WorldWideScience

Sample records for immune deficiency disorders

  1. Eosinophilia associated with disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kelli W.; Milner, Joshua D.; Freeman, Alexandra F.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Elevated serum eosinophil levels have been associated with multiple disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation. Although primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are rare, it is important to consider these in the differential diagnosis of patients with eosinophilia. This review discusses the clinical features, laboratory findings, diagnosis, and genetic basis of disease of several disorders of immune deficiency or dysregulation – all which have documented eosinophilia as part of the syndrome. The article includes autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome, DOCK8 deficiency, PGM3 deficiency, ADA-SCID, Omenn syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome, Comel-Netherton syndrome, and severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome (SAM). PMID:26209898

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis in primary immune deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Merin; de la Morena, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Long-term prophylactic antibiotics are being widely implemented as primary or adjunctive therapy in primary immune deficiencies. This practice has transformed clinical outcomes in the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, complement deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, Toll signaling defects, and prevented Pneumocystis in patients with T-cell deficiencies. Yet, controlled trials are few in the context of primary antibody deficiency syndromes, and most of this practice has been extrapolated from data in patients who are immune competent and with recurrent acute otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. The paucity of guidelines on the subject is reflected in recent surveys among practicing immunologists that highlight differences of habit regarding this treatment. Such discrepancies reinforce the lack of standard protocols on the subject. This review will provide evidence for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in various primary immune deficiency populations, especially highlighting the role antibiotic prophylaxis in primary antibody deficiency syndromes. We also discussed the relationship of long-term antibiotic use and the prevalence of resistant pathogens. Overall, examination of available data on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in antibody deficiency syndromes merit future investigation in well-designed multicenter prospective trials because this population has few other management options.

  3. 38 CFR 4.88b - Schedule of ratings-infectious diseases, immune disorders and nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate system. 6302Leprosy (Hansen's Disease): As active disease 100 Note: A 100 percent evaluation shall...-infectious diseases, immune disorders and nutritional deficiencies. 4.88b Section 4.88b Pensions, Bonuses... Ratings Infectious Diseases, Immune Disorders and Nutritional Deficiencies § 4.88b Schedule of ratings...

  4. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Immune Deficiency Disorders; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorders; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  5. The case for a national service for primary immune deficiency disorders in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Steele, Richard; Jordan, Anthony; Preece, Kahn; Barker, Russell; Brewerton, Maia; Lindsay, Karen; Sinclair, Jan; Storey, Peter; Woon, See-Tarn

    2016-06-10

    Primary immune deficiency disorders (PIDs) are rare conditions for which effective treatment is available. It is critical these patients are identified at an early stage to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Treatment of these disorders is expensive and expert evaluation and ongoing management by a clinical immunologist is essential. Until recently there has been a major shortage of clinical immunologists in New Zealand. While the numbers of trained immunologists have increased in recent years, most are located in Auckland. The majority of symptomatic PID patients require life-long immunoglobulin replacement. Currently there is a shortage of subcutaneous and intravenous immunoglobulin (SCIG/IVIG) in New Zealand. A recent audit by the New Zealand Blood Service (NZBS) showed that compliance with indications for SCIG/IVIG treatment was poor in District Health Boards (DHBs) without an immunology service. The NZBS audit has shown that approximately 20% of annual prescriptions for SCIG/IVIG, costing $6M, do not comply with UK or Australian guidelines. Inappropriate use may have contributed to the present shortage of SCIG/IVIG necessitating importation of the product. This is likely to have resulted in a major unnecessary financial burden to each DHB. Here we present the case for a national service responsible for the tertiary care of PID patients and oversight for immunoglobulin use for primary and non-haematological secondary immunodeficiencies. We propose that other PIDs, including hereditary angioedema, are integrated into a national PID service. Ancillary services, including the customised genetic testing service, and research are also an essential component of an integrated national PID service and are described in this review. As we show here, a hub-and-spoke model for a national service for PIDs would result in major cost savings, as well as improved patient care. It would also allow seamless transition from paediatric to adult services.

  6. Immune Gamma Globulin Therapeutic Indications in Immune Deficiency and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luanna; Wu, Eveline Y; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2016-07-01

    Immune gamma globulin (IgG) has a long history in the treatment of both primary immune deficiency and autoimmune disorders. Disease indications continue to expand and new-generation products increase the versatility of delivery. This review encompasses a historical perspective as well as current and future implications of human immune globulin for the treatment of immune-mediated illness.

  7. Poliovirus excretion among persons with primary immune deficiency disorders: summary of a seven-country study series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Ivanova, Olga; Driss, Nadia; Tiongco-Recto, Marysia; da Silva, Rajiva; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Sazzad, Hossain M S; Mach, Ondrej; Kahn, Anna-Lea; Sutter, Roland W

    2014-11-01

    Persons with primary immune deficiency disorders (PID), especially those disorders affecting the B-cell system, are at substantially increased risk of paralytic poliomyelitis and can excrete poliovirus chronically. However, the risk of prolonged or chronic excretion is not well characterized in developing countries. We present a summary of a country study series on poliovirus excretion among PID cases. Cases with PID from participating institutions were enrolled during the first year and after obtaining informed consent were tested for polioviruses in stool samples. Those cases excreting poliovirus were followed on a monthly basis during the second year until 2 negative stool samples were obtained. A total of 562 cases were enrolled in Bangladesh, China, Iran, Philippines, Russia, Sri Lanka, and Tunisia during 2008-2013. Of these, 17 (3%) shed poliovirus, including 2 cases with immunodeficient vaccine-derived poliovirus. Poliovirus was detected in a single sample from 5/17 (29%) cases. One case excreted for more than 6 months. None of the cases developed paralysis during the study period. Chronic polioviruses excretion remains a rare event even among individuals with PID. Nevertheless, because these individuals were not paralyzed they would have been missed by current surveillance; therefore, surveillance for polioviruses among PID should be established. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity.

  9. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  10. Primary Immune Deficiencies – Principles of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Helen; Prevot, Johan; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Español, Teresa; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Solis, Leire; Drabwell, Josina

    2014-01-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are a growing group of over 230 different disorders caused by ineffective, absent or an increasing number of gain of function mutations in immune components, mainly cells and proteins. Once recognized, these rare disorders are treatable and in some cases curable. Otherwise untreated PIDs are often chronic, serious, or even fatal. The diagnosis of PIDs can be difficult due to lack of awareness or facilities for diagnosis, and management of PIDs is complex. This document was prepared by a worldwide multi-disciplinary team of specialists; it aims to set out comprehensive principles of care for PIDs. These include the role of specialized centers, the importance of registries, the need for multinational research, the role of patient organizations, management and treatment options, the requirement for sustained access to all treatments including immunoglobulin therapies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, important considerations for developing countries and suggestions for implementation. A range of healthcare policies and services have to be put into place by government agencies and healthcare providers, to ensure that PID patients worldwide have access to appropriate and sustainable medical and support services. PMID:25566243

  11. PRIMARY IMMUNE DEFICIENCIES – PRINCIPLES OF CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eChapel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary Immune Deficiencies (PIDs are a growing group of over 230 different disorders caused by ineffective, absent or an increasing number of gain of function mutations in immune components (mainly cells and proteins. Once recognised, these rare disorders are treatable and in some cases curable. Otherwise untreated PIDs are often chronic, serious or even fatal. The diagnosis of PIDs can be difficult due to lack of awareness and facilities for diagnosis, and management of PIDs is complex. This document was prepared by a worldwide multi-disciplinary team of specialists; it aims to set out comprehensive principles of care for PIDs. These include the role of specialised centres, the importance of registries, the need for multinational research, the role of patient organisations, management and treatment options, the requirement for sustained access to all treatments including immunoglobulin (Ig therapies and HSCT, important considerations for developing countries and suggestions for implementation. A range of healthcare policies and services have to be put into place by government agencies and healthcare providers, to ensure that PID patients world-wide have access to appropriate and sustainable medical and support services.

  12. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  13. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  14. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  15. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Cawson, R A; Porter, S R

    1986-07-19

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reviewed for dental practitioners, with an emphasis on oral findings; the clinical course, diagnosis, reporting, treatment, prognosis, transmission, and epidemiology are also covered. HIV infection has an incubation period that may be associated with glandular fever, a prodrome called AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) characterized by lymphadenopathy, low fever, weight loss, night sweats, diarrhea, oral candidosis, nonproductive cough and recurrent infections. AIDS is characterized by opportunistic infections. Over 50% present with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, 21% with Kaposi's sarcoma, and 6% have both. The AIDS virus causes direct neurological symptoms in some cases. Oral candidosis (thrush) in a young male without a local cause such as xerostomia or immune suppression is strongly suggestive of AIDS. Other oral manifestations are severe herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, venereal warts, aphthous ulceration, mycobacterial oral ulcers, oral histoplasmosis, sinusitis and osteomyelitis of the jaw. Hairy leukoplakia, usually seen on the lateral border of the tongue, is probably caused by Epstein-Barr virus. Kaposi's sarcoma, an endothelial cell tumor, is characteristic of AIDS, and in 50% of patients is oral or perioral. Cervical lymph node enlargement will be seen in those with ARC as well as AIDS. No guidelines have been issued by the Department of Health and Social Security for dental surgeons in the UK for reporting AIDS cases. Although HIV virions have been isolated from saliva, there are no known incidents of transmission via saliva. HIV is less likely to be transmitted by needle stick injuries than, for example hepatitis B (25% risk), especially if the blood is from a carrier rather than a full blown AIDS case.

  16. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  17. Hyperthyroidism caused by acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-J; Zhou, J-J; Yuan, X-L; Li, C-Y; Sheng, H; Su, B; Sheng, C-J; Qu, S; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an immune deficiency disease. The etiology of hyperthyroidism, which can also be immune-related, is usually divided into six classical categories, including hypophyseal, hypothalamic, thyroid, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a rare complication of highly active antimicrobial therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Hyperthyroidism caused directly by AIDS has not been previously reported. A 29-year-old man who complained of dyspnea and asthenia for 1 month, recurrent fever for more than 20 days, and breathlessness for 1 week was admitted to our hospital. The thyroid function test showed that the level of free thyroxine (FT4) was higher than normal and that the level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was below normal. He was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Additional investigations revealed a low serum albumin level and chest infection, along with diffuse lung fibrosis. Within 1 month, he experienced significant weight loss, no hand tremors, intolerance of heat, and perspiration proneness. We recommended an HIV examination; subsequently, AIDS was diagnosed based on the laboratory parameters. This is the first reported case of hyperthyroidism caused by AIDS. AIDS may cause hyperthyroidism by immunization regulation with complex, atypical, and easily ignored symptoms. Although hyperthyroidism is rare in patients with AIDS, clinicians should be aware of this potential interaction and should carefully monitor thyroid function in HIV-positive patients.

  18. Neutropenia in Patients with Primary Antibody Deficiency Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Nima Rezaei

    2004-06-01

    Neutropenia may occur in any of the primary immunodeficiency disorders. Persistent or severe infections always pose a supposition, which deserves further evaluation for detecting an underlying immune deficiency syndrome and neutropenia, since a delay in diagnosis may result in a serious organ damage or even death of the patient.

  19. Prophylactic immunoglobulin therapy in secondary immune deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agostini, Carlo; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Kimby, Eva

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In primary immunodeficiency (PID), immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IgRT) for infection prevention is well-established and supported by a wealth of clinical data. On the contrary, very little evidence-based data is available on the challenges surrounding the use of Ig......RT in secondary immune deficiencies (SID), and most published guidelines are mere extrapolations from the experience in PID. AREAS COVERED: In this article, four European experts provide their consolidated opinion on open questions surrounding the prophylactic use of IgRT in SID, based on their clinical...

  20. An update on serine deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, S. N.; Verhoeven-Duif, N. M.; Brilstra, E. H.; Van Maldergem, L.; Coskun, T.; Rubio-Gozalbo, E.; Berger, R.; de Koning, T. J.

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive

  1. Immune disorders in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Chitsazian, Zahra; Moosavian, Mehdi; Raygan, Fariba; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sharif, Ali Reza; Einollahi, Behzad

    2015-03-01

    Immunologically, End Stage renal Disease (ESRD) is associated with some disorders in both innate and adaptive immune system in such a form that there is a coexistence of both immune activation and immune suppression. Although these disorders are complex yet thoroughly unknown, there is a close relation between the progressively defective immune system with side effects as well as mortality causes including cardiovascular problems, infections, and malignancies. From the other point, chronic inflammation as a major determinant of "dialysis syndrome" (including malnutrition, cachexia, and vasculopathy) is considered as the main factor of inability and mortality in dialysis patients. Such inflammation is generally arisen from immune system response to uremia and individual's repetitive contact with dialysis instruments and, in the long term, leads to premature aging via intensifying tissue degeneration. Therefore, the immune system is known as one of the most important therapeutic targets to reduce morbidity and mortality in uremic and dialysis patients.   This review addresses different aspects as well as mechanisms of immune system dysfunction and possible therapeutics in dialysis patients.

  2. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. BACE1-Deficient Mice Exhibit Alterations in Immune System Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stertz, L; Contreras-Shannon, V; Monroy-Jaramillo, N; Sun, J; Walss-Bass, C

    2016-12-21

    BACE1 encodes for the beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 or β-secretase. Genetic deletion of Bace1 leads to behavioral alterations and affects midbrain dopaminergic signaling and memory processes. In order to further understand the role of BACE1 in brain function and behavior, we performed microarray transcriptome profiling and gene pathway analysis in the hippocampus of BACE1-deficient mice compared to wild type. We identified a total of 91 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), mostly enriched in pathways related to the immune and inflammation systems, particularly IL-9 and NF-κB activation pathways. Serum levels of IL-9 were elevated in BACE1-deficient mice. Our network analysis supports an intimate connection between immune response via NF-κB and BACE1 signaling through the NRG1/Akt1 pathway. Our findings warrant future mechanistic studies to determine if BACE1 signaling and the IL-9 pathway interact to alter behavior and brain function. This study opens new avenues in the investigation of hippocampus-related neuroimmunological and neuroinflammation-associated disorders.

  4. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.

  5. The Role of Nuclear Medicine in the Staging and Management of Human Immune Deficiency Virus Infection and Associated Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Klein, Hans C; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Sathekge, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Human immune deficiency virus (HIV) is a leading cause of death. It attacks the immune system, thereby rendering the infected host susceptible to many HIV-associated infections, malignancies and neurocognitive disorders. The altered immune system affects the way the human host responds to disease, r

  6. Immune-related endocrine disorders in novel immune checkpoint inhibition therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Min

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint inhibition against advance malignancies was named breakthrough discovery by the science magazine in 2013. In numerous clinical studies, monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoints, CTLA4, PD1 and PD1 ligand PDL1 have shown promising tumor response in different type of metastatic malignancies. The adverse events are autoimmune-related. The endocrine disorders, hypophysitis and thyroiditis are among the most common side effects associated with immune checkpoint inhibition treatment. Hypophysitis, a very rare endocrine disorder occurs in about one tenth of the patients receiving anti-CTLA4 treatment. Thyroiditis, on the other hand, is more commonly seen in patients receiving anti-PD1 treatment. In addition, both thyroiditis and hypophysitis are common in patients receiving combination treatment with anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1 treatment. The time to onset of hypophysitis and thyroiditis is short. Most of the endocrine disorders occur within 12 weeks after initiation of the immune checkpoint inhibition therapy. Hypophysitis can manifest as total anterior pituitary hormone deficiency or isolated pituitary hormone deficiency. Diabetes insipidus is rare. TSH and gonadotropin deficiencies may be reversible but ACTH deficiency appears permanent. Thyroiditis can present as hypothyroidism or thyrotoxicosis followed by hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism appears irreversible. Early identifying the onset of hypophysitis and thyroiditis and proper management of these endocrine disorders will improve the quality of the life and the outcome of this novel immunotherapy.

  7. Environmental controls on iodine deficiency disorders (IDD)

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C C; Fordyce, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    It is estimated that in excess of one billion people world-wide are at risk from iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), the most obvious manifestation of which is goitre (see Fordyce, 2000). Iodine deficiency is the world’s most common cause of mental retardation and brain damage, and the negative effects of impaired mental function have a significant impact on the social and economic development of communities. Although IDD can be caused by a number of factors, goitrogens fo...

  8. Carnitine deficiency disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    Mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids provides an important source of energy for the heart as well as for skeletal muscle during prolonged aerobic work and for hepatic ketogenesis during long-term fasting. The carnitine shuttle is responsible for transferring long-chain fatty acids across the barrier of the inner mitochondrial membrane to gain access to the enzymes of beta-oxidation. The shuttle consists of three enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 2) and a small, soluble molecule, carnitine, to transport fatty acids as their long-chain fatty acylcarnitine esters. Carnitine is provided in the diet (animal protein) and also synthesized at low rates from trimethyl-lysine residues generated during protein catabolism. Carnitine turnover rates (300-500 micromol/day) are deficiency have been described. There is speculation that carnitine supplements might be beneficial in other settings (such as genetic acyl-CoA oxidation defects--"secondary carnitine deficiency", chronic ischemia, hyperalimentation, nutritional carnitine deficiency), but efficacy has not been documented. The formation of abnormal acylcarnitines has been helpful in expanded newborn screening programs using tandem mass-spectrometry of blood spot acylcarnitine profiles to detect genetic fatty acid oxidation defects in neonates. Carnitine-deficient diets (vegetarian) do not have much effect on carnitine pools in adults. A modest 50% reduction in carnitine levels is associated with hyperalimentation in newborn infants, but is of doubtful significance. The above considerations indicate that carnitine does not become rate-limiting unless extremely low; testing the benefits of nutritional supplements may require invasive endurance studies of fasting ketogenesis or muscle and cardiovascular work.

  9. Aire deficiency promotes TRP-1 specific immune rejection of melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Nagavalli, Anil; Su, Maureen A.

    2013-01-01

    The thymic transcription factor AIRE prevents autoimmunity in part by promoting expression of tissue-specific self-antigens, which include many cancer antigens. For example, AIRE-deficient patients are predisposed to vitiligo, an autoimmune disease of melanocytes that is often triggered by efficacious immunotherapies against melanoma. Therefore, we hypothesized that Aire deficiency in mice may elevate immune responses to cancer and provide insights into how such responses might be triggered. In this study, we show that Aire deficiency decreases thymic expression of TRP-1 (TYRP1), which is a self-antigen in melanocytes and a cancer antigen in melanomas. Aire deficiency resulted in defective negative selection of TRP-1 specific T cells without affecting thymic numbers of regulatory T cells. Aire deficient mice displayed elevated T cell immune responses that were associated with suppression of melanoma outgrowth. Further, transplantation of Aire-deficient thymic stroma was sufficient to confer more effective immune rejection of melanoma in an otherwise Aire wildtype host. Together, our work showed how Aire deficiency can enhance immune responses against melanoma, and how manipulating TRP-1 specific T cell negative selection may offer a logical strategy to enhance immune rejection of melanoma. PMID:23370329

  10. Aire deficiency promotes TRP-1-specific immune rejection of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Nagavalli, Anil; Su, Maureen A

    2013-04-01

    The thymic transcription factor autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity in part by promoting expression of tissue-specific self-antigens, which include many cancer antigens. For example, AIRE-deficient patients are predisposed to vitiligo, an autoimmune disease of melanocytes that is often triggered by efficacious immunotherapies against melanoma. Therefore, we hypothesized that Aire deficiency in mice may elevate immune responses to cancer and provide insights into how such responses might be triggered. In this study, we show that Aire deficiency decreases thymic expression of TRP-1 (TYRP1), which is a self-antigen in melanocytes and a cancer antigen in melanomas. Aire deficiency resulted in defective negative selection of TRP-1-specific T cells without affecting thymic numbers of regulatory T cells. Aire-deficient mice displayed elevated T-cell immune responses that were associated with suppression of melanoma outgrowth. Furthermore, transplantation of Aire-deficient thymic stroma was sufficient to confer more effective immune rejection of melanoma in an otherwise Aire wild-type host. Together, our work showed how Aire deficiency can enhance immune responses against melanoma and how manipulating TRP-1-specific T-cell negative selection may offer a logical strategy to enhance immune rejection of melanoma. ©2013 AACR.

  11. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future.

  12. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M; Hreidarsson, A B; Andersen, S; Bülow Pedersen, I; Knudsen, N; Perrild, H; Jørgensen, T; Ovesen, L

    2000-11-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency disorders are avoided but not higher. Iodine supplementation programs should aim at relatively uniform iodine intake, avoiding deficient or excessive iodine intake in subpopulations. To adopt such a strategy, surveillance programs are needed.

  13. Obsessive compulsive disorder as early manifestation of b12 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Valizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available B12 acts as a cofactor in synthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, thus B12 deficiency affects mood, emotions and sleeping and can lead to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric manifestations of B12 deficiency are varied. They seldom precede anemia. We want to present a case of B12 deficiency which was presented with obsessive compulsive disorder.

  14. Folate deficiency and neurological disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, M I

    1976-01-01

    The restless legs syndrome could represent a folate responsive disorder in both patients with acquired-folate deficiency and those with familial symptomatology. Patients with acquired folate-deficiency could be divided into two subgroups. (i) those with minor neurological signs (restless legs syndrome, vibration sense impairment and tactile hypoesthesia in both legs with diminished ankle jerks and a prolonged or assymetrical Achilles-reflex time) and (ii) those with major neurological signs (subacute combined degeneration with or without neuropathies). In some of these patients the classical triad of the malabsorption syndrome is replaced by another triad, constipation, abnormal jejunal biopsy and abnormal d-xylose absorption. A low folic serum acid level could induce minor neuropsychiatric symptoms while an additional low CSF folate could induce major neurological symptoms in spite of the presence of a normal erythrocyte folate level and in the absence of frank anemia. Possible further studies are described.

  15. An unusual ocular presentation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunachalam Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male who presented with bilateral keratomalacia and on subsequent evaluation was found to be human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive is being reported. A MEDLINE search of the literature did not reveal any report of keratomalacia as the initial presenting feature of HIV/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

  16. Heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Detection by gallium scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drane, W.E.; Tipler, B.M.

    1987-06-01

    A case of heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) secondary to the central nervous system complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reported. Because of the overwhelming suspicion of infection in this patient, this diagnosis was not considered until a gallium scan revealed the typical findings of heterotopic ossification. Because of the increasing utilization of gallium imaging in the AIDS population, every imaging specialist should be aware of this potential disorder.

  17. Heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Detection by gallium scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drane, W E; Tipler, B M

    1987-06-01

    A case of heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) secondary to the central nervous system complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reported. Because of the overwhelming suspicion of infection in this patient, this diagnosis was not considered until a gallium scan revealed the typical findings of heterotopic ossification. Because of the increasing utilization of gallium imaging in the AIDS population, every imaging specialist should be aware of this potential disorder.

  18. Gene therapy for primary adaptive immune deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2011-06-01

    Gene therapy has become an option for the treatment of 2 forms of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): X-linked SCID and adenosine deaminase deficiency. The results of clinical trials initiated more than 10 years ago testify to sustained and reproducible correction of the underlying T-cell immunodeficiency. Successful treatment is based on the selective advantage conferred on T-cell precursors through their expression of the therapeutic transgene. However, "first-generation" retroviral vectors also caused leukemia in some patients with X-linked SCID because of the constructs' tendency to insert into active genes (eg, proto-oncogenes) in progenitor cells and transactivate an oncogene through a viral element in the long terminal repeat. These elements have been deleted from the vectors now in use. Together with the use of lentiviral vectors (which are more potent for transducing stem cells), these advances should provide a basis for the safe and effective extension of gene therapy's indications in the field of primary immunodeficiencies. Nevertheless, this extension will have to be proved by examining the results of the ongoing clinical trials.

  19. New genetic discoveries and primary immune deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2014-04-01

    The field of immunology has undergone recent discoveries of genetic causes for many primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). The ever-expanding knowledge has led to increased understanding behind the pathophysiology of these diseases. Since these diseases are rare, the patients are frequently misdiagnosed early in the presentation of their illnesses. The identification of new genes has increased our opportunities for recognizing and making the diagnosis in patients with PIDD before they succumb to infections that may result secondary to their PIDD. Some mutations lead to a variety of presentations of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The myriad and ever-growing genetic mutations which lead to SCID phenotypes have been identified in recent years. Other mutations associated with some genetic syndromes have associated immunodeficiency and are important for making the diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency in patients with some syndromes, who may otherwise be missed within the larger context of their syndromes. A variety of mutations also lead to increased susceptibility to infections due to particular organisms. These patterns of infections due to specific organisms are important keys in properly identifying the part of the immune system which is affected in these patients. This review will discuss recent genetic discoveries that enhance our understanding of these complex diseases.

  20. Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD control in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant S Pandav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD constitute the single largest cause of preventable brain damage worldwide. Majority of consequences of IDD are invisible and irreversible but at the same time these are preventable. In India, the entire population is prone to IDD due to deficiency of iodine in the soil of the subcontinent and consequently the food derived from it. To combat the risk of IDD, salt is fortified with iodine. However, an estimated 350 million people do not consume adequately iodized salt and, therefore, are at risk for IDD. Of the 325 districts surveyed in India so far, 263 are IDD-endemic. The current household level iodized salt coverage in India is 91 per cent with 71 per cent households consuming adequately iodized salt. The IDD control goal in India was to reduce the prevalence of IDD below 10 per cent in the entire country by 2012. What is required is a "mission approach" with greater coordination amongst all stakeholders of IDD control efforts in India. Mainstreaming of IDD control in policy making, devising State specific action plans to control IDD, strict implementation of Food Safety and Standards (FSS Act, 2006, addressing inequities in iodized salt coverage (rural-urban, socio-economic, providing iodized salt in Public Distribution System, strengthening monitoring and evaluation of IDD programme and ensuring sustainability of IDD control activities are essential to achieve sustainable elimination of IDD in India.

  1. Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) control in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandav, Chandrakant S.; Yadav, Kapil; Srivastava, Rahul; Pandav, Rijuta; Karmarkar, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) constitute the single largest cause of preventable brain damage worldwide. Majority of consequences of IDD are invisible and irreversible but at the same time these are preventable. In India, the entire population is prone to IDD due to deficiency of iodine in the soil of the subcontinent and consequently the food derived from it. To combat the risk of IDD, salt is fortified with iodine. However, an estimated 350 million people do not consume adequately iodized salt and, therefore, are at risk for IDD. Of the 325 districts surveyed in India so far, 263 are IDD-endemic. The current household level iodized salt coverage in India is 91 per cent with 71 per cent households consuming adequately iodized salt. The IDD control goal in India was to reduce the prevalence of IDD below 10 per cent in the entire country by 2012. What is required is a “mission approach” with greater coordination amongst all stakeholders of IDD control efforts in India. Mainstreaming of IDD control in policy making, devising State specific action plans to control IDD, strict implementation of Food Safety and Standards (FSS) Act, 2006, addressing inequities in iodized salt coverage (rural-urban, socio-economic), providing iodized salt in Public Distribution System, strengthening monitoring and evaluation of IDD programme and ensuring sustainability of IDD control activities are essential to achieve sustainable elimination of IDD in India. PMID:24135192

  2. Treatment with amino acids in serine deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, T J

    2006-01-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are rare defects in the biosynthesis of the amino acid L-serine. At present two disorders have been reported: 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency and 3-phosphoserine phosphatase deficiency. These enzyme defects lead to severe neurological symptoms such as congenital microcephaly and severe psychomotor retardation and in addition in patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency to intractable seizures. These symptoms respond to a variable degree to treatment with L-serine, sometimes combined with glycine. In this paper the current practice of amino acid treatment with L-serine and glycine in serine deficiency is reviewed.

  3. Cerebral creatine deficiencies: a group of treatable intellectual developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2014-07-01

    Currently there are 91 treatable inborn errors of metabolism that cause intellectual developmental disorders. Cerebral creatine deficiencies (CDD) comprise three of these: arginine: glycine amidinotransferase [AGAT], guanidinoacetate methyltransferase [GAMT], and X-linked creatine transporter deficiency [SLC6A8]. Intellectual developmental disorder and cerebral creatine deficiency are the hallmarks of CDD. Additional clinical features include prominent speech delay, autism, epilepsy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, and signal changes in the globus pallidus. Patients with GAMT deficiency exhibit the most severe clinical spectrum. Myopathy is a distinct feature in AGAT deficiency. Guanidinoacetate (GAA) is the immediate product in the creatine biosynthetic pathway. Low GAA concentrations in urine, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid are characteristic diagnostic markers for AGAT deficiency, while high GAA concentrations are characteristic markers for GAMT deficiency. An elevated ratio of urinary creatine /creatinine excretion serves as a diagnostic marker in males with SLC6A8 deficiency. Treatment strategies include oral supplementation of high-dose creatine-monohydrate for all three CDD. Guanidinoacetate-reducing strategies (high-dose ornithine, arginine-restricted diet) are additionally employed in GAMT deficiency. Supplementation of substrates for intracerebral creatine synthesis (arginine, glycine) has been used additionally to treat SLC6A8 deficiency. Early recognition and treatment improves outcomes. Normal outcomes in neonatally ascertained siblings from index families with AGAT and GAMT deficiency suggest a potential benefit of newborn screening for these disorders.

  4. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HTLV-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena.

    This manual presents information about the disease, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and guidelines for service delivery to Montana residents who have been diagnosed with AIDS or related disorders. The first section describes the disease's causes, symptoms, and transmission; risk factors; high-risk populations; prevention suggestions;…

  5. Sleep, immunity and inflammation in gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tauseef; Choe, James; Awab, Ahmed; Wagener, Theodore L; Orr, William C

    2013-12-28

    Sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many research endeavors. An estimated 70 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Certain sleep disorders have been shown to cause neurocognitive impairment such as decreased cognitive ability, slower response times and performance detriments. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. Several research studies support the associations among sleep, immune function and inflammation. Here, we review the current research linking sleep, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases and discuss the interdependent relationship between sleep and these gastrointestinal disorders. Different physiologic processes including immune system and inflammatory cytokines help regulate the sleep. The inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 have been shown to be a significant contributor of sleep disturbances. On the other hand, sleep disturbances such as sleep deprivation have been shown to up regulate these inflammatory cytokines. Alterations in these cytokine levels have been demonstrated in certain gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, liver disorders and colorectal cancer. In turn, abnormal sleep brought on by these diseases is shown to contribute to the severity of these same gastrointestinal diseases. Knowledge of these relationships will allow gastroenterologists a great opportunity to enhance the care of their patients.

  6. Combating micronutrient deficiency disorders amongst children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kapil

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrients (MN are the nutrients that are needed by the body in small quantities which play leading roles in the production of enzymes, hormones and other substances that help to regulate growth activity, development and functioning of the immune and reproductive systems. Children, adolescent boys & girls and expectant mothers form a vulnerable group in developing countries where economic stress and food security are issues of concern. MNs deficiencies, which have been considered as major risk factors in child survival are the leading cause of mental retardation, preventable blindness, morbidity, birth defects, morbidity and mortality. Micronutrient malnutrition has many adverse effects on human health, not all of which are clinically evident. Even moderate levels of deficiency (which can be detected by biochemical or clinical measurements can have serious detrimental effects on human function. Thus, in addition to the obvious and direct health effects, the existence of MN deficiency has profound implications for economic development and productivity, particularly in terms of the potentially huge public health costs and the loss of human capital formation.According to WHO mortality data, around 0.8 million deaths (1.5% of the total can be attributed to iron deficiency each year, and a similar number to vitamin A deficiency. In terms of the loss of healthy life, expressed in  disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, iron-deficiency anaemia results in  25 million DALYs lost (or 2.4% of the global total, vitamin A deficiency  in 18 million DALYs lost (or 1.8% of the global total and iodine deficiency  in 2.5 million DALYs lost (or 0.2% of the global total [1].A child belonging to low socio-economic families residing in poor environmental and sanitation settings consume low quantity of foods which deficient not only in 2-3 MNs Deficiencies but also in macronutrients. These children also suffer from recurrent episodes of morbidities which

  7. History of Innate Immunity in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eMcGeer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The foundations of innate immunity in neurodegenerative disorders were first laid by Hortega in 1919. He identified and named microglia, recognizing them as cells of mesodermal origin. Van Furth in 1969 elaborated the monocyte phagocytic system with microglia as the brain representatives. Validation of these concepts did not occur until 1987 when HLA-DR was identified on activated microglia in a spectrum of neurological disorders. HLA-DR had already been established as a definitive marker of immunocompetent cells of mesodermal origin. It was soon determined that the observed inflammatory reaction was an innate immune response. A rapid expansion of the field took place as other markers of an innate immune response were found that were made by neurons, astrocytes, oligodendroglia and endothelial cells. The molecules included complement proteins and their regulators, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, acute phase reactants, prostaglandins, proteases, protease inhibitors, coagulation factors, fibrinolytic factors, anaphylotoxins, integrins, free radical generators, and other unidentified neurotoxins. The Nimmerjahn movies demonstrated that resting microglia were constantly active, sampling the surround and responding rapidly to brain damage. Ways of reducing the neurotoxic innate immune response and stimulating a healing response continue to be sought as a means for ameliorating the pathology in a spectrum of chronic degenerative disorders.

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency Reduces the Immune Response, Phagocytosis Rate, and Intracellular Killing Rate of Microglial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Marie Luise; Schütze, Sandra; Redlich, Sandra; Götz, Alexander; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Bertsch, Thomas; Ribes, Sandra; Hanenberg, Andrea; Schneider, Simon; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Sieber, Cornel; Nau, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Meningitis and meningoencephalitis caused by Escherichia coli are associated with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. A high prevalence of neurological disorders has been observed in geriatric populations at risk of hypovitaminosis D. Vitamin D has potent effects on human immunity, including induction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and suppression of T-cell proliferation, but its influence on microglial cells is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of vitamin D deficiency on the phagocytosis rate, intracellular killing, and immune response of murine microglial cultures after stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-cysteine (TLR1/2), poly(I·C) (TLR3), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (TLR9). Upon stimulation with high concentrations of TLR agonists, the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was decreased in vitamin D-deficient compared to that in vitamin D-sufficient microglial cultures. Phagocytosis of E. coli K1 after stimulation of microglial cells with high concentrations of TLR3, -4, and -9 agonists and intracellular killing of E. coli K1 after stimulation with high concentrations of all TLR agonists were lower in vitamin D-deficient microglial cells than in the respective control cells. Our observations suggest that vitamin D deficiency may impair the resistance of the brain against bacterial infections. PMID:24686054

  9. Microflora analysis of a child with severe combined immune deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. R.; Kropp, K. D.; Molina, T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a microflora analysis of a 5-year-old male child with severe combined immune deficiency who was delivered by Caesarean section and continuously maintained in an isolator. Despite precautions, it was found that the child had come in contact with at least 54 different microbial contaminants. While his skin autoflora was similar to that of a reference group of healthy male adults in numbers of different species and the number of viable cells present per square centimeter of surface area, the subject's autoflora differed from the reference group in that significantly fewer anaerobic species were recovered from the patient's mouth and feces. It is suggested that the child's remaining disease free shows that the reported bacteria are noninvasive or that the unaffected components of the child's immune defense mechanisms are important.

  10. Granulomatous skin lesions complicating Varicella infection in a patient with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and immune deficiency: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Den Oord Joost

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS(OMIM 268400 is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by poikiloderma, small stature, skeletal and dental abnormalities, cataract and an increased risk of cancer. It is caused by mutations in RECQL4 at 8q24. Immune deficiency is not described as a classical feature of the disease. Here we report the appearance of granulomatous skin lesions complicating primary Varicella Zoster Virus infection in a toddler with Rothmund Thomson syndrome and immune deficiency. Although granulomatous disorders are sometimes seen after Herpes zoster, they are even more rare after Varicella primary infection. Granulomas have hitherto not been described in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome. With this report we aim to stress the importance of screening for immune deficiency in patients with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome.

  11. The immune response in SAPHO syndrome: deficiency, hyper- responsiveness, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayem, Gilles; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of SAPHO syndrome still remains to be determined. However, like in other forms of spondylarthritides, this rare condition seems to result from the combination of genetic, environmental and immunological factors. Surely, SAPHO syndrome cannot be simply regarded as the adult form of the 'caricatural' DIRA (deficiency in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist) syndrome, although this purely genetic disease also causes multiple osteomyelitis and pustular rashes. An initial bacterial trigger, mainly represented by the cutaneous saprophyte Propionibacterium acnes, could take advantage of a selective deficiency of the innate immunity, implicating neutrophils. This could elicit thereafter a 'hyperimmune' reaction, as in other chronic inflammatory conditions like reactive arthritis, Crohn's disease or hidradenitis suppurativa. The reported efficacy of either longterm antibiotic regimens (especially with azithromycin) or immunomodulatory biologic agents targetting TNF-α or IL-1 supports the concept of a post- or para-infectious hyperresponsiveness disorder, with a convincing rationale for 'hybrid' therapies.

  12. Bipolar and panic disorders may be associated with hereditary defects in the innate immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldager, Leslie; Köhler, Karl Ole; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) represent important arms of the innate immune system, and different deficiencies may result in infections or autoimmune diseases. Both bipolar and panic disorders are associated with increased...

  13. NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY DISORDERS IN PAEDIATRICS: AN AYURVEDIC PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikole Rushikesh V.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is major concern for the mankind. Food determines body condition right from the womb to tomb; it is main source of energy. Abnormal nutrition may cause both over and under nutrition hazards. It causes more than half of the nearly 11 million deaths each year among children under age five. Nutritional deficiency disorders are viewed under Apatarpanajanya vyadhis. Ancient Acharyas explained diseases related to nutritional deficiency such as Phakka, Parigarbhika, Bala shosha etc in different samhitas. This paper highlights Ayurvedic perspective of nutritional deficiency related disorders.

  14. TREX1 deficiency triggers cell-autonomous immunity in a cGAS-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablasser, Andrea; Hemmerling, Inga; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Behrendt, Rayk; Roers, Axel; Hornung, Veit

    2014-06-15

    Cytosolic detection of DNA is crucial for the initiation of antiviral immunity but can also cause autoimmunity in the context of endogenous nucleic acids being sensed. Mutations in the human 3' repair exonuclease 1 (TREX1) have been linked to the type I IFN-associated autoimmune disease Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. The exact mechanisms driving unabated type I IFN responses in the absence of TREX1 are only partly understood, but it appears likely that accumulation of endogenous DNA species triggers a cell-autonomous immune response by activating a cytosolic DNA receptor. In this article, we demonstrate that knocking out the DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase completely abrogates spontaneous induction of IFN-stimulated genes in TREX1-deficient cells. These findings indicate a key role of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase for the initiation of self-DNA-induced autoimmune disorders, thus providing important implications for novel therapeutic approaches.

  15. Deficient saccadic inhibition in Asperger's disorder and the social-emotional processing disorder

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Background: Both Asperger's disorder and the social-emotional processing disorder (SEPD), a form of non-verbal learning disability, are associated with executive function deficits. SEPD has been shown to be associated with deficient saccadic inhibition.

  16. Immune response against Sporothrix schenckii in TLR-4-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassá, Micheli Fernanda; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Ribeiro, Livia Carolina de Abreu; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2012-07-01

    For many fungal diseases, macrophages are the major cell population implicated in host protection, primarily by their ability to eliminate the invading fungal pathogen through phagocytosis. In sporotrichosis, this remains true, because of macrophages’ ability to recognize Sporothrix schenckii through specific receptors for some of the fungus’ cellular surface constituents. Further confirmation for macrophages’ pivotal role in fungal diseases came with the identification of toll-like receptors, and the subsequent numerous associations found between TLR-4 deficiency and host susceptibility to diverse fungal pathogens. Involvement of TLR-4 in immune response against sporotrichosis has been conducted to investigate how TLR-4 signaling could affect inflammatory response development through evaluation of H2O2 production and IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β release during the course of S. schenckii infection on TLR-4-deficient mice. The results showed that macrophages are largely dependent on TLR-4 for inflammatory activation and that in the absence of TLR-4 signaling, increased TGF-β release may be one of the contributing factors for the abrogated inflammatory activation of peritoneal exudate cells during mice sporotrichosis.

  17. Iron Deficiency Impairs Intra-Hepatic Lymphocyte Mediated Immune Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliano Bonaccorsi-Riani

    Full Text Available Hepatic expression of iron homeostasis genes and serum iron parameters predict the success of immunosuppression withdrawal following clinical liver transplantation, a phenomenon known as spontaneous operational tolerance. In experimental animal models, spontaneous liver allograft tolerance is established through a process that requires intra-hepatic lymphocyte activation and deletion. Our aim was to determine if changes in systemic iron status regulate intra-hepatic lymphocyte responses. We used a murine model of lymphocyte-mediated acute liver inflammation induced by Concanavalin A (ConA injection employing mice fed with an iron-deficient (IrDef or an iron-balanced diet (IrRepl. While the mild iron deficiency induced by the IrDef diet did not significantly modify the steady state immune cell repertoire and systemic cytokine levels, it significantly dampened inflammatory liver damage after ConA challenge. These findings were associated with a marked decrease in T cell and NKT cell activation following ConA injection in IrDef mice. The decreased liver injury observed in IrDef mice was independent from changes in the gut microflora, and was replicated employing an iron specific chelator that did not modify intra-hepatic hepcidin secretion. Furthermore, low-dose iron chelation markedly impaired the activation of isolated T cells in vitro. All together, these results suggest that small changes in iron homeostasis can have a major effect in the regulation of intra-hepatic lymphocyte mediated responses.

  18. Fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency: a treatable neurometabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamate, Mahesh; Jambagi, Milind; Gowda, Prashanth; Sonoli, Smita

    2014-09-22

    Fructose-1,6-diphosphatase (FDPase) deficiency is usually considered an inborn error of fructose metabolism, however, strictly speaking it is a defect of gluconeogenesis. The disorder is manifested by the appearance of hypoglycaemia, ketosis and lactic acidosis (neonatally or later during fasting or induced by fructose) and may also be life-threatening. FDPase deficiency can be suspected using simple bedside tests such as glucometer random blood sugar, Benedict's test, Rothera's test and Seliwanoff's test. We report our experience with two cases of FDPase deficiency and review the relevant literature. We also describe the fructosuria in these cases during the crises period, which has not been stressed in the literature.

  19. Immune Deficiency Influences Juvenile Social Behavior and Maternal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinnies, Kayla M.; Cox, Kimberly H.; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2017-01-01

    Mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) lack functional T and B-lymphocytes, and have impaired cognitive abilities. Here, we assessed social behaviors in male SCID and C57BL/6 (B6) juvenile mice. In a social preference task, SCID mice spent more time than B6 mice investigating a novel adult male mouse. In a social recognition task, SCID mice habituated to a novel ovariectomized mouse, but failed to show dishabituation when presented with an unfamiliar individual. We hypothesized that partial immune restoration could normalize behaviors. SCID pups (postnatal day 7) received either saline or splenocytes from normal donors. Splenocyte-replaced SCID mice spent less time interacting with a novel mouse than saline-injected SCID or B6 control mice. Again, control SCID mice failed to dishabituate to a novel mouse, but splenocyte-replaced SCID mice showed dishabituation. In both of these studies B6 and SCID pairs were used to produce offspring that remained with their dams until weaning. There are no studies of maternal behavior in SCID dams; therefore to investigate the potential role for this factor we quantified maternal behavior in SCID and B6 dams; several significant differences were found. To control for differences in maternal care we mated heterozygous SCIDs to produce offspring. These homozygous SCID and WT offspring reared by dams of the same genotypes displayed similar responses to a novel mouse; however, in the social recognition task SCID males did not display dishabituation to a novel mouse. Taken together, our data indicate that gene by environment interactions influence social interactions in immune deficient mice. PMID:26030431

  20. How We Manage Adenosine Deaminase-Deficient Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA SCID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Donald B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2017-02-14

    Adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA SCID) accounts for 10-15% of cases of human SCID. From what was once a uniformly fatal disease, the prognosis for infants with ADA SCID has improved greatly based on the development of multiple therapeutic options, coupled with more frequent early diagnosis due to implementation of newborn screening for SCID. We review the various treatment approaches for ADA SCID including allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling or family member or from a matched unrelated donor or a haplo-identical donor, autologous HSCT with gene correction of the hematopoietic stem cells (gene therapy-GT), and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with polyethylene glycol-conjugated adenosine deaminase. Based on growing evidence of safety and efficacy from GT, we propose a treatment algorithm for patients with ADA SCID that recommends HSCT from a matched family donor, when available, as a first choice, followed by GT as the next option, with allogeneic HSCT from an unrelated or haplo-identical donor or long-term ERT as other options.

  1. Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles Myasthenia gravis affects 60,000 Americans, but removal ... gravis, an autoimmune disorder that causes life-threatening muscle weakness, researchers report. Since the 1940s, doctors have ...

  2. Immune activation by casein dietary antigens in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severance, E.G.; Dupont, D.; Dickerson, F.B.; Stallings, C.R.; Origoni, A.E.; Krivogorsky, B.; Yang, S.; Haasnoot, W.; Yolken, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Inflammation and other immune processes are increasingly linked to psychiatric diseases. Antigenic triggers specific to bipolar disorder are not yet defined. We tested whether antibodies to bovine milk caseins were associated with bipolar disorder, and whether patients recognized differe

  3. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M

    2000-01-01

    in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately......Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism...

  4. Iron Deficiency in Preschool Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Ayhan; Gurkan, Kagan; Turkoglu, Serhat; Akca, Omer Faruk; Kilic, Birim Gunay; Uslu, Runa

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) causes negative outcomes on psychomotor and behavioral development of infants and young children. Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are under risk for ID and this condition may increase the severity of psychomotor and behavioral problems, some of which already inherently exist in these children. In the present…

  5. The challenge of the global elimination of iodine deficiency disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, van der F.

    1997-01-01

    Most nations of the world are well positioned for success in their pursuit of the virtual elimination of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) by the year 2000. In 1990 at the World Summit for Children, Heads of State and Government had agreed on this global goal and in 1992 at the International Confere

  6. Iron Deficiency in Preschool Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Ayhan; Gurkan, Kagan; Turkoglu, Serhat; Akca, Omer Faruk; Kilic, Birim Gunay; Uslu, Runa

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) causes negative outcomes on psychomotor and behavioral development of infants and young children. Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are under risk for ID and this condition may increase the severity of psychomotor and behavioral problems, some of which already inherently exist in these children. In the present…

  7. On Potassium Deficiency in Cotton– Disorder, Cause and Tissue Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezhong Dong

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available As modern cotton varieties including Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis transgenic cotton are adopted and yield per unit area continues to increase, potassium deficiency is occurring with rising frequency in many cotton-growing countries. Symptoms of K deficiencies used to occur at the bottom of the plant on the older or mature leaves, but more recently described symptoms show up on young leaves near the top of the plant. Potassium deficiency induces numerous disorders in cotton, including decreased leaf area index, photosynthesis and plant biomass, but enhances specific leaf weight and earliness of maturity. Low supply and uptake of K, adoption of modern cotton varieties particularly Bt transgenic cotton, and environmental stress are obvious contributors to potassium deficiency. Single leaf photosynthesis (Pn reduction results mainly from decreased stomatal conductance, low chlorophyl content, poor chloroplast ultrastructure, restricted saccharide translocation, and decreased synthesis of RuBP carboxylase under K deficient conditions. Canopy photosynthesis reduction in K-deficient plants is mainly attributed to both inhibited single leaf Pn rate and decreased leaf area index. Potassium concentrations in both blade and petiole of top fully expanded leaves on main stem are good indicators of K deficiency.

  8. Autosomal recessive PGM3 mutations link glycosylation defects to atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and neurocognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Xiaomin; Ichikawa, Mie; Lyons, Jonathan J.; Datta, Shrimati; Lamborn, Ian T.; Jing, Huie; Kim, Emily S.; Biancalana, Matthew; Wolfe, Lynne A.; DiMaggio, Thomas; Matthews, Helen F.; Kranick, Sarah M.; Stone, Kelly D.; Holland, Steven M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Hughes, Jason D.; Mehmet, Huseyin; McElwee, Joshua; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Freeze, Hudson H.; Su, Helen C.; Milner, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying genetic syndromes that lead to significant atopic disease can open new pathways for investigation and intervention in allergy. Objective To define a genetic syndrome of severe atopy, elevated serum IgE, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and motor and neurocognitive impairment. Methods Eight patients from two families who had similar syndromic features were studied. Thorough clinical evaluations, including brain MRI and sensory evoked potentials, were performed. Peripheral lymphocyte flow cytometry, antibody responses, and T cell cytokine production were measured. Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations. Immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, enzymatic assays, nucleotide sugar and sugar phosphate analyses along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of glycans were used to determine the molecular consequences of the mutations. Results Marked atopy and autoimmunity were associated with increased TH2 and TH17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. Bacterial and viral infection susceptibility were noted along with T cell lymphopenia, particularly of CD8+ T cells, and reduced memory B cells. Apparent brain hypomyelination resulted in markedly delayed evoked potentials and likely contributed to neurological abnormalities. Disease segregated with novel autosomal recessive mutations in a single gene, phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3). Although PGM3 protein expression was variably diminished, impaired function was demonstrated by decreased enzyme activity and reduced UDP-GlcNAc, along with decreased O- and N-linked protein glycosylation in patients’ cells. These results define a new Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation. Conclusions Autosomal recessive, hypomorphic PGM3 mutations underlie a disorder of severe atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, intellectual disability and hypomyelination. PMID:24589341

  9. Materno-Fetal Transmission of Human Immune Deficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Schäfer

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Mother-to-child transmission of human immune deficiency virus (HIV is a multifactorial event highly associated with advanced maternal HIV disease and obstetric incidents taking place during parturition. Thus, various approaches to prevention may be beneficial. Although the time and the route of materno-fetal HIV transmission are still not sufficiently clear, much speaks in favor of a late HIV transmission, most probably taking place during parturition or the phase before the delivery. The fetus is remarkably protected by the placenta and the intact fetal membranes against many viral infections during gestation. These conditions change at parturition and the chance for a transition of HIV-infected carrier cells or virus into the fetal compartment increases. Proinflammatory cytokines secreted at the materno-fetal interface accumulate in amniotic fluid and may chemoattract and stimulate potentially HIV-infected immunocytes. After rupture of membranes, maternal cells of the decidua are directly exposed to the amniotic fluid. Aside from the contamination of the fetal skin at vaginal delivery as a debatable route of infection, blood-to-blood contacts and the fetal swallowing of contaminated amniotic fluid may be the major path of fetal HIV infection. For the fetal prophylaxis of an intrauterine infection, the application of zidovudine is recommended. However, cesarian section before the onset of labor leads also to a diminution of the transmission rate. As the transmission seems to have both systemic and local causes, it makes sense to combine different intervention strategies. Whether a combination of zidovudine and elective cesarean section can lower the transmission risk further has to be evaluated.

  10. Economic impact of routine opt-out antenatal human immune deficiency virus screening: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, Everistus; Haigh, Carol; Duncan, Fiona; Fatoye, Francis

    2017-03-02

    To evaluate the economic impact of routine testing of human immune deficiency virus in antenatal settings. Many children are being infected with human immune deficiency virus through mother-to-child transmission of the virus. Most of these infections are preventable if the mothers' human immune deficiency virus status is identified in a timely manner and appropriate interventions put in place. Routine human immune deficiency virus testing is widely acclaimed as a strategy for universal access to human immune deficiency virus testing and is being adopted by developed and developing poor income countries without recourse to the economic impact. A systematic review of published articles. Extensive electronic searches for relevant journal articles published from 1998-2015 when countries began to implement routine antenatal HIV testing on their own were conducted in the following databases: Science Direct, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, JSTOR, CINAHL and PubMed with search terms as listed in Box 2. Manual searches were also performed to complement the electronic identification of high-quality materials. There were no geographical restrictions, but language was limited to English. Fifty-five articles were retrieved; however, ten were eligible and included in the review. The findings showed that many programmes involving routine human immune deficiency virus testing for pregnant women compared to the alternatives were cost-effective and cost saving. Data from the reviewed studies showed cost savings between $5,761.20-$3.69 million per case of previously undiagnosed maternal human immune deficiency virus-positive infection prevented. Overall, cost-effectiveness was strongly associated with the prevalence rate of human immune deficiency virus in the various settings. Routine human immune deficiency virus testing is both cost-effective and cost saving compared to the alternatives. However, there are wide variations in the methodological approaches to the studies. Adopting standard

  11. Complex I deficiencies in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Sergio; De Rasmo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Complex I is the point of entry in the mitochondrial electron transport chain for NADH reducing equivalents, and it behaves as a regulatable pacemaker of respiratory ATP production in human cells. Defects in complex I are associated with several human neurological disorders, including primary mitochondrial diseases, Parkinson disease (PD), and Down syndrome, and understanding the activity and regulation of complex I may reveal aspects of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Complex I is regulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and the protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathway, and elucidating the role of the cAMP/PKA system in regulating complex I and oxygen free radical production provides new perspectives for devising therapeutic strategies for neurological diseases.

  12. Sequential Cadaveric Lung and Bone Marrow Transplant for Immune Deficiency Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID); Immunodeficiency With Predominant T-cell Defect, Unspecified; Severe Chronic Neutropenia; Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD); Hyper IgE Syndromes; Hyper IgM Deficiencies; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease; Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID)

  13. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy.

  14. Zinc deficiency is common in several psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Grønli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mounting evidence suggests a link between low zinc levels and depression. There is, however, little knowledge about zinc levels in older persons with other psychiatric diagnoses. Therefore, we explore the zinc status of elderly patients suffering from a wide range of psychiatric disorders. METHODS: Clinical data and blood samples for zinc analyzes were collected from 100 psychogeriatric patients over 64 of age. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms were assessed using the Montgomery and Aasberg Depression Rating Scale, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Clockdrawing Test, clinical interviews and a review of medical records. In addition, a diagnostic interview was conducted using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview instrument. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in patients with depression was compared with the prevalence in patients without depression, and the prevalence in a control group of 882 older persons sampled from a population study. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in zinc deficiency prevalence between the control group (14.4% and the patient group (41.0% (χ(2 = 44.81, df = 1, p<0.001. In a logistic model with relevant predictors, zinc deficiency was positively associated with gender and with serum albumin level. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in the patient group was significantly higher in patients without depression (i.e. with other diagnoses than in patients with depression as a main diagnosis or comorbid depression (χ(2 = 4.36, df = 1, p = 0.037. CONCLUSIONS: Zinc deficiency is quite common among psychogeriatric patients and appears to be even more prominent in patients suffering from other psychiatric disorders than depression. LIMITATIONS: This study does not provide a clear answer as to whether the observed differences represent a causal relationship between zinc deficiency and psychiatric symptoms. The blood sample collection time points

  15. [The superoxide theory of pathogenesis and therapy of immune disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V V

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of the understanding that there are common development mechanisms for the inflammatory and immune reactions it was established that the activity of the oxidant-antioxidant system (OAS) correlates not only with a severity of the inflammatory reaction but also with a degree of immune disorders. Such disorders were studied in patients with endogenous uveitis and with cancer of the esophagus or uterine cervix, i.e. those nosological forms, which are normally accompanied by OAS decompensation, which comprised a lower activity of primary antioxidants (superoxides of dismutase, catalase, lactoferrin, ceruloplasmin etc.) in patients with pronounced immune disorders. Moreover, a lower content of secondary antioxidants, like vitamin A, ascorbic acid and tocopherol, was registered in the blood of patients with immune disorders. The suppression of the antioxidant system was concomitant with an essentially increased level of lipid peroxidation in all patients. Besides, it was noted that there were intensifying signs of immune disorders primarily observed during irradiation chemotherapy. In this context, a clear-cut correlation was established, in monitoring the body immune status, between degrees of free-radical formation and lipid peroxidation, on the one hand, and an activity of detoxication-system antioxidants, on the other hand,. The OAS correction by direct or indirect-action antioxidants normally improves the clinical course of immune impairments. The indirect-action antioxidants, e.g. synthetic regulatory peptide "Imunofan", induce the increasing activity of primary endogenous antioxidants. An activation of the detoxication antioxidant system, brings about, in such cases, a lower content of inflammation mediators, a recovery of cell-immunity indices and lower parameters of body auto-sensitization. Finally, the antioxidant system in patients with chronic inflammatory or oncological disorders, when recovered, ensures the correction of cell immunity and cuts

  16. Natural killer cells eradicate galectin-1-deficient glioma in the absence of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gregory J; Chockley, Peter; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Doherty, Robert; Ritt, Michael; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2014-09-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells safeguard against early tumor formation by destroying transformed target cells in a process referred to as NK immune surveillance. However, the immune escape mechanisms used by malignant brain tumors to subvert this innate type of immune surveillance remain unclear. Here we show that malignant glioma cells suppress NK immune surveillance by overexpressing the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-1. Conversely, galectin-1-deficient glioma cells could be eradicated by host NK cells before the initiation of an antitumor T-cell response. In vitro experiments demonstrated that galectin-1-deficient GL26-Cit glioma cells are ∼3-fold more sensitive to NK-mediated tumor lysis than galectin-1-expressing cells. Our findings suggest that galectin-1 suppression in human glioma could improve patient survival by restoring NK immune surveillance that can eradicate glioma cells. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5079-90. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Ensuring effective prevention of iodine-deficiency disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Völzke, Henry; Caron, Philippe Jean; Dahl, Lisbeth;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Programs initiated to prevent iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) may not remain effective due to changes in government policies, commercial factors, and human behavior that may affect the efficacy of IDD prevention programs in unpredictable directions. Monitoring and outcome studies...... by the lack of centralized standardization procedures. In addition, data on outcomes and the cost of achieving them are needed in order to provide evidence of the beneficial effects of IDD prevention in countries with mild iodine deficiency. CONCLUSION: Monitoring studies can be optimized by including...... are needed to optimize the effectiveness of IDD prevention. SUMMARY: Although the need for monitoring is compelling, the current reality in Europe is less than optimal. Regular and systematic monitoring surveys have only been established in a few countries, and comparability across the studies is hampered...

  18. DOCK8 Immune Deficiency as a Model for Primary Cytoskeletal Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean A. McGhee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DOCK8 deficiency is a newly described primary immune deficiency resulting in profound susceptibility to cutaneous viral infections, elevated IgE levels, and eosinophilia, but lacking in the skeletal manifestations commonly seen in hyper IgE syndrome, which it otherwise resembles. Although little is known about the DOCK8 protein, it resembles other atypical guanine exchange factors in the DOCK family, and is known to bind to CDC42. This suggests that a likely role for DOCK8 is in modulating signals that trigger cytoskeletal reorganization. As a result, DOCK8 may also be related to other immune deficiencies that involve the cytoskeleton and Rho GTPase signaling pathways, such as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and Rac2 deficiency.

  19. Immune disorders and handedness in dyslexic boys and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariabková, K; Hugdahl, K; Glós, J

    1995-12-01

    Thirty dyslexic and 30 control boys aged 7-11 years were compared for frequency of immune disorders and handedness as well as for family history of immune disorders and learning disabilities (dyslexia and stuttering). They were also compared for neurological status and for history of speech and language difficulties. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the frequency of immune disorders and in handedness. The results showed significantly more dyslexic boys with soft neurological signs and signs of speech and language disorders. The frequency of dyslexia was significantly higher in the relatives of the dyslexic boys. Also significantly more mothers of the dyslexic boys reported difficulties during pregnancy and complications at delivery. The results are discussed in terms of Geschwind's hypothesis and neuromaturational delay as possible determinants of developmental dyslexia.

  20. Induction of protective CTL immunity against peptide transporter TAP-deficient tumors through dendritic cell vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Benedict; Grufman, Per; Fredriksson, Vanoohi; Andersson, Kenth; Roseboom, Marjet; Laban, Sandra; Camps, Marcel; Wolpert, Elisabeth Z; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Offringa, Rienk; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; van Hall, Thorbald

    2007-09-15

    A large proportion of human cancers show deficiencies in the MHC class I antigen-processing machinery. Such defects render tumors resistant to immune eradication by tumoricidal CTLs. We recently identified a unique population of CTL that selectively targets tumor immune-escape variants through recognition of MHC-presented peptides, termed TEIPP (T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing), expressed on cells lacking functional TAP-peptide transporters. Previously, we showed that vaccination with TEIPP peptides mediates protection against TAP-deficient tumors. Here, we further explored the concept of TEIPP-targeted therapy using a dendritic cell (DC)-based cellular vaccine. Impairment of TAP function in DC induced the presentation of endogenous TEIPP antigens by MHC class I molecules, and immunization with these DCs protected mice against the outgrowth of TAP-deficient lymphomas and fibrosarcomas. Immune analysis of vaccinated mice revealed strong TEIPP-specific CTL responses, and a crucial role for CD8(+) cells in tumor resistance. Finally, we show that TEIPP antigens could be successfully induced in wild-type DC by introducing the viral TAP inhibitor UL49.5. Our results imply that immune intervention strategies with TAP-inhibited DC could be developed for the treatment of antigen processing-deficient cancers in humans.

  1. Immune dysregulation in autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briceno Noriega, D.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common and severe neuro-developmental disorder in early childhood which is defined by social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotypic behaviours. The aetiology of ASD remains poorly understood. Susceptibility to development of ASD has significant

  2. Immune dysregulation in autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briceno Noriega, D.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common and severe neuro-developmental disorder in early childhood which is defined by social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotypic behaviours. The aetiology of ASD remains poorly understood. Susceptibility to development of ASD has significant

  3. Combined immune deficiency in a patient with a novel NFKB2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsley, Andrew W; Qian, Yaping; Valencia, C Alexander; Shah, Kara; Zhang, Kejian; Assa'ad, Amal

    2014-11-01

    NFKB2 encodes the p100/p52 protein, a critical mediator of the canonical and noncanonical NFkB signaling pathways. Here we report the comprehensive immune evaluation of a child with a novel NFKB2 mutation and provide evidence that aberrant NFKB2 signaling not only causes humoral immune deficiency, but also interferes with the TCR-mediated proliferation of T cells. These observations expand the known phenotype associated with NFKB2 mutations.

  4. Cesarean Section and Chronic Immune Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevelsted, Astrid; Stokholm, Jakob; Bønnelykke, Klaus;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Immune diseases such as asthma, allergy, inflammatory bowel disease, and type 1 diabetes have shown a parallel increase in prevalence during recent decades in westernized countries. The rate of cesarean delivery has also increased in this period and has been associated...... with the development of some of these diseases. METHODS: Mature children born by cesarean delivery were analyzed for risk of hospital contact for chronic immune diseases recorded in the Danish national registries in the 35-year period 1977-2012. Two million term children participated in the primary analysis. We......, or celiac disease. CONCLUSIONS: Cesarean delivery exemplifies a shared environmental risk factor in early life associating with several chronic immune diseases. Understanding commonalities in the underlying mechanisms behind chronic diseases may give novel insight into their origin and allow prevention....

  5. Microbial Dysbiosis in Common Variable Immune Deficiencies : Evidence, Causes, and Consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berbers, Roos-Marijn; Nierkens, Stefan; van Laar, Jacob M.; Bogaert, Debby; Leavis, Helen L.

    2017-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an immune disorder that not only causes increased susceptibility to infection, but also to inflammatory complications such as autoimmunity, lymphoid proliferation, malignancy, and granulomatous disease. Recent findings implicate the microbiome as a driver

  6. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-10-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring.

  7. Successful efforts toward elimination iodine deficiency disorders in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Umesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine deficiency (ID is the world′s single most important preventable cause of brain damage and mental retardation. Iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs is a public health problem in 130 countries, affecting 13% of the world population. The simplest solution to prevent the IDD is to consume iodized common salt every day. In India, significant progress has been achieved toward elimination of IDD, in the last 30 years. Satisfactory levels of urinary iodine excretion and iodine content of salt have been documented by the research surveys conducted by research scientists. The results indicate that we are progressing toward elimination of IDD. IDD is due to a nutritional deficiency, which is prima-rily that of iodine, in soil and water. IDD is known to re-appear if the IDD Control Program is not sustained. To ensure that the population continues to have intake of adequate amount of iodine, there is a need of i periodic surveys to assess the magnitude of the IDD with respect to impact of iodized salt (IS intervention; ii strengthening the health and nutrition education activities to create demand for IS and iii development of a monitoring information system (MIS for ensuring that the adequately IS is available to the beneficiaries.

  8. Iodine deficiency disorders in the iodine-replete environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) constitute significant public health problems in parts of the world with poor iodine nutrition, but have been eradicated in North America and other regions. We herein report 3 cases of IDD, which occurred in women living in iodine-replete environments. The clinical presentation, biochemical findings, and radiological features of the patients were analyzed and presented in 3 case reports. The radiological features are illustrated in sonographic and scintigraphic images. A literature review and discussion, which highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, ancillary investigations, and rational treatment of iodine deficiency goiter and hypothyroidism are provided. All 3 patients were young women, aged 24 to 38 years, who had goiter. Two of them presented with goitrous hypothyroidism. Radioactive iodine scintigraphy showed a characteristic finding of diffusely increased uptake (in the absence of clinical and biochemical evidence of hyperthyroidism). This scintigraphic pattern was found to be pathognomonic. Dietary iodine supplementation alone resulted in complete remission of IDD in the subjects, including the 2 patients with hypothyroidism. IDD can occur in iodine-replete environments. A high index of suspicion is needed to recognize these cases. It is pertinent that the correct diagnosis be made to avoid unwarranted life-long thyroxine therapy in patients presenting with goiter and hypothyroidism, which is easily treatable with iodized salt. These cases underscore the need for considering iodine deficiency in the etiologic diagnosis of goiter and hypothyroidism, even in iodine-sufficient regions.

  9. Composition of Intestinal Microbiota in Immune-Deficient Mice Kept in Three Different Housing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoene-Reineke, Christa; Fischer, André; Friese, Christian; Briesemeister, Dana; Göbel, Ulf B.; Kammertoens, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Abundance of commensals constituting the intestinal microbiota (IM) affects the immune system and predisposes to a variety of diseases, including intestinal infections, cancer, inflammatory and metabolic disorders. Housing conditions determine the IM and can hence influence the immune system. We analyzed how both variables affect the IM of four immune-compromized mouse lines kept under different housing conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the IM composition in mice by quantitative 16S rRNA RT-PCR analysis of the main fecal bacterial groups (Enterobacteriaceae, enterococci, lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, Bacteroides/Prevotella (BP) spp., Clostridium leptum and coccoides groups). Mice were homozygous (HO) or heterozygous (HE) for a targeted inactivating mutation of either the IFN-γ Receptor (R), IFN-γ, Rag1 or IL-4 genes. Overall, differences in IM composition were subtle. However, in the SPF-barrier, total eubacterial loads were higher in Rag1 HE versus Rag1 HO mice as well as in IFN-γR HE versus IFN-γR HO and WT animals. Although absent in WT mice, bifidobacterial loads were higher in HO and HE IFN-γ and Rag1 as well as IL-4 HO mice. Furthermore, BP was slightly lower in HO and HE IFN-γR and IFN-γ mice as well as in IL-4 HO mice as compared to WT controls. Interestingly, IM compositions were comparable in WT mice when kept in individual ventilated cages (IVC) or open cages (OC). IFN-γ HO and HE mice, however, had higher enterobacteria and BP loads, but lacked bifidobacteria when kept in OC versus IVC, as was the case in HO and HE Rag1 mice. In addition, Rag1 HO mice harbored higher clostridial loads when housed in OC as compared to IVC. Unexpectedly, lactobacilli levels were higher in IFN-γR mice when kept in OC versus IVC. Conclusion/Significance Housing-dependent and immune-deficiency mediated changes in intestinal microbiota composition were rather subtle but may nevertheless impact immunopathology in experimental models

  10. Composition of intestinal microbiota in immune-deficient mice kept in three different housing conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Thoene-Reineke

    Full Text Available Abundance of commensals constituting the intestinal microbiota (IM affects the immune system and predisposes to a variety of diseases, including intestinal infections, cancer, inflammatory and metabolic disorders. Housing conditions determine the IM and can hence influence the immune system. We analyzed how both variables affect the IM of four immune-compromized mouse lines kept under different housing conditions.We investigated the IM composition in mice by quantitative 16S rRNA RT-PCR analysis of the main fecal bacterial groups (Enterobacteriaceae, enterococci, lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, Bacteroides/Prevotella (BP spp., Clostridium leptum and coccoides groups. Mice were homozygous (HO or heterozygous (HE for a targeted inactivating mutation of either the IFN-γ Receptor (R, IFN-γ, Rag1 or IL-4 genes. Overall, differences in IM composition were subtle. However, in the SPF-barrier, total eubacterial loads were higher in Rag1 HE versus Rag1 HO mice as well as in IFN-γR HE versus IFN-γR HO and WT animals. Although absent in WT mice, bifidobacterial loads were higher in HO and HE IFN-γ and Rag1 as well as IL-4 HO mice. Furthermore, BP was slightly lower in HO and HE IFN-γR and IFN-γ mice as well as in IL-4 HO mice as compared to WT controls. Interestingly, IM compositions were comparable in WT mice when kept in individual ventilated cages (IVC or open cages (OC. IFN-γ HO and HE mice, however, had higher enterobacteria and BP loads, but lacked bifidobacteria when kept in OC versus IVC, as was the case in HO and HE Rag1 mice. In addition, Rag1 HO mice harbored higher clostridial loads when housed in OC as compared to IVC. Unexpectedly, lactobacilli levels were higher in IFN-γR mice when kept in OC versus IVC.Housing-dependent and immune-deficiency mediated changes in intestinal microbiota composition were rather subtle but may nevertheless impact immunopathology in experimental models.

  11. Impact of iron deficiency anemia on the function of the immune system in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Tamer Hasan; Badr, Mohamed Ahmed; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Zkaria, Marwa; El Saadany, Hosam Fathy; Abdel Rahman, Doaa Mohamed; Shahbah, Doaa Abdallah; Al Morshedy, Salah Mohamed; Fathy, Manar; Esh, Asmaa Mohamed Hosni; Selim, Amal Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The importance of iron deficiency as a public health problem is based ultimately on the seriousness of its consequences on health. The most extensively investigated consequences of iron deficiency involve work performance and immune function. The significance of the effects on work performance is generally accepted. In contrast, data on the influence of iron deficiency on immune function are often perceived as being confusing and contradictory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of iron deficiency anemia on humoral, cellular, nonspecific immunity, and also the effect on the cytokines that are the key factors of many immunologic steps. Forty children with iron deficiency anemia and 20 age and sex-matched healthy children were included. All children were subjected to full medical history, thorough clinical examination, complete blood count, iron indices (serum iron, serum total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin, and transferrin saturation), immunoglobulin assay (IgA, IgG, and IgM), interleukin (IL)-6 serum level, study of T-lymphocyte subsets, and evaluation of phagocytic function of macrophages and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils. Patients had significantly lower IgG levels, IL-6, phagocytic activity, and oxidative burst of neutrophils than controls, although there was no significant difference between patients and controls with regard to other immunoglobulins and CD4/CD8 ratio. There was significantly positive correlation between serum iron and IL-6 serum level. We concluded that humoral, nonspecific immunity (phagocytic activity and oxidative burst), and the IL-6 are influenced in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Study of these abnormalities after correction of iron deficiency is strongly needed. PMID:27893677

  12. Impact of iron deficiency anemia on the function of the immune system in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Tamer Hasan; Badr, Mohamed Ahmed; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Zkaria, Marwa; El Saadany, Hosam Fathy; Abdel Rahman, Doaa Mohamed; Shahbah, Doaa Abdallah; Al Morshedy, Salah Mohamed; Fathy, Manar; Esh, Asmaa Mohamed Hosni; Selim, Amal Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The importance of iron deficiency as a public health problem is based ultimately on the seriousness of its consequences on health. The most extensively investigated consequences of iron deficiency involve work performance and immune function. The significance of the effects on work performance is generally accepted. In contrast, data on the influence of iron deficiency on immune function are often perceived as being confusing and contradictory.We aimed to evaluate the effect of iron deficiency anemia on humoral, cellular, nonspecific immunity, and also the effect on the cytokines that are the key factors of many immunologic steps.Forty children with iron deficiency anemia and 20 age and sex-matched healthy children were included. All children were subjected to full medical history, thorough clinical examination, complete blood count, iron indices (serum iron, serum total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin, and transferrin saturation), immunoglobulin assay (IgA, IgG, and IgM), interleukin (IL)-6 serum level, study of T-lymphocyte subsets, and evaluation of phagocytic function of macrophages and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils.Patients had significantly lower IgG levels, IL-6, phagocytic activity, and oxidative burst of neutrophils than controls, although there was no significant difference between patients and controls with regard to other immunoglobulins and CD4/CD8 ratio. There was significantly positive correlation between serum iron and IL-6 serum level.We concluded that humoral, nonspecific immunity (phagocytic activity and oxidative burst), and the IL-6 are influenced in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Study of these abnormalities after correction of iron deficiency is strongly needed.

  13. Health-Related Quality of Life in Primary Immune Deficient Patients

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    "Habibeh Mozaffari

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary immunodeficiency (PI disorders are abnormalities in development and maturation of the immune system. Individuals with PI disease may experience frequent infections, which limit their abilities to exhibit physical and psychological well-being secondary to their illness. In this survey we compared health-related quality of life of primary immune deficient patients with healthy children. The case-control study was designed for patients with PI disease who were referred to Children Medical Center in 2004-2005. Demographic information was taken and Pediatric Quality Of Life (PEDQOL questionnaire were filled for 50 PI patients and 100 healthy children. The mean age in PI patients was 12.62± 3.65 (range from 8 to 18 years and in the control group was 11.04± 3.3 years. In PI patients 68% were male and 32% female .Most patients with PI disease had a diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (54% or X-linked agammaglobulinemia (24%. Patients with PI disease had great limitations in physical functioning and psychological well-being (p<0.001 and p<0.001 respectively compared with children without a chronic health condition. Patients had lower PEDQOL scores in all age groups compared with normal sample (p<0.001. Long duration of disease significantly correlated with low psychological score. (r = -3.23. P= 0.03 Children with PI disease experience poorer health related quality of life than healthy children, indicating more attention should be paid to early diagnosis and treatment of PI disease, as well as more attention to their social limitation. PI patients may need psychological consultation for better coping with their illness.

  14. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: A Preliminary Examination of the Effects on Gay Couples and Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic significantly influences attitudes about life and lifestyles. Homosexuals have to give increased consideration to coupling, the nature of coupled relationships, sex and intimacy, and death long before the normal time. Discusses impact of AIDS on the early stages of gay coupling and on the…

  15. Infection-derived lipids elicit a novel immune deficiency circuitry in arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The insect Immune Deficiency (IMD) pathway resembles the tumor necrosis factor receptor network in mammals and senses diaminopimelic-type peptidoglycans present in Gram-negative bacteria. Whether unidentified chemical moieties elicit the IMD signaling cascade remains unknown. Here, we disclose thoug...

  16. Studies on the prevention and control of human immune deficiency virus associated tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakezha, T.

    2014-01-01

    The overall question the thesis intended to answer was how to optimise interventions for the prevention and control of human immune deficiency virus (HIV) -associated tuberculosis (TB) in high TB and HIV burden settings such as South Africa. In these settings the incidence of and mortality from TB

  17. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: A Preliminary Examination of the Effects on Gay Couples and Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic significantly influences attitudes about life and lifestyles. Homosexuals have to give increased consideration to coupling, the nature of coupled relationships, sex and intimacy, and death long before the normal time. Discusses impact of AIDS on the early stages of gay coupling and on the…

  18. Leptin, resistin and visfatin: the missing link between endocrine metabolic disorders and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Suhaimi, Ebtesam A; Shehzad, Adeeb

    2013-05-01

    Adipose tissue is still regarded as a principle site for lipid storage and mobilizing tissue with an important role in the control of energy homeostasis. Additionally, adipose tissue-secreted hormones such as leptin, visfatin, resistin, apelin, omentin, sex steroids, and various growth factors are now regarded as a functional part of the endocrine system. These hormones also play an important role in the immune system. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested the complex role of adipocyte-derived hormones in immune system and inflammation. Adipokines mediate beneficial and detrimental effects in immunity and inflammation. Many of these adipocytokines have a physiological role in metabolism. The uncontrolled secretions of several adipocytokines were associated with the stimulation of inflammatory processes leading to metabolic disorders including obesity, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Obesity leads to the dysfunction of adipocytes andcorrelated with the imbalance of adipokines levels. In obese and diabetic conditions, leptin deficiency inhibited the Jak/Stat3/PI3K and insulin pathways. In this review, ample evidence exists to support the recognition of the adipocyte's role in various tissues and pathologies. New integral insights may add dimensions to translate any potential agents into the future clinical armamentarium of chronic endocrine metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Functional balance of both adipocytes and immune cells is important to exert their effects on endocrine metabolic disorders; furthermore, adipose tissue should be renamed not only as a functional part of the endocrine system but also as a new part of the immune system.

  19. 5-Lipoxygenase deficiency impairs innate and adaptive immune responses during fungal infection.

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    Adriana Secatto

    Full Text Available 5-Lipoxygenase-derived products have been implicated in both the inhibition and promotion of chronic infection. Here, we sought to investigate the roles of endogenous 5-lipoxygenase products and exogenous leukotrienes during Histoplasma capsulatum infection in vivo and in vitro. 5-LO deficiency led to increased lung CFU, decreased nitric oxide production and a deficient primary immune response during active fungal infection. Moreover, H. capsulatum-infected 5-LO(-/- mice showed an intense influx of neutrophils and an impaired ability to generate and recruit effector T cells to the lung. The fungal susceptibility of 5-LO(-/- mice correlated with a lower rate of macrophage ingestion of IgG-H. capsulatum relative to WT macrophages. Conversely, exogenous LTB4 and LTC4 restored macrophage phagocytosis in 5-LO deficient mice. Our results demonstrate that leukotrienes are required to control chronic fungal infection by amplifying both the innate and adaptive immune response during histoplasmosis.

  20. Observable essential fatty acid deficiency markers and autism spectrum disorder.

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    Brown, Christine M; Austin, David W; Busija, Lucy

    2014-07-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been associated with essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiencies, with some researchers theorising that dysregulation of phospholipid metabolism may form part of the biological basis for ASD. This pilot study compared observable signs of fatty acid status of 19 children with an ASD diagnosis to 23 of their typically developing siblings. A pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding history was also obtained from their parents, which included a measure of infant intake of fatty acid rich colostrum immediately post-partum. When considered within their family group, those infants not breastfed (with colostrum) within the first hour of life and who had a history of fatty acid deficiency symptoms were more likely to have an ASD diagnosis. Other variables such as formula use, duration of breastfeeding, gestational age and Apgar scores were not associated with group membership. The results of this study are consistent with previous research showing a relationship between fatty acid metabolism, breastfeeding and ASD such that early infant feeding practices and the influence this has on the fatty acid metabolism of the child may be a risk factor for ASD.

  1. Effects of early vitamin D deficiency rickets on bone and dental health, growth and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerofsky, Melissa; Ryder, Mark; Bhatia, Suruchi; Stephensen, Charles B; King, Janet; Fung, Ellen B

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with adverse health outcomes, including impaired bone growth, gingival inflammation and increased risk for autoimmune disease, but the relationship between vitamin D deficiency rickets in childhood and long-term health has not been studied. In this study, we assessed the effect of early vitamin D deficiency on growth, bone density, dental health and immune function in later childhood to determine if children previously diagnosed with rickets were at greater risk of adverse health outcomes compared with healthy children. We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, parathyroid hormone, bone mineral density, anthropometric measures, dietary habits, dental health, general health history, and markers of inflammation in 14 previously diagnosed rickets case children at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Center. We compared the findings in the rickets cases with 11 healthy children selected from the population of CHO staff families. Fourteen mothers of the rickets cases, five siblings of the rickets cases, and seven mothers of healthy children also participated. Children diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency rickets had a greater risk of fracture, greater prevalence of asthma, and more dental enamel defects compared with healthy children. Given the widespread actions of vitamin D, it is likely that early-life vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk of disease later in childhood. Further assessment of the long-term health effects of early deficiency is necessary to make appropriate dietary recommendations for infants at risk of deficiency.

  2. Nutritional n-3 PUFAs deficiency during perinatal periods alters brain innate immune system and neuronal plasticity-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madore, Charlotte; Nadjar, Agnès; Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Sere, A; Aubert, A; Portal, Céline; Joffre, Corinne; Layé, Sophie

    2014-10-01

    Low dietary intake of the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is a causative factor of neurodevelopmental disorders. However the mechanisms linking n-3 PUFAs low dietary intake and neurodevelopmental disorders are poorly understood. Microglia, known mainly for their immune function in the injured or infected brain, have recently been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in regulating maturation of neuronal circuits during normal brain development. Disruption of this role during the perinatal period therefore could significantly contribute to psychopathologies with a neurodevelopmental neurodevelopmental component. N-3 PUFAs, essential lipids and key structural components of neuronal membrane phospholipids, are highly incorporated in cell membranes during the gestation and lactation phase. We previously showed that in a context of perinatal n-3 PUFAs deficiency, accretion of these latter is decreased and this is correlated to an alteration of endotoxin-induced inflammatory response. We thus postulated that dietary n-3 PUFAs imbalance alters the activity of microglia in the developing brain, leading to abnormal formation of neuronal networks. We first confirmed that mice fed with a n-3 PUFAs deficient diet displayed decreased n-3 PUFAs levels in the brain at post-natal days (PND)0 and PND21. We then demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs deficiency altered microglia phenotype and motility in the post-natal developing brain. This was paralleled by an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines expression at PND21 and to modification of neuronal plasticity-related genes expression. Overall, our findings show for the first time that a dietary n-3 PUFAs deficiency from the first day of gestation leads to the development of a pro-inflammatory condition in the central nervous system that may contribute to neurodevelopmental alterations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Common variable immune deficiency associated Hodgkin’s lymphoma complicated with EBV-linked hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Aslan, Tuncay; Etgul, Sezgin; Aydin, Seda; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is described by an increase in macrophages accountable for extensive phagocytosis of hematopoietic cells. Secondary HPS arises commonly in the presence of infections, neoplasia, autoimmune disorders and immune disorders. Here, we reported a patient with common variable immune deficiency (CVID) and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) who later developed EBV linked hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. 42 year old men underwent check-up because of back pain in July 2012. He had known CVID disease. In physical examination he had no lymphadenopathies however his spleen was palpable 3 cm under arcus costa. He had hypogammaglobulinemia with IgG levels around 500 mg/dl. In abdominal computed tomography (CT) multiple lymphadenopathies reaching maximum 26×17 cm size were seen so, PET-CT was performed. Involvement in thorax, abdomen, and bone was detected with maximum SUV max 11.5. He had undergone tru-cut biopsy from lymph node in November 2012 which revealed HL. Bone marrow investigation favored with mix cell type. His cytogenetic analysis was reported as 46 XY. He was considered as stage 4 disease and ABVD (Adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine and dexamethasone). He was given six cycles of chemotherapy in May 2013 and complete remission was observed in control CT screening in July 2013. However pancytopenia evolved in August 2013. Bone marrow investigation revealed suspicious lymphohistiocytic infiltration. Treatment was planned to apply autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) after salvage chemotherapy. Control bone marrow investigation again revealed the lymphohistiocytic aggregates with hemophagocytosis. Our patient showed 5 criteria of hemophagocytic syndrome. He had ferritin elevation (>5000 μg/dl), splenomegaly (13 cm) cytopenia, triglyceride elevation and hemophagocytosis. He had unrelated SCT transplantation however he died from transplant related toxicity. The primary and secondary immune deficiency caused by chemotherapy are the major causes

  4. Possibilities of Correction for Iron Deficiency and Intestinal Microbiocenosis Disorders in Children

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    L.V. Kvashnina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiencies and intestinal microbiocenosis disorders in children are the most urgent problems in pediatrics. The article presents the data of our own researches on the effectiveness of the correction for iron deficiency anemia in children with intestinal microbiocenosis disorders during the combination use of iron supplements and spore-forming probiotic Lactovit Forte.

  5. The Immune System, Cytokines, and Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Anne; Glozier, Nicholas; Dale, Russell; Guastella, Adam J

    2017-04-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental condition characterized by variable impairments in communication and social interaction as well as restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Heterogeneity of presentation is a hallmark. Investigations of immune system problems in ASD, including aberrations in cytokine profiles and signaling, have been increasing in recent times and are the subject of ongoing interest. With the aim of establishing whether cytokines have utility as potential biomarkers that may define a subgroup of ASD, or function as an objective measure of response to treatment, this review summarizes the role of the immune system, discusses the relationship between the immune system, the brain, and behavior, and presents previously-identified immune system abnormalities in ASD, specifically addressing the role of cytokines in these aberrations. The roles and identification of biomarkers are also addressed, particularly with respect to cytokine profiles in ASD.

  6. STUDY ABOUT THE INCIDENCE OF HEARING-SPEAKING DISORDERS IN A POPULATION WITH MENTAL DEFICIENCY

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    Ioana Mihaela Tomulescu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is about the incidence of hearing-speaking disorders in a population with mental deficiency. We studied 596 children interned in Neurology and Psychiatry Clinical Hospital of Oradea during the 1999 - 2001 period. In 596 children, 393 presented different types of mental deficiency. The most frequent disorders observed are hearing loss or deafness, deaf-mutism, mutism and speaking retardation. Also, we related an increased frequency in rural area and in group of children with severe mental deficiency.

  7. The role of nuclear medicine in the staging and management of human immune deficiency virus infection and associated diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankrah, Alfred O.; Sathekge, Mike [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Pretoria (South Africa); Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Klein, Hans; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O. [University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    Human immune deficiency virus (HIV) is a leading cause of death. It attacks the immune system, thereby rendering the infected host susceptible to many HIV-associated infections, malignancies and neurocognitive disorders. The altered immune system affects the way the human host responds to disease, resulting in atypical presentation of these disorders. This presents a diagnostic challenge and the clinician must use all diagnostic avenues available to diagnose and manage these conditions. The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has markedly reduced the mortality associated with HIV infection but has also brought in its wake problems associated with adverse effects or drug interaction and may even modulate some of the HIV-associated disorders to the detriment of the infected human host. Nuclear medicine techniques allow non-invasive visualisation of tissues in the body. By using this principle, pathophysiology in the body can be targeted and the treatment of diseases can be monitored. Being a functional imaging modality, it is able to detect diseases at the molecular level, and thus it has increased our understanding of the immunological changes in the infected host at different stages of the HIV infection. It also detects pathological changes much earlier than conventional imaging based on anatomical changes. This is important in the immunocompromised host as in some of the associated disorders a delay in diagnosis may have dire consequences. Nuclear medicine has played a huge role in the management of many HIV-associated disorders in the past and continues to help in the diagnosis, prognosis, staging, monitoring and assessing the response to treatment of many HIV-associated disorders. As our understanding of the molecular basis of disease increases nuclear medicine is poised to play an even greater role. In this review we highlight the functional basis of the clinicopathological correlation of HIV from a metabolic view and discuss how the use of

  8. Meningitis and stridor in advanced Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidoo P

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available P Naidoo, D Pillay, S SamanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Port Shepstone Regional Hospital, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South AfricaAbstract: A 37-year-old female presented confused with a preceding history of severe headache. After clinical examination and investigations, she was diagnosed with disseminated tuberculosis (including central nervous system involvement, and Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Her hospital stay was complicated. She developed stridor and a cerebrovascular accident with left hemiplegia. She died approximately 2 weeks after admission. The potential causes of her stridor included a mediastinal mass or a central mechanism secondary to tuberculosis meningitis. Limited resources precluded definitive imaging of the chest to rule out a mediastinal mass. Further, an autopsy was not done. Despite these limitations, this case is unique because it reports the presence of both stridor and tuberculosis meningitis in an adult patient.Keywords: Human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, meningitis, stridor, tuberculosis

  9. Immune deficiency in Ataxia-Telangiectasia: a longitudinal study of 44 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, C; Davies, G; Taylor, M; Anderson, M; Bainbridge, S; Tighe, P; McDermott, E M

    2014-05-01

    Ataxia-Telangiectasia (A-T) is a genetic condition leading to neurological defects and immune deficiency. The nature of the immune deficiency is highly variable, and in some cases causes significant morbidity and mortality due to recurrent sinopulmonary infections. Although the neurological defects in A-T are progressive, the natural history of the immune deficiency in A-T has not been evaluated formally. In this study we analyse the clinical history and immunological data in 44 patients with A-T who attended the National Ataxia-Telangiectasia clinic in Nottingham between 2001 and 2011. Using patient medical records and Nottingham University Hospitals (NUH) National Health Service Trust medical IT systems, data regarding clinical history, use of immunoglobulin replacement therapy, total immunoglobulin levels, specific antibody levels and lymphocyte subset counts were obtained. T cell receptor spectratyping results in some patients were already available and, where possible, repeat blood samples were collected for analysis. This study shows that subtle quantitative changes in certain immunological parameters such as lymphocyte subset counts may occur in patients with A-T over time. However, in general, for the majority of patients the severity of immune deficiency (both clinically and in terms of immunological blood markers) does not seem to deteriorate significantly with time. This finding serves to inform the long-term management of this cohort of patients because, if recurrent respiratory tract infections present later in life, then other contributory factors (e.g. cough/swallowing difficulties, underlying lung disease) should be investigated aggressively. Our findings also offer some form of reassurance for parents of children with A-T, which is otherwise a progressively severely debilitating condition. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Audiological and Ontological Findings in Acquired Immune-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS

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    Farzaneh Vadoudfam

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune-deficiency syndrome. Head and neck are the most common sites in contamination with this virus. HIV can affect outer, middle and inner parts of the ear. Changing in the color of the skin, effusion, infection and sudden hearing loss are some types of the audiological and ontological findings in such patients.

  11. Meningitis and stridor in advanced Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Naidoo P; Pillay D; Saman S

    2013-01-01

    P Naidoo, D Pillay, S SamanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Port Shepstone Regional Hospital, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South AfricaAbstract: A 37-year-old female presented confused with a preceding history of severe headache. After clinical examination and investigations, she was diagnosed with disseminated tuberculosis (including central nervous system involvement), and Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Her hospital stay was complicated. She developed stri...

  12. Suspected primary immune deficiency in a Donge de Bordeaux dog : short communication

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    R.G. Lobetti

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A young Donge de Bordeaux dog was presented with chronic intermittent antibiotic responsive gastrointestinal and respiratory disease. Further evaluation showed bacterial lymphadenitis, bacterial tracheitis, normal white cell and differential cell counts, hypogammaglobulinaemia, and the absence of B-lymphocytes but the presence of T-lymphocytes in the lymphoid tissue stained with lymphocyte markers. As the dog came from a narrow genetic base, with related dogs showing similar clinical signs, possible B-cell congenital immune deficiency was suspected.

  13. Nutritional zinc deficiency, immune capacity and malaria : a study on mediators of immunity to malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbugi, E.V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis aimed at investigating the role of genetic and nutritional factors that affect the immune response to malaria in Tanzanian children. The introductory chapter (Chapter 1) reviews the importance of nutritional deficiencies, particularly of zinc, and presents the hypothesis that such defici

  14. Recollection deficiencies in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakeford, Justine L; Edelstyn, Nicola M J; Oyebode, Femi; Srivastava, Shrikant; Calthorpe, William R; Mukherjee, Tirthankar

    2010-02-28

    Neuropsychological research suggests that recognition memory (RM) and recall memory are impaired in patients with a major depressive disorder or a dysphoric mood state. This study examines the proposal that abnormalities in recollection (a form of recall) result from a breakdown in frontal strategic memory processes involved in encoding and retrieval, and executive functions linked to reality monitoring, planning, problem-solving, reasoning and decision-making. We investigated two predictions arising from this theory. Firstly, patients diagnosed with a major depressive disorder (MDD) will display a dissociation between (deficient) recollection and (preserved) familiarity. Secondly, if recollection impairments are indicative of a breakdown in prefrontal strategic memory processes which are dependent, at least in part, on executive processes, then an explicit correlational approach predicts that recollection will be positively associated with the severity of executive dysfunction in MDD patients. The remember/know paradigm was used to investigate RM for words and neutral faces in 16 MDD patients and 16 healthy volunteers, matched for age, gender and estimates of premorbid IQ. Measures of executive function included working memory, reasoning and decision-making. Applying the Dual Process Signal Detection interpretation of the remember/know data, the MDD group displayed significant impairments in RM and recollection rates for both verbal and neutral facial memoranda. In contrast, familiarity-aware rates were preserved. There was no evidence of executive dysfunction in the patient group, and little evidence that recollection rates correlated with executive function. Furthermore, a single process signal detection approach suggested that the MDD patients displayed a reduction in sensitivity for RM and remember rates but not know responses. The criteria for detecting studied from unstudied items, and remembering from knowing, were the same in both patient and healthy

  15. Vitamin D deficiency in postmenopausal women with pelvic floor disorders

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    Preethi Raja Navaneethan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Findings suggest association of vitamin D deficiency and PFD in postmenopausal women. In addition, postmenopausal women have a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency indicating a need to evaluate vitamin D levels in these women.

  16. Immune deficiency vs. immune excess in inflammatory bowel diseases-STAT3 as a rheo-STAT of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have provided many genetic alterations, conferring susceptibility to multifactorial polygenic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Yet, how specific genetic alterations functionally affect intestinal inflammation often remains elusive. It is noteworthy that a large overlap of genes involved in immune deficiencies with those conferring inflammatory bowel disease risk has been noted. This has provided new arguments for the debate on whether inflammatory bowel disease arises from either an excess or a deficiency in the immune system. In this review, we highlight the functional effect of an inflammatory bowel disease-risk allele, which cannot be deduced from genome-wide association studies data alone. As exemplified by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), we show that a single gene can have a plethora of effects in various cell types of the gut. These effects may individually contribute to the restoration of intestinal homeostasis on the one hand or pave the way for excessive immunopathology on the other, as an inflammatory "rheo-STAT".

  17. Role of medical resource level in iodine deficiency disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Liang, Zhen; Luo, Yong-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs) refer to a series of diseases caused by the human body's insufficient iodine intake. Edible salt became iodized in China in 1996, which yielded remarkable results. We have known that IDDs is associated with iodine in the human body, but it is not clear whether IDDs is related to medical resource level. We collected the number of IDDs cases and an index for the level of medical resource from 31 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities directly under the central government in China. All data came from the China Statistical Yearbook of Health and Family Planning issued in 2013 by the Peking Union Medical College Publishing House. Data standardization and linear regression analysis were used. The results showed that IDDs correlated with the number of beds in medical and health institutions, number of medical health personnel, number of medical and health institutions, total health expenditure, average health expenditure per capita, medical insurance for urban resident and new rural cooperative medical rural residents (P medical and health institutions and government health expenditure for these institutions. Based on the experimental data, we concluded that IDDs had a positive connection with the medical resource level, and basic and rural areas had a more significant association with IDDs. This analysis provides new and explicit ideas for iodine prevention and control work in China.

  18. Dietary deficiency of cobalamin presented solely as schizoaffective disorder in a lacto-vegetarian adolescent

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    Somashekarappa Dhananjaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalamin is an important nutrient. It is not synthesized in human body and supplied only in nonvegetarian diet. Its deficiency reported with range of psychiatric disorders. Only four pediatric cases have been reported as psychiatric disorders. Authors report a case of dietary deficiency of cobalamin presenting solely as schizoaffective disorder without hematological/neurological manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of cobalamin deficiency is an opportunity to reverse pathophysiology. This case highlights the importance of diet history and serum cobalamin level in atypical psychiatric presentations.

  19. Dietary Deficiency of Cobalamin Presented Solely as Schizoaffective Disorder in a Lacto-Vegetarian Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhananjaya, Somashekarappa; Manjunatha, Narayana; Manjunatha, Rajashekaaiah; Kumar, Seetharamarao Udaya

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin is an important nutrient. It is not synthesized in human body and supplied only in nonvegetarian diet. Its deficiency reported with range of psychiatric disorders. Only four pediatric cases have been reported as psychiatric disorders. Authors report a case of dietary deficiency of cobalamin presenting solely as schizoaffective disorder without hematological/neurological manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of cobalamin deficiency is an opportunity to reverse pathophysiology. This case highlights the importance of diet history and serum cobalamin level in atypical psychiatric presentations.

  20. Brief Report: Childhood Disintegrative Disorder as a Likely Manifestation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Subodh, B. N.; Parakh, Preeti; Lahariya, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Childhood disintegrative disorder is a rare disorder, characterized by regression of acquired skills after a period of normal development. The case of childhood disintegrative disorder presented here was found to have vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia on extensive evaluation to find a probable cause for regression. This case…

  1. Brief Report: Childhood Disintegrative Disorder as a Likely Manifestation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Subodh, B. N.; Parakh, Preeti; Lahariya, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Childhood disintegrative disorder is a rare disorder, characterized by regression of acquired skills after a period of normal development. The case of childhood disintegrative disorder presented here was found to have vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia on extensive evaluation to find a probable cause for regression. This case…

  2. Immunization with lipopolysaccharide-deficient whole cells provides protective immunity in an experimental mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Pulido, Marina R; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010), one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii.

  3. Microbial Dysbiosis in Common Variable Immune Deficiencies: Evidence, Causes, and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbers, Roos-Marijn; Nierkens, Stefan; van Laar, Jacob M; Bogaert, Debby; Leavis, Helen L

    2017-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an immune disorder that not only causes increased susceptibility to infection, but also to inflammatory complications such as autoimmunity, lymphoid proliferation, malignancy, and granulomatous disease. Recent findings implicate the microbiome as a driver of this systemic immune dysregulation. Here, we critically review the current evidence for a role of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of CVID immune dysregulation, and describe the possible immunologic mechanisms behind causes and consequences of microbial dysbiosis in CVID. We integrate this evidence into a model describing a role for the gut microbiota in the maintenance of inflammation and immune dysregulation in CVID, and suggest research strategies to contribute to the development of new diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets.

  4. Early gestation screening of pregnant women for iodine deficiency disorders and iron deficiency in urban centre in Vadodara, Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K; Nair, S; Khade, C; Rajan, M G R

    2014-02-01

    Pregnancy is a special condition where many metabolic changes may occur because of increased requirement of essential micronutrients such as iron and iodine. Foetal thyroid starts producing its own thyroid hormones after 12 weeks of gestation. Therefore, the first trimester is very crucial for meeting thyroid hormone requirements of the mother and foetus. Iodine deficiency and iron deficiency may affect mental and physical growth of the foetus. Hence, it is very important to establish a programme on the screening of pregnant women for thyroid dysfunction tests along with established iron status assessment. Thus, the study was aimed to screen the pregnant women for iodine deficiency disorders and iron deficiency during early gestation, situational analysis on thyroid insufficiency and iron deficiency in pregnant women (gestational age iron deficiency was 91%. Screening programme for iodine deficiency during early gestation should be implemented along with the existing programme of haemoglobin estimation at first prenatal visit. This would help prevent damage to the developing brain and growth of the foetus and also to trace at-risk pregnant women.

  5. PARALYTIC DISORDERS ASSOCIATED WITH PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY IN BUFFALOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Habib, G. Jabbar1, M. M. Siddiqui and Z. Shah2

    2004-01-01

    both P supplementation and improvement in nutritive value of range grass hay. Feeding of molasses-urea blocks fortified with deficient minerals is suggested as appropriate strategic supplement for correcting the health disorder in buffaloes of the Buner area.

  6. Leptin, resistin and visfatin: the missing link between endocrine metabolic disorders and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is still regarded as a principle site for lipid storage and mobilizing tissue with an important role in the control of energy homeostasis. Additionally, adipose tissue-secreted hormones such as leptin, visfatin, resistin, apelin, omentin, sex steroids, and various growth factors are now regarded as a functional part of the endocrine system. These hormones also play an important role in the immune system. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested the complex role of adipocyte-derived hormones in immune system and inflammation. Adipokines mediate beneficial and detrimental effects in immunity and inflammation. Many of these adipocytokines have a physiological role in metabolism. The uncontrolled secretions of several adipocytokines were associated with the stimulation of inflammatory processes leading to metabolic disorders including obesity, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Obesity leads to the dysfunction of adipocytes andcorrelated with the imbalance of adipokines levels. In obese and diabetic conditions, leptin deficiency inhibited the Jak/Stat3/PI3K and insulin pathways. In this review, ample evidence exists to support the recognition of the adipocyte’s role in various tissues and pathologies. New integral insights may add dimensions to translate any potential agents into the future clinical armamentarium of chronic endocrine metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Functional balance of both adipocytes and immune cells is important to exert their effects on endocrine metabolic disorders; furthermore, adipose tissue should be renamed not only as a functional part of the endocrine system but also as a new part of the immune system. PMID:23634778

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Using drug from mathematical perceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Amar Nath; Saha, Shubhankar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-11-12

    Entry of acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus into the host immune cell involves the participation of various components of host and viral cell unit. These components may be categorized as attachment of the viral surface envelope protein subunit, gp120, to the CD4(+) receptor and chemokine coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, present on T cell surface. The viral fusion protein, gp41, the second cleaved subunit of Env undergoes reconfiguration and the membrane fusion reaction itself. Since the CD4(+) T cell population is actively involved; the ultimate outcome of human immunodeficiency virus infection is total collapse of the host immune system. Mathematical modeling of the stages in viral membrane protein-host cell receptor-coreceptor interaction and the effect of antibody vaccine on the viral entry into the susceptible host cell has been carried out using as impulsive differential equations. We have studied the effect of antibody vaccination and determined analytically the threshold value of drug dosage and dosing interval for optimum levels of infection. We have also investigated the effect of perfect adherence of drug dose on the immune cell count in extreme cases and observed that systematic drug dosage of the immune cells leads to longer and improved lives.

  8. Attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder and reward deficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Blum

    2008-11-01

    form of a gene (DRD2 A1 allele that prevents the expression of the normal laying down of dopamine receptors in brain reward sites. This gene, and others involved in neurophysiological processing of specific neurotransmitters, have been associated with defi cient functions and predispose individuals to have a high risk for addictive, impulsive, and compulsive behavioral propensities. It has been proposed that genetic variants of dopaminergic genes and other “reward genes” are important common determinants of reward deficiency syndrome (RDS, which we hypothesize includes ADHD as a behavioral subtype. We further hypothesize that early diagnosis through genetic polymorphic identification in combination with DNA-based customized nutraceutical administration to young children may attenuate behavioral symptoms associated with ADHD. Moreover, it is concluded that dopamine and serotonin releasers might be useful therapeutic adjuncts for the treatment of other RDS behavioral subtypes, including addictions.Keywords: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, genes, reward dependence, reward deficiency syndrome, treatment, neuropsychological deficits

  9. Interleukin-22 alleviates metabolic disorders and restores mucosal immunity in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Ota, Naruhisa; Manzanillo, Paolo; Kates, Lance; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Eidenschenk, Celine; Zhang, Juan; Lesch, Justin; Lee, Wyne P; Ross, Jed; Diehl, Lauri; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Kolumam, Ganesh; Ouyang, Wenjun

    2014-10-09

    The connection between an altered gut microbiota and metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease is well established. Defects in preserving the integrity of the mucosal barriers can result in systemic endotoxaemia that contributes to chronic low-grade inflammation, which further promotes the development of metabolic syndrome. Interleukin (IL)-22 exerts essential roles in eliciting antimicrobial immunity and maintaining mucosal barrier integrity within the intestine. Here we investigate the connection between IL-22 and metabolic disorders. We find that the induction of IL-22 from innate lymphoid cells and CD4(+) T cells is impaired in obese mice under various immune challenges, especially in the colon during infection with Citrobacter rodentium. While innate lymphoid cell populations are largely intact in obese mice, the upregulation of IL-23, a cytokine upstream of IL-22, is compromised during the infection. Consequently, these mice are susceptible to C. rodentium infection, and both exogenous IL-22 and IL-23 are able to restore the mucosal host defence. Importantly, we further unveil unexpected functions of IL-22 in regulating metabolism. Mice deficient in IL-22 receptor and fed with high-fat diet are prone to developing metabolic disorders. Strikingly, administration of exogenous IL-22 in genetically obese leptin-receptor-deficient (db/db) mice and mice fed with high-fat diet reverses many of the metabolic symptoms, including hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance. IL-22 shows diverse metabolic benefits, as it improves insulin sensitivity, preserves gut mucosal barrier and endocrine functions, decreases endotoxaemia and chronic inflammation, and regulates lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissues. In summary, we identify the IL-22 pathway as a novel target for therapeutic intervention in metabolic diseases.

  10. Selenium Deficiency Attenuates Chicken Duodenal Mucosal Immunity via Activation of the NF-κb Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Qu, Yanpeng; Wang, Jianfa; Wu, Rui

    2016-08-01

    Selenium (Se) deficiency can cause intestinal mucosal inflammation, which is related to activation of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of inflammatory response in chicken duodenal mucosa caused by Se deficiency and its relationship with the NF-κB signaling pathway remain elusive. In this study, we firstly obtained Se-deficient chickens bred with 0.01 mg/kg Se and the normal chickens bred with 0.4 mg/kg Se for 35 days. Then, NF-κB signaling pathway, secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), inflammatory cytokines, oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione activities were determined. The results showed that Se deficiency obviously enhanced p50, p65, and p65 DNA-binding activities. The phosphorylation of IκB-α and phosphorylation of kappa-B kinase subunit alpha (IKKα) and IKKα were elevated, but IκB-α was decreased (P mucosal immunity via activation of NF-κB signaling pathway regulated by redox activity, which suggested that Se is a crucial host factor involved in regulating inflammation.

  11. Recent advances in transplantation for primary immune deficiency diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena, M Teresa; Nelson, Robert P

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapeutic option for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a group of diseases which otherwise carry life expectancies that are of limited duration and quality. Survival following HCT for SCID has improved from approximately 23 to 91 % over the last 40 years. Success with SCID prompted efforts to apply HCT to the therapeutic challenge of well over 20 molecularly defined primary immune deficiency diseases (PID). Such success is due to both early recognition of PIDs and advances in the field of transplantation. Such advances include high-resolution HLA DNA donor-recipient matching, expansion of donor sources, better tolerated conditioning, new antibiotics, and wider availability. International collaborative efforts have provided patients and caregivers information that permit better treatment decisions now, and direct clinicians and investigators to ensure progress in the future. Pioneers in screening for SCID have taken steps to correct the fundamental challenge to successful treatment, which is the rapid discovery and characterization of cases and offering the transplant option to an affected child early in life; blood spot testing for T and B cell receptor quantification is now available to a growing fraction of newborns. Organizations including the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium in the USA, The European Society for Primary Immunodeficiency, the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, the United States Immunodeficiency Network, the Immune Deficiency Foundation, and the Jeffrey Modell Foundation are contributing mightily to increase awareness and standardize optimal utilization to the benefit of patients. This review will update the allergist-immunologist concerning disease presentations, indications for transplantation, methodologies, conditioning regimens, and clinical outcomes for patients with PID for which timely HCT is

  12. Immune disorders induced by exposure to pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarczyk, Justyna; Pekar, Joanna; Nieradko-Iwanicka, Barbara

    2017-06-08

    Pyrethroids are biocides, which belong to the third generation of insecticides. They are used as biocides, insecticides and medicines. These agents react selectively, because they are less harmful to birds and mammals (due to poor intestinal absorption and rapid detoxification in the body of homeothermic organisms) and they are poisonous for fish and insects. The aim of the article is to present the current state of knowledge on the effects of pyrethroids on the immune system based on the latest scientific research. The mechanism of action of pyrethroids include the delaying closure of voltage- sensitive sodium and chloride channels (including GABA- dependent channels). These compounds are neurotoxic. Studies have shown that they cause numerous immune disorders contributing to lowering of immunity in humans and animals. Exposure to pyrethroids can cause inhibition of proliferation of peripheral blood leukocytes and reducing the concentration of IgG immunolgobulines. They also cause reduced macrophages and decrease in interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin 8 (IL-8), interleukin 12p70 (IL-12p70), and interferon γ (IFN-γ). Some of these compounds cause increase of liver weight and increase of bone marrow cellularity, and may induce apoptosis of the thymus. Pyrethroids can cause allergies and asthma. Their immunosuppressive effects can impair host resistance against infections. Exposure to these compounds can also contribute to induction of the cancer, especially in patients with impaired immune function.

  13. Vitamin d deficiency in a multiethnic healthy control cohort and altered immune response in vitamin D deficient European-American healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Ritterhouse

    Full Text Available In recent years, vitamin D has been shown to possess a wide range of immunomodulatory effects. Although there is extensive amount of research on vitamin D, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or the mechanism by which vitamin D regulates the human immune system. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency and the relationship between vitamin D and the immune system in healthy individuals.Healthy individuals (n = 774 comprised of European-Americans (EA, n = 470, African-Americans (AA, n = 125, and Native Americans (NA, n = 179 were screened for 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] levels by ELISA. To identify the most noticeable effects of vitamin D on the immune system, 20 EA individuals with severely deficient (24.8 ng/mL vitamin D levels were matched and selected for further analysis. Serum cytokine level measurement, immune cell phenotyping, and phosphoflow cytometry were performed.Vitamin D sufficiency was observed in 37.5% of the study cohort. By multivariate analysis, AA, NA, and females with a high body mass index (BMI, >30 demonstrate higher rates of vitamin D deficiency (p<0.05. Individuals with vitamin D deficiency had significantly higher levels of serum GM-CSF (p = 0.04, decreased circulating activated CD4+ (p = 0.04 and CD8+ T (p = 0.04 cell frequencies than individuals with sufficient vitamin D levels.A large portion of healthy individuals have vitamin D deficiency. These individuals have altered T and B cell responses, indicating that the absence of sufficient vitamin D levels could result in undesirable cellular and molecular alterations ultimately contributing to immune dysregulation.

  14. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  15. Bone marrow transplantation for CVID-like humoral immune deficiency associated with red cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayour, Elias J; Mousallem, Talal; Van Mater, David; Wang, Endi; Martin, Paul; Buckley, Rebecca H; Barfield, Raymond C

    2016-10-01

    Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have a higher incidence of autoimmune disease, which may mark the disease onset; however, anemia secondary to pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon presenting feature. Here, we describe a case of CVID-like humoral immune deficiency in a child who initially presented with red cell aplasia and ultimately developed progressive bone marrow failure. Although bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been associated with high mortality in CVID, our patient was successfully treated with a matched sibling BMT and engrafted with >98% donor chimerism and the development of normal antibody titers to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. CD147: a novel modulator of inflammatory and immune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X; Song, Z; Zhang, S; Nanda, A; Li, G

    2014-01-01

    CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein, is expressed on all leukocytes, platelets, and endothelial cells. It has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological activities through interacting with multiple partners, including cyclophilins, monocarboxylate transporters, Caveolin-1, and integrins. While CD147 is best known as a potent inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (hence also called EMMPRIN), it can also function as a key mediator of inflammatory and immune responses. Increased expression of CD147 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, such as asthma-mediated lung inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Therapeutic targeting of CD147 has yielded encouraging effects in a number of experimental models of human diseases, suggesting CD147 as an attractive target for treatment of inflammation-related diseases. Here we review the current understanding of CD147 expression and functions in inflammatory and immune responses and potential implications for treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  17. Pertactin deficient Bordetella pertussis present a better fitness in mice immunized with an acellular pertussis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegerle, N; Dore, G; Guiso, N

    2014-11-20

    Bordetella pertussis is the etiologic agent of whooping cough and has been the target of vaccination for over fifty years. The latest strategies include the use of acellular pertussis vaccines that induce specific immunity against few virulence factors amongst which pertactin is included in three and five component acellular pertussis vaccines. Recently, it has been reported that B. pertussis clinical isolates loose the production of this adhesin in regions reaching high vaccine coverage with vaccines targeting this virulence factor. We here demonstrate that isolates not producing pertactin are capable of sustaining longer infection as compared to pertactin producing isolates in an in vivo model of acellular pertussis immunization. Loosing pertactin production might thus provide a selective advantage to these isolates in this background, which could account for the upraise in prevalence of these pertactin deficient isolates in the population.

  18. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by dream-enacting behaviour and impaired motor inhibition during rapid eye movement sleep. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, but also reported in narcolepsy with cataplexy....... Most narcolepsy with cataplexy patients lack the sleep-wake, and rapid eye movement sleep, motor-regulating hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. In contrast, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and hypocretin deficiency are rare in narcolepsy without cataplexy. We hypothesized...... that rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder coexists with cataplexy in narcolepsy due to hypocretin deficiency. In our study, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was diagnosed by the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2nd edition) criteria in 63 narcolepsy patients with or without...

  19. Prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders among school children of Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandav, C S; Mallik, A; Anand, K; Pandav, S; Karmarkar, M G

    1997-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs) are an important cause of mental handicap and poor educability of children. Though Delhi does not lie in the classical Himalayan goitre belt, it has been shown that IDD was endemic in Delhi. Studies of school children in Delhi reported a total goitre rate of 55% which indicates severe endemicity. The sale of uniodized salt has been banned in Delhi since July 1989. This study was done five years later to assess the impact of this measure on IDD prevalence in Delhi. A cross-sectional study was done among class VI students studying in government schools of Delhi. A complete list of government middle schools in Delhi was obtained and 30 were selected on the basis of 'probability proportion to size'. A sample size of 1200 was decided based on an expected prevalence of 50% with 5% error and design effect of three. All children in class VI of each school were clinically examined by a trained doctor for the presence of goitre and casual urine samples were collected in capped plastic tubes. The urinary iodine estimation was done by the wet ashing method. The total goitre rate was 20.5%. If the results were limited to children in the age group of 10-12 years it was 19.7%. The urinary iodine was less than the recommended 100 micrograms/L of urine in 23.6% of the children; 7.6% had no iodine in the urine. It is possible that some children could have substituted water in place of urine. The median urinary iodine level was 198 micrograms/L of urine. The study showed that IDD continues to be prevalent in mild endemic proportions. Compared to the results of previous surveys, the IDD rates have declined in the last few years. However, it continues to be an important public health problem in Delhi. It is essential to monitor the iodine content of salt on a regular basis. IDD control activities should be strengthened in Delhi and repeat surveys should be done every 3-5 years to monitor the progress achieved in eliminating IDD.

  20. Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) in Burie and Womberma Districts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent findings show that both endemic and non-endemic areas have high goiter ... iodine level and concentration of iodized salt is dietary iodine deficiency. ... on adverse effects of IDD and benefits of iodine nutrition is highly recommended.

  1. Improving cellular therapy for primary immune deficiency diseases: recognition, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Puck, Jennifer M; Buckley, Rebecca H; Candotti, Fabio; Conley, Mary Ellen; Fleisher, Thomas A; Gaspar, H Bobby; Kohn, Donald B; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Rizzo, J Douglas; Roifman, Chaim M; Small, Trudy N; Shearer, William T

    2009-12-01

    More than 20 North American academic centers account for the majority of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) procedures for primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs), with smaller numbers performed at additional sites. Given the importance of a timely diagnosis of these rare diseases and the diversity of practice sites, there is a need for guidance as to best practices in management of patients with PIDs before, during, and in follow-up for definitive treatment. In this conference report of immune deficiency experts and HCT physicians who care for patients with PIDs, we present expert guidance for (1) PID diagnoses that are indications for HCT, including severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), combined immunodeficiency disease, and other non-SCID diseases; (2) the critical importance of a high degree of suspicion of the primary care physician and timeliness of diagnosis for PIDs; (3) the need for rapid referral to an immune deficiency expert, center with experience in HCT, or both for patients with PIDs; (4) medical management of a child with suspicion of SCID/combined immunodeficiency disease while confirming the diagnosis, including infectious disease management and workup; (5) the posttransplantation follow-up visit schedule; (6) antimicrobial prophylaxis after transplantation, including gamma globulin administration; and (7) important indications for return to the transplantation center after discharge. Finally, we discuss the role of high-quality databases in treatment of PIDs and HCT as an element of the infrastructure that will be needed for productive multicenter clinical trials in these rare diseases.

  2. Impact on infants' cognitive development of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency disorder and common mental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thach Duc Tran

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA and common mental disorders (CMD on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. METHODS: A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12-20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb 30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants' Bayley cognitive scores. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries.

  3. Movement disorders in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome respond to the modified Atkins diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Mewasingh, L.; Verbeek, M.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Movement disorders are a prominent feature of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS). First-choice treatment is a ketogenic diet, but compliance is poor. We have investigated the effect of the modified Atkins diet as an alternative treatment for movement disorders in

  4. Movement disorders in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome respond to the modified Atkins diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Mewasingh, L.; Verbeek, M.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Movement disorders are a prominent feature of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS). First-choice treatment is a ketogenic diet, but compliance is poor. We have investigated the effect of the modified Atkins diet as an alternative treatment for movement disorders in

  5. Is vitamin D deficiency involved in the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno-Reyes Rodrigo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 20–30% of persons with HIV infection, especially those living in countries with limited resources, experience an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS after starting antiretroviral treatment. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, is a key player in the clearance of pathogens and influences the level of inflammation and macrophage activation. Presentation of the hypothesis We hypothesize that low availability of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, either due to vitamin D deficiency or due to polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor or in its activating/inactivating enzymes, contributes to the appearance of IRIS. Furthermore, drug interactions with the enzymatic pathways of vitamin D could favour the development of IRIS. Testing the hypothesis Our hypothesis could be explored by a case-control study to assess the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral treatment who develop and do not develop IRIS. Implications of the hypothesis If the role of vitamin D in IRIS is confirmed, we would be able to screen patients at risk for IRIS by screening for vitamin D deficiency. After confirmation by means of a clinical trial, vitamin D supplementation could be a cheap and safe way to reduce the incidence of IRIS.

  6. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  7. Mannose Binding Lectin Deficiency and Clinical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Erken

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity consists of macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer cells, mucosal immunuglobulins and the comlement system. Mannose binding lectin (MBL takes part in innate immunity through opsonisation and complement activation. MBL deficiency is associated with some infections and autoimmune disorders. However some studies indicate that MBL deficiency alone is not essential for immunity but it may intensify the clinic picture of an immune deficiency that already exists. This article refers to clincal studies related to MBL and brings up the clinical importance of MBL deficiency. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(4.000: 565-574

  8. Markedly impaired humoral immune response in mice deficient in complement receptors 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, H; Holers, V M; Li, B; Fung, Y; Mariathasan, S; Goellner, J; Strauss-Schoenberger, J; Karr, R W; Chaplin, D D

    1996-04-16

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35) and complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) have been implicated as regulators of B-cell activation. We explored the role of these receptors in the development of humoral immunity by generating CR1- and CR2-deficient mice using gene-targeting techniques. These mice have normal basal levels of IgM and of IgG isotypes. B- and T-cell development are overtly normal. Nevertheless, B-cell responses to low and high doses of a T-cell-dependent antigen are impaired with decreased titers of antigen-specific IgM and IgG isotypes. This defect is not complete because there is still partial activation of B lymphocytes during the primary immune response, with generation of splenic germinal centers and a detectable, although reduced, secondary antibody response. These data suggest that certain T-dependent antigens manifest an absolute dependence on complement receptors for the initiation of a normally robust immune response.

  9. [The association between iron deficiency and learning disorders in preschoolers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Sigler, D; Colomer Revuelta, J; Barona, C; Momparler, P; Colomer Revuelta, C

    1992-01-01

    With the aim preventing future problems of underachievement at school, we studied the possible relationship between learning difficulties and iron deficiency in nursery-school children. To do this, we determined the prevalence of iron deficiency and the prevalence or learning difficulties in the different areas of mental development in a sample of 136 nursery school children coming from the Alaquàs public school (Valencia), aged between four and five years. Their nutritional state and ferric state, socioeconomic and cultural level, and psychomotor development were evaluated. All the children were in a good nutritional state, coming from homogeneous families as regards their socio-cultural level and being divided into two groups as regards their economic situation. The iron deficiency prevalence was 17.6% in stage I (ferritina sérica < 12 ng/l) and 22.8% in stage III (anemia ferropénica). The coefficient for overall development was 85.95, the lowest marks being in the speech area. A positive association (prevalence ratio = 2; IC 95% = 1.1-8.3) between iron deficiency in its III stage and changes in the specific area of analysis and synthesis.

  10. Conditional IL-4/IL-13-deficient mice reveal a critical role of innate immune cells for protective immunity against gastrointestinal helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeser, K; Schwartz, C; Voehringer, D

    2015-05-01

    Approximately one-third of the world population is infected with gastrointestinal helminths. Studies in mouse models have demonstrated that the cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 are essential for worm expulsion, but the critical cellular source of these cytokines is poorly defined. Here, we compared the immune response to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in wild-type, T cell-specific IL-4/IL-13-deficient and general IL-4/IL-13-deficient mice. We show that T cell-derived IL-4/IL-13 promoted T helper 2 (Th2) polarization in a paracrine manner, differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages, and tissue recruitment of innate effector cells. However, innate IL-4/IL-13 played the critical role for induction of goblet cell hyperplasia and secretion of effector molecules like Mucin5ac and RELMβ in the small intestine. Surprisingly, T cell-specific IL-4/IL-13-deficient and wild-type mice cleared the parasite with comparable efficiency, whereas IL-4/IL-13-deficient mice showed impaired expulsion. These findings demonstrate that IL-4/IL-13 produced by cells of the innate immune system is required and sufficient to initiate effective type 2 immune responses resulting in protective immunity against N. brasiliensis.

  11. Nutritional zinc deficiency, immune capacity and malaria : a study on mediators of immunity to malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbugi, E.V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis aimed at investigating the role of genetic and nutritional factors that affect the immune response to malaria in Tanzanian children. The introductory chapter (Chapter 1) reviews the importance of nutritional deficiencies, particularly of zinc, and presents the hypothesis that such

  12. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Deficiency Inhibits Autoimmune Arthritis in Mice but Fails to Block Immune Complex-Mediated Inflammatory Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhoff, Lindsay E; Barron, Bridgette L; Johnson, Elizabeth M; Bonami, Rachel H; Maseda, Damian; Fensterheim, Benjamin A; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S; Crofford, Leslie J; Kendall, Peggy L

    2016-08-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a B cell signaling protein that also contributes to innate immunity. BTK inhibitors prevent autoimmune arthritis but have off-target effects, and the mechanisms of protection remain unknown. We undertook these studies using genetic deletion to investigate the role of BTK in adaptive and innate immune responses that drive inflammatory arthritis. BTK-deficient K/BxN mice were generated to study the role of BTK in a spontaneous model that requires both adaptive and innate immunity. The K/BxN serum-transfer model was used to bypass the adaptive system and elucidate the role of BTK in innate immune contributions to arthritis. BTK deficiency conferred disease protection to K/BxN mice, confirming outcomes of BTK inhibitors. B lymphocytes were profoundly reduced, more than in other models of BTK deficiency. Subset analysis revealed loss of B cells at all developmental stages. Germinal center B cells were also decreased, with downstream effects on numbers of follicular helper T cells and greatly reduced autoantibodies. In contrast, total IgG was only mildly decreased. Strikingly, and in contrast to small molecule inhibitors, BTK deficiency had no effect in the serum-transfer model of arthritis. BTK contributes to autoimmune arthritis primarily through its role in B cell signaling and not through innate immune components. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Immune signatures and disorder-specific patterns in a cross-disorder gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Simone; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Patel, Hamel; Lee, Sanghyuck; Dempster, David; Curtis, Charles; Paya-Cano, Jose; Murphy, Declan; Wilson, C. Ellie; Horder, Jamie; Mendez, M. Andreina; Asherson, Philip; Rivera, Margarita; Costello, Helen; Maltezos, Stefanos; Whitwell, Susannah; Pitts, Mark; Tye, Charlotte; Ashwood, Karen L.; Bolton, Patrick; Curran, Sarah; McGuffin, Peter; Dobson, Richard; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies point to overlap between neuropsychiatric disorders in symptomatology and genetic aetiology. Aims To systematically investigate genomics overlap between childhood and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Method Analysis of whole-genome blood gene expression and genetic risk scores of 318 individuals. Participants included individuals affected with adult ADHD (n = 93), childhood ADHD (n = 17), MDD (n = 63), ASD (n = 51), childhood dual diagnosis of ADHD–ASD (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 78). Results Weighted gene co-expression analysis results reveal disorder-specific signatures for childhood ADHD and MDD, and also highlight two immune-related gene co-expression modules correlating inversely with MDD and adult ADHD disease status. We find no significant relationship between polygenic risk scores and gene expression signatures. Conclusions Our results reveal disorder overlap and specificity at the genetic and gene expression level. They suggest new pathways contributing to distinct pathophysiology in psychiatric disorders and shed light on potential shared genomic risk factors. PMID:27151072

  14. Cobalamin deficiency results in severe metabolic disorder of serine and threonine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebara, S; Toyoshima, S; Matsumura, T; Adachi, S; Takenaka, S; Yamaji, R; Watanabe, F; Miyatake, K; Inui, H; Nakano, Y

    2001-12-05

    Dietary cobalamin (vitamin B12; Cbl) deficiency caused significant increases in plasma serine, threonine, glycine, alanine, tyrosine, lysine and histidine levels in rats. In particular, the serine and threonine levels were over five and eight times, respectively, higher in the Cbl-deficient rats than those in the sufficient controls. In addition, some amino acids, including serine and threonine, were excreted into urine at significantly higher levels in the deficient rats. When Cbl was supplemented into the deficient rats for 2 weeks, in coincidence with the disappearance of the urinary excretion of methylmalonic acid (an index of Cbl deficiency), the plasma serine and threonine levels were normalized. These results indicate that Cbl deficiency results in metabolic disorder of certain amino acids, including serine and threonine. The expression level of hepatic serine dehydratase (SDH), which catalyzes the conversion of serine and threonine to pyruvate and 2-oxobutyrate, respectively, was significantly lowered by Cbl deficiency, even though Cbl does not participate directly in the enzyme reaction. The SDH activity in the deficient rats was less than 20% of that in the sufficient controls, and was normalized 2 weeks after the Cbl supplementation. It is thus suggested that the decrease of the SDH expression relates closely with the abnormalities in the plasma and urinary levels of serine and threonine in the Cbl-deficient rats.

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    variables were analysed in relation to cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency with uni- and multivariate logistic/linear regression models, controlling for possible rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder biasing factors (age, gender, disease duration, previous anti-cataplexy medication). Only hypocretin......Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by dream-enacting behaviour and impaired motor inhibition during rapid eye movement sleep. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, but also reported in narcolepsy with cataplexy....... Most narcolepsy with cataplexy patients lack the sleep-wake, and rapid eye movement sleep, motor-regulating hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. In contrast, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and hypocretin deficiency are rare in narcolepsy without cataplexy. We hypothesized...

  16. Evolution of iodine deficiency disorders control program in India: A journey of 5,000 years

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrakant S Pandav

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) has been documented since around 5,000 years. However, geological factors like frequent glaciations, flooding, and changing of course of rivers has led to iodine deficiency in soil. As a result everyone remains at risk of IDD, if optimum intake of iodine is not sustained. Evolution of the IDD control program in India has been a dynamic process. The model of IDD control program in India provides important lessons for successful implementation of a national hea...

  17. Social capital of Iranian patients living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S K; Nedjat, S; Jabbari, H; Saiepour, N; Heris, M J

    2015-12-13

    This study investigated the social capital of Iranian patients living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the associated factors. In a cross-sectional study the Integrated Social Capital Questionnaire was filled by a sequential sample of 300 patients visiting a referral counselling centre in Tehran. The patients' social capital scores were around 50% in the trust, social cohesion, collective action and cooperation and political empowerment domains. The groups and networks membership domain scored the lowest (27.1%). In regression analysis, employment status was significantly associated with groups and networks membership; age, marital status and financial status were associated with collective action and cooperation; period of disease awareness and marital status affected social cohesion and inclusion; and having risky behaviour affected empowerment and political action. Efforts are needed to enhance the social capital of those patients living with AIDS who are younger, unemployed, divorced/widowed, with risky behaviours and shorter disease awareness.

  18. Light deficiency confers breast cancer risk by endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2012-09-01

    North-America and northern European countries exhibit the highest incidence rate of breast cancer, whereas women in southern regions are relatively protected. Immigrants from low cancer incidence regions to high-incidence areas might exhibit similarly higher or excessive cancer risk as compared with the inhabitants of their adoptive country. Additional cancer risk may be conferred by incongruence between their biological characteristics and foreign environment. Many studies established the racial/ethnic disparities in the risk and nature of female breast cancer in United States between African-American and Caucasian women. Mammary tumors in black women are diagnosed at earlier age, and are associated with higher rate of mortality as compared with cancers of white cases. Results of studies on these ethnic/racial differences in breast cancer incidence suggest that excessive pigmentation of dark skinned women results in a relative light-deficiency. Poor light exposure may explain the deleterious metabolic and hormonal alterations; such as insulin resistance, deficiencies of estrogen, thyroxin and vitamin-D conferring excessive cancer risk. The more northern the location of an adoptive country the higher the cancer risk for dark skinned immigrants. Recognition of the deleterious systemic effects of darkness and excessive melatonin synthesis enables cancer protection treatment for people living in light-deficient environment. Recent patents provide new methods for the prevention of hormonal and metabolic abnormities.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus myelitis and Castleman's disease in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balderacchi Jasminka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Few cases of Epstein-Barr virus myelitis have been described in the literature. Multi-centric Castleman's disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that is well known for its associations with the human immunodeficiency virus, human herpes virus 8, and Kaposi's sarcoma. The concurrent presentation of these two diseases in a patient at the same time is extremely unusual. Case Presentation We describe the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man with acquired immune deficiency syndrome who presented with fever, weight loss and diffuse lymphadenopathy, and was diagnosed with multi-centric Castleman's disease. He presented three weeks later with lower extremity weakness and urinary retention, at which time cerebrospinal fluid contained lymphocytic pleocytosis and elevated protein. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal spinal cord signal intensity over several cervical and thoracic segments, suggesting the diagnosis of myelitis. Our patient was ultimately diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus myelitis, as Epstein-Barr virus DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of multi-centric Castleman's disease followed by acute Epstein-Barr virus myelitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient. Clinicians caring for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients should be vigilant about monitoring patients with increasing lymphadenopathy, prompting thorough diagnostic investigations when necessary.

  20. Immunization Uptake in Younger Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwaik, Ghassan Abu; Roberts, Wendy; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan; Smith, Isabel M.; Szatmari, Peter; Modi, Bonnie M.; Tanel, Nadia; Brian, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parental concerns persist that immunization increases the risk of autism spectrum disorder, resulting in the potential for reduced uptake by parents of younger siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder ("younger sibs"). Objective: To compare immunization uptake by parents for their younger child relative to their…

  1. The neuro-immune axis: Prospect for novel treatments for mental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraneveld, Aletta D.; de Theije, Caroline G.M.; van Heesch, Floor; Borre, Yuliya; de Kivit, Sander; Olivier, Berend; Korte, Mechiel; Garssen, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed bidirectional pathways between the (central) nervous system and immune system have been implicated in various mental disorders, including depressive and neurodevelopmental disorders. In this minireview, the role of the neuro-immune axis and its targetability in relation to major depression

  2. Peripheral immune abnormalities in two high-risk populations for bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, G.; Schiweck, C.; Brouwer, R.; Mesman, E.; Grosse, L.; de Wit, H; Nolen, W. A.; Drexhage, H. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    Objective: Mounting data support the hypothesis for a role of the immune system in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to examine immune alterations in two unique familial high-risk cohorts for bipolar disorder. Methods: The study population comprised bipolar

  3. Hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with inherited bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, M; Cochrane, A; Wakefield, C; Stain, A-M; Ling, S; Blanchette, V; Gold, R; Ford-Jones, L

    2009-03-01

    Hepatitis A and B vaccines are highly effective tools that can greatly reduce infection risk in the bleeding disorder population. Although hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with bleeding disorders is universally recommended, various advisory bodies often differ with respect to many practical aspects of vaccination. To review the published literature and guidelines and form a practical, comprehensive and consistent approach to hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with bleeding disorders. We reviewed published immunization guidelines from North American immunization advisory bodies and published statements from North American and international haemophilia advisory bodies. A search of the MEDLINE database was performed to find original published literature pertaining to hepatitis A or B immunization of patients with haemophilia or bleeding disorder patients that provided supporting or refuting evidence for advisory body guidelines. Various advisory bodies' immunization guidelines regarding individuals with bleeding disorders have contradictory statements and often did not clarify issues (e.g. post vaccination surveillance). Published literature addressing immunization in bleeding disorder patients is sparse and mostly examines route of vaccine administration, complications and corresponding antibody response. Although the risk of hepatitis A and B infection is low, the use of simple measures such as vaccination is reasonable and advocated by haemophilia advisory bodies. Following our review of the available literature and North American guidelines, we have developed comprehensive and practical recommendations addressing hepatitis A and B immunization for the bleeding disorder population that may be applicable in Bleeding Disorder clinics.

  4. Can we find a solution to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome controversy? Is acquired immune deficiency syndrome the consequence of continuous excessive stressing of the body?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hässig, A; Wen-Xi, L; Stampfli, K

    1996-04-01

    The time of re-evaluation of the role of human immunodeficiency viruses in the pathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome has now come, now that methods are available for the direct detection of human immunodeficiency viruses and for the detection of cellular anti-human immunodeficiency virus immune reactions. It has been shown that human immunodeficiency virus infections are common among anti-human immunodeficiency virus antibody negative high-risk individuals. The disease is brought under control by cellular immune reactions and the anti-human immunodeficiency virus antibody test remains negative. Apart from proof that infection with human immunodeficiency viruses has occurred, a positive result in an anti-human immunodeficiency virus-antibody test is also an indication of an independent immunosuppression state. According to the definition of the Centers of Disease Control classical acquired immune deficiency syndrome is the consequence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus in association with continuous excessive stress, such as observed in the known risk groups. At the center of the pathogenetic process is hypercortisolism-determined damage of T lymphocytes, in which insufficiency of thymus is prominent. For this reason, in our view, there are indications for shifting efforts from the prophylaxis of infection with human immunodeficiency viruses to the prophylaxis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome by reducing stress factors.

  5. TLR7 Deficiency Leads to TLR8 Compensative Regulation of Immune Response against JEV in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Muhammad; Wang, Ke; Lin, Xianwu; Qian, Wenjie; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Chong; Wang, Kunlun; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F.; Cui, Min

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a highly fatal pathogen to human beings. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) plays a role as the first host defense against most single-stranded RNA flaviviruses. This study aims to investigate the role of TLR7 in inducing adaptive immune response in mice against JEV. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to examine the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in mice. After JEV infection, physical parameters of mice (survival rate and body weight) were evaluated, and organs or cells were collected for further analysis. The expression of TLR7 was increased significantly as compare to other TLR molecules post-JEV infection. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD273 on bone marrow-derived dendritic cells was increased significantly in TLR7−/− mice. Furthermore, viral load was also increased significantly in TLR7−/− mice as compare to C57BL/6 mice. But there was no significant difference among survival rate and body weight in TLR7−/− mice as compare to C57BL/6. Interestingly, we also found that TLR8 was upregulated in TLR7−/− mice. The study concluded that TLR8 was upregulated in TLR7-deficient mice, and it might play a compensatory role in the immune response in TLR7−/− mice.

  6. Immunization with cationized BSA inhibits progression of disease in ApoBec-1/LDL receptor deficient mice with manifest atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbus, Daniel; Wigren, Maria; Ljungcrantz, Irena; Söderberg, Ingrid; Alm, Ragnar; Björkbacka, Harry; Nilsson, Jan; Fredrikson, Gunilla N

    2011-06-01

    Immune responses against modified self-antigens generated by hypercholesterolemia play an important role in atherosclerosis identifying the immune system as a possible novel target for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. It has recently been shown that these immune responses can be modulated by subcutaneous injection of adjuvant. In the present study we immunized 25-week old ApoBec-1/LDL receptor deficient mice with manifest atherosclerosis with adjuvant and two different concentrations of the carrier molecule cationized BSA (cBSA). Plasma levels of Th2-induced apolipoprotein B (apoB)/IgG1 immune complexes were increased in the cBSA immunized groups verifying induction of immunity against a self-antigen. Mice were sacrificed at 36 weeks of age and atherosclerosis was monitored by en face Oil red O staining of the aorta. Immunization with 100 μg cBSA inhibited plaque progression, whereas the lower dose (50 μg) did not. In addition, the higher dose induced a more stable plaque phenotype, indicated by a higher content of collagen and less macrophages and T cells in the plaques. Moreover, there was an increased ratio of Foxp3+/Foxp3⁻ T cells in the circulation suggesting activation of a regulatory T cell response. In conclusion, we show that immunization with cBSA induces an immune response against apoB as well as an activation of Treg cells. This was associated with development of a more stable plaque phenotype and reduced atherosclerosis progression.

  7. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  8. Selective predisposition to bacterial infections in IRAK-4-deficient children : IRAK-4-dependent TLRs are otherwise redundant in protective immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ku, Cheng-Lung; von Bernuth, Horst; Picard, Capucine; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Chang, Huey-Hsuan; Yang, Kun; Chrabieh, Maya; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Gallin, John; Holland, Steven M.; Roifman, Chaim; Ehl, Stephan; Smart, Joanne; Tang, Mimi; Barrat, Franck J.; Levy, Ofer; McDonald, Douglas; Day-Good, Noorbibi K.; Miller, Richard; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro; Al-Hajjar, Sami; Al-Ghonaium, Abdulaziz; Speert, David; Sanlaville, Damien; Li, Xiaoxia; Geissmann, Frederic; Vivier, Eric; Marodi, Laszlo; Garty, Ben-Zion; Chapel, Helen; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Bossuyt, Xavier; Abel, Laurent; Puel, Anne; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Human interleukin ( IL) 1 receptor - associated kinase 4 ( IRAK- 4) deficiency is a recently discovered primary immunodefi ciency that impairs Toll/ IL- 1R immunity, except for the Toll- like receptor ( TLR) 3 - and TLR4 - interferon ( IFN)-alpha/beta pathways. The clinical and immunological phenoty

  9. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata eToth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as C. parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response towards this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi’s virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses.In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host pathogen interactions.

  10. Evidence for a dysregulated immune system in the etiology of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Sinead M; Drexhage, Hemmo A

    2013-09-01

    There is extensive bi-directional communication between the brain and the immune system in both health and disease. In recent years, the role of an altered immune system in the etiology of major psychiatric disorders has become more apparent. Studies have demonstrated that some patients with major psychiatric disorders exhibit characteristic signs of immune dysregulation and that this may be a common pathophysiological mechanism that underlies the development and progression of these disorders. Furthermore, many psychiatric disorders are also often accompanied by chronic medical conditions related to immune dysfunction such as autoimmune diseases, diabetes and atherosclerosis. One of the major psychiatric disorders that has been associated with an altered immune system is schizophrenia, with approximately one third of patients with this disorder showing immunological abnormalities such as an altered cytokine profile in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. An altered cytokine profile is also found in a proportion of patients with major depressive disorder and is thought to be potentially related to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Emerging evidence suggests that altered immune parameters may also be implicated in the neurobiological etiology of autism spectrum disorders. Further support for a role of immune dysregulation in the pathophysiology of these psychiatric disorders comes from studies showing the immunomodulating effects of antipsychotics and antidepressants, and the mood altering effects of anti-inflammatory therapies. This review will not attempt to discuss all of the psychiatric disorders that have been associated with an augmented immune system, but will instead focus on several key disorders where dysregulation of this system has been implicated in their pathophysiology including depression, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder.

  11. Vitamin A supplementation in early life enhances the intestinal immune response of rats with gestational vitamin A deficiency by increasing the number of immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is a critical micronutrient for regulating immunity in many organisms. Our previous study demonstrated that gestational or early-life vitamin A deficiency decreases the number of immune cells in offspring. The present study aims to test whether vitamin A supplementation can restore lymphocyte pools in vitamin A-deficient rats and thereby improve the function of their intestinal mucosa; furthermore, the study aimed to identify the best time frame for vitamin A supplementation. Vitamin A-deficient pregnant rats or their offspring were administered a low-dose of vitamin A daily for 7 days starting on gestational day 14 or postnatal day 1, day 14 or day 28. Serum retinol concentrations increased significantly in all four groups that received vitamin A supplementation, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The intestinal levels of secretory immunoglobulin A and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor increased significantly with lipopolysaccharide challenge in the rats that received vitamin A supplementation starting on postnatal day 1. The rats in this group had higher numbers of CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, CD11C+ dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches and CD4+CD25+ T cells in the spleen compared with the vitamin A-deficient rats; flow cytometric analysis also demonstrated that vitamin A supplementation decreased the number of B cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Additionally, vitamin A supplementation during late gestation increased the numbers of CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and decreased the numbers of B lymphocytes in the mesenteric lymph nodes. However, no significant differences in lymphocyte levels were found between the rats in the other two vitamin A supplement groups and the vitamin A-deficient group. In conclusion, the best recovery of a subset of lymphocytes in the offspring of gestational vitamin A-deficient rats and the greatest improvement in the intestinal mucosal immune

  12. Alkaline ceramidase 3 deficiency aggravates colitis and colitis-associated tumorigenesis in mice by hyperactivating the innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Xu, R; Snider, A J; Schrandt, J; Li, Y; Bialkowska, A B; Li, M; Zhou, J; Hannun, Y A; Obeid, L M; Yang, V W; Mao, C

    2016-03-03

    Increasing studies suggest that ceramides differing in acyl chain length and/or degree of unsaturation have distinct roles in mediating biological responses. However, still much remains unclear about regulation and role of distinct ceramide species in the immune response. Here, we demonstrate that alkaline ceramidase 3 (Acer3) mediates the immune response by regulating the levels of C18:1-ceramide in cells of the innate immune system and that Acer3 deficiency aggravates colitis in a murine model by augmenting the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in myeloid and colonic epithelial cells (CECs). According to the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, ACER3 is downregulated in immune cells in response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a potent inducer of the innate immune response. Consistent with these data, we demonstrated that LPS downregulated both Acer3 mRNA levels and its enzymatic activity while elevating C(18:1)-ceramide, a substrate of Acer3, in murine immune cells or CECs. Knocking out Acer3 enhanced the elevation of C(18:1)-ceramide and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immune cells and CECs in response to LPS challenge. Similar to Acer3 knockout, treatment with C(18:1)-ceramide, but not C18:0-ceramide, potentiated LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immune cells. In the mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis, Acer3 deficiency augmented colitis-associated elevation of colonic C(18:1)-ceramide and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acer3 deficiency aggravated diarrhea, rectal bleeding, weight loss and mortality. Pathological analyses revealed that Acer3 deficiency augmented colonic shortening, immune cell infiltration, colonic epithelial damage and systemic inflammation. Acer3 deficiency also aggravated colonic dysplasia in a mouse model of colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Taken together, these results suggest that Acer3 has an important anti-inflammatory role by suppressing cellular or tissue C(18

  13. Immune Thrombocytopenia Resolved by Eltrombopag in a Carrier of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scaramucci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin mimetic peptide, may provide excellent clinical efficacy in steroid-refractory patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP [1,2]. Eltrombopag is generally well tolerated. However, its use in the particular setting of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD and history of acute hemolytic anemia (AHA has not been reported so far. A 51-year-old female was diagnosed as having ITP in September 2014. She was not taking any medication and her past history was negative, apart from having been diagnosed a carrier (heterozygous of G6PD deficiency (Mediterranean variant after a familial screening by molecular and biochemical methods. She presented with only slightly reduced (about 50% enzyme level, belonging to World Health Organization-defined class 3 [3,4]. In the following years, the patient experienced some episodes of AHA, which were managed at outside institutions; in particular, a severe episode of AHA, probably triggered by urinary infection and antibiotics [5], had complicated her second and last delivery. The hemolytic episodes were selflimiting and resolved without sequelae. No other causes of hemolysis were documented. When the case came to our attention, a diagnosis of ITP was made; hemolytic parameters were normal, although the G6PD enzyme concentration was not measured. Oral prednisone (1 mg/kg was given with only a transient benefit. The patient was then a candidate for elective splenectomy. However, given her extremely low platelet count, she was started in October 2014 on eltrombopag at 50 mg/day as a bridge to splenectomy. Given that, to the best of our knowledge, the use of this drug has never been reported in the particular setting of G6PD deficiency, the patient was constantly monitored. A prompt platelet increase (178x109/L was observed 1 week after the start of treatment. After she achieved the target platelet count, the dose of eltrombopag was tapered to the lowest effective dose. The patient

  14. Lack of increased prevalence of immunoregulatory disorders in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Henriette; Csuka, Dorottya; Gács, Judit; Czaller, Ibolya; Zotter, Zsuzsanna; Füst, George; Varga, Lilian; Gergely, Péter

    2011-10-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to deficiency of C1-INH (HAE-C1-INH) is associated with enhanced consumption of the early complement components, which may predispose for autoimmune disease. We assessed the prevalence of such disorders among HAE- C1-INH patients and their impact on the natural course of HAE-C1-INH. Clinical data and immunoserological parameters of 130 HAE-C1-INH and 174 non-C1-INH-deficient patients with angioedema were analyzed. In our study, the incidence of immunoregulatory disorders was 11.5% in the population of HAE-C1-INH patients and 5.2% among non-C1-INH-deficient controls with angioedema. Immunoserology screening revealed a greater prevalence of anticardiolipin IgM (p=0.0118) among HAE-C1-INH patients, than in those with non-C1-INH-deficient angioedema. We did not find higher prevalence of immunoregulatory disorders among our HAE-C1-INH patients. However, in patients with confirmed immunoregulatory disorders, the latter influenced both the severity of HAE-C1-INH and the effectiveness of its long-term management. Appropriate management of the immunoregulatory disease thus identified improves the symptoms of HAE-C1-INH.

  15. Guanidinoacetate Methyltransferase (GAMT) Deficiency: Late Onset of Movement Disorder and Preserved Expressive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Declan J.; Ryan, Stephanie; Salomons, Gajja; Jakobs, Cornelis; Monavari, Ahmad; King, Mary D.

    2009-01-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a disorder of creatine biosynthesis, characterized by early-onset learning disability and epilepsy in most affected children. Severe expressive language delay is a constant feature even in the mildest clinical phenotypes. We report the clinical, biochemical, imaging, and treatment data of two…

  16. Autosomal recessive disorder with retardation of growth, mental deficiency, ptosis, pectus excavatum and camptodactyly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaldi, F.; Bennaceur, B.; Hammou, A.; Hamza, M.; Gharbi, H.A.

    1988-07-01

    Two strikingly similar brothers issued from consanguineous parents in the second degree present the following patterns of anomalies: Retardation of growth, mental deficiency, ocular abnormalities, pectus excavatum and camptodactyly. The ocular abnormalities include ptosis, microphthalmia and hypertelorism. No endocrine or metabolic aberrations are found. The authors conclude that the disorder has probably an autosomal recessive mode of transmission.

  17. [Severe deglutition disorders and iron deficiency; Plummer-Vinson syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerlings, S E; Statius van Eps, L W

    1991-11-01

    At oesophagogastroscopy a web was seen in the upper oesophagus in a female of 73 years with dysphagia. Because she also had a smooth tongue, a low serum iron level and anaemia, the syndrome of Plummer-Vinson was diagnosed. After treatment with ferrous fumarate the dysphagia, the web and the anaemia disappeared and the serum iron rose. The symptomatology of this syndrome is discussed. Remarkably, the pathogenesis is not completely known. There are indications that this uncommon syndrome is a premalignant disorder.

  18. Prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders among 6 - 12 years school children of Gulbarga city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveesh P M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iodine Deficiency Disorders is among the easiest and least expensive of all nutrient disorders to prevent. Salt iodization is currently the most widely used strategy to control and eliminate Iodine Deficiency Disorders. The Central Government has issued the notification banning the sale of non-iodated salt for direct human consumption in the entire country with effect from 17th May, 2006 under the Prevention of Food Adulteration Act 1954.  Rationale: 6 out of 17 districts surveyed in Karnataka were endemic to Iodine deficiency with goiter prevalence rates in the range of 10.67–41.11%. In Gulbarga more than 90% of the families were consuming salt with Iodine content less than 15 ppm.  Objectives: To assess the magnitude of the Iodine Deficiency Disorders among the children. To determine the Iodine content of the salt used at houses of the children and to find out the availability of adequately iodized salt at the retail shops. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study among 6-12 Years School Children conducted in Gulbarga city. Cluster sampling methodology and surveillance methods for iodine deficiency disorders as recommended by WHO/ICCIDD were used. The study included 1620 school children with equal proportion of girls and boys. The salt samples were tested on spot with MBI kit provided by UNICEF, and Iodine concentration was recorded as 0, <15 and >15 ppm. Results:  The overall prevalence of goitre was 4.32%, there was no significant gender variation in total goitre prevalence. The association between anaemia and the prevalence of total goitre was statistically significant. Proportion of the children consuming adequately iodised salt was 51.1%. Among salt samples collected from retail shops, only 44.62% samples were adequately iodised. Conclusion: prevalence of goitre was 4.32% which is below the cut-off to indicate endemicity of IDD. Adequately iodised salt availability and consumption among household is not

  19. DMPD: Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031249 Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. Le Bour...w Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. PubmedID 18031249 Title Nod1 and Nod2 i...n innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. Authors Le Bourhis L, Benko S

  20. AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE. Patients with LRBA deficiency show CTLA4 loss and immune dysregulation responsive to abatacept therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Bernice; Zhang, Kejian; Lu, Wei; Zheng, Lixin; Zhang, Qian; Kanellopoulou, Chrysi; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhiduo; Fritz, Jill M; Marsh, Rebecca; Husami, Ammar; Kissell, Diane; Nortman, Shannon; Chaturvedi, Vijaya; Haines, Hilary; Young, Lisa R; Mo, Jun; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Bleesing, Jack J; Mustillo, Peter; Stephens, Michael; Rueda, Cesar M; Chougnet, Claire A; Hoebe, Kasper; McElwee, Joshua; Hughes, Jason D; Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif; Matthews, Helen F; Price, Susan; Su, Helen C; Rao, V Koneti; Lenardo, Michael J; Jordan, Michael B

    2015-07-24

    Mutations in the LRBA gene (encoding the lipopolysaccharide-responsive and beige-like anchor protein) cause a syndrome of autoimmunity, lymphoproliferation, and humoral immune deficiency. The biological role of LRBA in immunologic disease is unknown. We found that patients with LRBA deficiency manifested a dramatic and sustained improvement in response to abatacept, a CTLA4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4)-immunoglobulin fusion drug. Clinical responses and homology of LRBA to proteins controlling intracellular trafficking led us to hypothesize that it regulates CTLA4, a potent inhibitory immune receptor. We found that LRBA colocalized with CTLA4 in endosomal vesicles and that LRBA deficiency or knockdown increased CTLA4 turnover, which resulted in reduced levels of CTLA4 protein in FoxP3(+) regulatory and activated conventional T cells. In LRBA-deficient cells, inhibition of lysosome degradation with chloroquine prevented CTLA4 loss. These findings elucidate a mechanism for CTLA4 trafficking and control of immune responses and suggest therapies for diseases involving the CTLA4 pathway. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Case report of mental disorder induced by niacin deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei WANG; Bo LIANG

    2012-01-01

    The 45-year-old male patient described in this case report had a classic case of pellagra. The patient was initially brought to a psychiatric hospital because of disorderly behavior. On admission the patient was unable to provide a history so he was given a provisional diagnosis of Psychosis Not Otherwise Specified. Despite having the cardinal symptoms of dermatitis, dementia and (three days after admission) diarrhea it took 20 days to confirm the diagnosis of pellagra. After initiation of appropriate treatment it took about six months for the patient to make a complete recovery.

  2. Adaptive immune response in JAM-C-deficient mice: normal initiation but reduced IgG memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Claudia; Lee, Boris P L; Palmer, Gaby; Gabay, Cem; Adams, Ralf; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Imhof, Beat A

    2009-04-15

    We have recently shown that junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-C-deficient mice have leukocytic pulmonary infiltrates, disturbed neutrophil homeostasis, and increased postnatal mortality. This phenotype was partially rescued when mice were housed in ventilated isolators, suggesting an inability to cope with opportunistic infections. In the present study, we further examined the adaptive immune responses in JAM-C(-/-) mice. We found that murine conventional dendritic cells express in addition to Mac-1 and CD11c also JAM-B as ligand for JAM-C. By in vitro adhesion assay, we show that murine DCs can interact with recombinant JAM-C via Mac-1. However, this interaction does not seem to be necessary for dendritic cell migration and function in vivo, even though JAM-C is highly expressed by lymphatic sinuses of lymph nodes. Nevertheless, upon immunization and boosting with a protein Ag, JAM-C-deficient mice showed decreased persistence of specific circulating Abs although the initial response was normal. Such a phenotype has also been observed in a model of Ag-induced arthritis, showing that specific IgG2a Ab titers are reduced in the serum of JAM-C(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that JAM-C deficiency affects the adaptive humoral immune response against pathogens, in addition to the innate immune system.

  3. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Mizumoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs.

  4. Penicillium marneffei chylous ascites in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Zhong Shen; Zhen-Yan Wang; Hong-Zhou Lu

    2012-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei (P.marneffei) infection usually occurs with skin,bone marrow,lung or hepatic involvement.However,no cases of P.marneffei infection with chylous ascites have been reported thus far.In this report,we describe the first case of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) which has been complicated by a P.marneffei infection causing chylous ascites.We describe the details of the case,with an emphasis on treatment regimen.This patient was treated with amphotericin B for 3 mo,while receiving concomitant therapy with an efavirenz-containing antiretroviral regimen,but cultures in ascitic fluid were persistently positive for P.marneffei.The infection resolved after treatment with high-dose voriconazole (400 mg every 12 h) for 3 mo.P.marneffei should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chylous ascites in human immunodeficiency virus patients.High-dose voriconazole is an effective,well-tolerated and convenient option for the treatment of systemic infections with P.marneffei in AIDS patients on an efavirenz-containing antiretroviral regimen.

  5. Granzyme K-deficient mice show no evidence of impaired antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joeckel, Lars T; Allison, Cody C; Pellegrini, Marc; Bird, Catherina H; Bird, Phillip I

    2017-04-21

    The biological role of granzyme K, a serine protease of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), is controversial. It has been reported to induce perforin-mediated cell death in vitro, but is also reported to be non-cytotoxic and to operate in inflammatory processes. To elucidate the biological role of this protease, we have deleted the granzyme K gene in mice (mutant allele: Gzmk(tm1.1Pib); MGI:5636646). Gzmk (-/-) mice are healthy, anatomically normal, fecund and show normal hematopoietic development. Gzmk (-/-) mice readily recover from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and mouse pox Ectromelia virus infection. Ex vivo, virus-specific granzyme K-deficient CTL are indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice in apoptosis induction of target cells. These data suggest that granzyme K does not play an essential role in viral immunity or cytotoxicity. Our granzyme K knockout line completes the collection of mouse models for the human granzymes, and will further our understanding of their biological roles and relationships.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 23 May 2017; doi:10.1038/icb.2017.35.

  6. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells after transplantation in immune-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyborski, Stefan A

    2005-10-01

    Our current knowledge of how human tissues grow and develop is limited. We need to increase our understanding of tissue formation if we are to fully realize the potential of stem cells as a source of material for research into health and disease and possible therapeutic applications. Transplanted pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide a potential system to model and investigate cell differentiation in humans. hESCs transplanted into immune-deficient mice form complex teratomas consisting of a range of differentiated somatic tissues, some of which appear highly organized and resemble structures normally identified in the embryo and adult. Analysis of such tumors may provide a unique opportunity to study organogenesis and lead to novel approaches in bioengineering and the growth of functioning structures composed of a range of alternative cell types. However, little has been done to characterize the developmental potential of hESCs after transplantation. This concise review presents evidence for the ability of hESCs to differentiate in vivo and highlights some of the prominent questions that need to be addressed if transplantation is to be used as a research tool to study hESC differentiation.

  7. Dysregulated TLR3-Dependent Signaling and Innate Immune Activation in Superoxide-Deficient Macrophages From Non-Obese Diabetic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Seleme, Maria C.; Lei, Weiqi; Burg, Ashley R.; Goh, Kah Yong; Metz, Allison; Steele, Chad; Tse, Hubert M.

    2012-01-01

    In Type 1 diabetes (T1D), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by macrophages and other innate immune cells destroy pancreatic β-cells while promoting autoreactive T cell maturation. Superoxide-deficient Non-Obese Diabetic mice (NOD.Ncf1m1J) are resistant to spontaneous diabetes, revealing the integral role of ROS-signaling in T1D. Here, we evaluate the innate immune activation state of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BM-Mϕ) from NOD and NOD.Ncf1m1J mice afte...

  8. Personal and Social Predictors about Safe Sexual Behavior in Patients with Immune Deficiency Virus in Ahwaz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Hasanpoor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Socio-demographic predictors about safe sex behaviours in individual suffering from immune deficiency virus (HIV had been tried to understand in this cross-sectional study. It was conducted on 120 individuals having immune deficiency virus (HIV. Collection of the data were based on socio-demographic and a safe sex behaviour questionnaire. To determine the socio-demographic the general linear model was used. Result revealed mean (SD of the total score of safe sexual behaviour among men and women was 66.5 (13.1, 62.2 (13.0 respectively and (Score limit: 0-100. Status of sexual partners, unprotected vaginal sex, drugs and alcohols, as well as employment status, were considered as predictors of safe sex behaviours. About 50 percent of the participants pose unsafe sexual practices, thus, it is advisable that the health promotion programs and HIV prevention should implement in various groups of the society.

  9. Site-specific influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on atherosclerosis in immune incompetent LDL receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Catherine A; Blachowicz, Lydia; Gupta, Gaorav; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Getz, Godfrey S

    2006-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are thought to influence plasma lipid levels, atherosclerosis, and the immune system. In this study, we fed male LDL receptor deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice and immune incompetent LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-) mice diets containing predominantly saturated fats (milk fat) or PUFA (safflower oil) to determine if the response to diet was influenced by immune status. Relative to milk fat diet, plasma lipid and VLDL levels in both the LDLR(-/-) and LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-) mice fed safflower oil diet were lower, suggesting that the primary effect of PUFA on plasma lipids was not due to its inhibition of the immune system. Neither diet nor immune status influenced hepatic triglyceride production and post-heparin lipase activity, suggesting that the differences in triglyceride levels are due to differences in rates of catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. While both diets promoted atherogenesis, both aortic root and innominate artery atherosclerosis in LDLR(-/-) mice was less in safflower oil fed animals. In contrast, a site-specific effect of PUFA was observed in the immune incompetent LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-). In these mice, aortic root atherosclerosis, but not innominate artery atherosclerosis, was less in PUFA fed animal. These results suggest that PUFA and the immune system may influence innominate artery atherosclerosis by some overlapping mechanisms.

  10. Iron deficiency in children with global developmental delay and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidrak, Samuel; Yoong, Terence; Woolfenden, Susan

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for iron deficiency in children with global developmental delay and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A retrospective review was conducted of the files of children referred to community paediatric clinics in South West Sydney from May 2009 to July 2011 who were diagnosed with global developmental delay and/or ASD. Data were extracted on iron studies and potential risk factors. Data were analysed using Pearson's ÷(2) -test and Fisher's exact test. Subjects included 122 children. The prevalence of iron depletion was 2.5% (95% CI 0.5-7.0%); that of iron deficiency was 6.6% (95% CI 2.9-12.5%), and that of iron deficiency anaemia was 4.1% (95% CI 1.3-9.3%). In children with global developmental delay without ASD, the prevalence of iron depletion was 1.8% (95% CI 0-9.7%), that of iron deficiency 5.5% (95% CI 1.1-15.1%) and that of iron deficiency anaemia 5.5% (95% CI 1.1-15.1%). In children with ASD with or without global developmental delay, the prevalence of iron depletion was 3.0% (95% CI 0.4-10.4%), that of iron deficiency 7.5% (95% CI 2.5-16.6%) and that of iron deficiency anaemia 3.0% (95% CI 0.4-10.4%). Univariate analysis demonstrated three significant potential risk factors for iron depletion, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia: problems sucking, swallowing or chewing (P = 0.002); poor eating behaviour (P = 0.008); and inadequate amounts of meat, chicken, eggs or fish (P = 0.002). Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia were more common in this clinical sample of children with global developmental delay and/or ASD than in the general population. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. Effects of paroxetine and venlafaxine on immune parameters in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denys, D; Fluitman, S; Kavelaars, A; Heijnen, C; Westenberg, HGM

    2006-01-01

    Background: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been associated with an altered activity of the immune system. This study was carried out to investigate whether treatment with paroxetine and venlafaxine modifies the immune function in OCD and whether this modification is related to treatment out

  12. The association between immune activation and manic symptoms in patients with a depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, K.; Boschloo, L.; Vogelzangs, N.; Haarman, B. C. M.; Riemersma-van der Lek, R.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Schoevers, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Although recent studies have shown that immunological processes play an important role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders, immune activation may only be present in specific subgroups of patients. Our study aimed to examine whether immune activation was associated with (a) the presence of manic

  13. MiR-15a/16 deficiency enhances anti-tumor immunity of glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells through targeting mTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiao; Liu, Ronghua; Deng, Yuting; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Wang, Yuedi; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Feifei; Chu, Yiwei

    2017-11-15

    MiR-15a/16, a miRNA cluster located at chromosome 13q14, has been reported to act as an immune regulator in inflammatory disorders besides its aberrant expression in cancers. However, little is known about its regulation in tumor-infiltrating immune cells. In our study, using an orthotropic GL261 mouse glioma model, we found that miR-15a/16 deficiency in host inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mice survival, which might be associated with the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. More importantly, tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells without miR-15a/16 showed lower expression of PD-1, Tim-3 and LAG-3, and stronger secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α than WT tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. Also, our in vitro experiments further confirmed that miR-15a/16(-/-) CD8+ T displayed higher active phenotypes, more cytokines secretion and faster expansion, compared to WT CD8+ T cells. Mechanismly, mTOR was identified as a target gene of miR-15a/16 to negatively regulate the activation of CD8+ T cells. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-15a/16 deficiency resists the exhaustion and maintains the activation of glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells to alleviate glioma progression via targeting mTOR. Our findings provide evidence for the potential immunotherapy through targeting miR-15a/16 in tumor-infiltrating immune cells. © 2017 UICC.

  14. Blood donors at high risk of transmitting the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, M; Hewitt, P E; Barbara, J A; Mochnaty, P Z

    1985-03-09

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) occurs most commonly in homosexual men. This group carries the greatest risk of transmitting AIDS by blood transfusion. Both promiscuous and nonpromiscuous male homosexuals should refrain from giving blood. A leaflet stating this advice was prepared by the Department of Health and Social Security, United Kingdom. In July 1984 a questionnaire was given to all donors attending a blood donor clinic in the west end of London, England. 53% were male. Donors were given a leaflet on AIDS and a questionnaire to complete in private. Those who considered themselves to be in a high risk group were asked to designate their blood for research purposes only. Serum samples from donors who confirmed that they were in the high risk category were tested for antihepatitis B core antigen and anti-human T lymphotropic virus type III (anti-HTLV-III) in addition to the routine screening of donors for hepatitis B surface antigen and syphilis. All high risk donors were men. Homosexuality was the only high risk factor. Of 5000 questionnaires administered between July and October, 614 were not completed or had ambiguous answers. 38 donors who completed the questionnaire beonged to a high risk group. Of these, 7 were positive for antihepatitis B core antigen; none were positive for anti-HTLV-III, T pallidum hemagglatination, or hepatits B surface antigen. Although the homosexual donors had a much lower incidence of sexually transmitted disease than those attending special clinics, this should not encourage complacency. All possible measures must be taken to prevent homosexuals from donating blood.

  15. The role of the innate immune system in granulomatous disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Josephine Petersen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic structure of the granuloma serves to protect the body from microbiological challenge. This organised aggregate of immune cells seeks to contain this challenge and protect against dissemination, giving host immune cells a chance to eradicate the threat. A number of systemic diseases are characterised by this specialised inflammatory process and granulomas have been shown to develop at multiple body sites and in various tissues. Central to this process is the macrophage and the arms of the innate immune response. This review seeks to explore how the innate immune response drives this inflammatory process in a contrast of diseases, particularly those with a component of immunodeficiency. By understanding the genes and inflammatory mechanisms behind this specialised immune response, will guide research in in the development of novel therapeutics to combat granulomatous diseases.

  16. Biotinidase Deficiency: A Reversible Neurometabolic Disorder (An Iranian Pediatric Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available  How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P, Ahmadabadi F, Jafari N, Jabbehdari S, Alaee MR, Ghofrani M, Taghdiri MM, Tonekaboni SH. Biotinidase Deficiency: A Reversible Neurometabolic Disorder (An Iranian Pediatric Case Series. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(4:47- 52. ObjectiveBiotinidase deficiency is one of the rare congenital metabolic disorders with autosomal recessive inheritance. If this disorder is diagnosed in newborn period, could be prevented well from mental and physical developmentaldelay and most of clinical manifestations.Materials & MethodsThe patients were diagnosed as biotinidase deficiency in Neurology Department of Mofid Children’s Hospital in Tehran, Iran, between 2009 and 2012 were included in this study. This study was conducted to define the age, gender, past medical history, developmental status, general appearance, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging findings, and response to treatment in 16 patients with biotinidase deficiency in this department.ResultsIn clinical presentation, cutaneous lesions were not found in 37% of the patients and 43% patients had not alopecia. 75% patients had abnormal neuroimaging that in 56% of them, generalized brain atrophy and myelination delay were found. Results of the present study showed the efficacy of biotin in early diagnosed patients with seizure and dermatological manifestations. The seizure and skin manifestations were improved after biotin therapy.ConclusionAccording to the results of this study, we suggest that early assessment and diagnosis have an important role in the prevention of disease progression and clinical signs. ReferencesWolf B.Disorders of biotin metabolism. In: Scriver CR,Beaudet AL, Sly W, et al.,eds. The Metabolic and MolecularBases of Inherited Disease, 8thed. New York,NY:McGraw-Hill;2001: 3935-3962.Rathi N, RathiM.Biotinidase deficiency with hypertonia as unusual feature.IndianPediatr. 2009;46(1:65-67.Wolf B.Worldwide survey of neonatal screening for

  17. Prognosis of physiological disorders in physic nut to N, P, and K deficiency during initial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elcio Ferreira; Macedo, Fernando Giovannetti; Zanchim, Bruno José; Lima, Giuseppina Pace Pereira; Lavres, José

    2017-06-01

    The description of physiological disorders in physic nut plants deficient in nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) may help to predict nutritional imbalances before the appearance of visual symptoms and to guide strategies for early nutrient supply. The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of physic nuts (Jatropha curcas L.) during initial development by analyzing the gas exchange parameters, nutrient uptake and use efficiency, as well as the nitrate reductase and acid phosphatase activities and polyamine content. Plants were grown in a complete nutrient solution and solutions from which N, P or K was omitted. The nitrate reductase activity, phosphatase acid activity, polyamine content and gas exchange parameters from leaves of N, P and K-deficient plants indicates earlier imbalances before the appearance of visual symptoms. Nutrient deficiencies resulted in reduced plant growth, although P- and K-deficient plants retained normal net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and instantaneous carboxylation efficiency (k) during the first evaluation periods, as modulated by the P and K use efficiencies. Increased phosphatase acid activity in P-deficient plants may also contribute to the P use efficiency and to A and gs during the first evaluations. Early physiological and biochemical evaluations of N-, P- and K-starved plants may rely on reliable, useful methods to predict early nutritional imbalances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. A candidate mouse model for Hartnup disorder deficient in neutral amino acid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symula, D J; Shedlovsky, A; Guillery, E N; Dove, W F

    1997-02-01

    The mutant mouse strain HPH2 (hyperphenylalaninemia) was isolated after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis on the basis of delayed plasma clearance of an injected load of phenylalanine. Animals homozygous for the recessive hph2 mutation excrete elevated concentrations of many of the neutral amino acids in the urine, while plasma concentrations of these amino acids are normal. In contrast, mutant homozygotes excrete normal levels of glucose and phosphorus. These data suggest an amino acid transport defect in the mutant, confirmed in a small reduction in normalized values of 14C-labeled glutamine uptake by kidney cortex brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). The hyperaminoaciduria pattern is very similar to that of Hartnup Disorder cases also show niacin deficiency symptoms, of Hartnup Disorder cases also show niacin deficiency symptoms, which are thought to be multifactorially determined. Similarly, the HPH2 mouse exhibits a niacin-reversible syndrome that is modified by diet and by genetic background. Thus, HPH2 provides a candidate mouse model for the study of Hartnup Disorder, an amino acid transport deficiency and a multifactorial disease in the human.

  19. Antitumor immunity is defective in T cell-specific microRNA-155-deficient mice and is rescued by immune checkpoint blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, Thomas B; Lee, Soh-Hyun; Tang, William W; Wallace, Jared A; Alexander, Margaret; Runtsch, Marah C; Larsen, Dane K; Thompson, Jacob; Ramstead, Andrew G; Voth, Warren P; Hu, Ruozhen; Round, June L; Williams, Matthew A; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2017-09-14

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) regulates antitumor immune responses. However, its specific functions within distinct immune cell types have not been delineated in conditional knockout (KO) mouse models. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-155 specifically within T cells during the immune response to syngeneic tumors. We found that miR-155 expression within T cells is required to limit syngeneic tumor growth and promote interferon gamma (IFNγ) production by T cells within the tumor microenvironment. Consequently, we found that miR-155 expression by T cells is necessary for proper tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) expression of IFNγ-inducible genes. We also found that immune checkpoint-blocking (ICB) antibodies against programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) restored antitumor immunity in miR-155 T cell-conditional KO (TCKO) mice. We noted that these ICB antibodies rescued the levels of IFNγ; expressing T cells, expression of multiple activation and effector genes expressed by tumor-infiltrating CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, and TAM activation. Moreover, the ICB approach partially restored expression of several de-repressed miR-155 targets in tumor-infiltrating, miR-155 deficient CD8+ T cells, suggesting that miR-155 and the ICB regulate overlapping pathways to promote antitumor immunity. Taken together, our findings highlight miR-155s multifaceted role in T cells in which it promotes antitumor immunity. These results suggest that the augmentation of miR-155 expression could be used to improve anticancer immunotherapies. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. Type I Interferon Receptor Deficiency in Dendritic Cells Facilitates Systemic Murine Norovirus Persistence Despite Enhanced Adaptive Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Nice

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order for a virus to persist, there must be a balance between viral replication and immune clearance. It is commonly believed that adaptive immunity drives clearance of viral infections and, thus, dysfunction or viral evasion of adaptive immunity is required for a virus to persist. Type I interferons (IFNs play pleiotropic roles in the antiviral response, including through innate control of viral replication. Murine norovirus (MNoV replicates in dendritic cells (DCs and type I IFN signaling in DCs is important for early control of MNoV replication. We show here that the non-persistent MNoV strain CW3 persists systemically when CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. Persistence in this setting is associated with increased early viral titers, maintenance of DC numbers, increased expression of DC activation markers and an increase in CD8 T cell and antibody responses. Furthermore, CD8 T cell function is maintained during the persistent phase of infection and adaptive immune cells from persistently infected mice are functional when transferred to Rag1-/- recipients. Finally, increased early replication and persistence are also observed in mixed bone marrow chimeras where only half of the CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. These findings demonstrate that increased early viral replication due to a cell-intrinsic innate immune deficiency is sufficient for persistence and a functional adaptive immune response is not sufficient for viral clearance.

  1. Genetic Hemoglobin Disorders, Infection, and Deficiencies of Iron and Vitamin A Determine Anemia in Young Cambodian Children123

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Joby; Yiannakis, Miriam; Main, Barbara; Devenish, Robyn; Anderson, Courtney; An, Ung Sam; Williams, Sheila M.; Gibson, Rosalind S.

    2012-01-01

    In Cambodia, many factors may complicate the detection of iron deficiency. In a cross-sectional survey, we assessed the role of genetic hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency, infections, and other factors on Hb in young Cambodian children. Data on sociodemographic status, morbidity, and growth were collected from children (n = 3124) aged 6 to 59 mo selected from 3 rural provinces and Phnom Penh municipality. Blood samples were collected (n = 2695) for complete blood count, Hb type (by DNA analysis), ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), retinol-binding protein (RBP), C-reactive protein, and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). Genetic Hb disorders, anemia, and vitamin A deficiency were more common in rural than in urban provinces (P 1.0 g/L (P iron deficiency. New low-cost methods for detecting genetic Hb disorders are urgently required. PMID:22378325

  2. Mesencephalic complex I deficiency does not correlate with parkinsonism in mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palin, Eino J H; Paetau, Anders; Suomalainen, Anu

    2013-08-01

    Genetic evidence from recessively inherited Parkinson's disease has indicated a clear causative role for mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. This role has long been discussed based on findings that toxic inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complex I caused parkinsonism and that tissues of patients with Parkinson's disease show complex I deficiency. Disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance are a common cause of inherited neurodegenerative disorders, and lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions or depletion and respiratory chain defect, including complex I deficiency. However, parkinsonism associates typically with defects of catalytic domain of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Surprisingly, however, not all mutations affecting DNA polymerase gamma manifest as parkinsonism, but, for example, spacer region mutations lead to spinocerebellar ataxia and/or severe epilepsy. Furthermore, defective Twinkle helicase, a close functional companion of DNA polymerase gamma in mitochondrial DNA replication, results in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, epilepsy or adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy, but not typically parkinsonism. Here we sought for clues for this specificity in the neurological manifestations of mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders by studying mesencephalic neuropathology of patients with DNA polymerase gamma or Twinkle defects, with or without parkinsonism. We show here that all patients with mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders had neuronopathy in substantia nigra, most severe in DNA polymerase gamma-associated parkinsonism. The oculomotor nucleus was also affected, but less severely. In substantia nigra, all patients had a considerable decrease of respiratory chain complex I, but other respiratory chain enzymes were not affected. Complex I deficiency did not correlate with parkinsonism, age, affected gene or inheritance. We conclude that the cell number in substantia nigra correlated well with parkinsonism in DNA polymerase gamma

  3. Movement disorders in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome respond to the modified Atkins diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G; Mewasingh, Leena; Verbeek, Marcel M; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Willemsen, Michel A

    2013-09-01

    Movement disorders are a prominent feature of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS). First-choice treatment is a ketogenic diet, but compliance is poor. We have investigated the effect of the modified Atkins diet as an alternative treatment for movement disorders in GLUT1DS. Four patients with GLUT1DS ages 15 to 30 years who had movement disorders as the most prominent feature were prospectively evaluated after initiation of the modified Atkins diet. Movement disorders included dystonia, ataxia, myoclonus, and spasticity, either continuous or paroxysmal, triggered by action or exercise. Duration of treatment ranged from 3 months to 16 months. All patients reached mild to moderate ketosis and experienced remarkable improvement in the frequency and severity of paroxysmal movement disorders. Cognitive function also improved subjectively. The modified Atkins diet is an effective and feasible alternative to the ketogenic diet for the treatment of GLUT1DS-related paroxysmal movement disorders in adolescence and adulthood. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Mood disorder with mixed, psychotic features due to vitamin b12 deficiency in an adolescent: case report

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Reports of psychiatric disorders due to its deficiency mostly focus on middle aged and elderly patients. Here we report a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency in a 16-year old, male adolescent who presented with mixed mood disorder symptoms with psychotic features. Chief complaints were “irritability, regressive behavior, apathy, crying and truancy” which lasted for a year. Premorbid personality was unrema...

  5. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Som Gowda Nanjappa

    Full Text Available Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+ T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+ T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 cells have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+ T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  6. Tc17 cells mediate vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in immune deficient hosts lacking CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjappa, Som Gowda; Heninger, Erika; Wüthrich, Marcel; Gasper, David Joseph; Klein, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines may help reduce the growing incidence of fungal infections in immune-suppressed patients. We have found that, even in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells persist and confer resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Type 1 cytokines contribute to that resistance, but they also are dispensable. Although the role of T helper 17 cells in immunity to fungi is debated, IL-17 producing CD8(+) T cells (Tc17 cells) have not been investigated. Here, we show that Tc17 cells are indispensable in antifungal vaccine immunity in hosts lacking CD4(+) T cells. Tc17 cells are induced upon vaccination, recruited to the lung on pulmonary infection, and act non-redundantly in mediating protection in a manner that requires neutrophils. Tc17 cells did not influence type I immunity, nor did the lack of IL-12 signaling augment Tc17 cells, indicating a distinct lineage and function. IL-6 was required for Tc17 differentiation and immunity, but IL-1R1 and Dectin-1 signaling was unexpectedly dispensable. Tc17 cells expressed surface CXCR3 and CCR6, but only the latter was essential in recruitment to the lung. Although IL-17 producing T cells are believed to be short-lived, effector Tc17 cells expressed low levels of KLRG1 and high levels of the transcription factor TCF-1, predicting their long-term survival and stem-cell like behavior. Our work has implications for designing vaccines against fungal infections in immune suppressed patients.

  7. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuanhui [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); He, Jinsheng, E-mail: jshhe@bjtu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zheng, Xianxian [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wu, Qiang [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Hong, Tao [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China)

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  8. Hematological Disorders following Gastric Bypass Surgery: Emerging Concepts of the Interplay between Nutritional Deficiency and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome are among the most common and detrimental metabolic diseases of the modern era, affecting over 50% of the adult population in the United States. Surgeries designed to promote weight loss, known as bariatric surgery, typically involve a gastric bypass procedure and have shown high success rates for treating morbid obesity. However, following gastric bypass surgery, many patients develop chronic anemia, most commonly due to iron deficiency. Deficiencies of vitamins B1, B12, folate, A, K, D, and E and copper have also been reported after surgery. Copper deficiency can cause hematological abnormalities with or without neurological complications. Despite oral supplementation and normal serum concentrations of iron, copper, folate, and vitamin B12, some patients present with persistent anemia after surgery. The evaluation of hematologic disorders after gastric bypass surgery must take into account issues unique to the postsurgery setting that influence the development of anemia and other cytopenias. In this paper, the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of the hematological disorders associated with gastric bypass surgery are reviewed, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Toll-like receptors as targets for immune disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keogh, Brian

    2012-02-01

    Since the identification of the first Toll-like receptor (TLR) in humans in 1997, understanding of the molecular basis for innate immunity has increased significantly. The TLR family and downstream signalling pathways have been extensively characterised, There is now significant evidence suggesting a role for TLRs in human inflammatory and immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, allergy\\/asthma and atherosclerosis. Various approaches have been taken to identify novel therapeutic agents targeting TLRs including biologics, small molecules and nucleic acid-based drugs. Several are now being evaluated in the clinic and showing promise against various diseases. This review paper outlines the recent advances in the understanding of TLR biology and highlights novel TLR agonists and antagonists in development for the treatment of immune diseases.

  10. Vpu-Deficient HIV Strains Stimulate Innate Immune Signaling Responses in Target Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Doehle, Brian P.; Chang, Kristina; Fleming, Lamar; McNevin, John; Hladik, Florian; McElrath, M. Juliana; Gale, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Acute virus infection induces a cell-intrinsic innate immune response comprising our first line of immunity to limit virus replication and spread, but viruses have developed strategies to overcome these defenses. HIV-1 is a major public health problem; however, the virus-host interactions that regulate innate immune defenses against HIV-1 are not fully defined. We have recently identified the viral protein Vpu to be a key determinant responsible for HIV-1 targeting and degradation of interfer...

  11. Evolution of iodine deficiency disorders control program in India: a journey of 5,000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) has been documented since around 5,000 years. However, geological factors like frequent glaciations, flooding, and changing of course of rivers has led to iodine deficiency in soil. As a result everyone remains at risk of IDD, if optimum intake of iodine is not sustained. Evolution of the IDD control program in India has been a dynamic process. The model of IDD control program in India provides important lessons for successful implementation of a national health program. In formulating National Health Programs; policy environment, scientific inputs, political will, and institutional structure for decision making are necessary but not sufficient. Continuous and dynamic generation of reliable and representative state and national level data, proactive recognition of values of key stakeholders and addressing them through sustained advocacy, development of partnerships among stakeholders, institutional continuity, and mentorship are critical for achieving sustainability of results.

  12. Hot water extracts of Chlorella vulgaris improve immune function in protein-deficient weanling mice and immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyo-Jin; Rim, Hong-Kun; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Hong, Seung-Heon; Um, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of hot water extracts of Chlorella vulgaris (CVE) on a deteriorated immune function through utilization of a protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) diet. Unicellular algae, C. vulgaris, were used as biological response modifier. PEM is associated with decreased host immune defense. Male C57BL/6J mice, initially four weeks old, were fed for 8 days with standard diet or a PEM diet. Mice in the PEM diet group were orally administered 0.1 g/kg and 0.15 g/kg of CVE for the following week. Nutritional parameters such as the total protein, albumin, glucose, and interferon γ (IFN-γ) were increased in blood serum of the CVE-treated group compared with the non-treated group. The mononuclear cell numbers from spleen, superficial, and mesenteric lymph node were reduced in mice fed with PEM diet, but numbers from the spleen and superficial lymph node were increased by the CVE (0.1 and 0.15 g/kg) treatment. We also investigated the effect of CVE on the production of cytokines in human T-cell line, MOLT-4 cells, and primary cultured splenocytes. The CVE treatment significantly increased the production of both interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-4 compared with the media control, but did not affect the production of IFN-γ. These results suggest that CVE may be useful in improving the immune function.

  13. SLC39A8 Deficiency: A Disorder of Manganese Transport and Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julien H; Hogrebe, Max; Grüneberg, Marianne; DuChesne, Ingrid; von der Heiden, Ava L; Reunert, Janine; Schlingmann, Karl P; Boycott, Kym M; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Mhanni, Aziz A; Innes, A Micheil; Hörtnagel, Konstanze; Biskup, Saskia; Gleixner, Eva M; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Fiedler, Barbara; Omran, Heymut; Rutsch, Frank; Wada, Yoshinao; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Santer, René; Nebert, Daniel W; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2015-12-03

    SLC39A8 is a membrane transporter responsible for manganese uptake into the cell. Via whole-exome sequencing, we studied a child that presented with cranial asymmetry, severe infantile spasms with hypsarrhythmia, and dysproportionate dwarfism. Analysis of transferrin glycosylation revealed severe dysglycosylation corresponding to a type II congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) and the blood manganese levels were below the detection limit. The variants c.112G>C (p.Gly38Arg) and c.1019T>A (p.Ile340Asn) were identified in SLC39A8. A second individual with the variants c.97G>A (p.Val33Met) and c.1004G>C (p.Ser335Thr) on the paternal allele and c.610G>T (p.Gly204Cys) on the maternal allele was identified among a group of unresolved case subjects with CDG. These data demonstrate that variants in SLC39A8 impair the function of manganese-dependent enzymes, most notably β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, a Golgi enzyme essential for biosynthesis of the carbohydrate part of glycoproteins. Impaired galactosylation leads to a severe disorder with deformed skull, severe seizures, short limbs, profound psychomotor retardation, and hearing loss. Oral galactose supplementation is a treatment option and results in complete normalization of glycosylation. SLC39A8 deficiency links a trace element deficiency with inherited glycosylation disorders.

  14. Multiple immune disorders in unrecognized celiac disease: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio La Villa; Peietro Pantaleo; Roberto Tarquini; Lino Cirami; Federico Perfetto; Francesco Mancuso; Giacomo Laffi

    2003-01-01

    We reported a female patient with unrecognized celiac disease and multiple extra intestinal manifestations, mainly related to a deranged immune function, including macroamilasemia, macrolipasemia, IgA nephropathy,thyroiditis, and anti-b2-glicoprotein-1 antibodies, that disappeared or improved after the implementation of a gluten-free diet.

  15. Maternal Immune Activation and Autism Spectrum Disorder: From Rodents to Nonhuman and Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careaga, Milo; Murai, Takeshi; Bauman, Melissa D

    2017-03-01

    A subset of women who are exposed to infection during pregnancy have an increased risk of giving birth to a child who will later be diagnosed with a neurodevelopmental or neuropsychiatric disorder. Although epidemiology studies have primarily focused on the association between maternal infection and an increased risk of offspring schizophrenia, mounting evidence indicates that maternal infection may also increase the risk of autism spectrum disorder. A number of factors, including genetic susceptibility, the intensity and timing of the infection, and exposure to additional aversive postnatal events, may influence the extent to which maternal infection alters fetal brain development and which disease phenotype (autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, other neurodevelopmental disorders) is expressed. Preclinical animal models provide a test bed to systematically evaluate the effects of maternal infection on fetal brain development, determine the relevance to human central nervous system disorders, and to evaluate novel preventive and therapeutic strategies. Maternal immune activation models in mice, rats, and nonhuman primates suggest that the maternal immune response is the critical link between exposure to infection during pregnancy and subsequent changes in brain and behavioral development of offspring. However, differences in the type, severity, and timing of prenatal immune challenge paired with inconsistencies in behavioral phenotyping approaches have hindered the translation of preclinical results to human studies. Here we highlight the promises and limitations of the maternal immune activation model as a preclinical tool to study prenatal risk factors for autism spectrum disorder, and suggest specific changes to improve reproducibility and maximize translational potential.

  16. Bilateral Central Retinal Vein Occlusions Combined with Artery Occlusions in A Patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Wen; Xuemei Chen; Haitai Li; Ruiduan Liao; Dezheng Wu

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This is the first report of a bilateral nonischemic central retinal vein occlusionscombined with artery occlusions in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome(AIDS). Methods: Case report. Results: A 22-year-old Chinese(male) with a positive human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) infection developed bilateral nonischemic central retinal vein occlusions combinedwith artery occlusions and severe vision loss. The manifestations of the fundus andfluorescein angiography were similar in both eyes.Conclusion: This case report provides the evidences that central retinal vein and arteryocclusions are probably part of the spectrum of AIDS vascular diseases.

  17. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States in 1986: etiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and dental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anneroth, G; Anneroth, I; Lynch, D P

    1986-12-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) results from a lymphotropic retrovirus (HTLV-III) infection and is characterized by specific opportunistic infections and malignancies. The virus is transmitted primarily by semen and blood. Infection is limited principally to defined risk groups, i.e., homosexual men and intravenous drug users. Head and neck manifestations include cervical lymphadenopathy and Kaposi's sarcoma. Oral manifestations include Kaposi's sarcoma, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, precocious periodontal disease, xerostomia, herpes simplex, recurrent aphthae, erythema multiforme, and venereal warts. Although HTLV-III is present in saliva, there are no reported cases of transmission secondary to dental procedures. Appropriate precautions and techniques are recommended in treating patients at risk for AIDS.

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency in HIV Infection: Not Only a Bone Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Mansueto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypovitaminosis D is a worldwide disorder, with a high prevalence in the general population of both Western and developing countries. In HIV patients, several studies have linked vitamin D status with bone disease, neurocognitive impairment, depression, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, infections, autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. In this review, we focus on the most recent epidemiological and experimental data dealing with the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and HIV infection. We analysed the extent of the problem, pathogenic mechanisms, clinical implications, and potential benefits of vitamin D supplementation in HIV-infected subjects.

  19. Intracellular replication-deficient Leishmania donovani induces long lasting protective immunity against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Dey, Ranadhir; Nylen, Susanne; Duncan, Robert; Sacks, David; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2009-08-01

    No vaccine is currently available for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani. This study addresses whether a live attenuated centrin gene-deleted L. donovani (LdCen1(-/-)) parasite can persist and be both safe and protective in animals. LdCen1(-/-) has a defect in amastigote replication both in vitro and ex vivo in human macrophages. Safety was shown by the lack of parasites in spleen and liver in susceptible BALB/c mice, immune compromised SCID mice, and human VL model hamsters 10 wk after infection. Mice immunized with LdCen1(-/-) showed early clearance of virulent parasite challenge not seen in mice immunized with heat killed parasites. Upon virulent challenge, the immunized mice displayed in the CD4(+) T cell population a significant increase of single and multiple cytokine (IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF) producing cells and IFN-gamma/IL10 ratio. Immunized mice also showed increased IgG2a immunoglobulins and NO production in macrophages. These features indicated a protective Th1-type immune response. The Th1 response correlated with a significantly reduced parasite burden in the spleen and no parasites in the liver compared with naive mice 10 wk post challenge. Protection was observed, when challenged even after 16 wk post immunization, signifying a sustained immunity. Protection by immunization with attenuated parasites was also seen in hamsters. Immunization with LdCen1(-/-) also cross-protected mice against infection with L. braziliensis that causes mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Results indicate that LdCen1(-/-) can be a safe and effective vaccine candidate against VL as well as mucocutaneous leishmaniasis causing parasites.

  20. Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cells Are the Canaries in the Coal Mine That Portend Later Life Immune Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiosa, Michael D; Tate, Everett R

    2015-10-01

    Disorders of the blood system are a significant and growing global health concern and include a spectrum of diseases ranging from aplastic anemia and leukemias to immune suppression. This array of hematological disorders is attributed to the fact that the blood system undergoes a perpetual cycle of turn over with aged and exhausted red and white blood cells undergoing daily replacement. The foundational cells of this replenishment process are comprised of rare hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) located in the bone marrow that possess the dual function of long-term self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. This constant turnover makes the hematopoietic system uniquely vulnerable to changes in the environment that impact multilineage differentiation, self-renewal, or both. Notably, environmental endocrine-disrupting exposures occurring during development, when HSCs are first emerging, can lead to alterations in HSC programming that impacts the blood and immune systems throughout life. In this review, we describe the process of fetal hematopoiesis and provide an overview of the intrauterine environmental and endocrine-disrupting compounds that disrupt this process. Finally, we describe research opportunities for fetal HSCs as potential sentinels of later-life blood and immune system disorders.

  1. Factors of Innate and Adaptive Local Immunity in Children with Primary Deficiencies of Antibody Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Chernyshova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In 40 children with various types of primary immunodeficiencies (PID of antibody formation we examined factors of local immunity in saliva. It is found that in the saliva of children with PID of antibody formation in comparison with immunocompetent children the concentration of factors of adaptive immunity is significantly reduced. Lack of adaptive immunity in the PID of antibody formation to some extent is compensated by increased concentrations of innate immune factors on the mucous membranes — the free Sc, as well as lactoferrin in selective immunodeficiency of IgA. At PID of antibody formation we observed increased TNF-α level in the saliva, which may indicate the persistence of local inflammation on the membranes of the respiratory tract.

  2. Systematic Characterization of the Immune Response to Gluten and Casein in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    of the Immune Response to Gluten and Casein in Autism Spectrum Disorders PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Armin Alaedini, PhD CONTRACTING... Gluten and Casein in Autism Spectrum Disorders 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH 10-1-0887 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...heterogeneity within this spectrum and the lack of biomarkers to characterize disease phenotypes and to understand treatment outcome. Dietary gluten

  3. Vitamin D across growth hormone (GH) disorders: From GH deficiency to GH excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciresi, A; Giordano, C

    2017-04-01

    The interplay between vitamin D and the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I system is very complex and to date it is not fully understood. GH directly regulates renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity, although the action of GH in modulating vitamin D metabolism may also be IGF-I mediated. On the other hand, vitamin D increases circulating IGF-I and the vitamin D deficiency should be normalized before measurement of IGF-I concentrations to obtain reliable and unbiased IGF-I values. Indeed, linear growth after treatment of nutritional vitamin D deficiency seems to be mediated through activation of the GH/IGF-I axis and it suggests an important role of vitamin D as a link between the proliferating cartilage cells of the growth plate and GH/IGF-I secretion. Vitamin D levels are commonly lower in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) than in controls, with a variable prevalence of insufficiency or deficiency, and this condition may worsen the already known cardiovascular and metabolic risk of GHD, although this finding is not common to all studies. In addition, data on the impact of GH treatment on vitamin D levels in GHD patients are quite conflicting. Conversely, in active acromegaly, a condition characterized by a chronic GH excess, both increased and decreased vitamin D levels have been highlighted, and the interplay between vitamin D and the GH/IGF-I axis becomes even more complicated when we consider the acromegaly treatment, both medical and surgical. The current review summarizes the available data on vitamin D in the main disorders of the GH/IGF-I axis, providing an overview of the current state of the art.

  4. Deficient innate immunity, thymopoiesis, and gene expression response to radiation in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wing; Neale, Geoffrey; Behm, Fred; Iyengar, Rekha; Finkelstein, David; Kastan, Michael B; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-06-01

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at an increased risk of developing secondary malignant neoplasms. Radiation and chemotherapy can cause mutations and cytogenetic abnormalities and induce genomic instability. Host immunity and appropriate DNA damage responses are critical inhibitors of carcinogenesis. Therefore, we sought to determine the long-term effects of ALL treatment on immune function and response to DNA damage. Comparative studies on 14 survivors in first complete remission and 16 siblings were conducted. In comparison to siblings on the cells that were involved in adaptive immunity, the patients had either higher numbers (CD19+ B cells and CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells) or similar numbers (alphabetaT cells and CD45RO+/RA- memory T cells) in the blood. In contrast, patients had lower numbers of all lymphocyte subsets involved in innate immunity (gammadeltaT cells and all NK subsets, including KIR2DL1+ cells, KIR2DL2/L3+ cells, and CD16+ cells), and lower natural cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells. Thymopoiesis was lower in patients, as demonstrated by less CD45RO-/RA+ naïve T cell and less SjTREC levels in the blood, whereas the Vbeta spectratype complexity score was similar. Array of gene expression response to low-dose radiation showed that about 70% of the probesets had a reduced response in patients. One of these genes, SCHIP-1, was also among the top-ranked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) during the whole-genome scanning by SNP microarray analysis. ALL survivors were deficient in innate immunity, thymopoiesis, and DNA damage responses to radiation. These defects may contribute to their increased likelihood of second malignancy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The kinetics of early T and B cell immune recovery after bone marrow transplantation in RAG-2-deficient SCID patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atar Lev

    Full Text Available The kinetics of T and B cell immune recovery after bone marrow transplantation (BMT is affected by many pre- and post-transplant factors. Because of the profoundly depleted baseline T and B cell immunity in recombination activating gene 2 (RAG-2-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID patients, some of these factors are eliminated, and the immune recovery after BMT can then be clearly assessed. This process was followed in ten SCID patients in parallel to their associated transplant-related complications. Early peripheral presence of T and B cells was observed in 8 and 4 patients, respectively. The latter correlated with pre-transplant conditioning therapy. Cells from these patients carried mainly signal joint DNA episomes, indicative of newly derived B and T cells. They were present before the normalization of the T cell receptor (TCR and the B cell receptor (BCR repertoire. Early presentation of the ordered TCR gene rearrangements after BMT occurred simultaneously, but this pattern was heterogeneous over time, suggesting different and individual thymic recovery processes. Our findings early after transplant could suggest the long-term patients' clinical outcome. Early peripheral presence of newly produced B and T lymphocytes from their production and maturation sites after BMT suggests donor stem cell origin rather than peripheral expansion, and is indicative of successful outcome. Peripheral detection of TCR excision circles and kappa-deleting recombination excision circles in RAG-2-deficient SCID post-BMT are early markers of T and B cell reconstitution, and can be used to monitor outcome and tailor specific therapy for patients undergoing BMT.

  6. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Mucin Expression and Suppresses the Mucosal Immune Function of the Respiratory Tract in Chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Shaoqiong; Liu, Guanhua; Zhao, Jingpeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Wang, Xiaojuan; Song, Zhigang; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The chicken immune system is immature at the time of hatching. The development of the respiratory immune system after hatching is vital to young chicks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary vitamin A supplement levels on respiratory mucin and IgA production in chicks. In this study, 120 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 4 groups consisting of three replicates of 10 broilers and subjected to dietary vitamin A supplement levels of 0, 1,500, 6,000, or 12,000 IU/kg for seven days. Compared with control birds, vitamin A supplementation significantly increased the mucin and IgA levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as the IgA level in serum. In the lungs, vitamin A supplementation downregulated TNF-α and EGFR mRNA expression. The TGF-β and MUC5AC mRNA expression levels were upregulated by vitamin A supplementation at a dose of 6,000 IU/kg, and the IL-13 mRNA expression level was increased at the 12,000 IU/kg supplement level. Vitamin A deficiency (control) significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of MUC2, IgA, EGFR, IL-13 and TGF-β in trachea tissue. Histological section analysis revealed that the number of goblet cells in the tracheal epithelium was less in the 0 and 12,000 IU/kg vitamin A supplement groups than in the other groups. In conclusion, vitamin A deficiency suppressed the immunity of the airway by decreasing the IgA and mucin concentrations in neonatal chicks. This study suggested that a suitable level of vitamin A is essential for the secretion of IgA and mucin in the respiratory tract by regulating the gene expression of cytokines and epithelial growth factors.

  7. Effect of threonine deficiency on intestinal integrity and immune response to coccidiosis in broiler chicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    For this study, threonine (Thr) deficiency was hypothesized to exacerbate the intestinal damage induced by feed withdrawal and coccidiosis infection because of its high obligatory requirement of the gut. Two dietary Thr treatments (0.49 and 0.90%) were fed to chicks from 1-21 d of age. At 13 d of a...

  8. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant for Patients With Primary Immune Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-15

    SCID; Omenn's Syndrome; Reticular Dysgenesis; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; CD40 Ligand Deficiency; Hyper IgM Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Griscelli Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Langerhan's Cell Histiocytosis

  9. Utility of immune response-derived biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oever, J. ten; Netea, M.G.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating between inflammatory disorders is difficult, but important for a rational use of antimicrobial agents. Biomarkers reflecting the host immune response may offer an attractive strategy to predict the etiology of an inflammatory process and can thus be of help in decision making. We

  10. Congenic mice: cutting tools for complex immune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogner, Ute C; Avner, Philip

    2003-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are, in general, under complex genetic control and subject to strong interactions between genetics and the environment. Greater knowledge of the underlying genetics will provide immunologists with a framework for study of the immune dysregulation that occurs in such diseases. Ascertaining the number of genes that are involved and their characterization have, however, proven to be difficult. Improved methods of genetic analysis and the availability of a draft sequence of the complete mouse genome have markedly improved the outlook for such research, and they have emphasized the advantages of mice as a model system. In this review, we provide an overview of the genetic analysis of autoimmune diseases and of the crucial role of congenic and consomic mouse strains in such research.

  11. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines.

  12. Deficiencies and excessive human complement system activation in disorders of multifarious etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Complement is an integral part of the immune system protecting the host organism against invasion and proliferation of various microorganisms. It is also involved in the removal of the body's own damaged and altered cells. Activation of the complement system is a very precise process and it is strictly controlled by regulatory proteins present in both plasma and at host cells' surfaces. C3 protein plays a major role in the complement activation and generation of immune responses. Deficiencies of the C3 and other complement components, so-called early and late complement proteins, contribute to the emergence of recurrent bacterial, viral and fungal infections. The low level of mannose-binding lectin is also important. This protein plays a protective role in the early stages of infection and in the control of inflammation. Its deficit is one of the most common reasons for human immunodeficiency, observed in microbial infections as well as in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. On the other hand, the excessive activation of complement proteins is often discovered to be the reason for many diseases. These include e.g. autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer's syndrome, schizophrenia, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, angioedema, macular degeneration, and Crohn's disease.

  13. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive beige- like anchor (LRBA Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

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    Shahrzad Bakhtiar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and vitiligo. LPS-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1 presented at six months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2 presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency.Using whole-exome sequencing (WES we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29 in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge our patient (patient 2 is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are necessary to

  14. Serine protease inhibitor 6-deficient mice have increased neutrophil immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Manling; Liu, Ni; Park, Sun-Mi; Wang, Yue; Byrne, Susan; Murmann, Andrea E; Bahr, Scott; Peter, Marcus E; Olson, Steven T; Belaaouaj, Abderrazzaq; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2007-10-01

    Inflammation is a localized, protective response to trauma or microbial invasion that destroys the injurious agent and the injured tissue. Neutrophil elastase (NE), a serine protease stored in the azurophil granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, digests microbes after phagocytosis. NE can also digest microbes extracellularly but is associated with tissue damage and inflammatory disease. In this study, we show that polymorphonuclear neutrophils from mice deficient in serine protease inhibitor 6, a weak intracellular NE inhibitor, had increased susceptibility to self-inflicted lysis because of increased NE activity. The resulting transient increase in local extracellular NE activity was within a narrow range that resulted in the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa but did not damage the lung. Therefore, deficiency in a weak intracellular inhibitor of NE results in an acute inflammatory response that protects from P. aeruginosa but does not cause lung disease.

  15. Molecular pathology of mismatch repair deficient tumours with emphasis on immune escape mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierssen, Jan Willem Frederik

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes molecular methods to distinguish separate colon tumour entities. Furthermore, it shows that distinct immune escape mechanisms, in particular distinct mechanisms of corrupting the HLA system, are operational in subsets of colon tumours. The apparent necessity of some colon tumou

  16. Tracking progress toward elimination of iodine deficiency disorders in Jharkhand, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patro Binod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the current status of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD in the state of Jharkhand? Objectives: (1 To determine the status of iodine deficiency in the state. (2 To determine the availability and cost of adequately iodized salt at the retail shops. (3 To study the perceptions of the community regarding iodine deficiency, salt and iodized salt. Design: A cross-sectional community-based survey. Study setting: Thirty clusters selected through the probability proportion to size (PPS sampling in the state of Jharkhand. Study participants: Children aged 6-12 years, households, retail shopkeepers and opinion leaders. Study tool: Quantitative and qualitative methodology using a pretested questionnaire and focus group discussion used to carry out the community-based survey. Results: Total goiter rate (TGR was 0.9%. Median urinary iodine level was 173.2 µg/L. The proportion of individuals with urinary iodine levels less than 100 and 50 µg/L were 26.4% and 10%, respectively. Slightly less than two-thirds (64.2% of the households were found to be consuming adequately iodized salt as measured by titration (greater than 15 ppm. Iodized salt was available across the state and the cost varied between Re. 1 and Rs. 8 per kilogram. A common belief among the community was that iodized salt is equivalent to refined packet salt that is further equivalent to expensive salt. Conclusion: The results of the present survey show that the iodine nutrition in the state of Jharkhand is optimal. Considering that the consumption of adequately iodized salt should increase from 64.2% to the goal of more than 90%, sustained efforts are required in this place to consolidate the current coverage of adequately iodized salt and increase it to greater than 90%.

  17. Evaluation of the knowledge level of psychology students on Attention Deficiency and Hyperactivity Disorder

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    A. Şebnem Soysal

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Since ADHD is a matter of clinical diagnosis, occupational proficiency gains utmost importance on behalf of psychologists. The aim of this research is to determine the knowledge level of students on attention deficiency and hyperactivity disorder, who study in different classes of the Psychology Department in Uludağ University. The study is conducted on a total of 151 volunteering students from four different classes in the Psychology Department of Uludağ University. A questionnaire was administered to measure the knowledge level of these students on ADHD, who participated in the research. The points received from the questionnaire that was used to measure the participants’ level of knowledge on ADHD were compared in terms of sex, age and socio-demographic characteristics and no significant differences were found among the groups. The results of the study demonstrate that pschology students’ accumulation of knowledge on ADHD is unsatisfactory.

  18. Genetic deficiency of the mitochondrial protein PGAM5 causes a Parkinson's-like movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Springer, Danielle A; Allen, Michele D; Zheng, Lixin; Chao, Brittany; Zhang, Yan; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Lenardo, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that selectively disposes of dysfunctional mitochondria. Delineating the molecular regulation of mitophagy is of great importance because defects in this process lead to a variety of mitochondrial diseases. Here we report that mice deficient for the mitochondrial protein, phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5), displayed a Parkinson's-like movement phenotype. We determined biochemically that PGAM5 is required for the stabilization of the mitophagy-inducing protein PINK1 on damaged mitochondria. Loss of PGAM5 disables PINK1-mediated mitophagy in vitro and leads to dopaminergic neurodegeneration and mild dopamine loss in vivo. Our data indicate that PGAM5 is a regulator of mitophagy essential for mitochondrial turnover and serves a cytoprotective function in dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Moreover, PGAM5 may provide a molecular link to study mitochondrial homeostasis and the pathogenesis of a movement disorder similar to Parkinson's disease.

  19. Genetic deficiency of the mitochondrial protein PGAM5 causes a Parkinson’s-like movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Springer, Danielle A.; Allen, Michele D.; Zheng, Lixin; Chao, Brittany; Zhang, Yan; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Lenardo, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that selectively disposes of dysfunctional mitochondria. Delineating the molecular regulation of mitophagy is of great importance because defects in this process lead to a variety of mitochondrial diseases. Here we report that mice deficient for the mitochondrial protein, phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5), displayed a Parkinson’s-like movement phenotype. We determined biochemically that PGAM5 is required for the stabilization of the mitophagy-inducing protein PINK1 on damaged mitochondria. Loss of PGAM5 disables PINK1-mediated mitophagy in vitro and leads to dopaminergic neurodegeneration and mild dopamine loss in vivo. Our data indicate that PGAM5 is a regulator of mitophagy essential for mitochondrial turnover and serves a cytoprotective function in dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Moreover, PGAM5 may provide a molecular link to study mitochondrial homeostasis and the pathogenesis of a movement disorder similar to Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25222142

  20. Nutrition, evolution and thyroid hormone levels - a link to iodine deficiency disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    An increased iodine requirement as a result of significant changes in human nutrition rather than a decreased environmental iodine supply is suggested to represent the main cause of the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). The pathomechanism proposed is based on the fact that serum concentrations of thyroid hormones, especially of trijodothyronine (T3), are dependent on the amount of dietary carbohydrate. High-carbohydrate diets are associated with significantly higher serum T3 concentrations, compared with very low-carbohydrate diets. While our Paleolithic ancestors subsisted on a very low carbohydrate/high protein diet, the agricultural revolution about 10,000 years ago brought about a significant increase in dietary carbohydrate. These nutritional changes have increased T3 levels significantly. Higher T3 levels are associated with an enhanced T3 production and an increased iodine requirement. The higher iodine requirement exceeds the availability of iodine from environmental sources in many regions of the world, resulting in the development of IDD.

  1. Immune deficiency augments the prevalence of p53 loss of heterozygosity in spontaneous tumors but not bi-directional loss of heterozygosity in bone marrow progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetzer, Yoav; Napchan, Yael; Kaufman, Tom; Molchadsky, Alina; Tal, Perry; Goldfinger, Naomi; Rotter, Varda

    2017-03-15

    p53 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is a frequent event in tumors of somatic and Li-Fraumeni syndrome patients harboring p53 mutation. Here, we focused on resolving a possible crosstalk between the immune-system and p53 LOH. Previously, we reported that p53 heterozygous bone-marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells undergo p53 LOH in-vivo. Surprisingly, the loss of either the wild-type p53 allele or mutant p53 allele was detected with a three-to-one ratio in favor of losing the mutant allele. In this study, we examined whether the immune-system can affect the LOH directionality in bone marrow progenitors. We found that mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from immune-deficient mice exhibited the same preference of losing the mutant p53 allele as immune-competent matched cells, nevertheless, these animals showed a significantly shorter tumor-free survival, indicating the possible involvement of immune surveillance in this model. Surprisingly, spontaneous tumors of p53 heterozygous immune-deficient mice exhibited a significantly higher incidence of p53 LOH compared to that observed in tumors derived of p53 heterozygous immune-competent mice. These findings indicate that the immune-system may affect the p53 LOH prevalence in spontaneous tumors. Thus suggesting that the immune-system may recognize and clear cells that underwent p53 LOH, whereas in immune-compromised mice, those cells will form tumors with shorter latency. In individuals with a competent immune-system, p53 LOH independent pathways may induce malignant transformation which requires a longer tumor latency. Moreover, this data may imply that the current immunotherapy treatment aimed at abrogating the inhibition of cellular immune checkpoints may be beneficial for LFS patients.

  2. PEST family phosphatases in immunity, autoimmunity, and autoinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veillette, André; Rhee, Inmoo; Souza, Cleiton Martins; Davidson, Dominique

    2009-03-01

    The proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich (PEST) family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes proline-enriched phosphatase (PEP)/lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), PTP-PEST, and PTP-hematopoietic stem cell fraction (HSCF). PEP/LYP is a potent inhibitor of T-cell activation, principally by suppressing the activity of Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs). This function seems to be dependent, at least in part, on the ability of PEP to bind C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), a PTK also involved in inactivating Src kinases. Interestingly, a polymorphism of LYP in humans (R620W) is a significant risk factor for autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. The R620W mutation may be a 'gain-of-function' mutation. In non-hematopoietic cells, PTP-PEST is a critical regulator of adhesion and migration. This effect correlates with the aptitude of PTP-PEST to dephosphorylate cytoskeletal proteins such as Cas, focal adhesion associated-kinase (FAK), Pyk2, and PSTPIP. While not established, a similar function may also exist in immune cells. Additionally, overexpression studies provided an indication that PTP-PEST may be a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation. Interestingly, mutations in a PTP-PEST- and PTP-HSCF-interacting protein, PSTPIP1, were identified in humans with pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome and familial recurrent arthritis, two autoinflammatory diseases. These mutations abrogate the ability of PSTPIP1 to bind PTP-PEST and PTP-HSCF, suggesting that these two PTPs may be negative regulators of inflammation.

  3. Eating disorders: a situation of malnutrition with peculiar changes in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, A

    2000-03-01

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are significant public health concerns for a great deal of the population, and thus are even considered to be epidemics. These syndromes have a common aim: the pursuit of a desirable and extremely low weight, which is obviously very far from the ideal body weight. Therefore, these patients show abnormal food behavior, leading to a situation of malnutrition. Nutrients play an important role in the development and functionality of the immune system. Thus, the assessment of immunological parameters acquires great interest as a useful tool to evaluate the nutritional status of these patients. In addition, it is very well known that a depleted immune system as a consequence of malnutrition is linked to an increased susceptibility to infections. However, an extensive literature has pointed out that anorexic patients, even though severely malnourished, are relatively free from infectious diseases. As the immune system is altered by distorted food behaviors, such as in case of eating disorders, the awareness of the characteristics of other systems involved in these pathologies, and therefore altered, would be very helpful for the understanding of the mechanisms triggered in these syndromes. In fact, the interactions among the immune system and the remaining systems in eating disorders are beginning to be studied. Finally, the main goal is to limit the evolution of these illnesses through an early diagnosis and appropriate therapy to subsequently get a constant and definitive cure for the patients.

  4. Impact of innate immunity in a subset of children with autism spectrum disorders: a case control study

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    Cushing-Ruby Agnes

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD evaluated in our clinic, there appears to be a subset that can be clinically distinguished from other ASD children because of frequent infections (usually viral accompanied by worsening behavioural symptoms and/or loss/decrease in acquired skills. This study assessed whether these clinical features of this ASD subset are associated with atopy, asthma, food allergy (FA, primary immunodeficiency (PID, or innate immune responses important in viral infections. Methods This study included the ASD children described above (ASD test, N = 26 and the following controls: ASD controls (N = 107, non-ASD controls with FA (N = 24, non-ASD controls with chronic rhinosinusitis/recurrent otitis media (CRS/ROM; N = 38, and normal controls (N = 43. We assessed prevalence of atopy, asthma, FA, CRS/ROM, and PID. Innate immune responses were assessed by measuring production of proinflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in response to agonists of Toll-like receptors (TLRs, with or without pre-treatment of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a TLR4 agonist. Results Non-IgE mediated FA was equally prevalent in both ASD test and ASD control groups, occurring at higher frequency than in the non-ASD controls. Allergic rhinitis, atopic/non-atopic asthma, and atopic dermatitis were equally prevalent among the study groups except for the CRS/ROM group in which non-atopic asthma was more prevalent (52.6%. CRS/ROM and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD were more prevalent in the ASD test group than in the ASD control, FA, and normal control groups: 23.1% vs. Conclusion Clinical features of the ASD test group were not associated with atopy, asthma, FA, or PID in our study but may be associated with altered TLR responses mediating neuro-immune interactions.

  5. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantations for Primary Immune Deficiencies: 3 Decades of Experience From a Tertiary Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousso, Sharon Z; Shamriz, Oded; Zilkha, Amir; Braun, Jacques; Averbuch, Diana; Or, Reuven; Weintraub, Michael; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Stepensky, Polina

    2015-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the leading treatment for the majority of severe primary immune deficiency (PID). This study aims to analyze changes in outcome over time. We conducted a retrospective analysis of HSCT in children with PID in a tertiary medical center over the period of 1983 to 2012. We identified 93 children with PID with a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 29 d to 21.2 y) after HSCT. The 2-year survival rates after HSCT for children with severe combined immune deficiency, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis/lymphoproliferative disease, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, granulocyte defect, and undefined PID were 65.7%±6.8%, 80%±10.3%, 83.3%±15.2%, 75%±12.5%, and 25%±21.7%, respectively. Survival was associated with year of HSCT and matching. The hazard ratio (HR) (95% CI) for HSCT done in 1983 to 1999 compared with 2000 to 2012 and for matched (related and unrelated) compared with mismatched donor were 2.14 (0.99 to 4.653) and 3.07 (1.46 to 6.4), respectively. Survival was not associated with age, sex of the recipient, underlying PID, conditioning regimen, and presence of acute graft-versus-host disease. After adjustment to the underlying PID, donor and use of fludarabine-based conditioning, the HR (95% CI) for HSCT from the year 2000 was 4.69 (range, 1.4 to 15.45). Advances in HSCT over time have improved the survival of children with PID.

  6. Altered Innate Immunity Confers Staphylococcus aureus resistance in O-Glycosylation Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans bus Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    the cuticle of Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetics 187, 141-155. 45. Gu, X. (2003). Evolution of duplicate genes versus genetic robustness against null...aureus. This work demonstrates a genetic link between O-glycosylation and expression of key components of the innate immune response...Introduction: The bus mutants were isolated in genetic screens for altered susceptibility to the nematode specific pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum

  7. Immune disorders in sepsis and their treatment as a significant problem of modern intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łysenko, Lidia; Leśnik, Patrycja; Nelke, Kamil; Gerber, Hanna

    2017-08-22

    Despite the great advances in the treatment of sepsis over the past 20 years, sepsis remains the main cause of death in intensive care units. In the context of new possibilities of treating sepsis, a comprehensive response of the immune system to the infection, immunosuppression, in particular, has in recent years gained considerable interest. There is vast evidence pointing to the correlation between comorbid immunosuppression and an increased risk of recurrent infections and death. Immune disorders may impact the clinical course of sepsis. This applies in particular to patients with deteriorated clinical response to infections. They usually suffer from comorbidities and conditions accompanied by immunosuppression. Sepsis disrupts innate and adaptive immunity. The key to diagnose the immune disorders in sepsis and undertake targeted immunomodulatory therapy is to define the right biomarkers and laboratory methods, which permit prompt "bedside" diagnosis. Flow cytometry is a laboratory tool that meets these criteria. Two therapeutic methods are currently being suggested to restore the immune homeostasis of sepsis patients. Excessive inflammatory response may be controlled through extracorporeal blood purification techniques, in large part derived from renal replacement therapy. These are such techniques as high-volume haemofiltration, cascade haemofiltration, plasma exchange, coupled plasma filtration and adsorption, high-absorption membranes, high cut-off membranes. The main task of theses techniques is the selective elimination of middle molecular weight molecules, such as cytokines. Pharmacotherapy with the use of such immunostimulants as interleukin 7, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon gamma, PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 antagonists, intravenous immunoglobulins may help fight immunosuppressive immune disorders.

  8. Immune complex glomerulonephritis following bone marrow transplantation in C3 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Welch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of circulating complement in host defense and immune disease is well established. Although a number of cells and tissues are capable of synthesizing complement components locally, the importance of such local synthesis in immune disease has been difficult to establish. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used bone marrow transplantation (BMT between C3 knockout (C3KO and wild type (WT mice to construct animals that were discordant for systemic (hepatic and local (monocytic C3 synthetic capacity. An immune complex glomerulonephritis (GN was then induced using intraperitoneal injections of horse spleen apoferritin (HSA with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS adjuvant. All HSA/LPS animals developed a proliferative GN with glomerular infiltration by monocytes. By sensitive ELISA, monocyte C3 synthesis could be detected in C3KO animals transplanted with WT bone marrow cells. Despite this, there were no significant differences among groups of mice in measures of clinical (proteinuria, renal function or histologic (glomerular cellularity, crescents disease severity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this model of GN, local synthesis of C3 by infiltrating cells does not appear to be of pathologic importance.

  9. Postmenopausal osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis: The estrogen deficiency-immune mechanisms link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir-Koren, Rony; Livshits, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized, among other factors, by systemic bone loss, reaching ~50% prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This is roughly a doubled prevalence in comparison with age-matched non-RA women. Postmenopausal RA women are more likely to be sero-positive for the anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA). Our extensive review of recent scientific literature enabled us to propose several mechanisms as responsible for the accelerated bone loss in ACPA(+) RA postmenopausal women. Menopause-associated estrogen deficiency plays a major role in these pathological mechanisms, as follows. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A new mouse model of mild ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (spf-j displays cerebral amino acid perturbations at baseline and upon systemic immune activation.

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    Tatyana N Tarasenko

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD, OMIM# 311250 is an inherited X-linked urea cycle disorder that is characterized by hyperammonemia and orotic aciduria. In this report, we describe a new animal model of OTCD caused by a spontaneous mutation in the mouse Otc gene (c.240T>A, p.K80N. This transversion in exon 3 of ornithine transcarbamylase leads to normal levels of mRNA with low levels of mature protein and is homologous to a mutation that has also been described in a single patient affected with late-onset OTCD. With higher residual enzyme activity, spf-J were found to have normal plasma ammonia and orotate. Baseline plasma amino acid profiles were consistent with mild OTCD: elevated glutamine, and lower citrulline and arginine. In contrast to WT, spf-J displayed baseline elevations in cerebral amino acids with depletion following immune challenge with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. Our results indicate that the mild spf-J mutation constitutes a new mouse model that is suitable for mechanistic studies of mild OTCD and the exploration of cerebral pathophysiology during acute decompensation that characterizes proximal urea cycle dysfunction in humans.

  11. A new mouse model of mild ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (spf-j) displays cerebral amino acid perturbations at baseline and upon systemic immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N; Rosas, Odrick R; Singh, Larry N; Kristaponis, Kara; Vernon, Hilary; McGuire, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD, OMIM# 311250) is an inherited X-linked urea cycle disorder that is characterized by hyperammonemia and orotic aciduria. In this report, we describe a new animal model of OTCD caused by a spontaneous mutation in the mouse Otc gene (c.240T>A, p.K80N). This transversion in exon 3 of ornithine transcarbamylase leads to normal levels of mRNA with low levels of mature protein and is homologous to a mutation that has also been described in a single patient affected with late-onset OTCD. With higher residual enzyme activity, spf-J were found to have normal plasma ammonia and orotate. Baseline plasma amino acid profiles were consistent with mild OTCD: elevated glutamine, and lower citrulline and arginine. In contrast to WT, spf-J displayed baseline elevations in cerebral amino acids with depletion following immune challenge with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. Our results indicate that the mild spf-J mutation constitutes a new mouse model that is suitable for mechanistic studies of mild OTCD and the exploration of cerebral pathophysiology during acute decompensation that characterizes proximal urea cycle dysfunction in humans.

  12. Folate receptor alpha defect causes cerebral folate transport deficiency: a treatable neurodegenerative disorder associated with disturbed myelin metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinfeld, R.; Grapp, M.; Kraetzner, R.; Dreha-Kulaczewski, S.; Helms, G.; Dechent, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Grosso, S.; Gartner, J.

    2009-01-01

    Sufficient folate supplementation is essential for a multitude of biological processes and diverse organ systems. At least five distinct inherited disorders of folate transport and metabolism are presently known, all of which cause systemic folate deficiency. We identified an inherited brain-specifi

  13. Association of human TLR1 and TLR6 deficiency with altered immune responses to BCG vaccination in South African infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Kaur Randhawa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of effective immunoprophylaxis against tuberculosis (TB remains a global priority, but is hampered by a partially protective Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine and an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although host genetic factors may be a primary reason for BCG's variable and inadequate efficacy, this possibility has not been intensively examined. We hypothesized that Toll-like receptor (TLR variation is associated with altered in vivo immune responses to BCG. We examined whether functionally defined TLR pathway polymorphisms were associated with T cell cytokine responses in whole blood stimulated ex vivo with BCG 10 weeks after newborn BCG vaccination of South African infants. In the primary analysis, polymorphism TLR6_C745T (P249S was associated with increased BCG-induced IFN-γ in both discovery (n = 240 and validation (n = 240 cohorts. In secondary analyses of the combined cohort, TLR1_T1805G (I602S and TLR6_G1083C (synonymous were associated with increased IFN-γ, TLR6_G1083C and TLR6_C745T were associated with increased IL-2, and TLR1_A1188T was associated with increased IFN-γ and IL-2. For each of these polymorphisms, the hypo-responsive allele, as defined by innate immunity signaling assays, was associated with increased production of TH1-type T cell cytokines (IFN-γ or IL-2. After stimulation with TLR1/6 lipopeptide ligands, PBMCs from TLR1/6-deficient individuals (stratified by TLR1_T1805G and TLR6_C745T hyporesponsive genotypes secreted lower amounts of IL-6 and IL-10 compared to those with responsive TLR1/6 genotypes. In contrast, no IL-12p70 was secreted by PBMCs or monocytes. These data support a mechanism where TLR1/6 polymorphisms modulate TH1 T-cell polarization through genetic regulation of monocyte IL-10 secretion in the absence of IL-12. These studies provide evidence that functionally defined innate immune gene variants are associated with the

  14. B cell-specific deficiencies in mTOR limit humoral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuling; Pruitt, Margaret; Tran, Dena; Du Bois, Wendy; Zhang, Ke; Patel, Rushi; Hoover, Shelley; Simpson, R Mark; Simmons, John; Gary, Joy; Snapper, Clifford M; Casellas, Rafael; Mock, Beverly A

    2013-08-15

    Generation of high-affinity Abs in response to Ags/infectious agents is essential for developing long-lasting immune responses. B cell maturation and Ab responses to Ag stimulation require Ig somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) for high-affinity responses. Upon immunization with either the model Ag 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten (NP) conjugated to chicken γ globulin lysine (NP-CGG) or heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular type 14 protein (Pn14), knock-in (KI) mice hypomorphic for mTOR function had a decreased ability to form germinal centers, develop high-affinity anti-NP-specific or anti-Pn14-specific Abs, and perform SHM/CSR. Hypomorphic mTOR mice also had a high mortality (40%) compared with wild-type (WT) (0%) littermates and had lower pneumococcal surface protein A-specific Ab titers when immunized and challenged with live S. pneumoniae infection. Mice with mTOR deleted in their B cell lineage (knockout [KO]) also produced fewer splenic germinal centers and decreased high-affinity Ab responses to NP-CGG than did their WT littermates. CSR rates were lower in mTOR KI and KO mice, and pharmacologic inhibition of mTOR in WT B cells resulted in decreased rates of ex vivo CSR. RNA and protein levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a protein essential for SHM and CSR, were lower in B cells from both KI and B cell-specific KO mice, concomitant with increases in phosphorylated AKT and FOXO1. Rescue experiments increasing AID expression in KI B cells restored CSR levels to those in WT B cells. Thus, mTOR plays an important immunoregulatory role in the germinal center, at least partially through AID signaling, in generating high-affinity Abs.

  15. Seeding efficiency of primitive human hematopoietic cells in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immune deficiency mice: implications for stem cell frequency assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. van Hennik; A.E. de Koning (Alexandra); R.E. Ploemacher (Robert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractNonobese diabetic/severe combined immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse repopulating cells (SRC) have been proposed to represent a more primitive human stem cell subset than the cobblestone area-forming cell (CAFC) week (wk) 6 or the long-term

  16. Seeding efficiency of primitive human hematopoietic cells in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immune deficiency mice: implications for stem cell frequency assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. van Hennik; A.E. de Koning (Alexandra); R.E. Ploemacher (Robert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractNonobese diabetic/severe combined immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse repopulating cells (SRC) have been proposed to represent a more primitive human stem cell subset than the cobblestone area-forming cell (CAFC) week (wk) 6 or the long-term culture-initiatin

  17. Understanding deficient emotional self-regulation in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surman, Craig B H; Biederman, Joseph; Spencer, Thomas; Miller, Carolyn A; McDermott, Katie M; Faraone, Stephen V

    2013-09-01

    While symptoms of deficient emotional self-regulation (DESR) such as low frustration tolerance, temper outbursts, emotional impulsivity, and mood lability are commonly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about their nature. The main aim of this post hoc study was to examine the correlates of DESR in a large sample of adults with and without ADHD. Subjects were 206 adults with ADHD and 123 adults without ADHD from a family study of ADHD. Emotional impulsivity was operationalized using items from the Barkley Current Behavior Scale. Subjects were comprehensively assessed for psychiatric comorbidity using structured diagnostic interview methodology. We used the Quality of Life, Enjoyment, and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (QLES-Q-SF) and Social Adjustment Scale-Self-report (SAS-SR) to assess quality of life and psychosocial functioning. DESR was more common among ADHD compared with non-ADHD adults, and 55% of adults with ADHD reported extreme DESR of greater severity than 95% of control subjects. The association of ADHD and DESR was not entirely accounted for by either current or lifetime comorbid disorders. DESR was also associated with significant functional impairment as evaluated by the QLES-Q-SF and SAS-SR, and with reduced marital status, as well as higher risk for traffic accidents and arrests. DESR adversely impacts quality of life in adults with ADHD. More work is needed to further evaluate DESR in clinical and investigational studies of subjects with ADHD.

  18. Dysregulated TLR3-dependent signaling and innate immune activation in superoxide-deficient macrophages from nonobese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleme, Maria C; Lei, Weiqi; Burg, Ashley R; Goh, Kah Yong; Metz, Allison; Steele, Chad; Tse, Hubert M

    2012-05-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory cytokines produced by macrophages and other innate immune cells destroy pancreatic β cells while promoting autoreactive T cell maturation. Superoxide-deficient nonobese diabetic mice (NOD.Ncf1(m1J)) are resistant to spontaneous diabetes, revealing the integral role of ROS signaling in T1D. Here, we evaluate the innate immune activation state of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BM-Mϕ) from NOD and NOD.Ncf1(m1J) mice after poly(I:C)-induced Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) signaling. We show that ROS synthesis is required for efficient activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway and concomitant expression of TLR3 and the cognate adaptor molecule, TRIF. Poly(I:C)-stimulated NOD.Ncf1(m1J) BM-Mϕ exhibited a 2- and 10-fold decrease in TNF-α and IFN-β proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, respectively, in contrast to NOD BM-Mϕ. Optimal expression of IFN-α/β is not solely dependent on superoxide synthesis, but requires p47(phox) to function in a NOX-independent manner to mediate type I interferon synthesis. Interestingly, MHC-II I-A(g7) expression necessary for CD4 T cell activation is increased 2-fold relative to NOD, implicating a role for superoxide in I-A(g7) downregulation. These findings suggest that defective innate immune-pattern-recognition receptor activation and subsequent decrease in TNF-α and IFN-β proinflammatory cytokine synthesis necessary for autoreactive T cell maturation may contribute to the T1D protection observed in NOD.Ncf1(m1J) mice.

  19. Differential Impact of LPG-and PG-Deficient Leishmania major Mutants on the Immune Response of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Favila

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania major infection induces robust interleukin-12 (IL12 production in human dendritic cells (hDC, ultimately resulting in Th1-mediated immunity and clinical resolution. The surface of Leishmania parasites is covered in a dense glycocalyx consisting of primarily lipophosphoglycan (LPG and other phosphoglycan-containing molecules (PGs, making these glycoconjugates the likely pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS responsible for IL12 induction.Here we explored the role of parasite glycoconjugates on the hDC IL12 response by generating L. major Friedlin V1 mutants defective in LPG alone, (FV1 lpg1-, or generally deficient for all PGs, (FV1 lpg2-. Infection with metacyclic, infective stage, L. major or purified LPG induced high levels of IL12B subunit gene transcripts in hDCs, which was abrogated with FV1 lpg1- infections. In contrast, hDC infections with FV1 lpg2- displayed increased IL12B expression, suggesting other PG-related/LPG2 dependent molecules may act to dampen the immune response. Global transcriptional profiling comparing WT, FV1 lpg1-, FV1 lpg2- infections revealed that FV1 lpg1- mutants entered hDCs in a silent fashion as indicated by repression of gene expression. Transcription factor binding site analysis suggests that LPG recognition by hDCs induces IL-12 in a signaling cascade resulting in Nuclear Factor κ B (NFκB and Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF mediated transcription.These data suggest that L. major LPG is a major PAMP recognized by hDC to induce IL12-mediated protective immunity and that there is a complex interplay between PG-baring Leishmania surface glycoconjugates that result in modulation of host cellular IL12.

  20. Nogo-receptor 1 deficiency has no influence on immune cell repertoire or function during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Litwak

    Full Text Available The potential role of Nogo-66 Receptor 1 (NgR1 on immune cell phenotypes and their activation during neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, is unclear. To further understand the function of this receptor on haematopoietically-derived cells, phenotypic and functional analyses were performed using NgR1-deficient (ngr1-/- animals. Flow cytometry-based phenotypic analyses performed on blood, spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, bone marrow and central nervous-system (CNS-infiltrating blood cells revealed no immunological defects in naïve ngr1-/- animals versus wild-type littermate (WTLM controls. EAE was induced by either recombinant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (rMOG, a model in which B cells are considered to contribute pathogenically, or by MOG35-55 peptide, a B cell-independent model. We have demonstrated that in ngr1-/- mice injected with MOG35-55, a significant reduction in the severity of EAE correlated with reduced axonal damage present in the spinal cord when compared to their WTLM controls. However, despite a reduction in axonal damage observed in the CNS of ngr1-/- mice at the chronic stage of disease, no clinical differences could be attributed to a specific genotype when rMOG was used as the encephalitogen. Following MOG35-55-induction of EAE, we could not derive any major changes to the immune cell populations analyzed between ngr1-/- and WTLM mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that NgR1 has little if any effects on the repertoire of immune cells, their activation and trafficking to the CNS.

  1. Iron Deficiency Parameters in Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percinel, Ipek; Yazici, Kemal Utku; Ustundag, Bilal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare iron deficiency parameters in patients with stimulant-naive attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and healthy controls, to investigate whether there are differences among the ADHD presentations, and to evaluate the relationship between ADHD symptom severity and serum ferritin levels. In addition, ADHD-Predominantly Inattentive (ADHD-PI) patients with restrictive hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms were evaluated as a separate group with "restrictive inattention presentation" (ADHD-Rest) and were compared with other groups. Patients with ADHD-Rest are typically defined as having six or more symptoms of inattention and fewer than three symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity. A total of 200 ADHD cases consisting of 100 ADHD-Combine (ADHD-C) and 100 ADHD-PI and a total of 100 healthy control cases were included in the study. The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version was performed in a semi-structured interview during the diagnosis. The Turgay DSM-IV-Based Child and Adolescent Behavior Disorders Screening and Rating Scale, the Conners' Rating Scale-Revised: Long Form (Parent-Teacher) (CPRSR:L, CTRS-R:L) were used for clinical evaluation. Hemogram, serum iron, iron binding capacity and serum ferritin levels were assessed. There were no significant differences between the ADHD patients and the healthy control cases in terms of iron deficiency parameters. Further, there were no significant differences among the ADHD presentations in terms of the same parameters, nor were there any significant differences when the groups were examined after the identification of the ADHD-Rest. The CPRS-R:L Hyperactivity and the CTRS-R:L Hyperactivity scores were negatively correlated with serum ferritin level in the ADHD group. To our knowledge, our current study is the first to compare serum ferritin levels in ADHD-Rest with other presentations of ADHD, and included the largest

  2. Adaptive Immune Response to Model Antigens Is Impaired in Murine Leukocyte-Adhesion Deficiency-1 Revealing Elevated Activation Thresholds In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Peters

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Absence of β2 integrins (CD11/CD18 leads to leukocyte-adhesion deficiency-1 (LAD1, a rare primary immunodeficiency syndrome. Although extensive in vitro work has established an essential function of β2 integrins in adhesive and signaling properties for cells of the innate and adaptive immune system, their respective participation in an altered adaptive immunity in LAD1 patients are complex and only partly understood in vivo. Therefore, we investigated adaptive immune responses towards different T-dependent antigens in a murine LAD1 model of β2 integrin-deficiency (CD18−/−. CD18−/− mice generated only weak IgG responses after immunization with tetanus toxoid (TT. In contrast, robust hapten- and protein-specific immune responses were observed after immunization with highly haptenated antigens such as (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl21 acetyl chicken γ globulin (NP21-CG, even though regularly structured germinal centers with specificity for the defined antigens/haptens in CD18−/− mice remained absent. However, a decrease in the hapten/protein ratio lowered the efficacy of immune responses in CD18−/− mice, whereas a mere reduction of the antigen dose was less crucial. Importantly, haptenation of TT with NP (NP-TT efficiently restored a robust IgG response also to TT. Our findings may stimulate further studies on a modification of vaccination strategies using highly haptenated antigens in individuals suffering from LAD1.

  3. Epidermal filaggrin deficiency mediates increased systemic T-helper 17 immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, C. M.; Petersen, T. H.; Bandier, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cellular T-helper (Th)17 infiltrates dominate skin inflammation in filaggrin-deficient flaky tail (ft/ft) mice, and Th17 cells are found in both the skin and blood of patients with acute atopic dermatitis. However, the potential role of loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene...... (FLG) for increased peripheral Th17 cells is unclear. Objectives: To study whether mutations in FLG influence the frequency of peripheral Th17 cells. Methods: We studied blood samples from six adults with mutations in FLG and five controls without mutations for frequencies of cytokine-producing CD4+ T...... increased frequency of peripheral Th17 cells in FLG mutation carriers when compared with WT individuals. Mouse studies showed increased frequency of peripheral Th17 cells in adult ft/ft mice but not in 2-week-old ft/ft mice. Moreover, altered TCR Vβ-chain repertoire was found in ft/ft mice when compared...

  4. IL-15 deficient tax mice reveal a role for IL-1α in tumor immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Rauch

    Full Text Available IL-15 is recognized as a promising candidate for tumor immunotherapy and has been described as both a promoter of cancer and a promoter of anti-cancer immunity. IL-15 was discovered in cells transformed by HTLV-1, the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and the human retrovirus that carries the Tax oncogene. We have developed the TAX-LUC mouse model of ATL in which Tax expression drives both malignant transformation and luciferase expression, enabling non-invasive imaging of tumorigenesis in real time. To identify the role of IL-15 in spontaneous development of lymphoma in vivo, an IL-15(-/- TAX-LUC strain was developed and examined. The absence of IL-15 resulted in aggressive tumor growth and accelerated mortality and demonstrated that IL-15 was not required for Tax-mediated lymphoma but was essential for anti-tumor immunity. Further analysis revealed a unique transcriptional profile in tumor cells that arise in the absence of IL-15 that included a significant increase in the expression of IL-1α and IL-1α-regulated cytokines. Moreover, anti-IL-1α antibodies and an IL-1 receptor antagonist (Anakinra were used to interrogate the potential of IL-1α targeted therapies in this model. Taken together, these findings identify IL-15 and IL-1α as therapeutic targets in lymphoma.

  5. IL-15 deficient tax mice reveal a role for IL-1α in tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Daniel A; Harding, John C; Ratner, Lee

    2014-01-01

    IL-15 is recognized as a promising candidate for tumor immunotherapy and has been described as both a promoter of cancer and a promoter of anti-cancer immunity. IL-15 was discovered in cells transformed by HTLV-1, the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and the human retrovirus that carries the Tax oncogene. We have developed the TAX-LUC mouse model of ATL in which Tax expression drives both malignant transformation and luciferase expression, enabling non-invasive imaging of tumorigenesis in real time. To identify the role of IL-15 in spontaneous development of lymphoma in vivo, an IL-15(-/-) TAX-LUC strain was developed and examined. The absence of IL-15 resulted in aggressive tumor growth and accelerated mortality and demonstrated that IL-15 was not required for Tax-mediated lymphoma but was essential for anti-tumor immunity. Further analysis revealed a unique transcriptional profile in tumor cells that arise in the absence of IL-15 that included a significant increase in the expression of IL-1α and IL-1α-regulated cytokines. Moreover, anti-IL-1α antibodies and an IL-1 receptor antagonist (Anakinra) were used to interrogate the potential of IL-1α targeted therapies in this model. Taken together, these findings identify IL-15 and IL-1α as therapeutic targets in lymphoma.

  6. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF IMMUNE IMBALANCE AND AUTOIMMUNITY IN NERVOUS SYSTEM DISORDERS (NSDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijendra K. SINGH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the role of immune imbalance and autoimmunity has been experimentally demonstrated in nervous system disorders (NSDs that include Alzheimer’s disease, autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, tics and Tourette’s syndrome, schizophrenia, and some other NSDs. And yet, these NSDs are never counted as autoimmune diseases. Deriving from the rapidly expanding knowledge of neuro-immunology and auto-immune diseases, for example multiple scle-rosis (MS, the author of this mini-review strongly recommends that these NSDs should be included while tallying the number of autoimmune diseases. This effort will help create an updated global database of all autoimmune diseases as well as it should help treat millions of patients who are suffering from debilitating NSDs for which there is no known cure or treatment currently.

  7. Alterations in early cytokine-mediated immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum infection in Tanzanian children with mineral element deficiencies: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeurink Prescilla V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficiencies in vitamins and mineral elements are important causes of morbidity in developing countries, possibly because they lead to defective immune responses to infection. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of mineral element deficiencies on early innate cytokine responses to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 304 Tanzanian children aged 6-72 months were stimulated with P. falciparum-parasitized erythrocytes obtained from in vitro cultures. Results The results showed a significant increase by 74% in geometric mean of TNF production in malaria-infected individuals with zinc deficiency (11% to 240%; 95% CI. Iron deficiency anaemia was associated with increased TNF production in infected individuals and overall with increased IL-10 production, while magnesium deficiency induced increased production of IL-10 by 46% (13% to 144% in uninfected donors. All donors showed a response towards IL-1β production, drawing special attention for its possible protective role in early innate immune responses to malaria. Conclusions In view of these results, the findings show plasticity in cytokine profiles of mononuclear cells reacting to malaria infection under conditions of different micronutrient deficiencies. These findings lay the foundations for future inclusion of a combination of precisely selected set of micronutrients rather than single nutrients as part of malaria vaccine intervention programmes in endemic countries.

  8. Vitamin Supplementation at the Time of Immunization with a Cold-Adapted Influenza Virus Vaccine Corrects Poor Mucosal Antibody Responses in Mice Deficient for Vitamins A and D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surman, S L; Penkert, R R; Jones, B G; Sealy, R E; Hurwitz, J L

    2016-01-06

    Vitamin A and D deficiencies and insufficiencies are prevalent worldwide in developed and developing countries. Vitamin metabolites are functionally intertwined in that they are high-affinity ligands for related receptors of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The effects of vitamin A deficiencies (VAD) on antibody responses to respiratory virus vaccines have already been demonstrated. Of particular concern was the reduction in IgA, a first line of defense against pathogens in the respiratory tract. Here, we describe the individual and combined effects of vitamin A and D deficiencies in mice immunized with an attenuated influenza virus vaccine. Relative to VAD, vitamin D deficiency (VDD) had a limited effect, but double deficiencies for vitamins A and D (VAD+VDD) further reduced antibody responses in the respiratory tract. The administration of supplemental vitamins A and D to VAD+VDD mice at the time of vaccination restored responses in a dose-dependent manner. Results suggest that vitamin supplementation programs may be beneficial in a clinical setting to promote healthy immune responses to respiratory virus vaccines in vitamin-deficient individuals.

  9. Maternal hypothyroxinaemia during the first half of gestation in an iodine deficient area with endemic cretinism and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermiglio, F; Lo Presti, V P; Scaffidi Argentina, G; Finocchiaro, M D; Gullo, D; Squatrito, S; Trimarchi, F

    1995-04-01

    Iodine deficiency is well known as the cause of several disorders such as endemic goitre and cretinism, along with a wide spectrum of psychoneurological development disorders including endemic mental deficiency and endemic cognitive deficiency, which are generally correlated to damage to the fetus. Such damage is, by inference, deemed a consequence either directly of iodine deficiency or of insufficient availability of thyroxine at the feto-placental unit level. Early pregnancy represents the crucial period for neurogenesis in the embryo. Several experimental studies have emphasized the direct role of maternal T4 in neurological embryogenesis, before the onset of fetal thyroid function and, therefore, its protective role in fetal thyroid failure. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether iodine deficiency may influence thyroid status of pregnant women throughout the first half of pregnancy. Thyroid function tests including total and free T4 and T3, TBG and TSH along with urinary iodine excretion were measured in the serum of pregnant women from an iodine deficient endemic goitre area in north-eastern Sicily, at 8, 13 and 20 weeks of gestation. The times of sampling were chosen to correspond approximately to a period prior to, coincident with and after the onset of fetal thyroid function, respectively. The longitudinal study was undertaken in 16 euthyroid pregnant women from the iodine deficient area in which major iodine deficiency disorders such as endemic cretinism and endemic cognitive deficiency in schoolchildren still persist (area A) and in 7 age matched volunteer pregnant women from a marginally iodine sufficient area (area B). Hormones and TBG were measured using commercial kits. Urinary iodine was measured by an automated method. The divergent changes in serum T4 and TBG with pregnancy progression induced a progressive TBG desaturation by T4 during the whole study period (from 22 to 17% in area A, ANOVA two-way F = 18.9, P pregnant women. FT4

  10. Left-handedness: association with immune disease, migraine, and developmental learning disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwind, N; Behan, P

    1982-08-01

    We report an experimental study designed to test the following hypothesis derived from clinical observations: There is an elevated frequency in left-handed individuals and in their families of immune disease, migraine, and developmental learning disorders. In two separate investigations the frequency of these conditions was compared in strongly left-handed subjects and in strongly right-handed controls. In each of the investigations we found markedly higher frequencies of immune disease in the left-handers than in the right-handers. The rate of learning disabilities was also much higher in the left-handers than in the right-handers in both investigations. In a second study the frequency of left-handedness was compared in patients with migraine or immune disease and in general population control subjects free of these disorders. There was a higher frequency of left-handedness in patients with migraine and myasthenia gravis than in controls. We present a brief outline of a hypothesis that may account for an increased frequency of immune disease in left-handers and in their families.

  11. 'Order from disorder sprung': recognition and regulation in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tak W

    2003-06-15

    threat is resolved. Once Paradise has been regained, memory cells remain in the body to sharply reduce the impact of a second exposure to a pathogen. Vaccination programs take advantage of this capacity of the human immune system for immunological memory, sparing millions the suffering associated with disease scourges. Thus does the order of the immune response spring from the disorder of pathogen attacks, and thus is Paradise preserved.

  12. 'Order from disorder sprung': recognition and regulation in the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tak W.

    2003-06-01

    threat is resolved. Once Paradise has been regained, memory cells remain in the body to sharply reduce the impact of a second exposure to a pathogen. Vaccination programs take advantage of this capacity of the human immune system for immunological memory, sparing millions the suffering associated with disease scourges. Thus does the order of the immune response spring from the disorder of pathogen attacks, and thus is Paradise preserved.

  13. Reinforcement and Stimulant Medication Ameliorate Deficient Response Inhibition in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Keri S; Fosco, Whitney D; Pelham, William E; Waxmonsky, James G; Bubnik, Michelle G; Hawk, Larry W

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the degree to which reinforcement, stimulant medication, and their combination impact response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Across three studies, participants with ADHD (n = 111, 25 girls) and typically-developing (TD) controls (n = 33, 6 girls) completed a standard version of the stop signal task (SST) and/or a reinforcement-manipulation SST with performance-contingent points. In two of these studies, these tasks were performed under placebo or 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate (MPH) conditions. Cross-study comparisons were conducted to test hypotheses regarding the separate and combined effects of reinforcement and methylphenidate on response inhibition among children with ADHD relative to TD controls. Baseline response inhibition was worse among children with ADHD compared to controls. MPH produced dose-related improvements in response inhibition in children with ADHD; compared to non-medicated TD controls, 0.3 mg/kg MPH normalized deficient response inhibition, and 0.6 mg/kg MPH resulted in better inhibition in children with ADHD. Reinforcement improved response inhibition to a greater extent for children with ADHD than for TD children, normalizing response inhibition. The combination of MPH and reinforcement improved response inhibition among children with ADHD compared to reinforcement alone and MPH alone, also resulting in normalization of response inhibition despite repeated task exposure. Deficient response inhibition commonly observed in children with ADHD is significantly improved with MPH and/or reinforcement, normalizing inhibition relative to TD children tested under standard conditions.

  14. Central Nervous System-Peripheral Immune System Dialogue in Neurological Disorders: Possible Application of Neuroimmunology in Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Min-Jung; Kwon, Min-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Previous concepts of immune-privileged sites obscured the role of peripheral immune cells in neurological disorders and excluded the consideration of the potential benefits of immunotherapy. Recently, however, numerous studies have demonstrated that the blood-brain barrier in the central nervous system is an educational barrier rather than an absolute barrier to peripheral immune cells. Emerging knowledge of immune-privileged sites suggests that peripheral immune cells can infiltrate these sites via educative gates and that crosstalk can occur between infiltrating immune cells and the central nervous system parenchyma. This concept can be expanded to the testis, which has long been considered an immune-privileged site, and to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Thus, we propose that the relationship between peripheral immune cells, the brain, and the urologic system should be considered as an additional possible mechanism in urologic diseases, and that immunotherapy might be an alternative therapeutic strategy in treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  15. [The probiotic correction of microecological and immune disorders in gastroduodenal pathology in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykova, E A; Bondarenko, V M; Izachik, Iu A; Izachik, N A; Grigor'ev, A V; Murashov, A O; Abramov, N A

    1996-01-01

    The state of microbiocenosis was studied and the level of immunoglobulins was determined in the gastric juice and feces of children with chronic diseases of the digestive system. In 20% of patients an increase in the contamination of the gastric biotope with opportunistic microflora was established. The isolation rate of Helicobacter pylori was 56%. The detection of H. pylori was found to be accompanied by the aggravation of the form and course of gastritis. In cases of Helicobacter-associated pathology the deficiency of Lactobacillus sp. in the stomach was established, which was accompanied by their deficiency and absence in feces. The study also revealed a decrease in the population level of Bifidobacterium sp. with a simultaneous increase in the population of opportunistic enterobacteria and changes in the state of local immunity: the decreased level of SIgA in most samples and the decreased level of IgG in the presence of H. pylori. The correction of microecological and immune disturbances with probiotic preparations, containing bifidobacteria (bifidumbacterin-forte) and lactobacilli, yielded good results.

  16. Embracing Complexity beyond Systems Medicine: A New Approach to Chronic Immune Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Velde, Anje A.; Bezema, Tjitske; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; 't Hart, Bert A.; van Middendorp, Henriët; Hack, Erik C.; van Montfrans, Joris M.; Belzer, Clara; Jans-Beken, Lilian; Pieters, Raymond H.; Knipping, Karen; Huber, Machteld; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Garssen, Johan; Radstake, Tim R.; Evers, Andrea W. M.; Prakken, Berent J.; Joosten, Irma

    2016-01-01

    In order to combat chronic immune disorders (CIDs), it is an absolute necessity to understand the bigger picture, one that goes beyond insights at a one-disease, molecular, cellular, and static level. To unravel this bigger picture we advocate an integral, cross-disciplinary approach capable of embracing the complexity of the field. This paper discusses the current knowledge on common pathways in CIDs including general psychosocial and lifestyle factors associated with immune functioning. We demonstrate the lack of more in-depth psychosocial and lifestyle factors in current research cohorts and most importantly the need for an all-encompassing analysis of these factors. The second part of the paper discusses the challenges of understanding immune system dynamics and effectively integrating all key perspectives on immune functioning, including the patient’s perspective itself. This paper suggests the use of techniques from complex systems science in describing and simulating healthy or deviating behavior of the immune system in its biopsychosocial surroundings. The patient’s perspective data are suggested to be generated by using specific narrative techniques. We conclude that to gain more insight into the behavior of the whole system and to acquire new ways of combatting CIDs, we need to construct and apply new techniques in the field of computational and complexity science, to an even wider variety of dynamic data than used in today’s systems medicine. PMID:28018353

  17. [Auto-immune disorders as a possible cause of neuropsychiatric syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martinez, P; Molenaar, P C; Losen, M; Hoffmann, C; Stevens, J; de Witte, L D; van Amelsvoort, T; van Os, J; Rutten, B P F

    2015-01-01

    Changes that occur in the behaviour of voltage-gated ion channels and ligand-gated receptor channels due to gene mutations or auto-immune attack are the cause of channelopathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Although the relation between molecular channel defects and clinical symptoms has been explained in the case of many neuromuscular channelopathies, the pathophysiology of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes is still unclear. To review recent findings regarding neuronal auto-immune reactions in severe neuropsychiatric syndromes. Using PubMed, we consulted the literature published between 1990 and August 2014 relating to the occurrence of auto-immune antibodies in severe and persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes. Auto-antibodies have only limited access to the central nervous system, but if they do enter the system they can, in some cases, cause disease. We discuss recent findings regarding the occurrence of auto-antibodies against ligand-activated receptor channels and potassium channels in neuropsychiatric and neurological syndromes, including schizophrenia and limbic encephalitis. Although the occurrence of several auto-antibodies in schizophrenia has been confirmed, there is still no proof of a causal relationship in the syndrome. We still have no evidence of the prevalence of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes. The discovery that an antibody against an ion channel is associated with some neuropsychiatric disorders may mean that in future it will be possible to treat patients by means of immunosuppression, which could lead to an improvement in a patient's cognitive abilities.

  18. Tongue Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  19. The Role of Infection and Immune Responsiveness in a Case of Treatment-Resistant Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Rosalie

    2017-01-01

    A case of psychotropic-resistant pediatric bipolar disorder is presented. Both awareness and proper treatment of previously unrecognized infections and their effects on the immune system were very important in stabilizing the patient's psychiatric symptoms.

  20. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  1. Complex regional pain syndrome treated with intravenous immunoglobulin in a patient with common variable immune deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, Raffi

    2013-12-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) represents a large heterogeneous group of antibody-deficiency syndromes associated with a wide range of clinical features and a lack of defined causes in the realm of primary immunodeficiencies. Here, we present a case of CVID in a 62-year-old white male patient with a history of longstanding complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). His medical history included multiple sinus infections per year and several pneumonias requiring antibiotics. He has had various back surgeries, including a laminectomy at the L4 level 1 year prior to his diagnosis. Thereafter, he underwent four sympathetic nerve blocks with minimal pain relief. Blood chemistries showed a normal white blood cell count with a normal differential, but increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels. Total Ig (Immunoglobulin)G was 611 mg/dL (normal 700-1,600), IgG1 was 425 mg/dL (341-894), IgG2 was 114 mg/dL (171-632), IgG3 was 14.4 mg/dL (18.4-106), and IgG4 was 7.4 mg/dL (2.4-121). IgA was 47 mg/dL (normal 70-400), IgM was 131 mg/dL (40-230), and IgE was 4.5 kU/L (<4.0). He only had 10 of 23 pneumococcal titers in the protective range post-vaccination. Upon treatment of the CVID with intravenous immunoglobulin, the patient's pain levels were significantly decreased and have been maintained for more than 2 years. Therefore, immunoglobulin therapy appears to have been beneficial in the treatment of the patient's symptoms of CRPS, including pain. Additional studies investigating the mechanism by which immunoglobulin therapy may reduce the inflammation and pain of CRPS are needed.

  2. Expansion of inflammatory innate lymphoid cells in patients with common variable immune deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cols, Montserrat; Rahman, Adeeb; Maglione, Paul J.; Garcia-Carmona, Yolanda; Simchoni, Noa; Ko, Huai-Bin M.; Radigan, Lin; Cerutti, Andrea; Blankenship, Derek; Pascual, Virginia; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Background Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an antibody deficiency treated with immunoglobulin; however, patients can have noninfectious inflammatory conditions that lead to heightened morbidity and mortality. Objectives Modular analyses of RNA transcripts in whole blood previously identified an upregulation of many interferon-responsive genes. In this study we sought the cell populations leading to this signature. Methods Lymphoid cells were measured in peripheral blood of 55 patients with CVID (31 with and 24 without inflammatory/autoimmune complications) by using mass cytometry and flow cytometry. Surface markers, cytokines, and transcriptional characteristics of sorted innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) were defined by using quantitative PCR. Gastrointestinal and lung biopsy specimens of subjects with inflammatory disease were stained to seek ILCs in tissues. Results The linage-negative, CD127+, CD161+ lymphoid population containing T-box transcription factor, retinoic acid–related orphan receptor (ROR) γt, IFN-γ, IL-17A, and IL-22, all hallmarks of type 3 innate lymphoid cells, were expanded in the blood of patients with CVID with inflammatory conditions (mean, 3.7% of PBMCs). ILCs contained detectable amounts of the transcription factors inhibitor of DNA binding 2, T-box transcription factor, and RORγt and increased mRNA transcripts for IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) and IL-26, demonstrating inflammatory potential. In gastrointestinal and lung biopsy tissues of patients with CVID, numerous IFN-γ+RORγt+CD3− cells were identified, suggesting a role in these mucosal inflammatory states. Conclusions An expansion of this highly inflammatory ILC population is a characteristic of patients with CVID with inflammatory disease; ILCs and the interferon signature are markers for the uncontrolled inflammatory state in these patients. PMID:26542033

  3. Exacerbated fatigue and motor deficits in interleukin-10-deficient mice after peripheral immune stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyszton, C. P.; Sparkman, N. L.; Grant, R. W.; Buchanan, J. B.; Broussard, S. R.; Woods, J.; Johnson, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 is important for regulating inflammation in the periphery and brain, but whether it protects against infection- or age-related psychomotor disturbances and fatigue is unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated motor coordination, time to fatigue, and several central and peripheral proinflammatory cytokines in male young adult (3-mo-old) and middle-aged (12-mo-old) wild-type (IL-10+/+) and IL-10-deficient (IL-10−/−) mice after intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. No age-related differences were observed; therefore, data from the two ages were pooled and analyzed to determine effects of genotype and treatment. LPS treatment increased IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα mRNA in all brain areas examined in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice, but to a greater extent and for a longer time in IL-10−/− mice. Plasma IL-1β and IL-6 were increased similarly in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice 4 h after LPS but remained elevated longer in IL-10−/− mice, whereas TNFα was higher in IL-10−/− mice throughout after LPS treatment. Motor performance and motor learning in IL-10+/+ mice were not affected by LPS treatment; however, both were reduced in IL-10−/− mice treated with LPS compared with those treated with saline. Furthermore, although LPS reduced the time to fatigue in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice, the effects were exacerbated in IL-10−/− mice. Thus the increased brain and peripheral inflammation induced by LPS in IL-10−/− mice was associated with increased coordination deficits and fatigue. These data suggest that IL-10 may inhibit motor deficits and fatigue associated with peripheral infections via its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:18650318

  4. Deficient prefrontal attentional control in late-life generalized anxiety disorder: an fMRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R B; Eldreth, D A; Mohlman, J

    2011-10-04

    Younger adults with anxiety disorders are known to show an attentional bias toward negative information. Little is known regarding the role of biased attention in anxious older adults, and even less is known about the neural substrates of any such bias. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to assess the mechanisms of attentional bias in late life by contrasting predictions of a top-down model emphasizing deficient prefrontal cortex (PFC) control and a bottom-up model emphasizing amygdalar hyperreactivity. In all, 16 older generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients (mean age=66 years) and 12 non-anxious controls (NACs; mean age=67 years) completed the emotional Stroop task to assess selective attention to negative words. Task-related fMRI data were concurrently acquired. Consistent with hypotheses, GAD participants were slower to identify the color of negative words relative to neutral, whereas NACs showed the opposite bias, responding more quickly to negative words. During negative words (in comparison with neutral), the NAC group showed PFC activations, coupled with deactivation of task-irrelevant emotional processing regions such as the amygdala and hippocampus. By contrast, GAD participants showed PFC decreases during negative words and no differences in amygdalar activity across word types. Across all participants, greater attentional bias toward negative words was correlated with decreased PFC recruitment. A significant positive correlation between attentional bias and amygdala activation was also present, but this relationship was mediated by PFC activity. These results are consistent with reduced prefrontal attentional control in late-life GAD. Strategies to enhance top-down attentional control may be particularly relevant in late-life GAD treatment.

  5. Phalloplasty: A panacea for 46,XY disorder of sex development conditions with penile deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Nina; Hoebeke, Piet

    2014-01-01

    In cases of severe penile inadequacy, such as in pathological conditions involving penile amputation (e.g. penile cancer), or in 46,XY disorders of sex development with severe undervirilization or maldevelopment of the penis (e.g. idiopathic micropenis, cloacal exstrophy), standard (surgical) penile lengthening techniques do not provide patients with a phallus suitable for sexual intercourse. Genital dissatisfaction can lead to low self-esteem and psychosexual dysfunction. Therefore, phalloplasty, the gold standard in transgender surgery, may provide a possibility to achieve a satisfactory genital appearance and sexual function. Small series have reported cosmetically acceptable and erogenous sensate neophalli with incorporation of a neourethra to allow voiding in a standing position and with enough bulk to allow penile prosthesis insertion for pleasurable intercourse. Although early results seem promising, further publication of series with large numbers and longer follow-up is needed to evaluate to what extent phalloplasty improves physical and sexual outcomes. Complications are of particular concern because of associated scarring and loss of sensitive tissue. Without full preoperative workups assessing patients' expectations and reasons for undergoing surgery, they may still struggle with self/penile image and with psychological barriers for engaging in sexual activity. Recommendations for the psychosocial management of boys and men with penile deficiency are suggested.

  6. The impaired intestinal mucosal immune system by valine deficiency for young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with decreasing immune status and regulating tight junction proteins transcript abundance in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian-Bo; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on the growth, intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance and gene expression of immune-related signaling molecules in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Six iso-nitrogenous diets containing graded levels of valine (4.3-19.1 g kg(-)(1) diet) were fed to the fish for 8 weeks. The results showed that percentage weight gain (PWG), feed intake and feed efficiency of fish were the lowest in fish fed the valine-deficient diet (P valine deficiency decreased lysozyme, acid phosphatase activities and complement 3 content in the intestine (P valine deficiency significantly decreased transcript of Occludin, Claudin b, Claudin c, Claudin 3, and ZO-1 (P valine did not have a significant effect on expression of Claudin 12 in the intestine of grass carp (P > 0.05). In conclusion, valine deficiency decreased fish growth and intestinal immune status, as well as regulated gene expression of tight junction proteins, NF-κB P65, IκBα and TOR in the fish intestine. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of lysozyme activity or PWG, the dietary valine requirement of young grass carp (268-679 g) were established to be 14.47 g kg(-1) diet (4.82 g 100 g(-1) CP) or 14.00 g kg(-1) diet (4.77 g 100 g(-1) CP), respectively.

  7. Immunoglobulin K light chain deficiency: A rare, but probably underestimated, humoral immune defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Pierguido; Colatutto, Antonio; Fabbro, Dora; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Perosa, Anna R; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Human immunoglobulin molecules are generated by a pair of identical heavy chains, which identify the immunoglobulin class, and a pair of identical light chains, Kappa or Lambda alternatively, which characterize the immunoglobulin type. In normal conditions, Kappa light chains represent approximately 2/3 of the light chains of total immunoglobulins, both circulating and lymphocyte surface bound. Very few cases of immunoglobulin Kappa or Lambda light chain defects have been reported. Furthermore, the genetic basis of this defect has been extensively explored only in a single case. We report a case of a patient suffering of serious recurrent bacterial infections, which was caused by a very rare form of immunoglobulin disorder, consisting of a pure defect of Kappa light chain. We evaluated major serum immunoglobulin concentrations, as well as total and free Kappa and Lambda light chain concentrations. Lymphocyte phenotyping was also performed and finally we tested the Kappa chain VJ rearrangement as well as the constant Kappa region sequence. Studies performed on VJ rearrangement showed a polyclonal genetic arrangement, whereas the gene sequencing for the constant region of Kappa chain showed a homozygous T to G substitution at the position 1288 (rs200765148). This mutation causes a substitution from Cys to Gly in the protein sequence and, therefore, determines the abnormal folding of the constant region of Kappa chain. We suggest that this defect could lead to an effective reduction of the variability of total antibody repertoire and a consequent defect of an apparently normal immunoglobulin response to common antigens.

  8. Quality of life among people living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome receiving anti-retroviral therapy: a study from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Smith Giri, Maniraj Neupane, Sushil Pant, Utsav Timalsina, Sagar Koirala, Santosh Timalsina, Sashi Sharma Department of Medicine, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine the impact of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS on the quality of life of affected individuals in Nepal. Patients and methods: A cross sectional study was done among 70 individuals attending the Anti-Retroviral Therapy clinic of the University Hospital in Nepal. Quality of life (QOL was evaluated using World Health Organization Quality of life questionnaire (WHO QOL-BREF instrument. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS Version 17.0. Results: The median scores with interquartile range (IQR in four domains of QOL in descending order were physical (61; IQR 22, social (58; IQR 33, environmental (56; IQR 13, and psychological (54; IQR 8. Older age was associated with lower perceived overall QOL. Females were more likely to have lower QOL scores in the social and psychological domains. Higher CD4 counts and a married status were significant predictors of higher QOL scores in the environmental domain. Conclusion: Being older, female, single, and having advanced clinical stage is associated with lower QOL scores in people living with AIDS. Lowest QOL scores were seen in the psychological domain suggesting the need of psychological interventions. Keywords: quality of life, AIDS, Nepal, WHO QOL-BREF

  9. [Changes of acquired immune deficiency syndrome related knowledge, attitudes, behaviors and their influencing factors among college students in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-18

    To compare acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) related knowledge, attitudes, behaviors and their influencing factors among college students in different years in Beijing, and to provide evidence for targeted health education among college students in future. College students were selected by the stratified cluster sampling method, and a questionnaire survey was conducted among college students in year 2006 and 2016 in Beijing. The sample sizes were 1 800 and 3 001 college students, respectively. The contents of the questionnaire included: socio-demographic characteristics, AIDS related knowledge, AIDS related attitude, sex intercourse and its related risk behaviors, condom use intension, and AIDS related health education. Compared with the year 2006, the average AIDS knowledge scores of college students in year 2016 dropped from 12.78±1.95 to 11.90±2.56 (t=12.91, Pinfluencing factors of intention on condom use were male (OR=0.713), self-efficacy of condom purchase (OR=0.876), never received sex education before college (OR=0.752), self-efficacy of condom use (OR=1.135), belief of condom use (OR=1.775), and attitude towards AIDS patients (OR=1.136). AIDS related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors among college students have been changed, AIDS related health education should be designed and improved based on new characteristics of college students. AIDS health education in colleges should pay more attention to sex attitude and sex responsibility and self-protection awareness among college students as well.

  10. Outer membrane vesicles from flagellin-deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induce cross-reactive immunity and provide cross-protection against heterologous Salmonella challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xiangmin; Curtiss, Roy; Kong, Qingke

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) isolated from Salmonella Typhimurium are potentially useful for developing subunit vaccines because of high immunogenicity and protective efficacy. However, flagella might remain in OMV pellets following OMV purification, resulting in non-essential immune responses and counteraction of bacterial protective immune responses when developing a vaccine against infection of multiple serotypes Salmonella. In this study, a flagellin-deficient S. Typhimurium mutant was constructed. Lipopolysaccharide profiles, protein profiles and cryo-electron microscopy revealed that there were no significant differences between the wild-type and mutant OMVs, with the exception of a large amount of flagellin in the wild-type OMVs. Neither the wild-type OMVs nor the non-flagellin OMVs were toxic to macrophages. Mice immunized with the non-flagellin OMVs produced high concentrations of IgG. The non-flagellin OMVs elicited strong mucosal antibody responses in mice when administered via the intranasal route in addition to provoking higher cross-reactive immune responses against OMPs isolated from S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis. Both intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization with the non-flagellin OMVs provided efficient protection against heterologous S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge. Our results indicate that the flagellin-deficient OMVs may represent a new vaccine platform that could be exploited to facilitate the production of a broadly protective vaccine. PMID:27698383

  11. Pseudodementia in a twenty-one-year-old with bipolar disorder and vitamin B12 and folate deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, S D

    2000-12-01

    A twenty-one-year-old female known to suffer from bipolar type I disorder developed features of a pseudodementia. Following prompt initial response to treatment with antidepressants, there was an early recurrence of cognitive impairment. Blood investigations confirmed a macrocytic anaemia and vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies. There was dramatic resolution of cognitive impairment after vitamin replacement. This suggested the occurrence of a reversible nutritional dementia and reinforced the need to rule out secondary organic causes of psychiatric symptoms even in patients previously diagnosed with a primary psychiatric disorder.

  12. Peroxisome deficiency but not the defect in ether lipid synthesis causes activation of the innate immune system and axonal loss in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottelbergs Astrid

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice with peroxisome deficiency in neural cells (Nestin-Pex5−/− develop a neurodegenerative phenotype leading to motor and cognitive disabilities and early death. Major pathologies at the end stage of disease include severe demyelination, axonal degeneration and neuroinflammation. We now investigated the onset and progression of these pathological processes, and their potential interrelationship. In addition, the putative role of oxidative stress, the impact of plasmalogen depletion on the neurodegenerative phenotype, and the consequences of peroxisome elimination in the postnatal period were studied. Methods Immunohistochemistry in association with gene expression analysis was performed on Nestin-Pex5−/− mice to document demyelination, axonal damage and neuroinflammation. Also Gnpat−/− mice, with selective plasmalogen deficiency and CMV-Tx-Pex5−/− mice, with tamoxifen induced generalized loss of peroxisomes were analysed. Results Activation of the innate immune system is a very early event in the pathological process in Nestin-Pex5−/− mice which evolves in chronic neuroinflammation. The complement factor C1q, one of the earliest up regulated transcripts, was expressed on neurons and oligodendrocytes but not on microglia. Transcripts of other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes and markers of phagocytotic activity were already significantly induced before detecting pathologies with immunofluorescent staining. Demyelination, macrophage activity and axonal loss co-occurred throughout the brain. As in patients with mild peroxisome biogenesis disorders who develop regressive changes, demyelination in cerebellum and brain stem preceded major myelin loss in corpus callosum of both Nestin-Pex5−/− and CMV-Tx-Pex5−/− mice. These lesions were not accompanied by generalized oxidative stress throughout the brain. Although Gnpat−/− mice displayed dysmyelination and Purkinje cell axon damage in cerebellum

  13. The role of CD4+ T cells in cell-mediated immunity to LCMV: studies in MHC class I and class II deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1994-01-01

    Parameters of the virus-specific T-cell response were analysed in order to dissect the contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to cell-mediated immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. In MHC class II deficient mice, initial T-cell responsiveness was not impaired, but virus clearance...... was delayed, and virus-specific Td activity declined more rapidly. Furthermore, class I restricted Tc memory appeared to be impaired in these mice. To directly evaluate the role of CD4+ cells in virus clearance and T-cell mediated inflammation, MHC class I deficient mice were also studied. No virus......-specific CD8+ T-cell response, but our findings strongly suggest that CD4+ T cells are critical for maintaining full antiviral immunity. Furthermore, CD4+ T cells per se have a low potential for mediating virus-specific inflammation that is associated with a low degree of virus control....

  14. Bullous disorders as a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: A series of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullous disorders such as pemphigus vulgaris, bullous pemphigoid after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy in certain human immunodeficiency virus reactive individuals have been described in this case series as a manifestation of an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This phenomenon should be suspected in individuals who present with bullous lesions within 3-8 weeks after initiation of therapy despite of improved immunological response. Strong clinical suspicion, through clinical examination, appropriate laboratory investigation such as CD4 T-cell count, histopathological examinations with H and E stain, direct immunofluorescence test are required for diagnosis.

  15. Intact reflexive but deficient voluntary social orienting in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Anne Kirchgessner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Impairment in social interactions is a primary characteristic of people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Although these individuals tend to orient less to naturalistic social cues than do typically developing (TD individuals, laboratory experiments testing social orienting in ASD have been inconclusive, possibly because of a failure to fully isolate reflexive (stimulus-driven and voluntary (goal-directed social orienting processes. The purpose of the present study was to separately examine potential reflexive and/or voluntary social orienting differences in individuals with ASD relative to TD controls. Subjects (ages 7-14 with high-functioning ASD and a matched control group completed three gaze cueing tasks on an iPad in which individuals briefly saw a face with averted gaze followed by a target after a variable delay. Two tasks were 100% predictive with either all congruent (target appears in gaze direction or all incongruent (target appears opposite from gaze direction trials, respectively. Another task was non-predictive with these same trials (half congruent and half incongruent intermixed randomly. Response times (RTs to the target were used to calculate reflexive (incongruent condition RT – congruent condition RT and voluntary (non-predictive condition RT – predictive condition RT gaze cueing effects. Subjects also completed two additional non-social orienting tasks (ProPoint and AntiPoint. Subjects with ASD demonstrate intact reflexive but deficient voluntary gaze following. Similar results were found in a separate test of non-social orienting. This suggests problems with using social cues, but only in a goal-directed fashion, in our sample of high-functioning individuals with ASD. Such findings may not only explain inconclusive previous findings but more importantly be critical for understanding social dysfunctions in ASD and for developing future interventions.

  16. Bacterial Wilt and Boron Deficiency Stress: A New Disorder in Eucalypt Plantations in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DELL Bernard; XU Daping

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a new disorder that first appeared in eucalypt plantations in south China in 2003. The plantations were destructively sampled near Leizhou, Yanxi, Kaiping and Gaoyao in September to December 2003. Whilst some 5% of 0.5 to 1.5 year-old Eucalyptus urophylla trees declined rapidly and exhibited symptoms of wilting, the majority of the affected trees declined slowly and exhibited two foliar symptoms. Young leaves initially developed an interveinal chlorosis extending from the leaf margin inwards to the midrib. Most leaves then developed pockets of necrotic tissue that became bleached but typically had brown margins. The former symptoms have been recognised as being caused by limited boron supply in soil, but the latter symptoms have not been previously observed in eucalypts in China. Inorganic analysis showed that the leaves with the latter symptoms had deficient B concentrations whereas the leaves from healthy trees had adequate B concentrations. Bacterial wilt, Ralstonia solanacearum, was present at all sites where foliar symptoms and tree death were present. The root system of all trees with foliar chlorosis and necrosis had signs of infection in some roots and attrition of lateral roots. The trunk and branches of the recently died trees and the trees with advanced leaf drop had discoloured xylem, which on cutting, oozed bacterial slime. Possible relationships between root damage caused by abiotic (e.g. typhoons, root damage from hand weeding) and biotic factors and reduced B uptake are discussed. Recommendations are made for reducing bacterial wilt disease and improving B management in fast-growing short-rotation eucalypt plantations.

  17. Pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorders: revisiting gastrointestinal involvement and immune imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsam, Mohtashem; Ahangari, Raheleh; Naser, Saleh A

    2014-08-07

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise a group of neurodevelopmental abnormalities that begin in early childhood and are characterized by impairment of social communication and behavioral problems including restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Several genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ASD, most of them are involved in neuronal synaptogenesis. A number of environmental factors and associated conditions such as gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities and immune imbalance have been linked to the pathophysiology of ASD. According to the March 2012 report released by United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of ASD has sharply increased during the recent years and one out of 88 children suffers now from ASD symptoms. Although there is a strong genetic base for the disease, several associated factors could have a direct link to the pathogenesis of ASD or act as modifiers of the genes thus aggravating the initial problem. Many children suffering from ASD have GI problems such as abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, gastroesophageal reflux, and intestinal infections. A number of studies focusing on the intestinal mucosa, its permeability, abnormal gut development, leaky gut, and other GI problem raised many questions but studies were somehow inconclusive and an expert panel of American Academy of Pediatrics has strongly recommended further investigation in these areas. GI tract has a direct connection with the immune system and an imbalanced immune response is usually seen in ASD children. Maternal infection or autoimmune diseases have been suspected. Activation of the immune system during early development may have deleterious effect on various organs including the nervous system. In this review we revisited briefly the GI and immune system abnormalities and neuropeptide imbalance and their role in the pathophysiology of ASD and discussed some future research directions.

  18. Regulatory T-cell depletion in the gut caused by integrin β7 deficiency exacerbates DSS colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H L; Zheng, Y J; Pan, Y D; Xie, C; Sun, H; Zhang, Y H; Yuan, M Y; Song, B L; Chen, J F

    2016-03-01

    Integrin α4β7 controls lymphocyte trafficking into the gut and has essential roles in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The α4β7-blocking antibody vedolizumab is approved for IBD treatment; however, high dose of vedolizumab aggravates colitis in a small percentage of patients. Herein, we show that integrin β7 deficiency results in colonic regulatory T (Treg) cell depletion and exacerbates dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity. In DSS-treated β7-deficient mice, the loss of colonic Treg cells induces excessive macrophage infiltration in the colon via upregulation of colonic epithelial intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and increases proinflammatory cytokine expression, thereby exacerbating DSS-induced colitis. Moreover, reconstitution of the colonic Treg cell population in β7-deficient mice suppresses aberrant innate immune response in the colon and attenuates DSS colitis. Thus, integrin α4β7 is essential for suppression of DSS colitis as it regulates the colonic Treg cell population and innate immunity.

  19. Immune and inflammatory responses in TNF alpha-deficient mice: a critical requirement for TNF alpha in the formation of primary B cell follicles, follicular dendritic cell networks and germinal centers, and in the maturation of the humoral immune response

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the role of TNF alpha in the development of in vivo immune response we have generated TNF alpha-deficient mice by gene targeting. Homozygous mutant mice are viable and fertile, develop lymph nodes and Peyer's patches and show no apparent phenotypic abnormalities, indicating that TNF alpha is not required for normal mouse development. In the absence of TNF alpha mice readily succumb to L. monocytogenes infections and show reduced contact hypersensitivity responses. Furthermore, ...

  20. Project youth inform--a school-based sexually transmitted disease/acquired immune deficiency syndrome education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, T; Chan, R K; Goh, C L

    1995-07-01

    A pilot project, ¿Youth Inform¿ endorsed by the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education, Singapore, was undertaken in 1992 for 2 years. It aims to enhance sexually transmitted disease (STDs)/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) control in Singapore by providing structured information for young people between the ages of 16 to 20 years in Polytechnics, Junior Colleges, Centralised Institutes and Pre-University Centres. Project Youth Inform comprises 8 components. They include a focus group discussion, a training seminar for teachers, a lecture/slide presentation cum question-and-answer session, an educational booklet/bookmark, exhibitions, a video, provisions for anonymous questions, and an evaluation. The programme is conducted during school hours at the premises of the institutions and the attendance per session is between 150 to 350 students. A total of 152 sessions have been completed for all the schools. It is ongoing and is currently administered by the School Health Service and Training and Health Education Department. Feedback from principals, teachers and students was gathered formally through surveys and informally through interviews and observations. One thousand students were randomly selected for the survey to assess their responses towards the programme. Eighty-six percent reported that they found it educational and informative. Indicators found to have an influence on the effectiveness of the programme were timing, vocabulary used (medical terms) and integration of the programme into the school's curriculum. In conclusion, Project Youth Inform was on the whole positively received. However, it is essential to constantly accommodate and adapt to new facts and methods of teaching and maintain close coordination with the Ministries and the schools. An effective STD/acquired immune deficiency syndrome programme is an important step towards the prevention, management and control of the epidemic.

  1. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Akshaya Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%. The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52% was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm 3 with comorbid conditions.

  2. Pitx3 deficient mice as a genetic animal model of co-morbid depressive disorder and parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kang, Young-Mi; Kang, Young; Park, Tae-Shin; Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Han, Baek-Soo; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Lee, Chul-Ho; Ardayfio, Paul A; Han, Pyung-Lim; Jung, Bong-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2014-03-13

    Approximately 40-50% of all patients with Parkinson׳s disease (PD) show symptoms and signs of depressive disorders, for which neither pathogenic understanding nor rational treatment are available. Using Pit3x-deficient mice, a model for selective nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration, we tested depression-related behaviors and acute stress responses to better understand how a nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficit increases the prevalence of depressive disorders in PD patients. Pitx3-deficient mice showed decreased sucrose consumption and preference in the two-bottle free-choice test of anhedonia. Acute restraint stress increased c-Fos (known as a neuronal activity marker) expression levels in various brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex, striatum, nucleus accumbens, and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), in both Pitx3+/+ and -/- mice. However, the stress-induced increases in c-Fos levels in the cortex, dorsal striatum, and PVN were significantly greater in Pitx3-/- than +/+ mice, suggesting that signs of depressive disorders in parkinsonism are related to altered stress vulnerability. Based on these results, we propose that Pitx3-/- mice may serve as a useful genetic animal model for co-morbid depressive disorder and parkinsonism.

  3. Prolidase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Qazi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolidase deficiency is a rare inborn disorder of collagen metabolism characterized by chronic recurrent skin ulceration. A seven-year-old girl and her younger sibling with clinical features and laboratory criteria fulfilling the diagnosis of prolidase deficiency are presented in view of rarity of the condition.

  4. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  5. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  6. The role of cytokine deficiencies and cytokine autoantibodies in clinical dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liszewski, Walter; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines are small, secreted proteins that are essential for promoting and maintaining a normal immune response. Upregulation of cytokines frequently occurs in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Conversely, several immunodeficiency, autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders are known to occur...... review the role of cytokine deficiencies and cytokine autoantibodies in immunodeficiency syndromes, as well as in autoimmune disorders. Finally, we will examine autoinflammatory disorders due to cytokine deficiencies....

  7. Adiponectin administration prevents weight gain and glycemic profile changes in diet-induced obese immune deficient Rag1-/- mice lacking mature lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Perakakis, Nikolaos; Gong, Huizhi; Chamberland, John P; Brinkoetter, Mary T; Hamnvik, Ole-Petter R; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation leading to insulin resistance and diabetes. Adiponectin is an adipokine that regulates inflammatory responses. The aim of our study was to investigate whether any effects of adiponectin against obesity and insulin-resistance may depend on the adaptive immune system. We treated high-fat-diet fed Rag1-/- mice lacking mature lymphocytes with adiponectin over 7weeks and investigated alterations in their metabolic outcome and inflammatory state. Adiponectin protects from weight gain despite a small compensatory stimulation of energy intake in mice lacking an adaptive immune system. Additionally, adiponectin protects from dysglycemia. Minor alterations in the macrophage phenotype, but not in the circulating cytokine levels, may contribute to the protective role of adiponectin against hyperglycemia and diabetes. Adiponectin or agents increasing adiponectin may be a promising therapeutic option against obesity and hyperglycemia in immune-deficient populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adaptive Maternal Immune Deviations as a Ground For Autism Spectrum Disorders Development in Children

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    Poletaev Alexander B.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a vexed problem today. Overall, there is a high frequency of birth children (1:80 – 1:150 with late diagnosed autism spectrum disorders (ASD and this trend is getting progressively stronger. The causes for the currently increased frequency of ASD and the pathogenesis of ASD are not fully understood yet. One of the most likely mechanisms inducing ASD may be a maternal immune imprinting. This phenomenon is based on transplacental translocation of maternal antibodies of IgG class and, as a consequence, on the epigenetic “tuning” of immune system of the fetus and child. This mechanism provides development of child’s anti-infection resistance before meeting with microorganisms, but it can be also a cause of inborn pathology including the ASD appearance. The quantitative changes in maternal blood serum autoantibodies depend on a specific microbial population, or are induced by environmental chemical pollutants in association with some individual features of the maternal metabolism. These immune changes are adaptive in most cases for the maternal organism, but can be pathogenic for the fetus in some cases. We discuss in the present paper the possibilities to predict the risk from abnormal development of nervous system in fetus and early diagnosis of ASD in high-risk group of children.

  9. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920630 Effects of the spleen on immunestate of patients with gastric cancer.QIUDengbo (仇登波), et al. Dept General Surg,Union Hosp, Tongji Med Univ, Wuhan, 430022.Natl Med J China 1992; 72(6): 334-337. For analysing the effects of the spleen on im-mune state of gastric cancer patients.T-lym-

  10. Major depressive disorder and immunity to varicella-zoster virus in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael R; Levin, Myron J; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Lucko, Anne; Lang, Nancy; Caulfield, Michael J; Weinberg, Adriana; Chan, Ivan S F; Clair, Jim; Smith, Jeff G; Marchese, R D; Williams, Heather M; Beck, Danielle J; McCook, Patricia T; Johnson, Gary; Oxman, Michael N

    2011-05-01

    Major depressive disorder has been associated with activation of inflammatory processes as well as with reductions in innate, adaptive and non-specific immune responses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between major depression and a disease-relevant immunologic response, namely varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-specific immunity, in elderly adults. A cross-sectional cohort study was conducted in 104 elderly community dwelling adults ≥ 60years of age who were enrolled in the depression substudy of the shingles prevention study, a double blind, placebo-controlled vaccine efficacy trial. Fifty-two subjects had a current major depressive disorder, and 52 age- and sex-matched controls had no history of depression or any mental illness. VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity (VZV-CMI) was measured by VZV responder cell frequency (VZV-RCF) and interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays, and antibody to VZV was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against affinity-purified VZV glycoproteins (gpELISA). VZV-CMI, measured by VZV-RCF, was significantly lower in the depressed group than in the controls (pdepressive symptoms in the depressed patients. In addition, an age-related reduction in VZV-RCF was observed in the depressed patients, but not in the controls. Furthermore, there was a trend for depressive symptom severity to be associated with lower ELISPOT counts. Finally, VZV-RCF was higher in depressed patients treated with antidepressant medications as compared to untreated depressed patients. Since lower levels of VZV-RCF appear to explain the increased risk and severity of herpes zoster observed in older adults, these findings suggest that, in addition to increasing age, depression may increase the risk and severity of herpes zoster.

  11. Iron, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Zinc Deficiencies in Children Presenting with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Villagomez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder increasing in prevalence. Although there is limited evidence to support treating ADHD with mineral/vitamin supplements, research does exist showing that patients with ADHD may have reduced levels of vitamin D, zinc, ferritin, and magnesium. These nutrients have important roles in neurologic function, including involvement in neurotransmitter synthesis. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of each of these nutrients in the brain, the possible altered levels of these nutrients in patients with ADHD, possible reasons for a differential level in children with ADHD, and safety and effect of supplementation. With this knowledge, clinicians may choose in certain patients at high risk of deficiency, to screen for possible deficiencies of magnesium, vitamin D, zinc, and iron by checking RBC-magnesium, 25-OH vitamin D, serum/plasma zinc, and ferritin. Although children with ADHD may be more likely to have lower levels of vitamin D, zinc, magnesium, and iron, it cannot be stated that these lower levels caused ADHD. However, supplementing areas of deficiency may be a safe and justified intervention.

  12. Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Respond to Pre-Award Requests Manage Your Award Negotiation & Initial Award After Award ... New Trial Launched in West Africa to Evaluate Three Vaccination Strategies , April 6, 2017 Monoclonal Antibody Cures Marburg Infection ...

  13. Immune Deficiency Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... informed with IDF communications Share Your Experiences Inspire others through your stories and videos Visit a Plasma Center Discover the ... to advance research and improve the quality of life of patients. Quick Links ... Reel Stories IDF ADVOCATE Newsletter IDF ePHR & PI CONNECT SCID ...

  14. Trim37-deficient mice recapitulate several features of the multi-organ disorder Mulibrey nanism

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    Kaisa M. Kettunen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mulibrey nanism (MUL is a rare autosomal recessive multi-organ disorder characterized by severe prenatal-onset growth failure, infertility, cardiopathy, risk for tumors, fatty liver, and type 2 diabetes. MUL is caused by loss-of-function mutations in TRIM37, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase belonging to the tripartite motif (TRIM protein family and having both peroxisomal and nuclear localization. We describe a congenic Trim37 knock-out mouse (Trim37−/− model for MUL. Trim37−/− mice were viable and had normal weight development until approximately 12 months of age, after which they started to manifest increasing problems in wellbeing and weight loss. Assessment of skeletal parameters with computer tomography revealed significantly smaller skull size, but no difference in the lengths of long bones in Trim37−/− mice as compared with wild-type. Both male and female Trim37−/− mice were infertile, the gonads showing germ cell aplasia, hilus and Leydig cell hyperplasia and accumulation of lipids in and around Leydig cells. Male Trim37−/− mice had elevated levels of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones, but maintained normal levels of testosterone. Six-month-old Trim37−/− mice had elevated fasting blood glucose and low fasting serum insulin levels. At 1.5 years Trim37−/− mice showed non-compaction cardiomyopathy, hepatomegaly, fatty liver and various tumors. The amount and morphology of liver peroxisomes seemed normal in Trim37−/− mice. The most consistently seen phenotypes in Trim37−/− mice were infertility and the associated hormonal findings, whereas there was more variability in the other phenotypes observed. Trim37−/− mice recapitulate several features of the human MUL disease and thus provide a good model to study disease pathogenesis related to TRIM37 deficiency, including infertility, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiomyopathy and tumorigenesis.

  15. Cobalamin deficiency resulting in a rare haematological disorder: a case report

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    Chapuis Thomas M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present the case of a patient with a cobalamin deficiency resulting in pancytopaenia, emphasizing the importance to define, diagnose and treat cobalamin deficiency. Case presentation A 52-year-old man from the Democratic Republic of Congo presented to the emergency department with shortness of breath and a sore tongue. Physical examination was unremarkable. His haemoglobin was low and the peripheral blood smear revealed pancytopaenia with a thrombotic microangiopathy. The findings were low cobalamin and folate levels, and high homocysteine and methylmalonate levels. Pernicious anaemia with chronic atrophic gastritis was confirmed by gastric biopsy and positive antiparietal cell and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Cobalamin with added folate was given. Six months later, the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion Cobalamin deficiency should always be ruled out in a patient with pancytopaenia. Our case report highlights a life-threatening cobalamin deficiency completely reversible after treatment.

  16. First two unrelated cases of isolated sedoheptulokinase deficiency: A benign disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.C. Wamelink (Mirjam); R.J.J.F. Ramos (Ruben J. J. F.); A.P.M. van den Elzen (Annette P. M.); G.J.G. Ruijter (George); R. Bonte (Ramon); L. Diogo (Luisa); P. Garcia (Paula); N. Neves (Nelson); B. Nota (Benjamin); A. Haschemi (Arvand); I. Tavares de Almeida (Isabel); G.S. Salomons (Gajja)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe present the first two reported unrelated patients with an isolated sedoheptulokinase (SHPK) deficiency. The first patient presented with neonatal cholestasis, hypoglycemia, and anemia, while the second patient presented with congenital arthrogryposis multiplex, multiple contractures,

  17. Work of the Polish Council for Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders, and the model of iodine prophylaxis in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybiński, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The Polish Council for Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (PCCIDD) was established in 1991 in Krakow at the Chair and Dept. of Endocrinology, Jagiellonian University, Collegium Medicum, following the example of the International Council for Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (ICCIDD) in Charlottesville, USA. The PCCIDD co-operates with the European Co-ordinating Centre in Pisa, Italy. The PCCIDD comprises a group of experts in endocrinology, iodine prophylaxis, the technology of salt and food iodisation, and Polish representatives of several organisations: WHO, UNICEF, the Polish Consumers Federation, and the Spokesman for Children's Rights. The strategic goal of the Polish Council is to solve the problem of iodine deficiency in Poland realising the Programme for Elimination of Iodine Deficiency financed by the Ministry of Health. The Polish model of iodine prophylaxis contains obligatory iodisation of household salt (20-40 mg KI/1 kg) and neonates' formula (10 μg/100 mL of milk), and additional supplementation for pregnant and breastfeeding women with 150-200 μg of iodine as pharmacotherapy. The model is very effective: endemic goitre in schoolchildren has been eradicated, the prevalence of goitre in pregnant women has fallen from 80% to 19%, the frequency of transient hypothyroidism in neonates has dropped from 2.0% to 0.16%, and the observed increase of incidence rate of thyroid cancer in women over 40 years old has diminished markedly. In 2008, a WHO Collaborating Centre (WHOCC) for Nutrition was designated at the Department of Endocrinology, UJCM in Krakow. The main goal of the WHOCC is to sustain effective iodine prophylaxis in Poland in the light of the latest WHO recommendations on the necessary reduction of daily salt intake as a risk factor for hypertension and arteriosclerosis. Therefore, additional standardised carriers of iodine (milk, mineral water) have been introduced into the food market.

  18. Complement factor I deficiency: a not so rare immune defect. Characterization of new mutations and the first large gene deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba-Domínguez María

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complement Factor I (CFI is a serine protease with an important role in complement alternative pathway regulation. Complete factor I deficiency is strongly associated with severe infections. Approximately 30 families with this deficiency have been described worldwide. Patients and methods We have studied five new Spanish families suffering from CFI deficiency. From 19 screened people, 7 homozygous, 10 heterozygous and 2 healthy subjects were identified. Clinical, biochemical and genetic descriptions are included. Results Molecular studies demonstrated 4 novel mutations in the screened individuals; amongst them, we describe here the first great gene deletion reported in the CFI locus, which includes full exon 2 and part of the large intron 1. Conclusion CFI deficiency is possibly an underestimated defect and the eventual existence of this deficiency should be tested in those patients exhibiting low C3 and recurrent bacterial infections. We propose a simple diagnostic flowchart to help clinicians in the identification and correct diagnosis of such patients.

  19. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goaster, Jacqueline Le; Bourée, Patrice; Ifergan, Charles; Tangy, Frederic; Olivier, René; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab) levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels.

  20. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Le Goaster

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels.

  1. N-acetylglutamate synthetase deficiency: diagnosis, management and follow-up of a rare disorder of ammonia detoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubiger, G; Bachmann, C; Barben, P; Colombo, J P; Tönz, O; Schüpbach, D

    1991-03-01

    We report the 9-year follow-up of a patient suffering from N-acetylglutamate synthetase deficiency, an urea cycle disorder leading to severe neonatal hyperammonaemia. Hitherto two patients from two families with this inborn error of metabolism had been observed. Our management consisted mainly of a protein-restricted diet and oral treatment with N-carbamylglutamate, an activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase, together with arginine or citrulline. The somatic development was normal whereas a moderate psychomotor retardation was diagnosed. The patient died after an episode of coma and prolonged generalized convulsions at the age of 9.5 years.

  2. Mood disorder with mixed, psychotic features due to vitamin b12 deficiency in an adolescent: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Reports of psychiatric disorders due to its deficiency mostly focus on middle aged and elderly patients. Here we report a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency in a 16-year old, male adolescent who presented with mixed mood disorder symptoms with psychotic features. Chief complaints were “irritability, regressive behavior, apathy, crying and truancy” which lasted for a year. Premorbid personality was unremarkable with no substance use/exposure or infections. No stressors were present. The patient was not vegetarian. Past medical history and family history was normal. Neurological examination revealed glossitis, ataxia, rigidity in both shoulders, cog-wheel rigidity in the left elbow, bilateral problems of coordination in cerebellar examination, reduced swinging of the arms and masked face. Romberg’s sign was present. Laboratory evaluations were normal. Endoscopy and biopsy revealed atrophy of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter Pylori colonization. Schilling test was suggestive of malabsorbtion. He was diagnosed with Mood disorder with Mixed, Psychotic Features due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency and risperidone 0.5 mg/day and intramuscular vitamin B12 500 mcg/day were started along with referral for treatment of Helicobacter pylori. A visit on the second week revealed no psychotic features. Romberg’s sign was negative and cerebellar tests were normal. Extrapyramidal symptoms were reduced while Vitamin B12 levels were elevated. Risperidone was stopped and parenteral Vitamin B12 treatment was continued with monthly injections for 3 months. Follow-up endoscopy and biopsy at the first month demonstrated eradication of H. pylori. He was followed monthly for another 6 months and psychiatric symptoms did not recur at the time of last evaluation. Despite limitations, this case may underline the observation that mood disorders with psychotic features

  3. Vitamin E deficiency depressed fish growth, disease resistance, and the immunity and structural integrity of immune organs in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella): Referring to NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jia-Hong; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary vitamin E on growth, disease resistance and the immunity and structural integrity of head kidney, spleen and skin in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). The fish were fed six diets containing graded levels of vitamin E (0, 45, 90, 135, 180 and 225 mg/kg diet) for 10 weeks. Subsequently, a challenge test was conducted by injection of Aeromonas hydrophila. The results showed that compared with optimal vitamin E supplementation, vitamin E deficiency caused depressed growth, poor survival rates and increased skin lesion morbidity in grass carp. Meanwhile, vitamin E deficiency decreased lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, complement component 3 and complement component 4 contents in the head kidney, spleen and skin of grass carp (P E deficiency down-regulated antimicrobial peptides (Hepcidin, liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide-2A, -2B, β-defensin), IL-10, TGFβ1, IκBα, TOR and S6K1 mRNA levels (P E deficiency caused oxidative damage, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities, and down-regulated the mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes and signaling molecules Nrf2 (P E deficiency also induced apoptosis by up-regulating capase-2, -3, -7, and -8 mRNA levels in the head kidney, spleen and skin of grass carp. In conclusion, this study indicated that dietary vitamin E deficiency depressed fish growth, impaired the immune function and disturbed the structural integrity of the head kidney, spleen and skin in grass carp, but optimal vitamin E supplementation can reverse those negative effects in fish. The optimal vitamin E requirements for young grass carp (266.39-1026.63 g) to achieve optimal growth performance and disease resistance based on the percent weight gain (PWG) and skin lesion morbidity were estimated to be 116.2 and 130.9 mg/kg diet, respectively. Meanwhile, based on immune indicator (LA activity in the head kidney) and

  4. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  5. Blood gene expression profiles suggest altered immune function associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Aliza P; Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies found that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can impair immune function and increase risk for cardiovascular disease or events. Mechanisms underlying the physiological reverberations of anxiety, however, are still elusive. Hence, we aimed to investigate molecular processes mediating effects of anxiety on physical health using blood gene expression profiles of 336 community participants (157 anxious and 179 control). We examined genome-wide differential gene expression in anxiety, as well as associations between nine major modules of co-regulated transcripts in blood gene expression and anxiety. No significant differential expression was observed in women, but 631 genes were differentially expressed between anxious and control men at the false discovery rate of 0.1 after controlling for age, body mass index, race, and batch effect. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that genes with altered expression levels in anxious men were involved in response of various immune cells to vaccination and to acute viral and bacterial infection, and in a metabolic network affecting traits of metabolic syndrome. Further, we found one set of 260 co-regulated genes to be significantly associated with anxiety in men after controlling for the relevant covariates, and demonstrate its equivalence to a component of the stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity profile. Taken together, our results suggest potential molecular pathways that can explain negative effects of GAD observed in epidemiological studies. Remarkably, even mild anxiety, which most of our participants had, was associated with observable changes in immune-related gene expression levels. Our findings generate hypotheses and provide incremental insights into molecular mechanisms mediating negative physiological effects of GAD.

  6. Utility of immune response-derived biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Oever, Jaap; Netea, Mihai G; Kullberg, Bart-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating between inflammatory disorders is difficult, but important for a rational use of antimicrobial agents. Biomarkers reflecting the host immune response may offer an attractive strategy to predict the etiology of an inflammatory process and can thus be of help in decision making. We performed a review of the literature to evaluate the diagnostic value of inflammatory biomarkers in adult patients admitted to the hospital with suspected systemic acute infections. Elevated procalcitonin (PCT) concentrations indicate a bacterial infection in febrile patients with an auto-immune disease, rather than a disease flare. CD64 expression on neutrophils can discriminate between non-infectious systemic inflammation and sepsis, and limited evidence suggests the same for decoy receptor 3. PCT is useful for both diagnosing bacterial infection complicating influenza and guiding antibiotic treatment in lower respiratory tract infections in general. In undifferentiated illnesses, increased CD35 expression on neutrophils distinguishes bacterial from viral infections. Compared to bacterial infections, invasive fungal infections are characterized by low concentrations of PCT. No biomarker predicting a specific infecting agent could be identified.

  7. Persistent Immune Stimulation Exacerbates Genetically Driven Myeloproliferative Disorders via Stromal Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodo, Claudio; Burocchi, Alessia; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Chiodoni, Claudia; Portararo, Paola; Cappetti, Barbara; Botti, Laura; Gulino, Alessandro; Isidori, Alessandro; Liso, Arcangelo; Visani, Giuseppe; Martelli, Maria Paola; Falini, Brunangelo; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Colombo, Mario P; Sangaletti, Sabina

    2017-07-01

    Systemic immune stimulation has been associated with increased risk of myeloid malignancies, but the pathogenic link is unknown. We demonstrate in animal models that experimental systemic immune activation alters the bone marrow stromal microenvironment, disarranging extracellular matrix (ECM) microarchitecture, with downregulation of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and collagen-I and induction of complement activation. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in Treg frequency and by an increase in activated effector T cells. Under these conditions, hematopoietic precursors harboring nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) mutation generated myeloid cells unfit for normal hematopoiesis but prone to immunogenic death, leading to neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. NET fostered the progression of the indolent NPM1-driven myeloproliferation toward an exacerbated and proliferative dysplastic phenotype. Enrichment in NET structures was found in the bone marrow of patients with autoimmune disorders and in NPM1-mutated acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. Genes involved in NET formation in the animal model were used to design a NET-related inflammatory gene signature for human myeloid malignancies. This signature identified two AML subsets with different genetic complexity and different enrichment in NPM1 mutation and predicted the response to immunomodulatory drugs. Our results indicate that stromal/ECM changes and priming of bone marrow NETosis by systemic inflammatory conditions can complement genetic and epigenetic events towards the development and progression of myeloid malignancy. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3685-99. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Deficiency of dietary niacin impaired intestinal mucosal immune function via regulating intestinal NF-κB, Nrf2 and MLCK signaling pathways in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lin; Li, Shun-Quan; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary niacin on intestinal mucosal immune and physical barrier, and relative mRNA levels of signaling molecules in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 young grass carp (255.63 ± 0.41 g) were fed six diets containing graded levels of niacin (3.95, 14.92, 24.98, 35.03, 44.97 and 55.01 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. Results observed that niacin deficiency decreased lysozyme (LA) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, and complement 3 (C3) content in the intestine (P niacin deficiency increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC) contents, decreased glutathione content, and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in the intestine of young grass carp (P niacin deficiency decreased mRNA levels of CuZnSOD, MnSOD, GPx, CAT, GST, GR, Claudin b, Claudin 3, Claudin c, Occludin, ZO-1, Claudin 15 and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) (P  0.05). In conclusion, niacin deficiency decreased intestinal mucosal immune and intestinal physical function, as well as regulated mRNA levels of NF-κB P65, IκBα, IKKα, IKKβ, IKKγ, Nrf2, Keap1a, p38 MAPK and MLCK in the intestine of young grass carp. Based on the broken-line model analysis of intestinal lysozyme activity, the requirement of niacin for young grass carp (255.63 ± 0.41 g) were estimated to be 39.80 mg/kg diet.

  9. Effect of dietary phosphorus deficiency on the growth, immune function and structural integrity of head kidney, spleen and skin in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluates the effects of dietary phosphorus on the growth, immune function and structural integrity (head kidney, spleen and skin) of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) that were fed graded levels of available phosphorus (0.95-8.75 g/kg diet). Results indicated that phosphorus deficiency decreased the growth performance of young grass carp. In addition, the results first demonstrated that compared with the optimal phosphorus level, phosphorus deficiency depressed the lysozyme (LZ) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and the complement 3 (C3), C4 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) contents, and down-regulated the mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides, anti-inflammatory cytokines, inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) and target of rapamycin (TOR), whereas it up-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and NF-κB p52 mRNA levels to decrease fish head kidney and spleen immune functions. Moreover, phosphorus deficiency up-regulated the mRNA levels of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a), Fas ligand (FasL), apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1), Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax), caspase -2, -3, -7, -8 and -9, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), whereas it depressed the glutathione (GSH) contents and antioxidant enzymes activities, and down-regulated the mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), B-cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2), myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) and tight junction complexes to attenuate fish head kidney and spleen structural integrity. In addition, phosphorus deficiency increased skin hemorrhage and lesions morbidity. Finally, based on the percent weight gain (PWG) and the ability to combat skin hemorrhage and lesions, the dietary available phosphorus requirements for young grass carp (254.56-898.23 g) were estimated to be 4.10 and 4.13 g/kg diet, respectively. In summary, phosphorus deficiency decreases the growth

  10. The earliest cases of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group M in Congo-Kinshasa, Rwanda and Burundi and the origin of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangroenweghe, D

    2001-06-29

    The early cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the 1960s and 1970s in Congo-Kinshasa (Zaire), Rwanda and Burundi are reviewed. These countries appear to be the source of the HIV-1 group M epidemic, which then spread outwards to neighbouring Tanzania and Uganda in the east, and Congo-Brazzaville in the west. Further spread to Haiti and onwards to the USA can be explained by the hundreds of single men from Haiti who participated in the UNESCO educational programme in the Congo between 1960 and 1975.

  11. Clinical features and treatment of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus co-infection among patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨蓉蓉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the clinical features of hepatitis B virus(HBV)and hepatitis C virus(HCV)co-infection among acquired immune deficiency syndrome(AIDS)patients and the interaction of lamivudine(3 TC)contained antiretroviral therapy(ART)with hepatitis virus replication.Methods From 2004 to 2010,199human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)/HBV coinfected patients admitted to Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University were enrolled,including 76 cases of HIV/HBV/HCV triple infection and 123 cases of

  12. Solubilization of immune complexes in complement factor deficient sera and the influence of temperature, ionic strength and divalent cations on the solubilization reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, Ivan; Svehag, Svend-Erik;

    1984-01-01

    The complement-mediated solubilization (CMS) of immune complexes (IC) and the initial kinetics (IKS) of this reaction in human sera depleted of or deficient in C2, C3, C8, factors B, P and I were investigated. Sera depleted of B or P and those lacking native C3 or factor I showed virtually no CMS...... by a radioassay and kinetic data for the binding of C3b to preformed immune complexes. The CMS capacity reached maximum at 39-41 degrees C and at an ionic strength of approximately 0.20 mu. Selective chelation of Mg2+ completely abolished the CMS of IC. Maximal CMS was observed at Mg2+ concentration of about 2m...

  13. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2012-01-01

    in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory...... directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated......8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity....

  14. Are newly discovered drivers of immune-mediated skin disorders expressed in normal skin regenerating from standardized surface injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A.G.M.; Keijsers, R.R.M.C.; Seyger, M.M.B.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2014-01-01

    Background: In healthy skin, tape stripping induces a transient wave of histological changes resembling immune-mediated skin diseases, such as psoriasis. The response to surface trauma may harbor mechanisms which are also relevant to the development of Koebner-positive skin disorders. However, studi

  15. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: The expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Leen (Wilhelmina); J. Klepper (Joerg); M.M. Verbeek (Marcel); M. Leferink (Maike); T. Hofste (Tom); B.G.M. van Engelen (Baziel); R.A. Wevers (Ron); T. Arthur (Todd); N. Bahi-Buisson (Nadia); D. Ballhausen (Diana); J. Bekhof (Jolita); P. van Bogaert (Patrick); I. Carrilho (Inês); B. Chabrol (Brigitte); M.P. Champion (Michael); J. Coldwell (James); P. Clayton (Peter); E. Donner (Elizabeth); A. Evangeliou (Athanasios); F. Ebinger (Friedrich); K. Farrell (Kevin); R.J. Forsyth (Rob); C.G.E.L. de Goede (Christian); S. Gross (Stephanie); S. Grünewald (Sonja); H. Holthausen (Hans); S. Jayawant (Sandeep); K. Lachlan (Katherine); V. Laugel (Vincent); K. Leppig (Kathy); M.J. Lim (Ming); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); A.D. Marina; L. Martorell (Loreto); J. McMenamin (Joe); M.E.C. Meuwissen (Marije); H. Mundy (Helen); N.O. Nilsson (Nils); A. Panzer (Axel); B.T. Poll-The; C. Rauscher (Christian); C.M.R. Rouselle (Christophe); I. Sandvig (Inger); T. Scheffner (Thomas); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); N. Simpson (Neil); P. Sykora (Parol); R. Tomlinson (Richard); J. Trounce (John); D.W.M. Webb (David); B. Weschke (Bernhard); H. Scheffer (Hans); M.A. Willemsen (Michél)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGlucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing an

  16. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome : the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Ines; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Della Marina, Adela; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michel A.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  17. Genetically attenuated, P36p-deficient malarial sporozoites induce protective immunity and apoptosis of infected liver cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.R. van; Douradinha, B.; Franke-Fayard, B.; Heussler, V.; Dooren, M.W. van; Schaijk, B.C.L. van; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Mota, M.M.; Waters, A.P.; Janse, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Immunization with Plasmodium sporozoites that have been attenuated by gamma-irradiation or specific genetic modification can induce protective immunity against subsequent malaria infection. The mechanism of protection is only known for radiation-attenuated sporozoites, involving cell-mediated and hu

  18. Newborn screening for remethylation disorders and vitamin B12 deficiency-evaluation of new strategies in cohorts from Qatar and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramer, Gwendolyn; Abdoh, Ghassan; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Shahbeck, Noora; Ali, Rehab; Mahmoud, Laila; Fang-Hoffmann, Junmin; Hoffmann, Georg F; Al Rifai, Hilal; Okun, Jürgen G

    2017-04-01

    Newborn screening is a precondition for early diagnosis and successful treatment of remethylation disorders and classical homocystinuria (cystathionine-ß-synthase deficiency). Newborn screening for classical homocystinuria using total homocysteine measurement in dried blood spots has been very successfully performed for many years for newborns from Qatar. A new optimized newborn screening strategy for remethylation disorders and homocystinuria was developed and evaluated for newborns from Qatar using total homocysteine measurement as first-tier and methionine, methionine-phenylalanine-ratio and propionylcarnitine as second-tiers. Proposed cut-offs were also retrospectively evaluated in newborn screening samples of 12 patients with remethylation disorders and vitamin B12 deficiency from Qatar and Germany. Over a 12 months period, the proposed strategy led to a decrease in the recall rate in homocysteine screening for Qatar from 1.09% to 0.68%, while allowing for additional systematic inclusion of remethylation disorders and vitamin B12 deficiency into the screening panel for Qatar. In the evaluated period the applied strategy would have detected all patients with classical homocystinuria identified by the previous strategy and in addition 5 children with maternal nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency and one patient with an isolated remethylation disorder. Additional retrospective evaluation of newborn screening samples of 12 patients from Germany and Qatar with remethlyation disorders or vitamin B12 deficiency showed that all of these patients would have been detected by the cut-offs used in the proposed new strategy. In addition, an adapted strategy for Germany using methionine, methionine-phenylalanine-ratio and propionylcarnitine as first-tier, and homocysteine as a second-tier test was also positively evaluated retrospectively. The proposed strategy for samples from Qatar allows inclusion of remethylation disorders and vitamin B12 deficiency in the screening

  19. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVex(TM)-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; Ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1.

  20. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  1. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abildgaard Steffensen

    Full Text Available Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii. To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  2. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  3. Frequent respiratory tract infections in the canine model of X-linked ectodermal dysplasia are not caused by an immune deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Casal, Margret L.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Ryan, Sara; Scheidt, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Moore, Peter F.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    As in many human patients with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED), XHED dogs are at an increased risk for pulmonary disorders. Localized immune system defects had been suspected previously in affected dogs because of frequent infections and unexpected deaths due to opportunistic respiratory tract infections. Experiments were designed to examine systemic and localized humoral and cellular responses, development and function of T cells, and thymic morphology. All dogs used in the...

  4. Significance of Anti-cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Autoantibodies in Immune-mediated Inflammatory Skin Disorders with and without Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Chander; Kashyap, Bineeta; Daulatabad, Deepashree; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Iqbal R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs) are autoantibodies directed against citrullinated peptides. Rheumatoid factor (RF), an antibody against the Fc portion of IgG, is known to form immune complexes and contribute to the etiopathogenesis of various skin disorders. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute-phase protein, increases following secretion of interleukin-6 from macrophages and T cells. Anti-CCP, RF, and CRP are well-established immune-markers, their diagnostic potential in immune-mediated skin disorders remains less widely studied. To determine the correlation between anti-CCP, RF, and CRP in immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. About 61 clinically diagnosed cases of various immune-mediated skin diseases (psoriasis [n = 38], connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis [n = 14], and immunobullous disorders including pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus [n = 9]) were included in the study. These patients were subclassified on the basis of presence or absence of arthritis. Arthritis was present in nine cases of psoriasis and seven connective tissue disorder patients. Detection of serum anti-CCP was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas CRP and RF levels were detected using latex agglutination technique. Of the 61 specimens, 14.75% had elevated serum anti-CCP levels. RF and CRP levels were elevated in 18.03% and 39.34% specimens, respectively. RF was elevated in 13.16% of inflammatory and 42.88% of connective tissue disorders, whereas anti-CCP was raised in 10.53% of inflammatory and 35.71% of connective tissue disorders. CRP positivity was highest in connective tissue disorders (50%), followed by 39.47% in inflammatory and 22.22% in immunobullous conditions. In none of the immunobullous patients, anti-CCP or RF levels were found to be elevated. Association of the presence of arthritis with elevated anti-CCP was found to be statistically significant. Although anti-CCP, RF, and CRP levels are

  5. Significance of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies in immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorders with and without arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chander Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs are autoantibodies directed against citrullinated peptides. Rheumatoid factor (RF, an antibody against the Fc portion of IgG, is known to form immune complexes and contribute to the etiopathogenesis of various skin disorders. C-reactive protein (CRP, an acute-phase protein, increases following secretion of interleukin-6 from macrophages and T cells. Anti-CCP, RF, and CRP are well-established immune-markers, their diagnostic potential in immune-mediated skin disorders remains less widely studied. Aims and Objectives: To determine the correlation between anti-CCP, RF, and CRP in immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. Materials and Methods: About 61 clinically diagnosed cases of various immune-mediated skin diseases (psoriasis [n = 38], connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis [n = 14], and immunobullous disorders including pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus [n = 9] were included in the study. These patients were subclassified on the basis of presence or absence of arthritis. Arthritis was present in nine cases of psoriasis and seven connective tissue disorder patients. Detection of serum anti-CCP was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas CRP and RF levels were detected using latex agglutination technique. Results: Of the 61 specimens, 14.75% had elevated serum anti-CCP levels. RF and CRP levels were elevated in 18.03% and 39.34% specimens, respectively. RF was elevated in 13.16% of inflammatory and 42.88% of connective tissue disorders, whereas anti-CCP was raised in 10.53% of inflammatory and 35.71% of connective tissue disorders. CRP positivity was highest in connective tissue disorders (50%, followed by 39.47% in inflammatory and 22.22% in immunobullous conditions. In none of the immunobullous patients, anti-CCP or RF levels were found to be elevated. Association of the presence of arthritis with elevated anti-CCP was

  6. Significance of Anti-cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Autoantibodies in Immune-mediated Inflammatory Skin Disorders with and without Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Chander; Kashyap, Bineeta; Daulatabad, Deepashree; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Iqbal R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs) are autoantibodies directed against citrullinated peptides. Rheumatoid factor (RF), an antibody against the Fc portion of IgG, is known to form immune complexes and contribute to the etiopathogenesis of various skin disorders. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute-phase protein, increases following secretion of interleukin-6 from macrophages and T cells. Anti-CCP, RF, and CRP are well-established immune-markers, their diagnostic potential in immune-mediated skin disorders remains less widely studied. Aims and Objectives: To determine the correlation between anti-CCP, RF, and CRP in immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. Materials and Methods: About 61 clinically diagnosed cases of various immune-mediated skin diseases (psoriasis [n = 38], connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis [n = 14], and immunobullous disorders including pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus [n = 9]) were included in the study. These patients were subclassified on the basis of presence or absence of arthritis. Arthritis was present in nine cases of psoriasis and seven connective tissue disorder patients. Detection of serum anti-CCP was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas CRP and RF levels were detected using latex agglutination technique. Results: Of the 61 specimens, 14.75% had elevated serum anti-CCP levels. RF and CRP levels were elevated in 18.03% and 39.34% specimens, respectively. RF was elevated in 13.16% of inflammatory and 42.88% of connective tissue disorders, whereas anti-CCP was raised in 10.53% of inflammatory and 35.71% of connective tissue disorders. CRP positivity was highest in connective tissue disorders (50%), followed by 39.47% in inflammatory and 22.22% in immunobullous conditions. In none of the immunobullous patients, anti-CCP or RF levels were found to be elevated. Association of the presence of arthritis with elevated anti-CCP was found to be

  7. Immunological characterization and transcription profiling of peripheral blood (PB) monocytes in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD): case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There exists a small subset of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) characterized by fluctuating behavioral symptoms and cognitive skills following immune insults. Some of these children also exhibit specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD), resulting in frequent infection caused by encapsulated organisms, and they often require supplemental intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (ASD/SPAD). This study assessed whether these ASD/SPAD children have distinct immunological findings in comparison with ASD/non-SPAD or non-ASD/SPAD children. Case description We describe 8 ASD/SPAD children with worsening behavioral symptoms/cognitive skills that are triggered by immune insults. These ASD/SPAD children exhibited delayed type food allergy (5/8), treatment-resistant seizure disorders (4/8), and chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (5/8) at high frequencies. Control subjects included ASD children without SPAD (N = 39), normal controls (N = 37), and non-ASD children with SPAD (N = 12). Discussion and Evaluation We assessed their innate and adaptive immune responses, by measuring the production of pro-inflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in responses to agonists of toll like receptors (TLR), stimuli of innate immunity, and T cell stimulants. Transcription profiling of PB monocytes was also assessed. ASD/SPAD PBMCs produced less proinflammatory cytokines with agonists of TLR7/8 (IL-6, IL-23), TLR2/6 (IL-6), TLR4 (IL-12p40), and without stimuli (IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α) than normal controls. In addition, cytokine production of ASD/SPAD PBMCs in response to T cell mitogens (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-12p40) and candida antigen (Ag) (IL-10, IL-12p40) were less than normal controls. ASD/non-SPAD PBMDs revealed similar results as normal controls, while non-ASD/SPAD PBMCs revealed lower production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-23 with a TLR4 agonist. Only common features observed between ASD/SPAD and non

  8. Immunological characterization and transcription profiling of peripheral blood (PB monocytes in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyonouchi Harumi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There exists a small subset of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD characterized by fluctuating behavioral symptoms and cognitive skills following immune insults. Some of these children also exhibit specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD, resulting in frequent infection caused by encapsulated organisms, and they often require supplemental intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG (ASD/SPAD. This study assessed whether these ASD/SPAD children have distinct immunological findings in comparison with ASD/non-SPAD or non-ASD/SPAD children. Case description We describe 8 ASD/SPAD children with worsening behavioral symptoms/cognitive skills that are triggered by immune insults. These ASD/SPAD children exhibited delayed type food allergy (5/8, treatment-resistant seizure disorders (4/8, and chronic gastrointestinal (GI symptoms (5/8 at high frequencies. Control subjects included ASD children without SPAD (N = 39, normal controls (N = 37, and non-ASD children with SPAD (N = 12. Discussion and Evaluation We assessed their innate and adaptive immune responses, by measuring the production of pro-inflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in responses to agonists of toll like receptors (TLR, stimuli of innate immunity, and T cell stimulants. Transcription profiling of PB monocytes was also assessed. ASD/SPAD PBMCs produced less proinflammatory cytokines with agonists of TLR7/8 (IL-6, IL-23, TLR2/6 (IL-6, TLR4 (IL-12p40, and without stimuli (IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α than normal controls. In addition, cytokine production of ASD/SPAD PBMCs in response to T cell mitogens (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-12p40 and candida antigen (Ag (IL-10, IL-12p40 were less than normal controls. ASD/non-SPAD PBMDs revealed similar results as normal controls, while non-ASD/SPAD PBMCs revealed lower production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-23 with a TLR4 agonist. Only common features observed between ASD/SPAD and non

  9. Altered synaptic phospholipid signaling in PRG-1 deficient mice induces exploratory behavior and motor hyperactivity resembling psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patrick; Petzold, Sandra; Sommer, Angela; Nitsch, Robert; Schwegler, Herbert; Vogt, Johannes; Roskoden, Thomas

    2017-08-24

    Plasticity related gene 1 (PRG-1) is a neuron specific membrane protein located at the postsynaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. PRG-1 modulates signaling pathways of phosphorylated lipid substrates such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Deletion of PRG-1 increases presynaptic glutamate release probability leading to neuronal over-excitation. However, due to its cortical expression, PRG-1 deficiency leading to increased glutamatergic transmission is supposed to also affect motor pathways. We therefore analyzed the effects of PRG-1 function on exploratory and motor behavior using homozygous PRG-1 knockout (PRG-1(-/-)) mice and PRG-1/LPA2-receptor double knockout (PRG-1(-/-)/LPA2(-/-)) mice in two open field settings of different size and assessing motor behavior in the Rota Rod test. PRG-1(-/-) mice displayed significantly longer path lengths and higher running speed in both open field conditions. In addition, PRG-1(-/-) mice spent significantly longer time in the larger open field and displayed rearing and self-grooming behavior. Furthermore PRG-1(-/-) mice displayed stereotypical behavior resembling phenotypes of psychiatric disorders in the smaller sized open field arena. Altogether, this behavior is similar to the stereotypical behavior observed in animal models for psychiatric disease of autistic spectrum disorders which reflects a disrupted balance between glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. These differences indicate an altered excitation/inhibition balance in neuronal circuits in PRG-1(-/-) mice as recently shown in the somatosensory cortex [38]. In contrast, PRG-1(-/-)/LPA2(-/-) did not show significant changes in behavior in the open field suggesting that these specific alterations were abolished when the LPA2-receptor was lacking. Our findings indicate that PRG-1 deficiency led to over-excitability caused by an altered LPA/LPA2-R signaling inducing a behavioral phenotype typically observed in animal models for psychiatric disorders. Copyright

  10. External quality assessment of platelet disorder investigations: results of international surveys on diagnostic tests for dense granule deficiency and platelet aggregometry interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Catherine P M; Moffat, Karen A; Plumhoff, Elizabeth; Timleck, Marnie; Hoffman, Suzanne; Spitzer, Ernie; Van Cott, Elizabeth M; Meijer, Piet

    2012-09-01

    The quality of platelet aggregation and dense granule deficiency testing is important for diagnosing platelet function disorders. After a successful pilot exercise on diagnosing platelet dense granule deficiency by electron microscopy (EM), the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association (NASCOLA) has launched regular external quality assurance (EQA) for dense granule EM, as well as for the interpretation of platelet aggregation findings. EQA records were analyzed to assess performance. For EM EQA, between 2009 and 2011, there was excellent performance in distinguishing normal from dense granule-deficient samples and good (>70%) agreement on classifying most electron dense structures in platelets. For aggregation EQA, some normal variants were misclassified and overall case interpretations were more acceptable for rare disorders than for common findings. NASCOLA experiences with these EQAs indicate that there is a need to improve the quality of platelet disorder evaluations. For aggregometry interpretations, deficits in performance could be addressed by translating guideline recommendations into practice.

  11. [The role of inositol deficiency in the etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimiuk, Artur J; Szamatowicz, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Inositol acts as a second messenger in insulin signaling pathway Literature data suggest inositol deficiency in insulin-resistant women with the polycystic ovary syndrome. Supplementation of myo-inisitol decreases insulin resistance as it works as an insulin sensitizing agent. The positive role of myo-inositol in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome has been of increased evidence recently The present review presents the effects of myo-inositol on the ovarian, hormonal and metabolic parameters in women with PCOS.

  12. Ketogenic diet improves behaviors in a maternal immune activation model of autism spectrum disorder

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    Ruskin, David N.; Murphy, Michelle I.; Slade, Sierra L.; Masino, Susan A.

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal factors influence autism spectrum disorder (ASD) incidence in children and can increase ASD symptoms in offspring of animal models. These may include maternal immune activation (MIA) due to viral or bacterial infection during the first trimesters. Unfortunately, regardless of ASD etiology, existing drugs are poorly effective against core symptoms. For nearly a century a ketogenic diet (KD) has been used to treat seizures, and recent insights into mechanisms of ASD and a growing recognition that immune/inflammatory conditions exacerbate ASD risk has increased interest in KD as a treatment for ASD. Here we studied the effects of KD on core ASD symptoms in offspring exposed to MIA. To produce MIA, pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were injected with the viral mimic polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid; after weaning offspring were fed KD or control diet for three weeks. Consistent with an ASD phenotype of a higher incidence in males, control diet-fed MIA male offspring were not social and exhibited high levels of repetitive self-directed behaviors; female offspring were unaffected. However, KD feeding partially or completely reversed all MIA-induced behavioral abnormalities in males; it had no effect on behavior in females. KD-induced metabolic changes of reduced blood glucose and elevated blood ketones were quantified in offspring of both sexes. Prior work from our laboratory and others demonstrate KDs improve relevant behaviors in several ASD models, and here we demonstrate clear benefits of KD in the MIA model of ASD. Together these studies suggest a broad utility for metabolic therapy in improving core ASD symptoms, and support further research to develop and apply ketogenic and/or metabolic strategies in patients with ASD. PMID:28166277

  13. Ferumoxytol versus placebo in iron deficiency anemia: efficacy, safety, and quality of life in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, David C; Dahl, Naomi V; Strauss, William E; Barish, Charles F; Hetzel, David J; Bernard, Kristine; Li, Zhu; Allen, Lee F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and can adversely affect quality of life. Oral iron is poorly tolerated in many patients with GI disorders. Ferumoxytol is approved for the intravenous treatment of IDA in patients with chronic kidney disease. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ferumoxytol in patients with IDA and concomitant GI disorders. Patients and methods This analysis included 231 patients with IDA and GI disorders from a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating ferumoxytol (510 mg ×2) versus placebo in patients who had failed or were intolerant of oral iron therapy. The primary study end point was the proportion of patients achieving a ≥20 g/L increase in hemoglobin (Hgb) from baseline to Week 5. Other end points included mean change in Hgb, proportion of patients achieving Hgb ≥120 g/L, mean change in transferrin saturation, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Results Significantly more patients with IDA receiving ferumoxytol achieved a ≥20 g/L increase in Hgb versus placebo (82.1% vs 1.7%, respectively; P<0.001). Mean increase in Hgb (28.0 g/L vs −1.0 g/L, respectively; P<0.001) significantly favored ferumoxytol treatment. Ferumoxytol-treated patients demonstrated significantly greater improvements than placebo-treated patients relative to their very poor baseline PRO scores posttreatment, including improvements in the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue questionnaire and various domains of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Ferumoxytol-treated patients had a low rate of adverse events. Conclusion In this study, ferumoxytol was shown to be an efficacious and generally well-tolerated treatment option for patients with IDA and underlying GI disorders who were unable to use or had a history of unsatisfactory oral iron therapy. PMID:27468245

  14. Genetic hemoglobin disorders rather than iron deficiency are a major predictor of hemoglobin concentration in women of reproductive age in rural prey Veng, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakochuk, Crystal D; Whitfield, Kyly C; Barr, Susan I; Lamers, Yvonne; Devlin, Angela M; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; Kroeun, Hou; Talukder, Aminuzzaman; McLean, Judy; Green, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is common in Cambodian women. Potential causes include micronutrient deficiencies, genetic hemoglobin disorders, inflammation, and disease. We aimed to investigate factors associated with anemia (low hemoglobin concentration) in rural Cambodian women (18-45 y) and to investigate the relations between hemoglobin disorders and other iron biomarkers. Blood samples were obtained from 450 women. A complete blood count was conducted, and serum and plasma were analyzed for ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), folate, vitamin B-12, retinol binding protein (RBP), C-reactive protein (CRP), and α1 acid glycoprotein (AGP). Hemoglobin electrophoresis and multiplex polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the prevalence and type of genetic hemoglobin disorders. Overall, 54% of women had a genetic hemoglobin disorder, which included 25 different genotypes (most commonly, hemoglobin E variants and α(3.7)-thalassemia). Of the 420 nonpregnant women, 29.5% had anemia (hemoglobin iron stores (ferritin iron deficiency (sTfR >8.3 mg/L), iron deficiency anemia (IDA) were 14.2% and 1.5% in those with and without hemoglobin disorders, respectively. There was no biochemical evidence of vitamin A deficiency (RBP 5 mg/L) and 26% (AGP >1 g/L) of nonpregnant women, respectively. By using an adjusted linear regression model, the strongest predictors of hemoglobin concentration were hemoglobin E homozygous disorder and pregnancy status. Other predictors were 2 other heterozygous traits (hemoglobin E and Constant Spring), parity, RBP, log ferritin, and vitamin B-12. Multiple biomarkers for anemia and iron deficiency were significantly influenced by the presence of hemoglobin disorders, hence reducing their diagnostic sensitivity. Further investigation of the unexpectedly low prevalence of IDA in Cambodian women is warranted. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. rhIGF-1 Therapy for Growth Failure and IGF-1 Deficiency in Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Ia (PMM2 Deficiency

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    Bradley S. Miller MD, PhD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of rare disorders in which glycosylation required for proper protein-protein interactions and protein stability is disrupted, manifesting clinically with multiple system involvement and growth failure. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF system plays an important role in childhood growth and has been shown to be dysfunctional with low IGF-1 levels in children with CDG type Ia (PMM2 deficiency. Case report. A 3-year-old Caucasian male with failure to thrive was diagnosed with PMM2-CDG at 5 months of age. Initially, his length and weight were less than −2 standard deviation score, IGF-1 <25 ng/mL (normal 55-327 ng/mL, IGFBP-3 1.0 µg/mL (normal 0.7-3.6 ng/mL, and acid-labile subunit 1.3 mg/L (normal 0.7-7.9 mg/L. Despite aggressive feeding, he continued to show poor linear growth and weight gain. At 17 months, he underwent an IGF-1 generation test with growth hormone (0.1 mg/kg/d for 7 days; baseline IGF-1of 27 ng/mL (normal 55-327 ng/mL stimulated to only 33 ng/mL. Recombinant human IGF-1 (rhIGF-1 therapy (up to 130 µg/kg/dose twice daily was initiated at 21 months of age resulting in an excellent linear growth response with height increasing from −2.73 to −1.39 standard deviation score over 22 months. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels also increased. Conclusion. This is the first case report of rhIGF-1 therapy in a patient with PMM2-CDG. The child had an excellent linear growth response. These results provide additional in vivo evidence for IGF dysfunction in PMM2-CDG and suggest that rhIGF-1 may be a novel treatment for growth failure in PMM2-CDG.

  16. Color vision deficiency compensation for Visual Processing Disorder using Hardy-Rand-Rittler test and color transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbin, Jessie R.; Pinugu, Jasmine Nadja J.; Bautista, Joshua Ian C.; Nebres, Pauline D.; Rey Hipolito, Cipriano M.; Santella, Jose Anthony A.

    2017-06-01

    Visual processing skill is used to gather visual information from environment however, there are cases that Visual Processing Disorder (VPD) occurs. The so called visual figure-ground discrimination is a type of VPD where color is one of the factors that contributes on this type. In line with this, color plays a vital role in everyday living, but individuals that have limited and inaccurate color perception suffers from Color Vision Deficiency (CVD) and still not aware on their case. To resolve this case, this study focuses on the design of KULAY, a Head-Mounted Display (HMD) device that can assess whether a user has a CVD or not thru the standard Hardy-Rand-Rittler (HRR) test. This test uses pattern recognition in order to evaluate the user. In addition, color vision deficiency simulation and color correction thru color transformation is also a concern of this research. This will enable people with normal color vision to know how color vision deficient perceives and vice-versa. For the accuracy of the simulated HRR assessment, its results were validated thru an actual assessment done by a doctor. Moreover, for the preciseness of color transformation, Structural Similarity Index Method (SSIM) was used to compare the simulated CVD images and the color corrected images to other reference sources. The output of the simulated HRR assessment and color transformation shows very promising results indicating effectiveness and efficiency of the study. Thus, due to its form factor and portability, this device is beneficial in the field of medicine and technology.

  17. The influence of maternal prenatal and early childhood nutrition and maternal prenatal stress on offspring immune system development and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; O'Connor, Thomas G; Roth, Christine; Susser, Ezra; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of maternal prenatal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood) as well as maternal prenatal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early interventions.

  18. The Influence of Maternal Prenatal and Early Childhood Nutrition and Maternal Prenatal Stress on Offspring Immune System Development and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Horvath Marques

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of prenatal maternal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood as well as prenatal maternal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early

  19. Immune Disorders in Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis: What Do We Know So Far?

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    Aleksandra Pyzik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of literature attempts to identify the factors that are involved in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto thyroiditis, an immune defect in an individual with genetic susceptibility accompanied with environmental factors. The frequency of Hashimoto’s disease is a growing trend and among Caucasians it is estimated at approximately 5%. The dysfunction of the gland may be clinically evident (0.1–2% of the population or subclinical (10–15%. The pathology is diagnosed five to ten times more often in women than men and its incidence increases with the age (the peak of the number of cases is between 45 and 65; however, it can also be diagnosed in children. The pathogenesis of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is still not fully comprehended. In the etiology of Hashimoto thyroiditis excessively stimulated T CD4+ cells are known to play the most important role. Recent research has demonstrated an increasing role of newly discovered cells such as Th17 (CD4+IL-17+ or T regulatory cells (CD4+CD25+highFoxP3+ in the induction of autoimmune disorders. The process of programmed cell death also plays an equally important role in the pathogenesis and the development of hypothyroidism.

  20. A zebrafish model of congenital disorders of glycosylation with phosphomannose isomerase deficiency reveals an early opportunity for corrective mannose supplementation

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    Jaime Chu

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG have recessive mutations in genes required for protein N-glycosylation, resulting in multi-systemic disease. Despite the well-characterized biochemical consequences in these individuals, the underlying cellular defects that contribute to CDG are not well understood. Synthesis of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO, which serves as the sugar donor for the N-glycosylation of secretory proteins, requires conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to mannose-6-phosphate via the phosphomannose isomerase (MPI enzyme. Individuals who are deficient in MPI present with bleeding, diarrhea, edema, gastrointestinal bleeding and liver fibrosis. MPI-CDG patients can be treated with oral mannose supplements, which is converted to mannose-6-phosphate through a minor complementary metabolic pathway, restoring protein glycosylation and ameliorating most symptoms, although liver disease continues to progress. Because Mpi deletion in mice causes early embryonic lethality and thus is difficult to study, we used zebrafish to establish a model of MPI-CDG. We used a morpholino to block mpi mRNA translation and established a concentration that consistently yielded 13% residual Mpi enzyme activity at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf, which is within the range of MPI activity detected in fibroblasts from MPI-CDG patients. Fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis detected decreased LLO and N-glycans in mpi morphants. These deficiencies resulted in 50% embryonic lethality by 4 dpf. Multi-systemic abnormalities, including small eyes, dysmorphic jaws, pericardial edema, a small liver and curled tails, occurred in 82% of the surviving larvae. Importantly, these phenotypes could be rescued with mannose supplementation. Thus, parallel processes in fish and humans contribute to the phenotypes caused by Mpi depletion. Interestingly, mannose was only effective if provided prior to 24 hpf. These data provide insight into treatment efficacy

  1. The Neural Correlates of Deficient Error Awareness in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Redmond G.; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Dockree, Paul M.; Lau, Adam; Hester, Robert; Garavan, Hugh; Fitzgerald, Michael; Foxe, John J.; Robertson, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to detect and correct errors is critical to adaptive control of behaviour and represents a discrete neuropsychological function. A number of studies have highlighted that attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with abnormalities in behavioural and neural responsiveness to performance errors. One limitation of…

  2. Diagnostic Assessment of Movement Disorders and Psychomotor Deficiency in Residual Schizophrenia

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    Vera Ilanković

    2014-06-01

    We would like to stress that psychiatric patients in psychotic, (prepsychotic and postpsychotic states, besides being mentally ill, also suffer from serious movement disorders  (psychomotor disturbances and deficits which put them into the category of  disabled persons, who besides requiring psychiatric (neuropsychiatric treatment, also require systematic psychomotor and speech  rehabilitation.

  3. White Blood Cell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  4. Overview of Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  5. Neonatal Immune Challenge with Lipopolysaccharide Triggers Long-lasting Sex- and Age-related Behavioral and Immune/Neurotrophic Alterations in Mice: Relevance to Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custódio, Charllyany Sabino; Mello, Bruna Stefânia Ferreira; Filho, Adriano José Maia Chaves; de Carvalho Lima, Camila Nayane; Cordeiro, Rafaela Carneiro; Miyajima, Fábio; Réus, Gislaine Z; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; de Oliveira, Antônio Carlos; de Lucena, David Freitas; Macedo, Danielle S

    2017-05-23

    Early-life challenges, particularly infections and stress, are related to neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Here, we conducted a wide range of behavioral tests in periadolescent (postnatal day (PN) 35) and adult (PN70) Swiss mice neonatally challenged with LPS on PN5 and -7, to unveil behavioral alterations triggered by LPS exposure. Immune and neurotrophic (brain-derived neurotrophic factor-BDNF) alterations were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC), and hypothalamus (HT). Since the incidence and clinical manifestations of neurodevelopmental disorders present significant sex-related differences, we sought to distinctly evaluate male and female mice. While on PN35, LPS-challenged male mice presented depressive, anxiety-like, repetitive behavior, and working memory deficits; on PN70, only depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors were observed. Conversely, females presented prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficits in both ages studied. Behavioral changes in periadolescence and adulthood were accompanied, in both sexes, by increased levels of interleukin (IL-4) (PFC, HC, and HT) and decreased levels of IL-6 (PFC, HC, and HT). BDNF levels increased in both sexes on PN70. LPS-challenged male mice presented, in both ages evaluated, increased HC myeloperoxidase activity (MPO); while when adult increased levels of interferon gamma (IFNγ), nitrite and decreased parvalbumin were observed. Alterations in innate immunity and parvalbumin were the main LPS-induced remarks between males and females in our study. We concluded that neonatal LPS challenge triggers sex-specific behavioral and neurochemical alterations that resemble autism spectrum disorder, constituting in a relevant model for the mechanistic investigation of sex bias associated with the development of this disorder.

  6. Sociodemographic influences on immunization of children with chronic neurological disorders in Enugu, Nigeria

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    J.C. Okoro

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Children with obvious neurological deficits whose mothers have low educational attainment are at risk of low immunization coverage. It is recommended that healthcare workers should assess the immunization status of children with CND at every opportunity. Female education and empowerment should be encouraged as a means of enhancing the immunization coverage of these children.

  7. Mutations in NFKB2 and potential genetic heterogeneity in patients with DAVID syndrome, having variable endocrine and immune deficiencies

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    Brue, Thierry; Quentien, Marie-Hélène; Khetchoumian, Konstantin; Bensa, Marco; Capo-Chichi, José-Mario; Delemer, Brigitte; Balsalobre, Aurelio; Nassif, Christina; Papadimitriou, Dimitris T; Pagnier, Anne; Hasselmann, Caroline; Patry, Lysanne; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Souchon, Pierre-François; Takayasu, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    Background DAVID syndrome is a rare condition combining anterior pituitary hormone deficiency with common variable immunodeficiency. NFKB2 mutations have recently been identified in patients with ACTH and variable immunodeficiency. A similar mutation was previously found in Nfkb2 in the immunodeficient Lym1 mouse strain, but the effect of the mutation on endocrine function was not evaluated. Methods We ascertained six unrelated DAVID syndrome families. We performed whole exome and traditional...

  8. Genetically Engineered Ascorbic acid-deficient Live Mutants of Leishmania donovani induce long lasting Protective Immunity against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

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    Anand, Sneha; Madhubala, Rentala

    2015-06-02

    Visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe systemic form of the disease. There are still no vaccines available for humans and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. Recently, we reported functional importance of Arabino-1, 4-lactone oxidase (ALO) enzyme from L. donovani involved in ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we have shown that ΔALO parasites do not affect the ability of null mutants to invade visceral organs but severely impair parasite persistence beyond 16 week in BALB/c mice and hence are safe as an immunogen. Both short term (5 week) and long term (20 week) immunization with ΔALO parasites conferred sustained protection against virulent challenge in BALB/c mice, activated splenocytes and resulted in induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Protection in immunized mice after challenge correlated with the stimulation of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Antigen-mediated cell immunity correlated with robust nitrite and superoxide generation, macrophage-derived oxidants critical in controlling Leishmania infection. Our data shows that live attenuated ΔALO parasites are safe, induce protective immunity and can provide sustained protection against Leishmania donovani. We further conclude that the parasites attenuated in their anti-oxidative defence mechanism can be exploited as vaccine candidates.

  9. Immune System

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    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  10. An altered immune response, but not individual cationic antimicrobial peptides, is associated with the oral attenuation of Ara4N-deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice.

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    Kristi L Strandberg

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium uses two-component regulatory systems (TCRS to respond to stimuli in the local microenvironment. Upon infection, the Salmonella TCRSs PhoP-PhoQ (PhoPQ and PmrA-PmrB (PmrAB are activated by environmental signals in the intestinal lumen and within host cells. TCRS-mediated gene expression results in lipopolysaccharide (LPS modification and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. The PmrA-regulated pmrHFIJKLM operon mediates 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose (Ara4N production and attachment to the lipid A of LPS. A ΔpmrF S. Typhimurium strain cannot produce Ara4N, exhibits increased sensitivity to cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP-mediated killing, and attenuated virulence in mice upon oral infection. CAMPs are predicted to play a role in elimination of Salmonella, and may activate PhoPQ and PmrAB in vivo, which could increase bacterial resistance to host defenses. Competition experiments between wild type (WT and ΔpmrF mutant strains of S. Typhimurium indicated that selection against this mutant first occurs within the intestinal lumen early during infection. However, CRAMP and active cryptdins alone are not responsible for elimination of Ara4N-deficient bacteria in vivo. Investigation into the early immune response to ΔpmrF showed that it differed slightly from the early immune response to WT S. Typhimurium. Further investigation into the early immune response to infection of Peyer's patches suggests a role for IL-13 in the attenution of the ΔpmrF mutant strain. Thus, prominent CAMPs present in the mouse intestine are not responsible for the selection against the ΔpmrF strain in this location, but limited alterations in innate immune induction were observed that affect bacterial survival and virulence.

  11. Synergistic effects of host B7-H4 deficiency and gemcitabine treatment on tumor regression and anti-tumor T cell immunity in a mouse model.

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    Leung, Joanne; St-Onge, Philippe; Stagg, John; Suh, Woong-Kyung

    2017-04-01

    B7-H4 (B7x/B7S1), a B7 family inhibitor of T cell activity, is expressed in multiple human cancers and correlates with decreased infiltrating lymphocytes and poor prognosis. In murine models, tumor-expressed B7-H4 enhances tumor growth and reduces T cell immunity, and blockade of tumor-B7-H4 rescues T cell activity and lowers tumor burden. This implicates B7-H4 as a target for cancer immunotherapy, yet limits the efficacy of B7-H4 blockade exclusively to patients with B7-H4+ tumors. Given the expression of B7-H4 on host immune cells, we have previously shown that BALB/c mice lacking host B7-H4 have enhanced anti-tumor profiles, yet similar 4T1 tumor growth relative to control. Given that T cell-mediated immunotherapies work best for tumors presenting tumor-associated neoantigens, we further investigated the function of host B7-H4 in the growth of a more immunogenic derivative, 4T1-12B, which is known to elicit strong anti-tumor CD8 T cell responses due to expression of a surrogate tumor-specific antigen, firefly luciferase. Notably, B7-H4 knockout hosts not only mounted greater tumor-associated anti-tumor T cell responses, but also displayed reduced tumors. Additionally, B7-H4-deficiency synergized with gemcitabine to further inhibit tumor growth, often leading to tumor eradication and the generation of protective T cell immunity. These findings imply that inhibition of host B7-H4 can enhance anti-tumor T cell immunity in immunogenic cancers, and can be combined with other anti-cancer therapies to further reduce tumor burden regardless of tumor-B7-H4 positivity.

  12. Disorders of innate immunity in human ageing and effects of nutraceutical administration.

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    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Immune decline with ageing accounts for the increased risk of infections, inflammatory chronic disease, autoimmunity and cancer in humans. Both innate and adaptive immune functions are compromised in aged people and, therefore, attempts to correct these dysfunctions represent a major goal of modern medicine. In this review, special emphasis will be placed on the aged innate immunity with special reference to polymorphonuclear cell, monocyte/ macrophage, dendritic cell and natural killer cell functions. As potential modifiers of the impaired innate immunity, some principal nutraceuticals will be illustrated, such as micronutrients, pre-probiotics and polyphenols. In elderly, clinical trials with the above products are scanty, however, some encouraging effects on the recovery of innate immune cells have been reported. In addition, our own results obtained with symbiotics and polyphenols extracted from red wine or fermented grape marc suggest the potential ability of these substances to modulate the innate immune response in ageing, thus reducing the inflammaging which characterizes immune senescence.

  13. Assessment of serum copper, iron and immune complexes in potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer

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    Ritu TIWARI

    Full Text Available Abstract Potentially malignant disorders (PMDs of oral cavity and oral cancer remain a cause of serious concern despite intensive research and development. Diet and immunity have been identified to play a crucial role as modifying factors in these diseases. Our study intended to explore this relationship by estimating and comparing the serum levels of copper, iron and circulating immune complexes (CICs in patients diagnosed with PMDs and oral cancer and normal healthy individuals. In this study, 40 histopathologically diagnosed cases of PMDs and oral cancer were included along with 30 healthy controls and 5 ml of venous blood was drawn using venipuncture. Serum estimation of copper, iron and CIC then followed using the colorimetric and spectrophotometric methods. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using one way ANOVA and Pearson’s Product-Moment Correlation Test. The mean serum copper level was measured as 138.98 ± 10.13µg/100ml in the PMD group and 141.99 ± 21.44 µg/100ml in the oral cancer as compared to 105.5 + 18.81µ/100ml in the controls. The mean serum CIC levels was highest in the oral cancer (9.65 ± 0.16OD470 followed by the PMD group (0.18 + 0.21 OD470 and least in the control group (0.048 ± 0.02OD470. Whereas, the serum levels of iron showed a significant decrease in the PMD group (110.9 ± 10.54 µg/100ml and the oral cancer group (114.29 ± 25.83 µg/100ml as compared with the control group (136.85 ± 14.48 µg/100ml. There was no positive correlation obtained between the three groups with respect to the chosen parameters indicating that the variables were independent of each other. It can be thus be ascertained that trace elements like copper and iron as well as humoral responses (CICs have a close relationship with PMDs and oral cancers.

  14. Extremely prolonged HIV seroconversion associated with an MHC haplotype carrying disease susceptibility genes for antibody deficiency disorders.

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    Padiglione, Alex; Aleksic, Eman; French, Martyn; Arnott, Alicia; Wilson, Kim M; Tippett, Emma; Kaye, Matthew; Gray, Lachlan; Ellett, Anne; Crane, Megan; Leslie, David E; Lewin, Sharon R; Breschkin, Alan; Birch, Chris; Gorry, Paul R; McPhee, Dale A; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2010-11-01

    Severe immunodeficiency during primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is unusual. Here, we characterized viral and immunological parameters in a subject presenting with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in the setting of prolonged primary HIV illness and delayed seroconversion. HIV antibody was only detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 12 months after presentation, and Western blot profiles remain indeterminate. Isolated virus was of R5 phenotype, exhibited poor viral fitness, but was otherwise unremarkable. Analysis of HIV antibody isotypes showed failure to mount a detectable HIV IgG response over nearly 2 years of infection, in particular IgG(1)- and IgG(3)-specific responses, despite normal responses to common infections and vaccines. Genetic analysis demonstrated homozygosity for part of an MHC haplotype containing susceptibility genes for common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) syndrome and other antibody deficiency disorders. Thus, a primary disorder of specific antibody production may explain exceptionally slow antibody development in an otherwise severe seroconversion illness. This highlights the need for multiparameter testing, in particular use of a fourth generation HIV test, for confirming HIV infection and underscores the importance of host factors in HIV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis IL-10 deficiency leads to increased immunity and regressive infection without enhancing tissue pathology.

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    Tânia A Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular immunity is the main defense mechanism in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, the most important systemic mycosis in Latin America. Th1 immunity and IFN-γ activated macrophages are fundamental to immunoprotection that is antagonized by IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Both in human and experimental PCM, several evidences indicate that the suppressive effect of IL-10 causes detrimental effects to infected hosts. Because direct studies have not been performed, this study was aimed to characterize the function of IL-10 in pulmonary PCM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wild type (WT and IL-10(-/- C57BL/6 mice were used to characterize the role of IL-10 in the innate and adaptive immunity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb infection. We verified that Pb-infected peritoneal macrophages from IL-10(-/- mice presented higher phagocytic and fungicidal activities than WT macrophages, and these activities were associated with elevated production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO and MCP-1. For in vivo studies, IL-10(-/- and WT mice were i.t. infected with 1×10(6 Pb yeasts and studied at several post-infection periods. Compared to WT mice, IL-10(-/- mice showed increased resistance to P. brasiliensis infection as determined by the progressive control of pulmonary fungal loads and total clearance of fungal cells from dissemination organs. This behavior was accompanied by enhanced delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, precocious humoral immunity and controlled tissue pathology resulting in increased survival times. In addition, IL-10(-/- mice developed precocious T cell immunity mediated by increased numbers of lung infiltrating effector/memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. The inflammatory reactions and the production of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines were reduced at late phases of infection, paralleling the regressive infection of IL-10(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work demonstrates for the first time that IL-10 plays a

  16. In pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis IL-10 deficiency leads to increased immunity and regressive infection without enhancing tissue pathology.

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    Tânia A Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular immunity is the main defense mechanism in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, the most important systemic mycosis in Latin America. Th1 immunity and IFN-γ activated macrophages are fundamental to immunoprotection that is antagonized by IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Both in human and experimental PCM, several evidences indicate that the suppressive effect of IL-10 causes detrimental effects to infected hosts. Because direct studies have not been performed, this study was aimed to characterize the function of IL-10 in pulmonary PCM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wild type (WT and IL-10(-/- C57BL/6 mice were used to characterize the role of IL-10 in the innate and adaptive immunity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb infection. We verified that Pb-infected peritoneal macrophages from IL-10(-/- mice presented higher phagocytic and fungicidal activities than WT macrophages, and these activities were associated with elevated production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO and MCP-1. For in vivo studies, IL-10(-/- and WT mice were i.t. infected with 1×10(6 Pb yeasts and studied at several post-infection periods. Compared to WT mice, IL-10(-/- mice showed increased resistance to P. brasiliensis infection as determined by the progressive control of pulmonary fungal loads and total clearance of fungal cells from dissemination organs. This behavior was accompanied by enhanced delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, precocious humoral immunity and controlled tissue pathology resulting in increased survival times. In addition, IL-10(-/- mice developed precocious T cell immunity mediated by increased numbers of lung infiltrating effector/memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. The inflammatory reactions and the production of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines were reduced at late phases of infection, paralleling the regressive infection of IL-10(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work demonstrates for the first time that IL-10 plays a

  17. Unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling: a management modality for treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in Henan Province of China.

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    Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-jun; Liu, Zhi-bin; Li, Qiang; Yang, Ji-ping; He, Ying

    2015-04-01

    Henan Province in China has a major epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Chinese medicine (CM) has been used throughout the last decade, and a management modality was developed, which can be described by unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling (UGC). The UGC modality has one primary concept (patient-centered medicine from CM theory), four basic foundations (classifying administrative region, characteristics of CM on disease treatment, health resource conditions, and distribution of patients living with HIV), six important relationships (the "three uniformities and three combinations," and the six relationships therein guide the treatment of AIDS with CM), and four key sections (management, operation, records, and evaluation). In this article, the authors introduce the UGC modality, which could be beneficial to developing countries or resource-limited areas for the management of chronic infectious disease.

  18. Leptin deficiency down-regulates IL-23 production in glomerular podocytes resulting in an attenuated immune response in nephrotoxic serum nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kei; Kaneko, Yoshikatsu; Sato, Yuya; Otsuka, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Suguru; Goto, Shin; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Madaio, Michael P; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-04-01

    Leptin, one of the typical adipokines, is reported to promote Th17 cell responses and to enhance production of proinflammatory cytokines. To clarify the role of leptin in the regulation of the IL-23/IL-17 axis and the development of kidney disease, we used a murine model of nephrotoxic serum (NTS) nephritis (NTN). Sheep NTS was administered in wild-type C57BL/6J mice and food-restricted, leptin-deficient C57BL/6J-ob/ob(FR-ob/ob) mice after preimmunization with sheep IgG. The profile of mRNA expression relevant to T helper lymphocytes in the kidneys was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Cultured murine glomerular podocytes and peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs) were used to investigate the direct effect of leptin on IL-23 or MCP-1 production by qRT-PCR. Kidney injury and macrophage infiltration were significantly attenuated in FR-ob/obmice 7 days after NTS injection. The Th17-dependent secondary immune response against deposited NTS in the glomeruli was totally impaired in FR-ob/obmice because of deteriorated IL-17 and proinflammatory cytokine production including IL-23 and MCP-1 in the kidney. IL-23 was produced in glomerular podocytes in NTN mice and cultured murine glomerular podocytes produced IL-23 under leptin stimulation. MCP-1 production in PEMs was also promoted by leptin. Induction of MCP-1 expression was observed in PEMs regardless of Ob-Rb, and the leptin signal was transduced without STAT3 phosphorylation in PEMs. Leptin deficiency impairs the secondary immune response against NTS and down-regulates IL-23 production and Th17 responses in the NTN kidney, which is accompanied by decreased MCP-1 production and macrophage infiltration in the NTN kidney.

  19. RNAi knock-down of shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Toll gene and immune deficiency gene reveals their difference in regulating antimicrobial peptides transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Fujun; He, Shulin; Liu, Yongjie; Zhu, Xiaowen; Sun, Chengbo; Liu, Xiaolin

    2014-06-01

    NF-κB dependent antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are of critical importance in protecting insects or mammals from microorganisms infection. However, we still do not make clear signaling pathways in regulating AMPs expression in shrimps. In this study, RNAi approach was used to study differences between Toll signaling pathway and immune deficiency signaling pathway in regulating the transcription of NF-κB dependent AMPs post bacteria challenge. Results showed that the transcription level of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor was highly suppressed in Litopenaeus vannamei immune deficiency (LvIMD) silenced shrimps by gene specific dsRNA compared to Litopenaeus vannamei Toll (LvToll) silenced shrimps with or without Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus lysodeikticus challenge. Conversely the transcription level of penaeidin3a was significantly suppressed in LvToll silenced shrimps compared to LvIMD silenced shrimps. However, no obvious difference was found in regulating the transcription of CrustinP. Meanwhile, we found that silencing LvToll both down regulated the transcription of Dorsal and Relish while silencing LvIMD only down regulated the transcription of Relish. At last, shrimp survival experiment showed that post V. anguillarum challenge high mortality was found both in LvToll and LvIMD silenced groups while post M. lysodeikticus challenge we saw high mortality only in LvToll silenced group. Hence, we conclude that shrimp L. vannamei Toll pathway and IMD pathway might be different in regulating the transcription of NF-κB dependent AMPs and responding to bacteria challenge but not independent of each other.

  20. Opportunistic autoimmune disorders potentiated by immune-checkpoint inhibitors anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1

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    Yi-Chi eKong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve the efficacy of immunotherapy for cancer and autoimmune diseases, recent ongoing and completed clinical trials have focused on specific targets to redirect the immune network toward eradicating a variety of tumors and ameliorating the self-destructive process. In a previous review (Kong et al., Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1183:222-236, 2010, both systemic immunomodulators and monoclonal antibodies, anti-CTLA-4 and anti-CD52, were discussed regarding therapeutics and autoimmune sequelae, as well as predisposing factors known to exacerbate immune-related adverse events. This review will focus on immune-checkpoint inhibitors, and the data from most clinical trials involve blockade with anti-CTLA-4 such as ipilimumab. However, despite the mild to severe immune-related adverse events observed with ipilimumab in ~60% of patients, overall survival averaged ~22-25% at 3-5 years. To boost overall survival, other monoclonal antibodies targeting programmed death-1 and its ligand are undergoing clinical trials as monotherapy or dual therapy with anti-CTLA-4. Therapeutic combinations may generate different spectrum of opportunistic autoimmune disorders. To simulate clinical scenarios, we have applied regulatory T cell perturbation to murine models combined to examine the balance between thyroid autoimmunity and tumor-specific immunity.

  1. Deficiency in Either 4E-BP1 or 4E-BP2 Augments Innate Antiviral Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehdi, Atef; Sean, Polen; Linares, Izzar; Colina, Rodney; Jaramillo, Maritza; Alain, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    Genetic deletion of both 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 was found to protect cells against viral infections. Here we demonstrate that the individual loss of either 4E-BP1 or 4E-BP2 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) is sufficient to confer viral resistance. shRNA-mediated silencing of 4E-BP1 or 4E-BP2 renders MEFs resistant to viruses, and compared to wild type cells, MEFs knockout for either 4E-BP1 or 4E-BP2 exhibit enhanced translation of Irf-7 and consequently increased innate immune response to viruses. Accordingly, the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, influenza virus and Sindbis virus is markedly suppressed in these cells. Importantly, expression of either 4E-BP1 or 4E-BP2 in double knockout or respective single knockout cells diminishes their resistance to viral infection. Our data show that loss of 4E-BP1 or 4E-BP2 potentiates innate antiviral immunity. These results provide further evidence for translational control of innate immunity and support targeting translational effectors as an antiviral strategy. PMID:25531441

  2. Alpha-CaMKII deficiency causes immature dentate gyrus, a novel candidate endophenotype of psychiatric disorders

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    Yamasaki Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elucidating the neural and genetic factors underlying psychiatric illness is hampered by current methods of clinical diagnosis. The identification and investigation of clinical endophenotypes may be one solution, but represents a considerable challenge in human subjects. Here we report that mice heterozygous for a null mutation of the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII+/- have profoundly dysregulated behaviours and impaired neuronal development in the dentate gyrus (DG. The behavioral abnormalities include a severe working memory deficit and an exaggerated infradian rhythm, which are similar to symptoms seen in schizophrenia, bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric disorders. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus of these mutants revealed that the expression levels of more than 2000 genes were significantly changed. Strikingly, among the 20 most downregulated genes, 5 had highly selective expression in the DG. Whereas BrdU incorporated cells in the mutant mouse DG was increased by more than 50 percent, the number of mature neurons in the DG was dramatically decreased. Morphological and physiological features of the DG neurons in the mutants were strikingly similar to those of immature DG neurons in normal rodents. Moreover, c-Fos expression in the DG after electric footshock was almost completely and selectively abolished in the mutants. Statistical clustering of human post-mortem brains using 10 genes differentially-expressed in the mutant mice were used to classify individuals into two clusters, one of which contained 16 of 18 schizophrenic patients. Nearly half of the differentially-expressed probes in the schizophrenia-enriched cluster encoded genes that are involved in neurogenesis or in neuronal migration/maturation, including calbindin, a marker for mature DG neurons. Based on these results, we propose that an "immature DG" in adulthood might induce alterations in behavior and

  3. Deficient cardiovascular stress reactivity predicts poor executive functions in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

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    Hirvikoski, Tatja; Olsson, Erik M G; Nordenstrom, Anna; Lindholm, Torun; Nordstrom, Anna-Lena; Lajic, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Associations between cardiovascular stress markers, subjective stress reactivity, and executive functions were studied in 60 adults (30 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ADHD, and 30 controls) using the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT, a test of executive functions) as a cognitive stressor. Despite higher self-perceived stress, the adults with ADHD showed lower or atypical cardiovascular stress reactivity, which was associated with poorer performance on PASAT. Using cardiovascular stress markers, subjective stress, and results on PASAT as predictors in a logistic regression, 83.3% of the ADHD group and 86.9% of the controls could be classified correctly.

  4. Combined effect of the environmental factors as ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency on the thyroid gland and the immune condition

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    Danyarova, L. [Department of Endocrynology, Research Institute of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2012-07-01

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site was the primary testing venue for the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons. It is located on the steppe in northeast Kazakhstan. The tragic situation of the Semipalatinsk region is an acute and chronic radiation, repeated in big and small doses and a total absence of territorial decontamination, created unique conditions for study of the long term influence of the radiation doses on the health of the population. The Semipalatinsk region of the Republic of Kazakhstan belongs also to an area of moderate and pronounced iodine deficiency. The purpose of the research is to study the prevalence of a thyroid gland pathology and the condition of a cytokine immune link that is likely to be influenced by a combine effect of ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency. 1100 people passed through the investigation and it appears that 56, 75% of them had a thyroid pathology. Thyroid gland functional condition analysis (TSH, FT3, FT4 a-TG, a-TPO) has shown the prevalence of a subclinical hypothyroidism (33%). 28, 8% resulted in the presence of antibodies to thyroglobulin and the thyroid peroxides, whereas in the areas located further to the nuclear range, the percentage was only 13, 0%

  5. Novel Combined Immune Deficiency and Radiation Sensitivity Blended Phenotype in an Adult with Biallelic Variations in ZAP70 and RNF168

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Ivan K.; Sanders, Robert P.; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Coban-Akdemir, Zeynep H.; Kim, Vy Hong-Diep; Dadi, Harjit; Roifman, Chaim M.; Quigg, Troy; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.; Hanson, I. Celine

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of high-throughput genomic sequencing techniques, novel genetic etiologies are being uncovered for previously unexplained Mendelian phenotypes, and the underlying genetic architecture of disease is being unraveled. Although most of these “mendelizing” disease traits represent phenotypes caused by single-gene defects, a percentage of patients have blended phenotypes caused by pathogenic variants in multiple genes. We describe an adult patient with susceptibility to bacterial, herpesviral, and fungal infections. Immunologic defects included CD8+ T cell lymphopenia, decreased T cell proliferative responses to mitogens, hypogammaglobulinemia, and radiation sensitivity. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in ZAP70. Biallelic mutations in ZAP70 are known to produce a spectrum of immune deficiency that includes the T cell abnormalities observed in this patient. Analyses for variants in genes associated with radiation sensitivity identified the presence of a homozygous RNF168 variant of unknown significance. RNF168 deficiency causes radiosensitivity, immunodeficiency, dysmorphic features, and learning difficulties syndrome and may account for the radiation sensitivity. Thus, the patient was found to have a novel blended phenotype associated with multilocus genomic variation: i.e., separate and distinct genetic defects. These findings further illustrate the clinical utility of applying genomic testing in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases. PMID:28603521

  6. Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency: should we use a different cutoff value for hematologic disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, B; Yalcın, H Z; Colak, A

    2014-08-01

    Anemia and macrocytosis are well-defined expected hematologic findings of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency; however, some previous studies did not show a significant association of subnormal B12 with anemia and macrocytosis. We retrospectively analyzed 17 713 laboratory patient records to evaluate vitamin B12 and folate levels in relation to anemia and macrocytosis. In an age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression model, low B12 status but not marginal B12 status was significantly associated with anemia [ORs respectively, 1.291 (95% CI, 1.182-1.410), 1.022 (95% CI, 0.943-1.108)] and macrocytosis [ORs, respectively, 3.853 (95% CI, 3.121-4.756), 1.031 (95% CI, 0.770-1.381)]. Also low folate status but not marginal folate status was significantly associated with anemia [adjusted ORs, respectively, 1.819 (95% CI, 1.372-2.411), 1.101 (95% CI, 0.931-1.301)] and macrocytosis [adjusted ORs, respectively, 2.945 (95% CI, 1.747-4.965), 1.228 (95% CI, 0.795-1.898)]. Our results show that increased anemia and macrocytosis are observed at values below commonly used B12 lower-reference thresholds. Determining a hematologic cutoff value may help physicians in clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Laboratory tests for disorders of complement and complement regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Angela R; Murali, Mandakolathur R

    2015-12-01

    The complement pathway is a cascade of proteases that is involved in immune surveillance and innate immunity, as well as adaptive immunity. Dysfunction of the complement cascade may be mediated by aberrations in the pathways of activation, complement regulatory proteins, or complement deficiencies, and has been linked to a number of hematologic disorders, including paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary angioedema (HAE), and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). Here, current laboratory tests for disorders of the complement pathway are reviewed, and their utility and limitations in hematologic disorders and systemic diseases are discussed. Current therapeutic advances targeting the complement pathway in treatment of complement-mediated hematologic disorders are also reviewed.

  8. Membrane Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency as a Preventable Risk Factor for Comorbid Coronary Heart Disease in Major Depressive Disorder

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    Robert K. McNamara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depression disorder (MDD significantly increases the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD which is a leading cause of mortality in patients with MDD. Moreover, depression is frequently observed in a subset of patients following acute coronary syndrome (ACS and increases risk for mortality. Here evidence implicating omega-3 (n-3 fatty acid deficiency in the pathoaetiology of CHD and MDD is reviewed, and the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acid deficiency is a preventable risk factor for CHD comorbidity in MDD patients is evaluated. This hypothesis is supported by cross-national and cross-sectional epidemiological surveys finding an inverse correlation between n-3 fatty acid status and prevalence rates of both CHD and MDD, prospective studies finding that lower dietary or membrane EPA+DHA levels increase risk for both MDD and CHD, case-control studies finding that the n-3 fatty acid status of MDD patients places them at high risk for emergent CHD morbidity and mortality, meta-analyses of controlled n-3 fatty acid intervention studies finding significant advantage over placebo for reducing depression symptom severity in MDD patients, and for secondary prevention of cardiac events in CHD patients, findings that n-3 fatty acid status is inversely correlated with other documented CHD risk factors, and patients diagnosed with MDD after ACS exhibit significantly lower n-3 fatty acid status compared with nondepressed ACS patients. This body of evidence provides strong support for future studies to evaluate the effects of increasing dietary n-3 fatty acid status on CHD comorbidity and mortality in MDD patients.

  9. The Th17/Treg Immune Balance in Ulcerative Colitis Patients with Two Different Chinese Syndromes: Dampness-Heat in Large Intestine and Spleen and Kidney Yang Deficiency Syndrome

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    Yang Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the Th17/Treg immune balance in the ulcerative colitis (UC patients with two Chinese syndrome: dampness-heat in large intestine (DHLI and spleen and kidney Yang deficiency (SKYD. Methods. Ninety UC patients (45 were diagnosed with DHLI and 45 with SKYD syndrome and 23 healthy people were recruited. The serumIL-17 and TGF-β1 levels of these participants were measured with ELISA; the expression of IL-17 and TGF-β 1 in colonic mucosa tissue was determined with immunohistochemistry and the percentage of Th17 and Treg in peripheral blood with flow cytometry. Results. The levels of IL-17 and Th17 were significantly higher in both DHLI and SKYD groups than in healthy control group and higher in DHLI than in SKYD group (P<0.05. The levels of TGF-β1 and Treg were significantly lower in the two UC patients groups than in healthy control group; and lower in SKYD group than in DHLI group (P<0.05. Conclusions. UC with DHLI syndrome could be characterized by the elevation of Th17 and IL-17 levels, which indicated an accentuation of inflammatory reaction; UC with SKYD syndrome could be characterized by the reduction of serum Treg and TGF-β1 levels, which represented a depression of immune tolerance.

  10. The modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by chemical chaperone upregulates immune negative cytokine IL-35 in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Dai, Shen; Dong, Zhaojing; Sun, Yue; Song, Xingguo; Guo, Chun; Zhu, Faliang; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Lining

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a newly identified immune negative molecule which is secreted by CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs) and contributes to their suppressive capacity. Early data have shown that IL-35 inhibits development of several autoimmune diseases. However, the role of IL-35 in atherosclerosis, a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disease in arterial wall, remains to be investigated. Here, we found that IL-35 was involved in atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. ApoE(-/-) mice with established atherosclerotic lesion displayed a lower level of IL-35 compared to age-matched wild type C57BL/6 mice without plaque. However, IL-35 expression increased significantly in ApoE(-/-) mice with attenuated plaque. More importantly, we found that modulation of ER stress treated by chemical chaperone, 4-Phenyl butyric acid (PBA) in vivo, mainly upregulated immune negative regulating molecule IL-35, as well as IL-10 and Foxp3, accompanied by increased Tregs. However, no obvious impact on pro-inflammatory molecules such as TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-23 was observed, which provides new insight into the benefit of ER stress recovery from attenuated plaque. Our results suggest that IL-35 might have a potential value for atherosclerotic therapy.

  11. Different roles of Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 (EDS1) bound to and dissociated from Phytoalexin Deficient4 (PAD4) in Arabidopsis immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Steffen; Stamm, Anika; Malonek, Stefan; Wagner, Stephan; Becker, Dieter; Medina-Escobar, Nieves; Vlot, A Corina; Feys, Bart J; Niefind, Karsten; Parker, Jane E

    2011-07-01

    • Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 (EDS1) is an important regulator of plant basal and receptor-triggered immunity. Arabidopsis EDS1 interacts with two related proteins, Phytoalexin Deficient4 (PAD4) and Senescence Associated Gene101 (SAG101), whose combined activities are essential for defense signaling. The different sizes and intracellular distributions of EDS1-PAD4 and EDS1-SAG101 complexes in Arabidopsis leaf tissues suggest that they perform nonredundant functions. • The nature and biological relevance of EDS1 interactions with PAD4 and SAG101 were explored using yeast three-hybrid assays, in vitro analysis of recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli, and characterization of Arabidopsis transgenic plants expressing an eds1 mutant (eds1(L262P) ) protein which no longer binds PAD4 but retains interaction with SAG101. • EDS1 forms molecularly distinct complexes with PAD4 or SAG101 without additional plant factors. Loss of interaction with EDS1 reduces PAD4 post-transcriptional accumulation, consistent with the EDS1 physical association stabilizing PAD4. The dissociated forms of EDS1 and PAD4 are fully competent in signaling receptor-triggered localized cell death at infection foci. By contrast, an EDS1-PAD4 complex is necessary for basal resistance involving transcriptional up-regulation of PAD4 itself and mobilization of salicylic acid defenses. • Different EDS1 and PAD4 molecular configurations have distinct and separable functions in the plant innate immune response.

  12. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  13. Triheptanoin dramatically reduces paroxysmal motor disorder in patients with GLUT1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, Fanny; Hainque, Elodie; Gras, Domitille; Adanyeguh, Isaac M; Caillet, Samantha; Héron, Bénédicte; Roubertie, Agathe; Kaphan, Elsa; Valabregue, Romain; Rinaldi, Daisy; Vuillaumier, Sandrine; Schiffmann, Raphael; Ottolenghi, Chris; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Servais, Laurent; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of our previous work with triheptanoin, which provides key substrates to the Krebs cycle in the brain, we wished to assess its therapeutic effect in patients with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) who objected to or did not tolerate ketogenic diets. We performed an open-label pilot study with three phases of 2 months each (baseline, treatment and withdrawal) in eight patients with GLUT1-DS (7-47 years old) with non-epileptic paroxysmal manifestations. We used a comprehensive patient diary to record motor and non-motor paroxysmal events. Functional (31)P-NMR spectroscopy was performed to quantify phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) within the occipital cortex during (activation) and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. Patients with GLUT1-DS experienced a mean of 30.8 (± 27.7) paroxysmal manifestations (52% motor events) at baseline that dropped to 2.8 (± 2.9, 76% motor events) during the treatment phase (p = 0.028). After withdrawal, paroxysmal manifestations recurred with a mean of 24.2 (± 21.9, 52% motor events; p = 0.043). Furthermore, brain energy metabolism normalised with triheptanoin, that is, increased Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation compared to the recovery phase (p = 0.021), and deteriorated when triheptanoin was withdrawn. Treatment with triheptanoin resulted in a 90% clinical improvement in non-epileptic paroxysmal manifestations and a normalised brain bioenergetics profile in patients with GLUT1-DS. NCT02014883. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Behavioral phenotyping of glutathione-deficient mice: relevance to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulak, Anita; Cuenod, Michel; Do, Kim Q

    2012-01-15

    Redox-dysregulation represents a common pathogenic mechanism in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP). It may in part arise from a genetically compromised synthesis of glutathione (GSH), the major cellular antioxidant and redox-regulator. Allelic variants of the genes coding for the rate-limiting GSH synthesizing enzyme glutamate-cysteine-ligase modifier (GCLM) and/or catalytic (GCLC) subunit have been associated with SZ and BP. Using mice knockout (KO) for GCLM we have previously shown that impaired GSH synthesis is associated with morphological, functional and neurochemical anomalies similar to those in patients. Here we asked whether GSH deficit is also associated with SZ- and BP-relevant behavioral and cognitive anomalies. Accordingly, we subjected young adult GCLM-wildtype (WT), heterozygous and KO males to a battery of standard tests. Compared to WT, GCLM-KO mice displayed hyperlocomotion in the open field and forced swim test but normal activity in the home cage, suggesting that hyperlocomotion was selective to environmental novelty and mildly stressful situations. While spatial working memory and latent inhibition remained unaffected, KO mice showed a potentiated hyperlocomotor response to an acute amphetamine injection, impaired sensorymotor gating in the form of prepulse inhibition and altered social behavior compared to WT. These anomalies resemble important aspects of both SZ and the manic component of BP. As such our data support the notion that redox-dysregulation due to GSH deficit is implicated in both disorders. Moreover, our data propose the GCLM-KO mouse as a valuable model to study the behavioral and cognitive consequences of redox dysregulation in the context of psychiatric disease.

  15. Induction of Protective Immunity to Cryptococcal Infection in Mice by a Heat-Killed, Chitosan-Deficient Strain of Cryptococcus neoformans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Upadhya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a major opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes fatal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals and is responsible for a large proportion of AIDS-related deaths. The fungal cell wall is an essential organelle which undergoes constant modification during various stages of growth and is critical for fungal pathogenesis. One critical component of the fungal cell wall is chitin, which in C. neoformans is predominantly deacetylated to chitosan. We previously reported that three chitin deacetylase (CDA genes have to be deleted to generate a chitosan-deficient C. neoformans strain. This cda1Δ2Δ3Δ strain was avirulent in mice, as it was rapidly cleared from the lungs of infected mice. Here, we report that clearance of the cda1Δ2Δ3Δ strain was associated with sharply spiked concentrations of proinflammatory molecules that are known to be critical mediators of the orchestration of a protective Th1-type adaptive immune response. This was followed by the selective enrichment of the Th1-type T cell population in the cda1Δ2Δ3Δ strain-infected mouse lung. Importantly, this response resulted in the development of robust protective immunity to a subsequent lethal challenge with a virulent wild-type C. neoformans strain. Moreover, protective immunity was also induced in mice vaccinated with heat-killed cda1Δ2Δ3Δ cells and was effective in multiple mouse strains. The results presented here provide a strong framework to develop the cda1Δ2Δ3Δ strain as a potential vaccine candidate for C. neoformans infection.

  16. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (Lrrk2) Deficiency Diminishes the Development of Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU) and the Adaptive Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandu, Wambui S; Tan, Cuiyan; Ogbeifun, Osato; Vistica, Barbara P; Shi, Guangpu; Hinshaw, Samuel J H; Xie, Chengsong; Chen, Xi; Klinman, Dennis M; Cai, Huaibin; Gery, Igal

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 are related to certain forms of Parkinson's disease and, possibly, to the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. In both these diseases inflammatory processes participate in the pathogenic process. LRRK2 is expressed in lymphoid cells and, interestingly, Lrrk2 (-/-) mice were reported to develop more severe experimental colitis than their wild type (WT) controls. Here, we examined the possible involvement of LRRK2 in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), an animal model for human uveitis, by testing Lrrk2 (-/-) mice for their capacity to develop this experimental eye disease and related immune responses. Lrrk2 (-/-) mice and their WT controls (C57Bl/6) were immunized with interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) and compared for their development of EAU, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) by skin tests, production of cytokines in culture, and expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-17 and FoxP3 by spleen cells, using flow cytometry. Peritoneal macrophages were examined for their production of cytokines/chemokines in culture following stimulation with LPS or the oligodeoxynucleotide CpG. The Lrrk2 (-/-) and WT mice were also compared for their response to bovine serum albumin (BSA). The Lrrk2 (-/-) mice developed lower levels of EAU, DTH responses and cytokine production by lymphocytes than did their WT controls. Intracellular expression of IFN-γ and IL-17, by spleen cells, and secretion of cytokines/chemokines by activated peritoneal macrophages of Lrrk2 (-/-) mice trended toward diminished levels, although variabilities were noted. The expression levels of FoxP3 by Lrrk2 (-/-) spleen cells, however, were similar to those seen in WT controls. Consistent with their low response to IRBP, Lrrk2 (-/-) mice responded to BSA less vigorously than their WT controls. Lrrk2 deficiency in mice diminished the development of EAU and the related adaptive immune responses to IRBP as compared to the WT controls.

  17. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  19. [Hepon, promoter of local immunity in the complex therapy of dysfunctional microflora in bowel disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, A I; Ruchkina, I N

    2003-01-01

    The promoter of local immunity Heponum contributes to the restoration of eubiosis and normalization of showings of the immune status in patients with post-infection IBS. It is recommended to include Heponum in the complex therapy of chronic bowels diseases with the purpose of the restoration of normal microbiocenosis.

  20. Effects of Trauma-Hemorrhage and IL-6 Deficiency on Splenic Immune Function in a Murine Trauma Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mommsen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic immune function is known to be depressed following hemorrhage. The present study investigates the effects of femoral shaft fracture, isolated or in combination with hemorrhage, on early stage cytokine production capacity of splenocytes and observes the role of IL-6 under these conditions. Male IL-6 knockout (IL-6−/− and wild-type mice (WT were randomly divided into three groups: sham (S, isolated femoral fracture (Fx, and femoral fracture + volume controlled hemorrhage (TH-Fx (=6 per group. Animals were sacrificed four hours after induction of hemorrhage and fracture. Cytokine release (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 of isolated and LPS-stimulated splenocytes was determined by cytometric bead array. Femoral fracture with or without hemorrhage caused a suppression of in vitro cytokine production capacity of splenocytes at an early posttraumatic stage in WT and IL-6−/−. In the absence of IL-6, the profile of splenic cytokine secretion is significantly altered, identifying this cytokine as a potential therapeutic target to modulate the posttraumatic immune response.

  1. Inflammation, immunity and functional gastrointestinal disorders%炎症免疫与功能性胃肠病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽; 陈明锴; 邓琴

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) is closely related to psychological factors. Mucosal immunity and inflammation are causes of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with FGIDs. Inflammation factors not only play an important role in the development of depression but also have an impact on gastrointestinal motility. The role of immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of FGIDs has also attracted wide attention. In this article, we will review the roles of inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of FGIDs.%功能性胃肠病(functional gastrointestinal disorders,FGIDs)与精神心理因素密切相关,黏膜免疫和炎症是部分FGIDs患者胃肠道症状产生的基础.炎症因子在抑郁的发生发展中有重要作用,其对胃肠动力的影响也越来越受到人们的重视.本文简要综述了炎症免疫在FGIDs中的作用及可能机制.

  2. Chapter 30: historical aspects of the major neurological vitamin deficiency disorders: the water-soluble B vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    This historical review addresses major neurological disorders associated with deficiencies of water-soluble B vitamins: beriberi, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, pellagra, neural tube defects, and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. Beriberi: Beriberi was known for millennia in Asia, but was not described by a European until the 17th century when Brontius in the Dutch East Indies reported the progressive sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The prevalence of beriberi increased greatly in Asia with a change in the milling process for rice in the late 19th century. In the 1880s, Takaki demonstrated the benefits of dietary modification in sailors, and later instituted dietary reforms in the Japanese Navy, which largely eradicated beriberi from the Japanese Navy by 1887. In 1889 Eijkman in Java serendipitously identified dietary factors as a major contributor to "chicken polyneuritis," which he took to be an animal model for beriberi; the polyneuritis could be cured or prevented by feeding the chickens either unpolished rice or rice polishings. By 1901, Grijns, while continuing studies of beriberi in Java, suggested a dietary deficiency explanation for beriberi after systematically eliminating deficiencies of known dietary components and excluding a toxic effect. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: In the late 1870s, Wernicke identified a clinicopathological condition with ophthalmoparesis, nystagmus, ataxia, and encephalopathy, associated with punctate hemorrhages symmetrically arranged in the grey matter around the third and fourth ventricles and the aqueduct of Sylvius. In the late 1880s, Korsakoff described a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including a confabulatory amnestic state following an agitated delirium, occurring in conjunction with peripheral polyneuropathy. Beginning around 1900, investigators recognized the close relationship between Korsakoff's psychosis, delirium tremens, and Wernicke's encephalopathy, but not until several decades later were Wernicke

  3. The role of registries in rare genetic lipid disorders: Review and introduction of the first global registry in lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Stroes, Erik; Soran, Handrean; Johnson, Colin; Moulin, Philippe; Iotti, Giorgio; Zibellini, Marco; Ossenkoppele, Bas; Dippel, Michaela; Averna, Maurizio R

    2016-08-21

    A good understanding of the natural history of rare genetic lipid disorders is a pre-requisite for successful patient management. Disease registries have been helpful in this regard. Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency (LPLD) is a rare, autosomal-recessive lipid disorder characterized by severe hypertriglyceridemia and a very high risk for recurrent acute pancreatitis, however, only limited data are available on its natural course. Alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera(®)) is the first gene therapy to receive Marketing Authorization in the European Union; GENIALL (GENetherapy In the MAnagement of Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency), a 15-year registry focusing on LPLD was launched in 2014 as part of its Risk Management Plan. The aim of this publication is to introduce the GENIALL Registry within a structured literature review of registries in rare genetic lipid disorders. A total of 11 relevant initiatives/registries were identified (homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (hoFH) [n = 5]; LPLD [n = 1]; Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency [LALD, n = 1], detection of mutations in genetic lipid disorders [n = 4]). Besides one product registry in hoFH and the LALD registry, all other initiatives are local or country-specific. GENIALL is the first global prospective registry in LPLD that will collect physician and patient generated data on the natural course of LPLD, as well as long-term outcomes of gene therapy.

  4. RUNX1 deficiency (familial platelet disorder with predisposition to myeloid leukemia, FPDMM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Heller, Paula G

    2017-04-01

    In this review, we discuss disease-causing alterations of RUNT-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), a master regulator of hematopoietic differentiation. Familial platelet disorder with predisposition to myeloid leukemia (FPDMM) typically presents with (1) mild to moderate thrombocytopenia with normal-sized platelets; (2) functional platelets defects leading to prolonged bleeding; and (3) an increased risk to develop myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), or T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Hematological neoplasms in carriers of a germline RUNX1 mutation need additional secondary mutations or chromosome aberrations to develop. If a disease-causing mutation is known in the family, it is important to prevent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a sibling or other relative carrying the familial mutation. First experiments introducing a wild-type copy of RUNX1 into induce pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) lines from patients with FPDMM appear to demonstrate that by gene correction reversal of the phenotype may be possible. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Chronic orthostatic and antiorthostatic restraint induce neuroendocrine, immune and neurophysiological disorders in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenmacher, I.; Mekaouche, M.; Maurel, D.; Barbanel, G.; Givalois, L.; Boissin, J.; Malaval, F.; Ixart, G.

    rhythmicity of major physiological variables, the loss of normal correlations between ACTH and CORT, and inflammatory-immune hyperreactivity. These pathophysiological disorders may all be parts of a complex chronic stress syndrome.

  6. Evaluation of endemic goiter prevalence in Bulgarian schoolchildren: results from national strategies for prevention and control of iodine-deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatseva, Penka; Vladeva, Stefka; Argirova, Mariana

    2007-06-01

    Iodine deficiency is a major health problem worldwide. The environment of the Balkan countries, including Bulgaria, is distinguished for its low iodine content. In 1994, the strategies for the prevention and control of iodinedeficiency disorders were actualized in Bulgaria and universal salt iodization and supplementation for the risk population groups (schoolchildren, pregnant women) were introduced. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the iodine prophylaxis in schoolchildren, living in an endemic for goiter area after the introduction of salt iodization in Bulgaria. For this purpose, the goiter prevalence and iodine status in 483 schoolchildren (274 boys and 209 girls) aged between 8 and 15 yr, living in an endemic for goiter area in Bulgaria were evaluated. Despite the normalization of iodine supply, mild iodine deficiency on the basis of goiter prevalence (16.15%) and urinary iodine excretion was found. These data indicate the need for reevaluation of the national strategy for prevention of iodine deficiency.

  7. Genomic expression analyses reveal lysosomal, innate immunity proteins, as disease correlates in murine models of a lysosomal storage disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Suhail Alam

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC disease is a rare, genetic, lysosomal disorder with progressive neurodegeneration. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology and a lack of blood-based diagnostic markers are major hurdles in the treatment and management of NPC and several additional, neurological lysosomal disorders. To identify disease severity correlates, we undertook whole genome expression profiling of sentinel organs, brain, liver, and spleen of Balb/c Npc1(-/- mice relative to Npc1(+/- at an asymptomatic stage, as well as early- and late-symptomatic stages. Unexpectedly, we found prominent up regulation of innate immunity genes with age-dependent change in their expression, in all three organs. We shortlisted a set of 12 secretory genes whose expression steadily increased with age in both brain and liver, as potential plasma correlates of neurological and/or liver disease. Ten were innate immune genes with eight ascribed to lysosomes. Several are known to be elevated in diseased organs of murine models of other lysosomal diseases including Gaucher's disease, Sandhoff disease and MPSIIIB. We validated the top candidate lysozyme, in the plasma of Npc1(-/- as well as Balb/c Npc1(nmf164 mice (bearing a point mutation closer to human disease mutants and show its reduction in response to an emerging therapeutic. We further established elevation of innate immunity in Npc1(-/- mice through multiple functional assays including inhibition of bacterial infection as well as cellular analysis and immunohistochemistry. These data revealed neutrophil elevation in the Npc1(-/- spleen and liver (where large foci were detected proximal to damaged tissue. Together our results yield a set of lysosomal, secretory innate immunity genes that have potential to be developed as pan or specific plasma markers for neurological diseases associated with lysosomal storage and where diagnosis is a major problem. Further, the accumulation of neutrophils in diseased organs

  8. Global Expression Studies of Schizophrenic Brain: A Meta-Analysis Study Linking Neurological Immune System with Psychological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sajjad; Kamal, Mohammad A; Iqbal, Zafar; Ansari, Shakeel A; Rasool, Mahmood; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H; Damanhouri, Gazi; Mirza, Zeenat

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia, a psychological disorder with enormous societal impact, is a result of abnormalities in gene expression and dysregulation of the immune response in the brain. Few studies have been conducted to understand its etiology, however, the exact molecular mechanism largely remains unknown, though some poorly understood theories abound. Present meta-study links the role of central nervous system, immunological system and psychological disorders by using global expression approach and pathway analysis. We retrieved genome-wide mRNA expression data and clinico-pathological information from five independent studies of schizophrenic patients from Gene Expression Omnibus database. We continued further with three studies having common platform. Our result showed a total of 527 differentially expressed genes of which 314 are up regulated and 213 are down regulated. After adjusting the sources of variation, we carried out pathway and gene ontology analysis, and observed alteration of 14-3-3-mediated signaling, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor signaling, role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells in regulation of the immune response, G beta gamma signaling, dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein of relative molecular mass 32,000 feedback in cAMP signaling, complement system, axonal guidance signaling, dendritic cell maturation, cAMP response element-binding protein signaling in neurons and interleukin-1 signaling pathways and networks. Conclusively, our global gene expression pathway and gene set enrichment analysis studies suggest disruption of many common pathways and processes, which links schizophrenia to immune and central nervous system. Present meta-study links the role of central nervous system, immunological system and psychological disorders by using global expression approach and pathway analysis.

  9. Ivermectin-facilitated immunity in onchocerciasis. Reversal of lymphocytopenia, cellular anergy and deficient cytokine production after single treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboslay, P T; Dreweck, C M; Hoffmann, W H; Lüder, C G; Heuschkel, C; Görgen, H; Banla, M; Schulz-Key, H

    1992-09-01

    A longitudinal investigation has been conducted into the cell-mediated immune responses of onchocerciasis patients after a single-dose treatment with ivermectin. Untreated patients tested for delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity (DCH) to seven recall antigens showed lower responses than infection-free control individuals (P less than 0.01), but 6 and 14 months after treatment DCH reactions increased to similar levels to those seen in the controls. The in vitro cellular reactivity to Onchocerca volvulus-derived antigen (OvAg) was reduced in untreated patients as compared with controls, and the lymphocyte blastogenic responses to OvAg and streptolysin-O clearly improved up to 14 months after treatment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from untreated patients produced IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 in response to mitogenic stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), only low levels of IL-1 beta, IL-2 and TNF-alpha in response to OvAg, but higher amounts of IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in response to OvAg than control individuals. After ivermectin treatment, the OvAg-induced production of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha increased significantly 1 and 14 months after treatment. The PHA-induced production of IL-2 and IL-4 increased 1 month after treatment and remained significantly elevated until 14 months after treatment, whereas the OvAg-specific secretion of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma did not change after ivermectin treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of lymphocyte-subsets in the peripheral blood of untreated patients revealed a relative and absolute (P less than 0.01) diminution of CD4+ cells and a significantly smaller CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio as compared with controls. By 4 weeks after treatment and thereafter, CD4+ T cells increased relatively and absolutely (P less than 0.01); likewise there was an absolute increase in T-helper-inducer cells (CD4+CD45RO+) and a temporarily improved CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio (P = 0.001). The expression of

  10. IFNγ producing CD8+ T cells modified to resist major immune checkpoints induce regression of MHC class I-deficient melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buferne, Michel; Chasson, Lionel; Grange, Magali; Mas, Amandine; Arnoux, Fanny; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Naquet, Philippe; Leserman, Lee; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Tumors with reduced expression of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules may be unrecognized by tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and thus constitute a challenge for cancer immunotherapy. Here we monitored development of autochthonous melanomas in TiRP mice that develop tumors expressing a known tumor antigen as well as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter knock in gene. The latter permits non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth by biofluorescence. One developing melanoma was deficient in cell surface expression of MHC-I, but MHC-I expression could be rescued by exposure of these cells to IFNγ. We show that CD8+ T cells specific for tumor antigen/MHC-I were efficient at inducing regression of the MHC-I-deficient melanoma, provided that the T cells were endowed with properties permitting their migration into the tumor and their efficient production of IFNγ. This was the case for CD8+ T cells transfected to express an active form of STAT5 (STAT5CA). The amount of IFNγ produced ex vivo from T cells present in tumors after adoptive transfer of the CD8+ T cells was correlated with an increase in surface expression of MHC-I molecules by the tumor cells. We also show that these CD8+ T cells expressed PD-1 and upregulated its ligand PDL-1 on melanoma cells within the tumor. Despite upregulation of this immunosuppressive pathway, efficient IFNγ production in the melanoma microenvironment was found associated with resistance of STAT5CA-expressing CD8+ T cells to inhibition both by PD-1/PDL-1 engagement and by TGFβ1, two main immune regulatory mechanisms hampering the efficiency of immunotherapy in patients. PMID:25949872

  11. IFNγ producing CD8(+) T cells modified to resist major immune checkpoints induce regression of MHC class I-deficient melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buferne, Michel; Chasson, Lionel; Grange, Magali; Mas, Amandine; Arnoux, Fanny; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Naquet, Philippe; Leserman, Lee; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2015-02-01

    Tumors with reduced expression of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules may be unrecognized by tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and thus constitute a challenge for cancer immunotherapy. Here we monitored development of autochthonous melanomas in TiRP mice that develop tumors expressing a known tumor antigen as well as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter knock in gene. The latter permits non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth by biofluorescence. One developing melanoma was deficient in cell surface expression of MHC-I, but MHC-I expression could be rescued by exposure of these cells to IFNγ. We show that CD8(+) T cells specific for tumor antigen/MHC-I were efficient at inducing regression of the MHC-I-deficient melanoma, provided that the T cells were endowed with properties permitting their migration into the tumor and their efficient production of IFNγ. This was the case for CD8(+) T cells transfected to express an active form of STAT5 (STAT5CA). The amount of IFNγ produced ex vivo from T cells present in tumors after adoptive transfer of the CD8(+) T cells was correlated with an increase in surface expression of MHC-I molecules by the tumor cells. We also show that these CD8(+) T cells expressed PD-1 and upregulated its ligand PDL-1 on melanoma cells within the tumor. Despite upregulation of this immunosuppressive pathway, efficient IFNγ production in the melanoma microenvironment was found associated with resistance of STAT5CA-expressing CD8(+) T cells to inhibition both by PD-1/PDL-1 engagement and by TGFβ1, two main immune regulatory mechanisms hampering the efficiency of immunotherapy in patients.

  12. Antigen-Experienced CD4lo T Cells Are Linked to Deficient Contraction of the Immune Response in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Linkes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following proper activation, naïve “CD4lo” T cells differentiate into effector T cells with enhanced expression of CD4 -“CD4hi” effectors. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice display a unique set of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells that persist after primary stimulation. Here, we report that a population of such cells remained after secondary and tertiary TCR stimulation and produced cytokines upon antigenic challenge. However, when NOD blasts were induced in the presence of rIL-15, the number of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells was significantly reduced. Clonal contraction, mediated in part by CD95-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD, normally regulates the accumulation of “CD4hi” effectors. Interestingly, CD95 expression was dramatically reduced on the AICD-resistant NOD “CD4lo” T cells. Thus, while autoimmune disease has often been attributed to the engagement of robust autoimmunity, we suggest that the inability to effectively contract the immune response distinguishes benign autoimmunity from progressive autoimmune diseases that are characterized by chronic T cell-mediated inflammation.

  13. Innate immune reactivity of the liver in rats fed a choline-deficient L-amino-acid-defined diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hideto Kawaratani; Tatsuhiro Tsujimoto; Toshiyuld Kitazawa; Mitsuteru Kitade; Hitoshi Yoshiji; Masahito Uemura; Hiroshi Fukui

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the innate immune reactivity of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α),Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4),and CD14 in the liver of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) model rats.METHODS:Male F344 rats were fed a cholinedeficient L-amino-acid-defined (CDAA) diet.The rats were killed after 4 or 8 wk of the diet,and their livers were removed for immunohistochemical investigation and RNA extraction.The liver specimens were immunostained for TNF-α,TLR4,and CD14.The gene expressions of TNF-a,TLR4,and CD14 were determined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Kupffer cells were isolated from the liver by Percoll gradient centrifugation,and were then cultured to measure TNF-α production.RESULTS:The serum and liver levels of TNF-α in the CDAA-fed rats increased significantly as compared with the control group,as did the immunohistochemical values and gene expressions of TNF-α,TLR4,and CD14 with the progression of steatohepatitis.TNF-α production from the isolated Kupffer cells of the CDAAfed rats was elevated by lipopolysaccharide stimulation.CONCLUSION:The expressions of TNF-α,TLR4,and CD14 increased in the NASH model,suggesting that TLR4 and CD14-mediated endotoxin liver damage may also occur in NASH.

  14. Idiopathic Mediastinal Fibrosis: a Systemic Immune-Mediated Disorder. A Case Series and a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giovanni M; Emmi, Giacomo; Corradi, Domenico; Urban, Maria L; Maritati, Federica; Landini, Federica; Galli, Paola; Palmisano, Alessandra; Vaglio, Augusto

    2017-06-01

    Mediastinal fibrosis is a rare disease characterised by fibrous proliferation in the mediastinum. It can be idiopathic or secondary to several conditions such as infections and malignancies. Anecdotal reports have described idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis (IMF) in association with other fibro-inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. We report nine new IMF cases recently seen at our Fibro-Inflammatory Disease Clinic and reviewed the IMF cases reported in the English language literature throughout 2006-2016. The purposes of our literature search were to assess the frequency of the association between IMF and other immune-mediated disorders and to analyse which disorders most often coexist with IMF. Of our nine IMF cases, one was associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, one with large-vessel arteritis, three with idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (one of which was IgG4-related), one with pancreatitis and one with IgG4-related seminal vesicle involvement. The remaining two cases, in which IMF was not associated with any other disease, were both classifiable as IgG4-related. The literature review showed that, of the 84 IMF cases identified, 27 (32 %) were associated with other idiopathic autoimmune or fibro-inflammatory disorders, particularly small-vessel vasculitis, Behçet disease, retroperitoneal fibrosis and other conditions belonging to the IgG4-related disease spectrum. Based on our own data and the literature review, we conclude that IMF is often associated with other autoimmune or fibro-inflammatory diseases; therefore, its clinical management requires an accurate screening of associated conditions. Immune-mediated mechanisms may be shared by these disorders.

  15. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the global level is still needed. Understanding the epidemiology of MNDs is critical to understand what intervention strategies will work best under different conditions.

  16. The interaction between the immune system and epigenetics in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Nardone

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have firmly established that the etiology of autism includes both genetic and environmental components. However, we are only just beginning to elucidate the environmental factors that might be involved in the development of autism, as well as the molecular mechanisms through which they function. Mounting epidemiological and biological evidence suggest that prenatal factors that induce a more activated immune state in the mother are involved in the development of autism. In parallel, molecular studies have highlighted the role of epigenetics in brain development as process susceptible to environmental influences and potentially causative of ASD. In this review, we will discuss converging evidence for a multidirectional interaction between immune system activation in the mother during pregnancy and epigenetic regulation in the brain of the fetus that may cooperate to produce an autistic phenotype. This interaction includes immune factor-induced changes in epigenetic signatures in the brain, dysregulation of epigenetic modifications specifically in genomic regions that encode immune functions, and aberrant epigenetic regulation of microglia. Overall, the interaction between immune system activation in the mother and the subsequent epigenetic dysregulation in the developing fetal brain may be a main consideration for the environmental factors that cause autism.

  17. Leptin in the interplay of inflammation, metabolism and immune system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Pino, Jesús; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel Angel; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Mera, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez, Rodolfo; Gualillo, Oreste

    2017-02-01

    Leptin is one of the most relevant factors secreted by adipose tissue and the forerunner of a class of molecules collectively called adipokines. Initially discovered in 1994, its crucial role as a central regulator in energy homeostasis has been largely described during the past 20 years. Once secreted into the circulation, leptin reaches the central and peripheral nervous systems and acts by binding and activating the long form of leptin receptor (LEPR), regulating appetite and food intake, bone mass, basal metabolism, reproductive function and insulin secretion, among other processes. Research on the regulation of different adipose tissues has provided important insights into the intricate network that links nutrition, metabolism and immune homeostasis. The neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bi-directionally through common ligands and receptors during stress responses and inflammation, and control cellular immune responses in several pathological situations including immune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases. This Review discusses the latest findings regarding the role of leptin in the immune system and metabolism, with particular emphasis on its effect on autoimmune and/or inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

  18. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  19. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  20. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  1. Genetics of immune-mediated disorders: from genome-wide association to molecular mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified not only hundreds of susceptibility loci to immune-mediated diseases but also pinpointed causal amino-acid variants of HLA genes that contribute to many autoimmune reactions. Majority of non-HLA genetic variants are located within non-coding regulatory region. Expression QTL studies have shown that these variants affect disease mainly by regulating gene expression. We discuss recent findings on shared genetic loci between infectious and immune-mediated diseases and provide potential clues to explore genetic associations in the context of these infectious agents. We propose that the interdisciplinary studies (genetics-genomics-immunology-infection-bioinformatics) are the future post-GWAS approaches to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. PMID:25458995

  2. Findings from the Horizontes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Education project: the impact of indigenous outreach workers as change agents for injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkel, R C; Golaszewski, T; Koman, J J; Singh, B K; Catan, V; Souply, K

    1993-01-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) intervention using indigenous outreach workers was implemented with Hispanic injection drug users (IDUs) and their sexual partners in three locations: Laredo, Texas; San Diego, California; and San Juan, Puerto Rico. A total of 2,169 subjects were contacted, given health education, HIV antibody testing, and follow-up counseling. This article reports on the 1,616 IDUs (75%) who completed the initial and follow-up interviews. The results indicated significant increases in health knowledge on AIDS, decreases in needle risk drug taking behaviors, some decreases in sex risk behaviors, and more realistic perceptions of personal AIDS risk. Using multivariate analyses, gender (male) and increasing age (older than age 25 years) were the strongest predictors of behavior change. Surprisingly, the identification of a positive HIV serostatus was not a significant predictor of behavior change. Although intended as a comparison study between contrasting levels of intervention, logistical and administrative problems undermined the use of a true quasi-experimental design. Nonetheless, the results from this research suggest that the use of indigenous outreach workers is an effective means of combatting the spread of HIV in this difficult to reach population. Some programmatic recommendations are provided for future efforts of this kind, particularly in relation to role conflicts experienced by outreach workers.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of paclitaxel and NM-3 on human gastric cancer in a severe combined immune deficiency mice orthotopic implantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Shui Zhu; Ming-Quan Song; Guo-Qiang Chen; Qin Li; Qun Sun; Qiang Zhang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the molecular mechanisms of action of paclitaxel and NM-3 on human gastric cancer in severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice.METHODS: Human gastric cancer cells SGC-7901 were implanted into SCID mice and mice were treated with paclitaxel and NM-3. The effects of paclitaxel and NM-3 on apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells were analyzed using flow cytometry, TUNEL assays, and DNA fragment analyses.RESULTS: Apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells was successfully induced by paclitaxel, NM-3, and the combination of paclitaxel and NM-3 24 h after injection as shown by the presence of apoptotic hypodiploid peaks on the flow cytometer before G1-S and a characteristic apoptotic band pattern in the DNA electrophoresis. The apoptotic rate detected by TUNEL assay was found to be significantly higher in the paclitaxel/NM-3 compared to the control group (38.5% ± 5.14% vs 13.2% ± 1.75%,P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Paclitaxel in combination with NM-3 is able to induce apoptosis of the human gastric cancer cells in SCID mice effectively and synergistically.

  4. The correlation between perceived social support and illness uncertainty in people with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Iran

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    Moosa Sajjadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Illness uncertainty is a source of a chronic and pervasive psychological stress for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS (PLWH, and largely affects their quality of life and the ability to cope with the disease. Based on the uncertainty in illness theory, the social support is one of the illness uncertainty antecedents, and influences the level of uncertainty perceived by patients. Aim: To examine uncertainty in PLWH and its correlation with social support in Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional correlational study was conducted with 80 PLWH presenting to AIDS Research Center, Tehran, Iran in 2013. The data collected using illness uncertainty and social support inventories were analyzed through Pearson′s correlation coefficient, Spearman′s correlation coefficient, and regression analysis. Results: The results showed a high level of illness uncertainty in PLWH and a negative significant correlation between perceived social support and illness uncertainty ( P = 0.01, r = -0.29. Conclusion: Uncertainty is a serious aspect of illness experience in Iranian PLWH. Providing adequate, structured information to patients as well as opportunities to discuss their concerns with other PLWH and receive emotional support from their health care providers may be worthwhile.

  5. The Natural History of Children with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Baseline Features of the First Fifty Patients of the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium Prospective Study 6901

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Christopher C.; Cowan, Morton J.; Logan, Brent R.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Griffith, Linda M.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Kohn, Donald B.; Shearer, William T.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Hanson, I. Celine; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Filipovich, Alexandra; Goldman, Frederick; Kapoor, Neena; Small, Trudy; Smith, Angela; Chan, Ka-Wah; Cuvelier, Geoff; Heimall, Jennifer; Knutsen, Alan; Loechelt, Brett; Moore, Theodore; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2013-01-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) consists of 33 centers in North America. We hypothesized that the analysis of uniform data on patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) enrolled in a prospective protocol will identify variables that contribute to optimal outcomes following treatment. We report baseline clinical, immunologic, and genetic features of the first 50 patients enrolled, and the initial therapies administered, reflecting current practice in the diagnosis and treatment of both typical (n = 37) and atypical forms (n = 13) of SCID. From August 2010 to May 2012, patients with suspected SCID underwent evaluation and therapy per local center practices. Diagnostic information was reviewed by the PIDTC eligibility review panel, and hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) details were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Most patients (92%) had mutations in a known SCID gene. Half of the patients were diagnosed by newborn screening or family history, were younger than those diagnosed by clinical signs (median 15 vs. 181 days; P = <0.0001), and went to HCT at a median of 67 days vs. 214 days of life (P = <0.0001). Most patients (92%) were treated with HCT within 1–2 months of diagnosis. Three patients were treated with gene therapy and 1 with enzyme replacement. The PIDTC plans to enroll over 250 such patients and analyze short and long-term outcomes for factors beneficial or deleterious to survival, clinical outcome, and T- and B-cell reconstitution, and which biomarkers are predictive of these outcomes. PMID:23818196

  6. Deficient visuospatial working memory functions and neural correlates of the default-mode network in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hsiang-Yun; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Isaac Tseng, Wen-Yih

    2016-10-01

    In addition to the essential features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), namely social communication deficits and repetitive behaviors, individuals with ASD may suffer from working memory deficits and an altered default-mode network (DMN). We hypothesized that an altered DMN is related to working memory deficits in those with ASD. A total of 37 adolescents with ASD and 36 age- and IQ-matched typically developing (TD) controls were analyzed. Visuospatial working memory performance was assessed using pattern recognition memory (PRM), spatial recognition memory (SRM), and paired-associates learning (PAL) tasks. The intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the DMN was indexed by the temporal correlations between the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals of pairs of DMN regions, including those between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and between the PCC and parahippocampi (PHG). The corresponding structural connectivity of the DMN was indexed by the generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) of the dorsal and ventral cingulum bundles on the basis of diffusion spectrum imaging data. The results showed that ASD adolescents exhibited delayed correct responses in PRM and SRM tasks and committed more errors in the PAL task than the TD controls did. The delayed responses during the PRM and SRM tasks were negatively correlated with bilateral PCC-mPFC iFCs, and PAL performance was negatively correlated with right PCC-PHG iFC in ASD adolescents. Furthermore, ASD adolescents showed significant lower GFA in the right cingulum bundles than the TD group did; the GFA value was negatively correlated with SRM performance in ASD. Our results provide empirical evidence for deficient visuospatial working memory and corresponding neural correlates within the DMN in adolescents with ASD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 1058-1072. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pregnancy Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Immune Tolerance in Pregnancy and Its Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus—An Immunological Dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Gluhovschi; Gheorghe Gluhovschi; Ligia Petrica; Silvia Velciov; Adrian Gluhovschi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological condition that requires immune tolerance to the product of conception. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease with well-represented immune mechanisms that disturb immune tolerance. The association of pregnancy with systemic lupus erythematosus creates a particular immune environment in which the immune tolerance specific of pregnancy is required to coexist with alterations of the immune system caused by SLE. The main role is played by T regulatory (Treg) ...

  8. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eHagmeyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies.

  9. Genetics of immune-mediated disorders : from genome-wide association to molecular mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified not only hundreds of susceptibility loci to immune-mediated diseases but also pinpointed causal amino-acid variants of HLA genes that contribute to many autoimmune reactions. Majority of non-HLA genetic variants are located within non-coding regulatory

  10. 获得性免疫缺陷综合征合并肠结核1例%A case report of acquired immune deficiency syndrome complicated with intestinal tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄绍萍; 程计林; 赵玉洁; 史佩炯; 马学东; 冯艳玲

    2009-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) complicated with intestinal tuberculosis is rarely reported. Due to lack of typical clinical and endoscopic characteristics,it is easy to be misdiagnosed. In this article,we report and analyze a case of AIDS patient with intestinal tuberculosis,which might be helpful to raise awareness and reduce misdiagnosis or mistreatment.%文献报道获得性免疫缺陷综合征(acquired immune deficiency syndrome,AIDS)合并肠结核很少,临床表现和内镜特点不典型,易误诊.本文对1例手术证实为合并肠结核的AIDS病例进行分析,旨在提高对AIDS继发肠病的诊断认识,减少误诊误治.

  11. The goitre rate, its association with reproductive failure, and the knowledge of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD among women in Ethiopia: Cross-section community based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane Yemane

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iodine deficiency is severe public health problem in Ethiopia. Although urinary iodine excretion level (UIE is a better indicator for IDD the goitre rate is commonly used to mark the public health significance. The range of ill effect of IDD is however beyond goitre in Ethiopia. In this study the prevalence of goitre and its association with reproductive failure, and the knowledge of women on Iodine Deficiency were investigated. Methods A cross-section community based study was conducted during February to May 2005 in 10998 women in child bearing age of 15 to 49 years. To assess the state of iodine deficiency in Ethiopia, a multistage "Proportional to Population Size" (PPS sampling methods was used, and WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD recommended method for goitre classification. Results Total goitre prevalence (weighted was 35.8% (95% CI 34.5–37.1, 24.3% palpable and 11.5% visible goitre. This demonstrates that more than 6 million women were affected by goitre. Goitre prevalence in four regional states namely Southern Nation Nationalities and People (SNNP, Oromia, Bebshandul-Gumuz and Tigray was greater than 30%, an indication of severe iodine deficiency. In the rest of the regions except Gambella, the IDD situation was mild to moderate. According to WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD this is a lucid indication that IDD is a major public health problem in Ethiopia. Women with goitre experience more pregnancy failure (X2 = 16.5, p 2 = 67.52; p Conclusion Ethiopia is at risk of iodine deficiency disorders. The findings presented in this report emphasis on a sustainable iodine intervention program targeted at population particularly reproductive age women. Nutrition education along with Universal Salt Iodization program and iodized oil capsule distribution in some peripheries where iodine deficiency is severe is urgently required.

  12. Deafness induced by Connexin 26 (GJB2) deficiency is not determined by endocochlear potential (EP) reduction but is associated with cochlear developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2014-05-23

    Connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are the major cause of hereditary deafness and are responsible for >50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mouse models show that Cx26 deficiency can cause congenital deafness with cochlear developmental disorders, hair cell degeneration, and the reduction of endocochlear potential (EP) and active cochlear amplification. However, the underlying deafness mechanism still remains undetermined. Our previous studies revealed that hair cell degeneration is not a primary cause of hearing loss. In this study we investigated the role of EP reduction in Cx26 deficiency-induced deafness. We found that the EP reduction is not associated with congenital deafness in Cx26 knockout (KO) mice. The threshold of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in Cx26 KO mice was even greater than 110 dB SPL, demonstrating complete hearing loss. However, the EP in Cx26 KO mice varied and not completely abolished. In some cases, the EP could still remain at higher levels (>70 mV). We further found that the deafness in Cx26 KO mice is associated with cochlear developmental disorders. Deletion of Cx26 in the cochlea before postnatal day 5 (P5) could cause congenital deafness. The cochlea had developmental disorders and the cochlear tunnel was not open. However, no congenital deafness was found when Cx26 was deleted after P5. The cochlea also displayed normal development and the cochlear tunnel was open normally. These data suggest that congenital deafness induced by Cx26 deficiency is not determined by EP reduction and may result from cochlear developmental disorders.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions glutathione synthetase deficiency glutathione synthetase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a disorder that prevents the ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions GLUT1 deficiency syndrome GLUT1 deficiency syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is a disorder affecting the nervous ...

  15. AGEs and chronic subclinical inflammation in diabetes: disorders of immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hang; Jiang, Hongfei; Ren, Haitao; Hu, Xinlei; Wang, Xingang; Han, Chunmao

    2015-02-01

    Chronic subclinical inflammation represents a risk factor of type 2 diabetes and several diabetes complications, including neuropathy and atherosclerosis including macro-vasculopathy and micro-vasculopathy. However, the inflammatory response in the diabetic wound was shown to be remarkably hypocellular, unregulated and ineffective. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and one of its receptors, RAGE, were involved in inducing chronic immune imbalance in diabetic patients. Such interactions attracts immune cell into diffused glycated tissue and activates these cells to induce inflammatory damage, but disturbs the normal immune rhythm in diabetic wound. Traditional measurements of AGEs are high-performance liquid chromatography and immunohistochemistry staining, but their application faces the limitations including complexity, cost and lack of reproducibility. A new noninvasive method emerged in 2004, using skin autofluorescence as indicator for AGEs accumulation. It had been reported to be informative in evaluating the chronic risk of diabetic patients. Studies have indicated therapeutic potentials of anti-AGE recipes. These recipes can reduce AGE absorption/de novo formation, block AGE-RAGE interaction and arrest downstream signaling after RAGE activation.

  16. Hypogammaglobulinemia in BLT humanized mice--an animal model of primary antibody deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martinez-Torres

    Full Text Available Primary antibody deficiencies present clinically as reduced or absent plasma antibodies without another identified disorder that could explain the low immunoglobulin levels. Bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT humanized mice also exhibit primary antibody deficiency or hypogammaglobulinemia. Comprehensive characterization of B cell development and differentiation in BLT mice revealed other key parallels with primary immunodeficiency patients. We found that B cell ontogeny was normal in the bone marrow of BLT mice but observed an absence of switched memory B cells in the periphery. PC-KLH immunizations led to the presence of switched memory B cells in immunized BLT mice although plasma cells producing PC- or KLH- specific IgG were not detected in tissues. Overall, we have identified the following parallels between the humoral immune systems of primary antibody deficiency patients and those in BLT mice that make this in vivo model a robust and translational experimental platform for gaining a greater understanding of this heterogeneous array of humoral immunodeficiency disorders in humans: (i hypogammaglobulinemia; (ii normal B cell ontogeny in bone marrow; and (iii poor antigen-specific IgG response to immunization. Furthermore, the development of strategies to overcome these humoral immune aberrations in BLT mice may in turn provide insights into the pathogenesis of some primary antibody deficiency patients which could lead to novel clinical interventions for improved humoral immune function.

  17. Pregnancy Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Immune Tolerance in Pregnancy and Its Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--An Immunological Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluhovschi, Cristina; Gluhovschi, Gheorghe; Petrica, Ligia; Velciov, Silvia; Gluhovschi, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological condition that requires immune tolerance to the product of conception. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease with well-represented immune mechanisms that disturb immune tolerance. The association of pregnancy with systemic lupus erythematosus creates a particular immune environment in which the immune tolerance specific of pregnancy is required to coexist with alterations of the immune system caused by SLE. The main role is played by T regulatory (Treg) cells, which attempt to regulate and adapt the immune system of the mother to the new conditions of pregnancy. Other components of the immune system also participate to maintain maternal-fetal immune tolerance. If the immune system of pregnant women with SLE is not able to maintain maternal immune tolerance to the fetus, pregnancy complications (miscarriage, fetal hypotrophy, and preterm birth) or maternal complications (preeclampsia or activation of SLE, especially in conditions of lupus nephritis) may occur. In certain situations this can be responsible for neonatal lupus. At the same time, it must be noted that during pregnancy, the immune system is able to achieve immune tolerance while maintaining the anti-infectious immune capacity of the mother. Immunological monitoring of pregnancy during SLE, as well as of the mother's disease, is required. It is important to understand immune tolerance to grafts in transplant pathology.

  18. Pregnancy Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Immune Tolerance in Pregnancy and Its Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus—An Immunological Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gluhovschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a physiological condition that requires immune tolerance to the product of conception. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a disease with well-represented immune mechanisms that disturb immune tolerance. The association of pregnancy with systemic lupus erythematosus creates a particular immune environment in which the immune tolerance specific of pregnancy is required to coexist with alterations of the immune system caused by SLE. The main role is played by T regulatory (Treg cells, which attempt to regulate and adapt the immune system of the mother to the new conditions of pregnancy. Other components of the immune system also participate to maintain maternal-fetal immune tolerance. If the immune system of pregnant women with SLE is not able to maintain maternal immune tolerance to the fetus, pregnancy complications (miscarriage, fetal hypotrophy, and preterm birth or maternal complications (preeclampsia or activation of SLE, especially in conditions of lupus nephritis may occur. In certain situations this can be responsible for neonatal lupus. At the same time, it must be noted that during pregnancy, the immune system is able to achieve immune tolerance while maintaining the anti-infectious immune capacity of the mother. Immunological monitoring of pregnancy during SLE, as well as of the mother’s disease, is required. It is important to understand immune tolerance to grafts in transplant pathology.

  19. Complement genetics, deficiencies, and disease associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayilyan, Karine R

    2012-07-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity. More than 45 genes encoding the proteins of complement components or their isotypes and subunits, receptors, and regulators have been discovered. These genes are distributed throughout different chromosomes, with 19 genes comprising three significant complement gene clusters in the human genome. Genetic deficiency of any early component of the classical pathway (C1q, C1r/s, C2, C4, and C3) is associated with autoimmune diseases due to the failure of clearance of immune complexes (IC) and apoptotic materials, and the impairment of normal humoral response. Deficiencies of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the early components of the alternative (factor D, properdin) and terminal pathways (from C3 onward components: C5, C6, C7, C8, C9) increase susceptibility to infections and their recurrence. While the association of MBL deficiency with a number of autoimmune and infectious disorders has been well established, the effects of the deficiency of other lectin pathway components (ficolins, MASPs) have been less extensively investigated due to our incomplete knowledge of the genetic background of such deficiencies and the functional activity of those components. For complement regulators and receptors, the consequences of their genetic deficiency vary depending on their specific involvement in the regulatory or signalling steps within the complement cascade and beyond. This article reviews current knowledge and concepts about the genetic load of complement component deficiencies and their association with diseases. An integrative presentation of genetic data with the latest updates provides a background to further investigations of the disease association investigations of the complement system from the perspective of systems biology and systems genetics.

  20. Influence of the home environment on the prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewnunan, A; Modiba, L M

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still a 'family crises' which marks the beginning of the deterioration of the family unit and the trauma in the emotional, psychological and material lives of both the mother and child. In South African context where the majority of HIV-positive mothers are young single women who live in extended families, disclosure to the sexual partner alone is not an adequate condition for the success of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). In South Africa, close to one in three women who attend antenatal clinics are HIV positive. KwaZulu-Natal is one of the worst affected provinces, where as many as 40-60% of pregnant women attending antenatal services are living with HIV infection. The study sought to investigate the link between the home environment and its contribution to the success of the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual study was used in this study to explore whether the home environment for the support system is available for the HIV-positive women on the PMTCT programme. The population of this study included all women who have undergone counselling and tested HIV positive and who have joined the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS in a specific hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Although 14 women agreed to participate in the study, only 10 women were interviewed as saturation was attained. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were audio-taped and field notes were taken. Content analysis was used and it was done manually. This study revealed that one of the major issues still surrounding HIV/AIDS and PMTCT is that of non-disclosure, selective disclosure and the stigma and discrimination that surrounds this disease.

  1. Knowledge and attitude of Indian clinical dental students towards the dental treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Marya, Charu Mohan; Sharma, Nilima; Mohanty, Vikrant; Marwah, Mohita; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-12-01

    Oral health care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing area of concern. Information on HIV- and AIDS-related knowledge among dental students provides a crucial foundation for efforts aimed at developing an appropriate dental curriculum on HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of Indian clinical dental students towards the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS and perceived sources of information regarding HIV-related issues. Data were collected from clinical dental students (third year, fourth year and internship) from three dental institutions in Delhi National Capital Region (NCR). The questions assessed the knowledge and attitude towards treatment of patients with HIV and the perceived source of information related to HIV. The willingness to treat HIV-positive patients among dental students was 67.0%, and 74.20% were confident of treating a patient with HIV/AIDS. The potential problems in rendering treatment to these patients were effect on the attitude of other patients (49.90%) and staff fears (52.50%). The correct knowledge regarding the infection-control practice (barrier technique) was found among only 15.50% of respondents. The respondents had sufficient knowledge regarding the oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. There was no correlation between the knowledge and attitude score, demonstrating a gap between knowledge and attitude among dental students regarding treatment of HIV-infected patients. Appropriate knowledge has to be delivered through the dental education curriculum, which can instil confidence in students about their ability to manage HIV-positive patients. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  2. The natural history of children with severe combined immunodeficiency: baseline features of the first fifty patients of the primary immune deficiency treatment consortium prospective study 6901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Christopher C; Cowan, Morton J; Logan, Brent R; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Griffith, Linda M; Puck, Jennifer M; Kohn, Donald B; Shearer, William T; O'Reilly, Richard J; Fleisher, Thomas A; Pai, Sung-Yun; Hanson, I Celine; Pulsipher, Michael A; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Filipovich, Alexandra; Goldman, Frederick; Kapoor, Neena; Small, Trudy; Smith, Angela; Chan, Ka-Wah; Cuvelier, Geoff; Heimall, Jennifer; Knutsen, Alan; Loechelt, Brett; Moore, Theodore; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2013-10-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) consists of 33 centers in North America. We hypothesized that the analysis of uniform data on patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) enrolled in a prospective protocol will identify variables that contribute to optimal outcomes following treatment. We report baseline clinical, immunologic, and genetic features of the first 50 patients enrolled, and the initial therapies administered, reflecting current practice in the diagnosis and treatment of both typical (n = 37) and atypical forms (n = 13) of SCID. From August 2010 to May 2012, patients with suspected SCID underwent evaluation and therapy per local center practices. Diagnostic information was reviewed by the PIDTC eligibility review panel, and hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) details were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Most patients (92 %) had mutations in a known SCID gene. Half of the patients were diagnosed by newborn screening or family history, were younger than those diagnosed by clinical signs (median 15 vs. 181 days; P = <0.0001), and went to HCT at a median of 67 days vs. 214 days of life (P = <0.0001). Most patients (92 %) were treated with HCT within 1-2 months of diagnosis. Three patients were treated with gene therapy and 1 with enzyme replacement. The PIDTC plans to enroll over 250 such patients and analyze short and long-term outcomes for factors beneficial or deleterious to survival, clinical outcome, and T- and B-cell reconstitution, and which biomarkers are predictive of these outcomes.

  3. Morphometrical analysis of preantral follicular survival of VEGF-treated bovine ovarian cortex tissue following xenotransplantation in an immune deficient mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbeen, A; Van Ginneken, C; Fransen, E; Bosmans, E; Leroy, J L M R; Bols, P E J

    2016-05-01

    The increasing number of cancer survivors the past decades, has sparked the need for fertility preservation strategies. Due to predominantly ethical constraints, human research material is scarce. A bovine in vitro model is a valuable alternative. Therefore, the following objectives were defined: 1) to xeno-graft bovine ovarian cortex tissue in immune deficient mice as a study-model for female fertility preservation strategies; 2) to stereologically quantify vascularization in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)-treated and non-treated tissue; 3) to study preantral follicular survival in situ, after xenotransplantation. Bovine ovarian tissue strips were incubated with or without VEGF prior to grafting into female, neutered BALB/c-nu mice (n=16). Non-transplanted cortical tissue was used as a control. At time zero (control), two (2 weeks) and four (4 weeks) weeks after transplantation, grafts were retrieved and assessed by von Willebrand Factor and caspase-3 immunostaining. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model. In the VEGF+ grafts, 31% of the follicles were considered 'alive' 2 weeks after transplantation, compared to only 17% in the VEGF- grafts (P<0.05). However, no difference could be detected 4 weeks after transplantation (P=0.76) with less follicles being considered 'alive' after transplantation (22%), compared to the control (47.5%) (P<0.05). Finally, the vascular surface density was significantly less in the grafts, irrespective of the transplantation period or the use of VEGF. Although the transplantation process overall negatively influenced the number of viable follicles and vascular density, VEGF exposure prior to transplantation can favor follicle survival during a 2 weeks transplantation period.

  4. Quantitative Trait Locus and Brain Expression of HLA-DPA1 Offers Evidence of Shared Immune Alterations in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Z. Morgan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of schizophrenia encompassing the major histocompatibility locus (MHC were highly significant following genome-wide correction. This broad region implicates many genes including the MHC complex class II. Within this interval we examined the expression of two MHC II genes (HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DRB1 in brain from individual subjects with schizophrenia (SZ, bipolar disorder (BD, major depressive disorder (MDD, and controls by differential gene expression methods. A third MHC II mRNA, CD74, was studied outside of the MHC II locus, as it interacts within the same immune complex. Exon microarrays were performed in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC in BD compared to controls, and both HLA-DPA1 and CD74 were decreased in expression in BD. The expression of HLA-DPA1 and CD74 were both reduced in hippocampus, amygdala, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex regions in SZ and BD compared to controls by specific qPCR assay. We found several novel HLA-DPA1 mRNA variants spanning HLA-DPA1 exons 2-3-4 as suggested by exon microarrays. The intronic rs9277341 SNP was a significant cis expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL that was associated with the total expression of HLA-DPA1 in five brain regions. A biomarker study of MHC II mRNAs was conducted in SZ, BD, MDD, and control lymphoblastic cell lines (LCL by qPCR assay of 87 subjects. There was significantly decreased expression of HLA-DPA1 and CD74 in BD, and trends for reductions in SZ in LCLs. The discovery of multiple splicing variants in brain for HLA-DPA1 is important as the HLA-DPA1 gene is highly conserved, there are no reported splicing variants, and the functions in brain are unknown. Future work on the function and localization of MHC Class II proteins in brain will help to understand the role of alterations in neuropsychiatric disorders. The HLA-DPA1 eQTL is located within a large linkage disequilibrium block that has an irrefutable association with schizophrenia. Future

  5. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II and folate deficiencies result in reciprocal protection against cognitive and social deficits in mice: implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaevitz, Laura R; Picker, Jonathan D; Rana, Jasmine; Kolodny, Nancy H; Shane, Barry; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne E; Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-06-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors underlie a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ) and autism (AD). Due to the complexity and multitude of the genetic and environmental factors attributed to these disorders, recent research strategies focus on elucidating the common molecular pathways through which these multiple risk factors may function. In this study, we examine the combined effects of a haplo-insufficiency of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) and dietary folic acid deficiency. In addition to serving as a neuropeptidase, GCPII catalyzes the absorption of folate. GCPII and folate depletion interact within the one-carbon metabolic pathway and/or of modulate the glutamatergic system. Four groups of mice were tested: wild-type, GCPII hypomorphs, and wild-types and GCPII hypomorphs both fed a folate deficient diet. Due to sex differences in the prevalence of SZ and AD, both male and female mice were assessed on a number of behavioral tasks including locomotor activity, rotorod, social interaction, prepulse inhibition, and spatial memory. Wild-type mice of both sexes fed a folic acid deficient diet showed motor coordination impairments and cognitive deficits, while social interactions were decreased only in males. GCPII mutant mice of both sexes also exhibited reduced social propensities. In contrast, all folate-depleted GCPII hypomorphs performed similarly to untreated wild-type mice, suggesting that reduced GCPII expression and folate deficiency are mutually protective. Analyses of folate and neurometabolite levels associated with glutamatergic function suggest several potential mechanisms through which GCPII and folate may be interacting to create this protective effect.

  6. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The common variant - common disease hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased versus matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the common variant—common disease hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics.Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14bp-indel frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table2. The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2. Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15%, 22% and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR

  7. Seizures Related to Vitamin B6 Deficiency in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is closely associated with functions of the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Its deficiency may result in neurological disorders including convulsions and epileptic encephalopathy. Until today, this has only been reported in infants, children, and critically ill adult patients. We report a case of a 36year-old man with chronic alcoholism who presented with seizures after gastrointestinal disturbance. His seizures persisted even after treatment with antiepileptic drugs, but e...

  8. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: June 7, 2017 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  9. Generalized verrucosis in a patient with GATA2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E S; Kingsbery, M Y; Mintz, E M; Hsu, A P; Holland, S M; Rady, P L; Tyring, S K; Grossman, M E

    2014-05-01

    Generalized verrucosis is a characteristic of several genetic and immunodeficiency disorders including epidermodysplasia verruciformis; warts, hypogammaglobulinaemia, infections and myelokathexis (WHIM) syndrome; warts, immunodeficiency, lymphoedema and anogenital dysplasia (WILD) syndrome; severe combined immune deficiency and HIV, among others. In recent years, it has been consistently recognized in patients with GATA2 deficiency, a novel immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by monocytopenia, B-cell and natural killer-cell lymphopenia, and a tendency to develop myeloid leukaemias and disseminated mycobacterial, human papillomavirus (HPV) and opportunistic fungal infections. Mutations in GATA2 cause haploinsufficiency and track in families as an autosomal dominant immunodeficiency. GATA2 is a transcription factor involved in early haematopoietic differentiation and lymphatic and vascular development. We describe a case of generalized verrucosis with HPV type 57 presenting in a young man with GATA2 deficiency. GATA2 deficiency is a novel dominant immunodeficiency that is often recognized later in life and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with generalized verrucosis.

  10. Affective symptoms are associated with markers of inflammation and immune activation in bipolar disorders but not in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Sigrun; Dieset, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid; Steen, Nils E; Ueland, Thor; Melle, Ingrid; Aukrust, Pål; Andreassen, Ole A

    2011-12-01

    Elevated levels of inflammation are reported in bipolar disorders (BP), but how this relates to affective symptoms is unclear. We aimed to determine if immune markers that consistently have been reported elevated in BP were associated with depressive and manic symptoms, and if this was specific for BP. From a catchment area, 112 BP patients were included together with 153 schizophrenia (SCZ) patients and 239 healthy controls. Depression and mania were assessed and the patients were grouped into depressed, neutral, and elevated mood. We measured the immune markers tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNF-R1), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), interleukin 6 (IL-6), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) which have been found increased in severe mental disorders. In BP all inflammatory markers were lowest in depressed state, with significant group differences after control for confounders with respect to TNF-R1 (p = 0.04), IL-1Ra (p = 0.02), OPG (p = 0.004) and IL-6 (p = 0.005). STNF-R1 was positively correlated with the item elevated mood (p = 0.02) whereas sad mood was negatively correlated with OPG (p = 0.0003), IL-1Ra (p = 0.001) and IL-6 (p = 0.006). Compared to controls the neutral mood group had significantly higher levels of OPG (p = 0.0003) and IL-6 (p = 0.005), and the elevated mood group had higher levels of TNF-R1 (p = 0.000005) and vWf (p = 0.002). There were no significant associations between affective states orsymptoms in SCZ. The current associations between inflammatory markers and affective symptomatology in BP and not SCZ suggest that immune related mechanisms are associated with core psychopathology of BP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  12. Manganese deficiency or excess caused the depression of intestinal immunity, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the intestinal physical barrier, as regulated by NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signalling, in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Tang, Ren-Jun; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yong-An; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal mucosal immune components and mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) under dietary manganese (Mn) deficiency or excess were investigated. Fish were fed the diets containing graded levels of Mn [3.65-27.86 mg Mn kg(-1) diet] for 8 weeks. The results demonstrated that Mn deficiency significantly decreased the lysozyme and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, up-regulated tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 8 and the signalling factor nuclear factor-κB p65, and down-regulated interleukin 10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor β1, inhibitor of signalling factors κB-α and target of rapamycin mRNA levels in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI). However, Mn deficiency did not change the C3 content in the PI, whereas it decreased the C3 contents in the MI and DI. Additionally, Mn depletion also resulted in significantly low mRNA levels for tight junction proteins (claudin-b, claudin-c, claudin-15, occludin and zonula occludens-1), antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, GPx and CAT) and NF-E2-related factor-2 in the intestines of fish. Excessive Mn exhibited toxic effects similar to Mn deficiency, where optimal Mn contents reversed those indicators. In conclusion, Mn deficiency or excess causes the depression of intestinal immunity, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the intestinal physical barrier relating to NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signalling in grass carp. Furthermore, quadratic regression analysis at 95% maximum response of lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities in the distal intestine of young grass carp revealed the optimum dietary Mn levels to be 8.90 and 8.99 mg kg(-1) diet, respectively.

  13. Immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus in individuals with systemic and organ specific autoimmune disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannangai R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Autoimmune diseases usually manifest in genetically predisposed individuals following an environmental trigger. There are several viral infections including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. The aim of this study was to look at the antibody pattern to EBV proteins in the plasma of both systemic and organ specific autoimmune disorders, estimate pro-inflammatory plasma cytokines (IL-8 and TNF-α among these autoimmune patients and compare the observations with those in normal healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Samples from 44 rheumatoid arthritis patients, 25 Hashimoto′s thyroiditis patients, appropriately age and sex matched healthy controls were tested for EBV IgM antibodies by an immunoblot assay and two cytokines (IL-8 and TNF-α by commercial assays. Results: Among the rheumatoid arthritis patients, 23 (52% were positive for EBNA1 antibody, while 13 (52% of the Hashimoto′s thyroiditis patients and 12 (30% of the healthy controls showed similar bands. The intensity of the bands was high in the autoimmune patients when compared to the bands seen in control samples. The difference in the EBNA1 reactivity between rheumatoid arthritis patients and controls were significant (P = 0.038. There was a significant difference in the IgM reactivity to VCAp19 protein between patients and controls (P = 0.011. Conclusion: Our study showed an increased EBV activation among the autoimmune patient groups compared to the normal healthy controls. Further studies are required to delineate the association between the aetiology of autoimmune disorders and EBV.

  14. Small-molecule control of cytokine function: new opportunities for treating immune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Thomas B.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Shamji, Alykhan F.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating cytokine function with protein-based drugs has proven effective for treating a wide variety of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory disorders. However, the limited ability of protein-based drugs to modulate intracellular targets, including many implicated by studies of the genetics and physiology of these diseases, and to coordinately neutralize redundant inflammatory cytokines, suggest an important and complementary role for small molecules in immunomodulatory drug development. The recent clinical approval of Janus kinase and phosphodiesterase inhibitors, along with emerging evidence from other compound classes, firmly establish small molecules as effective tools for modulating therapeutically relevant proteins that give rise to aberrant cytokine signaling or mediate its downstream consequences. PMID:25222143

  15. Genetics Home Reference: transcobalamin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency often develop a blood disorder called megaloblastic anemia . Megaloblastic anemia results in a shortage of red blood cells, ... and Prevention: Intellectual Disability (PDF) Children's Hospital Boston: Megaloblastic Pernicious Anemia Children's Hospital Boston: White Blood Cell Disorders CLIMB: ...

  16. Clinical characteristics of 275 pediatric cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome%儿童艾滋病275例临床特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵燕; 庞琳; 云鹰; 刘中夫; 张福杰; 豆智慧; 程跃武; 唐志荣; 刘爱文; 彭国平; 乔晓春; 赵红心

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristic of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients younger than 15 years old and to explore the influence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on them. Methods The clinical information, including demographic profile, clinical stages of the disease, laboratory test results and developmental status were gathered from 275 antiretroviral therapy naive patients. Results Seventy eight point nine percent patients were infected by vertical transmission. Sixteen percent were infected by receiving blood products. The average age was (7.6±3. 7) years, with 5 cases younger than 1 year old, 104 cases ranging from 1 - 5 years and 166 cases elder than 6 years. Seventy point one percent patients were classified as stage 3 or 4 according to World Health Organization definitions. The average CD4 count was ( 137 ± 159 )/μL, ( 304 ± 317 ) /μL and ( 1 246 ± 776 )/μL respectively in children elder than 6 years, ranging from 1 to 5 years and younger than 1 year. One hundred and eighty one cases suffered from anemia on different severity grading. The most common HIV related symdromes included persistent fever, skin damage, persistent diarrhea, oral candidiasis and recurrent upper respiratory tract infection. Among these infected children, 49. 6% showed height lower than x - 2s and 19. 9% showed weight lower than x - 2s. Conclusions Most survival pediatric AIDS patients are elder than 6 years. HIV infection can significantly affect the children's immune system function,growth and development.%目的 研究15岁以下AIDS患者的临床特点,了解HIV对患儿的影响.方法 分析275例即将入选接受高效抗反转录病毒治疗患者的临床资料,对人口学、流行病学、临床分期、实验室特点及生长发育状况进行分析.结果 275例AIDS患者主要以母婴途径传播为主,占78.9%,输血及血制品传播的为16.0%.平均年龄(7.6±3.7)岁,其中1岁以内5例,1~5岁104例,6

  17. 从肠黏膜免疫系统损害探讨AIDS脾虚病机%Discuss the spleen deficiency of AIDS pathogenesis from the point of view intestinal mucosal immune system damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春芳; 李真; 徐立然

    2012-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients with intestinal mucosal immune system damage promoting the immunodeficiency of body and the incidence of opportunistic infections, which is consistent with the evolution of spleen deficiency pathogenesis point of view of TCM. This paper discusses the spleen deficiency of AIDS pathogenesis from the point of view intestinal mucosal immune system damage, and proposed strengthening the spleen to improve immune function of intestinal mucosa of AIDS.%HIV/AIDS患者肠黏膜免疫系统损害促进了机体免疫功能的缺失和机会性感染的发生,AIDS以脾虚为主的中医病机演变过程,与HIV感染所致以肠黏膜损伤为重要表现的全身免疫损伤过程相符合.文章从肠黏膜免疫系统损害角度探讨AIDS脾虚病机,提出健脾扶正以改善肠黏膜免疫功能的中医药治疗AIDS思路.

  18. Immunity decreases, antioxidant system damages and tight junction changes in the intestine of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) during folic acid deficiency: Regulation of NF-κB, Nrf2 and MLCK mRNA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-04-01

    This investigation used the same growth trial as the previous study, which showed that folic acid deficiency retarded growth in young grass carp (the percent weight gain of Groups 1-6 were 102.32 ± 3.41%, 137.25 ± 10.48%, 179.78 ± 3.95%, 164.33 ± 3.21%, 143.35 ± 8.12% and 115.28 ± 2.66%) [1]. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary folic acid on the immune response, antioxidant status and tight junctions in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 young grass carp were fed diets containing graded levels of folic acid at 0.10, 0.47, 1.03, 1.48, 1.88 and 3.12 mg kg(-1) diet for 8 weeks. The results indicated that acid phosphatase and lysozyme activities, and the complement component 3 content in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) were decreased with folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) (P Folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) up-regulated interleukin 1β, interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor α, nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κB p65), IκB kinase α (IKK-α), IKK-β and IKK-γ gene expression, meanwhile down-regulated interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β, IκB and target of rapamycin gene expression in the PI, MI and DI (P folic acid deficiency decreased fish intestinal innate immune function may be partly contributed to the regulation of NF-κB p65 pathway. Moreover, the activities and corresponding gene expression of glutathione content, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione s-transferases and glutathione reductase in fish intestine were depressed by deficient folic acid diet (0.1 mg kg(-1)) (P folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) down-regulated NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene expression, up-regulated Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) and Keap1b gene expression in fish intestine (P folic acid diet damaged fish intestinal antioxidant capacity partly by regulating Nrf2/Keap1 pathway

  19. Evolutionary biology and anthropology suggest biome reconstitution as a necessary approach toward dealing with immune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William; Ollerton, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Industrialized society currently faces a wide range of non-infectious, immune-related pandemics. These pandemics include a variety of autoimmune, inflammatory and allergic diseases that are often associated with common environmental triggers and with genetic predisposition, but that do not occur in developing societies. In this review, we briefly present the idea that these pandemics are due to a limited number of evolutionary mismatches, the most damaging being 'biome depletion'. This particular mismatch involves the loss of species from the ecosystem of the human body, the human biome, many of which have traditionally been classified as parasites, although some may actually be commensal or even mutualistic. This view, evolved from the 'hygiene hypothesis', encompasses a broad ecological and evolutionary perspective that considers host-symbiont relations as plastic, changing through ecological space and evolutionary time. Fortunately, this perspective provides a blueprint, termed 'biome reconstitution', for disease treatment and especially for disease prevention. Biome reconstitution includes the controlled and population-wide reintroduction (i.e. domestication) of selected species that have been all but eradicated from the human biome in industrialized society and holds great promise for the elimination of pandemics of allergic, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  20. Maternal iron deficiency worsens the associative learning deficits and hippocampal and cerebellar losses in a rat model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Shane M; Tran, Tuan D; Rufer, Echoleah S; Crump, Peter M; Smith, Susan M

    2015-11-01

    Gestational alcohol exposure causes lifelong physical and neurocognitive deficits collectively referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Micronutrient deficiencies are common in pregnancies of alcohol-abusing women. Here we show the most common micronutrient deficiency of pregnancy-iron deficiency without anemia-significantly worsens neurocognitive outcomes following perinatal alcohol exposure. Pregnant rats were fed iron-deficient (ID) or iron-sufficient diets from gestational day 13 to postnatal day (P) 7. Pups received alcohol (0, 3.5, 5.0 g/kg) from P 4 to P 9, targeting the brain growth spurt. At P 32, learning was assessed using delay or trace eyeblink classical conditioning (ECC). Cerebellar interpositus nucleus (IPN) and hippocampal CA1 cellularity was quantified using unbiased stereology. Global analysis of variance revealed that ID and alcohol separately and significantly reduced ECC learning with respect to amplitude (ps ≤ 0.001) and conditioned response [CR] percentage (ps ≤ 0.001). Iron and alcohol interacted to reduce CR percentage in the trace ECC task (p = 0.013). Both ID and alcohol significantly reduced IPN (ps learning impairments persisted even though the offsprings' iron status had normalized. Supporting our previous work, gestational ID exacerbates the associative learning deficits in this rat model of FASD. This is strongly associated with cellular reductions within the ECC neurocircuitry. Significant learning impairments in FASD could be the consequence, in part, of pregnancies in which the mother was also iron inadequate. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  1. Overview of Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  2. A Comparative Clinicopathologic Study of Collagenous Gastritis in Children and Adults: The Same Disorder With Associated Immune-mediated Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changqing; Park, Jason Y; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Arnold, Christina A; McDonald, Oliver G; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Salaria, Safia N; Limketkai, Berkeley N; McGrath, Kevin M; Musahl, Tina; Singhi, Aatur D

    2015-06-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition characterized by surface epithelial damage, subepithelial collagen deposition, and a lamina propria inflammatory infiltrate. Previous studies have proposed 2 clinicopathologic subtypes: (1) children (18 y of age or younger) presenting with severe anemia, nodular gastric mucosa, and isolated gastric disease; and (2) adults with chronic watery diarrhea that is associated with diffuse collagenous involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. However, notable exceptions exist. In fact, broad variability in clinical presentation, etiology, treatment and disease course has been reported. To better define the clinicopathologic features of collagenous gastritis, we have collected 10 pediatric and 21 adult cases and describe their clinical, endoscopic, pathologic, and follow-up findings. Both children and adults presented with similar clinical symptoms such as anemia (50%, 35%, respectively), epigastric/abdominal pain (50%, 45%), and diarrhea (40%, 55%). Concomitant immune disorders were identified in 2 (20%) children and 3 (14%) adults. Further, 7 of 17 (41%) adults were taking medications associated with other immune-related gastrointestinal diseases including olmesartan and antidepressants. Histologically, there were no differences between children and adults with collagenous gastritis in the location of gastric involvement, mean collagenous layer thickness, and prominence of eosinophils (P>0.05). Extragastric collagenous involvement was also seen with comparable frequencies in each cohort (44%, 59%). Follow-up information was available for 22 of 31 (71%) patients and ranged from 2 to 122 months (mean, 33.6 mo). Despite medical management in most cases, persistence of symptoms or collagenous gastritis on subsequent biopsies was seen in 100% of children and 82% of adults. Of note, treatment for 1 adult patient involved cessation of olmesartan resulting in resolution of both symptoms and subepithelial collagen deposition on subsequent

  3. Deficiency of dietary niacin impaired gill immunity and antioxidant capacity, and changes its tight junction proteins via regulating NF-κB, TOR, Nrf2 and MLCK signaling pathways in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun-Quan; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary niacin on gill immunity, tight junction proteins, antioxidant system and related signaling molecules mRNA expression, young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) were fed six diets containing graded levels of niacin (3.95-55.01 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. The study indicated that niacin deficiency decreased lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, and complement 3 content, and caused oxidative damage that might be partly due to the decreased copper, zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities and reduced glutathione content in fish gills (P niacin-deficient diet group. Conversely, the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ2, and interleukin 1β), signaling molecules (nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase α, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ, Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1b, myosin light chain kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) were significantly increased (P niacin-deficient diet. Interestingly, the varying niacin levels of 3.95-55.01 mg/kg diet had no effect on the mRNA level of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a, Claudin-c and -12 in fish gills (P > 0.05). In conclusion, niacin deficiency decreased gill immunity, impaired gill antioxidant system, as well as regulated mRNA expression of gill tight junction proteins and related signaling molecules of fish.

  4. High dose androgen therapy in male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5 alpha-reductase deficiency and disorders of the androgen receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, P; Wass, J. A.; Griffin, J E; Leshin, M; Savage, M O; Large, D. M.; Bu'Lock, D E; Anderson, D. C.; Wilson, J. D.; Besser, G M

    1984-01-01

    We describe the clinical and biochemical features of six men with male pseudohermaphroditism due to androgen resistance. Each of the subjects had male-gender behavior but incomplete virilization. The underlying defects in androgen metabolism were defined by studies of the 5 alpha-reductase enzyme and the androgen receptor in fibroblasts cultured from biopsies of genital skin. Four of the six have 5 alpha-reductase deficiency, and two have defects of the androgen receptor (the Reifenstein synd...

  5. Efeitos da deficiência de cobre, zinco e magnésio sobre o sistema imune de crianças com desnutrição grave Effects of copper, zinc and magnesium deficiency on the immune system of severely malnourished children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Michelle C. de Macêdo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Esclarecer as repercussões da deficiência de cobre, zinco e magnésio sobre o sistema imune de crianças desnutridas graves. FONTES DE DADOS: Foi realizada revisão bibliográfica mediante consulta às bases de dados Pubmed Medline, Lilacs e SciELO, selecionando-se publicações científicas recentes, da última década, e representativas do tema por meio dos descritores: desnutrição infantil, cobre, zinco, magnésio e sistema imune. SÍNTESE DE DADOS: Os micronutrientes são compostos orgânicos essenciais. Além de sua função regulatória, atuam de maneira decisiva na modulação da resposta imune. Sua deficiência pode ocorrer devido à ingestão inadequada ou associada a doenças específicas. Quando associada à desnutrição, a multideficiência de minerais pode acarretar disfunções imunológicas e aumento na suscetibilidade a infecções, afetando gravemente a eficácia de intervenções terapêuticas. Cobre, zinco e magnésio atuam como cofatores de enzimas responsáveis tanto por diversas atividades metabólicas como na resposta imune inata e adquirida, além do papel importante na maturação dos tecidos e células linfoides. Sua deficiência acarreta neutropenia e linfopenia, comprometendo a imunocompetência. CONCLUSÕES: As alterações ocasionadas pelos déficits séricos dos minerais cobre, zinco e magnésio comprometem o funcionamento do sistema imune, levando à imunossupressão. A reposição desses elementos no manejo da desnutrição grave, como preconizada pela Organização Mundial da Saúde, é essencial, uma vez que tais alterações podem ser reversíveis.OBJECTIVE: To report the effects of the deficiency of copper, zinc and magnesium on the immune system of severely malnourished children. DATA SOURCE: A literature review was performed by consulting the databases Pubmed Medline, Lilacs and SciELO, using the descriptors: child malnutrition, copper, zinc, magnesium and immune system. Representative

  6. Dietary vitamin C deficiency depresses the growth, head kidney and spleen immunity and structural integrity by regulating NF-κB, TOR, Nrf2, apoptosis and MLCK signaling in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Feng, Lin; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary vitamin C on the growth, and head kidney, spleen and skin immunity, structural integrity and related signaling molecules mRNA expression levels of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 grass carp (264.37 ± 0.66 g) were fed six diets with graded levels of vitamin C (2.9, 44.2, 89.1, 133.8, 179.4 and 224.5 mg/kg diet) for 10 weeks. Subsequently, a challenge test was conducted by injection of Aeromonas hydrophila and the survival rate recorded for 14 days. The results indicated that compared with optimal vitamin C supplementation, vitamin C deficiency (2.9 mg/kg diet) decreased lysozyme (LA) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, and complement 3 and complement 4 (C4) contents (P spleen), IL-12 P40, IL-15, IL-17D, nuclear factor κB p65, IκB kinases (IKKα, IKKβ, IKKγ), target of rapamycin and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 mRNA levels (P spleen under injection fish of A. hydrophila, suggesting that vitamin C deficiency could decrease fish head kidney and spleen immunity and cause inflammation. Meanwhile, compared with optimal vitamin C supplementation, vitamin C deficiency decreased the activities and mRNA levels of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferases and glutathione reductase (P spleen under injection fish of A. hydrophila, suggesting that vitamin C deficiency could decrease fish head kidney and spleen structural integrity through depression of antioxidative ability, induction of apoptosis and disruption of tight junctional complexes. In addition, except the activities of ACP and MnSOD, and mRNA expression levels of TGF-β1, Occludin and MnSOD, the effect of vitamin C on fish head kidney, spleen and skin immunity and structural integrity other indicators model are similar under infection of A. hydrophila. Finally, the vitamin C requirement for the growth performance (PWG) of young grass carp was

  7. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder coinciding with hematological immune disease: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patejdl, R; Wittstock, M; Zettl, U K; Jost, K; Grossmann, A; Prudlo, J

    2016-09-01

    Recently defined consensus criteria for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) allow establishing the diagnosis in patients without elevated AQP4-Ab and optic nerve involvement. According to the new extended definition, NMOSD is closely associated with extensive spinal cord inflammation occurring in the course of systemic autoimmune diseases as sarcoidosis or lupus erythematodes. NMOSD occurring in the course of hematological disease have not yet been reported in the literature. A 38 year old male subsequently developed thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and agranulocytosis over a 23 month period. Three months after an episode of agranulocytosis, he noticed ascending sensory disturbances and progressive weakness of his legs. Within two days, symptoms worsened to give almost complete paraplegia and loss of sensation below a midthoracic level. MRI revealed signal hyperintensity and edema in T2-weighted sequences reaching from the 2nd cervical to the 9th thoracic vertebral body. Two years later, he developed a second episode with lesions in the spinal cord and periventricular areas of brain stem and thalamus. The relapsing time course and the topographical pattern of central nervous system lesions restricted to axial brain structures and the spinal cord fulfill the criteria that have recently been defined for AQP4-Ab-negative NMO-spectrum disease. Systematic studies on the association of hematological autoimmune phenomena and spinal cord disease are needed to clarify whether this coincidence is just a casual phenomenon or whether it points to a yet undiscovered but perhaps therapeutically interesting link of immunological mechanisms affecting both organ systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rare association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis in a patient with other immune disorders: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Almeida-Menezes

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease is described in association with several autoimmune diseases, but rarely with myasthenia gravis. Case Report: We describe the case of a 31-year-old white woman with celiac disease who presented manifestations related to a hyperactive immune system, including macroamylasemia, false-positive anti-HCV, positive antinuclear antibody, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The Introduction of a gluten-free diet (GFD resolved these features, but myasthenia gravis (MG symptoms unexpectedly occurred on that occasion. Discussion: The role of a GFD in the course of autoimmune diseases has been studied and improvement has been reported in many diseases. However, there is no consensus in the literature regarding the course of neurological disorders associated with celiac disease. In the present case, a GFD did not prevent the appearance of symptoms related to myasthenia gravis. There are few reports on the association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis and therefore little is known about the course and time of onset of myasthenia in celiac patients. The present case increases the knowledge about this unusual autoimmune neurological disease associated with celiac disease.

  9. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAfter more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme

  10. Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Hospitalized Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in Zahedan, Southeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi-Shahri, Seyed Mohammad; Sharifi-Mood, Batool; Kouhpayeh, Hamid-Reza; Moazen, Javad; Farrokhian, Mohsen; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Studies show that nearly 40 million people are living with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) around the world and since the beginning of the epidemic, about 35 million have died from AIDS. Heterosexual intercourse is the most common route for transmission of HIV infection (85%). People with a sexually transmitted infection (STI), such as syphilis, genital herpes, chancroid, or bacterial vaginosis, are more likely to obtain HIV infection during sex. On the other hand, a patient with HIV can acquire other infections such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and also STIs. Co-infections and co-morbidities can affect the treatment route of patients with HIV/AIDs. Sometimes, physicians should treat these infections before treating the HIV infection. Therefore, it is important to identify co-infection or comorbidity in patients with HIV/AIDS. This study was conducted in order to understand the prevalence of HIV/AIDS/STI co-infection. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated all HIV/AIDS patients who were admitted to the infectious wards of Boo-Ali hospital (Southeastern Iran) between March 2000 and January 2015. All HIV/AIDS patients were studied for sexually transmitted infections (STI) such as syphilis, gonorrhea, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and genital herpes. A questionnaire including data on age, sex, job, history of vaccination against HBV, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc), hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), HCV-Ab, venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-Abs) test, and urine culture was designed. Data was analyzed by the Chi square test and P values of VDRL. The FTA-Abs was positive for all patients who were positive for VDRL. Gonorrhea was found in seven patients (17%) and three cases had genital herpes in clinical examinations. All patients who had positive test results for these STIs

  11. 维生素D缺乏与神经精神疾病的关系研究进展%Vitamin D Deficiency and Neuropyschiatric Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊小平; 庞海玲

    2016-01-01

    维生素D是一种类固醇激素,在机体钙磷代谢及骨成生中起重要作用。维生素D缺乏可引发佝偻病等疾病。近年来研究发现,维生素D缺乏与神经精神疾病关系密切,如痴呆、帕金森病、多发性硬化、癫痫及精神分裂症等。该文对维生素缺乏与上述几种疾病的关系进行了综述。%Vitamin D is a secosteroid hormones that is typically associated with phosphocalcic homeostasis and osteogenesis. Vitamin D is related to rickets and other diseases. Recently some studies demonstrated that vitamin D deficiency played important role in many neuropsychiatric disorders such as dementia, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, schiaophrenia, In this article, we will review the relationship of Vitamin D deficiency and the above diseases.

  12. RESULTS OF THE IMMUNIZATION ACCORDING TO THE NATIONAL CALENDAR ASSOCIATED WITH VACCINATION AGAINST INFLUENZA IN CHILDREN WITH SOMATIC DISORDERS AND IMMUNODEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Kharit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study safety and immunological efficacy of vaccination against influenza in separate and associated immunization according to the National Calendar. Patients and methods: 100 children with various disorders as well as children with HIV subjected to revaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, measles, parotiditis and rubella, were included into the study. Children were divided into 5 groups of 20 persons each: groups of separate or associated vaccination. In order to assess safety of vaccination children were observed for 30 days after vaccination. In order to analyze immunologic efficacy participants were taken serum tests before and on the 30th day after vaccination. Results: the study demonstrated high safety of the vaccine against influenza. Mild and moderate topical and general reactions were observed in isolated instances and did not differ in comparison groups. Simultaneous vaccination against influenza with immunization against diphtheria, parotiditis and rubella did not influence synthesis of antibodies, while synthesis of antibodies against measles was decreased; immunization against diphtheria and measles when associated with vaccination against influenza depressed synthesis of antibodies against A/H3N2 influenza. Conclusions: vaccine against influenza has low reactivity, high safety and can be used in association with immunization according to the National calendar in independence to somatic disorders of patients. 

  13. New insight into the pathogenesis of minimal change nephrotic syndrome: Role of the persistence of respiratory tract virus in immune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zheng; Dong, Liqun; Guo, Yannan; Wu, Jin; Zhai, Songhui

    2016-07-01

    The pathogenesis of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) is a complex clinical problem which, unfortunately, has been in need of significant breakthroughs for decades. Improved understanding of the mechanisms is important to develop effective treatment strategies. To our knowledge, the pathogenesis of MCNS is multifactorial, involving both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, reasonable to be regarded as a "long chain" cascade reaction. Current studies implicating that the disease could probably be caused by immune disorders, however, have focused merely on the middle or terminal of this "long chain". It remains unclear what really triggers the immune disorders. It is noteworthy that the close association of respiratory tract infection with the occurrence, relapse and aggravation of nephrotic syndrome has been confirmed for over two decades. Derived from what we demonstrated in earlier studies, that the persistence of respiratory tract virus may contribute to the onset and development of MCNS, this review summarizes current evidence investigating the possible mechanisms of viral persistence, and discusses the role of viral persistence in the pathogenesis of MCNS. The key point is: whether the persistence of respiratory tract virus results in immune disorders. The available evidence under review also highlight the fact that the background of genetic susceptibility to the disease was found in many patients, which could be triggered by extrinsic factors, e.g. by the infection of respiratory tract virus.

  14. Deficient Attention Is Hard to Find: Applying the Perceptual Load Model of Selective Attention to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Nigg, Joel T.; Carr, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Whether selective attention is a primary deficit in childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) remains in active debate. Methods: We used the "perceptual load" paradigm to examine both early and late selective attention in children with the Primarily Inattentive (ADHD-I) and Combined subtypes (ADHD-C) of ADHD. Results:…

  15. Fine motor deficiencies in children with developmental coordination disorder and learning disabilities: an underlying open-loop control deficit.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Wilson, P.H.; Westenberg, Y.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-two children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and learning disabilities (LD) and their age-matched controls attending normal primary schools were investigated using kinematic movement analysis of fine-motor performance. Three hypotheses about the nature of the motor deficits obs

  16. Fine motor deficiencies in children with developmental coordination disorder and learning disabilities: An underlying open-loop control deficit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Wilson, P.H.; Westenberg, Y.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-two children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and learning disabilities (LD) and their age-matched controls attending normal primary schools were investigated using kinematic movement analysis of fine-motor performance. Three hypotheses about the nature of the motor deficits obs

  17. Deficiência de ferro na adolescência Iron deficiency in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene P. Garanito

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de ferro é o distúrbio nutricional mais comum no mundo e constitui a maior causa de anemia associada às condições onde há erro alimentar, perda crônica de sangue ou quando ocorre o crescimento rápido, como na infância, na gravidez e na adolescência. Esta deficiência acarreta prejuízos no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor, na capacidade de aprendizagem, no apetite, no crescimento e na resposta do sistema imunológico. Na adolescência, além de com frequência observarmos hábitos alimentares inadequados, estão presentes intensas mudanças fisiológicas e psicossociais que, em associação, podem comprometer o crescimento e aumentar o risco do desenvolvimento de deficiência de ferro e outras carências nutricionais, sobretudo na fase púbere. Desta forma, o diagnóstico de deficiência de ferro entre os adolescentes deve ser lembrado a fim de que medidas possam ser tomadas para diminuir a incidência de anemia, do comprometimento do rendimento escolar e do sistema imunológico, neste período da vida.Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder in the world and is a major cause of anemia associated with situations involving chronic blood loss or rapid growth such as during infancy, pregnancy and adolescence. This deficiency leads to impairment in psychomotor development, learning ability, appetite, growth and immune response. In adolescence, inadequate dietary habits are often observed and intensive physiological and psychological changes are seen that when combined can impair growth and increase the risk of developing iron deficiency or other nutritional disorders, especially during puberty. Thus, the diagnosis of iron deficiency among adolescents should always be considered so that measures can be taken to reduce the incidence of anemia, impairment of the immune system and improve school performance.

  18. Dietary component isorhamnetin is a PPARγ antagonist and ameliorates metabolic disorders induced by diet or leptin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ming; Cai, Wujie; Yu, Lijing; Feng, Li; Zhang, Lu; Zang, Qingqing; Wang, Yahui; Wang, Dongshan; Chen, Hui; Tong, Qingchun; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-18

    Studies on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ ligands have been focused on agonists. However, PPARγ activation may induce obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), one of the most challenging medical conditions. Here, we identified that isorhamnetin, a naturally occurring compound in fruits and vegetables and the metabolite of quercetin, is a novel antagonist of PPARγ. Isorhamnetin treatment inhibited the adipocyte differentiation induced by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, reduced obesity development and ameliorated hepatic steatosis induced by both high-fat diet treatment and leptin deficiency. Our results suggest that dietary supplement of isorhamnetin may be beneficial to prevent obesity and steatosis and PPARγ antagonists may be useful to treat hepatic steatosis.

  19. Influence of testosterone replacement therapy on metabolic disorders in male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and androgen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjgava, Shota; Zerekidze, Tamar; Uchava, Lasha; Giorgadze, Elene; Asatiani, Ketevan

    2014-10-23

    Multiple epidemiological studies have shown that low testosterone levels are associated with and predict the future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome. The aim of our study was to show the influence of testosterone replacement therapy on obesity, HbA1c level, hypertension and dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes mellitus and androgen deficiency. One hundred and twenty-five male patients with diabetes mellitus were screened; 85 subjects aged 41 to 65 years, with BMI from 27.0 to 48.0 kg/m(2), were randomized in a placebo-controlled study. They also underwent a routine physical examination and selected by free testosterone examination. We divided patients into two groups: 1) treatment group, where we used diet, physical activity, patient's antidiabetic therapy and testosterone replacement therapy; 2) placebo group, where we used diet, physical activity, patient's antidiabetic therapy and placebo. After 6 months of treatment we repeated the diagnostic assessments: lipid profile was improved in both groups but in first group it was clinically significant. Free testosterone level increased in all groups, but in group I was clinically significant. HbA1c decreased in both groups, but in group I we obtained the best result. Leptin level after treatment was approximately the same in both groups. Also, blood pressure was reduced in both groups but results were similar. Our study demonstrated that it is possible to break this metabolic vicious circle by raising testosterone levels in diabetic men with androgen deficiency. Re-instituting physiological levels of testosterone, as the study has shown, has an important role in reducing the prevalence of diabetic complications.

  20. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contra...

  1. Protean manifestations of vitamin D deficiency, part 3: association with cardiovascular disease and disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David S H

    2011-05-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the risk factors of inflammation, insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and left ventricular hypertrophy. As a result there is an increase in cardiovascular events (CVEs) associated with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency itself or secondary hyperparathyroidism or both may be responsible for the increase in CVEs. Correction of vitamin D deficiency may decrease the incidence of CVEs. Vitamin D deficiency is also associated with Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, depression, and chronic pain and muscle weakness. Vitamin D deficiency is early treated with oral vitamin D supplements which may improve the manifestations of the diseases associated with vitamin D deficiency.

  2. Effect of l-Arginine in One Patient with Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorder due to PEX12 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlin, Arthur; Briand, Gilbert; Cheillan, David; Wiedemann, Arnaud; Montaut-Verient, Bettina; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Feillet, François

    2016-06-01

    Peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) are a heterogeneous group of disorders due to PEX genes mutations, with a broad clinical spectrum comprising severe neonatal disease to mild presentation. Recently, Berendse et al reported an improvement of peroxisomal functions with l-arginine supplementation in fibroblasts with specific mutations of PEX1, PEX6, and PEX12. We report the first treatment by l-arginine in a patient homozygous for the specific PEX12 mutation shown to be l-arginine responsive in fibroblasts. We described the effect of l-arginine on biochemical (decrease of some plasma peroxisomal parameters) and neurophysiological (improvement of deafness) parameters. Some subjective clinical effects have also been observed (no more sialorrhea, behavior improvement). More studies are needed to assess the efficacy of l-arginine in some PBD patients with specific mutations.

  3. T-cell-mediated immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in beta2-integrin (CD18)- and ICAM-1 (CD54)-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1996-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice with deficient expression of beta2-integrins or ICAM-1. In such mice, the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was only slightly impaired and bystander activation was as extensive as that observed in wild...

  4. Surfactant protein D of the innate immune defence is inversely associated with human obesity and SP-D deficiency infers increased body weight in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, G.L.; Hjelmborg, J.V.B.; Leth-Larsen, R.

    2006-01-01

    of the present study was to describe the association between serum SP-D and weight, waist circumference or BMI, and furthermore to observe body weight development in SP-D-deficient (Spd-/-) mice. As a part of the Danish population-based twin study (GEMINAKAR) on the metabolic syndrome, we analysed 1476 Danish...

  5. Structure–Biological Function Relationship Extended to Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 2-Like Protein Mad2 Native and Mutants-New Opportunity for Genetic Disorder Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Speranta; Milac, Adina; Mernea, Maria; Mihailescu, Dan; Putz, Mihai V.; Buiu, Catalin

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN) and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2) to active closed (C-Mad2) conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) or Mad1) were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided) and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53–0.65) and fitted correlation r2 (0.82–0.90). Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN. PMID:25411801

  6. Structure–Biological Function Relationship Extended to Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 2-Like Protein Mad2 Native and Mutants-New Opportunity for Genetic Disorder Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speranta Avram

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2 to active closed (C-Mad2 conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20 or Mad1 were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53–0.65 and fitted correlation r2 (0.82–0.90. Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN.

  7. Absence of lactobacilli containing glycolipids with the α-galactose epitope and the enhanced fucosylation of a receptor glycolipid GA1 in the digestive tracts of immune-deficient scid mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamori, Masao; Tanaka, Kyoko; Adachi, Shigeki; Aoki, Daisuke; Nomura, Taisei

    2015-07-01

    The Lactobacillus species in the digestive tracts of immune-deficient scid mice was distinct from that in control mice, i.e. Lactobacillus murinus in scid and L. johnsonii in control mice, according to their 16S-rRNA, indicating that a symbiotic relationship between lactobacilli and a host is established under pressure from the immune system. The caecal and colonal contents rich in L. murinus of scid mice were loose with a strong sour smell, resulting in diarrhoea, and those with L. johnsonii in control mice included abundant solid materials. Lactobacillus glycolipids were revealed to be recognized by the immune system, and by TLC-immunostaining, LacTetH-DG (Galα1-6Galα1-6Galα1-2Glcα1-3'DG) of L. johnsonii was detected in the stomach, caecum and colon of control mice, but not in those of scid ones, in which fucosylation of a receptor GA1 for L. johnsonii was enhanced more than 4-fold compared with in the control mice. Thus, structural modification of receptor glycolipids was revealed to occur in the process of establishment of a symbiotic relationship between lactobacilli and a host. LacTetH-DG was also immunogenic to human, because of the presence of natural antibodies against it, and the antibody binding to it was comparable to that of blood group- and species-related glycosphingolipids.

  8. 德昌县艾滋病流行特征分析%Analysis on Epidemic Characteristics of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome in Dechang County

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施朝瑜

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand the epidemiological trend of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Dechang County so as to provide a scientific base for prevention and control of AIDS. Methods Descriptive epidemiological analysis was conducted on the AIDS epidemic data in Dechang county. Results From 1995 when the first case of HIV infection was confirmed to August 2011, a total of 262 cases of HIV/AIDS were reported with a total infection rate of 18. 95/100 000. From 2008 to 2010, the reported infections showed rapid growth. The annual infection rate of male was 26. 57/100 000 and female 11. 05/100 000 with a significant difference (Χ2 =43. 94, P = 0. 002). The ratio of male to female infections was 2. 49 : 1. Most of the AIDS cases were young adults aged between 20 and 45 years and old people aged between 55 and 75 years old who occupied 93. 49% of the total infectious cases. The number of reported AIDS cases of farmer and unknown occupations accounted for 82. 4% and there was an obvious occupations peak. Most patients in the county were infected by heterosexual sexual contact and injecting drugs, which accounted for 64. 89% and 32. 82% of the total respectively. The AIDS cases of 29 infected couples and 3 mother-to-child transmission. Conclusions AIDS epidemic growth is rapid in Dechang county with the situation being quite grim. We should enhance the AIDS prevention propaganda in the publicity, to raise national awareness of AIDS prevention. The related departments should cooperate to regulate the illegal entertainment and strengthen the management of migrant workers. The counseling and testing network should be improved so as to raise the detection rate and control the spread of AIDS.%目的 掌握德昌县艾滋病流行趋势,为制订防控措施提供准确依据.方法 利用描述流行病学方法分析德昌县1995年以来艾滋病疫情资料.结果 自1995年德昌县报告首例艾滋病感染者至2011年8月共报告艾滋病感染者/患者262

  9. Genetics Home Reference: primary carnitine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Filippo CA, Pasquali M, Berry SA, Longo N. Expanded newborn screening identifies maternal primary carnitine deficiency. Mol ... deficiency disorders in children. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Nov;1033:42-51. Review. Citation on ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions AMACR deficiency alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) deficiency is a disorder ...

  12. Autism as a disorder of deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and altered metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-10-01

    Autism has a strong genetic and environmental basis in which inflammatory markers and factors concerned with synapse formation, nerve transmission, and information processing such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and their products and neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and catecholamines and cytokines are altered. Antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements are needed for the normal metabolism of neurotrophic factors, eicosanoids, and neurotransmitters, supporting reports of their alterations in autism. But, the exact relationship among these factors and their interaction with genes and proteins concerned with brain development and growth is not clear. It is suggested that maternal infections and inflammation and adverse events during intrauterine growth of the fetus could lead to alterations in the gene expression profile and proteomics that results in dysfunction of the neuronal function and neurotransmitters, alteration(s) in the metabolism of PUFAs and their metabolites resulting in excess production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory cytokines and bioactive lipids that ultimately results in the development of autism. Based on these evidences, it is proposed that selective delivery of BDNF and methods designed to augment the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and PUFAs may prevent, arrest, or reverse the autism disease process.

  13. Deficiency of a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) on dendritic cells prevents the development of type 2 immunity and IgE production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mice in which dendritic cells (DCs)lack ADAM10 (ADAM10DC-/-) were found to have a dramatic decrease in TH2 immunity and IgE production, as measured by both lung inflammation to house dust mite (HDM) and active systemic anaphylaxis models (ASA). With HDM, the ADAM10DC-/- had significantly less airway...

  14. EFFECT OF GROWTH HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN WOMEN WITH GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY WHO HAVE A HISTORY OF ACROMEGALY VERSUS OTHER DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valassi, Elena; Brick, Danielle J.; Johnson, Jessica C.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the response in quality of life (QoL) to growth hormone (GH) replacement in women with GH deficiency (GHD) and a history of acromegaly with that in women with GHD of other causes. Methods Fifty-five women with GHD were studied: 17 with prior acromegaly and 38 with other causes of GHD. We compared two 6-month, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of GH therapy in women with hypopituitarism conducted with use of the same design—one in women with a history of acromegaly and one in women with no prior acromegaly. QoL was assessed with the following questionnaires: the QoL-Assessment of Growth Hormone deficiency in Adults (AGHDA), the Symptom Questionnaire, and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results The 2 groups had comparable mean pretreatment age, body mass index, and QoL scores and comparable mean GH dose at 6 months (0.61 ± 0.30 versus 0.67 ± 0.27 mg daily). After 6 months of GH replacement therapy, women with GHD and prior acromegaly demonstrated a greater improvement in AGHDA score, four SF-36 subscales (Role Limitations due to Physical Health, Energy or Fatigue, Emotional Well-Being, and Social Functioning), and the Somatic Symptoms subscale of the Symptom Questionnaire than did women with GHD of other causes. Poorer pretreatment QoL was associated with a greater improvement in QoL after administration of GH. Conclusion In this study, GH replacement therapy improved QoL in women with GHD and a history of acromegaly but not in women with GHD due to other hypothalamic and pituitary disorders. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term risks versus benefits of GH replacement in patients who develop GHD after definitive treatment for acromegaly. PMID:22440981

  15. 从虚瘀浊毒论治消渴痹证%Trea of Virtual Thirsting Disorder From Deficiency Blood Stasis Turbidity Toxin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东军; 李永美; 王磊; 柴可夫

    2016-01-01

    [目的]研究消渴病痹证的重要病因病机虚、瘀、浊、毒。[方法]结合《黄帝内经》中关于消瘅和痹证的条文与《金匮要略》中的相关理论,探讨虚、瘀、浊、毒在消渴痹证发病中的相互作用。同时,以桂枝芍药知母汤的临床医案进一步说明祛浊化毒、扶正补虚、活血化瘀之法在消渴病合并痹证治疗中的应用。[结果]虚、瘀、浊、毒能很好地体现消渴痹证的病机,虚、瘀、浊、毒在消渴病痹证衍化过程中是联动的整体,桂枝芍药知母汤论治消渴痹证符合虚、瘀、浊、毒的的病机。[结论]消渴痹证的病机为虚瘀浊毒,全面认识四者在消渴痹证发病中的关系,有利于提高对该病的认识。%Objective]To study the deficiency, blood stasis and turbidity, drug abuse each other is the important cause of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. [Methods]Combination of Huangdi Neijing provisions about despair an illusion of elimination and poliomyelitis in the important theory and formula, and the synopsis discusses deficiency, blood stasis and turbidity, poison in collateral to incorporate the interaction in the onset of poliomyelitis, and connecting with the application of cassia twig peony rhizoma anemarrhenae decoction clinical basis to further remove soft poison, tonify centralizer deficiency, the method for activating blood circulation in root merger poliomyelitis treatment, the application of Guizhi Shaoao Zhimu Decoction according to clinical cases the method has its principle, counterevidence deficiency, blood stasis and turbidity, drug abuse each other are collateral material combination of poliomyelitis key factors of the disease. [Results] The deficiency, blood stasis, phlegm and toxin are metabolic disorder of qi-blood pathological product of four influence each other, each other cause and effect. Phlegm, blood s