the existing practice described in some of the case reports. Conclusions: This review demonstrated the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of childhood CIDP.

  5. Increased demyelination and axonal damage in metallothionein I+II-deficient mice during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Espejo, C; Martínez-Cáceres, E M

    2003-01-01

    Metallothioneins I+II (MT-I+II) are antioxidant, neuroprotective factors. We previously showed that MT-I+II deficiency during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) leads to increased disease incidence and clinical symptoms. Moreover, the inflammatory response of macrophages and T cells......, oxidative stress, and apoptotic cell death during EAE were increased by MT-I+II deficiency. We now show for the first time that demyelination and axonal damage are significantly increased in MT-I+II deficient mice during EAE. Furthermore, oligodendroglial regeneration, growth cone formation, and tissue...... repair including expression of trophic factors were significantly reduced in MT-I+II-deficient mice during EAE. Accordingly, MT-I+II have protective and regenerative roles in the brain....

  6. RNase L mediated protection from virus induced demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek D C Ireland

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available IFN-alpha/beta plays a critical role in limiting viral spread, restricting viral tropism and protecting mice from neurotropic coronavirus infection. However, the IFN-alpha/beta dependent mechanisms underlying innate anti-viral functions within the CNS are poorly understood. The role of RNase L in viral encephalomyelitis was explored based on its functions in inhibiting translation, inducing apoptosis, and propagating the IFN-alpha/beta pathway through RNA degradation intermediates. Infection of RNase L deficient (RL(-/- mice with a sub-lethal, demyelinating mouse hepatitis virus variant revealed that the majority of mice succumbed to infection by day 12 p.i. However, RNase L deficiency did not affect overall control of infectious virus, or diminish IFN-alpha/beta expression in the CNS. Furthermore, increased morbidity and mortality could not be attributed to altered proinflammatory signals or composition of cells infiltrating the CNS. The unique phenotype of infected RL(-/- mice was rather manifested in earlier onset and increased severity of demyelination and axonal damage in brain stem and spinal cord without evidence for enhanced neuronal infection. Increased tissue damage coincided with sustained brain stem infection, foci of microglia infection in grey matter, and increased apoptotic cells. These data demonstrate a novel protective role for RNase L in viral induced CNS encephalomyelitis, which is not reflected in overall viral control or propagation of IFN-alpha/beta mediated signals. Protective function is rather associated with cell type specific and regional restriction of viral replication in grey matter and ameliorated neurodegeneration and demyelination.

  7. Multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy and hamartoma syndrome associated with a de novo PTEN mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Phan, Vietxuan; Baker, Mark R; O'Sullivan, Julia; Jennings, Matthew J; Whittaker, Roger G; Müller, Juliane S; Duff, Jennifer; Griffin, Helen; Miller, James A L; Gorman, Grainne S; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F; Roos, Andreas; Swan, Laura E; Horvath, Rita

    2018-05-22

    To describe a patient with a multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy with onset in childhood and a mutation in phosphatase and tensin homolog ( PTEN ), a tumor suppressor gene associated with inherited tumor susceptibility conditions, macrocephaly, autism, ataxia, tremor, and epilepsy. Functional implications of this protein have been investigated in Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. We performed whole-exome sequencing in the patient's genomic DNA validated by Sanger sequencing. Immunoblotting, in vitro enzymatic assay, and label-free shotgun proteomic profiling were performed in the patient's fibroblasts. The predominant clinical presentation of the patient was a childhood onset, asymmetric progressive multifocal motor neuropathy. In addition, he presented with macrocephaly, autism spectrum disorder, and skin hamartomas, considered as clinical criteria for PTEN-related hamartoma tumor syndrome. Extensive tumor screening did not detect any malignancies. We detected a novel de novo heterozygous c.269T>C, p.(Phe90Ser) PTEN variant, which was absent in both parents. The pathogenicity of the variant is supported by altered expression of several PTEN-associated proteins involved in tumorigenesis. Moreover, fibroblasts showed a defect in catalytic activity of PTEN against the secondary substrate, phosphatidylinositol 3,4-trisphosphate. In support of our findings, focal hypermyelination leading to peripheral neuropathy has been reported in PTEN-deficient mice. We describe a novel phenotype, PTEN-associated multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy with a skin hamartoma syndrome. A similar mechanism may potentially underlie other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with involvement of the phosphatidylinositol pathway. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Immunological Demyelination Triggers Macrophage/Microglial Cells Activation without Inducing Astrogliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Cloutier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The glial scar formed by reactive astrocytes and axon growth inhibitors associated with myelin play important roles in the failure of axonal regeneration following central nervous system (CNS injury. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that immunological demyelination of the CNS facilitates regeneration of severed axons following spinal cord injury. In the present study, we evaluate whether immunological demyelination is accompanied with astrogliosis. We compared the astrogliosis and macrophage/microglial cell responses 7 days after either immunological demyelination or a stab injury to the dorsal funiculus. Both lesions induced a strong activated macrophage/microglial cells response which was significantly higher within regions of immunological demyelination. However, immunological demyelination regions were not accompanied by astrogliosis compared to stab injury that induced astrogliosis which extended several millimeters above and below the lesions, evidenced by astroglial hypertrophy, formation of a glial scar, and upregulation of intermediate filaments glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Moreover, a stab or a hemisection lesion directly within immunological demyelination regions did not induced astrogliosis within the immunological demyelination region. These results suggest that immunological demyelination creates a unique environment in which astrocytes do not form a glial scar and provides a unique model to understand the putative interaction between astrocytes and activated macrophage/microglial cells.

  9. Acquired Demyelinating Syndromes: Focus on Neuromyelitis Optica and childhood-onset Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.D. van Pelt - Gravesteijn (Daniëlle)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAcquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) cover a broad spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory demyelinating syndromes, of which multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common subtype. This thesis focuses on two relatively rare clinical subtypes of ADS: neuromyelitis optica

  10. Diagnostic value of the near-nerve needle sensory nerve conduction in sensory inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Zeki; Oh, Shin J

    2018-03-01

    In this study we report the diagnostic value of the near-nerve needle sensory nerve conduction study (NNN-SNCS) in sensory inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (IDP) in which the routine nerve conduction study was normal or non-diagnostic. The NNN-SNCS was performed to identify demyelination in the plantar nerves in 14 patients and in the median or ulnar nerve in 2 patients with sensory IDP. In 16 patients with sensory IDP, routine NCSs were either normal or non-diagnostic for demyelination. Demyelination was identified by NNN-SNCS by dispersion and/or slow nerve conduction velocity (NCV) below the demyelination marker. Immunotherapy was initiated in 11 patients, 10 of whom improved or remained stable. NNN-SNCS played an essential role in identifying demyelinaton in 16 patients with sensory IDP, leading to proper treatment. Muscle Nerve 57: 414-418, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Reported Changes in Dietary Behavior Following a First Clinical Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Rebecca D; Lucas, Robyn M; Brennan, Vanessa; Sherriff, Jill L; Begley, Andrea; Black, Lucinda J

    2018-01-01

    Although the current evidence is insufficient to recommend a special diet for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), dietary advice for people with MS is prolific online and in the media. This study aimed to describe dietary changes made in the year following a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (FCD), a common precursor to MS. We used follow-up data from the Ausimmune Study, a multicentre matched case-control study examining the environmental risk factors for a FCD. A total of 244 cases (60 male, 184 female) completed a 1-year follow-up interview, which included a question about dietary changes. We described the number and proportion (%) of participants who reported making dietary changes and the type of change made. We investigated independent predictors of making a dietary change using a multivariable logistic regression model. A total of 38% ( n  = 92) of participants at the 1-year follow-up reported making at least one dietary change over the last year. There were no statistically significant independent associations between any participant characteristic and odds of making a dietary change. Of those who made at least one dietary change, the most common changes were increasing fruit and/or vegetable intake (27%, n  = 25) and following a low-fat diet (25%, n  = 23). A considerable proportion of the study population reported making at least one dietary change in the year following a FCD, with the majority of changes being toward a healthier diet. Further research is warranted to investigate the reasons behind any dietary changes adopted by people with a FCD or with MS, and whether making a dietary change has benefits for the progression of demyelinating diseases, e.g., to a diagnosis of MS, as well as for general health and well-being.

  12. Reported Changes in Dietary Behavior Following a First Clinical Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca D. Russell

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectivesAlthough the current evidence is insufficient to recommend a special diet for people with multiple sclerosis (MS, dietary advice for people with MS is prolific online and in the media. This study aimed to describe dietary changes made in the year following a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (FCD, a common precursor to MS.Subjects/methodsWe used follow-up data from the Ausimmune Study, a multicentre matched case-control study examining the environmental risk factors for a FCD. A total of 244 cases (60 male, 184 female completed a 1-year follow-up interview, which included a question about dietary changes. We described the number and proportion (% of participants who reported making dietary changes and the type of change made. We investigated independent predictors of making a dietary change using a multivariable logistic regression model.ResultsA total of 38% (n = 92 of participants at the 1-year follow-up reported making at least one dietary change over the last year. There were no statistically significant independent associations between any participant characteristic and odds of making a dietary change. Of those who made at least one dietary change, the most common changes were increasing fruit and/or vegetable intake (27%, n = 25 and following a low-fat diet (25%, n = 23.ConclusionA considerable proportion of the study population reported making at least one dietary change in the year following a FCD, with the majority of changes being toward a healthier diet. Further research is warranted to investigate the reasons behind any dietary changes adopted by people with a FCD or with MS, and whether making a dietary change has benefits for the progression of demyelinating diseases, e.g., to a diagnosis of MS, as well as for general health and well-being.

  13. Astrogliosis During Acute and Chronic Cuprizone Demyelination and Implications for Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norah Hibbits

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis, microglia/macrophage activation and astrocyte reactivity are important components of the lesion environment that can impact remyelination. The current study characterizes these glial populations relative to expression of candidate regulatory molecules in cuprizone demyelinated corpus callosum. Importantly, periods of recovery after acute or chronic cuprizone demyelination are examined to compare conditions of efficient versus limited remyelination, respectively. Microglial activation attenuates after early demyelination. In contrast, astrocyte reactivity persists throughout demyelination and a 6-week recovery period following either acute or chronic demyelination. This astrocyte reaction is characterized by (a early proliferation, (b increased expression of GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, Vim (vimentin, Fn1 (fibronectin and CSPGs (chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans and (c elaboration of a dense network of processes. Glial processes elongated in the axonal plane persist throughout lesion areas during both the robust remyelination that follows acute demyelination and the partial remyelination that follows chronic demyelination. However, prolonged astrocyte reactivity with chronic cuprizone treatment does not progress to barrier formation, i.e. dense compaction of astrocyte processes to wall off the lesion area. Multiple candidate growth factors and inflammatory signals in the lesion environment show strong correlations with GFAP across the acute cuprizone demyelination and recovery time course, yet there is more divergence across the progression of chronic cuprizone demyelination and recovery. However, differential glial scar formation does not appear to be responsible for differential remyelination during recovery in the cuprizone model. The astrocyte phenotype and lesion characteristics in this demyelination model inform studies to identify triggers of non-remyelinating sclerosis in chronic multiple sclerosis

  14. Maternal steroid therapy for fetuses with second-degree immune-mediated congenital atrioventricular block: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardulli, Andrea; D'Antonio, Francesco; Magro-Malosso, Elena R; Manzoli, Lamberto; Anisman, Paul; Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2018-03-07

    To explore the effect of maternal fluorinated steroid therapy on fetuses affected by second-degree immune-mediated congenital atrioventricular block. Studies reporting the outcome of fetuses with second-degree immune-mediated congenital atrioventricular block diagnosed on prenatal ultrasound and treated with fluorinated steroids compared with those not treated were included. The primary outcome was the overall progression of congenital atrioventricular block to either continuous or intermittent third-degree congenital atrioventricular block at birth. Meta-analyses of proportions using random effect model and meta-analyses using individual data random-effect logistic regression were used. Five studies (71 fetuses) were included. The progression rate to congenital atrioventricular block at birth in fetuses treated with steroids was 52% (95% confidence interval 23-79) and in fetuses not receiving steroid therapy 73% (95% confidence interval 39-94). The overall rate of regression to either first-degree, intermittent first-/second-degree or sinus rhythm in fetuses treated with steroids was 25% (95% confidence interval 12-41) compared with 23% (95% confidence interval 8-44) in those not treated. Stable (constant) second-degree congenital atrioventricular block at birth was present in 11% (95% confidence interval 2-27) of cases in the treated group and in none of the newborns in the untreated group, whereas complete regression to sinus rhythm occurred in 21% (95% confidence interval 6-42) of fetuses receiving steroids vs. 9% (95% confidence interval 0-41) of those untreated. There is still limited evidence as to the benefit of administered fluorinated steroids in terms of affecting outcome of fetuses with second-degree immune-mediated congenital atrioventricular block. © 2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Histological characterization and quantification of cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healty and demyelinated CNS tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Praet, J.; SANTERMANS, Eva; Reekmans, K.; de Vocht, N.; Le Blon, D.; Hoornaert, C.; Daans, J.; Goossens, H.; Berneman, Z.; HENS, Niel; Van der Linden, A.; Ponsaerts, P.

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical animal studies involving intracerebral (stem) cell grafting are gaining popularity in many laboratories due to the reported beneficial effects of cell grafting on various diseases or traumata of the central nervous system (CNS). In this chapter, we describe a histological workflow to characterize and quantify cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healthy and demyelinated CNS tissue. First, we provide standardized protocols to isolate and cult...

  16. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin preserves muscle strength in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Harbo, Thomas; Sindrup, Søren Hein

    2014-01-01

    evaluated after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary end-points were changes in muscle strength evaluated by isokinetic dynamometry in four affected muscle groups and a composite score of muscle performance and function tests, including Medical Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength, 40-m walking test (40-MWT......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is superior to placebo treatment for maintenance of muscle strength during 12 weeks in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The present study evaluated whether SCIG preserves muscle strength for 1 year......) and nine-hole peg test (9-HPT). Secondary end-points were changes of each of the listed parameters at each time point as well as an overall disability sum score (ODSS). RESULTS: The dose of SCIG was significantly unaltered during the follow-up period. Overall the isokinetic dynamometry value increased by 7...

  17. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Fatehi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of neuropathy are seen diabetic patients; chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP seems not to be infrequent neuropathy in patients suffering from diabetes and it seems to be more common than in the general population; on the contrary, some authorities do not support pathogenetic association between diabetes mellitus (DM and CIDP. Also, there are some controversies on the subject of CIDP treatment in diabetic patients. Some studies showed that patients with CIDP-DM considerably had recovered following treatment with immunotherapeutic modalities like (Intravenous immunoglobulin IVIG and conversely, some else have argued against the prescription of IVIG in this group and recommend treatment with corticosteroids and provided that resistant, rituximab may be beneficial. The main limitation in most studies is the inadequate number of cases and as a result, problematic decision making in treatment. This article represents an inclusive review of diabetic CIDP presentation and treatment.

  18. Thrombocytosis distinguishes POEMS syndrome from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Dispenzieri, Angela; Mandrekar, Jay; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2015-10-01

    POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal plasma cell disorder, and skin changes) syndrome may be mistaken for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Differentiating the 2 entities is crucial, as there are major treatment implications. We compared platelet counts in 136 POEMS patients and 67 CIDP controls. Of the patients with POEMS, 53.7% had thrombocytosis, compared with 1.5% of those with CIDP (P < 0.0001). The median platelet count in patients with POEMS was 467,000/μl compared with 275,000/μl in those with CIDP (P < 0.0001). Thrombocytosis is a helpful indicator to prompt clinicians to consider the diagnosis of POEMS syndrome in patients who are thought to have CIDP, and is an important reminder of the increased risk of thrombotic events in POEMS syndrome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Solitary osteosclerotic plasmacytoma: association with demyelinating polyneuropathy and amyloid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, S.D.; Hall, F.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Murphey, M.D. [Dept. of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2001-09-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with a 1-year history of polyneuropathy necessitating the use of a wheelchair. Initial diagnosis was idiopathic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and associated monoclonal gammopathy. Investigations for multiple myeloma, including bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, were negative. What was initially felt to be an incidental osteosclerotic focus noted on the radiographic bone survey was eventually shown to be a solitary osteosclereotic plasmacytoma with associated amyloid. This dramatically altered treatment. This case emphasizes the importance of including osteosclerotic plasmacytoma in the differential diagnosis of a focal sclerotic bone lesion in the clinical setting of polyneuropathy. These lesions are less likely to progress to multiple myeloma than lytic plasma cell neoplasms, and the presence of polyneuropathy often results in earlier diagnosis and treatment with enhanced prospect of cure. The finding of amyloid deposition within the osteosclerotic lesion may be of prognostic importance. (orig.)

  20. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  1. Pyrexia-associated Relapse in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Jun; Yoshimura, Hajime; Kohara, Nobuo

    2018-04-27

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy is a relapsing-remitting or chronic progressive demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. We report the case of a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy who experienced relapses on four occasions after experiencing pyrexia and flu-like symptoms. Our patient showed characteristic features, such as relapse after pyrexia and flu-like symptoms, remission after pyretolysis without treatment, and the absence of remarkable improvement in a nerve conduction study in the remission phase. The serum level of tumor necrosis factor-α was elevated in the relapse phase and reduced in the remission phase; thus, the induction of cytokine release by viral infection might have caused the relapses.

  2. Nerve Ultrasound Predicts Treatment Response in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy-a Prospective Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtig, Florian; Ross, Marlene; Dammeier, Nele Maria; Fedtke, Nadin; Heiling, Bianka; Axer, Hubertus; Décard, Bernhard F; Auffenberg, Eva; Koch, Marilin; Rattay, Tim W; Krumbholz, Markus; Bornemann, Antje; Lerche, Holger; Winter, Natalie; Grimm, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    As reliable biomarkers of disease activity are lacking, monitoring of therapeutic response in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) remains a challenge. We sought to determine whether nerve ultrasound and electrophysiology scoring could close this gap. In CIDP patients (fulfilling EFNS/PNS criteria), we performed high-resolution nerve ultrasound to determine ultrasound pattern sum scores (UPSS) and predominant echotexture nerve conduction study scores (NCSS) as well as Medical Research Council sum scores (MRCSS) and inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment disability scores (INCAT) at baseline and after 12 months of standard treatment. We retrospectively correlated ultrasound morphology with nerve histology when available. 72/80 CIDP patients featured multifocal nerve enlargement, and 35/80 were therapy-naïve. At baseline, clinical scores correlated with NCSS (r 2  = 0.397 and r 2  = 0.443, p  50% of measured segments, possibly reflecting axonal degeneration; and 3) almost no enlargement, reflecting "burned-out" or "cured" disease without active inflammation. Clinical improvement after 12 months was best in patients with pattern 1 (up to 75% vs up to 43% in pattern 2/3, Fisher's exact test p < 0.05). Nerve ultrasound has additional value not only for diagnosis, but also for classification of disease state and may predict treatment response.

  3. Disease: H01132 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01132 Aplastic anemia (AA) Aplastic anemia (AA) is a rare disease in which the re...duction of the circulating blood cells results from damage to the stem cell pool in bone marrow. Most cases of acquired aplastic anem...ia are the consequence of an immune-mediated destruction of hematopoiesis. Autoreac

  4. A patient with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and severe hypoganglionosis associated with a novel SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Yuko; Shirai, Kentaro; Takei, Akira; Goto, Yudai; Aoyama, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Akimitu; Imamura, Masatoshi; Enokizono, Takashi; Ohto, Tatsuyuki; Hori, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Keiko; Hayashi, Masaharu; Masumoto, Kouji; Inoue, Ken

    2018-05-01

    In this report, we present the case of a female infant with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease (PCWH) associated with a novel frameshift mutation (c.842dupT) in exon 5, the last exon of SOX10. She had severe hypoganglionosis in the small intestine and entire colon, and suffered from frequent enterocolitis. The persistence of ganglion cells made both the diagnosis and treatment difficult in the neonatal period. She also showed hypopigmentation of the irises, hair and skin, bilateral sensorineural deafness with hypoplastic inner year, severe demyelinating neuropathy with hypotonia, and diffuse brain hypomyelination. The p.Ser282GlnfsTer12 mutation presumably escapes from nonsense-mediated decay and may generate a dominant-negative effect. We suggest that hypoganglionosis can be a variant intestinal manifestation associated with PCWH and that hypoganglionosis and aganglionosis may share the same pathoetiological mechanism mediated by SOX10 mutations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Phosphatidylcholine 36:1 concentration decreases along with demyelination in the cuprizone animal model and post-mortem of multiple sclerosis brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Hildebrand, Kayla D; Nyamoya, Stella D; Amor, Sandra; Bazinet, Richard P; Kipp, Markus

    2018-03-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating and inflammatory disease. Myelin is enriched in lipids, and more specifically, oleic acid. The goal of this study was to evaluate the concentration of oleic acid following demyelination and remyelination in the cuprizone model, test if these changes occurred in specific lipid species, and whether differences in the cuprizone model correlate with changes observed in post-mortem human brains. Eight-week-old C57Bl/6 mice were fed a 0.2% cuprizone diet for 5 weeks and some animals allowed to recover for 11 days. Demyelination, inflammation, and lipid concentrations were measured in the corpus callosum. Standard fatty acid techniques and liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry were performed to measure concentrations of fatty acids in total brain lipids and a panel of lipid species within the phosphatidylcholine (PC). Similar measurements were conducted in post-mortem brain tissues of MS patients and were compared to healthy controls. Five weeks of cuprizone administration resulted in demyelination followed by significant remyelination after 11 days of recovery. Compared to control, oleic acid was decreased after 5 weeks of cuprizone treatment and increased during the recovery phase. This decrease in oleic acid was associated with a specific decrease in the PC 36:1 pool. Similar results were observed in human post-mortem brains. Decreases in myelin content in the cuprizone model was accompanied with decreases in oleic acid concentration and is associated with PC 36:1 suggesting that specific lipids could be a potential biomarker for myelin degeneration. The biological relevance of oleic acid for disease progression remains to be verified. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutenkova, E., E-mail: len--k@yandex.ru; Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M., E-mail: khodanovich@mail.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenina pr., 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin response in treatment-naïve chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuitwaard, Krista; Hahn, Angelika F.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Venance, Shannon L.; van Doorn, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    There is no consensus on which treatment should be used preferentially in individual patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Patients unlikely to respond to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) could be prescribed corticosteroids first to avoid high cost and a delayed

  8. CT and MRI 'ring sign' may be due to demyelination: diagnostic pitfall.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, M H

    2012-02-03

    We report a case of acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in which both CT and MRI showed multiple ring-enhancing lesions suggestive of abscesses or brain tumour. This is a relatively rare phenomenon.

  9. A mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial Mg²+ channel MRS2 results in demyelination in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kuramoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The rat demyelination (dmy mutation serves as a unique model system to investigate the maintenance of myelin, because it provokes severe myelin breakdown in the central nervous system (CNS after normal postnatal completion of myelination. Here, we report the molecular characterization of this mutation and discuss the possible pathomechanisms underlying demyelination. By positional cloning, we found that a G-to-A transition, 177 bp downstream of exon 3 of the Mrs2 (MRS2 magnesium homeostasis factor (Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, generated a novel splice acceptor site which resulted in functional inactivation of the mutant allele. Transgenic rescue with wild-type Mrs2-cDNA validated our findings. Mrs2 encodes an essential component of the major Mg²+ influx system in mitochondria of yeast as well as human cells. We showed that the dmy/dmy rats have major mitochondrial deficits with a markedly elevated lactic acid concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid, a 60% reduction in ATP, and increased numbers of mitochondria in the swollen cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes. MRS2-GFP recombinant BAC transgenic rats showed that MRS2 was dominantly expressed in neurons rather than oligodendrocytes and was ultrastructurally observed in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Our observations led to the conclusion that dmy/dmy rats suffer from a mitochondrial disease and that the maintenance of myelin has a different mechanism from its initial production. They also established that Mg²+ homeostasis in CNS mitochondria is essential for the maintenance of myelin.

  10. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  11. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Immune-Mediated Liver Injury and Compromise Virus Control During Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengmeng; Yuan, Xu; Liu, Dan; Ma, Yuhong; Zhu, Jun; Cui, Jun; Yu, Mengxue; Li, Changyong; Guo, Deyin

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used as therapeutic tools not only for their ability to differentiate toward different cells, but also for their unique immunomodulatory properties. However, it is still unknown how MSCs may affect immunity during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study was designed to explore the effect of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) on hepatic natural killer (NK) cells in a mouse model of acute HBV infection. Mice were injected with 1 × 10 6 BM-MSCs, which stained with chloromethyl derivatives of fluorescein diacetate fluorescent probe, 24 h before hydrodynamic injection of viral DNA (pHBV1.3) through the tail vein. In vivo imaging system revealed that BM-MSCs were accumulated in the injured liver, and they attenuated immune-mediated liver injury during HBV infection, as shown by lower alanine aminotransferase levels, reduced proinflammatory cytokine production, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver. Importantly, administration of BM-MSCs restrained the increased expression of natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D), an important receptor required for NK cell activation in the liver from HBV-infected mice. BM-MSCs also reduced NKG2D expression on NK cells and suppressed the cytotoxicity of NK cells in vitro. Furthermore, BM-MSC-derived transforming growth factor-β1 suppressed NKG2D expression on NK cells. As a consequence, BM-MSC treatment enhanced HBV gene expression and replication in vivo. These results demonstrate that adoptive transfer of BM-MSCs influences innate immunity and limits immune-mediated liver injury during acute HBV infection by suppressing NK cell activity. Meanwhile, the effect of BM-MSCs on prolonging virus clearance needs to be considered in the future.

  12. Differential local tissue permissiveness influences the final fate of GPR17‐expressing oligodendrocyte precursors in two distinct models of demyelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, Giusy T.; Marangon, Davide; Negri, Camilla; Menichetti, Gianluca; Fumagalli, Marta; Gelosa, Paolo; Dimou, Leda; Furlan, Roberto; Lecca, Davide

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Promoting remyelination is recognized as a novel strategy to foster repair in neurodegenerative demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In this respect, the receptor GPR17, recently emerged as a new target for remyelination, is expressed by early oligodendrocyte precursors (OPCs) and after a certain differentiation stage it has to be downregulated to allow progression to mature myelinating oligodendrocytes. Here, we took advantage of the first inducible GPR17 reporter mouse line (GPR17‐iCreERT2xCAG‐eGFP mice) allowing to follow the final fate of GPR17+ cells by tamoxifen‐induced GFP‐labeling to unveil the destiny of these cells in two demyelination models: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), characterized by marked immune cell activation and inflammation, and cuprizone induced demyelination, where myelin dysfunction is achieved by a toxic insult. In both models, demyelination induced a strong increase of fluorescent GFP+ cells at damaged areas. However, only in the cuprizone model reacting GFP+ cells terminally differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes, thus contributing to remyelination. In EAE, GFP+ cells were blocked at immature stages and never became myelinating oligodendrocytes. We suggest these strikingly distinct fates be due to different permissiveness of the local CNS environment. Based on previously reported GPR17 activation by emergency signals (e.g., Stromal Derived Factor‐1), we propose that a marked inflammatory milieu, such as that reproduced in EAE, induces GPR17 overactivation resulting in impaired downregulation, untimely and prolonged permanence in OPCs, leading, in turn, to differentiation blockade. Combined treatments with remyelinating agents and anti‐inflammatory drugs may represent new potential adequate strategies to halt neurodegeneration and foster recovery. PMID:29424466

  13. A nationwide survey of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kira, R.; Ishizaki, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Sanefuji, M.; Ichiyama, T.; Oka, A.; Kishi, T.; Kimura, S.; Kubota, M.; Takanashi, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Tamai, H.; Natsume, J.; Hamano, S.; Hirabayashi, S.; Maegaki, Y.; Mizuguchi, M.; Minagawa, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kira, J.; Kusunoki, S.; Hara, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and epidemiologic features of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the CNS in Japan. Methods: We conducted a nationwide survey and collected clinical data on children with ADS aged 15 years or younger, who visited hospitals between 2005 and 2007. Results: Among 977 hospitals enrolled, 723 (74.0%) responded to our inquiries and reported a total of 439 patients as follows: 244 with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), 117 with multiple sclerosis (MS), 14 with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and 64 with other ADS. We collected and analyzed detailed data from 204 cases, including those with ADEM (66), MS (58), and NMO (10). We observed the following: (1) the estimated annual incidence rate of pediatric ADEM in Japan was 0.40 per 100,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34–0.46), with the lowest prevalence in the north; (2) the estimated prevalence rate of MS was 0.69 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.58–0.80), with the lowest prevalence in the south; (3) NMO in Japan was rare, with an estimated prevalence of 0.06 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.04–0.08); and (4) the sex ratio and mean age at onset varied by ADS type, and (5) male/female ratios correlated with ages at onset in each ADS group. Conclusions: Our results clarify the characteristic clinical features of pediatric ADS in the Japanese population. PMID:27742816

  14. Experimental Demyelination and Axonal Loss Are Reduced in MicroRNA-146a Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nellie A; Molnar, Viktor; Szilagyi, Gabor T; Elkjaer, Maria L; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Okarmus, Justyna; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Thygesen, Eva K; Palkovits, Miklos; Gallyas, Ferenc; Larsen, Martin R; Lassmann, Hans; Benedikz, Eirikur; Owens, Trevor; Svenningsen, Asa F; Illes, Zsolt

    2018-01-01

    The cuprizone (CPZ) model of multiple sclerosis (MS) was used to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) related to in vivo de- and remyelination. We further investigated the role of miR-146a in miR-146a-deficient (KO) mice: this miRNA is differentially expressed in MS lesions and promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) during remyelination, but its role has not been examined during demyelination. MicroRNAs were examined by Agilent Mouse miRNA Microarray in the corpus callosum during CPZ-induced demyelination and remyelination. Demyelination, axonal loss, changes in number of oligodendrocytes, OPCs, and macrophages/microglia was compared by histology/immunohistochemistry between KO and WT mice. Differential expression of target genes and proteins of miR-146a was analyzed in the transcriptome (4 × 44K Agilent Whole Mouse Genome Microarray) and proteome (liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) of CPZ-induced de- and remyelination in WT mice. Levels of proinflammatory molecules in the corpus callosum were compared in WT versus KO mice by Meso Scale Discovery multiplex protein analysis. miR-146a was increasingly upregulated during CPZ-induced de- and remyelination. The absence of miR-146a in KO mice protected against demyelination, axonal loss, body weight loss, and atrophy of thymus and spleen. The number of CNP + oligodendrocytes was increased during demyelination in the miR-146a KO mice, while there was a trend of increased number of NG2 + OPCs in the WT mice. miR-146a target genes, SNAP25 and SMAD4, were downregulated in the proteome of demyelinating corpus callosum in WT mice. Higher levels of SNAP25 were measured by ELISA in the corpus callosum of miR-146a KO mice, but there was no difference between KO and WT mice during demyelination. Multiplex protein analysis of the corpus callosum lysate revealed upregulated TNF-RI, TNF-RII, and CCL2 in the WT mice in contrast to KO mice. The number of Mac3 + and Iba1 + macrophages/microglia was

  15. Experimental Demyelination and Axonal Loss Are Reduced in MicroRNA-146a Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nellie A. Martin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe cuprizone (CPZ model of multiple sclerosis (MS was used to identify microRNAs (miRNAs related to in vivo de- and remyelination. We further investigated the role of miR-146a in miR-146a-deficient (KO mice: this miRNA is differentially expressed in MS lesions and promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs during remyelination, but its role has not been examined during demyelination.MethodsMicroRNAs were examined by Agilent Mouse miRNA Microarray in the corpus callosum during CPZ-induced demyelination and remyelination. Demyelination, axonal loss, changes in number of oligodendrocytes, OPCs, and macrophages/microglia was compared by histology/immunohistochemistry between KO and WT mice. Differential expression of target genes and proteins of miR-146a was analyzed in the transcriptome (4 × 44K Agilent Whole Mouse Genome Microarray and proteome (liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of CPZ-induced de- and remyelination in WT mice. Levels of proinflammatory molecules in the corpus callosum were compared in WT versus KO mice by Meso Scale Discovery multiplex protein analysis.ResultsmiR-146a was increasingly upregulated during CPZ-induced de- and remyelination. The absence of miR-146a in KO mice protected against demyelination, axonal loss, body weight loss, and atrophy of thymus and spleen. The number of CNP+ oligodendrocytes was increased during demyelination in the miR-146a KO mice, while there was a trend of increased number of NG2+ OPCs in the WT mice. miR-146a target genes, SNAP25 and SMAD4, were downregulated in the proteome of demyelinating corpus callosum in WT mice. Higher levels of SNAP25 were measured by ELISA in the corpus callosum of miR-146a KO mice, but there was no difference between KO and WT mice during demyelination. Multiplex protein analysis of the corpus callosum lysate revealed upregulated TNF-RI, TNF-RII, and CCL2 in the WT mice in contrast to KO mice. The number of Mac3+ and

  16. Outcome in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from a Malaysian centre over sixteen years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiew, Fu Liong; Ong, Jun-Jean; Viswanathan, Shanthi; Puvanarajah, Santhi

    2018-04-01

    Long-term outcome in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) is very limited, especially from Asian countries. We aimed to determine the outcome of our cohort of CIDP patients and to define the relevant clinical, electrophysiological and laboratory determinants of disease activity, progression and treatment response. We retrospectively reviewed records of 23 CIDP patients attending our Neurology service at Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Malaysia between January 2000 and December 2016. We analysed data on neurological deficits, electrophysiological and laboratory parameters to determine diagnostic characteristics, correlation with disease activity and clinical outcomes following treatment. Included were 15 (65%) males and 8 (35%) females with a mean age of 42.7 years (SD 14.4). Mean duration of follow-up visit was 66 months (range 6-134 months). The cohort consists of 19 classical (sensory-motor) CIDP and 4 MADSAM. Large majority of patients (66%) had either stable active disease (CDAS 3, 44%) or were in remission (CDAS class 2, 22%) following treatment with standard immunotherapies (Intravenous Immunoglobulins, steroids or immunosuppressants). The proportion of CIDP patients in each CDAS class was comparable to published cohorts from North America and Europe. Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score was the only clinical score that differed across CDAS classes (p = .010) with significant inverse correlation (Spearman's rho -0.664, p = .001). In conclusion, treatment outcomes of our CIDP cohort was comparable to those of published series. Further studies with larger cohort of patients from other parts of Asia are important to determine the long-term outcome of this heterogenous disease in this region. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Mitochondrial m-AAA Protease Prevents Demyelination and Hair Greying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuaiyu; Jacquemyn, Julie; Murru, Sara; Martinelli, Paola; Barth, Esther; Langer, Thomas; Niessen, Carien M; Rugarli, Elena I

    2016-12-01

    The m-AAA protease preserves proteostasis of the inner mitochondrial membrane. It ensures a functional respiratory chain, by controlling the turnover of respiratory complex subunits and allowing mitochondrial translation, but other functions in mitochondria are conceivable. Mutations in genes encoding subunits of the m-AAA protease have been linked to various neurodegenerative diseases in humans, such as hereditary spastic paraplegia and spinocerebellar ataxia. While essential functions of the m-AAA protease for neuronal survival have been established, its role in adult glial cells remains enigmatic. Here, we show that deletion of the highly expressed subunit AFG3L2 in mature mouse oligodendrocytes provokes early-on mitochondrial fragmentation and swelling, as previously shown in neurons, but causes only late-onset motor defects and myelin abnormalities. In contrast, total ablation of the m-AAA protease, by deleting both Afg3l2 and its paralogue Afg3l1, triggers progressive motor dysfunction and demyelination, owing to rapid oligodendrocyte cell death. Surprisingly, the mice showed premature hair greying, caused by progressive loss of melanoblasts that share a common developmental origin with Schwann cells and are targeted in our experiments. Thus, while both neurons and glial cells are dependant on the m-AAA protease for survival in vivo, complete ablation of the complex is necessary to trigger death of oligodendrocytes, hinting to cell-autonomous thresholds of vulnerability to m-AAA protease deficiency.

  18. Prevention of the Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome After Liver Transplantation: A Multidisciplinary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismale, J F; Meliambro, K A; DeMaria, S; Bronster, D B; Florman, S; Schiano, T D

    2017-10-01

    The osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a serious neurologic condition that occurs in the setting of rapid correction of hyponatremia. It presents with protean manifestations, from encephalopathy to the "locked-in" syndrome. ODS can complicate liver transplantation (LT), and its incidence may increase with the inclusion of serum sodium as a factor in the Mayo End-Stage Liver Disease score. A comprehensive understanding of risk factors for the development of ODS in the setting of LT, along with recommendations to mitigate the risk of ODS, are necessary. The literature to date on ODS in the setting of LT was reviewed. Major risk factors for the development of ODS include severe pretransplant hyponatremia (serum sodium [SNa] ODS include correcting hyponatremia pretransplant via fluid restriction and/or ensuring an appropriate rate of increase from the preoperative SNa via close attention to fluid and electrolyte management both during and after surgery. Multidisciplinary management involving transplant hepatology, nephrology, neurology, surgery, and anesthesiology/critical care is key to performing LT safely in patients with hyponatremia. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cauda equina in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Vasilenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is a treatable disimmune neuropathy, which accurate diagnostics and treatment are essential to improve a long-lasting  prognosis and prevent invalidization. In atypical cases and  differential diagnosis extra investigations are needed, including neuroimaging.Objective. Evaluating the diagnostic role of the cauda equina magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in CIDP.Materials and methods. 8 patients with CIDP according to European Federation of Neurological Societies and Peripheral Nerve Society criteria were originally included in the main cohort: 6  patients with definitive CIDP, 1 patient – with possible CIDP; in 1  patient later mixed crioglobulinemia, associated with hepatitis C was  later diagnosed. MRI with contrast enhancement of the cauda equina was performed in all primary included patients in the main cohort  and in 8 controls with metabolic polyneuropathy. In 12 months MRI was repeated in the main cohort patients.Results. The enlargement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina and nodular hypertrophy was demonstrated in all CIDP patients, and in none of the control subjects. The extensiveness of qualitative  changes correlated with disease duration. All CIDP patients with root hypertrophy had gadolinium enhancement and its severity did not  correlate with disease activity. Contrast enhancement in roots of the  control group patients was explained by the medullary artery phenomenon.Conclusion. MRI of the cauda equina with contrast improves the diagnostic of CIDP, but does not depict the activity of the disease. MRI in CIDP is a promissing technique, requiring further investigation and standardization.

  20. 75 FR 12769 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; HLA Region Genetics in Immune- Mediated Diseases. Date: April 7-8... Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated...

  1. The role of the immune system in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecklenborg, J; Clayton, D; Siebert, S; Coley, S M

    2018-05-01

    The immune system and the kidneys are closely linked. In health the kidneys contribute to immune homeostasis, while components of the immune system mediate many acute forms of renal disease and play a central role in progression of chronic kidney disease. A dysregulated immune system can have either direct or indirect renal effects. Direct immune-mediated kidney diseases are usually a consequence of autoantibodies directed against a constituent renal antigen, such as collagen IV in anti-glomerular basement membrane disease. Indirect immune-mediated renal disease often follows systemic autoimmunity with immune complex formation, but can also be due to uncontrolled activation of the complement pathways. Although the range of mechanisms of immune dysregulation leading to renal disease is broad, the pathways leading to injury are similar. Loss of immune homeostasis in renal disease results in perpetual immune cell recruitment and worsening damage to the kidney. Uncoordinated attempts at tissue repair, after immune-mediated disease or non-immune mediated injury, result in fibrosis of structures important for renal function, leading eventually to kidney failure. As renal disease often manifests clinically only when substantial damage has already occurred, new diagnostic methods and indeed treatments must be identified to inhibit further progression and promote appropriate tissue repair. Studying cases in which immune homeostasis is re-established may reveal new treatment possibilities. © 2018 British Society for Immunology.

  2. Sex bias in experimental immune-mediated, drug-induced liver injury in BALB/c mice: suggested roles for Tregs, estrogen, and IL-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonhee Cho

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated, drug-induced liver injury (DILI triggered by drug haptens is more prevalent in women than in men. However, mechanisms responsible for this sex bias are not clear. Immune regulation by CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs and 17β-estradiol is crucial in the pathogenesis of sex bias in cancer and autoimmunity. Therefore, we investigated their role in a mouse model of immune-mediated DILI.To model DILI, we immunized BALB/c, BALB/cBy, IL-6-deficient, and castrated BALB/c mice with trifluoroacetyl chloride-haptenated liver proteins. We then measured degree of hepatitis, cytokines, antibodies, and Treg and splenocyte function.BALB/c females developed more severe hepatitis (p<0.01 and produced more pro-inflammatory hepatic cytokines and antibodies (p<0.05 than did males. Castrated males developed more severe hepatitis than did intact males (p<0.001 and females (p<0.05. Splenocytes cultured from female mice exhibited fewer Tregs (p<0.01 and higher IL-1β (p<0.01 and IL-6 (p<0.05 than did those from males. However, Treg function did not differ by sex, as evidenced by absence of sex bias in programmed death receptor-1 and responses to IL-6, anti-IL-10, anti-CD3, and anti-CD28. Diminished hepatitis in IL-6-deficient, anti-IL-6 receptor α-treated, ovariectomized, or male mice; undetectable IL-6 levels in splenocyte supernatants from ovariectomized and male mice; elevated splenic IL-6 and serum estrogen levels in castrated male mice, and IL-6 induction by 17β-estradiol in splenocytes from naïve female mice (p<0.05 suggested that 17β-estradiol may enhance sex bias through IL-6 induction, which subsequently discourages Treg survival. Treg transfer from naïve female mice to those with DILI reduced hepatitis severity and hepatic IL-6.17β-estradiol and IL-6 may act synergistically to promote sex bias in experimental DILI by reducing Tregs. Modulating Treg numbers may provide a therapeutic approach to DILI.

  3. Attenuation of Immune-Mediated Renal Injury by Telmisartan, an Angiotensin Receptor Blocker and a Selective PPAR-γ Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Hamano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM nephritis is characterized by activation of the renin-angiotensin system. This study aimed to determine the question of whether a temporary angiotensin II blockade at the initial stage of anti-GBM nephritis is able to attenuate the disease as well as differences in renoprotection among angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs with distinct peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ-modulating activities. Methods: C57BL/6J mice were immunized with rabbit IgG, followed by intravenous injection of rabbit anti-mouse antibodies. Mice were then treated with telmisartan, losartan, and telmisartan + GW9662 (a PPAR-γ antagonist for 5 days, or hydralazine for 9 days. On days 8 and 13, mice were sacrificed to obtain tissues for histological analysis. Results: The temporary administration of telmisartan significantly suppressed glomerular damage compared to hydralazine. Losartan showed a similar effect but was less effective. Co-administration of GW9662 attenuated the renoprotective effect of telmisartan, almost to levels observed with losartan. In particular, it limited the decreased infiltration of inflammatory cells and preservation of capillaries in the glomeruli induced by telmisartan. Conclusion: Temporary angiotensin II blockade at the initial stage of anti-GBM disease dramatically inhibited its progression. In addition to a class effect of ARBs, telmisartan modified inflammation and endothelial damage in the kidney through its PPAR-γ-agonistic action.

  4. Interferon-gamma in progression to chronic demyelination and neurological deficit following acute EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renno, T; Taupin, V; Bourbonnière, L

    1998-01-01

    The cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) is implicated in the induction of acute CNS inflammation, but it is less clear what role if any IFNgamma plays in progression to chronic demyelination and neurological deficit. To address this issue, we have expressed IFNgamma in myelinating oligodendrocytes....... In contrast to control mice, which remit from EAE with resolution of glial reactivity and leukocytic infiltration, transgenics showed chronic neurological deficits. While activated microglia/macrophages persisted in demyelinating lesions for over 100 days, CD4(+) T lymphocytes were no longer present in CNS...

  5. Evidence of demyelination in mild cognitive impairment and dementia using a direct and specific magnetic resonance imaging measure of myelin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhrara, Mustapha; Reiter, David A; Bergeron, Christopher M; Zukley, Linda M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Resnick, Susan M; Spencer, Richard G

    2018-04-18

    We investigated brain demyelination in aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and dementia using magnetic resonance imaging of myelin. Brains of young and old controls and old subjects with MCI, Alzheimer's disease, or vascular dementia were scanned using our recently developed myelin water fraction (MWF) mapping technique, which provides greatly improved accuracy over previous comparable methods. Maps of MWF, a direct and specific myelin measure, and relaxation times and magnetization transfer ratio, indirect and nonspecific measures, were constructed. MCI subjects showed decreased MWF compared with old controls. Demyelination was greater in Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia. As expected, decreased MWF was accompanied by decreased magnetization transfer ratio and increased relaxation times. The young subjects showed greater myelin content than the old subjects. We believe this to be the first demonstration of myelin loss in MCI, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia using a method that provides a quantitative magnetic resonance imaging-based measure of myelin. Our findings add to the emerging evidence that myelination may represent an important biomarker for the pathology of MCI and dementia. This study supports the investigation of the role of myelination in MCI and dementia through use of this quantitative magnetic resonance imaging approach in clinical studies of disease progression, relationship of functional status to myelination status, and therapeutics. Furthermore, mapping MWF may permit myelin to serve as a therapeutic target in clinical trials. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. CD40 dependent exacerbation of immune mediated hepatitis by hepatic CD11b+ Gr-1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Manns, Michael P.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing mice. We studied hepatic MDSC in two murine models of immune mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of tumor bearing mice with Concanavalin A or α-Galactosylceramide resulted in increased ALT and AST serum levels in comparison to tumor free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSC into naïve mice exacerbated Concanavalin A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells revealed a polarized pro-inflammatory gene signature after Concanavalin A treatment. An interferon gamma- dependent up-regulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells along with an up-regulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Concanavalin A treatment was observed. Concanavalin A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSC as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSC led to increased arginase activity upon Concanavalin A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40−/− tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased reactive oxygen species production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSC act as pro-inflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner. PMID:25616156

  7. Chinese Herbal Formula, Modified Danggui Buxue Tang, Attenuates Apoptosis of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A derivative formula, DGBX, which is composed of three herbs (Radix astragali, Radix Angelicae sinensis, and Coptis chinensis Franch, is derived from a famous Chinese herbal formula, Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT (Radix astragali and Radix Angelicae sinensis. We aimed to investigate the effects of DGBX on the regulation of the balance between proliferation and apoptosis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs due to the aberrant immune response in a mouse model of aplastic anemia (AA. Cyclosporine (CsA, an immunosuppressor, was used as the positive control. Our results indicated that DGBX could downregulate the production of IFNγ in bone marrow cells by interfering with the binding between SLAM and SAP and the expressions of Fyn and T-bet. This herbal formula can also inhibit the activation of Fas-mediated apoptosis, interferon regulatory factor-1-induced JAK/Stat, and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 signaling pathways and thereby induce proliferation and attenuate apoptosis of HSCs. In conclusion, DGBX can relieve the immune-mediated destruction of HSCs, repair hematopoietic failure, and recover the hematopoietic function of HSCs in hematogenesis. Therefore, DGBX can be used in traditional medicine against AA as a complementary and alternative immunosuppressive therapeutic formula.

  8. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  9. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  10. The nervous system in genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infections in mice. Lethal panmyelitis or nonlethal demyelinative myelitis or meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J R; Stoner, G L

    1984-11-01

    Female mice were inoculated vaginally with the MS strain of herpes simplex virus type 2, and serially positive vaginal cultures were used to confirm infection. The proportion of mice infected and the mortality rate in infected mice decreased with increasing age. In mice 12 weeks old, clinical, neuropathologic, and virologic criteria defined four patterns of disease. Moribund mice had severe genital lesions, hindleg paralysis, and urinary and fecal retention, and most died during the second week of infection. These mice had a panmyelitis with a decreasing gradient of both viral antigen and lesions extending rostrally from the lumbosacral cord into the brain stem. Lesions were about equally distributed in gray and white matter and were characterized by neuronal loss and axonal demyelination, respectively. By contrast, mice with nonfatal infections had mild or no evident genital lesions and a small proportion had mild hindleg weakness. Of these, some mice had demyelinative lesions, particularly in the lower spinal cord but also at higher cord and brain stem levels, whereas others had leptomeningitis. Both of these groups had sacral sensory root abnormalities. A third group of survivors lacked both sensory root and central nervous system abnormalities. This report defines a broader spectrum of disease patterns following infection by a natural route than has been previously appreciated. It provides the first evidence that nonfatal herpes simplex virus type 2 infection by a peripheral route can produce central nervous system demyelination. It indicates that in aseptic meningitis with this agent, the route of virus spread to the central nervous system is neural and not hematogenous. Finally, the antigenic and pathologic observations presented here complement and confirm the virus isolation data and pathologic findings of others that genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection causes ascending infection in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  11. Immune-Mediated Inflammation Promotes Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Recent-Onset Psoriatic Arthritis Patients without Conventional Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo A. Kolliker Frers

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the inflammatory burden in recent-onset psoriatic arthritis (PsA patients without conventional cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs are not available. This preliminary study focuses on cardiovascular risk in cutaneous psoriasis (CPs and recent-onset PsA patients. Blood biochemistry (glucose, cholesterol, uric acid, lipid profile and apolipoprotein B was analyzed using standard kits. Proatherogenic inflammation markers, C-reactive protein (CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6, and endothelial activators monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ultrasound images allowed measuring carotid intima–media thickness (cIMT. Our study first shows an increase in cIMT, and in serum levels of sICAM-1 and CRP in recent-onset PsA patients not presenting conventional CVRFs over the non-medicated time-period, from disease diagnosis to the beginning of pharmacological treatment, compared with healthy subjects. The outcome highlights the importance of monitoring serum level of sICAM1, CRP, and cIMT, and the value of primary prevention in psoriatic patients even with no history of cardiovascular events.

  12. Demyelinating evidences in CMS rat model of depression: a DTI study at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemanth Kumar, B S; Mishra, S K; Trivedi, R; Singh, S; Rana, P; Khushu, S

    2014-09-05

    Depression is among the most debilitating diseases worldwide. Long-term exposure to stressors plays a major role in development of human depression. Chronic mild stress (CMS) seems to be a valid animal model for depression. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is capable of inferring microstructural abnormalities of the white matter and has shown to serve as non-invasive marker of specific pathology. We developed a CMS rat model of depression and validated with behavioral experiments. We measured the diffusion indices (mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), axial (λ∥) and radial (λ⊥) diffusivity) to investigate the changes in CMS rat brain during depression onset. Diffusion indices have shown to be useful to discriminate myelin damage from axon loss. DTI was performed in both control and CMS rats (n=10, in each group) and maps of FA, MD, λ∥ and λ⊥ diffusivity values were generated using in-house built software. The diffusion indices were calculated by region of interest (ROI) analysis in different brain regions like the frontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, cingulum, thalamus, caudate putamen, corpus callosum, cerebral peduncle and sensory motor cortex. The results showed signs of demyelination, reflected by increased MD, decreased FA and increased λ⊥. The results also suggest a possible role of edema or inflammation concerning the brain morphology in CMS rats. The overall finding using DTI suggests there might be a major role of loss of myelin sheath, which leads to disrupted connectivity between the limbic area and the prefrontal cortex during the onset of depression. Our findings indicate that interpretation of these indices may provide crucial information about the type and severity of mood disorders. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Progesterone Enhanced Remyelination in the Mouse Corpus Callosum After Cuprizone Induced Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Ragerdi Kashani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Progesterone as a sex steroid hormone is thought to affect and prevent demyelination, but its role in promoting myelin repair is far less investigated. In this study, remyelinating potential of progesterone in corpus callosum was evaluated on an experimental model of MS. Methods: In this experimental study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were fed with 0.2% (w/w cuprizone in ground breeder chow ad libitum for 6 weeks. At day zero, after cuprizone removal, mice were divided randomly into two groups: (a placebo group, which received saline pellet implant, (b progesterone group, which received progesterone pellet implant. Some mice of the same age were fed with their normal diet to serve as the healthy control group. Two weeks after progesterone administration, Myelin content was assessed by Luxol-fast blue staining. The myelin basic protein (MBP and proteolipid protein (PLP expression were assessed using Western blot analysis and the changes in the number of oligodendrocytes and oligodendroglial progenitor cells were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC and flow cytometry. Results: Luxol-fast blue staining revealed enhanced remyelination in the progesterone group when compared with the placebo group. Densitometry measurements of immunoblots demonstrated that MBP and PLP proteins contents were significantly increased in the progesterone group compared with the placebo group. Flow cytometry and IHC analysis showed increases in Olig2 and O4 cells in the progesterone group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion: Overall, our results indicate that progesterone treatment can stimulate myelin production and that it may provide a feasible and practical way for remyelination in diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  14. Lesser-known myelin-related disorders: focal tumour-like demyelinating lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Arango, J A; Uribe Uribe, C S; Toro González, G

    2015-03-01

    Focal tumour-like demyelinating lesions are defined as solitary demyelinating lesions with a diameter greater than 2 cm. In imaging studies, these lesions may mimic a neoplasm or brain abscess; as a result, invasive diagnostic and therapeutic measures may be performed that will in some cases increase morbidity. Our aim was to analyse and characterise these lesions according to their clinical, radiological, and pathological characteristics, and this data in addition to our literature review will contribute to a better understanding of these lesions. This descriptive study includes 5 cases with pathological diagnoses. We provide subject characteristics gathered through reviewing their clinical, radiology, and pathology reports. Patients' ages ranged from 12 to 60 years; 3 patients were female. The time delay between symptom onset and hospital admission was 3 to 120 days. Clinical manifestations were diverse and dependent on the location of the lesion, pyramidal signs were found in 80% of patients, there were no clinical or radiological signs of spinal cord involvement, and follow-up times ranged from 1 to 15 years. Brain biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of demyelinating tumour-like lesions; however, their clinical features, along with several magnetic resonance imaging features such as open ring enhancement, venular enhancement, the presence of glutamate in spectroscopy, and others, may be sufficient to differentiate neoplastic lesions from focal tumour-like demyelinating lesions. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Deep gray matter demyelination detected by magnetization transfer ratio in the cuprizone model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveinung Fjær

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis (MS, the correlation between lesion load on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and clinical disability is weak. This clinico-radiological paradox might partly be due to the low sensitivity of conventional MRI to detect gray matter demyelination. Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR has previously been shown to detect white matter demyelination in mice. In this study, we investigated whether MTR can detect gray matter demyelination in cuprizone exposed mice. A total of 54 female C57BL/6 mice were split into one control group ( and eight cuprizone exposed groups ([Formula: see text]. The mice were exposed to [Formula: see text] (w/w cuprizone for up to six weeks. MTR images were obtained at a 7 Tesla Bruker MR-scanner before cuprizone exposure, weekly for six weeks during cuprizone exposure, and once two weeks after termination of cuprizone exposure. Immunohistochemistry staining for myelin (anti-Proteolopid Protein and oligodendrocytes (anti-Neurite Outgrowth Inhibitor Protein A was obtained after each weekly scanning. Rates of MTR change and correlations between MTR values and histological findings were calculated in five brain regions. In the corpus callosum and the deep gray matter a significant rate of MTR value decrease was found, [Formula: see text] per week ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] per week ([Formula: see text] respectively. The MTR values correlated to myelin loss as evaluated by immunohistochemistry (Corpus callosum: [Formula: see text]. Deep gray matter: [Formula: see text], but did not correlate to oligodendrocyte density. Significant results were not found in the cerebellum, the olfactory bulb or the cerebral cortex. This study shows that MTR can be used to detect demyelination in the deep gray matter, which is of particular interest for imaging of patients with MS, as deep gray matter demyelination is common in MS, and is not easily detected on conventional clinical MRI.

  16. Multiple sclerosis deep grey matter: the relation between demyelination, neurodegeneration, inflammation and iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lukas; Simeonidou, Constantina; Steinberger, Günther; Hametner, Simon; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Deretzi, Georgia; Kovacs, Gabor G; Kutzelnigg, Alexandra; Lassmann, Hans; Frischer, Josa M

    2014-12-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), diffuse degenerative processes in the deep grey matter have been associated with clinical disabilities. We performed a systematic study in MS deep grey matter with a focus on the incidence and topographical distribution of lesions in relation to white matter and cortex in a total sample of 75 MS autopsy patients and 12 controls. In addition, detailed analyses of inflammation, acute axonal injury, iron deposition and oxidative stress were performed. MS deep grey matter was affected by two different processes: the formation of focal demyelinating lesions and diffuse neurodegeneration. Deep grey matter demyelination was most prominent in the caudate nucleus and hypothalamus and could already be seen in early MS stages. Lesions developed on the background of inflammation. Deep grey matter inflammation was intermediate between low inflammatory cortical lesions and active white matter lesions. Demyelination and neurodegeneration were associated with oxidative injury. Iron was stored primarily within oligodendrocytes and myelin fibres and released upon demyelination. In addition to focal demyelinated plaques, the MS deep grey matter also showed diffuse and global neurodegeneration. This was reflected by a global reduction of neuronal density, the presence of acutely injured axons, and the accumulation of oxidised phospholipids and DNA in neurons, oligodendrocytes and axons. Neurodegeneration was associated with T cell infiltration, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in microglia and profound accumulation of iron. Thus, both focal lesions as well as diffuse neurodegeneration in the deep grey matter appeared to contribute to the neurological disabilities of MS patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Chimeric HCMV/HSV-1 and Δγ134.5 oncolytic herpes simplex virus elicit immune mediated antigliomal effect and antitumor memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed G. Ghonime

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor and are characterized by rapid and highly invasive growth. Because of their poor prognosis, new therapeutic strategies are needed. Oncolytic virotherapy (OV is a promising strategy for treating cancer that incorporates both direct viral replication mediated and immune mediated mechanisms to kill tumor cells. C134 is a next generation Δγ134.5 oHSV-1 with improved intratumoral viral replication. It remains safe in the CNS environment by inducing early IFN signaling which restricts its replication in non-malignant cells. We sought to identify how C134 performed in an immunocompetent tumor model that restricts its replication advantage over first generation viruses. To achieve this we identified tumors that have intact IFN signaling responses that restrict C134 and first generation virus replication similarly. Our results show that both viruses elicit a T cell mediated anti-tumor effect and improved animal survival but that subtle difference exist between the viruses effect on median survival despite equivalent in vivo viral replication. To further investigate this we examined the anti-tumor activity in immunodeficient mice and in syngeneic models with re-challenge. These studies show that the T cell response is integral to C134 replication independent anti-tumor response and that OV therapy elicits a durable and circulating anti-tumor memory. The studies also show that repeated intratumoral administration can extend both OV anti-tumor effects and induce durable anti-tumor memory that is superior to tumor antigen exposure alone.

  18. Differential profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity between endocervical and vaginal secretions from women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Rhoda; Kraus, Thomas A; Ding, Jian; Veretennikova, Alina; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Singh, Tricia; Lo, Yungtai; Quayle, Alison J; Chang, Theresa L

    2013-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection is one of the most prevalent bacterial STIs in the USA and worldwide, and women with C. trachomatis infection are at increased risk of acquiring HIV. Because immune activation at the genital mucosa facilitates HIV/SIV infection, C. trachomatis-mediated cytokine induction may contribute to increased HIV transmission in asymptomatic women. To begin to elucidate the mechanisms, we longitudinally analyzed profiles of innate immune factors and HIV infectivity in genital secretions from anatomically specific sites in asymptomatic women during C. trachomatis infection and post-antibiotic treatment. We found higher levels of cytokines and chemokines in endocervical secretions than vaginal secretions. Compared with the convalescent state, G-CSF, IL-1α, and RANTES were elevated in endocervical secretions, IFN-γ and TNF-α were elevated in vaginal secretions, and IFNγ, IL-1β, and MIP1-α were elevated in cervicolavage fluid (CVL), before adjustment of multiple comparisons. Elevated endocervical levels of IP-10 and MCP-1 were associated with the use of hormonal contraception in infected women after successful treatment, suggesting the role of hormonal contraception in inflammation independent of STIs. Importantly, soluble factors found in endocervical secretions during infection enhanced HIV infectivity while no difference in HIV infectivity was found with vaginal secretions or CVL during infection or at convalescence. Taken together, the profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity indicate that the endocervical and vaginal mucosa are immunologically distinct. Our results underscore the importance of considering anatomical site and local sampling methodology when measuring mucosal responses, particularly in the presence of C. trachomatis infection. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of the mitochondria in immune-mediated apoptotic death of the human pancreatic β cell line βLox5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaíma L Lightfoot

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are indispensable in the life and death of many types of eukaryotic cells. In pancreatic beta cells, mitochondria play an essential role in the secretion of insulin, a hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. Unregulated blood glucose is a hallmark symptom of diabetes. The onset of Type 1 diabetes is preceded by autoimmune-mediated destruction of beta cells. However, the exact role of mitochondria has not been assessed in beta cell death. In this study, we examine the role of mitochondria in both Fas- and proinflammatory cytokine-mediated destruction of the human beta cell line, βLox5. IFNγ primed βLox5 cells for apoptosis by elevating cell surface Fas. Consequently, βLox5 cells were killed by caspase-dependent apoptosis by agonistic activation of Fas, but only after priming with IFNγ. This beta cell line undergoes both apoptotic and necrotic cell death after incubation with the combination of the proinflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. Additionally, both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms that require proper mitochondrial function are involved. Mitochondrial contributions to βLox5 cell death were analyzed using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depleted βLox5 cells, or βLox5 ρ(0 cells. βLox5 ρ(0 cells are not sensitive to IFNγ and TNFα killing, indicating a direct role for the mitochondria in cytokine-induced cell death of the parental cell line. However, βLox5 ρ(0 cells are susceptible to Fas killing, implicating caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptotic death is the mechanism by which these human beta cells die after Fas ligation. These data support the hypothesis that immune mediators kill βLox5 cells by both mitochondrial-dependent intrinsic and caspase-dependent extrinsic pathways.

  20. Exudative pleural effusion associated with Behcet's disease | Ikuabe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Behcet's disease is a rare immune mediated small vessel systemic vasculitis in which diagnosis is mainly clinical and requires the presence of recurrent oral ulcers and at least two additional criteria that includes recurrent mouth and genital ulcers, skin lesions, eye inflammation (uveitis) and a positive pathergy ...

  1. Patient with neuromyelitis optica and inflammatory demyelinating lesions comprising whole spinal cord from C2 level till conus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlisa Goran

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an idiopathic, severe, inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, that causes severe optic neuritis and myelitis attacks. Early discrimination between multiple sclerosis (MS and NMO is important, as optimum treatment for both diseases may differ considerably. Case Presentation We report a case of a patient who initially presented as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, having spastic upper extremities diparesis and spastic paraplegia, C2/C3 sensory level and urinary incontinence, as well as extensive inflammatory spinal cord lesions from C2 level to conus. After 5 months the patient had another attack of transverse myelitis, had electrophysiological findings consistent with optic neuritis, was seropositive for NMO-IgG (aquaporin-4 IgG and thus fulfilled NMO diagnostic criteria. Following treatment of disease attacks with pulse corticosteroid therapy and intravenous immunoglobulins, we included oral azathioprine in a combination with oral prednisone in the therapy. Since there was no significant clinical improvement, we decided to use cyclophosphamide therapy, which resulted in good clinical improvement and gradual decrease of cord swelling. Conclusion In this NMO case report we wanted to emphasize the extensiveness of inflammatory spinal cord changes in our patient, from C2 level to conus. In the conclusion it is important to say that accurate, early diagnosis and distinction from MS is critical to facilitate initiation of immunosuppressive therapy for attack prevention.

  2. Glia Disease and Repair-Remyelination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, Robin J M; Goldman, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    it fails and the consequences of its failure; and discuss approaches for therapeutically enhancing remyelination in demyelinating diseases of both children and adults, both by stimulating endogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and by transplanting these cells into demyelinated brain......., the same is not true of its glial elements. In particular, the loss of oligodendrocytes, which results in demyelination, triggers a spontaneous and often highly efficient regenerative response, remyelination, in which new oligodendrocytes are generated and myelin sheaths are restored to denuded axons. Yet......, remyelination in humans is not without limitation, and a variety of demyelinating conditions are associated with sustained and disabling myelin loss. In this review, we will review the biology of remyelination, including the cells and signals involved; describe when remyelination occurs and when and why...

  3. Large-Scale Exome-wide Association Analysis Identifies Loci for White Blood Cell Traits and Pleiotropy with Immune-Mediated Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tajuddin, S.M. (Salman M.); U.M. Schick (Ursula); Eicher, J.D. (John D.); Chami, N. (Nathalie); Giri, A. (Ayush); J. Brody (Jennifer); W.D. Hill (W. David); T. Kacprowski (Tim); Li, J. (Jin); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); A. Manichaikul (Ani); E. Mihailov (Evelin); M.L. O'Donoghue (Michelle L.); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); R. Pazoki (Raha); Polfus, L.M. (Linda M.); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); C. Schurmann (Claudia); Vacchi-Suzzi, C. (Caterina); D. Waterworth (Dawn); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); A.D. Burt (Alastair); M.-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); J. Floyd (James); A. Greinacher (Andreas); T.B. Harris (Tamara); H. Highland (Heather); L.A. Lange (Leslie); Y. Liu (YongMei); R. Mägi (Reedik); M.A. Nalls (Michael); J. Mathias (Jasmine); D.A. Nickerson (Deborah); K. Nikus (Kjell); J.M. Starr (John); J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); I. Tzoulaki; Velez Edwards, D.R. (Digna R.); L.C. Wallentin (Lars); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); L.C. Becker (Lewis); Denny, J.C. (Joshua C.); Raffield, L.M. (Laura M.); J.D. Rioux (John); N. Friedrich (Nele); M. Fornage (Myriam); Gao, H. (He); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); D.C. Liewald (David C.); S.S. Rich (Stephen); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Bastarache, L. (Lisa); D.M. Becker (Diane); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); de Denus, S. (Simon); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); C. Hayward (Caroline); Hofman, A. (Albert); G. Homuth (Georg); E.M. Lange (Ethan); Launer, L.J. (Lenore J.); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Lu (Yingchang); A. Metspalu (Andres); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); Quarells, R.C. (Rakale C.); Richard, M. (Melissa); Torstenson, E.S. (Eric S.); K.D. Taylor (Kent); Vergnaud, A.-C. (Anne-Claire); A.B. Zonderman; D.R. Crosslin (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); M. Dörr (Marcus); P. Elliott (Paul); M. Evans (Michele); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); M. Kähönen (Mika); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); Slater, A.J. (Andrew J.); A. Dehghan (Abbas); White, H.D. (Harvey D.); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); T. Esko (Tõnu); Faraday, N. (Nauder); J.F. Wilson (James); M. Cushman (Mary Ann); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); T.L. Edwards (Todd L.); N.A. Zakai (Neil); G. Lettre (Guillaume); A. Reiner (Alexander); P. Auer (Paul)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWhite blood cells play diverse roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Genetic association analyses of phenotypic variation in circulating white blood cell (WBC) counts from large samples of otherwise healthy individuals can provide insights into genes and biologic pathways involved in

  4. Comparisons in fluctuation of muscle strength and function in patients with immune-mediated neuropathy treated with intravenous versus subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Ingelise; Markvardsen, Lars H; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2018-04-01

    Variations in muscle strength and function have not been studied in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy whose treatment regimen has been changed from intravenous to subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IVIg to SCIg). In a prospective, open-label study, patients were changed from monthly IVIg to weekly SCIg. The primary endpoint was variation in isokinetic muscle strength (cIKS). Secondary endpoints were variations in Medical Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength (GS), 9-hole-peg test (9-HPT), and 40-meter-walk test (40-MWT). The coefficient of variance of cIKS during the IVIg and SCIg treatment periods was unchanged (mean ± SD: 6.97 ± 4.83% vs. 5.50 ± 3.13%, P = 0.21). The variations in the 9-HPT and 40-MWT were significantly lower in the SCIg group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.005, respectively). When therapy was changed from IVIg to SCIg, fluctuation of muscle strength was unchanged, but performance fluctuations were diminished. Muscle Nerve 57: 610-614, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Devic's Disease (Neuromyelitis optical)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinzon, Alfredo; Echeverry, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Aida Bibiana

    2010-01-01

    We present a case report about a young woman initially treated as having multiple sclerosis, who relapsed with serious visual impairment. Devic's disease is a demyelinating disorder that presents as transverse myelitis associated with optic neuritis, typically bilateral. Multiple sclerosis is in fact the main differential diagnosis

  6. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A case series and review of literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Rezai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a rare immune mediated and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that usually affects children. It is a monophasic disorder related with multifocal neurologic symptoms. In this paper, we report seven cases of Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in pediatrics in addition; a review of literatures is presented.

  7. Apolipoprotein E Mimetic Promotes Functional and Histological Recovery in Lysolecithin-Induced Spinal Cord Demyelination in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhen; Li, Fengqiao; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B E; Hu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Yiyan; Yu, Panpan; Zhang, Yongjie; Cai, Jun; Vitek, Michael P; Shields, Christopher B

    2013-04-01

    Considering demyelination is the pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), reducing demyelination and/or promoting remyelination is a practical therapeutic strategy to improve functional recovery for MS. An apolipoprotein E (apoE)-mimetic peptide COG112 has previously demonstrated therapeutic efficacy on functional and histological recovery in a mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of human MS. In the current study, we further investigated whether COG112 promotes remyelination and improves functional recovery in lysolecithin induced focal demyelination in the white matter of spinal cord in mice. A focal demyelination model was created by stereotaxically injecting lysolecithin into the bilateral ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) of T8 and T9 mouse spinal cords. Immediately after lysolecithin injection mice were treated with COG112, prefix peptide control or vehicle control for 21 days. The locomotor function of the mice was measured by the beam walking test and Basso Mouse Scale (BMS) assessment. The nerve transmission of the VLF of mice was assessed in vivo by transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs). The histological changes were also examined by by eriochrome cyanine staining, immunohistochemistry staining and electron microscopy (EM) method. The area of demyelination in the spinal cord was significantly reduced in the COG112 group. EM examination showed that treatment with COG112 increased the thickness of myelin sheaths and the numbers of surviving axons in the lesion epicenter. Locomotor function was improved in COG112 treated animals when measured by the beam walking test and BMS assessment compared to controls. TcMMEPs also demonstrated the COG112-mediated enhancement of amplitude of evoked responses. The apoE-mimetic COG112 demonstrates a favorable combination of activities in suppressing inflammatory response, mitigating demyelination and in promoting remyelination and associated functional recovery in animal model

  8. Apolipoprotein E Mimetic Promotes Functional and Histological Recovery in Lysolecithin-Induced Spinal Cord Demyelination in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Zhen; Li, Fengqiao; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B.E.; Hu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Yiyan; Yu, Panpan; Zhang, Yongjie; Cai, Jun; Vitek, Michael P.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering demyelination is the pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), reducing demyelination and/or promoting remyelination is a practical therapeutic strategy to improve functional recovery for MS. An apolipoprotein E (apoE)-mimetic peptide COG112 has previously demonstrated therapeutic efficacy on functional and histological recovery in a mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of human MS. In the current study, we further investigated whether COG1...

  9. Inhibition of GABA A receptor improved special memory impairment in the local model of demyelination in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi Majd, Alireza; Ebrahim Tabar, Forough; Afghani, Arghavan; Ashrafpour, Sahand; Dehghan, Samaneh; Gol, Mohammad; Ashrafpour, Manouchehr; Pourabdolhossein, Fereshteh

    2018-01-15

    Cognitive impairment and memory deficit are common features in multiple Sclerosis patients. The mechanism of memory impairment in MS is unknown, but neuroimaging studies suggest that hippocampal demyelination is involved. Here, we investigate the role of GABA A receptor on spatial memory in the local model of hippocampal demyelination. Demyelination was induced in male Wistar rats by bilaterally injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) 1% into the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The treatment groups were received daily intraventricular injection of bicuculline (0.025, 0.05μg/2μl/animal) or muscimol (0.1, 0.2μg/2μl/animal) 5days after LPC injection. Morris Water Maze was used to evaluate learning and memory in rats. We used Luxol fast blue staining and qPCR to assess demyelination extention and MBP expression level respectively. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD45 and H&E staining were performed to assess inflammatory cells infiltration. Behavioral study revealed that LPC injection in the hippocampus impaired learning and memory function. Animals treated with both doses of bicuculline improved spatial learning and memory function; however, muscimol treatment had no effect. Histological and MBP expression studies confirmed that demylination in LPC group was maximal. Bicuculline treatment significantly reduced demyelination extension and increased the level of MBP expression. H&E and IHC results showed that bicuculline reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in the lesion site. Bicuculline improved learning and memory and decreased demyelination extention in the LPC-induced hippocampal demyelination model. We conclude that disruption of GABAergic homeostasis in hippocampal demyelination context may be involved in memory impairment with the implications for both pathophysiology and therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Anti-Ma2–associated limbic encephalitis with coexisting chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Weina; Qi, Baochang; Wang, Xu; Yang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We report the rare case of a 74-year-old man with anti-Ma2–associated paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome (PNS), and review and analyze the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Patient concerns: The patient presented with a 5-month history of muscle weakness, progressive body aches, and weakness and numbness in both lower extremities. Before his hospitalization, he had experienced cognitive function decline; ptosis, inward gaze, and vertical gaze palsy in the right eye; and occasional visual hallucinations. Brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yielded normal results. Anti-Ma2 antibodies were detected in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. A 4-hour electroencephalogram showed irregular sharp slow waves and δ waves in the temporal region. Electromyography showed peripheral nerve demyelination. Positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) examination revealed hypermetabolism in the lymph nodes of the whole body. Biopsy of the lymph nodes showed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Diagnosis: A clinical diagnosis of lymphoma and PNS was made. Interventions: The patient was treated with intravenous dexamethasone (15 mg/day) for 3 days. Lessons: We have presented a rare case of a PNS involving both the central and peripheral nervous systems. The clinical features of this case indicated anti-Ma2–associated encephalitis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. PET-CT played a critical role in enabling early diagnosis and prompt treatment in this case. PMID:28984777

  11. Anti-Ma2-associated limbic encephalitis with coexisting chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Weina; Qi, Baochang; Wang, Xu; Yang, Yu

    2017-10-01

    We report the rare case of a 74-year-old man with anti-Ma2-associated paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome (PNS), and review and analyze the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. The patient presented with a 5-month history of muscle weakness, progressive body aches, and weakness and numbness in both lower extremities. Before his hospitalization, he had experienced cognitive function decline; ptosis, inward gaze, and vertical gaze palsy in the right eye; and occasional visual hallucinations. Brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yielded normal results. Anti-Ma2 antibodies were detected in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. A 4-hour electroencephalogram showed irregular sharp slow waves and δ waves in the temporal region. Electromyography showed peripheral nerve demyelination. Positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) examination revealed hypermetabolism in the lymph nodes of the whole body. Biopsy of the lymph nodes showed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A clinical diagnosis of lymphoma and PNS was made. The patient was treated with intravenous dexamethasone (15 mg/day) for 3 days. We have presented a rare case of a PNS involving both the central and peripheral nervous systems. The clinical features of this case indicated anti-Ma2-associated encephalitis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. PET-CT played a critical role in enabling early diagnosis and prompt treatment in this case.

  12. Osmotic demyelination syndrome with recent chemotherapy in normonatremic patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungjae; Baek, Hye Jin; Jung, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Seon Jeong; Lee, Yedaun; Lee, Kwaghwi; Ryu, Ji Hwa; Kim, Hong Dae [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS), an acquired demyelinating condition of the central pons and/or other regions of the brain, is frequently associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia. There are several reports of ODS in other clinical setting such as malnutrition, alcoholism, transplantation, malignancy, and chronic debilitating illness. However, cases of ODS associated with chemotherapy have not been frequently reported. Here, we describe a case of ODS in a normonatremic patient recently underwent chemotherapy for colon cancer. The diagnosis was confirmed by MRI showing a typical T2 hyperintensity in the central pons. This case suggests that ODS is not always associated with hyponatremia and that ODS can have a favorable clinical and radiologic prognosis.

  13. Overview of the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with intravenous immunoglobulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahdi-Rogers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Mahdi-Rogers, Yusuf A RajaballyNeuromuscular Clinic, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UKAbstract: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an acquired heterogeneous disorder of immune origin affecting the peripheral nerves, causing motor weakness and sensory symptoms and signs. The precise pathophysiology of CIDP remains uncertain although B and T cell mechanisms are believed to be implicated. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg have been shown in a number of trials to be an effective treatment for CIDP. IVIg is thought to exert its immunomodulatory effects by affecting several components of the immune system including B-cells, T-cells, macrophages and complement. This article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of CIDP and of its treatment with IVIg.Keywords: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, intravenous immunoglobulin, pathogenesis, treatment

  14. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in responders to intravenous therapy with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Debost, J-C; Harbo, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We hypothesized that subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins (SCIG) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is feasible, safe and superior to treatment with saline for the performance of muscle strength. METHODS: Thirty patients with motor...... Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength, standardized electrophysiological recordings from three nerves, and plasma IgG levels were evaluated. RESULTS: SCIG treatment was well tolerated in all 14 patients. Six patients complained of mild side-effects at the injection site. In the SCIG group...

  15. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-09-15

    to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA double-strand breaks in oligodendrocytes cause demyelination, axonal injury, and CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Pernille M.; Pinto, Milena; Patel, Shreyans

    2017-01-01

    with time of induction. In addition, after short transient induction of mtDNA DSBs, PLP:mtPstI mice showed an exacerbated response to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Together, our data demonstrate that mtDNA damage can cause primary oligodendropathy, which in turn triggers demyelination, proving...... forms, which are not accurately reproduced in the models currently available. For this reason, the PLP: mtPstI mouse represents a unique and much needed platform for testing remyelinating therapies....

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion presenting with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan Derek J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is associated with a range of neurological conditions. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare presentation; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is the commonest form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has occasionally been reported in acute Immunodeficiency Virus infection but little data exists on frequency, management and outcome. Case presentation We describe an episode of Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a 30-year-old man testing positive for Immunodeficiency Virus, probably during acute seroconversion. Clinical suspicion was confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis and nerve conduction studies. Rapid clinical deterioration prompted intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and early commencement of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. All symptoms resolved within nine weeks. Conclusion Unusual neurological presentations in previously fit patients are an appropriate indication for Immunodeficiency-Virus testing. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy with adequate penetration of the central nervous system should be considered as an early intervention, alongside conventional therapies such as intravenous immunoglobulin.

  18. Acute abdominal pain as the only symptom of a thoracic demyelinating lesion in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shohei; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Tanabe, Takuya; Fukui, Miho; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a syndrome characterized by complex neurological symptoms resulting from demyelinating lesions in the central nervous system. We report a child with a relapse of MS whose only presenting symptom was severe abdominal pain. Dysfunctional intestinal mobility was assessed by abdominal computed tomography. Findings resembled paralytic ileus resulting from peritonitis. However, the patient demonstrated no other symptoms of peritonitis. A T2-weighted magnetic resonance image revealed a new demyelinating lesion localized to thoracic segments T4-T12. The lesion presumably affected autonomic efferents involved in intestinal mobility. Treatment with a pulse of methylprednisolone reduced both abdominal pain and lesion size. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a pediatric MS patient with a demyelinating lesion associated with an autonomic symptom of altered intestinal mobility in the absence of neurological symptoms. This atypical presentation of MS highlights the need for physicians' vigilance when treating this patient population. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pervasive sharing of genetic effects in autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Cotsapas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological and clinical evidence, this suggests that some genetic risk factors may be shared across diseases-as is the case with alleles in the Major Histocompatibility Locus. In this work we evaluate the extent of this sharing for 107 immune disease-risk SNPs in seven diseases: celiac disease, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and type 1 diabetes. We have developed a novel statistic for Cross Phenotype Meta-Analysis (CPMA which detects association of a SNP to multiple, but not necessarily all, phenotypes. With it, we find evidence that 47/107 (44% immune-mediated disease risk SNPs are associated to multiple-but not all-immune-mediated diseases (SNP-wise P(CPMA<0.01. We also show that distinct groups of interacting proteins are encoded near SNPs which predispose to the same subsets of diseases; we propose these as the mechanistic basis of shared disease risk. We are thus able to leverage genetic data across diseases to construct biological hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of pathogenesis.

  20. A large variety of clinical features and concomitant disorders in celiac disease - A cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerman, Marleen; Tan, Ineke L.; Kolkman, Jeroen J.; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca; Visschedijk, Marijn C.; Weersma, Rinse K.

    Background and aims: Celiac disease (CeD) is a gluten triggered, immune-mediated disease of the small intestine. Few clinical cohort descriptions are available, despite the diverse clinical picture. This study provides an overview of a large Dutch CeD cohort focusing on presenting symptoms,

  1. Searching for Celiac Disease Screening-detected celiac disease in an HLA-genotyped birth cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Björck, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Celiac disease is a common immune mediated enteropathy strongly associated with HLA-DQB1*02 (DQ2), *0302 (DQ8), or both and the presence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). Prevalence studies have revealed that most affected individuals go undetected because of subclinical signs or being asymptomatic rendering screening a method for identification. However, less is known about subclinical manifestations of screening-detected celiac disease during childhood and if the...

  2. Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic, is protective against autoimmune-mediated demyelination by inhibiting effector T cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Mei

    Full Text Available Quetiapine (Que, a commonly used atypical antipsychotic drug (APD, can prevent myelin from breakdown without immune attack. Multiple sclerosis (MS, an autoimmune reactive inflammation demyelinating disease, is triggered by activated myelin-specific T lymphocytes (T cells. In this study, we investigated the potential efficacy of Que as an immune-modulating therapeutic agent for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model for MS. Que treatment was initiated on the onset of MOG(35-55 peptide induced EAE mice and the efficacy of Que on modulating the immune response was determined by Flow Cytometry through analyzing CD4(+/CD8(+ populations and the proliferation of effector T cells (CD4(+CD25(- in peripheral immune organs. Our results show that Que dramatically attenuates the severity of EAE symptoms. Que treatment decreases the extent of CD4(+/CD8(+ T cell infiltration into the spinal cord and suppresses local glial activation, thereby diminishing the loss of mature oligodendrocytes and myelin breakdown in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Our results further demonstrate that Que treatment decreases the CD4(+/CD8(+ T cell populations in lymph nodes and spleens of EAE mice and inhibits either MOG(35-55 or anti-CD3 induced proliferation as well as IL-2 production of effector T cells (CD4(+CD25(- isolated from EAE mice spleen. Together, these findings suggest that Que displays an immune-modulating role during the course of EAE, and thus may be a promising candidate for treatment of MS.

  3. Targeting demyelination and virtual hypoxia with high-dose biotin as a treatment for progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedel, Frédéric; Bernard, Delphine; Mock, Donald M; Tourbah, Ayman

    2016-11-01

    Progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severely disabling neurological condition, and an effective treatment is urgently needed. Recently, high-dose biotin has emerged as a promising therapy for affected individuals. Initial clinical data have shown that daily doses of biotin of up to 300 mg can improve objective measures of MS-related disability. In this article, we review the biology of biotin and explore the properties of this ubiquitous coenzyme that may explain the encouraging responses seen in patients with progressive MS. The gradual worsening of neurological disability in patients with progressive MS is caused by progressive axonal loss or damage. The triggers for axonal loss in MS likely include both inflammatory demyelination of the myelin sheath and primary neurodegeneration caused by a state of virtual hypoxia within the neuron. Accordingly, targeting both these pathological processes could be effective in the treatment of progressive MS. Biotin is an essential co-factor for five carboxylases involved in fatty acid synthesis and energy production. We hypothesize that high-dose biotin is exerting a therapeutic effect in patients with progressive MS through two different and complementary mechanisms: by promoting axonal remyelination by enhancing myelin production and by reducing axonal hypoxia through enhanced energy production. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Oligodendrocytes in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. A minimal unified model of disease trajectories captures hallmarks of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Kannan, Venkateshan; Kiani, Narsis A.; Piehl, Fredrik; Tegner, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease targeting the central nervous system (CNS) causing demyelination and neurodegeneration leading to accumulation of neurological disability. Here we present a minimal, computational model involving

  5. Prevalence of mucocutaneous findings in Celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Yayla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy which develops as a result of exposure to gluten in food products in individuals with a genetic predisposition. Gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal clinical findings can be seen in these patients. An increased frequence of autoimmune diseases has been reported in patients with celiac disease. Some dermatological diseases, such as dermatitis herpetiformis, vitiligo, psoriasis, alopecia areata and recurrent aphthous stomatitis have been reported to be more common among patients with celiac disease. However, there are no controlled studies on this subject. The aim of this study was to identify the mucocutaneous symptoms seen in celiac patients and to compare these findings with a control group. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine celiac patients and 54 age-and sex-matched healthy volunteers were included in the study. In the patient group, celiac disease history, height and weight parameters, the medications of the patients, compliance to a gluten-free diet, concomitant skin disorders and additional illnesses were questioned; height and weight parameters, diagnosed illnesses, and medications were questioned in the control group. Dermatological analyses were performed in all participants. Results: Mucocutaneous findings were found to be present in 38 patients (77.6% in the celiac patient group and in 31 (57.4% individuals in the control group. The presence of mucocutaneous findings in celiac patients was significantly more common than in the control group. While immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases were detected in 8 celiac patients (16.3%, none of the individuals in the control group had immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. Conclusion: In celiac patients, the frequency of immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and all mucocutaneous diseases were found to be increased. Therefore, we suggest

  6. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwani, N.; Tappouni, R.; Tice, J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  7. Salivary Gluten Degradation and Oral Microbial Profiles in Healthy Individuals and Celiac Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, N.; Faller, L.; Leffler, D.A.; Kelly, C.P.; Hansen, J.; Bosch, J.A.; Wei, G.; Paster, B.J.; Schuppan, D.; Helmerhorst, E.J.

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Saliva harbors the second highest bacterial load of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract after the colon. We hypothesized that enzymes produced by oral bacteria may be involved

  8. Specific nongluten proteins of wheat are novel target antigens in celiac disease humoral response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is generally understood to be triggered by the ingestion of gluten proteins of wheat and related cereals. The skin manifestation of the condition is known as dermatitis herpetiformis. Antibody response to native and deamidated seque...

  9. Azotemia protects the brain from osmotic demyelination on rapid correction of hyponatremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murtaza F Dhrolia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS is a dreadful, irreversible and well-recognized clinical entity that classically occurs after rapid correction of hyponatremia. However, it has been observed that when hyponatremia is rapidly corrected in azotemic patients by hemodialysis (HD, patients do not necessarily develop ODS. We studied the effect of inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia with HD in patients with azotemia. Fifty-two azotemic patients, who underwent HD at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, having pre-HD serum sodium level <125 mEq/L and post-HD serum sodium levels that increased by ≥12 mEq/L from their pre-dialysis level, were studied. Serum sodium was analyzed before and within 24 h after a HD session. HD was performed using bicarbonate solution, with the sodium concentration being 140 meq/L. The duration of the dialysis session was based on the discretion of the treating nephrologist. Patients were examined for any neurological symptoms or signs before and after HD and for up to two weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in required cases. None of the 52 patients with azotemia, despite inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia with HD, developed ODS. This study suggests that patients with azotemia do not develop ODS on rapid correction of hyponatremia by HD, which suggests a possible protective role of azotemia on the brain from osmotic demyelination. However, the mechanism by which azotemia protects the brain from demyelination in humans is largely hypothetical and further studies are needed to answer this question.

  10. Celiac disease and its histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pudasaini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is gluten induced enteropathy and is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine characterized by malabsorption. It is a common immune mediated disorder which is triggered by consumption of wheat (gluten. It occurs in genetically predisposed individuals (carriers of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes. It is characterized by inflammation of the small-intestinal mucosa and myriad gastrointestinal and systemic manifestations. A duodenal biopsy with positive serology is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Celiac disease. As there are changing presentation for Celiac disease, communication of pathologist and gastroenterologists is essential for appropriate interpretation of duodenal biopsy.

  11. Imaging of Occupational Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champlin, Jay; Edwards, Rachael; Pipavath, Sudhakar

    2016-11-01

    Occupational lung diseases span a variety of pulmonary disorders caused by inhalation of dusts or chemical antigens in a vocational setting. Included in these are the classic mineral pneumoconioses of silicosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, and asbestos-related diseases as well as many immune-mediated and airway-centric diseases, and new and emerging disorders. Although some of these have characteristic imaging appearances, a multidisciplinary approach with focus on occupational exposure history is essential to proper diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Unusual features in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: Good outcome after prolonged ventilatory support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Jha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe respiratory muscle paralysis and ventilatory failure is rare in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP. We report a 14 year child who presented with respiratory failure, bulbar and multiple cranial nerves involvement along with bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis. He was diagnosed with CIDP after electrophysiological evaluation. He required AMBU ventilation for about 4 months (including domiciliary use, after which he recovered significantly. Along with several unusual features of CIDP, this report highlights good example of steady basic intensive care to save lives and rewarding outcome of prolonged respiratory support, provided by AMBU ventilation which is a rather primitive, but inexpensive device.

  13. The Role of Screening for Coeliac Disease in Asymptomatic Individuals

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kernan, R

    2017-11-01

    Coeliac Disease (CD) is a genetically linked autoimmune disorder in which ingestion of gluten causes an immune-mediated reaction in the small intestine, leading to either gastrointestinal malabsorptive symptoms or non-gastrointestinal features including anaemia, Vitamin D deficiency, fatigue and growth failure in childhood. Ireland’s rising incidence of CD likely represents a true increase in disease, correlating with emerging epidemiological data from Scotland and North America

  14. Nogo-A is a reliable oligodendroglial marker in adult human and mouse CNS and in demyelinated lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Maruschak, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    to be strongly expressed in mature oligodendrocytes in vivo. In the present investigation we analyzed the expression patterns of Nogo-A in adult mouse and human CNS as well as in demyelinating animal models and multiple sclerosis lesions. Nogo-A expression was compared with that of other frequently used...... oligodendroglial markers such as CC1, CNP, and in situ hybridization for proteolipid protein mRNA. Nogo-A strongly and reliably labeled oligodendrocytes in the adult CNS as well as in demyelinating lesions and thus represents a valuable tool for the identification of oligodendrocytes in human and mouse CNS tissue...

  15. Role of Demyelination Efficiency within Acellular Nerve Scaffolds during Nerve Regeneration across Peripheral Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiqin Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hudson’s optimized chemical processing method is the most commonly used chemical method to prepare acellular nerve scaffolds for the reconstruction of large peripheral nerve defects. However, residual myelin attached to the basal laminar tube has been observed in acellular nerve scaffolds prepared using Hudson’s method. Here, we describe a novel method of producing acellular nerve scaffolds that eliminates residual myelin more effectively than Hudson’s method through the use of various detergent combinations of sulfobetaine-10, sulfobetaine-16, Triton X-200, sodium deoxycholate, and peracetic acid. In addition, the efficacy of this new scaffold in repairing a 1.5 cm defect in the sciatic nerve of rats was examined. The modified method produced a higher degree of demyelination than Hudson’s method, resulting in a minor host immune response in vivo and providing an improved environment for nerve regeneration and, consequently, better functional recovery. A morphological study showed that the number of regenerated axons in the modified group and Hudson group did not differ. However, the autograft and modified groups were more similar in myelin sheath regeneration than the autograft and Hudson groups. These results suggest that the modified method for producing a demyelinated acellular scaffold may aid functional recovery in general after nerve defects.

  16. Regulatory effect of triiodothyronine on brain myelination and astrogliosis after cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendedel, Adib; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Azimzadeh, Maryam; Pasbakhsh, Parichehr; Omidi, Negar; Golestani, Abolfazl; Beyer, Cordian; Clarner, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Chronic demyelination and plaque formation in multiple sclerosis is accompanied by persisting astrogliosis, negatively influencing central nervous system recovery and remyelination. Triiodothyronin (T3) is thought to enhance remyelination in the adult brain by the induction of oligodendrocyte maturation. We investigated additional astrocyte-mediated mechanisms by which T3 might promote remyelination in chronically demyelinated lesions using the cuprizone mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were fed cuprizone for 12 weeks to induce lesions with an impaired remyelination capacity. While the expression of oligodenrocyte progenitor markers, i.e., platelet derived growth factor-α receptor was not affected by T3 administration, myelination status, myelin protein expression as well as total and adult oligodendrocyte numbers were markedly increased compared to cuprizone treated controls. In addition to these effects on oligodendrocyte numbers and function, astrogliosis but not microgliosis was ameliorated by T3 administration. Intermediate filament proteins vimentin and nestin as well as the extracellular matrix component tenascin C were significantly reduced after T3 exposure, indicating additional effects of T3 on astrocytes and astrogliosis. Our data clearly indicate that T3 promotes remyelination in chronic lesions by both enhancing oligodendrocyte maturation and attenuating astrogliosis.

  17. Diagnostic transcranial magnetic stimulation in children with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Voitenkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of our work was to evaluate MEPs characteristics in children with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and evaluate usefulness of TMS as an additional diagnostic method in this disorder.Methods. 20 healthy children (7–14 years old, average 12 years, 7 females, 13 males without any signs of neurological disorders were enrolled as controls and 37 patients (8–13 years old, average 11 years, 19 females, 18 males with AIDP were enrolled as the main group. EMG and TMS were performed on 3–7 day from the onset of the first symptoms. Cortical and lumbar MEP`s latencies, shapes and amplitudes and CMCT were averaged and analyzed.Results. Significant differences between children with AIDP and controls on latencies of both cortical and lumbar MEPs were registered. Cortical MEPs shapes were disperse in 100% of the cases, and lumbar MEPs were disperse in 57% of the cases. Amplitudes changes for both lumbar and cortical MEPs were not significant.Conclusions. Diagnostic transcranial magnetic stimulation on the early stage of the acute demyelinating polyneuropathy in children may be implemented as the additional tool. Main finding in this population is lengthening of the latency of cortical and lumbar motor evoked potentials. Disperse shape of the lumbar MEPs may also be used as the early sign of the acute demyelization of the peripheral nerves.

  18. Tc-99m-interleukin-2 scintigraphy in normal subjects and in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases : a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chianelli, M.; Mather, S. J.; Grossman, A.; Sobnak, R.; Fritzberg, A.; Britton, K. E.; Signore, A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Radiolabelled interleukin-2 is a radiopharmaceutical used for the study of chronic inflammatory processes. I-123-labelled interleukin-2 has successfully been used in a large number of patients affected by several immune-mediated diseases. I-123, however, is expensive and not readily

  19. Development of Graves' ophthalmopathy and uveitis after radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in a patient with HTLA-I associated myelopathy (HAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yasunori; Migita, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Tomoji; Okuda, Itsuko; Takeshita, Akira; Takagi, Akio; Shishiba, Yoshimasa

    1994-01-01

    HTLV-I carriers or patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) are prone to immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present a 44-year-old female with HAM who developed Graves' disease. She developed severe Graves' ophthalmopathy shortly after 131 I therapy, concurrently with a remarkable increase in TSH-receptor antibody titer. Ophthalmopathy was aggravated in spite of prednisolone therapy and euthyroidism being maintained by thyroxine replacement. Uveitis also developed after 131 I therapy and iridocyclitis finally required trabeculotomy. This case suggests that HAM patients may have a higher risk of immune-mediated Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy.(author)

  20. Suppression of IL-12p70 formation by IL-2 or following macrophage depletion causes T-cell autoreactivity leading to CNS demyelination in HSV-1-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhong Hyun Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have established two mouse models of central nervous system (CNS demyelination that differ from most other available models of multiple sclerosis (MS in that they represent a mixture of viral and immune triggers. In the first model, ocular infection of different strains of mice with a recombinant HSV-1 that expresses murine IL-2 constitutively (HSV-IL-2 causes CNS demyelination. In the second model, depletion of macrophages causes CNS demyelination in mice that are ocularly infected with wild-type (WT HSV-1. In the present study, we found that the demyelination in macrophage-intact mice infected with HSV-IL-2 was blocked by depletion of FoxP3-expressing cells, while concurrent depletion of macrophages restored demyelination. In contrast, demyelination was blocked in the macrophage-depleted mice infected with wild-type HSV-1 following depletion of FoxP3-expressing cells. In macrophage-depleted HSV-IL-2-infected mice, demyelination was associated with the activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, whereas in macrophage-depleted mice infected with WT HSV-1, demyelination was associated with CD4+ T cells. Macrophage depletion or infection with HSV-IL-2 caused an imbalance of T cells and TH1 responses as well as alterations in IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 but not other members of the IL-12 family or their receptors. Demyelination was blocked by adoptive transfer of macrophages that were infected with HSV-IL-12p70 or HSV-IL-12p40 but not by HSV-IL-12p35. These results indicate that suppression of IL-12p70 formation by IL-2 or following macrophage depletion causes T-cell autoreactivity leading to CNS demyelination in HSV-1-infected mice.

  1. Association of immune response to endothelial cell growth factor with early disseminated and late manifestations of Lyme disease but not posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kevin S; Klempner, Mark S; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor has been recently proposed as a potential autoantigen in manifestations of Lyme disease that are thought to involve immune-mediated mechanisms. Our findings indicate that a humoral immune response to this protein is not associated with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Disease: H01656 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01656 Psoriasis Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease...nvironmental factors, and immune disorders play an important role in causing psoriasis. Psoriasis is associa...ted with several comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, lymphoma, and depression. Psoriasis is an ...escription, drug) ... AUTHORS ... Burfield L, Burden AD ... TITLE ... Psoriasis. ... JOUR...tion) ... AUTHORS ... Limaye K ... TITLE ... Psoriasis: an overview and update. ... JOURNAL ... Nurse Pract 40:23-6 (2015) DOI:10.1097/01.NPR.0000453651.30695.43

  3. Using atypical symptoms and red flags to identify non-demyelinating disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Siobhan B

    2012-01-01

    Red flags and atypical symptoms have been described as being useful in suggesting alternative diagnoses to multiple sclerosis (MS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS); however, their diagnostic utility has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to establish the predictive value of red flags and the typicality\\/atypicality of symptoms at presentation in relation to the final diagnosis of patients referred with suspected MS.

  4. Autoimmune liver disease and therapy in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Homan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the liver. In childhood, autoimmune liver disorders include autoimmune hepatitis type I and II, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, Coombs-positive giant cell hepatitis, and de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation. Autoimmune liver disease has a more aggressive course in children, especially autoimmune hepatitis type II. Standard therapy is a combination of corticosteroids and azathioprine. Around 80 % of children with autoimmune liver disease show a rapid response to combination therapy. The non-responders are treated with more potent drugs, otherwise autoimmune disease progresses to cirrhosis of the liver and the child needs liver transplantation as rescue therapy.

  5. Delayed nerve stimulation promotes axon-protective neurofilament phosphorylation, accelerates immune cell clearance and enhances remyelination in vivo in focally demyelinated nerves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki A McLean

    Full Text Available Rapid and efficient axon remyelination aids in restoring strong electrochemical communication with end organs and in preventing axonal degeneration often observed in demyelinating neuropathies. The signals from axons that can trigger more effective remyelination in vivo are still being elucidated. Here we report the remarkable effect of delayed brief electrical nerve stimulation (ES; 1 hour @ 20 Hz 5 days post-demyelination on ensuing reparative events in a focally demyelinated adult rat peripheral nerve. ES impacted many parameters underlying successful remyelination. It effected increased neurofilament expression and phosphorylation, both implicated in axon protection. ES increased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and promoted node of Ranvier re-organization, both of which coincided with the early reappearance of remyelinated axons, effects not observed at the same time points in non-stimulated demyelinated nerves. The improved ES-associated remyelination was accompanied by enhanced clearance of ED-1 positive macrophages and attenuation of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in accompanying Schwann cells, suggesting a more rapid clearance of myelin debris and return of Schwann cells to a nonreactive myelinating state. These benefits of ES correlated with increased levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the acute demyelination zone, a key molecule in the initiation of the myelination program. In conclusion, the tremendous impact of delayed brief nerve stimulation on enhancement of the innate capacity of a focally demyelinated nerve to successfully remyelinate identifies manipulation of this axis as a novel therapeutic target for demyelinating pathologies.

  6. Delayed nerve stimulation promotes axon-protective neurofilament phosphorylation, accelerates immune cell clearance and enhances remyelination in vivo in focally demyelinated nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Nikki A; Popescu, Bogdan F; Gordon, Tessa; Zochodne, Douglas W; Verge, Valerie M K

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and efficient axon remyelination aids in restoring strong electrochemical communication with end organs and in preventing axonal degeneration often observed in demyelinating neuropathies. The signals from axons that can trigger more effective remyelination in vivo are still being elucidated. Here we report the remarkable effect of delayed brief electrical nerve stimulation (ES; 1 hour @ 20 Hz 5 days post-demyelination) on ensuing reparative events in a focally demyelinated adult rat peripheral nerve. ES impacted many parameters underlying successful remyelination. It effected increased neurofilament expression and phosphorylation, both implicated in axon protection. ES increased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and promoted node of Ranvier re-organization, both of which coincided with the early reappearance of remyelinated axons, effects not observed at the same time points in non-stimulated demyelinated nerves. The improved ES-associated remyelination was accompanied by enhanced clearance of ED-1 positive macrophages and attenuation of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in accompanying Schwann cells, suggesting a more rapid clearance of myelin debris and return of Schwann cells to a nonreactive myelinating state. These benefits of ES correlated with increased levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the acute demyelination zone, a key molecule in the initiation of the myelination program. In conclusion, the tremendous impact of delayed brief nerve stimulation on enhancement of the innate capacity of a focally demyelinated nerve to successfully remyelinate identifies manipulation of this axis as a novel therapeutic target for demyelinating pathologies.

  7. Changes in spatiotemporal gait parameters following intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Mary L; Chin, Russell L; Miranda, Caroline; Latov, Norman

    2017-10-01

    Gait impairment is a common presenting symptom in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). However, gait parameters have not previously been evaluated in detail as potential independent outcome measures. We prospectively measured changes in spatiotemporal gait parameters of 20 patients with CIDP at baseline and following treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), using GAITRite® a computerized walkway system with embedded sensors. Overall, study patients showed significant improvements in gait velocity, cadence, stride length, double support time, stance phase, and swing phase following IVIG treatment. Mean changes in velocity, stance phase, and swing phase, exhibited the greatest statistical significance among the subgroup that exhibited clinically meaningful improvement in Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment disability score, Medical Research Council sum score, and grip strength. Assessment of gait parameters, in particular velocity, step phase and swing phase, is a potentially sensitive outcome measure for evaluating treatment response in CIDP. Muscle Nerve 56: 732-736, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nerve sonography in multifocal motor neuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Druzhinin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative ultrasound characteristics (USC of the median, ulnar nerve at different levels and the spinal nerves in patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN; n=13; 40,4 ± 12,6 years old and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP; n = 7; 47,3 ± 11,2 year old did not reveal statistical difference in cross sectional area (CSA between analyzed groups. Patients with MMN have more pronounced asymmetry of CSA in comparison with CIDP patients which have a symmetrical pattern of diffuse nerve involvement. Quantitative USC has shown to be not informative enough in differentiation of MMN and CIDP. The qualitative analysis (QA according to 3 described types of nerve changes has shown that CIDP is characterized by the prevalence of type 3 pattern (85.8 % while MMN – by type 2 (69.2 %. The sensitivity and specificity of proposed QA patterns in nerve USC need to be analyzed in additional investigations. 

  9. Trigeminal Nerve Root Demyelination Not Seen in Six Horses Diagnosed with Trigeminal-Mediated Headshaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica L. Roberts

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal-mediated headshaking is an idiopathic neuropathic facial pain syndrome in horses. There are clinical similarities to trigeminal neuralgia, a neuropathic facial pain syndrome in man, which is usually caused by demyelination of trigeminal sensory fibers within either the nerve root or, less commonly, the brainstem. Our hypothesis was that the neuropathological substrate of headshaking in horses is similar to that of trigeminal neuralgia in man. Trigeminal nerves, nerve roots, ganglia, infraorbital, and caudal nasal nerves from horse abattoir specimens and from horses euthanized due to trigeminal-mediated headshaking were removed, fixed, and processed for histological assessment by a veterinary pathologist and a neuropathologist with particular experience of trigeminal neuralgia histology. No histological differences were detected between samples from horses with headshaking and those from normal horses. These results suggest that trigeminal-mediated headshaking may have a different pathological substrate from trigeminal neuralgia in man.

  10. Comparison of electrophysiological findings in axonal and demyelinating Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadegari, Samira; Nafissi, Shahriar; Kazemi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Incidence and predominant subtype of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) differs geographically. Electrophysiology has an important role in early diagnosis and prediction of prognosis. This study is conducted to determine the frequent subtype of GBS in a large group of patients in Iran and compare nerve conduction studies in axonal and demyelinating forms of GBS. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records and electrodiagnostic study (EDS) of 121 GBS patients who were managed in our hospital during 11 years. After regarding the exclusion criteria, patients classified as three groups: acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), and acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN). The most frequent subtype and then electrophysiological characteristic based on the time of EDS and their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile were assessed. Results: Among 70 patients finally included in the study, 67% were men. About 63%, 23%, and 14% had AIDP, AMAN, and AMSAN, respectively. AIDP patients represented a wider range of ages compared with other groups. Higher levels of CSF protein, abnormal late responses and sural sparing were more frequent in AIDP subtype. Five AMSAN patients also revealed sural sparing. Conduction block (CB) was observed in one AMAN patient. Prolonged F-wave latency was observed only in AIDP cases. CB and inexcitable sensory nerves were more frequent after 2 weeks, but reduced F-wave persistency was more prominent in the early phase. Conclusion: AIDP was the most frequent subtype. Although the electrophysiology and CSF are important diagnostic tools, classification should not be made based on a distinct finding. PMID:25422732

  11. A gluten-free diet effectively reduces symptoms and health care consumption in a Swedish celiac disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norström, Fredrik; Sandström, Olof; Lindholm, Lars; Ivarsson, Anneli

    2012-09-17

    A gluten-free diet is the only available treatment for celiac disease. Our aim was to investigate the effect of a gluten-free diet on celiac disease related symptoms, health care consumption, and the risk of developing associated immune-mediated diseases. A questionnaire was sent to 1,560 randomly selected members of the Swedish Society for Coeliacs, divided into equal-sized age- and sex strata; 1,031 (66%) responded. Self-reported symptoms, health care consumption (measured by health care visits and hospitalization days), and missed working days were reported both for the year prior to diagnosis (normal diet) and the year prior to receiving the questionnaire while undergoing treatment with a gluten-free diet. Associated immune-mediated diseases (diabetes mellitus type 1, rheumatic disease, thyroid disease, vitiligo, alopecia areata and inflammatory bowel disease) were self-reported including the year of diagnosis. All investigated symptoms except joint pain improved after diagnosis and initiated gluten-free diet. Both health care consumption and missed working days decreased. Associated immune-mediated diseases were diagnosed equally often before and after celiac disease diagnosis. Initiated treatment with a gluten-free diet improves the situation for celiac disease patients in terms of reduced symptoms and health care consumption. An earlier celiac disease diagnosis is therefore of great importance.

  12. Biology of the repair of central nervous system demyelinated lesions: an appraisal Biologia da reparação de lesões desmielinizantes do sistema nervoso central: uma avaliação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. V Peireira

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of myelin sheaths is maintained by oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells respectively in the central nervous system (CNS and in the peripheral nervous system. The process of demyelination consisting of the withdrawal of myelin sheaths from their axons is a characteristic feature of multiple sclerosis, the most common human demyelinating disease. Many experimental models have been designed to study the biology of demyelination and remyelination (repair of the lost myelin in the CNS, due to the difficulties in studying human material. In the ethidium bromide (an intercalating gliotoxic drug model of demyelination, CNS remyelination may be carried out by surviving oligodendrocytes and/or by cells differentiated from the primitive cell lines or either by Schwann cells that invade the CNS. However, some factors such as the age of the experimental animals, intensity and time of exposure to the intercalating chemical and the topography of the lesions have marked influence on the repair of the tissue.A integridade da bainha de mielina é fornecida pelos oligodendrócitos e pelas células de Schwann, no sistema nervoso central (SNC e no sistema nervoso periférico, respectivamente. O fenômeno de desmielinização refere-se à remoção das bainhas de mielina de axônios e este fato é característico na esclerose múltipla, a doença desmielinizante do SNC mais comum no homem. Muitos modelos experimentais têm sido utilizados para o estudo da biologia da desmielinização e remielinização no SNC, face à dificuldade de estudo de material humano. No modelo experimental da droga intercalate, gliotóxica, brometo de etídio, a remielinização do SNC pode ser efetuada por oligodendrócitos sobreviventes à lesão e/ou oriundos de diferenciação de linhagens celulares mais primitivas e por células de Schwann que invadem o SNC. No entanto, fatores como a idade dos animais, a intensidade, e o tempo de exposição ao agente intercalante e a

  13. An Evaluation of 20 Years of EU Framework Programme-Funded Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Translational Research in Non-Human Primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Krista G.; Jonker, Margreet; 't Hart, Bert A.

    2016-01-01

    Aging western societies are facing an increasing prevalence of chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases for which often no effective treatments exist, resulting in increasing health-care expenditure. Despite high investments in drug development, the number of promising new drug candidates

  14. Disease: H01698 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cell arteritis and large vessel vasculitis. ... JOURNAL ... RMD Open 2:e000137 (2016) DOI:10.1136/rmdopen-2015-000137 ...s of C-reactive protein (CRP) Glucocorticoids Tocilizumab [DR:D02596] See also H01465 Large-vessel vasculi...culitis in individuals over the age of 50 in Western countries. It is characterized...nown as temporal arteritis, is a chronic and polygenic immune-mediated disease of unknown etiology. It is the most common form of vas...tis (LVV). ICD-10: M31.6 MeSH: D013700 OMIM: 187360 PMID:27708947 (marker) ... AUTHOR

  15. Immune-Mediated Damage Completes the Parabola: Cryptococcus neoformans Pathogenesis Can Reflect the Outcome of a Weak or Strong Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liise-anne Pirofski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis occurs most frequently in immunocompromised individuals. This has led to the prevailing view that this disease is the result of weak immune responses that cannot control the fungus. However, increasingly, clinical and experimental studies have revealed that the host immune response can contribute to cryptococcal pathogenesis, including the recent study of L. M. Neal et al. (mBio 8:e01415-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01415-17 that reports that CD4+ T cells mediate tissue damage in experimental murine cryptococcosis. This finding has fundamental implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of cryptococcal disease; it helps explain why immunotherapy has been largely unsuccessful in treatment and provides insight into the paradoxical observation that HIV-associated cryptococcosis may have a better prognosis than cryptococcosis in those with no known immune impairment. The demonstration that host-mediated damage can drive cryptococcal disease provides proof of concept that the parabola put forth in the damage-response framework has the flexibility to depict complex and changing outcomes of host-microbe interaction.

  16. Anti-PD-L1/TGFβR2 (M7824) fusion protein induces immunogenic modulation of human urothelial carcinoma cell lines, rendering them more susceptible to immune-mediated recognition and lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenga, Italia; Donahue, Renee N; Gargulak, Morgan L; Lepone, Lauren M; Roselli, Mario; Bilusic, Marijo; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    Avelumab has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the therapy of Merkel cell carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma. M7824 is a novel first-in-class bifunctional fusion protein comprising a monoclonal antibody against programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1, avelumab), fused to the extracellular domain of human transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) receptor 2, which functions as a TGFβ "trap." Advanced urothelial tumors have been shown to express TGFβ, which possesses immunosuppressive properties that promote cancer progression and metastasis. The rationale for a combined molecule is to block the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction between tumor cells and immune cell infiltrate and simultaneously reduce or eliminate TGFβ from the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we explored the effect of M7824 on invasive urothelial carcinoma cell lines. Human urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma cell lines HTB-4, HTB-1, and HTB-5 were treated with M7824, M7824mut (M7824 that is mutated in the anti-PD-L1 portion of the molecule and thus does not bind PD-L1), anti-PD-L1 (avelumab), or IgG1 isotype control monoclonal antibody, and were assessed for gene expression, cell-surface phenotype, and sensitivity to lysis by TRAIL, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. M7824 retains the ability to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of tumor cells, although in some cases to a lesser extent than anti-PD-L1. However, compared to anti-PD-L1, M7824 increases (A) gene expression of molecules involved in T-cell trafficking in the tumor (e.g., CXCL11), (B) TRAIL-mediated tumor cell lysis, and (C) antigen-specific CD8 + T-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the immunomodulatory properties of M7824 on both tumor cell phenotype and immune-mediated lysis. Compared to anti-PD-L1 or M7824mut, M7824 induces immunogenic modulation of urothelial carcinoma cell lines, rendering them more susceptible to immune-mediated

  17. A recurrence of Guillain-Barr and eacute; syndrome or a case of acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in the course of chronic hepatitis B?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guner Celik Koyuncu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a demyelinating polyneuropathy characterized by distal/proximal weakness, which shows gradual progression over a period of 8 weeks or longer. Guillan-Barre Syndrome is a condition characterized by acute monophasic paralysis typically following an infectious assault, and it usually peaks in severity over 3-4 weeks at most. Although rare, there are acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy cases that show progression over a period shorter than 4 weeks, as is the case in Guillan-Barre Syndrome .This report discusses a case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a HBsAg-positive patient, which started as Guillan-Barre Syndrome but showed 3 recurrences within 6 months, each with rapidly progressing quadriplegia, respiratory arrest, and elevated liver enzymes and HBV DNA. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 782-786

  18. Relapsing and Progressive Tumefactive Demyelinating Form of Central Nervous System Involvement in a Patient with Progressive Systemic Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Hui Joong

    2013-01-01

    White matter hyper intensities (WMHI) on MRI are not rare in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS). In this presentation, WMHI were developed in both middle cerebellar peduncles and temporal white matter in a patient with PSS, and regressed after medication of high dose steroid. However, new lesions were developed in the subcortices of both precentral gyri, and progressed rapidly to tumefactive hyperintensity on MRI. We report an unusual relapsing and progressive tumefactive demyelinating form of central nervous system involvement in PSS.

  19. Influence of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia on flow velocities in the portal vein and caudal vena cava measured by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel Policelli; Koenigshof, Amy M; Smith, Daniel J; Strom, Phillip R; Nelson, Nathan C

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare blood flow velocities of the portal vein (PV) and caudal vena cava (CVC) measured by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in clinically normal dogs and dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA). ANIMALS 11 client-owned dogs admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital for management of primary IMHA and 21 staff- or student-owned clinically normal dogs. PROCEDURES Flow velocities in the PV and CVC at the porta hepatis were evaluated in conscious unsedated dogs with concurrent ECG monitoring; evaluations were performed before dogs with IMHA received heparin or blood transfusions. Three measurements of peak velocity at end expiration were obtained for each vessel, and the mean was calculated. Results were compared between IMHA and control groups. RESULTS Mean ± SD blood flow velocity in the CVC differed between control (63.0 ± 18.6 cm/s) and IMHA (104 ± 36.9 cm/s) groups. Variance in dogs with IMHA was significantly greater than that for the clinically normal dogs. No significant difference in blood flow velocity in the PV was detected between IMHA and control dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Higher blood flow velocities were detected by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in the CVC of dogs with naturally occurring IMHA and may be used to predict anemia in patients suspected of having IMHA.

  20. Interactions Between the Canonical WNT/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPAR Gamma on Neuroinflammation, Demyelination, and Remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Alexandre; Vallée, Jean-Noël; Guillevin, Rémy; Lecarpentier, Yves

    2018-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is marked by neuroinflammation and demyelination with loss of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. The immune response is regulated by WNT/beta-catenin pathway in MS. Activated NF-kappaB, a major effector of neuroinflammation, and upregulated canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway positively regulate each other. Demyelinating events present an upregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, whereas proper myelinating phases show a downregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway essential for the promotion of oligodendrocytes precursors cells proliferation and differentiation. The activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway results in differentiation failure and impairment in remyelination. However, PI3K/Akt pathway and TCF7L2, two downstream targets of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, are upregulated and promote proper remyelination. The interactions of these signaling pathways remain unclear. PPAR gamma activation can inhibit NF-kappaB, and can also downregulate the WNT/beta-catenin pathway. PPAR gamma and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway act in an opposite manner. PPAR gamma agonists appear as a promising treatment for the inhibition of demyelination and the promotion of proper remyelination through the control of both NF-kappaB activity and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway.

  1. Evaluation of the association between sexual dysfunction and demyelinating plaque location and number in female multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Volkan; Ozlece, Hatice Kose; Him, Aydın; Güneş, Ayfer; Cordano, Christian; Aksoy, Durdane; Çelik, Yahya

    2018-04-17

    Purpose To investigate the frequency of sexual dysfunction (SD) in female multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and to explore its association with the location and number of demyelinating lesions. Material and Methods We evaluated 42 female patients and 41 healthy subjects. All patients underwent neurological examination and 1.5 T brain and full spinal MRI. All subjects completed the female sexual function index (FSFI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short-Form 36 Quality of Life Scale (SF-36). All participants were also evaluated for serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T4, estradiol, and total testosterone. Results No statistically significant differences between the MS and control groups were found for age, body mass index (BMI), serum TSH, T4, E2, and total testosterone level. MS patients had a statistically significantly lower FSFI and SF-36 scores and higher BDI and BAI scores compared with healthy subjects. The location and number of demyelinating lesions were not associated with SD. Conclusion In our cohort, this difference in SD appears unrelated to the location and number of demyelinating lesions. These findings highlight the importance of the assessment and treatment of psychiatric comorbidities, such as depression and anxiety, in MS patients reporting SD.

  2. Treatments for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP): an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Lunn, Michael Pt; Hughes, Richard Ac; van Schaik, Ivo N; Frost, Chris; Chalk, Colin H

    2017-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic progressive or relapsing and remitting disease that usually causes weakness and sensory loss. The symptoms are due to autoimmune inflammation of peripheral nerves. CIPD affects about 2 to 3 per 100,000 of the population. More than half of affected people cannot walk unaided when symptoms are at their worst. CIDP usually responds to treatments that reduce inflammation, but there is disagreement about which treatment is most effective. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews (CSRs) and non-Cochrane systematic reviews of any treatment for CIDP and to compare the effects of treatments. We considered all systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any treatment for any form of CIDP. We reported their primary outcomes, giving priority to change in disability after 12 months.Two overview authors independently identified published systematic reviews for inclusion and collected data. We reported the quality of evidence using GRADE criteria. Two other review authors independently checked review selection, data extraction and quality assessments.On 31 October 2016, we searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (in theCochrane Library), MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL Plus for systematic reviews of CIDP. We supplemented the RCTs in the existing CSRs by searching on the same date for RCTs of any treatment of CIDP (including treatment of fatigue or pain in CIDP), in the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL Plus. Five CSRs met our inclusion criteria. We identified 23 randomised trials, of which 15 had been included in these CSRs. We were unable to compare treatments as originally planned, because outcomes and outcome intervals differed. CorticosteroidsIt is uncertain whether daily oral prednisone improved impairment compared to no treatment because the quality of the

  3. Effects of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on cuprizone induced demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Nessler

    Full Text Available For the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis there are no regenerative approaches to enhance remyelination. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been proposed to exert such regenerative functions. Intravenous administration of human MSC reduced the clinical severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model mimicking some aspects of multiple sclerosis. However, it is not clear if this effect was achieved by systemic immunomodulation or if there is an active neuroregeneration in the central nervous system (CNS. In order to investigate remyelination and regeneration in the CNS we analysed the effects of intravenously and intranasally applied murine and human bone marrow-derived MSC on cuprizone induced demyelination, a toxic animal model which allows analysis of remyelination without the influence of the peripheral immune system. In contrast to EAE no effects of MSC on de- and remyelination and glial cell reactions were found. In addition, neither murine nor human MSC entered the lesions in the CNS in this toxic model. In conclusion, MSC are not directed into CNS lesions in the cuprizone model where the blood-brain-barrier is intact and thus cannot provide support for regenerative processes.

  4. Standing postural reaction to visual and proprioceptive stimulation in chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Clement P; Tasseel-Ponche, Sophie; Lozeron, Pierre; Piccinini, Giulia; Quintaine, Victorine; Arnulf, Bertrand; Kubis, Nathalie; Yelnik, Alain P

    2018-02-28

    To investigate the weight of visual and proprioceptive inputs, measured indirectly in standing position control, in patients with chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy (CADP). Prospective case study. Twenty-five patients with CADP and 25 healthy controls. Posture was recorded on a double force platform. Stimulations were optokinetic (60°/s) for visual input and vibration (50 Hz) for proprioceptive input. Visual stimulation involved 4 tests (upward, downward, rightward and leftward) and proprioceptive stimulation 2 tests (triceps surae and tibialis anterior). A composite score, previously published and slightly modified, was used for the recorded postural signals from the different stimulations. Despite their sensitivity deficits, patients with CADP were more sensitive to proprioceptive stimuli than were healthy controls (mean composite score 13.9 ((standard deviation; SD) 4.8) vs 18.4 (SD 4.8), p = 0.002). As expected, they were also more sensitive to visual stimuli (mean composite score 10.5 (SD 8.7) vs 22.9 (SD 7.5), p <0.0001). These results encourage balance rehabilitation of patients with CADP, aimed at promoting the use of proprioceptive information, thereby reducing too-early development of visual compensation while proprioception is still available.

  5. Resistance training and aerobic training improve muscle strength and aerobic capacity in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvardsen, Lars H; Overgaard, Kristian; Heje, Karen; Sindrup, Søren H; Christiansen, Ingelise; Vissing, John; Andersen, Henning

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Eighteen CIDP patients treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin performed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and 12 weeks of resistance exercise after a run-in period of 12 weeks without exercise. Three times weekly the participants performed aerobic exercise on an ergometer bike or resistance exercise with unilateral training of knee and elbow flexion/extension. Primary outcomes were maximal oxygen consumption velocity (VO 2 -max) and maximal combined isokinetic muscle strength (cIKS) of knee and elbow flexion/extension. VO 2 -max and muscle strength were unchanged during run-in (-4.9% ± 10.3%, P = 0.80 and -3.7% ± 10.1%, P = 0.17, respectively). Aerobic exercise increased VO 2 -max by 11.0% ± 14.7% (P = 0.02). Resistance exercise resulted in an increase of 13.8% ± 16.0% (P = 0.0004) in cIKS. Aerobic exercise training and resistance exercise training improve fitness and strength in CIDP patients. Muscle Nerve 57: 70-76, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Standing postural reaction to visual and proprioceptive stimulation in chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement P. Provost

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the weight of visual and proprioceptive inputs, measured indirectly in standing position control, in patients with chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy (CADP. Design: Prospective case study. Subjects: Twenty-five patients with CADP and 25 healthy controls. Methods: Posture was recorded on a double force platform. Stimulations were optokinetic (60°/s for visual input and vibration (50 Hz for proprioceptive input. Visual stimulation involved 4 tests (upward, downward, rightward and leftward and proprioceptive stimulation 2 tests (triceps surae and tibialis anterior. A composite score, previously published and slightly modified, was used for the recorded postural signals from the different stimulations. Results: Despite their sensitivity deficits, patients with CADP were more sensitive to proprioceptive stimuli than were healthy controls (mean composite score 13.9 ((standard deviation; SD 4.8 vs 18.4 (SD 4.8, p = 0.002. As expected, they were also more sensitive to visual stimuli (mean composite score 10.5 (SD 8.7 vs 22.9 (SD 7.5, p< 0.0001. Conclusion: These results encourage balance rehabilitation of patients with CADP, aimed at promoting the use of proprioceptive information, thereby reducing too-early development of visual compensation while proprioception is still available.

  7. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Spataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation in the four limbs appeared, with these symptoms showing a progressive course. The diagnostic workup included EMG/ENG which demonstrated reduced conduction velocity with bilateral and symmetrical sensory and motor involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed a cytoalbuminologic dissociation. A prolonged treatment with corticosteroids allowed a significant improvement of the limb weakness. Diplopia and ptosis remained unchanged. This unusual form of CIDP presented as a long-lasting isolated cranial nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes.

  8. Nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) enhances protective immunity mediated by a CHIKV envelope protein expressing DNA Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Huihui; Ramanathan, Aarti A; Kawalakar, Omkar; Sundaram, Senthil G; Tingey, Colleen; Bian, Charoran B; Muruganandam, Nagarajan; Vijayachari, Paluru; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Ugen, Kenneth E; Muthumani, Karuppiah

    2013-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an important emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus, indigenous to tropical Africa and Asia. It can cause epidemic fever and acute illness characterized by fever and arthralgias. The epidemic cycle of this infection is similar to dengue and urban yellow fever viral infections. The generation of an efficient vaccine against CHIKV is necessary to prevent and/or control the disease manifestations of the infection. In this report, we studied immune response against a CHIKV-envelope DNA vaccine (pEnv) and the role of the CHIKV nonstructural gene 2 (nsP2) as an adjuvant for the induction of protective immune responses in a relevant mouse challenge model. When injected with the CHIKV pEnv alone, 70% of the immunized mice survived CHIKV challenge, whereas when co-injected with pEnv+pnsP2, 90% of the mice survived viral challenge. Mice also exhibited a delayed onset signs of illness, and a marked decrease in morbidity, suggesting a nsP2 mediated adjuvant effect. Co-injection of the pnsP2 adjuvant with pEnv also qualitatively and quantitatively increased antigen specific neutralizing antibody responses compared to vaccination with pEnv alone. In sum, these novel data imply that the addition of nsP2 to the pEnv vaccine enhances anti-CHIKV-Env immune responses and maybe useful to include in future CHIKV clinical vaccination strategies.

  9. Gene expression profiles of immune mediators and histopathological findings in animal models of leptospirosis: comparison between susceptible hamsters and resistant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Rouleau, Vincent; Bruyère-Ostells, Lilian; Goarant, Cyrille

    2011-11-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonosis characterized by multiple organ failure and variable host susceptibility toward pathogenic Leptospira strains. In this study, we put the role of inflammatory mediators in parallel with bacterial burdens and organ lesions by comparing a susceptible animal model, the hamster, and a resistant one, the Oncins France 1 (OF1) mouse, both infected with virulent Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae strain Verdun. Histological observations evidenced edema, congestion, hemorrhage, and inflammatory infiltration in the organs of hamsters, in contrast to limited changes in mice. Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR techniques, we showed that the relative Leptospira burden progressively increased in hamster tissues, while a rapid clearance was observed in mouse tissues. The early regulation of the proinflammatory mediators interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and cyclo-oxygenase-2 and the chemokines gamma interferon-inducible protein 10 kDa/CXCL10 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/CCL3 in mouse tissues contrasted with their delayed and massive overexpression in hamster tissues. Conversely, the induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was faster in the resistant than in the susceptible animal model. The role of these cytokines in the pathophysiology of leptospirosis and the implications of their differential regulation in the development of this disease are discussed.

  10. Effects of aquatic exercises in a rat model of brainstem demyelination with ethidium bromide on the beam walking test Efeitos de exercícios aquáticos no desempenho motor de ratos submetidos a um modelo de desmielização com brometo de etídio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Cristina Souza Nassar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with varied levels of disability. The impact of early physiotherapeutic interventions in the disease progression is unknown. We used an experimental model of demyelination with the gliotoxic agent ethidium bromide and early aquatic exercises to evaluate the motor performance of the animals. We quantified the number of footsteps and errors during the beam walking test. The demyelinated animals walked fewer steps with a greater number of errors than the control group. The demyelinated animals that performed aquatic exercises presented a better motor performance than those that did not exercise. Therefore aquatic exercising was beneficial to the motor performance of rats in this experimental model of demyelination.A esclerose múltipla é uma doença desmielinizante do sistema nervoso central que se associa a graus variados de incapacidade. Não se sabe se a realização de intervenções fisioterapêuticas precoces têm impacto na evolução dessa doença. Utilizamos um modelo experimental de desmielinização com o gliotóxico brometo de etídio e a aplicação de exercícios aquáticos precoces para avaliar o desempenho motor dos animais. Foram quantificados o número de passos e os erros executados durante a travessia da barra elevada. Os animais desmielinizados apresentaram menor número de passos e maior quantidade de erros em comparação aos grupos-controle. Os animais desmielinizados que realizaram exercícios aquáticos apresentaram melhor desempenho motor que os animais desmielinizados que não foram submetidos à intervenção. Portanto, a realização de exercícios aquáticos mostrou-se benéfica no desempenho motor dos animais submetidos ao modelo experimental do brometo de etídio.

  11. Combining Diffusion Tensor Metrics and DSC Perfusion Imaging: Can It Improve the Diagnostic Accuracy in Differentiating Tumefactive Demyelination from High-Grade Glioma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, S B; Muraleedharan, A; Kumar, S; Nagesh, C; Kesavadas, C; Abraham, M; Kapilamoorthy, T R; Thomas, B

    2017-04-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions with atypical features can mimic high-grade gliomas on conventional imaging sequences. The aim of this study was to assess the role of conventional imaging, DTI metrics ( p:q tensor decomposition), and DSC perfusion in differentiating tumefactive demyelinating lesions and high-grade gliomas. Fourteen patients with tumefactive demyelinating lesions and 21 patients with high-grade gliomas underwent brain MR imaging with conventional, DTI, and DSC perfusion imaging. Imaging sequences were assessed for differentiation of the lesions. DTI metrics in the enhancing areas and perilesional hyperintensity were obtained by ROI analysis, and the relative CBV values in enhancing areas were calculated on DSC perfusion imaging. Conventional imaging sequences had a sensitivity of 80.9% and specificity of 57.1% in differentiating high-grade gliomas ( P = .049) from tumefactive demyelinating lesions. DTI metrics ( p : q tensor decomposition) and DSC perfusion demonstrated a statistically significant difference in the mean values of ADC, the isotropic component of the diffusion tensor, the anisotropic component of the diffusion tensor, the total magnitude of the diffusion tensor, and rCBV among enhancing portions in tumefactive demyelinating lesions and high-grade gliomas ( P ≤ .02), with the highest specificity for ADC, the anisotropic component of the diffusion tensor, and relative CBV (92.9%). Mean fractional anisotropy values showed no significant statistical difference between tumefactive demyelinating lesions and high-grade gliomas. The combination of DTI and DSC parameters improved the diagnostic accuracy (area under the curve = 0.901). Addition of a heterogeneous enhancement pattern to DTI and DSC parameters improved it further (area under the curve = 0.966). The sensitivity increased from 71.4% to 85.7% after the addition of the enhancement pattern. DTI and DSC perfusion add profoundly to conventional imaging in differentiating tumefactive

  12. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Brynn B; Highfill, Steven L; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L; Bachovchin, William W; Fry, Terry J

    2013-10-01

    Multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and result in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologs) enzymes can mediate tumor regression by immune-mediated mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b) cells, particularly myeloid DCs, to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11bLy6-CLy6-G) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared with either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies, particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT.

  13. Fatigue, Pain, Anxiety and Depression in Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkies, Ingemar S J; Kieseier, Bernd C

    2016-01-01

    In the clinical evaluation of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), scant attention is paid to symptoms such as fatigue, pain and anxiety/depression. We aimed at addressing seminal studies that focused on the burden of these symptoms and their impact on quality of life (QoL) in these conditions. Fatigue, pain, and anxiety/depression are increasingly being recognized in patients with GBS and CIDP, although their pathophysiological provenance remains unknown. Fatigue and pain are significant in terms of prevalence and intensity, may be a presenting symptom, and can persist for years after apparent functional recovery, suggesting residual injury. Anxiety/depression has also been examined although studies are limited. Despite their negative impact on QoL, the long-term dynamics of these symptoms in patients with GBS and particularly CIDP receiving therapy in routine clinical practice have not been systematically evaluated. Such observations formed the basis for the ongoing (GAMEDIS) studies evaluating the effect of Gamunex on fatigue and depression in patients with CIDP, of which some preliminary data are presented. Strength and sensory deficits are the main areas of focus in patients with GBS and CIDP, but they do not explain the total reduction in QoL, suggesting the possible role of other complaints. A more comprehensive approach to patient care demands that factors such as pain, fatigue and anxiety/depression receive greater attention. The non-interventional GAMEDIS studies are expected to provide valuable insight into the long-term effectiveness of Gamunex in everyday practice. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps for differentiating primary CNS lymphomas from tumefactive demyelinating lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shan Shan; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Lim, Young Min

    2015-04-01

    This study intended to investigate the usefulness of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for discriminating primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSLs), especially atypical PCNSLs, from tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs). Forty-seven patients with PCNSLs and 18 with TDLs were enrolled in our study. Hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted images were defined as ROIs after ADC maps were registered to the corresponding T2-weighted image. ADC histograms were calculated from the ROIs containing the entire lesion on every section and on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The ADC histogram parameters were compared among all PCNSLs and TDLs as well as between the subgroup of atypical PCNSLs and TDLs. ROC curves were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the histogram parameters and to determine the optimum thresholds. The differences between the PCNSLs and TDLs were found in the minimum ADC values (ADCmin) and in the 5th and 10th percentiles (ADC5% and ADC10%) of the cumulative ADC histograms. However, no statistical significance was found in the mean ADC value or in the ADC value concerning the mode, kurtosis, and skewness. The ADCmin, ADC5%, and ADC10% were also lower in atypical PCNSLs than in TDLs. ADCmin was the best indicator for discriminating atypical PCNSLs from TDLs, with a threshold of 556×10(-6) mm2/s (sensitivity, 81.3 %; specificity, 88.9%). Histogram analysis of ADC maps may help to discriminate PCNSLs from TDLs and may be particularly useful in differentiating atypical PCNSLs from TDLs.

  15. MRI study of the cuprizone-induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis: demyelination is not found after co-treatment with polyprenols (long-chain isoprenoid alcohols)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodanovich, M.; Glazacheva, V.; Pan, E.; Akulov, A.; Krutenkova, E.; Trusov, V.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a neurological disorder with poorly understood pathogenic mechanisms and a lack of effective therapies. Therefore, the search for new MS treatments remains very important. This study was performed on a commonly used cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis. It evaluated the effect of a plant-derived substance called Ropren® (containing approximately 95% polyprenols or long-chain isoprenoid alcohols) on cuprizone- induced demyelination. The study was performed on 27 eight-week old male CD-1 mice. To induce demyelination mice were fed 0.5% cuprizone in the standard diet for 10 weeks. Ropren® was administered in one daily intraperitoneal injection (12mg/kg), beginning on the 6th week of the experiment. On the 11th week, the corpus callosum in the brain was evaluated in all animals using magnetic resonance imaging with an 11.7 T animal scanner using T2- weighted sequence. Cuprizone treatment successfully induced the model of demyelination with a significant decrease in the size of the corpus callosum compared with the control group (p<0.01). Mice treated with both cuprizone and Ropren® did not exhibit demyelination in the corpus callosum (p<0.01). This shows the positive effect of polyprenols on cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice.

  16. Neurological Disease in Lupus: Toward a Personalized Medicine Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlasson, Sarah; Wiseman, Stewart; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dhaun, Neeraj; Hunt, David P J

    2018-01-01

    The brain and nervous system are important targets for immune-mediated damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), resulting in a complex spectrum of neurological syndromes. Defining nervous system disease in lupus poses significant challenges. Among the difficulties to be addressed are a diversity of clinical manifestations and a lack of understanding of their mechanistic basis. However, despite these challenges, progress has been made in the identification of pathways which contribute to neurological disease in SLE. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of neurological disease in lupus will inform both classification and approaches to clinical trials.

  17. Neurological Disease in Lupus: Toward a Personalized Medicine Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlasson, Sarah; Wiseman, Stewart; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dhaun, Neeraj; Hunt, David P. J.

    2018-01-01

    The brain and nervous system are important targets for immune-mediated damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), resulting in a complex spectrum of neurological syndromes. Defining nervous system disease in lupus poses significant challenges. Among the difficulties to be addressed are a diversity of clinical manifestations and a lack of understanding of their mechanistic basis. However, despite these challenges, progress has been made in the identification of pathways which contribute to neurological disease in SLE. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of neurological disease in lupus will inform both classification and approaches to clinical trials. PMID:29928273

  18. Immune mediated neuropathy following checkpoint immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yufan; Menzies, Alexander M; Long, Georgina V; Fernando, S L; Herkes, G

    2017-11-01

    Checkpoint immunotherapy has revolutionised cancer therapy and is now standard treatment for many malignancies including metastatic melanoma. Acute inflammatory neuropathies, often labelled as Guillain-Barre syndrome, are an uncommon but potentially severe complication of checkpoint immunotherapy with individual cases described but never characterised as a group. We describe a case of acute sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy following a single dose of combination ipilimumab and nivolumab for metastatic melanoma. A literature search was performed, identifying 14 other cases of acute neuropathy following checkpoint immunotherapy, with the clinical, electrophysiological and laboratory features summarised. Most cases described an acute sensorimotor neuropathy (92%) with hyporeflexia (92%) that could occur from induction up till many weeks after the final dose of therapy. In contrast to Guillain-Barre syndrome, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis often shows a lymphocytic picture (50%) and the electrophysiology showed an axonal pattern (55%). Treatment was variable and often in combination. 11 cases received steroid therapy with only 1 death within this group, whereas of the 4 patients who did not receive steroid therapy there were 3 deaths. In conclusion checkpoint immunotherapy - induced acute neuropathies are distinct from and progress differently to Guillain-Barre syndrome. As with other immunotherapy related adverse events corticosteroid therapy should be initiated in addition to usual therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a Biomarker to Differentiate Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis From Multiple Sclerosis at First Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Wint Yan; Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Najmi, Safa; Salter, Amber; Heaps, Jodi; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Mar, Soe

    2018-01-01

    There are no clinical features or biomarkers that can reliably differentiate acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from multiple sclerosis at the first demyelination attack. Consequently, a final diagnosis is sometimes delayed by months and years of follow-up. Early treatment for multiple sclerosis is recommended to reduce long-term disability. Therefore, we intend to explore neuroimaging biomarkers that can reliably distinguish between the two diagnoses. We reviewed prospectively collected clinical, standard MRI and diffusion tensor imaging data from 12 pediatric patients who presented with acute demyelination with and without encephalopathy. Patients were followed for an average of 6.5 years to determine the accuracy of final diagnosis. Final diagnosis was determined using 2013 International Pediatric MS Study Group criteria. Control subjects consisted of four age-matched healthy individuals for each patient. The study population consisted of six patients with central nervous system demyelination with encephalopathy with a presumed diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and six without encephalopathy with a presumed diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome at high risk for multiple sclerosis. During follow-up, two patients with initial diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis were later diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Diffusion tensor imaging region of interest analysis of baseline scans showed differences between final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis patients, whereby low fractional anisotropy and high radial diffusivity occurred in multiple sclerosis patients compared with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis patients and the age-matched controls. Fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity measures may have the potential to serve as biomarkers for distinguishing acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from multiple sclerosis at the onset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Update on celiac disease – etiology, differential diagnosis, drug targets, and management advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlon SA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Samantha A Scanlon1, Joseph A Murray1,21Department of Internal Medicine, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to wheat gluten and similar proteins found in rye and barley that affects genetically susceptible persons. This immune-mediated enteropathy is characterized by villous atrophy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and crypt hyperplasia. Once thought a disease that largely presented with malnourished children, the wide spectrum of disease activity is now better recognized and this has resulted in a shift in the presenting symptoms of most patients with CD. New advances in testing, both serologic and endoscopic, have dramatically increased the detection and diagnosis of CD. While the gluten-free diet is still the only treatment for CD, recent investigations have explored alternative approaches, including the use of altered nonimmunogenic wheat variants, enzymatic degradation of gluten, tissue transglutaminase inhibitors, induction of tolerance, and peptides to restore integrity to intestinal tight junctions.Keywords: immune-mediated enteropathy, gliadin, gluten, epidemiology, CD diagnosis, therapy

  1. Molecular biological aspects of acquired bullous diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1998-01-01

    Bullous diseases of the oral mucosa and skin were originally classified on the basis of clinical and histological criteria. The discovery of autoantibodies in some of these patients and the introduction of molecular biology have resulted in a new understanding of the pathological mechanisms of many...... of the bullous lesions. In this article, updated topics of the immune-mediated bullous lesions which involve oral mucosa and skin are reviewed. Pemphigus antigens, which are desmosomal-associated proteins and belong to the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, have been isolated, and their genes have...

  2. Actualización en el tratamiento de la neuropatía óptica inflamatoria desmielinizante Updating on the treatment of the demyelinating inflammatory optical neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaimara Hernández Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de proporcionar una actualización de las drogas que se emplean para retrasar la aparición de esclerosis múltiple en el manejo de la neuropatía óptica inflamatoria desmielinizante. El artículo presenta el origen y la justificación de la terapia esteroidea en este grupo de enfermedad, así como los mecanismos de acción y beneficios de tratamientos más modernos como los inmunomoduladores e inmunosupresores. El trabajo también introduce muchas de las drogas con efectos neuroprotectores que se encuentran en fases experimentales, cuyo uso prevendría la neurodegeneración que se produce a nivel de las células ganglionares retinianas en esta enfermedad neurológica. Las opciones terapéuticas actuales ofrecen variantes de tratamiento adicionales a pacientes con mayores probabilidades de desarrollo de esclerosis múltiple y retrasan la aparición de un segundo brote, así como las secuelas invalidantes que esta suele originar.A bibliographic review was conducted to provide an updating of drugs used to retard the appearance of multiple sclerosis in the management of the demyelinating inflammatory optical neuropathy. Present paper shows the origin and the justification of the steroid therapy in this disease, as well as the mechanisms of action and benefits of more recent treatments, e.g. the ongoing immunomodulations and immunosuppressive ones and also to introduce many drugs in experimental phase having neuroprotection effects whose use will prevent the neurodegenerative effect produced at level of the retinal ganglion cells in this neurologic disease. The current therapeutical options offer variants of additional treatment to those patients with greater possibilities to development multiple sclerosis and retarding the appearance of a second outbreak, as well as its disabling sequelae.

  3. Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia With Lung Nodules Secondary to Pulmonary Manifestation of Crohn Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiq Zaman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Crohn disease is an immune-mediated inflammatory condition with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations in patients. Pulmonary involvement of Crohn disease is one manifestation. There have been case reports which have shown Crohn disease and lung nodules which were noted to be histopathological as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP. In our case, a 22-year-old woman with Crohn disease was seen with complaints of chest pain and cough. Computed tomographic scan of chest showed multiple bilateral lung nodules, for which biopsy was done, which showed COP. The case study is followed by a deeper discussion of COP and the extraintestinal manifestation seen in inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  5. Dynamic impact of brief electrical nerve stimulation on the neural immune axis-polarization of macrophages toward a pro-repair phenotype in demyelinated peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Nikki A; Verge, Valerie M K

    2016-09-01

    Demyelinating peripheral nerves are infiltrated by cells of the monocyte lineage, including macrophages, which are highly plastic, existing on a continuum from pro-inflammatory M1 to pro-repair M2 phenotypic states. Whether one can therapeutically manipulate demyelinated peripheral nerves to promote a pro-repair M2 phenotype remains to be elucidated. We previously identified brief electrical nerve stimulation (ES) as therapeutically beneficial for remyelination, benefits which include accelerated clearance of macrophages, making us theorize that ES alters the local immune response. Thus, the impact of ES on the immune microenvironment in the zone of demyelination was examined. Adult male rat tibial nerves were focally demyelinated via 1% lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC) injection. Five days later, half underwent 1 hour 20 Hz sciatic nerve ES proximal to the LPC injection site. ES had a remarkable and significant impact, shifting the macrophage phenotype from predominantly pro-inflammatory/M1 toward a predominantly pro-repair/M2 one, as evidenced by an increased incidence of expression of M2-associated phenotypic markers in identified macrophages and a decrease in M1-associated marker expression. This was discernible at 3 days post-ES (8 days post-LPC) and continued at the 5 day post-ES (10 days post-LPC) time point examined. ES also affected chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2; aka MCP-1) expression in a manner that correlated with increases and decreases in macrophage numbers observed in the demyelination zone. The data establish that briefly increasing neuronal activity favorably alters the immune microenvironment in demyelinated nerve, rapidly polarizing macrophages toward a pro-repair phenotype, a beneficial therapeutic concept that may extend to other pathologies. GLIA 2016;64:1546-1561. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Regional oligodendrocytopathy and astrocytopathy precede myelin loss and blood-brain barrier disruption in a murine model of osmotic demyelination syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchat, Joanna; Couturier, Bruno; Marneffe, Catherine; Gankam-Kengne, Fabrice; Balau, Benoît; De Swert, Kathleen; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Poncelet, Luc; Gilloteaux, Jacques; Nicaise, Charles

    2018-03-01

    The osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a non-primary inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system myelin that is often associated with a precipitous rise of serum sodium concentration. To investigate the physiopathology of ODS in vivo, we generated a novel murine model based on the abrupt correction of chronic hyponatremia. Accordingly, ODS mice developed impairments in brainstem auditory evoked potentials and in grip strength. At 24 hr post-correction, oligodendrocyte markers (APC and Cx47) were downregulated, prior to any detectable demyelination. Oligodendrocytopathy was temporally and spatially correlated with the loss of astrocyte markers (ALDH1L1 and Cx43), and both with the brain areas that will develop demyelination. Oligodendrocytopathy and astrocytopathy were confirmed at the ultrastructural level and culminated with necroptotic cell death, as demonstrated by pMLKL immunoreactivity. At 48 hr post-correction, ODS brains contained pathognomonic demyelinating lesions in the pons, mesencephalon, thalamus and cortical regions. These damages were accompanied by blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakages. Expression levels of IL-1β, FasL, TNFRSF6 and LIF factors were significantly upregulated in the ODS lesions. Quiescent microglial cells type A acquired an activated type B morphology within 24 hr post-correction, and reached type D at 48 hr. In conclusion, this murine model of ODS reproduces the CNS demyelination observed in human pathology and indicates ambiguous causes that is regional vulnerability of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, while it discards BBB disruption as a primary cause of demyelination. This study also raises new queries about the glial heterogeneity in susceptible brain regions as well as about the early microglial activation associated with ODS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Sildenafil (Viagra Protective Effects on Neuroinflammation: The Role of iNOS/NO System in an Inflammatory Demyelination Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Raposo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that sildenafil reduces the expression of cytokines, COX-2, and GFAP in a demyelinating model induced in wild-type (WT mice. Herein, the understandings of the neuroprotective effect of sildenafil and the mediation of iNOS/NO system on inflammatory demyelination induced by cuprizone were investigated. The cerebella of iNOS−/− mice were examined after four weeks of treatment with cuprizone alone or combined with sildenafil. Cuprizone increased GFAP, Iba-1, TNF-α, COX-2, IL-1β, and IFN-γ expression, decreased expression of glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi, and damaged myelin in iNOS−/− mice. Sildenafil reduced Iba-1, IFN-γ, and IL-1β levels but had no effect on the expression of GFAP, TNF-α, and COX-2 compared to the cuprizone group. Sildenafil elevated GSTpi levels and improved the myelin structure/ultrastructure. iNOS−/− mice suffered from severe inflammation following treatment with cuprizone, while WT mice had milder inflammation, as found in the previous study. It is possible that inflammatory regulation through iNOS-feedback is absent in iNOS−/− mice, making them more susceptible to inflammation. Sildenafil has at least a partial anti-inflammatory effect through iNOS inhibition, as its effect on iNOS−/− mice was limited. Further studies are required to explain the underlying mechanism of the sildenafil effects.

  8. Human induced pluripotent stem cells differentiation into oligodendrocyte progenitors and transplantation in a rat model of optic chiasm demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Pouya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to differentiate human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs into oligodendrocyte precursors and assess their recovery potential in a demyelinated optic chiasm model in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a cell population of oligodendrocyte progenitors from hiPSCs by using embryoid body formation in a defined medium supplemented with a combination of factors, positive selection and mechanical enrichment. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence analyses showed that stage-specific markers, Olig2, Sox10, NG2, PDGFRα, O4, A2B5, GalC, and MBP were expressed following the differentiation procedure, and enrichment of the oligodendrocyte lineage. These results are comparable with the expression of stage-specific markers in human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Transplantation of hiPSC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors into the lysolecithin-induced demyelinated optic chiasm of the rat model resulted in recovery from symptoms, and integration and differentiation into oligodendrocytes were detected by immunohistofluorescence staining against PLP and MBP, and measurements of the visual evoked potentials. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results showed that oligodendrocyte progenitors generated efficiently from hiPSCs can be used in future biomedical studies once safety issues have been overcome.

  9. [Correlation between dental pulp demyelination degree and pain visual analogue scale scores data under acute and chronic pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsantiia, N B; Davarashvili, X T; Gogiashvili, L E; Mamaladze, M T; Tsagareli, Z G; Melikadze, E B

    2013-05-01

    The aim of study is the analysis of pulp nerve fibers demyelination degree and its relationship with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score that may be measured as objective criteria. Material and methods of study. Step I: electron micrografs of dental pulp simples with special interest of myelin structural changes detected in 3 scores system, obtained from 80 patients, displays in 4 groups: 1) acute and 2) chronic pulpitis without and with accompined systemic deseases, 20 patients in each group. Dental care was realized in Kutaisi N1 Dental clinic. Step II - self-reported VAS used for describing dental pain. All data were performed by SPSS 10,0 version statistics including Spearmen-rank and Mann-Whitny coefficients for examine the validity between pulp demyelination degree and pain intensity in verbal, numbered and box scales. Researched Data were shown that damaged myelin as focal decomposition of membranes and Schwann cells hyperthrophia correspond with acute dental pain intensity as Spearman index reported in VAS numbered Scales, myelin and axoplasm degeneration as part of chronic gangrenous pulpitis disorders are in direct correlation with VAS in verbal, numbered and behavioral Rating Scales. In fact, all morphological and subjective data, including psychomotoric assessment of dental painin pulpitis may be used in dental practice for evaluation of pain syndrome considered personal story.

  10. Biochemical markers of psoriasis as a metabolic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gerkowicz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic immune mediated inflammatory skin disease with a population prevalence of 2–3%. In recent years, psoriasis has been recognized as a systemic disease associated with metabolic syndrome or its components such as: obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Many bioactive substances have appeared to be related to metabolic syndrome. Based on current literature, we here discuss the possible role of adiponectin, leptin, ghrelin, resistin, inflammatory cytokines, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, uric acid, C-reactive protein and lipid abnormalities in psoriasis and in metabolic syndrome.

  11. Clinical applications of immunoglobulin in neuromuscular diseases: focus on inflammatory myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, an increasing number of neuromuscular diseases have been recognized either to be caused primarily by autoimmune mechanisms, or to have important autoimmune components. The involved pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical manifestations have been better recognized and many of these disorders are potentially treatable by immunosuppression or by immunomodulation with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg. IVIg has been tried in a variety of immune-mediated neurological diseases, being target of widespread use in central and peripheral nervous systems diseases. Objective To give an overview of the main topics regarding the mechanism of action and different therapeutic uses of IVIg in neurological practice, mainly in neuromuscular diseases.

  12. Curcumin-loaded nanoparticles ameliorate glial activation and improve myelin repair in lyolecithin-induced focal demyelination model of rat corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Reza; Safarpour, Fatemeh; Hashemian, Mona; Tashakorian, Hamed; Ahmadian, Seyed Raheleh; Ashrafpour, Manouchehr; Ghasemi-Kasman, Maryam

    2018-05-01

    Curcumin has been introduced as effective anti-inflammatory agent in treatment of several inflammatory disorders. Despite the wide range pharmacological activities, clinical application of curcumin is restricted mainly due to the low water solubility of this substance. More recently, we could remarkably improve the aqueous solubility of curcumin by its encapsulation in chitosan-alginate-sodium tripolyphosphate nanoparticles (CS-ALG-STPP NPs). In this study, the anti-inflammatory and myelin protective effects of curcumin-loaded NPs were evaluated in lysolecithin (LPC)-induced focal demyelination model. Pharmacokinetic of curcumin was assessed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Local demyelination was induced by injection of LPC into corpus callosum of rats. Animals were pre-treated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of curcumin or curcumin-loaded NPs at dose of 12.5 mg/kg, 10 days prior to LPC injection and the injections were continued for 7 or 14 days post lesion. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunostaining against activated glial cells including astrocytes and microglia were carried out for assessment of inflammation level in lesion site. Myelin specific staining was performed to evaluate the effect of curcumin-loaded NPs on myelination of LPC receiving animals. HPLC results showed the higher plasma concentration of curcumin after administration of NPs. Histological evaluation demonstrated that, the extent of demyelination areas was reduced in animals under treatment of curcumin-loaded NPs. Furthermore, treatment with curcumin-loaded NPs effectively attenuated glial activation and inflammation in LPC-induced demyelination model compared to curcumin receiving animals. Overall; these findings indicate that treatment with curcumin-loaded NPs preserve myelinated axons through amelioration of glial activation and inflammation in demyelination context. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel paraneoplastic syndrome with acquired lipodystrophy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in an adolescent male with craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockemer, Hillary Elizabeth; Sumpter, Kathryn Maria; Cope-Yokoyama, Sandy; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2018-03-28

    Acquired lipodystrophy, craniopharyngioma and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are individually rare disorders, and have never before been reported in a single patient. A 15-year-7 month old Caucasian male presented with lower extremity weakness, frequent falls and abnormal fat distribution occurring over the previous 1 year. He was diagnosed with CIDP, craniopharyngioma and acquired lipodystrophy. The patient underwent tumor debulking and cranial irradiation for the craniopharyngioma, and received monthly intravenous immunoglobulin for the CIDP. The patient initially had some resolution of the lipodystrophy phenotype, but subsequently the abnormal fat distribution recurred and the patient developed additional systemic abnormalities, including mild pancytopenia and hepatic fibrosis. Our patient represents a novel association of acquired lipodystrophy, craniopharyngioma, and CIDP, possibly due to an as yet unidentified paraneoplastic autoantibody.

  14. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin as first-line therapy in treatment-naive patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, L H; Sindrup, S H; Christiansen, I

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is effective as maintenance treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We investigated whether multiple subcutaneous infusions are as effective as conventional therapy with intravenous loading doses in treatment...... treatment arm and followed for a further 10 weeks. All participants were evaluated at weeks 0, 2, 5 and 10 during both therapies. Primary outcome was combined isokinetic muscle strength (cIKS). Secondary outcomes were disability, clinical evaluation of muscle strength and the performance of various function...... tests. RESULTS: All participants received both therapies, 14 completing the protocol. Overall, cIKS increased by 7.4 ± 14.5% (P = 0.0003) during SCIG and by 6.9 ± 16.8% (P = 0.002) during IVIG, the effect being similar (P = 0.80). Improvement of cIKS peaked 2 weeks after IVIG and 5 weeks after SCIG...

  15. MR imaging of white-matter diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Yuh, W.T.C.; Mathews, K.; Wiese, J.; Kao, S.; Schreiber, A.; Farner, R.; Smith, W.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has become a valuable tool in the investigation of central nervous system abnormalities in children. This exhibit displays the MR imaging patterns in 30 children with diseases involving the white matter. Clinical, CT, and pathologic findings will be presented for comparison. The white matter disease entities studies include acquired white matter diseases, metabolic diseases, and phycomatoses. Specific examples include acute dissemination encephalomyelitis, anoxic encephalopathy, disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy, demyelinating adrenoleukodystrophy, Krabbe disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher disease, neurofibromatosis, and Sturge-Weber syndrome

  16. Chronic graft versus host disease and nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Barbouch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Disturbed kidney function is a common complication after bone marrow transplantation. Recently, attention has been given to immune-mediated glomerular damage related to graft versus host disease (GVHD. We describe a 19-year-old woman who developed membranous glomerulonephritis after bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Six months later, she developed soft palate, skin and liver lesions considered to be chronic GVHD. Fifteen months after undergoing BMT, this patient presented with nephrotic syndrome. A renal biopsy showed mem-branous glomerulonephritis associated with a focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. She was started on corticosteroid treatment with good outcome.

  17. Phenotype and Clinical Course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Co-Existent Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chung Sang; Deepak, Parakkal; De La Fuente, Jaime; Bledsoe, Adam C; Larson, Joseph J; Murray, Joseph A; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2018-05-07

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, principally Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease are among the most common immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We aim to elucidate the clinical course and outcomes of patients with concomitant inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease, a unique population that remains scarcely studied to date. A retrospective matched case-control study of adults with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease was performed at a tertiary referral institution in North America. Logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier curves compared disease characteristics and clinical outcomes of the two groups. A total of 342 inflammatory bowel disease patients were included in this study, of which 114 had coexistent celiac disease and 228 did not. Patients with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease had higher rates of primary sclerosing cholangitis (19.3% vs 5.7%; odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-9.4; pceliac disease (10.5% vs 3.5%; odds ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.3-8.2; p=0.01), compared to patients without concomitant celiac disease. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease with concomitant celiac disease have unique phenotypic features compared to non-celiac inflammatory bowel disease, with higher risks for colitis-related hospitalizations, extensive colitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Increased recognition of coexistent IBD and celiac disease can prompt clinicians to investigate for concomitant disease sooner, particularly in patients with seemingly refractory disease.

  18. Hand involvement in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burns, Joshua; Bray, Paula; Cross, Lauren A.; North, Kathryn N.; Ryan, Monique M.; Ouvrier, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), a demyelinating neuropathy characterised by progressive length-dependent muscle weakness and atrophy, is thought to affect the foot and leg first followed some time later by hand weakness and dysfunction. We aimed to characterise hand Strength, function

  19. Effects of the PPAR-β agonist GW501516 in an in vitro model of brain inflammation and antibody-induced demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honegger Paul

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain inflammation plays a central role in numerous brain pathologies, including multiple sclerosis (MS. Microglial cells and astrocytes are the effector cells of neuroinflammation. They can be activated also by agents such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor (PPAR pathways are involved in the control of the inflammatory processes, and PPAR-β seems to play an important role in the regulation of central inflammation. In addition, PPAR-β agonists were shown to have trophic effects on oligodendrocytes in vitro, and to confer partial protection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. In the present work, a three-dimensional brain cell culture system was used as in vitro model to study antibody-induced demyelination and inflammatory responses. GW 501516, a specific PPAR-β agonist, was examined for its capacity to protect from antibody-mediated demyelination and to prevent inflammatory responses induced by IFN-γ and LPS. Methods Aggregating brain cells cultures were prepared from embryonal rat brain, and used to study the inflammatory responses triggered by IFN-γ and LPS and by antibody-mediated demyelination induced by antibodies directed against myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG. The effects of GW 501516 on cellular responses were characterized by the quantification of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, inducible NO synthase (i-NOS, PPAR-β, PPAR-γ, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, myelin basic protein (MBP, and high molecular weight neurofilament protein (NF-H. GFAP expression was also examined by immunocytochemistry, and microglial cells were visualized by isolectin B4 (IB4 and ED1 labeling. Results GW 501516 decreased the IFN-γ-induced up-regulation of TNF-α and iNOS in accord with the proposed anti-inflammatory effects of this PPAR-β agonist. However, it increased IL

  20. Development of Graves' ophthalmopathy and uveitis after radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in a patient with HTLA-I associated myelopathy (HAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Yasunori; Migita, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Tomoji; Okuda, Itsuko; Takeshita, Akira; Takagi, Akio; Shishiba, Yoshimasa (Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    HTLV-I carriers or patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) are prone to immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present a 44-year-old female with HAM who developed Graves' disease. She developed severe Graves' ophthalmopathy shortly after [sup 131]I therapy, concurrently with a remarkable increase in TSH-receptor antibody titer. Ophthalmopathy was aggravated in spite of prednisolone therapy and euthyroidism being maintained by thyroxine replacement. Uveitis also developed after [sup 131]I therapy and iridocyclitis finally required trabeculotomy. This case suggests that HAM patients may have a higher risk of immune-mediated Graves' ophthalmopathy after [sup 131]I therapy.(author).

  1. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have increased risk of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Morten L; Kjeldsen, Jens; Knudsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    were significantly increased (P celiac disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), sarcoidosis, asthma, iridocyclitis, psoriasis, pyoderma gangrenosum, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Restricted to UC (P ...AIM: To investigate whether immune mediated diseases (IMD) are more frequent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: In this population based registry study, a total of 47325 patients with IBD were alive and registered in the Danish National Patient Registry on December 16, 2013....... Controls were randomly selected from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) and matched for sex, age, and municipality. We used ICD 10 codes to identify the diagnoses of the included patients. The IBD population was divided into three subgroups: Ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and Both...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journel, H.; Roussey, M.; Allaire, C.; Le Marec, B.; Gandon, Y.; Carsin, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher's disease is a progressive encephalopathy with demyelination of the cerebral white matter. The diagnosis cannot be made on clinical or biological grounds: pathological investigation is necessary to confirm tigroid demyelination. CT scanning failure to visualize this type of anomaly but detection is now possible with the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The authors studied the case of a boy who, at the age of 8 presented with symptoms characeristic of the disease, rotatory nystagmus, progressive encephalopathy, and inherited X-linked recessive traits. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal in the supra-tentorial white matter and the usual contrast was inverted. The authors believe that MRI can make an important contribution to the diagnosis of the disease. (orig.)

  3. Progesterone therapy induces an M1 to M2 switch in microglia phenotype and suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome in a cuprizone-induced demyelination mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, Roya; Pasbakhsh, Parichehr; Zibara, Kazem; Namjoo, Zeinab; Beigi Boroujeni, Fatemeh; Shahbeigi, Saeed; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Beyer, Cordian; Zendehdel, Adib

    2017-10-01

    Demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) has been associated to reactive microglia in neurodegenerative disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The M1 microglia phenotype plays a pro-inflammatory role while M2 is involved in anti-inflammatory processes in the brain. In this study, CPZ-induced demyelination mouse model was used to investigate the effect of progesterone (PRO) therapy on microglia activation and neuro-inflammation. Results showed that progesterone therapy (CPZ+PRO) decreased neurological behavioral deficits, as demonstrated by significantly decreased escape latencies, in comparison to CPZ mice. In addition, CPZ+PRO caused a significant reduction in the mRNA expression levels of M1-markers (iNOS, CD86, MHC-II and TNF-α) in the corpus callosum region, whereas the expression of M2-markers (Trem-2, CD206, Arg-1 and TGF-β) was significantly increased, in comparison to CPZ mice. Moreover, CPZ+PRO resulted in a significant decrease in the number of iNOS + and Iba-1 + /iNOS + cells (M1), whereas TREM-2 + and Iba-1 + /TREM-2 + cells (M2) significantly increased, in comparison to CPZ group. Furthermore, CPZ+PRO caused a significant decrease in mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 and IL-18 (~2-fold), in comparison to the CPZ group. Finally, CPZ+PRO therapy was accompanied with reduced levels of demyelination, compared to CPZ, as confirmed by immunofluorescence to myelin basic protein (MBP) and Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) staining, as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. In summary, we reported for the first time that PRO therapy causes polarization of M2 microglia, attenuation of M1 phenotype, and suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome in a CPZ-induced demyelination model of MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 2013 Update on Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Astegiano

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder, characterized by small intestinal inflammation and villous atrophy after the ingestion of gluten by genetically susceptible individuals. Several extraintestinal manifestations have been associated to celiac disease. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a primary disorder of the esophagus characterized by upper gastrointestinal symptoms, absence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field in biopsy specimens. Both celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are caused by aberrant, but distinct, immune responses to ingested antigens and can be responsive to restricted food intake. The aim of this review is to assess whether there is an association between these two pathologies. In the majority of the studies examined, including the studies in pediatric population, the prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in subjects with celiac disease was about 10-times that of the general population. We suggest searching for eosinophilic esophagitis in all children undergoing endoscopy for suspicious celiac disease.

  5. Novel Therapeutic/Integrative Approaches for Celiac Disease and Dermatitis Herpetiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Fasano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Gluten is a protein component in wheat and other cereals like rye and barley. At present, the only available treatment is a strict gluten-free diet. Recent advances have increased our understanding of the molecular basis for this disorder. Last decade has seen new scientific developments in this disease and led to the formulation of new concepts of pathophysiology that offer possible targets for new treatments or interventions integrative to the gluten-free diet.

  6. A young diabetic with suicidal risk: Rare disease with a rarer presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Philip

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare genetic or inherited forms of diabetes can mimic immune mediated type 1 diabetes. Early age of onset and associated features help to differentiate these diseases from type 1 diabetes. Wolfram syndrome, an inherited neuro degenerative disorder, presents as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy and deafness. But less well described features like psychiatric manifestations can be the presentation of this disease. We present such a case. Wolfram syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis in insulin dependent diabetic children who present with neuropsychiatric problems.

  7. Fluvoxamine stimulates oligodendrogenesis of cultured neural stem cells and attenuates inflammation and demyelination in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareghani, Majid; Zibara, Kazem; Sadeghi, Heibatollah; Dokoohaki, Shima; Sadeghi, Hossein; Aryanpour, Roya; Ghanbari, Amir

    2017-07-07

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) require medications controlling severity of the pathology and depression, affecting more than half of the patients. In this study, the effect of antidepressant drug fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Nanomolar concentrations of fluvoxamine significantly increased cell viability and proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) through increasing mRNA expression of Notch1, Hes1 and Ki-67, and protein levels of NICD. Also, physiological concentrations of fluvoxamine were optimal for NSC differentiation toward oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and neurons. In addition, fluvoxamine attenuated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity, a rat MS model, by significantly decreasing its clinical scores. Moreover, fluvoxamine treated EAE rats showed a decrease in IFN-γ serum levels and an increase in IL-4, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines respectively, compared to untreated EAE rats. Furthermore, immune cell infiltration and demyelination plaque significantly decreased in spinal cords of fluvoxamine-treated rats, which was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of MBP and GFAP positive cells and a decrease in lactate serum levels, a new biomarker of MS progression. In summary, besides its antidepressant activity, fluvoxamine stimulates proliferation and differentiation of NSCs particularly toward oligodendrocytes, a producer of CNS myelin.

  8. Experimental mouse model of optic neuritis with inflammatory demyelination produced by passive transfer of neuromyelitis optica-immunoglobulin G

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although optic neuritis (ON) is a defining feature of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), appropriate animal models of NMO ON are lacking. Most NMO patients are seropositive for immunoglobulin G autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) against the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4). Methods Several approaches were tested to develop a robust, passive-transfer mouse model of NMO ON, including NMO-IgG and complement delivery by: (i) retrobulbar infusion; (ii) intravitreal injection; (iii) a single intracranial injection near the optic chiasm; and (iv) 3-days continuous intracranial infusion near the optic chiasm. Results Little ON or retinal pathology was seen using approaches (i) to (iii). Using approach (iv), however, optic nerves showed characteristic NMO pathology, with loss of AQP4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity, granulocyte and macrophage infiltration, deposition of activated complement, demyelination and axonal injury. Even more extensive pathology was created in mice lacking complement inhibitor protein CD59, or using a genetically modified NMO-IgG with enhanced complement effector function, including significant loss of retinal ganglion cells. In control studies, optic nerve pathology was absent in treated AQP4-deficient mice, or in wild-type mice receiving control (non-NMO) IgG and complement. Conclusion Passive transfer of NMO-IgG and complement by continuous infusion near the optic chiasm in mice is sufficient to produce ON with characteristic NMO pathology. The mouse model of NMO ON should be useful in further studies of NMO pathogenesis mechanisms and therapeutics. PMID:24468108

  9. Oxidative stress in a model of toxic demyelination in rat brain: the effect of piracetam and vinpocetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Khadrawy, Yasser A; Salem, Neveen A; Sleem, Amany A

    2011-06-01

    We studied the role of oxidative stress and the effect of vinpocetine (1.5, 3 or 6 mg/kg) and piracetam (150 or 300 mg/kg) in acute demyelination of the rat brain following intracerebral injection of ethidium bromide (10 μl of 0.1%). ethidium bromide caused (1) increased malondialdehyde (MDA) in cortex, hippocampus and striatum; (2) decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in cortex, hippocampus and striatum; (3) decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) in cortex and hippocampus (4); increased serum nitric oxide and (5) increased striatal (but not cortical or hippocampal) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. MDA decreased in striatum and cortex by the lower doses of vinpocetine or piracetam but increased in cortex and hippocampus and in cortex, hypothalamus and striatum by the higher dose of vinpocetine or piracetam, respectively along with decreased TAC. GSH increased by the higher dose of piracetam and by vinpocetine which also decreased serum nitric oxide. Vinpocetine and piracetam displayed variable effects on regional AChE activity.

  10. Protective effects of erythropoietin against cuprizone-induced oxidative stress and demyelination in the mouse corpus callosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Ragerdi Kashani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Increasing evidence in both experimental and clinical studies suggests that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. The aim of the present work is to investigate the protective effects of erythropoietin against cuprizone-induced oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed a chow containing 0.2 % cuprizone for 6 weeks. After 3 weeks, mice were simultaneously treated with erythropoietin (5,000 IU/ kg body weight by daily intraperitoneal injections. Results: Our results showed that cuprizone induced oxidative stress accompanied with down-regulation of subunits of the respiratory chain complex and demyelination of corpus callosum. Erythropoietin antagonized these effects. Biochemical analysis showed that oxidative stress induced by cuprizone was regulated by erythropoietin. Similarly, erythropoietin induced the expression of subunits of the respiratory chain complex over normal control values reflecting a mechanism to compensate cuprizone-mediated down-regulation of these genes. Conclusion: The data implicate that erythropoietin abolishes destructive cuprizone effects in the corpus callosum by decreasing oxidative stress and restoring mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activity.

  11. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: morphological phenotype of the 17p duplication versus PMP22 point mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabreëls-Festen, A. A.; Bolhuis, P. A.; Hoogendijk, J. E.; Valentijn, L. J.; Eshuis, E. J.; Gabreëls, F. J.

    1995-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) or hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Ia (HMSN type Ia) is an autosomal dominant demyelinating polyneuropathy, which may result from duplications as large as 1.5 Mb on chromosome 17p 11.2-p12 encompassing the gene for the peripheral myelin

  12. Palivizumab Exposure and the Risk of Autoimmune Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Linder, Marie; Henriksen, Lonny

    2016-01-01

    of autoimmune disease were diagnosed among palivizumab-exposed children during the period of observation. Among the children exposed to palivizumab, one child in Denmark developed inflammatory bowel disease; in Sweden, children developed juvenile arthritis (one child), diabetes mellitus (two children), celiac......BACKGROUND: Treatment with biologic pharmaceuticals may be associated with an increased risk of immune-mediated disease. Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody designed to provide passive immunity against respiratory syncytial virus infection. Palivizumab is primarily used in preterm...... children known to be immunologically immature. The long-term effect of palivizumab in terms of autoimmune diseases has not yet been investigated. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with the development of autoimmune diseases in children. METHODS...

  13. Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD is an increasingly recognized immune-mediated condition comprised of a collection of disorders that share specific pathological, serological, and clinical features. IgG4-RD is a fibroinflammatory condition with a tendency to form tumors with inflammatory infiltrate with IgG4 rich plasma cells and elevation of serum IgG4, which may affect virtually every organ and tissue. IgG4-related ophthalmic disease may present as dacryoadenitis, myositis, or involvement of other orbital tissue. Hypophysitis or pachymeningitis may manifest as cranial neuropathies. The diagnosis of IgG4-RD is based on a typical clinical scenario, supportive laboratory test, expected radiological characteristics, and distinct histopathological and immunohistochemical features. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressives form the mainline treatment.

  14. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  15. The role of Haptoglobin and its related protein, Zonulin, in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Vermeire, Séverine; Cleynen, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), collectively called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are immune-mediated conditions characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gut. Their precise etiology is unknown, although an increased intestinal permeability has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of IBD. The intestinal epithelium provides the largest interface between the external environment and the host, and is thus a crucial regulation site of innate and adaptive immunity. Zonulin is one of the few known physiological mediators of paracellular intestinal permeability. It was found upregulated in different immune diseases like Celiac disease and Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Recently, human zonulin was identified as prehaptoglobin-2 (pre-HP2) which before only had been regarded as the inactive precursor for HP2. Haptoglobin (HP) is a hemoglobin-binding protein with immunomodulatory properties. Its gene harbors a common polymorphism with 2 different alleles: HP1 and HP2. Allele HP2 and genotype HP22 has been shown to be overrepresented in different immune diseases like Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and T1D, and has also been found to be more frequent in patients with IBD (UC and CD) than in healthy controls.   In order to get some clues about the mechanism of action of HP(2) in IBD pathogenesis, we here review the current state of knowledge about zonulin and haptoglobin structure and function, and their plausible role in immune mediated diseases with an emphasis on IBD.

  16. Diseases of white matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The diagnosis of white matter abnormalities was revolutionized by the advent of computed tomography (CT), which provided a noninvasive method of detection and assessment of progression of a variety of white matter processes. However, the inadequacies of CT were recognized early, including its relative insensitivity to small foci of abnormal myelin in the brain when correlated with autopsy findings and its inability to image directly white matter diseases of the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, sensitive to the slight difference in tissue composition of normal gray and white matter and to subtle increase in water content associated with myelin disorders, is uniquely suited for the examination of white matter pathology. Its clinical applications include the evaluation of the normal process of myelination in childhood and the various white matter diseases, including disorders of demyelination and dysmyelination

  17. Phospholipase A2 is involved in galactosylsphingosine-induced astrocyte toxicity, neuronal damage and demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Misslin

    Full Text Available Krabbe disease is a fatal rare inherited lipid storage disorder affecting 1:100,000 births. This illness is caused by mutations in the galc gene encoding for the enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC. Dysfunction of GALC has been linked to the toxic build-up of the galactolipid, galactosylsphingosine (psychosine, which induces cell death of oligodendrocytes. Previous studies show that phospholipase A2 (PLA2 may play a role in psychosine induce cell death. Here, we demonstrate that non-selective inhibition of cPLA2/sPLA2 and selective inhibition of cPLA2, but not sPLA2, also attenuates psychosine-induced cell death of human astrocytes. This study shows that extracellular calcium is required for psychosine induced cell death, but intracellular calcium release, reactive oxygen species or release of soluble factors are not involved. These findings suggest a cell autonomous effect, at least in human astrocytes. Supporting a role for PLA2 in psychosine-induced cell death of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, the results show inhibition of PLA2 attenuates psychosine-induced decrease in the expression of astrocyte marker vimentin as well as myelin basic protein (MBP, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG and the neuronal marker SMI-32 in organotypic slice cultures. These findings provide further mechanistic details of psychosine-induced death of glia and suggest a role for PLA2 in the process. This work also supports the proposal that novel drugs for Krabbe disease may require testing on astrocytes as well as oligodendrocytes for more holistic prediction of pre-clinical and clinical efficacy.

  18. Brain white matter demyelinating lesions and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a patient with C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Santos, Miguel; Caldeira, Inês; Gromicho, Marta; Pronto-Laborinho, Ana; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2017-10-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. It has been described before four patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and C9orf72-ALS. However, C9orf72 positivity is not associated with increased risk of MS. Inflammatory pathways related to NF-κB have been linked to ALS and MS, and appear to be important in C9orf72-ALS patients. A 42-year-old woman presented with progressive bulbar symptoms for 9 months. Neurological examination disclosed spastic dysarthria, atrophic tongue with fasciculations, brisk jaw and limb tendon reflexes, and bilateral Hoffman sign. Electrophysiological assessment confirmed ALS. Brain MRI revealed multiple and bilateral juxtacortical and periventricular inflammatory changes, some with gadolinium-enhancement, configuring a probable MS-like pattern. CSF evaluation was unremarkable, with no oligoclonal bands. Visual and somatosensory evoked potentials were normal. Follow-up brain MRI 6 months later showed two new lesions in two relatively characteristic locations of MS, with no gadolinium-enhancement. Genetic screening revealed a C9orf72 expansion. As patient had no clinical manifestation of MS, a diagnosis of radiologically isolated syndrome was considered. We speculate that these demyelinating lesions might facilitate expressivity of C9orf72 expansion, through NF-κB activation. This plausible association may lead to the identification of a therapeutic target in this subgroup of C9orf72-ALS patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantifying risk of early relapse in patients with first demyelinating events: Prediction in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelman, Tim; Meyniel, Claire; Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, Francois; Boz, Cavit; Alroughani, Raed; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Iuliano, Gerardo; Duquette, Pierre; Terzi, Murat; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Pucci, Eugenio; Verheul, Freek; Fiol, Marcela; Van Pesch, Vincent; Cristiano, Edgardo; Petersen, Thor; Moore, Fraser; Kalincik, Tomas; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Trojano, Maria; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2017-09-01

    Characteristics at clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) examination assist in identification of patient at highest risk of early second attack and could benefit the most from early disease-modifying drugs (DMDs). To examine determinants of second attack and validate a prognostic nomogram for individualised risk assessment of clinical conversion. Patients with CIS were prospectively followed up in the MSBase Incident Study. Predictors of clinical conversion were analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Prognostic nomograms were derived to calculate conversion probability and validated using concordance indices. A total of 3296 patients from 50 clinics in 22 countries were followed up for a median (inter-quartile range (IQR)) of 1.92 years (0.90, 3.71). In all, 1953 (59.3%) patients recorded a second attack. Higher Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) at baseline, first symptom location, oligoclonal bands and various brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics were all predictors of conversion. Conversely, older age and DMD exposure post-CIS were associated with reduced rates. Prognostic nomograms demonstrated high concordance between estimated and observed conversion probabilities. This multinational study shows that age at CIS onset, DMD exposure, EDSS, multiple brain and spinal MRI criteria and oligoclonal bands are associated with shorter time to relapse. Nomogram assessment may be useful in clinical practice for estimating future clinical conversion.

  20. Innate lymphoid cells in autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tingting; Turner, Jan-Eric

    2018-03-22

    Abnormal activation of the innate immune system is a common feature of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Since their identification as a separate family of leukocytes, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have emerged as important effector cells of the innate immune system. Alterations in ILC function and subtype distribution have been observed in a variety of immune-mediated diseases in humans and evidence from experimental models suggests a subtype specific role of ILCs in the pathophysiology of autoimmune inflammation. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of ILC biology in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders, including multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, psoriasis, and rheumatic diseases, with a special focus on the potential of ILCs as therapeutic targets for the development of novel treatment strategies in humans.

  1. Effect of oral cladribine on time to conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis in patients with a first demyelinating event (ORACLE MS): a phase 3 randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leist, Thomas P; Comi, Giancarlo; Cree, Bruce A C; Coyle, Patricia K; Freedman, Mark S; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Vermersch, Patrick; Casset-Semanaz, Florence; Scaramozza, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Patients who develop relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) present with a first clinical demyelinating event. In this double-blind, multicentre, randomised, phase 3 study we investigated the effect of oral cladribine on conversion to clinically definite MS in patients with a first clinical demyelinating event, when given at the same doses shown to be effective in relapsing-remitting MS. Between Oct 21, 2008, and Oct 11, 2010, we recruited patients aged 18-55 years, inclusive, from 160 hospitals, private clinics, or treatment centres in 34 countries. Eligible patients had a first clinical demyelinating event within 75 days before screening, at least two clinically silent lesions of at least 3 mm on a T2-weighted brain MRI scan, and an Expanded Disability Status Scale score of 5.0 or lower. Patients with a first clinical demyelinating event ≤75 days before screening were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive cladribine tablets at cumulative doses of 5.25 mg/kg or 3.5 mg/kg or placebo. Randomisation was done with a central web-based randomisation system and was stratified by geographic region. Masking was maintained using a two-physician model. The primary endpoint of this 96-week study was time to conversion to clinically definite MS according to the Poser criteria. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00725985. Of 903 participants assessed for eligibility, 616 patients received cladribine 5.25 mg/kg (n=204), cladribine 3.5 mg/kg (n=206), or placebo (n=206). At trial termination on Oct 25, 2011, cladribine was associated with a risk reduction versus placebo for time to conversion to clinically definite MS (hazard ratio [HR] for 5.25 mg/kg=0.38, 95% CI 0.25-0.58, pMS diagnosis compared with placebo. The safety profile of cladribine was similar to that noted in a trial in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Further research could clarify the potential effects of oral cladribine treatment in the early stages of MS. Merck Serono SA Geneva

  2. Interstital lung disease in ANCA vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Marco A; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Henderson, Ashley G; Xiao, Hong; Hu, Peiqi; Nachman, Patrick H; Falk, Ronald J; Charles Jennette, J

    2017-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) vasculitides are immune-mediated disorders that primarily affect small blood vessels of the airway and kidneys. Lung involvement, one of the hallmarks of microscopic polyangiitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In recent years, several retrospective series and case reports have described the association of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and ANCA vasculitis, particularly those positive for ANCA specific for myeloperoxidase. In the majority of these patients pulmonary fibrosis occurs concurrently or predates the diagnosis of ANCA vasculitis. More importantly, these studies have shown that ILD has an adverse impact on the long-term prognosis of ANCA vasculitis. This review focuses on the main clinical and radiologic features of pulmonary fibrosis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Major histopathology features, prognosis and therapeutic options are summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Celiac disease, iron deficiency anaemia, grave's disease, osteopenia and short stature in single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radaideh, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an intestinal immune mediated disorder, triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing diet in genetically susceptible individuals. The genetic pre-disposition is related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially HLA-DQ2 positive patients. The prevalence of celiac disease in high worldwide and it has been estimated to be 1-26% in Western countries. Many auto-immune diseases can be associated with celiac disease including auto-immune thyroid disease; hashimoto thyroiditis and grave's disease. The opposite also appears to be true, celiac disease is found on persons with auto-immune thyroid disorders at high rates than the general population. Celiac disease is also associated with other extraintestinal diseases other the auto-immune diseases like anemia, short stature, metabolic bone disease and others. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with auto-immune thyroid disease, anemia, short stature and metabolic bone disease. The life-long adherence to gluten-free diet is the only cure in celiac disease and can improve the quality of patients life and prevent future complications. This report describes a case of Grave's disease, Iron deficiency anemia, Short stature, Osteopenia, diagnosed to have Celiac disease. (author)

  4. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (IIDL): Conventional and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) findings in 42 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Kubin, Klaus [CT/MRI Institut Dr. Klaus Kubin, Salzburg (Austria); Wallner-Blazek, Mirja [Department of Neurology, Medical University Graz, Graz (Austria); Hauwe, Luc van den [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Macedo, Leonardo [Department of Radiology, CEDIMAGEM, Centro - Juiz de Fora (Brazil); Puchner, Stefan B. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Thurnher, Majda M., E-mail: majda.thurnher@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR imaging characteristics with conventional and advanced MR imaging techniques in patients with IIDL. Methods: MR images of the brain in 42 patients (20 male, 22 female) with suspected or known multiple sclerosis (MS) from four institutions were retrospectively analyzed. Lesions were classified into five different subtypes: (1) ring-like lesions; (2) Balo-like lesions; (3) diffuse infiltrating lesions; (4) megacystic lesions; and (5) unclassified lesions. The location, size, margins, and signal intensities on T1WI, T2WI, and diffusion-weighted images (DWI), and the ADC values/ratios for all lesions, as well as the contrast enhancement pattern, and the presence of edema, were recorded. Results: There were 30 ring-like, 10 Balo-like, 3 megacystic-like and 16 diffuse infiltrating-like lesions were detected. Three lesions were categorized as unclassified lesions. Of the 30 ring-like lesions, 23 were hypointense centrally with a hyperintense rim. The mean ADC, measured centrally, was 1.50 ± 0.41 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. The mean ADC in the non-enhancing layers of the Balo-like lesions was 2.29 ± 0.17 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, and the mean ADC in enhancing layers was 1.03 ± 0.30 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. Megacystic lesions had a mean ADC of 2.14 ± 0.26 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. Peripheral strong enhancement with high signal on DWI was present in all diffuse infiltrating lesions. Unclassified lesions showed a mean ADC of 1.43 ± 0.13 mm{sup 2}/s. Conclusion: Restriction of diffusion will be seen in the outer layers of active inflammation/demyelination in Balo-like lesions, in the enhancing part of ring-like lesions, and at the periphery of infiltrative-type lesions.

  5. Autoimmune Addison's disease - An update on pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, Alexander; Bratland, Eirik; Husebye, Eystein S

    2018-06-01

    Autoimmunity against the adrenal cortex is the leading cause of Addison's disease in industrialized countries, with prevalence estimates ranging from 93-220 per million in Europe. The immune-mediated attack on adrenocortical cells cripples their ability to synthesize vital steroid hormones and necessitates life-long hormone replacement therapy. The autoimmune disease etiology is multifactorial involving variants in immune genes and environmental factors. Recently, we have come to appreciate that the adrenocortical cell itself is an active player in the autoimmune process. Here we summarize the complex interplay between the immune system and the adrenal cortex and highlight unanswered questions and gaps in our current understanding of the disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Coeliac disease: review of diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Marjorie M; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Sanders, David S

    2017-08-21

    Coeliac disease is an immune-mediated systemic disease triggered by exposure to gluten, and manifested by small intestinal enteropathy and gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. Recent guidelines recommend a concerted use of clear definitions of the disease. In Australia, the most recent estimated prevalence is 1.2% in adult men (1:86) and 1.9% in adult women (1:52). Active case finding is appropriate to diagnose coeliac disease in high risk groups. Diagnosis of coeliac disease is important to prevent nutritional deficiency and long term risk of gastrointestinal malignancy. The diagnosis of coeliac disease depends on clinico-pathological correlation: history, presence of antitransglutaminase antibodies, and characteristic histological features on duodenal biopsy (when the patient is on a gluten-containing diet). Human leucocyte antigen class II haplotypes DQ2 or DQ8 are found in nearly all patients with coeliac disease, but are highly prevalent in the general population at large (56% in Australia) and testing can only exclude coeliac disease for individuals with non-permissive haplotypes. Adhering to a gluten free diet allows duodenal mucosal healing and alleviates symptoms. Patients should be followed up with a yearly review of dietary adherence and a health check. Non-coeliac gluten or wheat protein sensitivity is a syndrome characterised by both gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten and possibly other wheat proteins in people who do not have coeliac disease or wheat allergy recognised by diagnostic tests.

  7. Enhanced accumulation of Kir4.1 protein, but not mRNA, in a murine model of cuprizone-induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Mitsunari; Kawamura, Takuya; Tokui, Ryuji; Furuta, Kohei; Sugino, Mami; Nakanishi, Masayuki; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2013-11-06

    Two channel proteins, inwardly rectifying potassium channel 4.1 (Kir4.1) and water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4), were recently identified as targets of an autoantibody response in patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica, respectively. In the present study, we examined the expression patterns of Kir4.1 and AQP4 in a mouse model of demyelination induced by cuprizone, a copper chelator. Demyelination was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using an anti-proteolipid protein antibody in various brain regions, including the corpus callosum, of cuprizone-fed mice. Activation of microglial and astroglial cells was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry, using an anti-ionized calcium binding adapter molecule and a glial fibrillary acidic protein antibody. Western blot analysis revealed the induction of Kir4.1 protein, but not AQP4, in the cortex of cuprizone-fed mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the Kir4.1 protein induction in microvessels of the cerebral cortex. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of Kir4.1 and AQP4 in the cortex did not change during cuprizone administration. These findings suggest that enhanced accumulation of Kir4.1 protein in the brain with an inflammatory condition facilitates the autoantibody formation against Kir4.1 in patients with multiple sclerosis. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The effect of triiodothyronine on maturation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells during remyelination following induced demyelination in male albino rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tahry, H; Marei, H; Shams, A; El-Shahat, M; Abdelaziz, H; Abd El-Kader, M

    2016-06-01

    Demyelination was induced by two weeks cuprizone treatment. Rats of +ve control and triiodothyronine (T3) then received three subcutaneous injections of either saline or T3 day after day and sacrificed at the end of the third and fifth weeks. Animals in -ve control group received only standard rodent chow. After one week of cuprizone withdrawal the corpus callosum in +ve control and T3 treated rats was still demyelinated as revealed by MBP immunohistochemistry. The assay of PLP gene showed significant increase of T3 treated group compared to both the -ve control and +ve control groups. After three weeks, significant improvement in myelination was detected in T3-treated group compared to +ve control as detected by both MBP immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. After one week of cuprizone withdrawal, PDGFRα positive cells and gene expression showed significant increase in +ve control and T3-treated groups as compared to -ve control with insignificant difference in between the former two groups. After three weeks of cuprizone withdrawal, PDGFRα positive cells in T3-treated and +ve control groups decreased to the control levels. These results suggest that T3 was effective in improving remyelination when administered during acute phase and might direct progenitor lineage toward oligodendrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in dengue viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Sulaiman, Wan Aliaa; Inche Mat, Liyana Najwa; Hashim, Hasnur Zaman; Hoo, Fan Kee; Ching, Siew Mooi; Vasudevan, Ramachandran; Mohamed, Mohd Hazmi; Basri, Hamidon

    2017-09-01

    Dengue is the most common arboviral disease affecting many countries worldwide. An RNA virus from the flaviviridae family, dengue has four antigenically distinct serotypes (DEN-1-DEN-4). Neurological involvement in dengue can be classified into dengue encephalopathy immune-mediated syndromes, encephalitis, neuromuscular or dengue muscle dysfunction and neuro-ophthalmic involvement. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune mediated acute demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system following recent infection or vaccination. This monophasic illness is characterised by multifocal white matter involvement. Many dengue studies and case reports have linked ADEM with dengue virus infection but the association is still not clear. Therefore, this article is to review and discuss concerning ADEM in dengue as an immune-medicated neurological complication; and the management strategy required based on recent literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lewis-Sumner syndrome and Tangier disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théaudin, Marie; Couvert, Philippe; Fournier, Emmanuel; Bouige, Daniel; Bruckert, Eric; Perrotte, Paul; Vaschalde, Yvan; Maisonobe, Thierry; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Carrié, Alain; Le Forestier, Nadine

    2008-07-01

    To report unusual electrophysiologic data in a patient with Tangier disease in an effort to better understand the pathophysiologic features of the peripheral nerve lesions in this disease. Case report. A 15-year-old girl had subacute onset of asymmetric neuropathy with persistent conduction block, resembling Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Electrophysiologic data in Tangier disease. After initially unsuccessful treatment with intravenously administered immunoglobulins, the finding of an abnormal lipid profile led to the diagnosis of Tangier disease due to the R587W mutation in the adenotriphosphate-binding cassette transporter-1 gene (ABCA1) (OMIM 9q22-q31). Conduction block, which is the electrophysiologic hallmark of focal demyelination, can be present in Tangier disease. It could be induced by focal nerve ischemia or by preferential lipid deposition in the paranodal regions of myelinated Schwann cells. The presence of a conduction block in Tangier disease may lead to a misdiagnosis of dysimmune neuropathy.

  11. Progressive dysarthria and ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsey McAlpine

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ‘Guillain-Barre syndrome’ (GBS is a broad term used to describe a collection of clinical syndromes which manifest as acute immune-mediated demyelinating diseases or more rarely axonal diseases of the peripheral nervous system. The most commonly recognised form is ‘acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy’ (AIDP, which classically presents as a proximal and distal weakness with diminished reflexes, often involving the cranial nerves and muscles of respiration [1]. It is a neurological emergency as these patients are at risk of developing respiratory failure; one third will require admission to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU for ventilatory support, and mortality rates of 3-10% have been reported

  12. Multi-organ IgG4-related disease: Demystifying the diagnostic enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Bhardwaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD is a multisystemic mass forming immune-mediated disease entity, commonly creating confusion and diagnostic challenges. We present a case of a 25-year-old female who presented with bilateral orbital masses, lymphadenopathy, paraspinal and renal masses, which clinicoradiologically simulated lymphoma. The lymph node biopsy revealed interfollicular sheets of plasma cells creating confusion with Castleman's disease and marginal zone lymphoma. The orbital biopsy revealed ductular destruction, periductular plasma cells, and fibrosis, mimicking Sjogren's syndrome and Castleman's disease. However, the correlation of the clinical features with histopathological findings, IgG4 immunopositivity, and serum studies helped in clinching the diagnosis. This case presents an uncommon combination of clinical features infrequently reported in literature. Furthermore, and more importantly, it highlights the need to keep a differential of IgG4-RD in mind, to aid early and correct treatment of the disease.

  13. Parkinson's disease associated with impaired oxidative phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterer, J.; Jarius, C.; Baumgartner, M.

    2001-01-01

    Parkinson's disease may be due to primary or secondary oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects. In a 76-year-old man with Parkinson's disease since 1992, slightly but recurrently elevated creatine phosphokinase, recurrently elevated blood glucose, thickening of the left ventricular myocardium, bifascicular block and hypacusis were found. Cerebral MRI showed atrophy, periventricular demyelination, multiple, disseminated, supra- and infratentorial lacunas, and haemosiderin deposits in both posterior horns. Muscle biopsy showed typical features of an OXPHOS defect. Whether the association of Parkinson's disease and impaired OXPHOS was causative or coincidental remains unknown. Possibly, the mitochondrial defect acted as an additional risk factor for Parkinson's disease or the OXPHOS defect worsened the preexisting neurological impairments by a cumulative or synergistic mechanism. In conclusion, this case shows that Parkinson's disease may be associated with a mitochondrially or nuclearly encoded OXPHOS defect, manifesting as hypacusis, myopathy, axonal polyneuropathy, cardiomyopathy and recurrent subclinical ischaemic strokes and haemorrhages. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Finding of Acute Marchiafava-Bignami Disease with Diffuse Involvement: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Jeong, Hae Woong; In, Hyun Sin

    2011-01-01

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a rare toxic disorder strongly associated with chronic alcoholism. It is characterized by progressive demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. The process may extend to neighboring white matter and subcortical regions. We report a case of MBD in which fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging revealed symmetrical hyperintense lesions with diffuse involvement of the corpus callosum, white matter, corticospinal tract, internal capsule, and middle cerebellar peduncle.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Finding of Acute Marchiafava-Bignami Disease with Diffuse Involvement: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Jeong, Hae Woong; In, Hyun Sin [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a rare toxic disorder strongly associated with chronic alcoholism. It is characterized by progressive demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. The process may extend to neighboring white matter and subcortical regions. We report a case of MBD in which fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging revealed symmetrical hyperintense lesions with diffuse involvement of the corpus callosum, white matter, corticospinal tract, internal capsule, and middle cerebellar peduncle.

  16. The value of qualitative and quantitative assessment of lesion to cerebral cortex signal ratio on double inversion recovery sequence in the differentiation of demyelinating plaques from non-specific T2 hyperintensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamcan, Salih; Battal, Bilal; Akgun, Veysel; Sari, Sebahattin; Tasar, Mustafa [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Oz, Oguzhan; Tasdemir, Serdar [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Neurology, Ankara (Turkey); Bozkurt, Yalcin [Golcuk Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the usefulness of the visual assessment and to determine diagnostic value of the lesion-to-cerebral cortex signal ratio (LCSR) measurement in the differentiation of demyelinating plaques and non-specific T2 hyperintensities on double inversion recovery (DIR) sequence. DIR and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences of 25 clinically diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and 25 non-MS patients with non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions were evaluated visually and LCSRs were measured by two observers independently. On DIR sequence, the calculated mean LCSR ± SD for demyelinating plaques and non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions were 1.60 ± 0.26 and 0.75 ± 0.19 for observer1, and 1.61 ± 0.27 and 0.74 ± 0.19 for observer2. LCSRs of demyelinating plaques were significantly higher than other non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions on DIR sequence. By using the visual assessment demyelinating plaques were differentiated from non-specific T2-hyperintensities with 92.8 % sensitivity, 97.5 % specificity and 95.1 % accuracy for observer1 and 92.8 % sensitivity, 95 % specificity and 93.9 % accuracy for observer2. Visual assessment and LCSR measurement on DIR sequence seems to be useful for differentiating demyelinating MS plaques from supratentorial non-specific T2 hyperintensities. This feature can be used for diagnosis of MS particularly in patients with only supratentorial T2-hyperintense lesions who are categorized as radiologically possible MS. (orig.)

  17. Diffusion and ADC-map images detect ongoing demyelination on subcortical white matter in an adult metachromatic leukodystrophy patient with autoimmune Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akiko; Kumabe, Yuri; Kimura, En; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ueda, Akihiko; Hirano, Teruyuki; Uchino, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Adult-onset metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) often shows schizophrenia- or encephalopathy-like symptoms at an early stage, such as behavioural abnormalities, cognitive impairment, mood disorders and hallucinations. The authors report the case of an adult woman with MLD who had been given antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia. In the differential diagnosis, screening of auto-antibodies was important for ruling out other encephalopathies as she had a euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis. Diagnosis was based the results of MRI, nerve conduction velocity, sensory evoked potential, motor evoked potential, lysosomal enzyme activity and gene analysis studies. Brain MRI showed diffuse demyelination spreading from the deep white matter to subcortical area as high signals at the edges of these lesions in diffusion and apparent diffusion coefficient-map images with the U-fibres conserved. The authors diagnosed adult-onset MLD coexisting with euthyroid autoimmune Hashimoto thyroiditis. PMID:22798296

  18. Integrated Metagenomics/Metaproteomics Reveals Human Host-Microbiota Signatures of Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzi, Youssef; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Pan, Chongle; Shah, Manesh; Halfvarson, Jonas; Tysk, Curt; Henrissat, Bernard; Raes, Jeroen; Verberkmoes, Nathan C.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD) or colon (CCD). Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers. PMID:23209564

  19. Integrated metagenomics/metaproteomics reveals human host-microbiota signatures of Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison R Erickson

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD or colon (CCD. Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers.

  20. The importance of vitamins D and K for the bone health and immune function in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hideki; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    This review summarizes the recent literature about the roles of vitamins D and K in bone metabolism and immunity-mediated inflammatory processes in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The levels of vitamins D and K are lower than normal in patients with IBD, especially in Crohn's disease. Although vitamins D and K are important for the maintenance of bone mineral density in non-IBD patients, an association between vitamins D or K and bone metabolism is not apparent in IBD patients. Recent studies showed that vitamins D and K are suggested to have immune-suppressive effects, both in animal models of colitis and human trials. In particular, vitamin D suppresses dendritic and T-cell functions by inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Insufficiency of vitamin D is associated with the activated phenotype of IBD. Vitamins D and K potentially contribute to the maintenance of bone health in IBD, but this effect may be diminished by other factors such as steroid use, reduced exposure to sunlight, and inflammatory cytokines. Vitamin D and possibly vitamin K are suggested to be involved in the suppression of immune-mediated inflammation and modulation of disease activity.

  1. Report of the ECCO pathogenesis workshop on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases: definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allez, Matthieu; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Louis, Edouard

    2010-01-01

    The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of response to anti-TNF agents in IBD. The outcome of this workshop is presented into two parts....... This first section addresses definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects of anti-TNF therapy failure, including pharmacokinetics of anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies and immune and non-immune mediated clearance of anti-TNF mAbs. The second section concerns the biological roles of TNF and TNF antagonists...

  2. Severe rickets in a young girl caused by celiac disease: the tragedy of delayed diagnosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharafi, Butheinah A; Al-Imad, Shafiq A; Shamshair, Amani M; Al-Faqeeh, Derhim H

    2014-10-08

    Celiac disease is a systemic immune mediated disease which usually presents with gastrointestinal symptoms, but it may present with extra gastrointestinal manifestations such as metabolic bone disease and failure to thrive. This may lead to a delay in the diagnosis. We present a 13 year old female from the middle east with an 8 year history of severe rickets causing multiple bone deformities leaving the child crippled with bowing of both of her arms and legs. The patient was also found to have growth failure, anemia and on further workup she was found to have celiac disease. We are presenting this case because it shows a severe case of rickets after malabsorption for many years. Celiac disease should be kept in mind as a cause of rickets in patients not responding to usual forms of treatment or when associated with other manifestations of malabsorption.

  3. Connective tissue diseases, multimorbidity and the ageing lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Paolo; Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Connective tissue diseases encompass a wide range of heterogeneous disorders characterised by immune-mediated chronic inflammation often leading to tissue damage, collagen deposition and possible loss of function of the target organ. Lung involvement is a common complication of connective tissue diseases. Depending on the underlying disease, various thoracic compartments can be involved but interstitial lung disease is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. Interstitial lung disease, pulmonary hypertension or both are found most commonly in systemic sclerosis. In the elderly, the prevalence of connective tissue diseases continues to rise due to both longer life expectancy and more effective and better-tolerated treatments. In the geriatric population, connective tissue diseases are almost invariably accompanied by age-related comorbidities, and disease- and treatment-related complications, which contribute to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with these conditions, and complicate treatment decision-making. Connective tissue diseases in the elderly represent a growing concern for healthcare providers and an increasing burden of global health resources worldwide. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the immune functions in the elderly and evidence-based guidelines specifically designed for this patient population are instrumental to improving the management of connective tissue diseases in elderly patients. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  4. Neurogenic Bladder in Lyme Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-hwa Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is a multi-systemic, tick-borne infectious disease caused by a spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Various urologic symptoms are associated with Lyme disease, which can be primary or late manifestations of the disease. Although voiding dysfunction is a rarely reported symptom in patients with Lyme disease, it is one of the most disabling complications of Lyme disease. Korea is not an endemic area of Lyme disease, thus, fewer cases have been reported. Herein, we report a case of a 32-year-old man with rapidly progressive bilateral ptosis, dysphagia, spastic paraparesis, and voiding difficulty in whom Lyme disease was diagnosed through serologic tests for antibodies and Western blot testing. A urodynamic study demonstrated detrusor areflexia and bulbocavernosus reflex tests showed delayed latency, indicating demyelination at S2-S4 levels. He received a 4-week course of intravenous ceftriaxone (2 g/day. The patient has recovered from the bilateral ptosis and spastic paraparesis but still suffers from neurogenic bladder.

  5. [A spectrum of neurological diseases with anti-VGKC antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nagado, Tatsui

    2007-11-01

    Anti-VGKC antibody causing peripheral nerve hyperexcitability is already an established clinical entity. Recently, many patients with non-herpetic limbic encephalitis (NHLE) with anti-VGKC antibody have been reported. The characteristic clinical features are low serum Na+ concentration and good response to immunotherapy. Anti-VGK antibody positive NHLE is relatively frequent among immune-mediated NHLE. It is important to know that this disease is responsive to immunotherapy. Furthermore, anti-VGKC antibody is also positive in some intractable epilepsies. These findings suggest that anti-VGKC is correlated with hyperexcitability in both the peripheral and central nervous system and that the spectrum of anti-VGKC antibody syndrome is now expanding.

  6. ROLE OF MRI IN WHITE MATTER DISEASES- CLINICO-RADIOLOGICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranath Reddy Kamireddy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The diagnostic process is difficult as there are many different white matter disorders (inherited and acquired. MRI has high diagnostic specificity to study the pattern of brain structures. MRI is more useful in demonstrating abnormalities of myelination. MATERIALS AND METHODS Our study developed a practical algorithm that relies mainly on the characteristics of brain MRI. Our study included clinicallysuspected patients with demyelination during a period of one year. RESULTS Our study included 25 clinically-suspected patients (out of total of 400 patients with demyelination during a period of one year (February 2016 to January 2017.  Multiple sclerosis accounted for the majority of cases (36.0% followed by acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (20%.  In multiple sclerosis, majority of the patients presented in the third decade of life with a definite female preponderance (M:F-1:2.  The most common symptom and site of involvement were visual impairment (73.3% and periventricular area (80%, respectively.  Other causes like PML, PVL, CPM, reversible posterior leucoencephalopathy, leukodystrophies and motor neuron disease comprised the remainder of the cases. CONCLUSION MRI due to its excellent grey white matter resolution is very sensitive in detecting subtle demyelination, the sensitivity being still further enhanced by FLAIR sequences. MRI in correlation with the clinical signs and symptoms is an ideal modality in early diagnosis of white matter diseases.

  7. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro......-inflammatory molecule tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) (i.e., TNF inhibitors). Approximately one-third of the patients do not respond to the treatment. Genetics and lifestyle may affect the treatment results. The aims of this multidisciplinary collaboration are to identify (1) molecular signatures of prognostic value...... to help tailor treatment decisions to an individual likely to initiate TNF inhibitor therapy, followed by (2) lifestyle factors that support achievement of optimised treatment outcome. This report describes the establishment of a cohort that aims to obtain this information. Clinical data including...

  8. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  9. Polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante inflamatória crônica: estudo de 18 pacientes Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: study of 18 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro C. Calia

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo prospectivo, analisamos as características clínicas, evolução e resposta terapêutica de 18 pacientes com a forma idiopática de polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante inflamatória crônica, que foram acompanhados por período que variou de 4 a 127 meses. O sexo masculino predominou sobre o feminino (1,25:1 e a idade de início dos sintomas variou de 6 a 85 anos. Observamos a preponderância da forma de evolução progressiva (61,1% sobre a forma recidivante (38,9%, bem como a baixa ocorrência de fatores predisponentes (16,7%. Todos os pacientes apresentavam comprometimento sensitivo e motor, associado a hipo ou arreflexia, enquanto apenas três (16,7% apresentavam comprometimento de nervos cranianos. No exame do liquor, as taxas de proteínas estavam elevadas em 88,9% dos pacientes, com média de 203,4 mg/dl. A eletroneuromiografia mostrou alterações desmielinizantes em todos os pacientes, associadas a alterações axonais em 94,4% deles. Em todos os sete pacientes submetidos a biopsia de nervo sural encontramos alterações compatíveis com desmielinização/remielinização. A análise com imunofluorescência, realizada em três pacientes foi normal em um e evidenciou depósito de anticorpos anti-CD3 em dois e anti-HLA-Dr em um. Optamos pela prednisona como tratamento inicial em todos os pacientes, sendo mantida posteriormente em doses reduzidas e em dias alternados em 72,2% deles. Dois pacientes (11,1% estão assintomáticos mesmo após retirada total da medicação e introduzimos azatioprína, associada ou não ao corticóide, nos quatro pacientes com má resposta à prednisona. Até a última avaliação, 16 pacientes (88,9% evoluíram com melhora funcional.This is a prospective study that describes 18 patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP, idiopathic type. The patients have been followed for a period of 4 to 127 months. We evaluated the clinical characteristics, the evolution

  10. Computed tomography and MRI in Krabbe's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winants, D.; Bernard, C.; Galloy, M.A.; Hoeffel, J.C.; Vidailhet, M.

    1988-01-01

    Krabbe's disease whose CT appearance is well known should benefit of the development of MRI as this method is more accurate. MRI permits early diagnosis of leucodystrophy. Yet it must be emphasized that abnormal white matter patterns are not sufficient to permit the diagnosis of Krabbe disease. In the case reported atrophy of the brain, the cerebellum and the brain-stem, demyelination of the white matter and necrosis of corpus callosum were observed. The abnormalities of the brain on MRI pictures help in the diagnosis as they may alert clinicians to the possibility of Krabbe disease in infants with progressive encephalopathy. A definitive diagnosis can be established thanks to the laboratory tests [fr

  11. CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Leonardis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. In our paper, different types of CMT are described with their typical clinical pictures, electrophysiological signs and molecular genetic studies. CMT is classified as demyelinative and axonal type and distal motor neuronopathy.Conclusions. CMT can be of autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked inheritance. The most frequent form of CMT is the result of the dominantly inherited duplication of chromosome 17p11.2 and is marked as CMT1A. The same group involves also rare patients with point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in protein zero gene. CMT1C is linked to chromosome 16p13.1–12.3. Patients with point mutations in early growth response 2 gene (EGR2 are included in group CMT1D. The disease can be also inhereted X-linked (CMTX with the mutations in connexin-32 gene. In autosomal recessive inherited demyelinating polyneuropathies (CMT4, mutations are found in the myotubularin-related protein-2 (CMT4B, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (CMT4D, EGR2 (CMT4E, and in the periaksin (CMT4F genes. In axonal inherited neuropathy, mutations are found in KIF1beta (CMT2A and in light neurofilament (CMT2E genes, other forms map to different chromosomal loci (CMT2B, CMT2D, CMT2F. Some suggestions for the diagnostic procedures of patients with CMT are given.

  12. A Comprehensive Review of Celiac Disease/Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Brian P; Williams, Emmanuelle; Clarke, Kofi

    2018-06-02

    Celiac disease is a complex immune-mediated gluten-sensitive enteropathy with protean clinical manifestations. It is manifest in genetically predisposed individuals who ingest gluten in varying amounts. In broad terms, it is thought to affect 1% of the population in the USA. More specifically, the prevalence increases drastically from 1:133 in patients not-at-risk, to 1:56 in symptomatic patients, to 1:39 in patients with a second-degree relative with the diagnosis, and to 1:22 in patients with a first-degree relative with the diagnosis. It may be associated with several immune-mediated phenomena, autoimmune diseases, and complicated by vitamin and other trace element deficiencies, bone disease, and malignancy. Our understanding of celiac disease has evolved rapidly over the past two decades. This has led to several lines of enquiry on the condition and potential treatment options. More recently, several entities including gluten intolerance, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and seronegative celiac disease have been described. These conditions are distinct from allergies or intolerance to wheat or wheat products. There are challenges in defining some of these entities since a large number of patients self-report these conditions. The absence of confirmatory diagnostic tests poses an added dilemma in distinguishing these entities. The differences in spectrum of symptoms and highlights of the variability between the pediatric and adult populations have been studied in some detail. The role of screening for celiac disease is examined in both the general population and "at risk" populations. Diagnostic strategies including the best available serologic testing, utility of HLA haplotypes DQ2 and DQ8 which are seen in over 90% of patients with celiac disease as compared with approximately 40% of the general population, and endoscopic evaluation are also reviewed. Comprehensive nutritional management after diagnosis is key to sustained health in patients with celiac disease

  13. Propentofylline treatment on open field behavior in rats with focal ethidium bromide-induced demyelination in the ventral surface of the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Júnior, J L; Bernardi, M M; Bondan, E F

    2016-03-01

    Propentofylline (PPF) is a xanthine derivative with pharmacological effects that are distinct from those of classic methylxanthines. It depresses the activation of microglial cells and astrocytes, which is associated with neuronal damage during neural inflammation and hypoxia. Our previous studies showed that PPF improved remyelination following gliotoxic lesions that were induced by ethidium bromide (EB). In the present study, the long-term effects of PPF on open field behavior in rats with EB-induced focal demyelination were examined. The effects of PPF were first evaluated in naive rats that were not subjected to EB lesions. Behavior in the beam walking test was also evaluated during chronic PPF treatment because impairments in motor coordination can interfere with behavior in the open field. The results showed that PPF treatment in unlesioned rats decreased general activity and caused motor impairment in the beam walking test. Gliotoxic EB injections increased general activity in rats that were treated with PPF compared with rats that received saline solution. Motor incoordination was also attenuated in PPF-treated rats. These results indicate that PPF reversed the effects of EB lesions on behavior in the open field and beam walking test. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hyperglycemia Promotes Schwann Cell De-differentiation and De-myelination via Sorbitol Accumulation and Igf1 Protein Down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wu; Tashiro, Syoichi; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Tando, Toshimi; Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Miyamoto, Kana; Morioka, Hideo; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Amizuka, Norio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-07-10

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently accompanied by complications, such as peripheral nerve neuropathy. Schwann cells play a pivotal role in regulating peripheral nerve function and conduction velocity; however, changes in Schwann cell differentiation status in DM are not fully understood. Here, we report that Schwann cells de-differentiate into immature cells under hyperglycemic conditions as a result of sorbitol accumulation and decreased Igf1 expression in those cells. We found that de-differentiated Schwann cells could be re-differentiated in vitro into mature cells by treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor, to reduce sorbitol levels, or with vitamin D3, to elevate Igf1 expression. In vivo DM models exhibited significantly reduced nerve function and conduction, Schwann cell de-differentiation, peripheral nerve de-myelination, and all conditions were significantly rescued by aldose reductase inhibitor or vitamin D3 administration. These findings reveal mechanisms underlying pathological changes in Schwann cells seen in DM and suggest ways to treat neurological conditions associated with this condition. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Hyperglycemia Promotes Schwann Cell De-differentiation and De-myelination via Sorbitol Accumulation and Igf1 Protein Down-regulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wu; Tashiro, Syoichi; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Tando, Toshimi; Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Miyamoto, Kana; Morioka, Hideo; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Amizuka, Norio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently accompanied by complications, such as peripheral nerve neuropathy. Schwann cells play a pivotal role in regulating peripheral nerve function and conduction velocity; however, changes in Schwann cell differentiation status in DM are not fully understood. Here, we report that Schwann cells de-differentiate into immature cells under hyperglycemic conditions as a result of sorbitol accumulation and decreased Igf1 expression in those cells. We found that de-differentiated Schwann cells could be re-differentiated in vitro into mature cells by treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor, to reduce sorbitol levels, or with vitamin D3, to elevate Igf1 expression. In vivo DM models exhibited significantly reduced nerve function and conduction, Schwann cell de-differentiation, peripheral nerve de-myelination, and all conditions were significantly rescued by aldose reductase inhibitor or vitamin D3 administration. These findings reveal mechanisms underlying pathological changes in Schwann cells seen in DM and suggest ways to treat neurological conditions associated with this condition. PMID:25998127

  16. Adult DRG Stem/Progenitor Cells Generate Pericytes in the Presence of Central Nervous System (CNS) Developmental Cues, and Schwann Cells in Response to CNS Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Marie; Maniglier, Madlyne; Deboux, Cyrille; Bachelin, Corinne; Zujovic, Violetta; Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne

    2015-06-01

    It has been proposed that the adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) harbor neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the neural crest. However, the thorough characterization of their stemness and differentiation plasticity was not addressed. In this study, we investigated adult DRG-NPC stem cell properties overtime, and their fate when ectopically grafted in the central nervous system. We compared them in vitro and in vivo to the well-characterized adult spinal cord-NPCs derived from the same donors. Using micro-dissection and neurosphere cultures, we demonstrate that adult DRG-NPCs have quasi unlimited self-expansion capacities without compromising their tissue specific molecular signature. Moreover, they differentiate into multiple peripheral lineages in vitro. After transplantation, adult DRG-NPCs generate pericytes in the developing forebrain but remyelinating Schwann cells in response to spinal cord demyelination. In addition, we show that axonal and endothelial/astrocytic factors as well astrocytes regulate the fate of adult DRG-NPCs in culture. Although the adult DRG-NPC multipotency is restricted to the neural crest lineage, their dual responsiveness to developmental and lesion cues highlights their impressive adaptive and repair potentials making them valuable targets for regenerative medicine. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and other acquired demyelinating syndromes of the central nervous system in Denmark during 1977-2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) including multiple sclerosis (MS) has never been investigated in a Danish pediatric population. OBJECTIVES: We estimated the nationwide age- and sex-specific incidence of pediatric ADS including MS. METHODS: Data were sourced from...... the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, providing cases of pediatric MS for 1977-2015, and the National Patient Register, providing cases of ADS during 2008-2015. All medical records were reviewed to validate the register-based diagnoses. RESULTS: We identified 364 cases of pediatric MS occurring during 1977......-2015 (incidence rate = 0.79 per 100,000 person-years). MS was exceptionally rare before puberty, but the incidence rose considerably from 9 years in girls and 11 years in boys. The female-to-male ratio was 2.5; the median age at onset was 16 years (range = 7-17 years). The MS incidence rate was relatively stable...

  18. Normalization of white matter intensity on T1-weighted images of patients with acquired central nervous system demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Rezwan; Brown, Robert; Narayanan, Sridar; Banwell, Brenda; Nakamura, Kunio; Arnold, Douglas L

    2015-01-01

    Intensity variation between magnetic resonance images (MRI) hinders comparison of tissue intensity distributions in multicenter MRI studies of brain diseases. The available intensity normalization techniques generally work well in healthy subjects but not in the presence of pathologies that affect tissue intensity. One such disease is multiple sclerosis (MS), which is associated with lesions that prominently affect white matter (WM). To develop a T1-weighted (T1w) image intensity normalization method that is independent of WM intensity, and to quantitatively evaluate its performance. We calculated median intensity of grey matter and intraconal orbital fat on T1w images. Using these two reference tissue intensities we calculated a linear normalization function and applied this to the T1w images to produce normalized T1w (NT1) images. We assessed performance of our normalization method for interscanner, interprotocol, and longitudinal normalization variability, and calculated the utility of the normalization method for lesion analyses in clinical trials. Statistical modeling showed marked decreases in T1w intensity differences after normalization (P < .0001). We developed a WM-independent T1w MRI normalization method and tested its performance. This method is suitable for longitudinal multicenter clinical studies for the assessment of the recovery or progression of disease affecting WM. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  19. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  20. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-11-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the 'multibiome' to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine. Furthermore, we discuss new insights into multibiome-host interactions in the context of host-protective immunity and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis. Finally, we provide reasons to account for the multibiome in experimental design, analysis and in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A scientific update on biosimilar infliximab (CT-P13) in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The development of biologic drugs has undoubtedly enhanced the spectrum of treatments available for immune-mediated inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, despite their clear clinical benifits, use of biologics is often hindered by their high costs. The manufacture and subsequent approval of more cost-effective 'biosimilar' versions of these drugs may address this issue and improve patient access. CT-P13 (Remsima(®), Inflectra(®)), a biosimilar of infliximab (Remicade(®)), has shown comparable efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics to its originator drug in clinical studies. The articles in this supplement present a scientific update on the development and use of biosimilars in rheumatic disorders, with specific focus on CT-P13. The information discussed highlights the predicted positive clinical and economic impact of biosimilars on the management of rheumatic diseases.

  2. In immune defense: redefining the role of the immune system in chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinow, Katya B; Rubinow, David R

    2017-03-01

    The recognition of altered immune system function in many chronic disease states has proven to be a pivotal advance in biomedical research over the past decade. For many metabolic and mood disorders, this altered immune activity has been characterized as inflammation, with the attendant assumption that the immune response is aberrant. However, accumulating evidence challenges this assumption and suggests that the immune system may be mounting adaptive responses to chronic stressors. Further, the inordinate complexity of immune function renders a simplistic, binary model incapable of capturing critical mechanistic insights. In this perspective article, we propose alternative paradigms for understanding the role of the immune system in chronic disease. By invoking allostasis or systems biology rather than inflammation, we can ascribe greater functional significance to immune mediators, gain newfound appreciation of the adaptive facets of altered immune activity, and better avoid the potentially disastrous effects of translating erroneous assumptions into novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. The Role of Celiac Disease in Severity of Liver Disorders and Effect of a Gluten Free Diet on Diseases Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Haldane, Thea; AlDulaimi, David; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Rostami, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    Context Celiac disease (CD) is defined as a permanent intolerance to ingested gluten. The intolerance to gluten results in immune-mediated damage of small intestine mucosa manifested by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. These abnormalities resolve with initiationa gluten-free diet. Evidence Acquisition PubMed, Ovid, and Google were searched for full text articles published between 1963 and 2012. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of celiac disease on severity of liver disorder were identified. Results Recently evidence has emerged revealingthat celiac disease not only is associated with small intestine abnormalities and malabsorption, but is also a multisystem disorder affecting other systems outside gastrointestinal tract, including musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular and nervous systems. Some correlations have been assumed between celiac and liver diseases. In particular, celiac disease is associated with changes in liver biochemistry and linked to alter the prognosis of other disorders. This review will concentrate on the effect of celiac disease and gluten-free diets on the severity of liver disorders. Conclusions Although GFD effect on the progression of CD associated liver diseases is not well defined, it seems that GFD improves liver function tests in patients with a hypertransaminasemia. PMID:24348636

  4. Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Banchs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease or hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN is a genetically heterogeneous group of conditions that affect the peripheral nervous system. The disease is characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of peripheral nerves and exhibits a range of patterns of genetic transmission. In the majority of cases, CMT first appears in infancy, and its manifestations include clumsiness of gait, predominantly distal muscular atrophy of the limbs, and deformity of the feet in the form of foot drop. It can be classified according to the pattern of transmission (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X linked, according to electrophysiological findings (demyelinating or axonal, or according to the causative mutant gene. The classification of CMT is complex and undergoes constant revision as new genes and mutations are discovered. In this paper, we review the most efficient diagnostic algorithms for the molecular diagnosis of CMT, which are based on clinical and electrophysiological data.

  5. The Histopathology of IgG4-Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avincsal, Mehmet Ozgur; Zen, Yoh

    2017-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a multi-organ immune-mediated chronic fibroinflammatory condition characterized by elevated serum IgG4 concentrations, tumefaction, and tissue infiltration by IgG4-positive plasma cells. The exact etiology of IgG4-related disease remains unclear with no known role of the IgG4 molecule itself being identified. Although the pancreas and salivary glands are the main organs affected, the involvement of other organs has also been reported. This multi-organ disease mimics a large number of malignant, infectious, and inflammatory disorders; therefore, a prompt differential diagnosis is important for selecting the right therapeutic strategy. Early steroid therapy assists in preventing tissue fibrosis, parenchymal extinction, and severe functional impairments in the affected organs. The definitive and prompt diagnosis of IgG4-related disease requires both histopathological confirmation and clinicopathological correlations. A histopathological examination is mandatory to exclude neoplastic or inflammatory conditions that mimic IgG4-related disease. The histological changes that occur are basically similar in any organ manifestation, with several site-specific findings being recognized. This chapter summarizes general rules for the pathological examination of IgG4-related disease, as well as the histopathological features and differential diagnoses of major organ manifestations.

  6. The Intestinal Microbiome in Early Life: Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claire eArrieta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human microbial colonization begins at birth and continues to develop and modulate in species abundance for about three years, until the microbiota becomes adult-like. During the same time period, children experience significant developmental changes that influence their current health status as well as their immune system. An ever-expanding number of articles associate several diseases with early life imbalances of the gut microbiota, also referred to as gut microbial dysbiosis. Whether early life dysbiosis precedes and plays a role in disease pathogenesis, or simply originates from the disease process itself is a question that is beginning to be answered in a few diseases, including IBD, obesity and asthma. This review describes the gut microbiome structure and function during the formative first years of life, as well as the environmental factors that determine its composition. It also aims to discuss the recent advances in understanding the role of the early life gut microbiota in the development of immune-mediated, metabolic, and neurological diseases. A greater understanding of how the early life gut microbiota impacts our immune development could potentially lead to novel microbial-derived therapies that target disease prevention at an early age.

  7. Asymptomatic pontine and extra-pontine lesions in a patient with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kanwar Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic demyelination syndrome leading to central pontine/extra-pontine myelinolysis (CPM/EPM occurs mainly in patients with history of alcohol abuse, malnourishment, following liver transplantation and less commonly, in association with other systemic diseases. Asymptomatic CPM/EPM is rare. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD who develop CPM/EPM are usually symptomatic with florid neurologic manifestations. Herein, we present a patient with ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis who was incidentally detected to have pontine and extra-pontine lesions suggestive of myelinolysis without any neurologic signs or symptoms.

  8. The Pathogenesis of Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseler, Laura; Chertow, Daniel S; Johnson, Karl M; Feldmann, Heinz; Morens, David M

    2017-01-24

    For almost 50 years, ebolaviruses and related filoviruses have been repeatedly reemerging across the vast equatorial belt of the African continent to cause epidemics of highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The 2013-2015 West African epidemic, by far the most geographically extensive, most fatal, and longest lasting epidemic in Ebola's history, presented an enormous international public health challenge, but it also provided insights into Ebola's pathogenesis and natural history, clinical expression, treatment, prevention, and control. Growing understanding of ebolavirus pathogenetic mechanisms and important new clinical observations of the disease course provide fresh clues about prevention and treatment approaches. Although viral cytopathology and immune-mediated cell damage in ebolavirus disease often result in severe compromise of multiple organs, tissue repair and organ function recovery can be expected if patients receive supportive care with fluids and electrolytes; maintenance of oxygenation and tissue perfusion; and respiratory, renal, and cardiovascular support. Major challenges for managing future Ebola epidemics include establishment of early and aggressive epidemic control and earlier and better patient care and treatment in remote, resource-poor areas where Ebola typically reemerges. In addition, it will be important to further develop Ebola vaccines and to adopt policies for their use in epidemic and pre-epidemic situations.

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging can be used to detect lesions in peripheral nerves in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markvardsen, Lars H.; Andersen, Henning [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Vaeggemose, Michael [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging: MR Research Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Ringgaard, Steffen [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging: MR Research Centre, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown that fractional anisotropy (FA) is lower in peripheral nerves in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We examined whether DTI correlates to muscle strength or impairment. MRI of sciatic and tibial nerves was performed on 3-T MR scanner by obtaining T2- and DTI-weighted sequences with fat saturation. On each slice of T2-weighted (T2w) and DTI, the tibial and sciatic nerves were segmented and served for calculation of signal intensity. On DTI images, pixel-by-pixel calculation of FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was done. Muscle strength at knee and ankle was determined by isokinetic dynamometry and severity of CIDP by neuropathy impairment score (NIS). Fourteen CIDP patients treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin were compared to gender- and age-matched controls. T2w values expressed as a nerve/muscle ratio (nT2w) were unchanged in CIDP versus controls 0.93 ± 0.21 versus 1.02 ± 0.21 (P = 0.10). FA values were lower in CIDP compared to controls 0.38 ± 0.07 versus 0.45 ± 0.05 (P < 0.0001), and ADC values were higher in CIDP versus controls 1735 ± 232 versus 1593 ± 116 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s (P = 0.005). In CIDP, FA values correlated to clinical impairment (NIS) (r = -0.57, P = 0.03), but not to muscle strength. FA value in the sciatic nerve distinguishes CIDP from controls with a sensitivity and a specificity of 92.9 %. CIDP patients have unchanged nT2w values, lower FA values, and higher ADC values of sciatic and tibial nerves compared to controls. FA values correlated to NIS but were unrelated to muscle strength. DTI of sciatic nerves seems promising to differentiate CIDP from controls. (orig.)

  10. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested...... in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations...... are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell...

  11. Role of the Immune System in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Fionnuala B; Martin, Finian

    2018-03-12

    The purpose of this review is to examine the proposed role of immune modulation in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Diabetic kidney disease has not historically been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, increasing evidence is emerging in support of an immune role in its pathophysiology. Both systemic and local renal inflammation have been associated with DKD. Infiltration of immune cells, predominantly macrophages, into the kidney has been reported in a number of both experimental and clinical studies. In addition, increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines have been linked to disease progression. Consequently, a variety of therapeutic strategies involving modulation of the immune response are currently being investigated in diabetic kidney disease. Although no current therapies for DKD are directly based on immune modulation many of the therapies in clinical use have anti-inflammatory effects along with their primary actions. Macrophages emerge as the most likely beneficial immune cell target and compounds which reduce macrophage infiltration to the kidney have shown potential in both animal models and clinical trials.

  12. The Microbiome: a Revolution in Treatment for Rheumatic Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James T; Asquith, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    The microbiome is the term that describes the microbial ecosystem that cohabits an organism such as humans. The microbiome has been implicated in a long list of immune-mediated diseases which include rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and even gout. The mechanisms to account for this effect are multiple. The clinical implications from observations on the microbiome and disease are broad. A growing number of microbiota constituents such as Prevotella copri, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Collinsella have been correlated or causally related to rheumatic disease. The microbiome has a marked effect on the immune system. Our understanding of immune pathways modulated by the microbiota such as the induction of T helper 17 (Th17) cells and secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to segmented filamentous bacteria continues to expand. In addition to the gut microbiome, bacterial communities of other sites such as the mouth, lung, and skin have also been associated with the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. Strategies to alter the microbiome or to alter the immune activation from the microbiome might play a role in the future therapy for rheumatic diseases.

  13. Sarcoidosis, Celiac Disease and Deep Venous Thrombosis: a Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Çelik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology and it may rarely be associated with a second disorder. Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy characterized with malabsorption caused by gluten intolerance, and several reports indicate an association between celiac disease and sarcoidosis. In addition, although celiac disease is associated with several extraintestinal pathologies, venous thrombosis has been rarely reported. Herein we present a rare case report of a patient with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, celiac disease and deep venous thrombosis because of the rare association of these disorders. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain, weight loss, chronic diarrhea and a 5-day history of swelling in her right leg. A diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis was achieved by doppler ultrasonographic examination. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made by biopsy of duodenal mucosa and supported with elevated serum level of anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was achieved by transbronchial needle aspiration from the subcarinal lymph node during flexible bronchoscopy.

  14. Top-down approach to biological therapy of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Simon; Neurath, Markus F

    2017-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated condition with a potentially disabling and destructive course. Despite growing data on when to use a therapeutic 'top-down' strategy, clinical management of this complex disorder is still challenging. Currently, the discussion of 'top-down' strategy in CD mostly includes biological therapy alone or in combination. Areas covered: This article is based on a review of existing literature regarding the use of biological therapy in a 'top-down' approach for the treatment of Crohn's disease. The authors reviewed all the major databases including MEDLINE as well as DDW and ECCO abstracts, respectively. Expert opinion: A 'top-down' therapeutic approach in Crohn's disease is strongly supported by existing data in patients with several risk factors for a severe course of disease. Moreover, there is an increasing amount of published data recommending a more individualised therapeutic strategy to identify candidates for 'top-down' treatment, based on enhanced diagnostics using biomarkers. Emerging therapeutic approaches besides existing therapy concepts using biologicals may possibly redefine the 'top-down' therapeutic strategy for Crohn's disease in the future.

  15. PET imaging of focal demyelination and remyelination in a rat model of multiple sclerosis: comparison of [{sup 11}C]MeDAS, [{sup 11}C]CIC and [{sup 11}C]PIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula Faria, Daniele de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Neuroscience, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Center of Nuclear Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Copray, Sjef [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Neuroscience, Groningen (Netherlands); Sijbesma, Jurgen W.A.; Willemsen, Antoon T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Vries, Erik F.J. de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Buchpiguel, Carlos A. [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Center of Nuclear Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, we compared the ability of [{sup 11}C]CIC, [{sup 11}C]MeDAS and [{sup 11}C]PIB to reveal temporal changes in myelin content in focal lesions in the lysolecithin rat model of multiple sclerosis. Pharmacokinetic modelling was performed to determine the best method to quantify tracer uptake. Sprague-Dawley rats were stereotactically injected with either 1 % lysolecithin or saline into the corpus callosum and striatum of the right brain hemisphere. Dynamic PET imaging with simultaneous arterial blood sampling was performed 7 days after saline injection (control group), 7 days after lysolecithin injection (demyelination group) and 4 weeks after lysolecithin injection (remyelination group). The kinetics of [{sup 11}C]CIC, [{sup 11}C]MeDAS and [{sup 11}C]PIB was best fitted by Logan graphical analysis, suggesting that tracer binding is reversible. Compartment modelling revealed that all tracers were fitted best with the reversible two-tissue compartment model. Tracer uptake and distribution volume in lesions were in agreement with myelin status. However, the slow kinetics and homogeneous brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]CIC make this tracer less suitable for in vivo PET imaging. [{sup 11}C]PIB showed good uptake in the white matter in the cerebrum, but [{sup 11}C]PIB uptake in the cerebellum was low, despite high myelin density in this region. [{sup 11}C]MeDAS distribution correlated well with myelin density in different brain regions. This study showed that PET imaging of demyelination and remyelination processes in focal lesions is feasible. Our comparison of three myelin tracers showed that [{sup 11}C]MeDAS has more favourable properties for quantitative PET imaging of demyelinated and remyelinated lesions throughout the CNS than [{sup 11}C]CIC and [{sup 11}C]PIB. (orig.)

  16. Tay-Sachs disease with conspicuous cranial computerized tomographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kishichiro; Mukawa, Akio; Muto, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Jiro; Takahashi, Shigeko.

    1985-01-01

    An autopsy case of a 3-year-old female infant with Tay-Sachs disease was presented. A cherry red spot in the fundus and a deficiency of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase A in the white blood cells were revealed soon after admission at the age of one year. Her parents and sister were found to be healthy carriers. The patient showed a typical clinical course with marked cranial swelling. In addition to the marked ballooning of neurons on light microscope, membranous cytoplasmic body (MCB) on electron microscope and abnormal accumulation of GM 2 ganglioside in the cerebral cortex by thin layer chromatography were confirmed in the autopsy specimens. In the late stage of her clinical course, the cranial computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated symmetric and deep-wavy hyperdense cerebral cortical zones, diffuse hypodensity and diminished volume of cerebral white matter, mild to moderate ventricular dilatation, and a small cerebellum and brainstem. These conspicuous appearances of the cranial CT seem to be characteristic of Tay-Sachs disease in the late stage, and they are derived from abnormal accumulation of GM 2 ganglioside in the cerebral cortex, and diffuse intense demyelination (dysmyelinating demyelination) of the cerebral white matter. (author)

  17. Nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Lisa; Lichti, Pia; Rath, Eva; Haller, Dirk

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronically relapsing, immune-mediated disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. A major challenge in the treatment of IBD is the heterogenous nature of these pathologies. Both, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are of multifactorial etiology and feature a complex interaction of host genetic susceptibility and environmental factors such as diet and gut microbiota. Genome-wide association studies identified disease-relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms in approximately 100 genes, but at the same time twin studies also clearly indicated a strong environmental impact in disease development. However, attempts to link dietary factors to the risk of developing IBD, based on epidemiological observations showed controversial outcomes. Yet, emerging high-throughput technologies implying complete biological systems might allow taking nutrient-gene interactions into account for a better classification of patient subsets in the future. In this context, 2 new scientific fields, "nutrigenetics" and "nutrigenomics" have been established. "Nutrigenetics," studying the effect of genetic variations on nutrient-gene interactions and "Nutrigenomics," describing the impact of nutrition on physiology and health status on the level of gene transcription, protein expression, and metabolism. It is hoped that the integration of both research areas will promote the understanding of the complex gene-environment interaction in IBD etiology and in the long-term will lead to personalized nutrition for disease prevention and treatment. This review briefly summarizes data on the impact of nutrients on intestinal inflammation, highlights nutrient-gene interactions, and addresses the potential of applying "omic" technologies in the context of IBD.

  18. Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, K; Yayla, Ç; Yüksel, M; Açar, B; Ünal, S; Ertem, A G; Kaplan, M; Akpinar, M Y; Kiliç, Z M Y; Kayaçetin, E

    2017-11-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the small intestine. It has been known that dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic coronary artery disease have become more frequent in patients with celiac disease. The aim of the study was to assess Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with celiac disease. This study was conducted at a single center in collaboration with gastroenterology and cardiology clinics. Between January 2014 and June 2015, a total of 76 consecutive patients were enrolled (38 patients with celiac disease and 38 control subjects). Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio were measured from the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Tp-e interval (64.2±11.0 vs. 44.5±6.0; pceliac disease than control subjects. There was a significant positive correlation between Tp-e/QTc ratio and disease duration in patients with celiac disease (r=0.480, p=0.003) and also there was a significant positive correlation between Tp-e/QTc ratio and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.434, pceliac disease. Whether these changes increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmia deserve further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Acute rhabdomyolysis and delayed pericardial effusion in an Italian patient with Ebola virus disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Brucato, Antonio; Petrosillo, Nicola; Biava, Gianluigi; Uyeki, Timothy M; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-08-30

    During the 2013-2016 West Africa Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic, some EVD patients, mostly health care workers, were evacuated to Europe and the USA. In May 2015, a 37-year old male nurse contracted Ebola virus disease in Sierra Leone. After Ebola virus detection in plasma, he was medically-evacuated to Italy. At admission, rhabdomyolysis was clinically and laboratory-diagnosed and was treated with aggressive hydration, oral favipiravir and intravenous investigational monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus. The recovery clinical phase was complicated by a febrile thrombocytopenic syndrome with pericardial effusion treated with corticosteroids for 10 days and indomethacin for 2 months. No evidence of recurrence is reported. A febrile thrombocytopenic syndrome with pericardial effusion during the recovery phase of EVD appears to be uncommon. Clinical improvement with corticosteroid treatment suggests that an immune-mediated mechanism contributed to the pericardial effusion.

  20. The Impact of Conventional and Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Bone Biology. Rheumatoid Arthritis as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Sofia Carvalho; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-08-01

    The bone and the immune system have a very tight interaction. Systemic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induce bone loss, leading to a twofold increase in osteoporosis and an increase of fragility fracture risk of 1.35-2.13 times. This review focuses on the effects of conventional and biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on bone biology, in the context of systemic inflammation, with a focus on RA. Published evidence supports a decrease in osteoclastic activity induced by DMARDs, which leads to positive effects on bone mineral density (BMD). It is unknown if this effect could be translated into fracture risk reduction. The combination with antiosteoclastic drugs can have an additional benefit.

  1. Anti-Mur as the most likely cause of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtary, Sara; Gikas, Anastasia; Glader, Bertil; Andrews, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Although rare in the United States, anti-Mur is relatively common in Southeast Asia and has been reported to have clinical significance in Chinese and Taiwanese populations. The infant was full term and the second child of a Chinese mother and Vietnamese father, presenting with jaundice. He was clinically diagnosed with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. The direct antiglobulin test indicated that the infant's red blood cells were coated only with anti-IgG. Anti-Mur was identified in the maternal serum and the neonate's plasma. The father was found to be positive for the Mur antigen. The cause of the infant's hemolytic anemia was determined to be most likely anti-Mur. Since anti-Mur is implicated in causing hemolytic disease of the newborn, it is important to recognize this antibody more commonly found in Asian patients in the United States as the Mur+ phenotype has a higher prevalence in this population. © 2016 AABB.

  2. Celiac disease manifesting as isolated cobalamin deficiency megaloblastic anemia: Case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sakaleshpur Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten